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Sample records for modulate helical organ

  1. WVD2 and WDL1 modulate helical organ growth and anisotropic cell expansion in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Christen Y L.; Pearlman, Rebecca S.; Silo-Suh, Laura; Hilson, Pierre; Carroll, Kathleen L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    Wild-type Arabidopsis roots develop a wavy pattern of growth on tilted agar surfaces. For many Arabidopsis ecotypes, roots also grow askew on such surfaces, typically slanting to the right of the gravity vector. We identified a mutant, wvd2-1, that displays suppressed root waving and leftward root slanting under these conditions. These phenotypes arise from transcriptional activation of the novel WAVE-DAMPENED2 (WVD2) gene by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in mutant plants. Seedlings overexpressing WVD2 exhibit constitutive right-handed helical growth in both roots and etiolated hypocotyls, whereas the petioles of WVD2-overexpressing rosette leaves exhibit left-handed twisting. Moreover, the anisotropic expansion of cells is impaired, resulting in the formation of shorter and stockier organs. In roots, the phenotype is accompanied by a change in the arrangement of cortical microtubules within peripheral cap cells and cells at the basal end of the elongation zone. WVD2 transcripts are detectable by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in multiple organs of wild-type plants. Its predicted gene product contains a conserved region named "KLEEK," which is found only in plant proteins. The Arabidopsis genome possesses seven other genes predicted to encode KLEEK-containing products. Overexpression of one of these genes, WVD2-LIKE 1, which encodes a protein with regions of similarity to WVD2 extending beyond the KLEEK domain, results in phenotypes that are highly similar to wvd2-1. Silencing of WVD2 and its paralogs results in enhanced root skewing in the wild-type direction. Our observations suggest that at least two members of this gene family may modulate both rotational polarity and anisotropic cell expansion during organ growth.

  2. Spontaneous formation of organic helical architectures through dynamic covalent chemistry.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfang; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhu, Junyan; Luo, Quan; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-12-01

    The spontaneous formation of organic helical structures, accompanied with an amplification of chirality, by dynamic covalent bonds between achiral and chiral building blocks is reported. PMID:25325888

  3. Helical growth in plant organs: mechanisms and significance.

    PubMed

    Smyth, David R

    2016-09-15

    Many plants show some form of helical growth, such as the circular searching movements of growing stems and other organs (circumnutation), tendril coiling, leaf and bud reversal (resupination), petal arrangement (contortion) and leaf blade twisting. Recent genetic findings have revealed that such helical growth may be associated with helical arrays of cortical microtubules and of overlying cellulose microfibrils. An alternative mechanism of coiling that is based on differential contraction within a bilayer has also recently been identified and underlies at least some of these growth patterns. Here, I provide an overview of the genes and cellular processes that underlie helical patterning. I also discuss the diversity of helical growth patterns in plants, highlighting their potential adaptive significance and comparing them with helical growth patterns in animals. PMID:27624832

  4. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-01-01

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube current×rotation time)∕pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning. PMID:19544765

  5. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  6. Comparison of arc-modulated cone beam therapy and helical tomotherapy for three different types of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Silke; Sterzing, Florian; Nill, Simeon; Schubert, Kai; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Debus, Juergen; Oelfke, Uwe

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Arc-modulated cone beam therapy (AMCBT) is a fast treatment technique deliverable in a single rotation with a conventional C-arm shaped linac. In this planning study, the authors assess the dosimetric properties of single-arc therapy in comparison to helical tomotherapy for three different tumor types. Methods: Treatment plans for three patients with prostate carcinoma, three patients with anal cancer, and three patients with head and neck cancer were optimized for helical tomotherapy and AMCBT. The dosimetric comparison of the two techniques is based on physical quantities derived from dose-volume histograms. Results: For prostate cancer, the quality of dose distributions calculated for AMCBT was of equal quality as that generated for tomotherapy with the additional benefits of a faster delivery and a lower integral dose. For highly complex geometries, the plan quality achievable with helical tomotherapy could not be achieved with arc-modulated cone beam therapy. Conclusions: Rotation therapy with a conventional linac in a single arc is capable to deliver a high and homogeneous dose to the target and spare organs at risk. Advantages of this technique are a fast treatment time and a lower integral dose in comparison to helical tomotherapy. For highly complex cases, e.g., with several target regions, the dose shaping capabilities of AMCBT are inferior to those of tomotherapy. However, treatment plans for AMCBT were also clinically acceptable.

  7. Hierarchical Helical Order in the Twisted Growth of Plant Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hirofumi

    2012-09-01

    The molecular and cellular basis of left-right asymmetry in plant morphogenesis is a fundamental issue in biology. A rapidly elongating root or hypocotyl of twisting mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits a helical growth with a handedness opposite to that of the underlying cortical microtubule arrays in epidermal cells. However, how such a hierarchical helical order emerges is currently unknown. We propose a model for investigating macroscopic chiral asymmetry in Arabidopsis mutants. Our elastic model suggests that the helical pattern observed is a direct consequence of the simultaneous presence of anisotropic growth and tilting of cortical microtubule arrays. We predict that the root helical pitch angle is a function of the microtubule helical angle and elastic moduli of the tissues. The proposed model is versatile and is potentially important for other biological systems ranging from protein fibrous structures to tree trunks.

  8. Alpha-turn mimetics: short peptide alpha-helices composed of cyclic metallopentapeptide modules.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Michael J; Beyer, Renée L; Hoang, Huy N; Lakdawala, Ami S; Snyder, James P; Oliver, Warren V; Robertson, Tom A; Appleton, Trevor G; Fairlie, David P

    2004-04-21

    Alpha-Helices are key structural components of proteins and important recognition motifs in biology. Short peptides (helical sequences are rarely helical away from their stabilizing protein environments. New techniques for stabilizing short peptide helices could be valuable for studying protein folding, modeling proteins, creating artificial proteins, and may aid the design of inhibitors or mimics of protein function. This study reports the facile incorporation of 3- and 4-alpha turns in 10-15 residue peptides through formation in situ of multiple cyclic metallopeptide modules [Pd(en)(H*XXXH*)](2+). The nonhelical peptides Ac-H*ELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2) (1), Ac-H*ELTH*AVTDYH*ELTH*-NH(2) (2), and Ac-H*AAAH*HELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2) (3) (H is histidine-methylated at imidazole-N3) react in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or water with 2, 2, and 3 molar equivalents, respectively, of [Pd(en)(NO(3))(2)] to form exclusively [Pd(2)(en)(2)(Ac-H*ELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2))](4+) (4), [Pd(2)(en)(2)(Ac-H*ELTH*AVTDYH*ELTH*-NH(2))](4+) (5), and [Pd(3)(en)(3)(Ac-H*AAAH*HELTH*H*VTDH*-NH(2))](6+) (6), characterized by mass spectrometry, 1D and 2D (1)H- and 1D (15)N-NMR spectroscopy. Despite the presence of multiple histidines and other possible metal-binding residues in these peptides, 2D (1)H NMR spectra reveal that Pd(en)(2+) is remarkably specific in coordinating to imidazole-N1 of only (i, i + 4) pairs of histidines (i.e., only those separated by three amino acids), resulting in 4-6 made up of cyclic metallopentapeptide modules ([Pd(en)(H*XXXH*)](2+))(n), n = 2, 2, 3, respectively, each cycle being a 22-membered ring. We have previously shown that a single metallopentapeptide can nucleate alpha-helicity (Kelso et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 421-424.). We now demonstrate its use as an alpha-turn-mimicking module for the facile conversion of unstructured short peptides into helices of macrocycles and provide 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data, structure

  9. Comparison of Plan Quality Provided by Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Daliang; Holmes, Timothy W.; Afghan, Muhammad K.N.; Shepard, David M.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is an arc-based approach to intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) that can be delivered on a conventional linear accelerator using a conventional multileaf collimator. In a previous work, we demonstrated that our arc-sequencing algorithm can produce highly conformal IMAT plans. Through plan comparisons, we explored the ability of IMAT to serve as an alternative to helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The IMAT plans were created for 10 patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy. Treatment plan comparisons, according to the target dose coverage and critical structure sparing, were performed to determine whether similar plan quality could be achieved using IMAT. Results: In 8 of 10 patient cases, IMAT was able to provide plan quality comparable to that of helical tomotherapy. In 2 of these 8 cases, the use of non-axial coplanar or non-coplanar arcs in IMAT planning led to significant improvements in normal tissue sparing. The remaining 2 cases posed particular dosimetric challenges. In 1 case, the target was immediately adjacent to a spinal cord that had received previous irradiation. The second case involved multiple target volumes and multiple prescription levels. Both IMAT and tomotherapy were able to produce clinically acceptable plans. Tomotherapy, however, provided a more uniform target dose and improved critical structure sparing. Conclusions: For most cases, IMAT can provide plan qualities comparable to that of helical tomotherapy. For some intracranial tumors, IMAT's ability to deliver non-coplanar arcs led to significant dosimetric improvements. Helical tomotherapy, however, can provide improved dosimetric results in the most complex cases.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Helical Tomotherapy in Nasopharynx Cancer: Planning Comparison and NTCP Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Dell'Oca, Italo; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for nasopharynx cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost approach. Methods and Materials: The data from 6 patients who had previously been treated with HT were used. A three-beam IMPT technique was optimized in the Hyperion treatment planning system, simulating a 'beam scanning' technique. HT was planned using the tomotherapy treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 66 Gy in 30 fractions to planning target volume (PTV1; GTV and enlarged nodes) and 54 Gy to PTV2 subclinical, electively treated nodes. Normal tissue complication probability calculation was performed for the parotids and larynx. Results: Very similar PTVs coverage and homogeneity of the target dose distribution for IMPT and HT were found. The conformity index was significantly lower for protons than for photons (1.19 vs. 1.42, respectively). The mean dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands decreased by 6.4 Gy and 5.6 Gy, respectively, with IMPT. The volume of mucosa and esophagus receiving {>=}20 Gy and {>=}30 Gy with IMPT was significantly lower than with HT. The average volume of larynx receiving {>=}50 Gy was significantly lower with HT, while for thyroid, it was comparable. The volume receiving {>=}30, {>=}20, and {>=}10 Gy in total body volume decreased with IMPT by 14.5%, 19.4%, and 23.1%, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability for the parotid glands was significantly lower with IMPT for all sets of parameters; however, we also estimated an almost full recovery of the contralateral parotid with HT. The normal tissue complication probability for the larynx was not significantly different between the two irradiation techniques. Conclusion: Excellent target coverage, homogeneity within the PTVs, and sparing of the organs at risk were reached with both modalities. IMPT allows for better sparing of most organs at

  11. Modulated helical metals at magnetic domain walls of pyrochlore iridium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breakings, metal-insulator transitions, and transport properties of magnetic-domain-wall states in pyrochlore iridium oxides are studied by employing a symmetry-adapted effective Hamiltonian with a slab perpendicular to the (111) direction of the pyrochlore structure. Emergent metallic domain wall, which has an unconventional topological nature with a controllable and mobile metallic layer, is shown to host Fermi surfaces with modulated helical spin textures resembling Rashba metals. The helical nature of the domain-wall Fermi surfaces is experimentally detectable by anomalous Hall conductivity, circular dichroism, and optical Hall conductivity under external magnetic fields. Possible applications of the domain-wall metals to spin-current generation and "half-metallic" conduction are also discussed.

  12. Modulated spin helicity stabilized by incommensurate orbital density waves in a quadruple perovskite manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. D.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Manuel, P.; Bombardi, A.; Martin, C.; Chapon, L. C.; Radaelli, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Through a combination of neutron diffraction and Landau theory we describe the spin ordering in the ground state of the quadruple perovskite manganite CaMn7O12 —a magnetic multiferroic supporting an incommensurate orbital density wave that onsets above the magnetic ordering temperature, TN 1=90 K. The multi-k magnetic structure in the ground state was found to be a nearly-constant-moment helix with modulated spin helicity, which oscillates in phase with the orbital occupancies on the Mn3 + sites via trilinear magneto-orbital coupling. Our phenomenological model also shows that, above TN 2=48 K, the primary magnetic order parameter is locked into the orbital wave by an admixture of helical and collinear spin density wave structures. Furthermore, our model naturally explains the lack of a sharp dielectric anomaly at TN 1 and the unusual temperature dependence of the electrical polarization.

  13. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  14. Helical Tomotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma-Any Advantages Over Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.C. Vincent Mui, Wing-lun A.; Fung, Wing-ki W.

    2010-07-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses different planning algorithm and dose delivery method from the linear accelerator (linac)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). This study compared the dosimetric outcomes between the tomotherapy plans and conventional linac-based IMRT plans in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifteen stage II-III cancer (American Joint Committee on Cancer) NPC patients treated by tomotherapy were conveniently recruited. Apart from the tomotherapy plans, a 7-field 6-MV photon conventional IMRT plan was computed for each patient with the same CT dataset and reference from the dose constraints and target dose prescriptions of the tomotherapy plans using the XiO treatment planning system. Average values of the dose parameters including the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), maximum and minimum doses of the target volumes, and the maximum and mean doses of the organs at risk (OAR) were compared between the two treatment methods. Better dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was demonstrated in the tomotherapy plans, in which the differences in the maximum and mean doses reached statistical significance (p < 0.05). Besides, the CI of the tomotherapy plans were significantly higher than the conventional linac-based plans for the nasopharynx PTV (NP-PTV) and neck lymphatics PTV (LN-PTV) (p = 0.017 and 0.010, respectively). The HI was significantly smaller in both NP-PTV and LN-PTV (p = 0.024 and < 0.001, respectively). Among the OAR, the brain stem and spinal cord doses in the tomotherapy plans were lower than that of the conventional IMRT plans. However, the doses to the other OAR did not show significant dosimetric differences. In the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, tomotherapy plans were superior to the 7-field conventional IMRT plans in PTV dose conformity and homogeneity and the sparing of the brain stem and spinal cord. However, no significant advantages were observed for the rest of the OAR.

  15. The Effect of Loops on the Structural Organization of α-Helical Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tastan, Oznur; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    Loops connecting the transmembrane (TM) α-helices in membrane proteins are expected to affect the structural organization of the thereby connected helices and the helical bundles as a whole. This effect, which has been largely ignored previously, is studied here by analyzing the x-ray structures of 41 α-helical membrane proteins. First we define the loop flexibility ratio, R, and find that 53% of the loops are stretched, where a stretched loop constrains the distance between the two connected helices. The significance of this constraining effect is supported by experiments carried out with bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin, in which cutting or eliminating their (predominately stretched) loops has led to a decrease in protein stability, and for rhodopsin, in most cases, also to the destruction of the structure. We show that for nonstretched loops in the extramembranous regions, the fraction of hydrophobic residues is comparable to that for soluble proteins; furthermore (as is also the case for soluble proteins), the hydrophobic residues in these regions are preferentially buried. This is expected to lead to the compact structural organization of the loops, which is transferred to the TM helices, causing them to assemble. We argue that a soluble protein complexed with a membrane protein similarly promotes compactness; other properties of such complexes are also studied. We calculate complementary attractive interactions between helices, including hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions of sequential motifs, such as GXXXG. The relative and combined effects of all these factors on the association of the TM helices are discussed and protein structures with only a few of these factors are analyzed. Our study emphasizes the need for classifying membrane proteins into groups according to structural organization. This classification should be considered when procedures for structural analysis or prediction are developed and applied. Detailed analysis of each structure

  16. SmartArc-Based Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison With Both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, Stefania; Wu, BinBin; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Fusco, Vincenzo; Ricchetti, Francesco; Wong, John; McNutt, Todd

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.

  17. Probing Conserved Helical Modules of Portal Complexes by Mass Spectrometry based Hydrogen/deuterium Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sebyung; Poliakov, Anton; Sexton, Jennifer; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Prevelige, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    The dsDNA bacteriophage P22 has a ring shaped dodecameric complex composed of the 84 kDa portal protein subunit which forms the central channel of the phage’s DNA packaging motor. The overall morphology of the P22 portal complex is similar to that of the portal complexes of Phi29, SPP1, T3, T7 phages and herpes simplex virus. Secondary structure prediction of P22 portal protein and its threading onto the crystal structure of the Phi29 portal complexes suggested that P22 portal protein complex shares conserved helical modules which were found in the dodecameric interfaces of the Phi29 portal complex. To identify the amino acids involved in inter-subunit contacts in the P22 portal ring complexes and validate the threading model, we performed comparative hydrogen/deuterium exchange analysis of monomeric and in vitro assembled portal proteins of P22 and the dodecameric Phi29 portal. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments provided evidence of inter-subunit interactions in the P22 portal complex similar to those in the Phi29 portal which map to the regions predicted to be conserved helical modules. PMID:18621389

  18. Light-Directed Dynamic Chirality Inversion in Functional Self-Organized Helical Superstructures.

    PubMed

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2016-02-24

    Helical superstructures are widely observed in nature, in synthetic polymers, and in supramolecular assemblies. Controlling the chirality (the handedness) of dynamic helical superstructures of molecular and macromolecular systems by external stimuli is a challenging task, but is of great fundamental significance with appealing morphology-dependent applications. Light-driven chirality inversion in self-organized helical superstructures (i.e. cholesteric, chiral nematic liquid crystals) is currently in the limelight because inversion of the handedness alters the chirality of the circularly polarized light that they selectively reflect, which has wide potential for application. Here we discuss the recent developments toward inversion of the handedness of cholesteric liquid crystals enabled by photoisomerizable chiral molecular switches or motors. Different classes of chiral photoresponsive dopants (guests) capable of conferring light-driven reversible chirality inversion of helical superstructures fabricated from different nematic hosts are discussed. Rational molecular designs of chiral molecular switches toward endowing handedness inversion to the induced helical superstructures of cholesteric liquid crystals are highlighted. This Review is concluded by throwing light on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging frontier, and it is expected to provide useful guidelines toward the development of self-organized soft materials with stimuli-directed chirality inversion capability and multifunctional host-guest systems. PMID:26764018

  19. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry of the head and neck: A comparison of treatment plans using linear accelerator-based IMRT and helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke . E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu; Molloy, Janelle A.; Read, Paul W.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To date, most intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery has occurred using linear accelerators (linacs), although helical tomotherapy has become commercially available. To quantify the dosimetric difference, we compared linac-based and helical tomotherapy-based treatment plans for IMRT of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We compared the dosimetry findings of 10 patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma. Five patients each had cancers in the base of the tongue and tonsil. Each plan was independently optimized using either the CORVUS planning system (Nomos Corporation, Sewickly, PA), commissioned for a Varian 2300 CD linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 1-cm multileaf collimator leaves, or helical tomotherapy. The resulting treatment plans were evaluated by comparing the dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), dose uniformity, and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: Helical tomotherapy plans showed improvement of critical structure avoidance and target dose uniformity for all patients. The average equivalent uniform dose reduction for organs at risk (OARs) surrounding the base of tongue and the tonsil were 17.4% and 27.14% respectively. An 80% reduction in normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid glands was observed in the tomotherapy plans relative to the linac-based plans. The standard deviation of the planning target volume dose was reduced by 71%. In our clinic, we use the combined dose-volume histograms for each class of plans as a reference goal for helical tomotherapy treatment planning optimization. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy provides improved dose homogeneity and normal structure dose compared with linac-based IMRT in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma resulting in a reduced risk for complications from focal hotspots within the planning target volume and for the adjacent parotid glands.

  20. Fast radiographic film calibration procedure for helical tomotherapy intensity modulated radiation therapy dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Yulong; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Weng Xuejun; Penagaricano, Jose; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2005-06-15

    Film dosimetry offers an advantageous in-phantom planar dose verification tool in terms of spatial resolution and ease of handling for quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. A critical step in the success of such a technique is that the film calibration be appropriately conducted. This paper presents a fast and efficient film calibration method for a helical tomotherapy unit using a single sheet of film. Considering the unique un-flattened cone shaped profile from a helical tomotherapy beam, a custom leaf control file (sinogram) was created, to produce a valley shaped intensity pattern. There are eleven intensity steps in the valley pattern, representing varying dose values from 38 to 265 cGy. This dose range covers the most commonly prescribed doses in fractionated IMRT treatments. An ion chamber in a solid water phantom was used to measure the dose in each of the eleven steps. For daily film calibration the whole procedure, including film exposure, processing, digitization and analysis, can be completed within 15 min, making it practical to use this technique routinely. This method is applicable to film calibration on a helical tomotherapy unit and is particularly useful in IMRT planar dose verification due to its efficiency and reproducibility. In this work, we characterized the dose response of the KODAK EDR2 ready-pack film which was used to develop the step valley dose maps and the IMRT QA planar doses. A comparison between the step valley technique and multifilm based calibration showed that both calibration methods agreed with less than 0.4% deviation in the clinically useful dose ranges.

  1. Dynamic and Progressive Control of DNA Origami Conformation by Modulating DNA Helicity with Chemical Adducts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haorong; Zhang, Hanyu; Pan, Jing; Cha, Tae-Gon; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-05-24

    DNA origami has received enormous attention for its ability to program complex nanostructures with a few nanometer precision. Dynamic origami structures that change conformation in response to environmental cues or external signals hold great promises in sensing and actuation at the nanoscale. The reconfiguration mechanism of existing dynamic origami structures is mostly limited to single-stranded hinges and relies almost exclusively on DNA hybridization or strand displacement. Here, we show an alternative approach by demonstrating on-demand conformation changes with DNA-binding molecules, which intercalate between base pairs and unwind DNA double helices. The unwinding effect modulates the helicity mismatch in DNA origami, which significantly influences the internal stress and the global conformation of the origami structure. We demonstrate the switching of a polymerized origami nanoribbon between different twisting states and a well-constrained torsional deformation in a monomeric origami shaft. The structural transformation is shown to be reversible, and binding isotherms confirm the reconfiguration mechanism. This approach provides a rapid and reversible means to change DNA origami conformation, which can be used for dynamic and progressive control at the nanoscale. PMID:27057775

  2. A Porous Metal-Organic Framework with Helical Chain Building Units Exhibiting Facile Transition from Micro- to Meso-porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinhee; Li, Jian-Rong; Carolina Sañudo, E.; Yuan, Daqiang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2012-01-01

    A metal–organic framework (MOF) with helical channels has been constructed by bridging helical chain secondary building units with 2,6-di-p-carboxyphenyl-4,4'-bipyridine ligands. The activated MOF shows permanent porosity and gas adsorption selectivity. Remarkably, the MOF exhibits a facile transition from micro- to meso-porosity.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh Ashok; Ghadi, Yogesh G; Sahoo, Priyadarshini; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Agarwal, Jaiprakash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription dose to 95% volume of planning target volume (PTV). Plan quality was assessed using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Doses to critical organs were assessed. Mean CI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.19 (standard deviation [SD] 0.13), 1.18 (SD 0.11), and 1.08 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean HI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.14 (SD 0.05), 1.08 (SD 0.02), and 1.07 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean R50% values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 8.5 (SD 0.35), 7.04 (SD 0.45), and 5.43 (SD 0.29), respectively. D2cm was found superior with IMRT and HT. Significant sparing of critical organs can be achieved with highly conformal techniques (IMRT and HT) without compromising the PTV conformity and homogeneity. PMID:26865754

  4. Bis(haloBODIPYs) with Labile Helicity: Valuable Simple Organic Molecules That Enable Circularly Polarized Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Ray, César; Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Ortiz, María J; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; Bañuelos, Jorge; Cohovi, Komlan D; Lunkley, Jamie L; Muller, Gilles; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-20

    Simple organic molecules (SOM) based on bis(haloBODIPY) are shown to enable circularly polarized luminescence (CPL), giving rise to a new structural design for technologically valuable CPL-SOMs. The established design comprises together synthetic accessibility, labile helicity, possibility of reversing the handedness of the circularly polarized emission, and reactive functional groups, making it unique and attractive as advantageous platform for the development of smart CPL-SOMs. PMID:27123965

  5. Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Helices Is Modulated by the Surrounding Protein Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Christine M.; Esmery, Nina; de Saint-Jean, Maud; Antonny, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Membrane curvature is involved in numerous biological pathways like vesicle trafficking, endocytosis or nuclear pore complex assembly. In addition to its topological role, membrane curvature is sensed by specific proteins, enabling the coordination of biological processes in space and time. Amongst membrane curvature sensors are the ALPS (Amphipathic Lipid Packing Sensors). ALPS motifs are short peptides with peculiar amphipathic properties. They are found in proteins targeted to distinct curved membranes, mostly in the early secretory pathway. For instance, the ALPS motif of the golgin GMAP210 binds trafficking vesicles, while the ALPS motif of Nup133 targets nuclear pores. It is not clear if, besides curvature sensitivity, ALPS motifs also provide target specificity, or if other domains in the surrounding protein backbone are involved. To elucidate this aspect, we studied the subcellular localization of ALPS motifs outside their natural protein context. The ALPS motifs of GMAP210 or Nup133 were grafted on artificial fluorescent probes. Importantly, ALPS motifs are held in different positions and these contrasting architectures were mimicked by the fluorescent probes. The resulting chimeras recapitulated the original proteins localization, indicating that ALPS motifs are sufficient to specifically localize proteins. Modulating the electrostatic or hydrophobic content of Nup133 ALPS motif modified its avidity for cellular membranes but did not change its organelle targeting properties. In contrast, the structure of the backbone surrounding the helix strongly influenced targeting. In particular, introducing an artificial coiled-coil between ALPS and the fluorescent protein increased membrane curvature sensitivity. This coiled-coil domain also provided membrane curvature sensitivity to the amphipathic helix of Sar1. The degree of curvature sensitivity within the coiled-coil context remains correlated to the natural curvature sensitivity of the helices. This suggests

  6. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  7. SmartArc-based volumetric modulated arc therapy for endometrial cancer: a dosimetric comparison with helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S) to achieve radiation delivery efficiency higher than that of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) when treating endometrial cancer, while maintaining plan quality. Methods Nine patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively studied. Three plans per patient were generated for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT. The dose distributions for the planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Results The average homogeneity index was 1.06, 1.10 and 1.07 for the VMAT-S, IMRT and HT plans, respectively. The V40 for the rectum, bladder and pelvis bone decreased by 9.0%, 3.0% and 3.0%, respectively, in the VMAT-S plan relative to the IMRT plan. The target coverage and sparing of OARs were comparable between the VMAT-S and HT plans. The average MU was 823, 1105 and 8403 for VMAT-S, IMRT and HT, respectively; the average delivery time was 2.6, 8.6 and 9.5 minutes, respectively. Conclusions For endometrial cancer, the VMAT-S plan provided comparable quality with significantly shorter delivery time and fewer MUs than with the IMRT and HT plans. In addition, more homogeneous PTV coverage and superior sparing of OARs in the medium to high dose region were observed in the VMAT-S relative to the IMRT plan. PMID:24175929

  8. Juxta-terminal Helix Unwinding as a Stabilizing Factor to Modulate the Dynamics of Transmembrane Helices.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Armin; Rajagopalan, Venkatesan; Sparks, Kelsey A; Greathouse, Denise V; Koeppe, Roger E

    2016-03-15

    Transmembrane helices of integral membrane proteins often are flanked by interfacial aromatic residues that can serve as anchors to aid the stabilization of a tilted transmembrane orientation. Yet, physical factors that govern the orientation or dynamic averaging of individual transmembrane helices are not well understood and have not been adequately explained. Using solid-state (2) H NMR spectroscopy to examine lipid bilayer-incorporated model peptides of the GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW(LA)6 LWLAGA-amide) family, we observed substantial unwinding at the terminals of several tilted helices spanning the membranes of DLPC, DMPC, or DOPC lipid bilayers. The fraying of helix ends might be vital for defining the dynamics and orientations of transmembrane helices in lipid bilayer membranes. PMID:26749271

  9. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Single-Arc Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy: A Collaborative Dosimetric Comparison Between Two Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Tang, Grace; Welsh, James S.; Mohiuddin, Majid M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Yu, Cedric X.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Both helical tomotherapy (HT) and single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) deliver radiation using rotational beams with multileaf collimators. We report a dual-institution study comparing dosimetric aspects of these two modalities. Methods and Materials: Eight patients each were selected from the University of Maryland (UMM) and the University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Riverview (UWR), for a total of 16 cases. Four cancer sites including brain, head and neck (HN), lung, and prostate were selected. Single-arc IMAT plans were generated at UMM using Varian RapidArc (RA), and HT plans were generated at UWR using Hi-Art II TomoTherapy. All 16 cases were planned based on the identical anatomic contours, prescriptions, and planning objectives. All plans were swapped for analysis at the same time after final approval. Dose indices for targets and critical organs were compared based on dose-volume histograms, the beam-on time, monitor units, and estimated leakage dose. After the disclosure of comparison results, replanning was done for both techniques to minimize diversity in optimization focus from different operators. Results: For the 16 cases compared, the average beam-on time was 1.4 minutes for RA and 4.8 minutes for HT plans. HT provided better target dose homogeneity (7.6% for RA and 4.2% for HT) with a lower maximum dose (110% for RA and 105% for HT). Dose conformation numbers were comparable, with RA being superior to HT (0.67 vs. 0.60). The doses to normal tissues using these two techniques were comparable, with HT showing lower doses for more critical structures. After planning comparison results were exchanged, both techniques demonstrated improvements in dose distributions or treatment delivery times. Conclusions: Both techniques created highly conformal plans that met or exceeded the planning goals. The delivery time and total monitor units were lower in RA than in HT plans, whereas HT provided higher target dose uniformity.

  10. Effects of geometric parameters on swimming of micro organisms with single helical flagellum in circular channels.

    PubMed

    Acemoglu, Alperen; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2014-04-01

    We present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the swimming of micro organisms with a single helical flagellum in circular channels. The CFD model is developed to obtain numerical solutions of Stokes equations in three dimensions, validated with experiments reported in literature, and used to analyze the effects of geometric parameters, such as the helical radius, wavelength, radii of the channel and the tail and the tail length on forward and lateral swimming velocities, rotation rates, and the efficiency of the swimmer. Optimal shapes for the speed and the power efficiency are reported. Effects of Brownian motion and electrostatic interactions are excluded to emphasize the role of hydrodynamic forces on lateral velocities and rotations on the trajectory of swimmers. For thin flagella, as the channel radius decreases, forward velocity and the power efficiency of the swimmer decreases as well; however, for thick flagella, there is an optimal radius of the channel that maximizes the velocity and the efficiency depending on other geometric parameters. Lateral motion of the swimmer is suppressed as the channel is constricted below a critical radius, for which the magnitude of the lateral velocity reaches a maximum. Results contribute significantly to the understanding of the swimming of bacteria in micro channels and capillary tubes. PMID:24703315

  11. Helical Magnetic Self-Organization in the RFX-mod and MST devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, P.; Piovesan, P.; Spolaore, M.; Cappello, S.; Puiatti, M. E.; Chapman, B. E.; Sarff, J. S.; den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; McGarry, M. B.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Stephens, H. D.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-11-01

    Self-organization of the reversed field pinch with large helical structure (QSH regimes) is predominant as plasma current is increased. In RFX-mod, the persistence and strength of the QSH state increases markedly above 1 MA. An internal transport barrier appears, and plasma thermalization within the helical magnetic surfaces reflects improved confinement. The QSH regime is also obtained in MST plasmas, which operates with plasma current up to nearly 0.6 MA. We report here a statistical analysis of the tearing mode behavior in MST (e.g., amplitudes and QSH persistency) that reveals a trend with plasma current similar to that observed in RFX-Mod. This trend supports an expectation for universal behavior that depends on parameters such as the Lundquist number that vary with the plasma current. Analysis of the common database from the two devices should help reveal key physics for QSH onset and dynamics. Planned Thomson scattering measurements and transport analysis on MST will be important to compare with the confinement behavior established for RFX-Mod. Work supported by USDoE.

  12. Effects of Geometric Parameters on Swimming of Micro Organisms with Single Helical Flagellum in Circular Channels

    PubMed Central

    Acemoglu, Alperen; Yesilyurt, Serhat

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the swimming of micro organisms with a single helical flagellum in circular channels. The CFD model is developed to obtain numerical solutions of Stokes equations in three dimensions, validated with experiments reported in literature, and used to analyze the effects of geometric parameters, such as the helical radius, wavelength, radii of the channel and the tail and the tail length on forward and lateral swimming velocities, rotation rates, and the efficiency of the swimmer. Optimal shapes for the speed and the power efficiency are reported. Effects of Brownian motion and electrostatic interactions are excluded to emphasize the role of hydrodynamic forces on lateral velocities and rotations on the trajectory of swimmers. For thin flagella, as the channel radius decreases, forward velocity and the power efficiency of the swimmer decreases as well; however, for thick flagella, there is an optimal radius of the channel that maximizes the velocity and the efficiency depending on other geometric parameters. Lateral motion of the swimmer is suppressed as the channel is constricted below a critical radius, for which the magnitude of the lateral velocity reaches a maximum. Results contribute significantly to the understanding of the swimming of bacteria in micro channels and capillary tubes. PMID:24703315

  13. Radiation dose for normal organs by helical tomotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Tsai, Hsiao-Han; Chu, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Jye-Bin; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2015-08-01

    This study derived a simple equation of effective dose (E) versus normal organ of patients with varying body weights undergoing lung cancer treatment of helical tomotherapy (TOMO). Five tissue-equivalent and Rando phantoms were used to simulate lung cancer patients. This study then measured E and equivalent dose of organ or tissues (DT) using thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD-100H). The TLD-100H was calibrated using TOMO 6MV photons, then inserted into phantom positions that closely corresponded with the position of the represented organs and tissues. Both E and DT were evaluated by ICRP 103. Peripheral doses varied markedly at positions close to the tumor center. The maximum statistical and total errors were 16.7-22.3%. This analytical result indicates that E of Rando and tissue-equivalent phantoms was in the ranged of 9.44±1.70 (10kg) to 4.58±0.83 (90kg)mSv/Gy. Notably, E decreased exponentially as phantom weight increased. Peripheral doses were also evaluated by TLD as a function of distance from the tumor center. Finally, experimental results are compared with those in literature. These findings will prove useful to patients, physicians, radiologists, and the public. PMID:25935507

  14. Molecular organization in striated domains induced by transmembrane alpha-helical peptides in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sparr, Emma; Ganchev, Dragomir N; Snel, Margot M E; Ridder, Anja N J A; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Chupin, Vladimir; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-01-11

    Transmembrane (TM) alpha-helical peptides with neutral flanking residues such as tryptophan form highly ordered striated domains when incorporated in gel-state 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers and inspected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) (1). In this study, we analyze the molecular organization of these striated domains using AFM, photo-cross-linking, fluorescence spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and X-ray diffraction techniques on different functionalized TM peptides. The results demonstrate that the striated domains consist of linear arrays of single TM peptides with a dominantly antiparallel organization in which the peptides interact with each other and with lipids. The peptide arrays are regularly spaced by +/-8.5 nm and are separated by somewhat perturbed gel-state lipids with hexagonally organized acyl chains, which have lost their tilt. This system provides an example of how domains of peptides and lipids can be formed in membranes as a result of a combination of specific peptide-peptide and peptide-lipid interactions. PMID:15628840

  15. On the performances of Intensity Modulated Protons, RapidArc and Helical Tomotherapy for selected paediatric cases

    PubMed Central

    Fogliata, Antonella; Yartsev, Slav; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Wyttenbach, Rolf; Bauman, Glenn; Cozzi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Background To evaluate the performance of three different advanced treatment techniques on a group of complex paediatric cancer cases. Methods CT images and volumes of interest of five patients were used to design plans for Helical Tomotherapy (HT), RapidArc (RA) and Intensity Modulated Proton therapy (IMP). The tumour types were: extraosseous, intrathoracic Ewing Sarcoma; mediastinal Rhabdomyosarcoma; metastastis of base of skull with bone, para-nasal and left eye infiltration from Nephroblastoma of right kidney; metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma of the anus; Wilm's tumour of the left kidney with multiple liver metastases. Cases were selected for their complexity regardless the treatment intent and stage. Prescribed doses ranged from 18 to 53.2 Gy, with four cases planned using a Simultaneous Integrated Boost strategy. Results were analysed in terms of dose distributions and dose volume histograms. Results For all patients, IMP plans lead to superior sparing of organs at risk and normal healthy tissue, where in particular the integral dose is halved with respect to photon techniques. In terms of conformity and of spillage of high doses outside targets (external index (EI)), all three techniques were comparable; CI90% ranged from 1.0 to 2.3 and EI from 0 to 5%. Concerning target homogeneity, IMP showed a variance (D5%–D95%) measured on the inner target volume (highest dose prescription) ranging from 5.9 to 13.3%, RA from 5.3 to 11.8%, and HT from 4.0 to 12.2%. The range of minimum significant dose to the same target was: (72.2%, 89.9%) for IMP, (86.7%, 94.1%) for RA, and (79.4%, 94.8%) for HT. Similarly, for maximum significant doses: (103.8%, 109.4%) for IMP, (103.2%, 107.4%) for RA, and (102.4%, 117.2%) for HT. Treatment times (beam-on time) ranged from 123 to 129 s for RA and from 146 to 387 s for HT. Conclusion Five complex pediatric cases were selected as representative examples to compare three advanced radiation delivery techniques. While differences were noted

  16. Assessing the Role of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Relative to IMRT and Helical Tomotherapy in the Management of Localized, Locally Advanced, and Post-Operative Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Blake, Samuel J.; Batchelar, Deidre L.; Cheung, Patrick; Mah, Katherine

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify differences in treatment delivery efficiency and dosimetry between step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five prostate cancer patients were selected retrospectively for this planning study. Treatment plans were generated for: prostate alone (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5), prostate bed (n = 5), and prostate bed + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5). Target coverage, dose homogeneity, integral dose, monitor units (MU), and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) were compared across techniques. Time required to deliver each plan was measured. Results: The dosimetric quality of IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans were comparable for target coverage (planning target volume V95%, clinical target volume V100% all >98.7%) and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) for all treatment groups. Although HT resulted in a slightly higher integral dose and mean doses to the OAR, it yielded a lower maximum dose to all OAR examined. VMAT resulted in reductions in treatment times over IMRT (mean = 75%) and HT (mean = 70%). VMAT required 15-38% fewer monitor units than IMRT over all treatment volumes, with the reduction per fraction ranging from 100-423 MU from the smallest to largest volumes. Conclusions: VMAT improves efficiency of delivery for equivalent dosimetric quality as IMRT and HT across various prostate cancer treatment volumes in the intact and postoperative settings.

  17. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Zhang, Xin Xin; Feng, Lin Chun; Chen, Jing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Hai Xia; Xu, Shou Ping; Xie, Chuan Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods Between August 2011 and September 2013, 132 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled for a prospective phase II study. The prescription doses delivered to the gross tumor volume (pGTVnx) and positive lymph nodes (pGTVnd), the high risk planning target volume (PTV1), and the low risk planning target volume (PTV2), were 67.5 Gy (2.25 Gy/F), 60 Gy (2.0 Gy/F), and 54 Gy (1.8 Gy/F), in 30 fractions, respectively. Acute toxicities were evaluated according to the established RTOG/EORTC criteria. This group of patients was compared with the 190 patients in the retrospective P70 study, who were treated between September 2004 and August 2009 with helical tomotherapy, with a dose of 70-74 Gy/33F/6.5W delivered to pGTVnx and pGTVnd. Results The median follow-up was 23.7 (12–38) months. Acute radiation related side-effects were mainly problems graded as 1 or 2. Only a small number of patients suffered from grade 4 leucopenia (4.5%) or thrombocytopenia (2.3%). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS), local-nodal relapse-free survival (LNRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.7%, 95.5%, 92.2%, 92.7% and 93.2%, at 2 years, respectively, with no significant difference compared with the P70 study. Conclusions Smart delivered via the helical tomotherapy technique appears to be associated with an acceptable acute toxicity profile and favorable short-term outcomes for patients with NPC. Long-term toxicities and patient outcomes are under investigation. PMID:27247555

  18. ModuleOrganizer: detecting modules in families of transposable elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most known eukaryotic genomes contain mobile copied elements called transposable elements. In some species, these elements account for the majority of the genome sequence. They have been subject to many mutations and other genomic events (copies, deletions, captures) during transposition. The identification of these transformations remains a difficult issue. The study of families of transposable elements is generally founded on a multiple alignment of their sequences, a critical step that is adapted to transposons containing mostly localized nucleotide mutations. Many transposons that have lost their protein-coding capacity have undergone more complex rearrangements, needing the development of more complex methods in order to characterize the architecture of sequence variations. Results In this study, we introduce the concept of a transposable element module, a flexible motif present in at least two sequences of a family of transposable elements and built on a succession of maximal repeats. The paper proposes an assembly method working on a set of exact maximal repeats of a set of sequences to create such modules. It results in a graphical view of sequences segmented into modules, a representation that allows a flexible analysis of the transformations that have occurred between them. We have chosen as a demonstration data set in depth analysis of the transposable element Foldback in Drosophila melanogaster. Comparison with multiple alignment methods shows that our method is more sensitive for highly variable sequences. The study of this family and the two other families AtREP21 and SIDER2 reveals new copies of very different sizes and various combinations of modules which show the potential of our method. Conclusions ModuleOrganizer is available on the Genouest bioinformatics center at http://moduleorganizer.genouest.org PMID:20860790

  19. A Water-Stable Metal-Organic Framework with a Double-Helical Structure for Fluorescent Sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Chang, Ze; Li, Ai-Lin; Tian, Dan; Yao, Zhao-Quan; Jia, Yan-Yuan; Bu, Xian-He

    2016-08-01

    Water instability is a crucial limiting factor in the practical application of most fluorescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, by introducing a fascinating double-helical structure generated through dense stacking of organic ligands, a water-stable fluorescence MOF has been synthesized, namely, [Cd2(tib)2(bda)2]·(solvent)n (1) [tib =1,3,5-tris(1-imidazolyl) benzene; H2bda = 2,2'-biphenyl dicarboxylic acid]. This helical structure helps to enhance the stability of 1 against common organic solvents and water, even acid/base aqueous solutions with a pH value ranging from 3 to 11. Furthermore, this material can be a potential fluorescent sensor for ketones. PMID:27409244

  20. Organ and effective doses in newborn patients during helical multislice computed tomography examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staton, Robert J.; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Matt D.; Hintenlang, David E.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-10-01

    In this study, two computational phantoms of the newborn patient were used to assess individual organ doses and effective doses delivered during head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and torso examinations using the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 helical multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scanner. The stylized phantom used to model the patient anatomy was the revised ORNL newborn phantom by Han et al (2006 Health Phys.90 337). The tomographic phantom used in the study was that developed by Nipper et al (2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3143) as recently revised by Staton et al (2006 Med. Phys. 33 3283). The stylized model was implemented within the MCNP5 radiation transport code, while the tomographic phantom was incorporated within the EGSnrc code. In both codes, the x-ray source was modelled as a fan beam originating from the focal spot at a fan angle of 52° and a focal-spot-to-axis distance of 57 cm. The helical path of the source was explicitly modelled based on variations in collimator setting (12 mm or 24 mm), detector pitch and scan length. Tube potentials of 80, 100 and 120 kVp were considered in this study. Beam profile data were acquired using radiological film measurements on a 16 cm PMMA phantom, which yielded effective beam widths of 14.7 mm and 26.8 mm for collimator settings of 12 mm and 24 mm, respectively. Values of absolute organ absorbed dose were determined via the use of normalization factors defined as the ratio of the CTDI100 measured in-phantom and that determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the PMMA phantom and ion chamber. Across various technique factors, effective dose differences between the stylized and tomographic phantoms ranged from +2% to +9% for head exams, -4% to -2% for chest exams, +8% to +24% for abdominal exams, -16% to -12% for pelvic exams and -7% to 0% for chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) exams. In many cases, however, relatively close agreement in effective dose was accomplished at the expense of compensating errors in individual organ

  1. Organ and effective doses in pediatric patients undergoing helical multislice computed tomography examination

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Staton, Robert J.; Hintenlang, David E.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-05-15

    As multidetector computed tomography (CT) serves as an increasingly frequent diagnostic modality, radiation risks to patients became a greater concern, especially for children due to their inherently higher radiosensitivity to stochastic radiation damage. Current dose evaluation protocols include the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) or point detector measurements using anthropomorphic phantoms that do not sufficiently provide accurate information of the organ-averaged absorbed dose and corresponding effective dose to pediatric patients. In this study, organ and effective doses to pediatric patients under helical multislice computed tomography (MSCT) examinations were evaluated using an extensive series of anthropomorphic computational phantoms and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Ten pediatric phantoms, five stylized (equation-based) ORNL phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year) and five tomographic (voxel-based) UF phantoms (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male) were implemented into MCNPX for simulation, where a source subroutine was written to explicitly simulate the helical motion of the CT x-ray source and the fan beam angle and collimator width. Ionization chamber measurements were performed and used to normalize the Monte Carlo simulation results. On average, for the same tube current setting, a tube potential of 100 kVp resulted in effective doses that were 105% higher than seen at 80 kVp, and 210% higher at 120 kVp regardless of phantom type. Overall, the ORNL phantom series was shown to yield values of effective dose that were reasonably consistent with those of the gender-specific UF phantom series for CT examinations of the head, pelvis, and torso. However, the ORNL phantoms consistently overestimated values of the effective dose as seen in the UF phantom for MSCT scans of the chest, and underestimated values of the effective dose for abdominal CT scans. These discrepancies increased

  2. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  3. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    SciTech Connect

    Komisopoulos, Georgios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  4. De novo designed library of linear helical peptides: an exploratory tool in the discovery of protein-protein interaction modulators.

    PubMed

    Bonache, M Ángeles; Balsera, Beatriz; López-Méndez, Blanca; Millet, Oscar; Brancaccio, Diego; Gómez-Monterrey, Isabel; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Pavone, Luigi M; Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Vidal, Michel; de la Torre-Martinez, Roberto; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; García-López, M Teresa; Martín-Martínez, Mercedes; de Vega, M Jesús Pérez; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2014-05-12

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have emerged as important targets for pharmaceutical intervention because of their essential role in numerous physiological and pathological processes, but screening efforts using small-molecules have led to very low hit rates. Linear peptides could represent a quick and effective approach to discover initial PPI hits, particularly if they have inherent ability to adopt specific peptide secondary structures. Here, we address this hypothesis through a linear helical peptide library, composed of four sublibraries, which was designed by theoretical predictions of helicity (Agadir software). The 13-mer peptides of this collection fixes either a combination of three aromatic or two aromatic and one aliphatic residues on one face of the helix (Ac-SSEEX(5)ARNX(9)AAX(12)N-NH2), since these are structural features quite common at PPIs interfaces. The 81 designed peptides were conveniently synthesized by parallel solid-phase methodologies, and the tendency of some representative library components to adopt the intended secondary structure was corroborated through CD and NMR experiments. As proof of concept in the search for PPI modulators, the usefulness of this library was verified on the widely studied p53-MDM2 interaction and on the communication between VEGF and its receptor Flt-1, two PPIs for which a hydrophobic α-helix is essential for the interaction. We have demonstrated here that, in both cases, selected peptides from the library, containing the right hydrophobic sequence of the hot-spot in one of the protein partners, are able to interact with the complementary protein. Moreover, we have discover some new, quite potent inhibitors of the VEGF-Flt-1 interaction, just by replacing one of the aromatic residues of the initial F(5)Y(9)Y(12) peptide by W, in agreement with previous results on related antiangiogenic peptides. Finally, the HTS evaluation of the full collection on thermoTRPs has led to a few antagonists of TRPV1 and TRPA

  5. Self-organization of helically forced MHD flow in confined cylindrical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Malcolm; Leroy, Matthieu; Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of a magnetically forced conducting fluid in confined geometries is studied. A pseudospectral method with volume penalisation is used to solve the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. A helical magnetic field is imposed via boundary conditions, which generates a response in the velocity field for large enough magnitudes. Different helical structures are observed in the flow depending on the magnitude and direction of the forcing and the cross-sectional geometry of the fluid domain. A computational technique for finding a solenoidal vector field which can be used in complex geometries is also proposed.

  6. N-terminal segments modulate the α-helical propensities of the intrinsically disordered basic regions of bZIP proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul K; Crick, Scott L; Pappu, Rohit V

    2012-02-17

    Basic region leucine zippers (bZIPs) are modular transcription factors that play key roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. The basic regions of bZIPs (bZIP-bRs) are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding and specificity. Bioinformatic predictions and spectroscopic studies suggest that unbound monomeric bZIP-bRs are uniformly disordered as isolated domains. Here, we test this assumption through a comparative characterization of conformational ensembles for 15 different bZIP-bRs using a combination of atomistic simulations and circular dichroism measurements. We find that bZIP-bRs have quantifiable preferences for α-helical conformations in their unbound monomeric forms. This helicity varies from one bZIP-bR to another despite a significant sequence similarity of the DNA binding motifs (DBMs). Our analysis reveals that intramolecular interactions between DBMs and eight-residue segments directly N-terminal to DBMs are the primary modulators of bZIP-bR helicities. We test the accuracy of this inference by designing chimeras of bZIP-bRs to have either increased or decreased overall helicities. Our results yield quantitative insights regarding the relationship between sequence and the degree of intrinsic disorder within bZIP-bRs, and might have general implications for other intrinsically disordered proteins. Understanding how natural sequence variations lead to modulation of disorder is likely to be important for understanding the evolution of specificity in molecular recognition through intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). PMID:22226835

  7. The thermodynamics of the self-assembly of covalently linked oligomeric naphthalenediimides into helical organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tambara, Koujiro; Olsen, John-Carl; Hansen, David E; Pantoş, G Dan

    2014-01-28

    The mechanism and thermodynamic functions of the self-assembly of a family of covalently linked oligomeric naphthalenediimides (NDIs) were investigated through variable-temperature NMR and CD studies. The NDIs were shown to self-assemble into helical supramolecular nanotubes via an isodesmic polymerisation mechanism, and regardless of the oligomer length a surprising entropy-enthalpy compensation was observed. PMID:24287562

  8. Assessment of Extended-Field Radiotherapy for Stage IIIC Endometrial Cancer Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Jidong Mackenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Pervez, Nadeem; Dundas, George; Urtasun, Raul; Pearcey, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) plans for pelvic and para-aortic RT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients; and to evaluate the integral dose (ID) received by critical structures within the radiation fields. Methods and Materials: We selected 10 patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. For each patient, three plans were created with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and HT. The IMRT and HT plans were both optimized to keep the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) the same as that with 3D-CRT. The dosimetry and ID for the critical structures were compared. A paired two-tailed Student t test was used for data analysis. Results: Compared with the 3D-CRT plans, the IMRT plans resulted in lower IDs in the organs at risk (OARs), ranging from -3.49% to -17.59%. The HT plans showed a similar result except that the ID for the bowel increased 0.27%. The IMRT and HT plans both increased the IDs to normal tissue (see and text for definition), pelvic bone, and spine (range, 3.31-19.7%). The IMRT and HT dosimetry showed superior PTV coverage and better OAR sparing than the 3D-CRT dosimetry. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed similar PTV coverage, lower Ids, and a decreased dose to most OARs. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated RT and HT appear to achieve excellent PTV coverage and better sparing of OARs, but at the expense of increased IDs to normal tissue and skeleton. HT allows for additional improvement in dosimetry and sparing of most OARs.

  9. Homochiral 3D metal-organic frameworks from chiral 1D rods: 6-way helical packing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Min; Moon, Dohyun; Jeong, Kyung Seok; Kim, Jaheon; Thallapally, Praveen K; Jeong, Nakcheol

    2011-09-01

    The chiral 3D MOFs resulted from the packing of chiral 1D SBBs were studied. It was demonstrated that the final packing pattern is sensitively dependent on the dimension of SBBs. In addition, we were able to identify a new plywood-like network from ligand 2H(2) exhibiting an unprecedented six-way chiral helical packing motif, which extends the list of invariant rod packings. PMID:21773637

  10. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001), and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001). HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001). For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  11. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, and Helical Tomotherapy for Hippocampal-Avoidance Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yi; Evans, Josh; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Pickett, Cadron; Jia, Guang; Chen, Quan; Zuo, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is a vital tool in radiation oncology and beyond, but it can result in adverse health effects such as neurocognitive decline. Hippocampal Avoidance WBRT (HA-WBRT) is a strategy that aims to mitigate the neuro-cognitive side effects of whole brain radiotherapy treatment by sparing the hippocampi while delivering the prescribed dose to the rest of the brain. Several competing modalities capable of delivering HA-WBRT, include: Philips Pinnacle step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), Varian RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), and helical TomoTherapy (TomoTherapy). Methods In this study we compared these methods using 10 patient datasets. Anonymized planning CT (computerized tomography) scans and contour data based on fused MRI images were collected. Three independent planners generated treatment plans for the patients using three modalities, respectively. All treatment plans met the RTOG 0933 criteria for HA-WBRT treatment. Results In dosimetric comparisons between the three modalities, TomoTherapy has a significantly superior homogeneity index of 0.15 ± 0.03 compared to the other two modalities (0.28 ± .04, p < .005 for IMRT and 0.22 ± 0.03, p < .005 for RapidArc). RapidArc has the fastest average delivery time of 2.5 min compared to the other modalities (15 min for IMRT and 18 min for TomoTherapy). Conclusion TomoTherapy is considered to be the preferred modality for HA-WBRT due to its superior dose distribution. When TomoTherapy is not available or treatment time is a concern, RapidArc can provide sufficient dose distribution meeting RTOG criteria and efficient treatment delivery. PMID:25894615

  12. A synergistic effect between cholesterol and tryptophan-flanked transmembrane helices modulates membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    van Duyl, Bianca Y; Meeldijk, Hans; Verkleij, Arie J; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Chupin, Vladimir; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette

    2005-03-22

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the structural consequences of hydrophobic mismatch for membrane proteins in lipid bilayers that contain cholesterol. For this purpose, tryptophan-flanked peptides, designed to mimic transmembrane segments of membrane proteins, were incorporated in model membranes of unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers of varying thickness and containing varying amounts of cholesterol. Analysis of the lipid organization by (31)P NMR and cryo-TEM demonstrated the formation of an isotropic phase, most likely representing a cubic phase, which occurred exclusively in mixtures containing lipids with relatively long acyl chains. Formation of this phase was inhibited by incorporation of lysophosphatidylcholine. These results indicate that the isotropic phase is formed as a consequence of negative hydrophobic mismatch and that its formation is related to a negative membrane curvature. When either peptide or cholesterol was omitted from the mixture, isotropic-phase formation did not occur, not even when the concentrations of these compounds were significantly increased. This suggests that formation of the isotropic phase is the result of a synergistic effect between the peptides and cholesterol. Interestingly, isotropic-phase formation was not observed when the tryptophans in the peptide were replaced by either lysines or histidines. We propose a model for the mechanism of this synergistic effect, in which its dependence on the flanking residues is explained by preferential interactions between cholesterol and tryptophan residues. PMID:15766283

  13. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer Patients: An Intraindividual Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Marnitz, Simone; Lukarski, Dusko; Koehler, Christhardt; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Ebert, Andreas; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Stromberger, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional IMRT for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty cervical cancer patients undergoing primary chemoradiation received radiation with HT; 10 patients underwent pelvic irradiation (PEL) and 10 extended-field irradiation (EXT). For treatment planning, the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) concept was applied. Tumor, pelvic, with or without para-aortic lymph nodes were defined as planning target volume A (PTV-A) with a prescribed dose of 1.8/50.4 Gy (28 fractions). The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV-B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. The lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume, and the upper dose constraint was 107%. The irradiated small-bowel volumes were kept as low as possible. For every HT plan, a conventional IMRT plan was calculated and compared with regard to dose-volume histogram, conformity index and conformity number, and homogeneity index. Results: Both techniques allowed excellent target volume coverage and sufficient SB sparing. Conformity index and conformity number results for both PTV-A and PTV-B, homogeneity index for PTV-B, and SB sparing for V45, V50, Dmax, and D1% were significantly better with HT. SB sparing was significantly better for conventional IMRT at low doses (V10). Conclusions: Both HT and conventional IMRT provide optimal treatment of cervical cancer patients. The HT technique was significantly favored with regard to target conformity, homogeneity, and SB sparing. Randomized trials are needed to assess the oncological outcome, toxicity, and clinical relevance of these differences.

  14. Form and Function: An Organic Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Bruce; Mazzocchi, Paul; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching organic chemistry. In this book, the diverse field of organic chemistry modules is introduced. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students to see that chemistry is a unified…

  15. Emerging double helical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-07-01

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on `bottom-up' and `top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  16. Co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers into helical and zig-zag polymer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yi; Yu Lingmin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Blair, Richard G.; Zhang Qichun

    2012-07-15

    Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (EG=ethylene glycol) (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized under solvothermal conditions at 150 Degree-Sign C or room temperature by the co-assembly of Zn(SPh){sub 2} and organic linkers such as 2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPyTA) and 1,3-bis(trans-4-pyridylvinyl)benzene (BPyVB). X-ray crystallography study reveals that both polymers 1 and 2 crystallize in space group P2{sub 1}/c of the monoclinic system. The solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up to 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers, single helicate [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(TPyTA)(EG)]{sub n} (1) and zig-zag structure [Zn(SPh){sub 2}(BPyVB)]{sub n} (2), were synthesized. Solid-state UV-vis absorptions show that 1 and 2 have maxium absorption onsets at 400 nm and 420 nm, respectively. TGA analysis indicates that 1 and 2 are stable up to 110 Degree-Sign C and 210 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two novel one-dimensional coordination polymers have been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TPyTA results in helical structures in 1 while BPyVB leads to zig-zag chains in 2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid-state UV-vis absorption spectra and TGA analysis of the title polymers were studied.

  17. Construction of Covalent Organic Nanotubes by Light-Induced Cross-Linking of Diacetylene-Based Helical Polymers.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kaho; Hong, Liu; Nishihara, Taishi; Nakanishi, Yusuke; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Kitaura, Ryo; Ousaka, Naoki; Yashima, Eiji; Ito, Hideto; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-08-31

    Organic nanotubes (ONTs) are tubular nanostructures composed of small molecules or macromolecules that have found various applications including ion sensor/channels, gas absorption, and photovoltaics. While most ONTs are constructed by self-assembly processes based on weak noncovalent interactions, this unique property gives rise to the inherent instability of their tubular structures. Herein, we report a simple "helix-to-tube" strategy to construct robust, covalent ONTs from easily accessible poly(m-phenylene diethynylene)s (poly-PDEs) possessing chiral amide side chains that can adopt a helical conformation through hydrogen-bonding interactions. The helically folded poly-PDEs subsequently undergo light-induced cross-linking at longitudinally aligned 1,3-butadiyne moieties across the whole helix to form covalent tubes (ONTs) both in solution and solid phases. The structures of poly-PDEs and covalent ONTs were characterized by spectroscopic analyses, diffraction analysis, and microscopic analyses. We envisage that this simple yet powerful "helix-to-tube" strategy will generate a range of ONT-based materials by introducing functional moieties into a monomer. PMID:27486790

  18. An In-tether Chiral Center Modulates the Helicity, Cell Permeability, and Target Binding Affinity of a Peptide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kuan; Geng, Hao; Zhang, Qingzhou; Liu, Qisong; Xie, Mingsheng; Sun, Chengjie; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Huacan; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Tao; Wu, Yun-Dong; Li, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    The addition of a precisely positioned chiral center in the tether of a constrained peptide is reported, yielding two separable peptide diastereomers with significantly different helicity, as supported by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the absolute configuration of the in-tether chiral center in helical form is R, which is in agreement with theoretical simulations. The relationship between the secondary structure of the short peptides and their biochemical/biophysical properties remains elusive, largely because of the lack of proper controls. The present strategy provides the only method for investigating the influence of solely conformational differences upon the biochemical/biophysical properties of peptides. The significant differences in permeability and target binding affinity between the peptide diastereomers demonstrate the importance of helical conformation. PMID:27167181

  19. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: A 'How-To' Technique Using Helical Tomotherapy and Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tewatia, Dinesh; Rowley, Howard; Kuo, John S.; Khuntia, Deepak; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm{sup 3}, occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy{sub 2} using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy{sub 2} using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.

  20. Technology for the Organic Chemist: Three Exploratory Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteb, John J.; McNulty, LuAnne M.; Magers, John; Morgan, Paul; Wilson, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to use computer-based technology is an essential skill set for students majoring in chemistry. This exercise details the introduction of appropriate uses for this technology in the organic chemistry series. The incorporation of chemically appropriate online resources (module 1), scientific databases (module 2), and the use of a…

  1. Module organization and variance in protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lee, Tsai-Ling; Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shu; Lin, Chih-Ta; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-01-01

    A module is a group of closely related proteins that act in concert to perform specific biological functions through protein–protein interactions (PPIs) that occur in time and space. However, the underlying module organization and variance remain unclear. In this study, we collected module templates to infer respective module families, including 58,041 homologous modules in 1,678 species, and PPI families using searches of complete genomic database. We then derived PPI evolution scores and interface evolution scores to describe the module elements, including core and ring components. Functions of core components were highly correlated with those of essential genes. In comparison with ring components, core proteins/PPIs were conserved across multiple species. Subsequently, protein/module variance of PPI networks confirmed that core components form dynamic network hubs and play key roles in various biological functions. Based on the analyses of gene essentiality, module variance, and gene co-expression, we summarize the observations of module organization and variance as follows: 1) a module consists of core and ring components; 2) core components perform major biological functions and collaborate with ring components to execute certain functions in some cases; 3) core components are more conserved and essential during organizational changes in different biological states or conditions. PMID:25797237

  2. Information Identification and Organization. Student Study Guide. Module II: Organization and Acquisition of Information and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolvin, Boyd M.; West, Sharon

    This second module in a three module program examines the types of materials and services that are available in a community information center or library and the tools or sources for obtaining them. The module covers: ways in which books and other materials are arranged and organized; descriptions of library catalogs and the basic information…

  3. Helicenes as All-in-One Organic Materials for Application in OLEDs: Synthesis and Diverse Applications of Carbo- and Aza[5]helical Diamines.

    PubMed

    Jhulki, Samik; Mishra, Abhaya Kumar; Chow, Tahsin J; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2016-06-27

    A set of eight helical diamines were designed and synthesized to demonstrate their relevance as all-in-one materials for multifarious applications in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), that is, as hole-transporting materials (HTMs), EMs, bifunctional hole transporting + emissive materials, and host materials. Azahelical diamines function very well as HTMs. Indeed, with high Tg values (127-214 °C), they are superior alternatives to popular N,N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB). All the helical diamines exhibit emissive properties when employed in nondoped as well as doped devices, the performance characteristics being superior in the latter. One of the carbohelical diamines (CHTPA) serves the dual function of hole transport as well as emission in simple double-layer devices; the efficiencies observed were better by quite some margin than those of other emissive helicenes reported. The twisting endows helical diamines with significantly high triplet energies such that they also function as host materials for red and green phosphors, that is, [Ir(btp)2 acac] (btp=2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridine; acac=acetylacetonate) and [Ir(ppy)3 ] (ppy=2-phenylpyridine), respectively. The results of device fabrications demonstrate how helicity/ helical scaffold may be diligently exploited to create molecular systems for maneuvering diverse applications in OLEDs. PMID:27244223

  4. Helical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-08-01

    A straight, helical plasma equilibrium equation is solved numerically for a plasma with a helical magnetic axis. As is expected, by a suitable choice of the plasma boundary, the vacuum configuration is made line ..integral.. dl/B stable. As the plasma pressure increases, the line ..integral.. dl/B criterion will improve (again as expected). There is apparently no limit on the plasma ..beta.. from the equilibrium consideration. Thus helical-axis stellarator ..beta.. will presumably be limited by MHD stability ..beta.., and not by equilibrium ..beta...

  5. Submolecular-Scale Imaging of α-Helices and C-Terminal Domains of Tubulins by Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Hitoshi; Ikegami, Koji; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Watanabe, Naoki; Tsukada, Masaru; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we directly imaged subnanometer-scale structures of tubulins by performing frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid. Individual α-helices at the surface of a tubulin protofilament were imaged as periodic corrugations with a spacing of 0.53 nm, which corresponds to the common pitch of an α-helix backbone (0.54 nm). The identification of individual α-helices allowed us to determine the orientation of the deposited tubulin protofilament. As a result, C-terminal domains of tubulins were identified as protrusions with a height of 0.4 nm from the surface of the tubulin. The imaging mechanism for the observed subnanometer-scale contrasts is discussed in relation to the possible structures of the C-terminal domains. Because the C-terminal domains are chemically modified to regulate the interactions between tubulins and other biomolecules (e.g., motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins), detailed structural information on individual C-terminal domains is valuable for understanding such regulation mechanisms. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that FM-AFM is capable of visualizing the structural variation of tubulins with subnanometer resolution. This is an important first step toward using FM-AFM to analyze the functions of tubulins. PMID:21889465

  6. A Dual Modulated Homochiral Helical Nanofilament Phase with Local Columnar Ordering Formed by Bent Core Liquid Crystals: Effects of Molecular Chirality.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Jákli, Antal; Hegmann, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    Helical nanofilament (HNF) phases form as a result of an intralayer mismatch between top and bottom molecular halves in bent-core liquid crystals (BC-LCs) that is relieved by local saddle-splay geometry. HNFs are immensely attractive for photovoltaic and chiral separation applications and as templates for the chiral spatial assembly of guest molecules. Here, the synthesis and characterization of two unichiral BC-LCs and one racemic mixture with tris-biphenyl-diester cores featuring chiral (R,R) and (S,S) or racemic 2-octyloxy aliphatic side chains are presented. In comparison to the achiral compound with linear side chains forming an intralayer modulated HNF phase (HNFmod ), synchrotron small angle X-ray diffraction indicates that the unichiral derivatives form a dual modulated HNF phase with intra- as well as interlayer modulations (HNFmod2 ) suggesting a columnar local structure of the nanofilaments. Transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry confirm that the unichiral materials exclusively form homochiral HNFs with a twist sense-matching secondary twist. A contact preparation provides the first example of two identical chiral liquid crystal phases only differing in their handedness that do not mix and form an achiral liquid crystal phase with an entirely different structure in the contact zone. PMID:27334846

  7. Fast, simple, and informative patient-specific dose verification method for intensity modulated total marrow irradiation with helical tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-specific dose verification for treatment planning in helical tomotherapy is routinely performed using a homogeneous virtual water cylindrical phantom of 30 cm diameter and 18 cm length (Cheese phantom). Because of this small length, treatment with total marrow irradiation (TMI) requires multiple deliveries of the dose verification procedures to cover a wide range of the target volumes, which significantly prolongs the dose verification process. We propose a fast, simple, and informative patient-specific dose verification method which reduce dose verification time for TMI with helical tomotherapy. Methods We constructed a two-step solid water slab phantom (length 110 cm, height 8 cm, and two-step width of 30 cm and 15 cm), termed the Whole Body Phantom (WB phantom). Three ionization chambers and three EDR-2 films can be inserted to cover extended field TMI treatment delivery. Three TMI treatment plans were conducted with a TomoTherapy HiArt Planning Station and verified using the WB phantom with ion chambers and films. Three regions simulating the head and neck, thorax, and pelvis were covered in a single treatment delivery. The results were compared to those with the cheese phantom supplied by Accuray, Inc. following three treatment deliveries to cover the body from head to pelvis. Results Use of the WB phantom provided point doses or dose distributions from head and neck to femur in a single treatment delivery of TMI. Patient-specific dose verification with the WB phantom was 62% faster than with the cheese phantom. The average pass rate in gamma analysis with the criteria of a 3-mm distance-to-agreement and 3% dose differences was 94% ± 2% for the three TMI treatment plans. The differences in pass rates between the WB and cheese phantoms at the upper thorax to abdomen regions were within 2%. The calculated dose agreed with the measured dose within 3% for all points in all five cases in both the WB and cheese phantoms. Conclusions Our

  8. Biomimetic Taste Receptors with Chiral Recognition by Photoluminescent Metal-Organic Frameworks Chelated with Polyaniline Helices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tu; Lin, Tsung Yan; Lee, Hung Lin; Chang, Yun Hsuan; Tsai, Yee Chen

    2016-01-22

    The adsorption of phenylaniline (Phe) enantiomers on (+)-polyaniline (PAN)-chelated [In(OH)(bdc)]n microcrystals was carefully designed and studied by using the Job titration, circular dichroism, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence to mimic heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors in selective, but not specific, ligand binding with chiral recognition and signal transduction. Six essential working principles across different length scales are unraveled: 1) a chiral (+)-PAN (host), 2) specific sites for Phe-(+)/PAN (guest-host) binding, 3) a conformational change of (+)-PAN after binding with Phe enantiomers, 4) different degrees of packing for (+)-PAN, 5) interactions between (+)-PAN and the underlying signal-generating framework (i.e., [In(OH)(bdc)]n microcrystals), and 6) a systematic photoluminescent signal combination by using principal-component analysis from the other three polymer-chelated metal-organic frameworkds (MOFs), such as poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), sodium alginate (SA), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to enhance the selectivity and discrimination capabilities. PMID:26670931

  9. A Series of Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Interesting Adjustable Photoluminescence Constructed by Helical Chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Gong Hao; Zhou, Shuai; Fan, Ruiqing; Yang, Yulin; Xu, Yan

    2015-07-13

    Based on the isonicotinic acid (HIN=pyridine-4-carboxylic acid), seven lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the formula [Ln(IN)2 L] (Ln=Eu (1), Tb (2), Er (3), Dy (4), Ho (5), Gd (6), La (7), L=OCH2 CH2 OH) have been synthesized by mixing Ln2 O3 with HIN under solvothermal conditions, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Crystal structural analysis shows that compounds 1-6 are isostructural, crystallize in a chiral space group P21 21 21 , whereas compound 7 crystallizes in space group C2/c. Nevertheless, they all consist of new intertwined chains. Simultaneously, on the basis of the above-mentioned compounds, we have realized a rational design strategy to form the doped Ln MOFs [(Eux Tb1-x )(IN)2 L] (x=0.35 (8), x=0.19 (9), x=0.06 (10)) by utilizing Tb(III) as the second "rare-earth metal". Interestingly, the photoluminescence of [(Eux Tb1-x )(IN)2 L] are not only adjustable by the ratios of Eu/Tb, but also temperature or excitation wavelength. PMID:26042654

  10. Helical logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkle, Ralph C.; Drexler, K. Eric

    1996-12-01

    Helical logic is a theoretical proposal for a future computing technology using the presence or absence of individual electrons (or holes) to encode 1s and 0s. The electrons are constrained to move along helical paths, driven by a rotating electric field in which the entire circuit is immersed. The electric field remains roughly orthogonal to the major axis of the helix and confines each charge carrier to a fraction of a turn of a single helical loop, moving it like water in an Archimedean screw. Each loop could in principle hold an independent carrier, permitting high information density. One computationally universal logic operation involves two helices, one of which splits into two `descendant' helices. At the point of divergence, differences in the electrostatic potential resulting from the presence or absence of a carrier in the adjacent helix controls the direction taken by a carrier in the splitting helix. The reverse of this sequence can be used to merge two initially distinct helical paths into a single outgoing helical path without forcing a dissipative transition. Because these operations are both logically and thermodynamically reversible, energy dissipation can be reduced to extremely low levels. This is the first proposal known to the authors that combines thermodynamic reversibility with the use of single charge carriers. It is important to note that this proposal permits a single electron to switch another single electron, and does not require that many electrons be used to switch one electron. The energy dissipated per logic operation can very likely be reduced to less than 0957-4484/7/4/004/img5 at a temperature of 1 K and a speed of 10 GHz, though further analysis is required to confirm this. Irreversible operations, when required, can be easily implemented and should have a dissipation approaching the fundamental limit of 0957-4484/7/4/004/img6.

  11. High-speed and low-power silicon-organic hybrid modulators for advanced modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauermann, M.; Wolf, S.; Palmer, R.; Koeber, S.; Schindler, P. C.; Wahlbrink, T.; Bolten, J.; Giesecke, A. L.; Koenigsmann, M.; Kohler, M.; Malsam, D.; Elder, D. L.; Dalton, L. R.; Leuthold, J.; Freude, W.; Koos, C.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) modulators for generating advanced modulation formats at high data rates and with low energy consumption. SOH integration combines slot waveguides on conventional silicon-on-insulator substrates with highly efficient electro-optic materials. With this approach we generate 16QAM signals at symbol rates of 28 GBd and 40 GBd leading to gross data rates (net data rates) of up to 160 Gbit/s (133 Gbit/s) for a single polarization. This is the highest value achieved by a silicon-based modulator up to now. With a maximum symbol rate of 28 GBd, low drive voltages of only 0.6 Vpp are sufficient and result in a record-low energy consumption of only 19 fJ/bit. This is the lowest energy consumption that has so far been reported for a 16QAM modulator at 28 GBd.

  12. Cyclophilin-B Modulates Collagen Cross-linking by Differentially Affecting Lysine Hydroxylation in the Helical and Telopeptidyl Domains of Tendon Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Terajima, Masahiko; Taga, Yuki; Chen, Yulong; Cabral, Wayne A; Hou-Fu, Guo; Srisawasdi, Sirivimol; Nagasawa, Masako; Sumida, Noriko; Hattori, Shunji; Kurie, Jonathan M; Marini, Joan C; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2016-04-29

    Covalent intermolecular cross-linking provides collagen fibrils with stability. The cross-linking chemistry is tissue-specific and determined primarily by the state of lysine hydroxylation at specific sites. A recent study on cyclophilin B (CypB) null mice, a model of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta, demonstrated that lysine hydroxylation at the helical cross-linking site of bone type I collagen was diminished in these animals (Cabral, W. A., Perdivara, I., Weis, M., Terajima, M., Blissett, A. R., Chang, W., Perosky, J. E., Makareeva, E. N., Mertz, E. L., Leikin, S., Tomer, K. B., Kozloff, K. M., Eyre, D. R., Yamauchi, M., and Marini, J. C. (2014) PLoS Genet 10, e1004465). However, the extent of decrease appears to be tissue- and molecular site-specific, the mechanism of which is unknown. Here we report that although CypB deficiency resulted in lower lysine hydroxylation in the helical cross-linking sites, it was increased in the telopeptide cross-linking sites in tendon type I collagen. This resulted in a decrease in the lysine aldehyde-derived cross-links but generation of hydroxylysine aldehyde-derived cross-links. The latter were absent from the wild type and heterozygous mice. Glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues was moderately increased in the CypB null tendon. We found that CypB interacted with all lysyl hydroxylase isoforms (isoforms 1-3) and a putative lysyl hydroxylase-2 chaperone, 65-kDa FK506-binding protein. Tendon collagen in CypB null mice showed severe size and organizational abnormalities. The data indicate that CypB modulates collagen cross-linking by differentially affecting lysine hydroxylation in a site-specific manner, possibly via its interaction with lysyl hydroxylases and associated molecules. This study underscores the critical importance of collagen post-translational modifications in connective tissue formation. PMID:26934917

  13. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. Results The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Conclusion Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities. PMID:24501708

  14. Dose to organs at risk in the upper abdomen in patients treated with extended fields by helical tomotherapy: a dosimetric and clinical preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this work was to determine the technical feasibility and safety of extended-field radiotherapy (EF), performed by Helical TomoTherapy, in patients with positive pelvic and/or para-aortic nodes. Dosimetric data were collected and acute and sub-acute toxicities of the upper abdominal organs at risk (OAR) were evaluated. Methods Twenty-nine patients suitable for EF irradiation for local disease and/or nodal disease in the pelvic or para-aortic area were treated. The prescription dose was 50.4/54 Gy (1.7-1.8 Gy/fraction) for prophylactic lymph nodes (N-) and 60–70.5 Gy (2–2.35 Gy/fraction) for clinically evident gross disease (N+). Modulation factor (MF), pitch and field width (FW) were chosen to optimize dose distribution and treatment duration. Dose values of PTVs and OAR were analysed. The length of the treatment field, the N + and N- volumes, and treatment duration were reported. To evaluate the safety of treatment, haematological, hepatic, renal and pancreatic functions were assessed before, during and after treatment. The median follow-up time was 17.6 months (range: 6–22 months). Results The treatment was well tolerated and all patients but one completed treatment without interruption. Four of the 29 patients experienced G3 haematological acute toxicity (13.8%), but no patient experienced sub-acute grade G3 toxicity. Ten patients experienced G1 and three G2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (nausea). No sub-acute gastrointestinal or renal toxicity was observed. Only one (3.7%) patient had a persistent slight increase of pancreatic enzymes and two (7.4%) patients a slight increase of hepatic enzymes six months after radiotherapy (G1 toxicity). Conclusions With our treatment design and dose regimen, we found that EF treatment by TomoTherapy could be safely and effectively delivered with minimal acute and sub-acute toxicities in the upper abdomen area. PMID:24160769

  15. Helical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Johnson, Eric; Richardson, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  16. Inhomogeneous nuclear spin polarization induced by helicity-modulated optical excitation of fluorine-bound electron spins in ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Greilich, A.; Zhukov, E. A.; Kirstein, E.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Korenev, V. L.; Yugova, I. A.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Pawlis, A.; Bayer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Optically induced nuclear spin polarization in a fluorine-doped ZnSe epilayer is studied by time-resolved Kerr rotation using resonant excitation of donor-bound excitons. Excitation with helicity-modulated laser pulses results in a transverse nuclear spin polarization, which is detected as a change of the Larmor precession frequency of the donor-bound electron spins. The frequency shift in dependence on the transverse magnetic field exhibits a pronounced dispersion-like shape with resonances at the fields of nuclear magnetic resonance of the constituent zinc and selenium isotopes. It is studied as a function of external parameters, particularly of constant and radio frequency external magnetic fields. The width of the resonance and its shape indicate a strong spatial inhomogeneity of the nuclear spin polarization in the vicinity of a fluorine donor. A mechanism of optically induced nuclear spin polarization is suggested based on the concept of resonant nuclear spin cooling driven by the inhomogeneous Knight field of the donor-bound electron.

  17. The Structure and Organization within the Membrane of the Helices Composing the Pore-Forming Domain of Bacillus thuringiensis δ -Endotoxin are Consistent with an ``Umbrella-Like'' Structure of the Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Ehud; La Rocca, Paolo; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Shai, Yechiel

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of membrane insertion and the structural organization of pores formed by Bacillus thuringiensis δ -endotoxin. We determined the relative affinities for membranes of peptides corresponding to the seven helices that compose the toxin pore-forming domain, their modes of membrane interaction, their structures within membranes, and their orientations relative to the membrane normal. In addition, we used resonance energy transfer measurements of all possible combinatorial pairs of membrane-bound helices to map the network of interactions between helices in their membrane-bound state. The interaction of the helices with the bilayer membrane was also probed by a Monte Carlo simulation protocol to determine lowest-energy orientations. Our results are consistent with a situation in which helices α 4 and α 5 insert into the membrane as a helical hairpin in an antiparallel manner, while the other helices lie on the membrane surface like the ribs of an umbrella (the ``umbrella model''). Our results also support the suggestion that α 7 may serve as a binding sensor to initiate the structural rearrangement of the pore-forming domain.

  18. Dosimetric study and in-vivo dose verification for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui . E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of using helical tomotherapy for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma. We retrospectively generated step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) plans and helical tomotherapy plans for two anal cancer patients, one male and one female, who were treated by the sIMRT technique. Dose parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs-at-risk (OARs) were compared between the sIMRT and the helical tomotherapy plans. The helical tomotherapy plans showed better dose homogeneity in the PTV, better dose conformity around the PTV, and, therefore, better sparing of nearby OARs compared with the sIMRT plans. In-vivo skin dose measurements were performed during conformal avoidance helical tomotherapy treatment of an anal cancer patient to verify adequate delivery of skin dose and sparing of OARs.

  19. A 3D chiral metal-organic framework based on left-handed helices containing 3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Yang, Tian-Yi; Feng, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Hui; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-15

    A chiral metal-organic framework, [Cu(atr)(OH)]·0.5H{sub 2}O·0.5en (1) (Hatr=3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole, en=ethylenediamine), was constructed via diffusion reaction of the achiral Hatr ligand and CuSO{sub 4} as starting materials. Compound 1 crystallizes in the chiral space group P3{sub 2}21 and features a porous metal-organic framework with 44.1% solvent-accessible volume fabricated by left-handed helices with a pitch height of l{sub p}=10.442 Å. Six helices gather around in a cycle forming a large honeycomb channel with a 6.58 Å inner diameter. Cu(II) center and atr{sup ‒} ligand regarded as 3-connected nodes, compound 1 can be simplified to a 3-c uninodal (4.12{sup 2}) (qtz-h) topological network. A gradual decreasing in the magnetic moment depending on temperature decreasing indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. The powder XRD confirms the bulk sample is a single crystal pure phase, and the thermogravimetric analysis shows the thermal stability of 1 is up to ca. 240 °C. - Highlights: • The present 3D chiral MOF is built from achiral Hatr ligand. • Six left-handed helices gather into a honeycomb channel in chiral sp P3{sub 2}21. • Compound 1 shows a 3-c uninodal (4.12{sup 2}) or qtz-h topological network. • Compound 1 indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction.

  20. Ligand Symmetry Modulation for Designing Mixed-Ligand Metal-Organic Frameworks: Gas Sorption and Luminescence Sensing Properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di-Ming; Tian, Jia-Yue; Liu, Chun-Sen

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of a new mixed-linker Zn(II)-based metal-organic framework (MOF), {[Zn2(atz)2(bpydb)](DMA)8}n (1) (atz = deprotonated 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, bpydb = deprotonated 4,4'-(4,4'-bipyridine-2,6-diyl) dibenzoic acid, DMA = N,N-dimethylacetamide), through symmetry modulation of a triazole ligand. The desymmetrized triazole linkers not only bond to the Zn(II) ions to result in a new helical Zn-triazolate chain building unit but also lead to the formation of a highly porous framework (N2 uptake: 617 cm(3)/g; BET surface area: 2393 m(2)/g) with 1D helical channels. The adsorption properties of desolved 1 were investigated by H2, C2H2, CO2, and CH4 sorption experiments, which showed that 1 exhibited high uptake capacity for H2 at 77 K and C2H2 around room temperature. More importantly, the high C2H2 uptake capacity but low binding energy makes this MOF a promising candidate for effective C2H2 capture from C2H2/CO2 and C2H2/CH4 mixed gases with low regenerative energy cost. In addition, 1 shows potential application for the luminescence sensing of small aromatic molecules picric acid (PA) and p-xylene (PX). PMID:27494087

  1. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  2. Measurement of organic/polymer material by phase modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yong; Teboul, Eric; Kramer, Alan R.

    2004-06-01

    Due to they can be tailored to provide a wide range of physical properties and their easiness of processing and fabrication, polymeric materials have found widespread use in the manufacture of microwave, electronics, photonics and bio-tech systems. This paper presents the basic principle of phase modulation spectroscopic ellipsometer (PMSE) and its advantages over other ellipsometry in measuring polymer film. Used for thin film measurements ultra-thin dielectric, meal film and organic film, the PMSE technique is now used over a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid infrared. Film thickness ranging from Angstrom up to 50um can be measured by PMSE. Applications of PMSE on measurement and characterization of polymer/organic material are given in the paper.

  3. Metal-Organic Nanotube with Helical and Propeller-Chiral Motifs Composed of a C10-Symmetric Double-Decker Nanoring.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Fukino, Takahiro; Hashizume, Daisuke; Mori, Tadashi; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-06-24

    Coassembly of an achiral ferrocene-cored tetratopic pyridyl ligand (FcL) with AgBF4 in CH2Cl2/MeCN (7:3 v/v) containing chiral Bu4N(+) (+)- or (-)-menthylsulfate (MS*(-)) results in the formation of an "optically active" metal-organic nanotube (FcNT) composed of a C10-symmetric double-decker nanoring featuring 10 FcL units and 20 Ag(+) ions. The circular dichroism spectrum of FcNT along with its 2D X-ray diffraction (2D XRD) pattern indicates that the constituent metal-organic nanorings in FcNT stack one-handed helically on top of each other. A crystal structure of the dimeric double-decker model complex (Ag2(FcL')2) from a ditopic ferrocene ligand (FcL') and AgBF4 allowed for confirming the binding of MS*(-) onto the Ag(+) center of the complex. The results of detailed spectroscopic studies indicate that in its double-decker aromatic arrays, FcNT possibly possesses propeller-chiral twists in addition to the helically chiral structure, where the former is considerably more dynamic than the latter. Notably, both chiral structural motifs responded nonlinearly to an enantiomeric excess of MS*(-) (majority rule) though with no stereochemical influence on one another. PMID:26053066

  4. A two-fold interpenetrating 3D metal-organic framework material constructed from helical chains linked via 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yiming; Zhao Zhenguo; Wu Xiaoyuan; Zhang Qisheng; Chen Lijuan; Wang Fei; Chen Shanci; Lu Canzhong

    2008-12-15

    A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound {l_brace}[Ag(L){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (1) has been synthesized by self-assembly of 4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz (L=4,4'-H{sub 2}bpz=3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-4,4'-bipyrazole) and Ag{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} under hydrothermal conditions. It crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/acd with a=21.406(4) A, b=21.406(4) A, c=36.298(8) A, Z=32. X-ray single-crystal diffraction reveals that 1 has a three-dimensional framework with an unprecedented alternate left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net. Photoluminescent investigation reveals that the title compound displays interesting emissions in a wide region, which shows that the title compound may be a good potential candidate as a photoelectric material. - Graphical abstract: A 3-connected dia-f-type metal-organic framework compound [Ag(4,4'-bpz){sub 3/2}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}] shows unprecedented alternating left- and right-handed helices structure, featuring a non-uniform two-fold interpenetrated (4.14{sup 2}) net.

  5. A 3D chiral metal-organic framework based on left-handed helices containing 3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Yang, Tian-Yi; Feng, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Zong-Hui; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    A chiral metal-organic framework, [Cu(atr)(OH)]·0.5H2O·0.5en (1) (Hatr=3-amino-1 H-1,2,4-triazole, en=ethylenediamine), was constructed via diffusion reaction of the achiral Hatr ligand and CuSO4 as starting materials. Compound 1 crystallizes in the chiral space group P3221 and features a porous metal-organic framework with 44.1% solvent-accessible volume fabricated by left-handed helices with a pitch height of lp=10.442 Å. Six helices gather around in a cycle forming a large honeycomb channel with a 6.58 Å inner diameter. Cu(II) center and atr‒ ligand regarded as 3-connected nodes, compound 1 can be simplified to a 3-c uninodal {4.122} (qtz-h) topological network. A gradual decreasing in the magnetic moment depending on temperature decreasing indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction in 1. The powder XRD confirms the bulk sample is a single crystal pure phase, and the thermogravimetric analysis shows the thermal stability of 1 is up to ca. 240 °C.

  6. Laminar circuit organization and response modulation in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Olivas, Nicholas D.; Quintanar-Zilinskas, Victor; Nenadic, Zoran; Xu, Xiangmin

    2012-01-01

    The mouse has become an increasingly important animal model for visual system studies, but few studies have investigated local functional circuit organization of mouse visual cortex. Here we used our newly developed mapping technique combining laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) with fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging to examine the spatial organization and temporal dynamics of laminar circuit responses in living slice preparations of mouse primary visual cortex (V1). During experiments, LSPS using caged glutamate provided spatially restricted neuronal activation in a specific cortical layer, and evoked responses from the stimulated layer to its functionally connected regions were detected by VSD imaging. In this study, we first provided a detailed analysis of spatiotemporal activation patterns at specific V1 laminar locations and measured local circuit connectivity. Then we examined the role of cortical inhibition in the propagation of evoked cortical responses by comparing circuit activity patterns in control and in the presence of GABAa receptor antagonists. We found that GABAergic inhibition was critical in restricting layer-specific excitatory activity spread and maintaining topographical projections. In addition, we investigated how AMPA and NMDA receptors influenced cortical responses and found that blocking AMPA receptors abolished interlaminar functional projections, and the NMDA receptor activity was important in controlling visual cortical circuit excitability and modulating activity propagation. The NMDA receptor antagonist reduced neuronal population activity in time-dependent and laminar-specific manners. Finally, we used the quantitative information derived from the mapping experiments and presented computational modeling analysis of V1 circuit organization. Taken together, the present study has provided important new information about mouse V1 circuit organization and response modulation. PMID:23060751

  7. Band gap modulation of functionalized metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Musho, Terence; Li, Jiangtan; Wu, Nianqiang

    2014-11-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been envisioned as alternatives to planar metallic catalysts for solar-to-fuel conversion. This is a direct result of their porous structure and the ability to tailor their optical absorption properties. This study investigates the band gap modulation of Zr-UiO-66 MOFs from both the computational and experimental points of view for three linker designs that include benzenedicarboxylate (BDC), BDC-NO2, and BDC-NH2. Emphasis in this study was aimed at understanding the influence of the bonding between the aromatic ring and the functional group. A ground state density functional theory (DFT) calculation was carried out to investigate the projected density of states and the origins of the modulation. A time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation of the hydrogen terminated linkers confirmed the modulation and accounted for the electron charge transfer providing comparable optical band gap predictions to experimental results. Computational results confirmed the hybridization of the carbon-nitrogen bond in conjunction with the donor state resulting from the NH2 functionalization. The NO2 functionalization resulted in an acceptor configuration with marginal modification to the valence band maximum. The largest modulation was BDC-NH2 with a band gap of 2.75 eV, followed by BDC-NO2 with a band gap of 2.93 eV and BDC with a band gap of 3.76 eV. The electron effective mass was predicted from the band structure to be 8.9 me for all MOF designs. PMID:25269595

  8. Determination of W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays in p anti-p collisions at CDF Run II and production of endcap modules for the ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit; /Geneva U.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presented here includes two parts. The first part discusses the production of endcap modules for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker at the University of Geneva. The ATLAS experiment is one of the two multi-purpose experiments being built at the LHC at CERN. The University of Geneva invested extensive efforts to create an excellent and efficient module production site, in which 655 endcap outer modules were constructed. The complexity and extreme requirements for 10 years of LHC operation with a high resolution, high efficiency, low noise tracking system resulted in an extremely careful, time consuming production and quality assurance of every single module. At design luminosity about 1000 particles will pass through the tracking system each 25 ns. In addition to requiring fast tracking techniques, the high particle flux causes significant radiation damage. Therefore, modules have to be constructed within tight and accurate mechanical and electrical specification. A description of the ATLAS experiment and the ATLAS Semiconductor tracker is presented, followed by a detailed overview of the module production at the University of Geneva. My personal contribution to the endcap module production at the University of Geneva was taking part, together with other physicists, in selecting components to be assembled to a module, including hybrid reception tests, measuring the I-V curve of the sensors and the modules at different stages of the production, thermal cycling the modules and performing electrical readout tests as an initial quality assurance of the modules before they were shipped to CERN. An elaborated description of all of these activities is given in this thesis. At the beginning of the production period the author developed a statistics package which enabled us to monitor the rate and quality of the module production. This package was then used widely by the ATLAS SCT institutes that built endcap modules of any type, and kept being improved and updated

  9. Formation of functional super-helical assemblies by constrained single heptad repeat

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sudipta; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Lipstman, Sophia; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the key role of super-helical motifs in molecular self-organization, several tandem heptad repeat peptides were used as building blocks to form well-ordered supramolecular nano-assemblies. However, the need for stable helical structures limits the length of the smallest described units to three heptad repeats. Here we describe the first-ever self-assembling single heptad repeat module, based on the ability of the non-coded α-aminoisobutyric acid to stabilize very short peptides in helical conformation. A conformationally constrained peptide comprised of aromatic, but not aliphatic, residues, at the first and fourth positions formed helical fibrillar assemblies. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the peptide demonstrates super-helical packing in which phenylalanine residues formed an ‘aromatic zipper' arrangement at the molecular interface. The modification of the minimal building block with positively charged residues results in tight DNA binding ascribed to the combined factors of helicity, hydrophobicity and charge. The design of these peptides defines a new direction for assembly of super-helical nanostructures by minimal molecular elements. PMID:26468599

  10. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B transporters modulate hydroxyurea pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Finkelstein, David; Ware, Russell E.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is currently the only FDA-approved drug that ameliorates the pathophysiology of sickle cell anemia. Unfortunately, substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of hydroxyurea may result in variation of the drug's efficacy. However, little is known about mechanisms that modulate hydroxyurea PK. Recent in vitro studies identifying hydroxyurea as a substrate for organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B) transporters prompted the current investigation assessing the role of OATP1B transporters in modulating hydroxyurea PK. Using wild-type and Oatp1b knockout (Oatp1b−/−) mice, hydroxyurea PK was analyzed in vivo by measuring [14C]hydroxyurea distribution in plasma, kidney, liver, urine, or the exhaled 14CO2 metabolite. Plasma levels were significantly reduced by 20% in Oatp1b−/− mice compared with wild-type (area under the curve of 38.64 or 48.45 μg·h−1·ml−1, respectively) after oral administration, whereas no difference was observed between groups following intravenous administration. Accumulation in the kidney was significantly decreased by twofold in Oatp1b−/− mice (356.9 vs. 748.1 pmol/g), which correlated with a significant decrease in urinary excretion. Hydroxyurea accumulation in the liver was also decreased (136.6 vs. 107.3 pmol/g in wild-type or Oatp1b−/− mice, respectively) correlating with a decrease in exhaled 14CO2. These findings illustrate that deficiency of Oatp1b transporters alters the absorption, distribution, and elimination of hydroxyurea thus providing the first in vivo evidence that cell membrane transporters may play a significant role in modulating hydroxyurea PK. Future studies to investigate other transporters and their role in hydroxyurea disposition are warranted for understanding the sources of variation in hydroxyurea's PK. PMID:23986199

  11. Self-organized plasmonic metasurfaces for all-optical modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Valle, G.; Polli, D.; Biagioni, P.; Martella, C.; Giordano, M. C.; Finazzi, M.; Longhi, S.; Duò, L.; Cerullo, G.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.

    2015-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a self-organized metasurface with a polarization dependent transmittance that can be dynamically controlled by optical means. The configuration consists of tightly packed plasmonic nanowires with a large dispersion of width and height produced by the defocused ion-beam sputtering of a thin gold film supported on a silica glass. Our results are quantitatively interpreted according to a theoretical model based on the thermomodulational nonlinearity of gold and a finite-element numerical analysis of the absorption and scattering cross-sections of the nanowires. We found that the polarization sensitivity of the metasurface can be strongly enhanced by pumping with ultrashort laser pulses, leading to potential applications in ultrafast all-optical modulation and switching of light.

  12. A series connection architecture for large-area organic photovoltaic modules with a 7.5% module efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Soonil; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Geunjin; Lee, Seongyu; Kim, Seok; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Jinho; Yi, Minjin; Kim, Junghwan; Back, Hyungcheol; Kim, Jae-Ryoung; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of organic photovoltaic modules via printing techniques has been the greatest challenge for their commercial manufacture. Current module architecture, which is based on a monolithic geometry consisting of serially interconnecting stripe-patterned subcells with finite widths, requires highly sophisticated patterning processes that significantly increase the complexity of printing production lines and cause serious reductions in module efficiency due to so-called aperture loss in series connection regions. Herein we demonstrate an innovative module structure that can simultaneously reduce both patterning processes and aperture loss. By using a charge recombination feature that occurs at contacts between electron- and hole-transport layers, we devise a series connection method that facilitates module fabrication without patterning the charge transport layers. With the successive deposition of component layers using slot-die and doctor-blade printing techniques, we achieve a high module efficiency reaching 7.5% with area of 4.15 cm2.

  13. A series connection architecture for large-area organic photovoltaic modules with a 7.5% module efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soonil; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Geunjin; Lee, Seongyu; Kim, Seok; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Jinho; Yi, Minjin; Kim, Junghwan; Back, Hyungcheol; Kim, Jae-Ryoung; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of organic photovoltaic modules via printing techniques has been the greatest challenge for their commercial manufacture. Current module architecture, which is based on a monolithic geometry consisting of serially interconnecting stripe-patterned subcells with finite widths, requires highly sophisticated patterning processes that significantly increase the complexity of printing production lines and cause serious reductions in module efficiency due to so-called aperture loss in series connection regions. Herein we demonstrate an innovative module structure that can simultaneously reduce both patterning processes and aperture loss. By using a charge recombination feature that occurs at contacts between electron- and hole-transport layers, we devise a series connection method that facilitates module fabrication without patterning the charge transport layers. With the successive deposition of component layers using slot-die and doctor-blade printing techniques, we achieve a high module efficiency reaching 7.5% with area of 4.15 cm(2). PMID:26728507

  14. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of ''hot'' spots or ''cold'' spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF's Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0 deg. - 340 deg. in 20 deg. increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x

  15. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of “hot” spots or “cold” spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF’s Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0°–340° in 20° increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x

  16. SU-E-T-197: Helical Cranial-Spinal Treatments with a Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Templeton, A; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) of systemic disease requires a high level of beam intensity modulation to reduce dose to bone marrow and other critical structures. Current helical delivery machines can take 30 minutes or more of beam-on time to complete these treatments. This pilot study aims to test the feasibility of performing helical treatments with a conventional linear accelerator using longitudinal couch travel during multiple gantry revolutions. Methods: The VMAT optimization package of the Eclipse 10.0 treatment planning system was used to optimize pseudo-helical CSI plans of 5 clinical patient scans. Each gantry revolution was divided into three 120° arcs with each isocenter shifted longitudinally. Treatments requiring more than the maximum 10 arcs used multiple plans with each plan after the first being optimized including the dose of the others (Figure 1). The beam pitch was varied between 0.2 and 0.9 (couch speed 5- 20cm/revolution and field width of 22cm) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared to tomotherapy plans. Results: Viable pseudo-helical plans were achieved using Eclipse. Decreasing the pitch from 0.9 to 0.2 lowered the maximum lens dose by 40%, the mean bone marrow dose by 2.1% and the maximum esophagus dose by 17.5%. (Figure 2). Linac-based helical plans showed dose results comparable to tomotherapy delivery for both target coverage and critical organ sparing, with the D50 of bone marrow and esophagus respectively 12% and 31% lower in the helical linear accelerator plan (Figure 3). Total mean beam-on time for the linear accelerator plan was 8.3 minutes, 54% faster than the tomotherapy average for the same plans. Conclusions: This pilot study has demonstrated the feasibility of planning pseudo-helical treatments for CSI targets using a conventional linac and dynamic couch movement, and supports the ongoing development of true helical optimization and delivery.

  17. Carrier modulation layer-enhanced organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Kumar, Sudhir; Singh, Meenu; Chen, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chung-Chia; Lee, Meng-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED)-based display products have already emerged in the market and their efficiencies and lifetimes are sound at the comparatively low required luminance. To realize OLED for lighting application sooner, higher light quality and better power efficiency at elevated luminance are still demanded. This review reveals the advantages of incorporating a nano-scale carrier modulation layer (CML), also known as a spacer, carrier-regulating layer, or interlayer, among other terms, to tune the chromaticity and color temperature as well as to markedly improve the device efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) for numerous OLED devices. The functions of the CML can be enhanced as multiple layers and blend structures are employed. At proper thickness, the employment of CML enables the device to balance the distribution of carriers in the two emissive zones and achieve high device efficiencies and long operational lifetime while maintaining very high CRI. Moreover, we have also reviewed the effect of using CML on the most significant characteristics of OLEDs, namely: efficiency, luminance, life-time, CRI, SRI, chromaticity, and the color temperature, and see how the thickness tuning and selection of proper CML are crucial to effectively control the OLED device performance. PMID:26193252

  18. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Organic Matter - Module 17, Objectives, and Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    This module sketches out the impact of sewage organic matter on soils. For convenience, that organic matter is separated into the readily decomposable compounds and the more resistant material (volatile suspended solids, refractory organics, and sludges). The fates of those organics are reviewed along with loading rates and recommended soil…

  19. Flow-modulated targeted signal enhancement for volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Taylor; Gras, Ronda; Luong, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography is a technique that is becoming more widespread within the analytical community, especially in the separation of complex mixtures. Modulation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography can be achieved by manipulating temperature or flow and offers many advantages such as increased separation power, but one underutilized advantage is increased detectability due to the reduction of peak width from the use of a modulator. A flow modulator was used to selectively target analytes for increased detectability with a standard flame ionization detector operated at 100 Hz, without the need for cryogens or advanced modulation software. By the collection of the entire peak volume followed by peak transfer rather than further separation, an increase of 12 times in peak height and detectability was realized for the analytes tested using an internal loop modulator configuration. An external loop flow modulator configuration allowed for more volatile analytes (with k < 5), and demonstrated an analyte detectability enhancement factor of at least 6. The collection loop size can be readily increased with an external loop configuration to accommodate for these naturally broader peaks. This novel flow modulated targeted signal enhancement approach was applied to industrially significant analyses like the analysis of methanol in a hydrocarbon streams. Methanol was detected at 7 ppb with a conventional flame ionization detector and without the need for pre-concentration. PMID:27120133

  20. Poly(isophthalic acid)(ethylene oxide) as a Macromolecular Modulator for Metal-Organic Polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng-Hao; Wang, Le; Trueblood, Jonathan V; Grassian, Vicki H; Cohen, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    A new strategy was developed by using a polymer ligand, poly(isophthalic acid)(ethylene oxide), to modulate the growth of metal-organic polyhedra (MOP) crystals. This macromolecular modulator can effectively control the crystal habit of several different Cu24L24 (L = isophthalic acid derivatives) MOPs. The polymer also directed the formation of MOP structures under reaction conditions that only produce metal-organic frameworks in the absence of modulator. Moreover, the polymer also enabled the deposition of MOP crystals on glass surfaces. This macromolecular modulator strategy provides an innovative approach to control the morphology and assembly of MOP particles. PMID:27400759

  1. Assessment of Organ Motion in Postoperative Endometrial and Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R.; Latifi, Kujtim; Rusthoven, Chad; Javedan, Ken; Forster, Kenneth

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may be useful to reduce toxicity in gynecologic cancer patients requiring postoperative pelvic irradiation. This study was undertaken to quantify vaginal wall organ motion during the course of postoperative pelvic irradiation using pelvic IMRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two consecutive patients treated with postoperative pelvic IMRT on helical tomotherapy had fiducial markers placed at the vaginal apex prior to simulation then daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) scans for positioning. The daily positions of the fiducials were registered and measured in reference to the initial CT scan to quantify the degree of vaginal wall organ motion during the entire course of therapy. Results: The total motion of the fiducials center of mass (COM) was a median of 5.8 mm (range, 0.6-20.2 mm), and 95% of all COM positions fell within 15.7 mm of their original position. Directional margins of 3.1 mm along the right-left axis, 9.5 mm along the superoinferior axis, and of 12.1 mm along the anteroposterior axis encompassed the vaginal fiducials in 95% of treatments. Mean organ deformation for all patients was 3.9 mm, (range, 0-27.5 mm; standard deviation, 3.1 mm), with significant distortions of greater than 10 mm in 17% of secondary image sets. Conclusions: These data suggest a planning target volume margin of 16 mm will account for maximal organ motion in the majority of gynecologic patients undergoing postoperative pelvic IMRT, and it may be possible to incorporate directional motion into the planning target volume margin.

  2. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  3. Comparison of the dosimetries of 3-dimensions Radiotherapy (3D-RT) with linear accelerator and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in children irradiated for neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intensity modulated radiotherapy is an efficient radiotherapy technique to increase dose in target volumes and decrease irradiation dose in organs at risk. This last objective is mainly relevant in children. However, previous results suggested that IMRT could increase low dose, factor of risk for secondary radiation induced cancer. This study was performed to compare dose distributions with 3D-radiotherapy (3D-RT) and IMRT with tomotherapy (HT) in children with neuroblastoma. Seven children with neuroblastoma were irradiated. Treatment plans were calculated for 3D-RT, and for HT. For the volume of interest, the PTV-V95% and conformity index were calculated. Dose constraints of all the organs at risk and integral dose were compared. Results The conformity index was statistically better for HT than for 3D-RT. PTV-V95% constraint was reached in 6 cases with HT compared to 2 cases with 3D-RT. For the ipsilateral kidney of the tumor, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for 3 patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in two cases and higher in one case. The threshold was not reached for one patient with either technique, but the value was lower with HT than with 3D-RT. For the contralateral kidney of the tumors, the V12 Gy constraint was reached for all patients with both methods. The values were lower with HT than with 3D-RT in 5 of 7 children, equal in one patient and higher in one patient. The organ-at-risk volumes receiving low doses were significantly lower with 3D-RT but larger for the highest doses, compared to those irradiated with HT. The integral doses were not different. Conclusions IMRT with HT allows a better conformity treatment, a more frequently acceptable PTV-V95% than 3D-RT and, concomitantly, a better shielding of the kidneys. The integral doses are comparable between both techniques but consideration of differences in dose distribution between the two techniques, for the organs at risk, has to be taken in

  4. Chiral self-assembly of helical particles.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Hima Bindu; Cinacchi, Giorgio; Ferrarini, Alberta; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-04-12

    The shape of the building blocks plays a crucial role in directing self-assembly towards desired architectures. Out of the many different shapes, the helix has a unique position. Helical structures are ubiquitous in nature and a helical shape is exhibited by the most important biopolymers like polynucleotides, polypeptides and polysaccharides as well as by cellular organelles like flagella. Helical particles can self-assemble into chiral superstructures, which may have a variety of applications, e.g. as photonic (meta)materials. However, a clear and definite understanding of these structures has not been entirely achieved yet. We have recently undertaken an extensive investigation on the phase behaviour of hard helical particles, using numerical simulations and classical density functional theory. Here we present a detailed study of the phase diagram of hard helices as a function of their morphology. This includes a variety of liquid-crystal phases, with different degrees of orientational and positional ordering. We show how, by tuning the helix parameters, it is possible to control the organization of the system. Starting from slender helices, whose phase behaviour is similar to that of rodlike particles, an increase in curliness leads to the onset of azimuthal correlations between the particles and the formation of phases specific to helices. These phases feature a new kind of screw order, of which there is experimental evidence in colloidal suspensions of helical flagella. PMID:26767786

  5. Highly efficient terahertz wave modulators by photo-excitation of organics/silicon bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyung Keun; Kang, Chul; Hwang, In-Wook; Yoon, Youngwoon; Lee, Kiejin; Kee, Chul-Sik; Lee, Joong Wook

    2014-07-07

    Using hybrid bilayer systems comprising a molecular organic semiconductor and silicon, we achieve optically controllable active terahertz (THz) modulators that exhibit extremely high modulation efficiencies. A modulation efficiency of 98% is achieved from thermally annealed C{sub 60}/silicon bilayers, due to the rapid photo-induced electron transfer from the excited states of the silicon onto the C{sub 60} layer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the broadband modulation of THz waves. The cut-off condition of the system that is determined by the formation of efficient charge separation by the photo-excitation is highly variable, changing the system from insulating to metallic. The phenomenon enables an extremely high modulation bandwidth and rates of electromagnetic waves of interest. The realization of near-perfect modulation efficiency in THz frequencies opens up the possibilities of utilizing active modulators for THz spectroscopy and communications.

  6. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  7. High-efficiency THz modulator based on phthalocyanine-compound organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ting; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Jingling; Zang, Mengdi; Chen, Tianji; Hu, Yufeng; Hou, Yanbing

    2015-02-01

    We report a high efficiency, broadband terahertz (THz) modulator following a study of phthalocyanine-compound organic films irradiated with an external excitation laser. Both transmission and reflection modulations of each organic/silicon bilayers were measured using THz time-domain and continuous-wave systems. For very low intensities, the experimental results show that AlClPc/Si can achieve a high modulation factor for transmission and reflection, indicating that AlClPc/Si has a superior modulation efficiency compared with the other films (CuPc and SnCl2Pc). In contrast, the strong attenuation of the transmitted and reflected THz waves revealed that a nonlinear absorption process takes place at the organic/silicon interface.

  8. High-efficiency THz modulator based on phthalocyanine-compound organic films

    SciTech Connect

    He, Ting; Zhang, Bo E-mail: sjl-phy@cnu.edu.cn; Shen, Jingling E-mail: sjl-phy@cnu.edu.cn; Zang, Mengdi; Chen, Tianji; Hu, Yufeng; Hou, Yanbing

    2015-02-02

    We report a high efficiency, broadband terahertz (THz) modulator following a study of phthalocyanine-compound organic films irradiated with an external excitation laser. Both transmission and reflection modulations of each organic/silicon bilayers were measured using THz time-domain and continuous-wave systems. For very low intensities, the experimental results show that AlClPc/Si can achieve a high modulation factor for transmission and reflection, indicating that AlClPc/Si has a superior modulation efficiency compared with the other films (CuPc and SnCl{sub 2}Pc). In contrast, the strong attenuation of the transmitted and reflected THz waves revealed that a nonlinear absorption process takes place at the organic/silicon interface.

  9. Magnetic Helicity in Solar Dynamo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark; Augustson, Kyle C.; Zhang, Mei

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. Yet, despite its significance, magnetic helicity is often neglected in observational and theoretical studies of solar magnetism. This can be attributed to two factors; First, the calculation of the magnetic helicity is not unique; in general it depends on an electromagnetic guage through the magnetic vector potential. Second, unless it is explicitly calculated as part of the computational algorithm in numerical models, it is not always straightforward to obtain the magnetic vector potential. Here we consider gauge-invariant measures of the magnetic helicity and magnetic helicity flux and we describe how they can be computed from measurable quantities such as the magnetic field, the bulk plasma velocity, and the electrical current density. These measures can be applied to local Cartesian geometries as well as global spherical shells. Here we apply them to two global dynamo simulations, each exhibiting regular magnetic cycles. These include a convective MHD dynamo model and a 3-D Babcock-Leighton dynamo model. Both exhibit patterns of magnetic helicity evolution that reflect the global restructuring of the magnetic field over the

  10. Helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    Ideal fluid flow conserves a special quantity known as helicity, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. Helicity can be understood as a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines of the flow, providing an important geometric tool to study diverse physical systems such as turbulent fluids and plasmas. Since superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, a natural question arises: Is there an extra conserved quantity akin to helicity in superfluids? We address the question of a ''superfluid helicity'' theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  11. COMODO: an adaptive coclustering strategy to identify conserved coexpression modules between organisms.

    PubMed

    Zarrineh, Peyman; Fierro, Ana C; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; De Moor, Bart; Engelen, Kristof; Marchal, Kathleen

    2011-04-01

    Increasingly large-scale expression compendia for different species are becoming available. By exploiting the modularity of the coexpression network, these compendia can be used to identify biological processes for which the expression behavior is conserved over different species. However, comparing module networks across species is not trivial. The definition of a biologically meaningful module is not a fixed one and changing the distance threshold that defines the degree of coexpression gives rise to different modules. As a result when comparing modules across species, many different partially overlapping conserved module pairs across species exist and deciding which pair is most relevant is hard. Therefore, we developed a method referred to as conserved modules across organisms (COMODO) that uses an objective selection criterium to identify conserved expression modules between two species. The method uses as input microarray data and a gene homology map and provides as output pairs of conserved modules and searches for the pair of modules for which the number of sharing homologs is statistically most significant relative to the size of the linked modules. To demonstrate its principle, we applied COMODO to study coexpression conservation between the two well-studied bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. COMODO is available at: http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/∼kmarchal/Supplementary_Information_Zarrineh_2010/comodo/index.html. PMID:21149270

  12. A Helical Stairway Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Tom

    2008-01-01

    We answer a geometric question that was raised by the carpenter in charge of erecting helical stairs in a 10-story hospital. The explanation involves the equations of lines, planes, and helices in three-dimensional space. A brief version of the question is this: If A and B are points on a cylinder and the line segment AB is projected radially onto…

  13. Distortions in protein helices.

    PubMed

    Geetha, V

    1996-08-01

    alpha-helices are the most common secondary structures in observed proteins. However, they are not always found in ideal helical conformation and they often exhibit structural distortions. Quantification of these irregularities become essential in understanding the packing of helices and therefore, their role in the functional characteristics of the protein. The backbone torsions phi, psi are of limited utility in this endeavor, because distorted helices often maintain the backbone geometry. The local compensatory effects are responsible for the preservation of the entire hydrogen bond network of the helical stretch. Earlier descriptions of helical linearity and curvature rest mostly on approximation, thus motivating the search for a better method for understanding and quantifying helical irregularities. We developed a method which involves the rotation and superposition of identical repeating units of the protein by the quaternion method. The set of parameters derived from the rotation-superposition algorithm helps in identifying the bends and kinks which are not necessarily induced by unusual amino acids like proline. The quantification of irregularities of observed helices might lead to a better understanding of their packing interactions. PMID:8842770

  14. RM-SORN: a reward-modulated self-organizing recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Aswolinskiy, Witali; Pipa, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity plays an important role in learning and memory. Reward-modulation of plasticity offers an explanation for the ability of the brain to adapt its neural activity to achieve a rewarded goal. Here, we define a neural network model that learns through the interaction of Intrinsic Plasticity (IP) and reward-modulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). IP enables the network to explore possible output sequences and STDP, modulated by reward, reinforces the creation of the rewarded output sequences. The model is tested on tasks for prediction, recall, non-linear computation, pattern recognition, and sequence generation. It achieves performance comparable to networks trained with supervised learning, while using simple, biologically motivated plasticity rules, and rewarding strategies. The results confirm the importance of investigating the interaction of several plasticity rules in the context of reward-modulated learning and whether reward-modulated self-organization can explain the amazing capabilities of the brain. PMID:25852533

  15. RM-SORN: a reward-modulated self-organizing recurrent neural network

    PubMed Central

    Aswolinskiy, Witali; Pipa, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity plays an important role in learning and memory. Reward-modulation of plasticity offers an explanation for the ability of the brain to adapt its neural activity to achieve a rewarded goal. Here, we define a neural network model that learns through the interaction of Intrinsic Plasticity (IP) and reward-modulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). IP enables the network to explore possible output sequences and STDP, modulated by reward, reinforces the creation of the rewarded output sequences. The model is tested on tasks for prediction, recall, non-linear computation, pattern recognition, and sequence generation. It achieves performance comparable to networks trained with supervised learning, while using simple, biologically motivated plasticity rules, and rewarding strategies. The results confirm the importance of investigating the interaction of several plasticity rules in the context of reward-modulated learning and whether reward-modulated self-organization can explain the amazing capabilities of the brain. PMID:25852533

  16. Hypofractionated helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy of the prostate bed after prostatectomy with or without the pelvic lymph nodes - the PRIAMOS trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While evidence on safety and efficacy of primary hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer is accumulating, data on postoperative hypofractionated treatment of the prostate bed and of the pelvic lymph nodes is still scarce. This phase II trial was initiated to investigate safety and feasibility of hypofractionated treatment of the prostate bed alone or with the pelvic lymph nodes. Methods/design A total of 80 prostate cancer patients with the indication for adjuvant radiotherapy will be enrolled, where 40 patients with a low risk of lymph node involvement (arm 1) and another 40 patients with a high risk of lymph node involvement (arm 2) will each receive 54 Gy in 18 fractions to the prostate bed. Arm 2 will be given 45 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes additionally. Helical Tomotherapy and daily image guidance will be used. Discussion This trial was initiated to substantiate data on hypofractionated treatment of the prostate bed and generate first data on adjuvant hypofractionated radiotherapy of the pelvic lymph nodes. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01620710 PMID:23114055

  17. A computationally-efficient secondary organic aerosol module for three-dimensional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-04-01

    Accurately simulating secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in three-dimensional (3-D) air quality models is challenging due to the complexity of the physics and chemistry involved and the high computational demand required. A computationally-efficient yet accurate SOA module is necessary in 3-D applications for long-term simulations and real-time air quality forecasting. A coupled gas and aerosol box model (i.e., 0-D CMAQ-MADRID 2) is used to optimize relevant processes in order to develop such a SOA module. Solving the partitioning equations for condensable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and calculating their activity coefficients in the multicomponent mixtures are identified to be the most computationally-expensive processes. The two processes can be speeded up by relaxing the error tolerance levels and reducing the maximum number of iterations of the numerical solver for the partitioning equations for organic species; turning on organic-inorganic interactions only when the water content associated with organic compounds is significant; and parameterizing the calculation of activity coefficients for organic mixtures in the hydrophilic module. The optimal speed-up method can reduce the total CPU cost by up to a factor of 29.7 with ±15% deviation from benchmark results. These speedup methods are applicable to other SOA modules that are based on partitioning theories.

  18. Electro-Optic Modulator Based on Organic Planar Waveguide Integrated with Prism Coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the project, as they were formulated in the proposal, are the following: (1) Design and development of novel electro-optic modulator using single crystalline film of highly efficient electro-optic organic material integrated with prism coupler; (2) Experimental characterization of the figures-of-merit of the modulator. It is expected to perform with an extinction ratio of 10 dB at a driving signal of 5 V; (3) Conclusions on feasibility of the modulator as an element of data communication systems of future generations. The accomplishments of the project are the following: (1) The design of the electro-optic modulator based on a single crystalline film of organic material NPP has been explored; (2) The evaluation of the figures-of-merit of the electro-optic modulator has been performed; (3) Based on the results of characterization of the figures-of-merit, the conclusion was made that the modulator based on a thin film of NPP is feasible and has a great potential of being used in optic communication with a modulation bandwidth of up to 100 GHz and a driving voltage of the order of 3 to 5 V.

  19. Toward engineering functional organ modules by additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Marga, Francoise; Jakab, Karoly; Khatiwala, Chirag; Shepherd, Benjamin; Dorfman, Scott; Hubbard, Bradley; Colbert, Stephen; Gabor, Forgacs

    2012-06-01

    Tissue engineering is emerging as a possible alternative to methods aimed at alleviating the growing demand for replacement tissues and organs. A major pillar of most tissue engineering approaches is the scaffold, a biocompatible network of synthetic or natural polymers, which serves as an extracellular matrix mimic for cells. When the scaffold is seeded with cells it is supposed to provide the appropriate biomechanical and biochemical conditions for cell proliferation and eventual tissue formation. Numerous approaches have been used to fabricate scaffolds with ever-growing complexity. Recently, novel approaches have been pursued that do not rely on artificial scaffolds. The most promising ones utilize matrices of decellularized organs or methods based on multicellular self-assembly, such as sheet-based and bioprinting-based technologies. We briefly overview some of the scaffold-free approaches and detail one that employs biological self-assembly and bioprinting. We describe the technology and its specific applications to engineer vascular and nerve grafts. PMID:22406433

  20. Organic-based electro-optic modulators for microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, David

    As cutting-edge microwave photonic systems with higher complexity and stringent device requirement are being developed, the demand higher performance modulators with lower drive voltages and higher bandwidth is beginning to overtake the physical limitations of existing modulators based in LiNbO3. To address this growing demand, groundbreaking work in the field of organic electro-optic materials has been achieved over the past 10--15 years that has resulted in materials with electro-optic coefficients up to 10 times that of LiNbO3 and with demonstrated response times into the THz regime. This dissertation details work towards developing low drive-voltage, high bandwidth organic-based electro-optic modulators to support next generation microwave photonic systems. Initial efforts were focused on designing an organic electro-optic material based low frequency phase modulator and developing a fabrication procedure that successfully integrates the material without compromising its electro optic activity. Additionally a procedure for inducing the high electro-optic activity in the waveguide core through a process known as 'poling' was developed. The phase modulators were then characterized to confirm the expected high electro-optic activity and correspondingly low drive voltages. To transition from low frequency modulation to broadband operation it was necessary to gather some dielectric information of the waveguide materials for RF design. Because traditional RF dielectric constant measurements assume thick substrates on the order of 100s of microns, a modified microstrip ring resonator technique was developed to measure the dielectric constant of thin, polymer waveguide films on the order of 10 mum out to 110 GHz. A high frequency traveling wave microstrip modulator was then designed and optimized for operation up to 50 GHz, and efforts were turned towards RF packaging of the microstrip modulators for practical utilization and integration. To feed the RF signals a

  1. Prospective optimization of CT under tube current modulation: I. organ dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    In an environment in which computed tomography (CT) has become an indispensable diagnostic tool employed with great frequency, dose concerns at the population level have become a subject of public attention. In that regard, optimizing radiation dose has become a core problem to the CT community. As a fundamental step to optimize radiation dose, it is crucial to effectively quantify radiation dose for a given CT exam. Such dose estimates need to be patient-specific to reflect individual radiation burden. It further needs to be prospective so that the scanning parameters can be dynamically adjusted before the scan is performed. The purpose of this study was to prospectively estimate organ dose in abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose coefficients ( hfixed ) for fixed tube current were first estimated using a validated Monte Carlo simulation program and 58 computational phantoms. To account for the effect of TCM scheme, a weighted CTDIvol was computed for each organ based on the tube current modulation profile. The organ dose was predicted by multiplying the weighted CTDIvol with the organ dose coefficients ( hfixed ). To quantify prediction accuracy, each predicted organ dose was compared with organ dose simulated from Monte Carlo program with TCM profile explicitly modeled. The predicted organ dose showed good agreement with simulated organ dose across all organs and modulation strengths. For an average CTDIvol of a CT exam of 10 mGy, the absolute median error across all organs were 0.64 mGy (-0.21 and 0.97 for 25th and 75th percentiles, respectively). The percentage differences (normalized by CTDIvol of the exam) were within 15%. This study developed a quantitative model to predict organ dose under clinical abdominopelvic scans. Such information may aid in the optimization of CT protocols.

  2. A computationally-efficient secondary organic aerosol module for three-dimensional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-07-01

    Accurately simulating secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in three-dimensional (3-D) air quality models is challenging due to the complexity of the physics and chemistry involved and the high computational demand required. A computationally-efficient yet accurate SOA module is necessary in 3-D applications for long-term simulations and real-time air quality forecasting. A coupled gas and aerosol box model (i.e., 0-D CMAQ-MADRID 2) is used to optimize relevant processes in order to develop such a SOA module. Solving the partitioning equations for condensable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and calculating their activity coefficients in the multicomponent mixtures are identified to be the most computationally-expensive processes. The two processes can be speeded up by relaxing the error tolerance levels and reducing the maximum number of iterations of the numerical solver for the partitioning equations for organic species; conditionally activating organic-inorganic interactions; and parameterizing the calculation of activity coefficients for organic mixtures in the hydrophilic module. The optimal speed-up method can reduce the total CPU cost by up to a factor of 31.4 from benchmark under the rural conditions with 2 ppb isoprene and by factors of 10 71 under various test conditions with 2 10 ppb isoprene and >40% relative humidity while maintaining ±15% deviation. These speed-up methods are applicable to other SOA modules that are based on partitioning theories.

  3. Organ dose conversion coefficients for tube current modulated CT protocols for an adult population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Zhang, Yakun; Segars, William Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), patient-specific organ dose can be estimated using pre-calculated organ dose conversion coefficients (organ dose normalized by CTDIvol, h factor) database, taking into account patient size and scan coverage. The conversion coefficients have been previously estimated for routine body protocol classes, grouped by scan coverage, across an adult population for fixed tube current modulated CT. The coefficients, however, do not include the widely utilized tube current (mA) modulation scheme, which significantly impacts organ dose. This study aims to extend the h factors and the corresponding dose length product (DLP) to create effective dose conversion coefficients (k factor) database incorporating various tube current modulation strengths. Fifty-eight extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were included in this study representing population anatomy variation in clinical practice. Four mA profiles, representing weak to strong mA dependency on body attenuation, were generated for each phantom and protocol class. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the organ dose. The organ dose and effective dose was further normalized by CTDIvol and DLP to derive the h factors and k factors, respectively. The h factors and k factors were summarized in an exponential regression model as a function of body size. Such a population-based mathematical model can provide a comprehensive organ dose estimation given body size and CTDIvol. The model was integrated into an iPhone app XCATdose version 2, enhancing the 1st version based upon fixed tube current modulation. With the organ dose calculator, physicists, physicians, and patients can conveniently estimate organ dose.

  4. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed "lowest supercomplex" (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh's disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  5. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  6. Feasibility and efficacy of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer in comparison with conventionally fractionated 3D-CRT

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yixing; Shi, Shiming; Ye, Luxi; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Background The standard treatment for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still 60 Gy in conventional fractions combined with concurrent chemotherapy; however, the resulting local controls are disappointing. The aim of this study was to compare and assess the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated chemoradiotherapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional fractionation as opposed to using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Methods Sixty-nine patients with stage III (AJCC 7th edition) NSCLC who underwent definitive radiation treatment at our institution between July 2011 and November 2013 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered in the HT group (n=34), whereas 60 Gy in 30 fractions in the 3D-CRT group (n=35). Primary endpoints were toxicity, overall response rate, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results The median follow-up period was 26.4 months. V20 (P=0.005), V30 (P=0.001), V40 (P=0.004), mean lung dose (P=0.000) and max dose of spinal cord (P=0.005) were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group. There was no significant difference in the incidences of acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ grade 2 between the two groups, whereas the incidences of acute radiation esophagitis ≥ grade 2 were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.027). Two-year overall response rate was significantly higher in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.015). One- and 2-year OS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (95.0% and 68.7%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (85.5% and 47.6%, respectively; P=0.0236). One- and 2-year PFS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (57.8% and 26.3%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (32.7% and 11.4%, respectively; P=0.0351). Univariate analysis indicated that performance status (PS), T stage and radiotherapy technique were significant

  7. Modulation by Amino Acids: Toward Superior Control in the Synthesis of Zirconium Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Gutov, Oleksii V; Molina, Sonia; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Shafir, Alexandr

    2016-09-12

    The synthesis of zirconium metal-organic frameworks (Zr MOFs) modulated by various amino acids, including l-proline, glycine, and l-phenylalanine, is shown to be a straightforward approach toward functional-group incorporation and particle-size control. High yields in Zr-MOF synthesis are achieved by employing 5 equivalents of the modulator at 120 °C. At lower temperatures, the method provides a series of Zr MOFs with increased particle size, including many suitable for single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Furthermore, amino acid modulators can be incorporated at defect sites in Zr MOFs with an amino acid/ligand ratio of up to 1:1, depending on the ligand structure and reaction conditions. The MOFs obtained through amino acid modulation exhibit an improved CO2 -capture capacity relative to nonfunctionalized materials. PMID:27482849

  8. High efficiency THz-wave modulators based on conjugated polymer-based organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ting; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Guo-cui; Zang, Meng-di; Hou, Yan-bing; Shen, Jing-ling

    2016-02-01

    A study of the modulation mechanisms of conjugated polymer-based organic films and high-efficiency, broadband and all-optically controlled terahertz modulators based on these films is presented in this paper. Under very low-level external laser excitation, modulation efficiency of more than 99% is achieved using MEH-PPV/Si, PFO/Si and F8BT/Si bilayers. By analyzing the changes in the photo-excited carrier density and photoconductivity with changes in the external laser intensity, we introduce a nonlinear photo-induced absorption process to explain the strong attenuation mechanism for the transmitted terahertz waves. Finally, a simple THz communication test is carried out to demonstrate the potential future applications of the high-efficiency all-optically controlled terahertz modulator.

  9. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. J. B. Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.; Yeates, A. R.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  10. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDI{sub vol}-normalized-organ dose coefficients (h{sub organ}) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3

  11. A Half Century of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Using NASA's "OMNI" dataset, this work presents observations of the net magnetic helicity and the normalized helicity spectrum at 1 AU over the period 1965 - 2014. Past studies (1,2) reported that the helicity at large scales has a definite dominant sign organized with respect to the heliospheric current sheet, with negative helicities occurring north of the current sheet, and positive helicities south. The present study confirms this pattern and extends it by more than two solar cycles and past the most recent solar maximum. Particle scattering by turbulence with finite magnetic helicity is one of only two known particle transport mechanisms that are sensitive to particle charge sign and magnetic field polarity. Implications to cosmic ray transport will be discussed. References: (1) Bieber, Evenson, and Matthaeus, Geophys. Res. Lett. , Vol 14, p 864, 1987. (2) Smith and Bieber, Proc. 23rd Internat. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Calgary), Vol 3, p 493, 1993.

  12. Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a

  13. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460–7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18–70 years, weight range: 60–180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled

  14. Manifestation of helicity in one-dimensional iodobismuthate.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Souvik; Andrews, Alex P; Venugopal, Ajay

    2016-06-01

    We report here, the first example of an inorganic-organic hybrid material incorporating a helical iodobismuthate [BiI4]∞ templated by 2,6-diisopropylanilinium cations. The realisation of the helical iodobismuthate opens up the possibility of a wide range of physical properties among hybrid materials. PMID:27163408

  15. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Nayak, Pabitra K.; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-08-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500-1,700 cm-1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron-phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  16. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose coefficients (horgan) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3) to account

  17. The Dosimetric Effect of Intrafraction Prostate Motion on Step-and-Shoot Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans: Magnitude, Correlation With Motion Parameters, and Comparison With Helical Tomotherapy Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja M.; Chauhan, Bhavin; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the daily and cumulative dosimetric effects of intrafraction prostate motion on step-and-shoot (SNS) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, to evaluate the correlation of dosimetric effect with motion-based metrics, and to compare on a fraction-by-fraction basis the dosimetric effect induced in SNS and helical tomotherapy plans. Methods and Materials: Intrafraction prostate motion data from 486 fractions and 15 patients were available. A motion-encoded dose calculation technique was used to determine the variation of the clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 95%} values with respect to the static plan for SNS plans. The motion data were analyzed separately, and the correlation coefficients between various motion-based metrics and the dosimetric effect were determined. The dosimetric impact was compared with that incurred during another IMRT technique to assess correlation across different delivery techniques. Results: The mean ({+-}1 standard deviation [SD]) change in D{sub 95%} in the CTV over all 486 fractions was 0.2 {+-} 0.5%. After the delivery of five and 12 fractions, the mean ({+-}1 SD) changes over the 15 patients in CTV D{sub 95%} were 0.0 {+-} 0.2% and 0.1 {+-} 0.2%, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the CTV D{sub 95%} changes and the evaluated motion metrics were, in general, poor and ranged from r = -0.2 to r = -0.39. Dosimetric effects introduced by identical motion in SNS and helical tomotherapy IMRT techniques were poorly correlated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.32 for the CTV. Conclusions: The dosimetric impact of intrafraction prostate motion on the CTV is, in general, small. In only 4% of all fractions did the dosimetric consequence exceed 1% in the CTV. As expected, the cumulative effect was further reduced with fractionation. The poor correlations between the calculated motion parameters and the subsequent dosimetric effect implies that motion-based thresholds are of limited value in

  18. From Highly Crystalline to Outer Surface-Functionalized Covalent Organic Frameworks—A Modulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Crystallinity and porosity are of central importance for many properties of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), including adsorption, diffusion, and electronic transport. We have developed a new method for strongly enhancing both aspects through the introduction of a modulating agent in the synthesis. This modulator competes with one of the building blocks during the solvothermal COF growth, resulting in highly crystalline frameworks with greatly increased domain sizes reaching several hundreds of nanometers. The obtained materials feature fully accessible pores with an internal surface area of over 2000 m2 g–1. Compositional analysis via NMR spectroscopy revealed that the COF-5 structure can form over a wide range of boronic acid-to-catechol ratios, thus producing frameworks with compositions ranging from highly boronic acid-deficient to networks with catechol voids. Visualization of an −SH-functionalized modulating agent via iridium staining revealed that the COF domains are terminated by the modulator. Using functionalized modulators, this synthetic approach thus also provides a new and facile method for the external surface functionalization of COF domains, providing accessible sites for post-synthetic modification reactions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this concept by covalently attaching fluorescent dyes and hydrophilic polymers to the COF surface. We anticipate that the realization of highly crystalline COFs with the option of additional surface functionality will render the modulation concept beneficial for a range of applications, including gas separations, catalysis, and optoelectronics. PMID:26694214

  19. From Highly Crystalline to Outer Surface-Functionalized Covalent Organic Frameworks--A Modulation Approach.

    PubMed

    Calik, Mona; Sick, Torben; Dogru, Mirjam; Döblinger, Markus; Datz, Stefan; Budde, Harald; Hartschuh, Achim; Auras, Florian; Bein, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Crystallinity and porosity are of central importance for many properties of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), including adsorption, diffusion, and electronic transport. We have developed a new method for strongly enhancing both aspects through the introduction of a modulating agent in the synthesis. This modulator competes with one of the building blocks during the solvothermal COF growth, resulting in highly crystalline frameworks with greatly increased domain sizes reaching several hundreds of nanometers. The obtained materials feature fully accessible pores with an internal surface area of over 2000 m(2) g(-1). Compositional analysis via NMR spectroscopy revealed that the COF-5 structure can form over a wide range of boronic acid-to-catechol ratios, thus producing frameworks with compositions ranging from highly boronic acid-deficient to networks with catechol voids. Visualization of an -SH-functionalized modulating agent via iridium staining revealed that the COF domains are terminated by the modulator. Using functionalized modulators, this synthetic approach thus also provides a new and facile method for the external surface functionalization of COF domains, providing accessible sites for post-synthetic modification reactions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this concept by covalently attaching fluorescent dyes and hydrophilic polymers to the COF surface. We anticipate that the realization of highly crystalline COFs with the option of additional surface functionality will render the modulation concept beneficial for a range of applications, including gas separations, catalysis, and optoelectronics. PMID:26694214

  20. Significance of bending restraints for the stability of helical polymer conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Matthew J.; Bachmann, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We performed parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the formation and stability of helical tertiary structures for flexible and semiflexible polymers, employing a generic coarse-grained model. Structural conformations exhibit helical order with tertiary ordering into single helices, multiple helical segments organized into bundles, and disorganized helical arrangements. For both bending-restrained semiflexible and bending-unrestrained flexible helical polymers, the stability of the structural phases is discussed systematically by means of hyperphase diagrams parametrized by suitable order parameters, temperature, and torsion strength. This exploration lends insight into the restricted flexibility of biological polymers such as double-stranded DNA and proteins.

  1. Helical tomotherapy superficial dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Chester R.; Seibert, Rebecca M.; Robison, Benjamin; Mitchell, Martha

    2007-08-15

    Helical tomotherapy is a treatment technique that is delivered from a 6 MV fan beam that traces a helical path while the couch moves linearly into the bore. In order to increase the treatment delivery dose rate, helical tomotherapy systems do not have a flattening filter. As such, the dose distributions near the surface of the patient may be considerably different from other forms of intensity-modulated delivery. The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions near the surface for helical tomotherapy plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom. A hypothetical planning target volume (PTV) was defined on an anthropomorphic head phantom to simulate a 2.0 Gy per fraction IMRT parotid-sparing head and neck treatment of the upper neck nodes. A total of six target volumes were created with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm of separation between the surface of the phantom and the outer edge of the PTV. Superficial doses were measured for each of the treatment deliveries using film placed in the head phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the phantom's surface underneath an immobilization mask. In the 0 mm test case where the PTV extends to the phantom surface, the mean TLD dose was 1.73{+-}0.10 Gy (or 86.6{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose). The measured superficial dose decreases to 1.23{+-}0.10 Gy (61.5{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose) for a PTV-surface separation of 5 mm. The doses measured by the TLDs indicated that the tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimates superficial doses by 8.9{+-}3.2%. The radiographic film dose for the 0 mm test case was 1.73{+-}0.07 Gy, as compared to the calculated dose of 1.78{+-}0.05 Gy. Given the results of the TLD and film measurements, the superficial calculated doses are overestimated between 3% and 13%. Without the use of bolus, tumor volumes that extend to the surface may be underdosed. As such, it is recommended that bolus be added for these

  2. Minimizing a tricky situation in breast irradiation with helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Zeverino, Michele; Migliaccio, Fernanda; Torielli, Paolo; Angelini, Veronica; Sciacero, Piera; Girelli, Giuseppe; Cante, Domenico; Arrichiello, Cecilia; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Numico, Gianmauro; La Porta, Maria Rosa; Tofani, Santi; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    We report on a patient with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant intensity-modulated whole breast and lymph node irradiation with static angle tomotherapy (TomoDirect), who experienced a traumatic ipsilateral humeral fracture and was able to continue radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy and daily dosimetric monitoring by means of the Planned Adaptive module. PMID:24852873

  3. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W Paul; Dixon, Robert L; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-21

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460-7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18-70 years, weight range: 60-180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ([Formula: see text]) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate [Formula: see text] values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying [Formula: see text] with the organ dose coefficients ([Formula: see text]). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The discrepancy between the estimated organ dose and dose simulated using TCM Monte Carlo program was quantified. We further compared the

  4. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  5. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  6. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  7. Josephson junction through a disordered topological insulator with helical magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Alexander; Alidoust, Mohammad; Loss, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We study supercurrent and proximity vortices in a Josephson junction made of disordered surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator with a proximity induced in-plane helical magnetization. In a regime where the rotation period of helical magnetization is larger than the junction width, we find supercurrent 0 -π crossovers as a function of junction thickness, magnetization strength, and parameters inherent to the helical modulation and surface states. The supercurrent reversals are associated with proximity induced vortices, nucleated along the junction width, where the number of vortices and their locations can be manipulated by means of the superconducting phase difference and the parameters mentioned above.

  8. Organ Function as a Modulator of Organ Formation: Lessons from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michelle M; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2016-01-01

    Organogenesis requires an intricate balance between cell differentiation and tissue growth to generate a complex and fully functional organ. However, organogenesis is not solely driven by genetic inputs, as the development of several organ systems requires their own functionality. This theme is particularly evident in the developing heart as progression of cardiac development is accompanied by increased and altered hemodynamic forces. In the absence or disruption of these forces, heart development is abnormal, suggesting that the heart must sense these changes and respond appropriately. Here, we discuss concepts of how embryonic heart function contributes to heart development using lessons learned mostly from studies in zebrafish. PMID:26969993

  9. Flexible organic tandem solar modules: a story of up-scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyropoulos, George D.; Kubis, Peter; Li, Ning; Lucera, Luca; Salvador, Michael; Baran, Derya; Machui, Florian; Ameri, Tayebeh; Voigt, Monika M.; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2014-10-01

    The competition in the field of solar energy between Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) and several Inorganic Photovoltaic technologies is continuously increasing to reach the ultimate purpose of energy supply from inexpensive and easily manufactured solar cell units. Solution-processed printing techniques on flexible substrates attach a tremendous opportunity to the OPVs for the accomplishment of low-cost and large area applications. Furthermore, tandem architectures came to boost up even more OPVs by increasing the photon-harvesting properties of the device. In this work, we demonstrate the road of realizing flexible organic tandem solar modules constructed by a fully roll-to-roll compatible processing. The modules exhibit an efficiency of 5.4% with geometrical fill factors beyond 80% and minimized interconnection-resistance losses. The processing involves low temperature (<70 °C), coating methods compatible with slot die coating and high speed and precision laser patterning.

  10. Analysis of peripheral doses for base of tongue treatment by linear accelerator and helical TomoTherapy IMRT.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian Richard; Lamba, Michael A S; Elson, Howard R

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral doses to various organs from a typical head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered by linear accelerator (linac) and helical TomoTherapy. Multiple human CT data sets were used to segment critical structures and organs at risk, fused and adjusted to an anthropomorphic phantom. Eighteen contours were designated for thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) placement. Following the RTOG IMRT Protocol 0522, treatment of the primary tumor and involved nodes (PTV70) and subclinical disease sites (PTV56) was planned utilizing IMRT to 70Gy and 56 Gy. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were produced for linac and TomoTherapy treatments. TLDs were placed and each treatment plan was delivered to the anthropomorphic phantom four times. Within 2.5 cm (one helical TomoTherapy field width) superior and inferior to the field edges, normal tissue doses were on average 45% lower using linear accelerator. Beyond 2.5 cm, the helical TomoTherapy normal tissue dose was an average of 52% lower. The majority of points proved to be statistically different using the Student's t-test with p > 0.05. Using one method of calculation, probability of a secondary malignancy was 5.88% for the linear accelerator and 4.08% for helical TomoTherapy. Helical TomoTherapy delivers more dose than a linac immediately above and below the treatment field, contributing to the higher peripheral doses adjacent to the field. At distances beyond one field width (where leakage is dominant), helical TomoTherapy doses are lower than linear accelerator doses. PMID:20717081

  11. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Tejpal

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.

  12. Helical Tomotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Whole Pelvis Irradiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Dosimetric, Normal Tissue Complication Probability, and Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto; Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Lomax, Antony J.; Amichetti, Maurizio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Soukup, Martin; Schneider, Ralf; Hug, Eugen; Di Muzio, Nadia; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa) patients. Methods and Materials: The plans of 8 patients with HRPCa treated with HT were compared with IMPT plans with two quasilateral fields set up (-100{sup o}; 100{sup o}) and optimized with the Hyperion treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 74.2 Gy/Gy relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in 28 fractions on planning target volumes (PTVs)3-4 (P + proximal seminal vesicles), 65.5 Gy/Gy(RBE) on PTV2 (distal seminal vesicles and rectum/prostate overlapping), and 51.8 Gy/Gy(RBE) to PTV1 (pelvic lymph nodes). Normal tissue calculation probability (NTCP) calculations were performed for the rectum, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was estimated for the bowel cavity, penile bulb and bladder. Results: A slightly better PTV coverage and homogeneity of target dose distribution with IMPT was found: the percentage of PTV volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%}) was on average >97% in HT and >99% in IMPT. The conformity indexes were significantly lower for protons than for photons, and there was a statistically significant reduction of the IMPT dosimetric parameters, up to 50 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the rectum and bowel and 60 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the bladder. The NTCP values for the rectum were higher in HT for all the sets of parameters, but the gain was small and in only a few cases statistically significant. Conclusions: Comparable PTV coverage was observed. Based on NTCP calculation, IMPT is expected to allow a small reduction in rectal toxicity, and a significant dosimetric gain with IMPT, both in medium-dose and in low-dose range in all OARs, was observed.

  13. Patterns of morphological integration in marine modular organisms: supra-module organization in branching octocoral colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Juan Armando; Lasker, Howard R

    2003-01-01

    Despite the relative simplicity of their modular growth, marine invertebrates such as arborescent gorgonian octocorals (Octocorallia: Cnidaria) generate complex colonial forms. Colony form in these taxa is a consequence of modular (polyp) replication, and if there is a tight integration among modular and supramodular traits (e.g. polyp aperture, inter-polyp spacing, branch thickness, internode and branch length), then changes at the module level may lead to changes in colony architecture. Alternatively, different groups of traits may evolve semi-independently (or conditionally independent). To examine the patterns of integration among morphological traits in Caribbean octocorals, we compared five morphological traits across 21 species, correcting for the effects of phylogenetic relationships among the taxa. Graphical modelling and phylogenetic independence contrasts among the five morphological characters indicate two groups of integrated traits based on whether they were polyp- or colony-level traits. Although all characters exhibited bivariate associations, multivariate analyses (partial correlation coefficients) showed the strongest integration among the colony-level characters (internode distance and branch length). It is a quantitative demonstration that branching characters within the octocorals studied are independent of characters of the polyps. Despite the universally recognized modularity of octocorals at the level of polyps, branching during colony development may represent an emergent level of integration and modularity. PMID:14561292

  14. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  15. Antenna-coupled silicon-organic hybrid integrated photonic crystal modulator for broadband electromagnetic wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Hosseini, Amir; Subbaraman, Harish; Wang, Shiyi; Zhan, Qiwen; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.; Chung, Chi-jui; Yan, Hai; Pan, Zeyu; Nelson, Robert L.; Lee, Charles Y.; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    The detection and measurement of electromagnetic fields have attracted significant amounts of attention in recent years. Traditional electronic electromagnetic field sensors use large active conductive probes which perturb the field to be measured and also make the devices bulky. In order to address these problems, integrated photonic electromagnetic field sensors have been developed, in which an optical signal is modulated by an RF signal collected by a miniaturized antenna. In this work, we design, fabricate and characterize a compact, broadband and highly sensitive integrated photonic electromagnetic field sensor based on a silicon-organic hybrid modulator driven by a bowtie antenna. The large electro-optic (EO) coefficient of organic polymer, the slow-light effects in the silicon slot photonic crystal waveguide (PCW), and the broadband field enhancement provided by the bowtie antenna, are all combined to enhance the interaction of microwaves and optical waves, enabling a high EO modulation efficiency and thus a high sensitivity. The modulator is experimentally demonstrated with a record-high effective in-device EO modulation efficiency of r33=1230pm/V. Modulation response up to 40GHz is measured, with a 3-dB bandwidth of 11GHz. The slot PCW has an interaction length of 300μm, and the bowtie antenna has an area smaller than 1cm2. The bowtie antenna in the device is experimentally demonstrated to have a broadband characteristics with a central resonance frequency of 10GHz, as well as a large beam width which enables the detection of electromagnetic waves from a large range of incident angles. The sensor is experimentally demonstrated with a minimum detectable electromagnetic power density of 8.4mW/m2 at 8.4GHz, corresponding to a minimum detectable electric field of 2.5V/m and an ultra-high sensitivity of 0.000027V/m Hz-1/2 ever demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first silicon-organic hybrid device and also the first PCW device used for the

  16. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles. PMID:26367106

  17. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  18. CURRENT AND KINETIC HELICITY OF LONG-LIVED ACTIVITY COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Komm, Rudolf; Gosain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We study long-lived activity complexes and their current helicity at the solar surface and their kinetic helicity below the surface. The current helicity has been determined from synoptic vector magnetograms from the NSO/SOLIS facility, and the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows has been determined with ring-diagram analysis applied to full-disk Dopplergrams from NSO/GONG and SDO/HMI. Current and kinetic helicity of activity complexes follow the hemispheric helicity rule with mainly positive values (78%; 78%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 31%) in the southern hemisphere and negative ones (80%; 93%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 22% and 14%, respectively) in the northern hemisphere. The locations with the dominant sign of kinetic helicity derived from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and SDO/HMI data are more organized than those of the secondary sign even if they are not part of an activity complex, while locations with the secondary sign are more fragmented. This is the case for both hemispheres even for the northern one where it is not as obvious visually due to the large amount of magnetic activity present as compared to the southern hemisphere. The current helicity shows a similar behavior. The dominant sign of current helicity is the same as that of kinetic helicity for the majority of the activity complexes (83% with a 95% confidence level of 15%). During the 24 Carrington rotations analyzed here, there is at least one longitude in each hemisphere where activity complexes occur repeatedly throughout the epoch. These ''active'' longitudes are identifiable as locations of strong current and kinetic helicity of the same sign.

  19. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule.

    PubMed

    Slade, Michael C; Raker, Jeffrey R; Kobilka, Brandon; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2014-01-14

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world. PMID:24501431

  20. Image-guided total marrow and total lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: Schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey; Liu, An; Olivera, Gustavo; Somlo, George

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique to spare normal tissue and allow dose escalation in total body irradiation (TBI). We have developed intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for the total marrow irradiation (TMI), total lymphatic irradiation, or total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: For TBI, we typically use 12 Gy in 10 fractions delivered at an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD). Using helical tomotherapy, it is possible to deliver equally effective doses to the bone marrow and lymphatics while sparing normal organs to a significant degree. In the TMI patients, whole body skeletal bone, including the ribs and sternum, comprise the treatment target. In the total lymphatic irradiation, the target is expanded to include the spleen and major lymph node areas. Sanctuary sites for disease (brain and testes) are included when clinically indicated. Spared organs include the lungs, esophagus, parotid glands, eyes, oral cavity, liver, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, bladder, and ovaries. Results: With TBI, all normal organs received the TBI dose; with TMI, total lymphatic irradiation, and total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation, the visceral organs are spared. For the first 6 patients treated with TMI, the median dose to organs at risk averaged 51% lower than would be achieved with TBI. By putting greater weight on the avoidance of specific organs, greater sparing was possible. Conclusion: Sparing of normal tissues and dose escalation is possible using helical tomotherapy. Late effects such as radiation pneumonitis, veno-occlusive disease, cataracts, neurocognitive effects, and the development of second tumors should be diminished in severity and frequency according to the dose reduction realized for the organs at risk.

  1. Au nanorod helical superstructures with designed chirality.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Lu, Xuxing; Shen, Chenqi; Ke, Yonggang; Ni, Weihai; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-01-14

    A great challenge for nanotechnology is to controllably organize anisotropic nanomaterials into well-defined three-dimensional superstructures with customized properties. Here we successfully constructed anisotropic Au nanorod (AuNR) helical superstructures (helices) with tailored chirality in a programmable manner. By designing the 'X' pattern of the arrangement of DNA capturing strands (15nt) on both sides of a two-dimensional DNA origami template, AuNRs functionalized with the complementary DNA sequences were positioned on the origami and were assembled into AuNR helices with the origami intercalated between neighboring AuNRs. Left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) AuNR helices were conveniently accomplished by solely tuning the mirrored-symmetric 'X' patterns of capturing strands on the origami. The inter-rod distance was precisely defined as 14 nm and inter-rod angle as 45°, thus a full helix contains 9 AuNRs with its length up to about 220 nm. By changing the AuNR/origami molar ratio in the assembly system, the average number of AuNR in the helices was tuned from 2 to 4 and 9. Intense chiroptical activities arose from the longest AuNR helices with a maximum anisotropy factor of ∼0.02, which is highly comparable to the reported macroscopic AuNR assemblies. We expect that our strategy of origami templated assembly of anisotropic chiral superstructures would inspire the bottom-up fabrication of optically active nanostructures and shed light on a variety of applications, such as chiral fluids, chiral signal amplification, and fluorescence combined chiral spectroscopy. PMID:25516475

  2. Vitamin D Treatment Modulates Organic Dust-Induced Cellular and Airway Inflammatory Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Gregory A.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Romberger, Debra J.; Reiff, Daniel; McCaskill, Michael; Bauer, Christopher; Gleason, Angela M.; Poole, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to organic dusts elicits airway inflammatory diseases. Vitamin D recently has been associated with various airway inflammatory diseases, but its role in agricultural organic dust exposures is unknown. This study investigated whether vitamin D reduces organic dust-induced inflammatory outcomes in cell culture and animal models. Organic dust extracts obtained from swine confinement facilities induced neutrophil chemokine production (human IL-8, murine CXCL1/CXCL2). Neutrophil chemokine induction was reduced in human blood monocytes, human bronchial epithelial cells and murine lung slices pretreated with 1,25-(OH)2D3. Intranasal inhalation of organic dust extract induced neutrophil influx and CXCL1/CXCL2 release also was decreased in mice fed a relatively high vitamin D diet as compared to mice fed a low vitamin D diet. These findings were associated with reduced tracheal epithelial cell PKCα and PKCε activity and whole lung TLR2 and TLR4 gene expression. Collectively, vitamin D plays a role in modulating organic dust-induced airway inflammatory outcomes. PMID:23281135

  3. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three‐dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity‐modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart‐transplanted oncologic patients. PMID:27148425

  4. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Francesca M; Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-04-26

    Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart-transplanted oncologic patients. PMID:27148425

  5. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Nayak, Pabitra K.; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-01-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials. PMID:26246039

  6. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Lovrincic, Robert; Yu, Xi; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J; Rezus, Yves L A; Nayak, Pabitra K; Fonari, Alexandr; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Cahen, David

    2015-01-01

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500-1,700 cm(-1) region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron-phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials. PMID:26246039

  7. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average ..beta.. and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned.

  8. Modulation of volatile organic compound formation in the Mycodiesel-producing endophyte Hypoxylon sp. CI-4.

    PubMed

    Ul-Hassan, Syed Riyaz; Strobel, Gary A; Booth, Eric; Knighton, Berk; Floerchinger, Cody; Sears, Joe

    2012-02-01

    An endophytic Hypoxylon sp. (strain CI-4) producing a wide spectrum of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including 1,8-cineole, 1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene and cyclohexane, 1,2,4-tris(methylene), was selected as a candidate for the modulation of VOC production. This was done in order to learn if the production of these and other VOCs can be affected by using agents that may modulate the epigenetics of the fungus. Many of the VOCs made by this organism are of interest because of their high energy densities and thus the potential they might have as Mycodiesel fuels. Strain CI-4 was exposed to the epigenetic modulators suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, a histone deacetylase) and 5-azacytidine (AZA, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor). After these treatments the organism displayed striking cultural changes, including variations in pigmentation, growth rates and odour, in addition to significant differences in the bioactivities of the VOCs. The resulting variants were designated CI4-B, CI4-AZA and CI4-SAHA. GC/MS analyses of the VOCs produced by the variants showed considerable variation, with the emergence of several compounds not previously observed in the wild-type, particularly an array of tentatively identified terpenes such as α-thujene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, α-terpinolene and β-selinene, in addition to several primary and secondary alkanes, alkenes, organic acids and derivatives of benzene. Proton transfer reaction mass spectroscopic analyses showed a marked increase in the ratio of ethanol (mass 47) to the total mass of all other ionizable VOCs, from ~0.6 in the untreated strain CI-4 to ~0.8 in CI-4 grown in the presence of AZA. Strain CI4-B was created by exposure of the fungus to 100 µM SAHA; upon removal of the epigenetic modulator from the culture medium, it did not revert to the wild-type phenotype. Results of this study have implications for understanding why there may be a wide range of VOCs found in various isolates of this fungus in nature

  9. Chemically Stable Covalent Organic Framework (COF)-Polybenzimidazole Hybrid Membranes: Enhanced Gas Separation through Pore Modulation.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Bishnu P; Chaudhari, Harshal D; Banerjee, Rahul; Kharul, Ulhas K

    2016-03-24

    Highly flexible, TpPa-1@PBI-BuI and TpBD@PBI-BuI hybrid membranes based on chemically stable covalent organic frameworks (COFs) could be obtained with the polymer. The loading obtained was substantially higher (50 %) than generally observed with MOFs. These hybrid membranes show an exciting enhancement in permeability (about sevenfold) with appreciable separation factors for CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4. Further, we found that with COF pore modulation, the gas permeability can be systematically enhanced. PMID:26865381

  10. Extraordinary Separation of Acetylene-Containing Mixtures with Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open O Donor Sites and Tunable Robustness through Control of the Helical Chain Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zizhu; Zhang, Zhangjing; Liu, Lizhen; Li, Ziyin; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Chen, Banglin; Krishna, Rajamani; Xiang, Shengchang

    2016-04-11

    Acetylene separation is a very important but challenging industrial separation task. Here, through the solvothermal reaction of CuI and 5-triazole isophthalic acid in different solvents, two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, FJU-21 and FJU-22) with open O donor sites and controllable robustness have been obtained for acetylene separation. They contain the same paddle-wheel {Cu2 (COO2 )4 } nodes and metal-ligand connection modes, but with different helical chains as secondary building units (SBUs), leading to different structural robustness for the MOFs. FJU-21 and FJU-22 are the first examples in which the MOFs' robustness is controlled by adjusting the helical chain SBUs. Good robustness gives the activated FJU-22 a, which has higher surface area and gas uptakes than the flexible FJU-21 a. Importantly, FJU-22 a shows extraordinary separation of acetylene mixtures under ambient conditions. The separation capacity of FJU-22 a for 50:50 C2 H2 /CO2 mixtures is about twice that of the high-capacity HOF-3, and its actual separation selectivity for C2 H2 /C2 H4 mixtures containing 1 % acetylene is the highest among reported porous materials. Based on first-principles calculations, the extraordinary separation performance of C2 H2 for FJU-22 a was attributed to hydrogen-bonding interactions between the C2 H2 molecules with the open O donors on the wall, which provide better recognition ability for C2 H2 than other functional sites, including open metal sites and amino groups. PMID:26934040

  11. Biomimetic Hierarchical Assembly of Helical Supraparticles from Chiral Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunlong; Marson, Ryan L; van Anders, Greg; Zhu, Jian; Ma, Guanxiang; Ercius, Peter; Sun, Kai; Yeom, Bongjun; Glotzer, Sharon C; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-03-22

    Chiroptical materials found in butterflies, beetles, stomatopod crustaceans, and other creatures are attributed to biocomposites with helical motifs and multiscale hierarchical organization. These structurally sophisticated materials self-assemble from primitive nanoscale building blocks, a process that is simpler and more energy efficient than many top-down methods currently used to produce similarly sized three-dimensional materials. Here, we report that molecular-scale chirality of a CdTe nanoparticle surface can be translated to nanoscale helical assemblies, leading to chiroptical activity in the visible electromagnetic range. Chiral CdTe nanoparticles coated with cysteine self-organize around Te cores to produce helical supraparticles. D-/L-Form of the amino acid determines the dominant left/right helicity of the supraparticles. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with a helical pair-potential confirm the assembly mechanism and the origin of its enantioselectivity, providing a framework for engineering three-dimensional chiral materials by self-assembly. The helical supraparticles further self-organize into lamellar crystals with liquid crystalline order, demonstrating the possibility of hierarchical organization and with multiple structural motifs and length scales determined by molecular-scale asymmetry of nanoparticle interactions. PMID:26900920

  12. Assessment of an organ-based tube current modulation in thoracic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Sugai, Mai; Toyoda, Asami; Koshida, Haruka; Sakuta, Keita; Takata, Tadanori; Koshida, Kichiro; Iida, Hiroji; Matsui, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, specific computed tomography (CT) scanners have been equipped with organ-based tube current modulation (TCM) technology. It is possible that organ-based TCM will replace the conventional dose-reduction technique of reducing the effective milliampere-second. The aim of this study was to determine if organ-based TCM could reduce radiation exposure to the breasts without compromising the image uniformity and beam hardening effect in thoracic CT examinations. Breast and skin radiation doses and the absorbed radiation dose distribution within a single section were measured with an anthropomorphic phantom and radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters using four approaches to thoracic CT (reference, organ-based TCM, copper shielding, and the combination of the above two techniques, hereafter referred to as the combination technique). The CT value and noise level were measured using the same calibration phantom. Organ-based TCM and copper shielding reduced radiation doses to the breast by 23.7% and 21.8%, respectively. However, the CT value increased, especially in the anterior region, using copper shielding. In contrast, the CT value and noise level barely increased using organ-based TCM. The combination technique reduced the radiation dose to the breast by 38.2%, but greatly increased the absorbed radiation dose from the central to the posterior regions. Moreover, the CT value increased in the anterior region and the noise level increased by more than 10% in the entire region. Therefore, organ-based TCM can reduce radiation doses to breasts with only small increases in noise levels, making it preferable for specific groups of patients, such as children and young women. PMID:22402390

  13. A common rejection module (CRM) for acute rejection across multiple organs identifies novel therapeutics for organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Purvesh; Roedder, Silke; Kimura, Naoyuki; De Vusser, Katrien; Morgan, Alexander A.; Gong, Yongquan; Fischbein, Michael P.; Robbins, Robert C.; Naesens, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Using meta-analysis of eight independent transplant datasets (236 graft biopsy samples) from four organs, we identified a common rejection module (CRM) consisting of 11 genes that were significantly overexpressed in acute rejection (AR) across all transplanted organs. The CRM genes could diagnose AR with high specificity and sensitivity in three additional independent cohorts (794 samples). In another two independent cohorts (151 renal transplant biopsies), the CRM genes correlated with the extent of graft injury and predicted future injury to a graft using protocol biopsies. Inferred drug mechanisms from the literature suggested that two FDA-approved drugs (atorvastatin and dasatinib), approved for nontransplant indications, could regulate specific CRM genes and reduce the number of graft-infiltrating cells during AR. We treated mice with HLA-mismatched mouse cardiac transplant with atorvastatin and dasatinib and showed reduction of the CRM genes, significant reduction of graft-infiltrating cells, and extended graft survival. We further validated the beneficial effect of atorvastatin on graft survival by retrospective analysis of electronic medical records of a single-center cohort of 2,515 renal transplant patients followed for up to 22 yr. In conclusion, we identified a CRM in transplantation that provides new opportunities for diagnosis, drug repositioning, and rational drug design. PMID:24127489

  14. Hydrodynamic interactions between rotating helices.

    PubMed

    Kim, MunJu; Powers, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria use rotating helical flagella to swim. At this scale, viscous effects dominate inertia, and there are significant hydrodynamic interactions between nearby helices. These interactions cause the flagella to bundle during the "runs" of bacterial chemotaxis. Here we use slender-body theory to solve for the flow fields generated by rigid helices rotated by stationary motors. We determine how the hydrodynamic forces and torques depend on phase and phase difference, show that rigid helices driven at constant torque do not synchronize, and solve for the flows. We also use symmetry arguments based on kinematic reversibility to show that for two rigid helices rotating with zero phase difference, there is no time-averaged attractive or repulsive force between the helices. PMID:15244620

  15. Conservation of helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    Helicity arises as a special conserved quantity in ideal fluids, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. As a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines, Helicity provides an important tool for studying a wide variety of physical systems such as plasmas and turbulent fluids. Superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, making it natural to ask whether their knottedness is similarly preserved. We address the conservation of helicity in superfluids theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  16. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  17. Total scalp irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Nigel . E-mail: nporton@facstaff.wisc.edu; Jaradat, Hazim; Welsh, James; Tome, Wolfgang

    2005-09-30

    Homogeneous irradiation of the scalp poses technical and dosimetric challenges due to the extensive, superficial, curved treatment volume. Conventional treatments on a linear accelerator use multiple matched electron fields or a combination of electron and photon fields. Problems with these techniques include dose heterogeneity in the target due to varying source-to-skin distance (SSD) and angle of beam incidence, significant dose to the brain, and the potential for overdose or underdose at match lines between the fields. Linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans have similar problems. This work presents treatment plans for total scalp irradiation on a helical tomotherapy machine. Helical tomotherapy is well-suited for scalp irradiation because it has the ability to deliver beamlets that are tangential to the scalp at all points. Helical tomotherapy also avoids problems associated with field matching and use of more than one modality. Tomotherapy treatment plans were generated and are compared to plans for treatment of the same patient on a linac. The resulting tomotherapy plans show more homogeneous target dose and improved critical structure dose when compared to state-of-the-art linac techniques. Target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the best tomotherapy plan was slightly higher than for the linac plan, while the volume of brain tissue receiving over 30 Gy was reduced by two thirds. Furthermore, the tomotherapy plan can be more reliably delivered than linac treatments, because the patient is aligned prior to each treatment based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)

  18. Helical tomotherapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Balog, John; Soisson, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed. PMID:18406907

  19. Helical Tomotherapy Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, John Soisson, Emilie

    2008-05-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed.

  20. Differentially organized top-down modulation of prepulse inhibition of startle.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2011-09-21

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle is the suppression of the startle reflex when a weaker sensory stimulus (the prepulse) shortly precedes the startling stimulus. PPI can be attentionally enhanced in both humans and laboratory animals. This study investigated whether the following three forebrain structures, which are critical for initial cortical processing of auditory signals, auditory fear conditioning/memories, and spatial attention, respectively, play a role in the top-down modulation of PPI in rats: the primary auditory cortex (A1), lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA), and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). The results show that, under the noise-masking condition, PPI was enhanced by fear conditioning of the prepulse in a prepulse-specific manner, and the conditioning-induced PPI enhancement was further increased by perceptual separation between the conditioned prepulse and the noise masker. Reversibly blocking glutamate receptors in the A1 with 2 mm kynurenic acid eliminated both the conditioning-induced and perceptual separation-induced PPI enhancements. Blocking the LA eliminated the conditioning-induced but not the perceptual separation-induced PPI enhancement, and blocking the PPC specifically eliminated the perceptual separation-induced PPI enhancement. The two types of PPI enhancements were also eliminated by the extinction manipulation. Thus, the top-down modulation of PPI is differentially organized and depends on operations of various forebrain structures. Due to the fine-tuned modulation by higher-order cognitive processes, functions of PPI can be more flexible to complex environments. The top-down enhancements of PPI in rats are also useful for modeling some mental disorders, such as schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:21940455

  1. Helical Tomotherapy for Parotid Gland Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Kyu; Rosen, Isaac I.; Gibbons, John P.; Fields, Robert S.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a postoperative treatment for parotid gland tumors. Methods and Materials: Helical tomotherapy plans were developed for 4 patients previously treated with segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) IMRT. A primary planning target volume (PTV64) and two secondary PTVs (PTV60, PTV54) were defined. The clinical goals from the SMLC plans were applied as closely as possible to the HT planning. The SMLC plans included bolus, whereas HT plans did not. Results: In general, the HT plans showed better target coverage and target dose homogeneity. The minimum doses to the desired coverage volume were greater, on average, in the HT plans for all the targets. Minimum PTV doses were larger, on average, in the HT plans by 4.6 Gy (p = 0.03), 4.8 Gy (p = 0.06), and 4.9 Gy (p = 0.06) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Maximum PTV doses were smaller, on average, by 2.9 Gy (p = 0.23), 3.2 Gy (p = 0.02), and 3.6 Gy (p = 0.03) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Average dose homogeneity index was statistically smaller in the HT plans, and conformity index was larger for PTV64 in 3 patients. Tumor control probabilities were higher for 3 of the 4 patients. Sparing of normal structures was comparable for the two techniques. There were no significant differences between the normal tissue complication probabilities for the HT and SMLC plans. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were comparable to or slightly better than SMLC plans. Helical tomotherapy is an effective alternative to SMLC IMRT for treatment of parotid tumors.

  2. C. elegans ADAMTS ADT-2 regulates body size by modulating TGFβ signaling and cuticle collagen organization

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Thilini; Flibotte, Stephane; Xiong, Sheng; Yin, Jianghua; Yzeiraj, Edlira; Moerman, Donald G.; Meléndez, Alicia; Savage-Dunn, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Organismal growth and body size are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. We have utilized the strong molecular genetic techniques available in the nematode C. elegans to identify genetic determinants of body size. In C. elegans, DBL-1, a member of the conserved family of secreted growth factors known as the Transforming Growth Factor β superfamily, is known to play a major role in growth control. The mechanisms by which other determinants of body size function, however, is less well understood. To identify additional genes involved in body size regulation, a genetic screen for small mutants was previously performed. One of the genes identified in that screen was sma-21. We now demonstrate that sma-21 encodes ADT-2, a member of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) family of secreted metalloproteases. ADAMTS proteins are believed to remodel the extracellular matrix and may modulate the activity of extracellular signals. Genetic interactions suggest that ADT-2 acts in parallel with or in multiple size regulatory pathways. We demonstrate that ADT-2 is required for normal levels of expression of a DBL-1-responsive transcriptional reporter. We further demonstrate that adt-2 regulatory sequences drive expression in glial-like and vulval cells, and that ADT-2 activity is required for normal cuticle collagen fibril organization. We therefore propose that ADT-2 regulates body size both by modulating TGFβ signaling activity and by maintaining normal cuticle structure. PMID:21256840

  3. The feasibility of a regional CTDIvol to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated CT exams

    PubMed Central

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun J.; Lu, Peiyun; McMillan, Kyle L.; Cagnon, Chris H.; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In AAPM Task Group 204, the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was developed by providing size adjustment factors which are applied to the Computed Tomography (CT) standardized dose metric, CTDIvol. However, that work focused on fixed tube current scans and did not specifically address tube current modulation (TCM) scans, which are currently the majority of clinical scans performed. The purpose of this study was to extend the SSDE concept to account for TCM by investigating the feasibility of using anatomic and organ specific regions of scanner output to improve accuracy of dose estimates. Methods: Thirty-nine adult abdomen/pelvis and 32 chest scans from clinically indicated CT exams acquired on a multidetector CT using TCM were obtained with Institutional Review Board approval for generating voxelized models. Along with image data, raw projection data were obtained to extract TCM functions for use in Monte Carlo simulations. Patient size was calculated using the effective diameter described in TG 204. In addition, the scanner-reported CTDIvol (CTDIvol,global) was obtained for each patient, which is based on the average tube current across the entire scan. For the abdomen/pelvis scans, liver, spleen, and kidneys were manually segmented from the patient datasets; for the chest scans, lungs and for female models only, glandular breast tissue were segmented. For each patient organ doses were estimated using Monte Carlo Methods. To investigate the utility of regional measures of scanner output, regional and organ anatomic boundaries were identified from image data and used to calculate regional and organ-specific average tube current values. From these regional and organ-specific averages, CTDIvol values, referred to as regional and organ-specific CTDIvol, were calculated for each patient. Using an approach similar to TG 204, all CTDIvol values were used to normalize simulated organ doses; and the ability of each normalized dose to correlate with patient size

  4. Efficient terahertz-wave generation and its ultrafast optical modulation in charge ordered organic ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Hirotake Iwai, Shinichiro; Itoh, Keisuke; Goto, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Yakushi, Kyuya

    2014-04-28

    Efficient terahertz (THz) wave generation in strongly correlated organic compounds α-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} and α′-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} (ET:bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene) was demonstrated. The spontaneous polarization induced by charge ordering or electronic ferroelectricity was revealed to trigger the THz-wave generation via optical rectification; the estimated 2nd-order nonlinear optical susceptibility for α-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} is over 70 times larger than that for prototypical THz-source ZnTe. Ultrafast (<1 ps) and sensitive (∼40%) photoresponse of the THz wave was observed for α-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3}, which is attributable to photoinduced quenching of the polarization accompanied by insulator(ferroelectric)-to-metal transition. Modulation of the THz wave was observed for α′-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} upon the poling procedure, indicating the alignment of polar domains.

  5. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  6. Development of an Organic Rankine-Cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiceniuk, T.

    1985-01-01

    An organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power module was developed for use in a multimodule solar power plant to be built and operated in a small community. Many successful components and subsystems, including the reciever, power conversion subsystem, energy transport subsystem, and control subsystem, were tested. Tests were performed on a complete power module using a test bed concentrator in place of the proposed concentrator. All major single-module program functional objectives were met and the multimodule operation presented no apparent problems. The hermetically sealed, self-contained, ORC power conversion unit subsequently successfully completed a 300-hour endurance run with no evidence of wear or operating problems.

  7. Helicity patterns on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A.

    Solar magnetic fields exhibit hemispheric preference for negative (pos- itive) helicity in northern (southern) hemisphere. The hemispheric he- licity rule, however, is not very strong, - the patterns of opposite sign helicity were observed on different spatial scales in each hemisphere. For instance, many individual sunspots exhibit patches of opposite he- licity inside the single polarity field. There are also helicity patterns on scales larger than the size of typical active region. Such patterns were observed in distribution of active regions with abnormal (for a give hemisphere) helicity, in large-scale photospheric magnetic fields and coronal flux systems. We will review the observations of large-scale pat- terns of helicity in solar atmosphere and their possible relationship with (sub-)photospheric processes. The emphasis will be on large-scale pho- tospheric magnetic field and solar corona.

  8. High temporal resolution for multislice helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Anno, H

    2000-05-01

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) substantially reduces scanning time. However, the temporal resolution of individual images is still insufficient for imaging rapidly moving organs such as the heart and adjacent pulmonary vessels. It may, in some cases, be worse than with current single-slice helical CT. The purpose of this study is to describe a novel image reconstruction algorithm to improve temporal resolution in multislice helical CT, and to evaluate its performance against existing algorithms. The proposed image reconstruction algorithm uses helical interpolation followed by data weighting based on the acquisition time. The temporal resolution, the longitudinal (z-axis) spatial resolution, the image noise, and the in-plane image artifacts created by a moving phantom were compared with those from the basic multislice helical reconstruction (helical filter interpolation, HFI) algorithm and the basic single-slice helical reconstruction algorithm (180 degrees linear interpolation, 180LI) using computer simulations. Computer simulation results were verified with CT examinations of the heart and lung vasculature using a 0.5 second multislice scanner. The temporal resolution of HFI algorithm varies from 0.28 and 0.86 s, depending on helical pitch. The proposed method improves the resolution to a constant value of 0.29 s, independent of pitch, allowing moving objects to be imaged with reduced blurring or motion artifacts. The spatial (z) resolution was slightly worse than with the HFI algorithm; the image noise was worse than with the HFI algorithm but was comparable to axial (step-and-shoot) CT. The proposed method provided sharp images of the moving objects, portraying the anatomy accurately. The proposed algorithm for multislice helical CT allowed us to obtain CT images with high temporal resolution. It may improve the image quality of clinical cardiac, lung, and vascular CT imaging. PMID:10841388

  9. Variation in the helical structure of native collagen.

    PubMed

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Persikov, Anton V; Antipova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The structure of collagen has been a matter of curiosity, investigation, and debate for the better part of a century. There has been a particularly productive period recently, during which much progress has been made in better describing all aspects of collagen structure. However, there remain some questions regarding its helical symmetry and its persistence within the triple-helix. Previous considerations of this symmetry have sometimes confused the picture by not fully recognizing that collagen structure is a highly complex and large hierarchical entity, and this affects and is effected by the super-coiled molecules that make it. Nevertheless, the symmetry question is not trite, but of some significance as it relates to extracellular matrix organization and cellular integration. The correlation between helical structure in the context of the molecular packing arrangement determines which parts of the amino acid sequence of the collagen fibril are buried or accessible to the extracellular matrix or the cell. In this study, we concentrate primarily on the triple-helical structure of fibrillar collagens I and II, the two most predominant types. By comparing X-ray diffraction data collected from type I and type II containing tissues, we point to evidence for a range of triple-helical symmetries being extant in the molecules native environment. The possible significance of helical instability, local helix dissociation and molecular packing of the triple-helices is discussed in the context of collagen's supramolecular organization, all of which must affect the symmetry of the collagen triple-helix. PMID:24586843

  10. The Advanced Helical Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  11. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomothearpy and linac-based IMRT in whole abdomen radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young-nam; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Jang, Hong Seok; Song, Jin Ho; Choi, Byung Ock; Cho, Seok Goo; Jung, Ji-Young; Kay, Chul Seung

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in radiotherapy techniques have allowed a significant improvement in the therapeutic ratio of whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) through linear-accelerator (Linac) based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT). IMRT has been shown to reduce the dose to organs at risk (OAR) while adequately treating the tumor volume. HT operates by adjusting 51 beam directions, couch speed, pitch and shapes of a binary multileaf collimator (MLC), with the purpose of clinically increasing the befit to the patient. We incorporated helical tomotherapy as a new modality for WAI for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients whose disease involved the intestine and the mesenteric lymph nodes. Excellent tumor coverage with effective sparing of normal organ sparings, and homogeneous dose distribution could be achieved. This study dosimetrically compared HT and linac-based IMRT by using several indices, including the conformity index (CI) and the homogeneity index (HI) for the planning target volume (PTV), as well as the, max dose and the mean dose and the quality index (QI) for five organs at risk (OARs). The HI and the CI were used to compare the quality of target coverage while the QI was used compare the dosimetric performans for OAR systems. The target coverages between the two systems were similar, but the most QIs were lower than 1, what means that HT is batter at sparing OARs than IMRT. Tomotherapy enabled excellent target coverage, effective sparing of normal tissues, and homogeneous dose distribution without severe acute toxicity.

  12. Light Modulates the Biosynthesis and Organization of Cyanobacterial Carbon Fixation Machinery through Photosynthetic Electron Flow.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaqi; Casella, Selene; Fang, Yi; Huang, Fang; Faulkner, Matthew; Barrett, Steve; Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved effective adaptive mechanisms to improve photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. The central CO2-fixing machinery is the carboxysome, which is composed of an icosahedral proteinaceous shell encapsulating the key carbon fixation enzyme, Rubisco, in the interior. Controlled biosynthesis and ordered organization of carboxysomes are vital to the CO2-fixing activity of cyanobacterial cells. However, little is known about how carboxysome biosynthesis and spatial positioning are physiologically regulated to adjust to dynamic changes in the environment. Here, we used fluorescence tagging and live-cell confocal fluorescence imaging to explore the biosynthesis and subcellular localization of β-carboxysomes within a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, in response to light variation. We demonstrated that β-carboxysome biosynthesis is accelerated in response to increasing light intensity, thereby enhancing the carbon fixation activity of the cell. Inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow impairs the accumulation of carboxysomes, indicating a close coordination between β-carboxysome biogenesis and photosynthetic electron transport. Likewise, the spatial organization of carboxysomes in the cell correlates with the redox state of photosynthetic electron transport chain. This study provides essential knowledge for us to modulate the β-carboxysome biosynthesis and function in cyanobacteria. In translational terms, the knowledge is instrumental for design and synthetic engineering of functional carboxysomes into higher plants to improve photosynthesis performance and CO2 fixation. PMID:26956667

  13. Fabry-Perot Interferometer-Based Electrooptic Modulator using LiNbO3 and Organic Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, C.; Frazier, D.; Penn, B.; Abdeldayem, H.; Sharma, A.; Yelleswarapu, C.; Leyderman, Alexander; Correa, Margarita; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the study of a Fabry-Perot electro-optical modulator using thin crystalline film NPP, and Crystalline LiNbO3. We are able to observe 14, and 60 percent degree of modulation. Measurements were carried using a standard lock-in amplifier with a silicon detector. The proposal to design a Fabry-Perot electro-optic modulator with an intracavity electro-optically active organic material was based on the initial results using poled polymer thin films. The main feature of the proposed device is the observation that in traditional electrooptic modulators like a Packets cell, it requires few kilovolts of driving voltage to cause a 3 dB modulation even in high figure-of-merit electrooptic materials like LiNbO3. The driving voltage for the modulator can be reduced to as low as 10 volts by introducing the electrooptic material inside die resonant cavity of a Fabry-Perot modulator. This is because the transmission of the Fabry-Perot cavity varies nonlinearly with the change of refractive index or phase of light due to applied electric field.

  14. Twist Helicity in Classical Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated that a partial measure of fluid Helicity (the sum of linking and writhing of vortex tubes) is conserved even as those vortices undergo topology changing reconnections. Measuring the total Helicity, however, requires additional information about how the vortex lines are locally twisted inside the vortex core. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel technique for experimentally measuring twist Helicity. Using this method, we are able to measure the production and eventual decay of twist for a variety of vortex evolutions. Remarkably, we observe twist dynamics capable of conserving total Helicity even in the presence of rapidly changing writhe. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  15. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Yue Bun Pun, Edwin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  16. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  17. Design principles for Bernal spirals and helices with tunable pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, Szilard N.; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Wales, David J.

    2014-07-01

    Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment.Using the framework of potential energy landscape theory, we describe two in silico designs for self-assembling helical colloidal superstructures based upon dipolar dumbbells and Janus-type building blocks, respectively. Helical superstructures with controllable pitch length are obtained using external magnetic field driven assembly of asymmetric dumbbells involving screened electrostatic as well as magnetic dipolar interactions. The pitch of the helix is tuned by modulating the Debye screening length over an experimentally accessible range. The second design is based on building blocks composed of rigidly linked spheres with short-range anisotropic interactions, which are predicted to self-assemble into Bernal spirals. These spirals are quite flexible, and longer helices undergo rearrangements via cooperative, hinge-like moves, in agreement with experiment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00324a

  18. Organization of the polarization splay modulated smectic liquid crystal phase by topographic confinement

    PubMed Central

    Ki Yoon, Dong; Deb, Rajdeep; Chen, Dong; Körblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Ishikawa, Ken; Rao, Nandiraju V. S.; Walba, David M.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the topographic patterning of surfaces by lithography and nanoimprinting has emerged as a new and powerful tool for producing single structural domains of liquid crystals and other soft materials. Here the use of surface topography is extended to the organization of liquid crystals of bent-core molecules, soft materials that, on the one hand, exhibit a rich, exciting, and intensely studied array of novel phases, but that, on the other hand, have proved very difficult to align. Among the most notorious in this regard are the polarization splay modulated (B7) phases, in which the symmetry-required preference for ferroelectric polarization to be locally bouquet-like or “splayed” is expressed. Filling space with splay of a single sign requires defects and in the B7 splay is accommodated in the form of periodic splay stripes spaced by defects and coupled to smectic layer undulations. Upon cooling from the isotropic phase this structure grows via a first order transition in the form of an exotic array of twisted filaments and focal conic defects that are influenced very little by classic alignment methods. By contrast, growth under conditions of confinement in rectangular topographic channels is found to produce completely new growth morphology, generating highly ordered periodic layering patterns. The resulting macroscopic order will be of great use in further exploration of the physical properties of bent-core phases and offers a route for application of difficult-to-align soft materials as are encountered in organic electronic and optical applications. PMID:21098307

  19. Shaping organs by a wingless-int/Notch/nonmuscle myosin module which orients feather bud elongation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Chen, Meng; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Wu, Ping; Nie, Qing; Widelitz, Randall; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-04-16

    How organs are shaped to specific forms is a fundamental issue in developmental biology. To address this question, we used the repetitive, periodic pattern of feather morphogenesis on chicken skin as a model. Avian feathers within a single tract extend from dome-shaped primordia to thin conical structures with a common axis of orientation. From a systems biology perspective, the process is precise and robust. Using tissue transplantation assays, we demonstrate that a "zone of polarizing activity," localized in the posterior feather bud, is necessary and sufficient to mediate the directional elongation. This region contains a spatially well-defined nuclear β-catenin zone, which is induced by wingless-int (Wnt)7a protein diffusing in from posterior bud epithelium. Misexpressing nuclear β-catenin randomizes feather polarity. This dermal nuclear β-catenin zone, surrounded by Notch1 positive dermal cells, induces Jagged1. Inhibition of Notch signaling disrupts the spatial configuration of the nuclear β-catenin zone and leads to randomized feather polarity. Mathematical modeling predicts that lateral inhibition, mediated by Notch signaling, functions to reduce Wnt7a gradient variations and fluctuations to form the sharp boundary observed for the dermal β-catenin zone. This zone is also enriched for nonmuscle myosin IIB. Suppressing nonmuscle myosin IIB disrupts directional cell rearrangements and abolishes feather bud elongation. These data suggest that a unique molecular module involving chemical-mechanical coupling converts a pliable chemical gradient to a precise domain, ready for subsequent mechanical action, thus defining the position, boundary, and duration of localized morphogenetic activity that molds the shape of growing organs. PMID:23576731

  20. Shaping organs by a wingless-int/Notch/nonmuscle myosin module which orients feather bud elongation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Chen, Meng; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Wu, Ping; Nie, Qing; Widelitz, Randall; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-01-01

    How organs are shaped to specific forms is a fundamental issue in developmental biology. To address this question, we used the repetitive, periodic pattern of feather morphogenesis on chicken skin as a model. Avian feathers within a single tract extend from dome-shaped primordia to thin conical structures with a common axis of orientation. From a systems biology perspective, the process is precise and robust. Using tissue transplantation assays, we demonstrate that a “zone of polarizing activity,” localized in the posterior feather bud, is necessary and sufficient to mediate the directional elongation. This region contains a spatially well-defined nuclear β-catenin zone, which is induced by wingless-int (Wnt)7a protein diffusing in from posterior bud epithelium. Misexpressing nuclear β-catenin randomizes feather polarity. This dermal nuclear β-catenin zone, surrounded by Notch1 positive dermal cells, induces Jagged1. Inhibition of Notch signaling disrupts the spatial configuration of the nuclear β-catenin zone and leads to randomized feather polarity. Mathematical modeling predicts that lateral inhibition, mediated by Notch signaling, functions to reduce Wnt7a gradient variations and fluctuations to form the sharp boundary observed for the dermal β-catenin zone. This zone is also enriched for nonmuscle myosin IIB. Suppressing nonmuscle myosin IIB disrupts directional cell rearrangements and abolishes feather bud elongation. These data suggest that a unique molecular module involving chemical–mechanical coupling converts a pliable chemical gradient to a precise domain, ready for subsequent mechanical action, thus defining the position, boundary, and duration of localized morphogenetic activity that molds the shape of growing organs. PMID:23576731

  1. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  2. The silicatein propeptide acts as inhibitor/modulator of self-organization during spicule axial filament formation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Muth, Sandra; Gietzen, Sabine; Korzhev, Michael; Grebenjuk, Vlad A; Wiens, Matthias; Schloßmacher, Ute; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-04-01

    Silicateins are crucial enzymes that are involved in formation of the inorganic biosilica scaffold of the spicular skeleton of siliceous sponges. We show that silicatein acquires its structure-guiding and enzymatically active state by processing of silicatein from pro-silicatein to the mature enzyme. A recombinant propeptide (PROP) of silicatein from the siliceous demosponge Suberites domuncula was prepared, and antibodies were raised against the peptide. In sponge tissue, these antibodies reacted with both surface structures and the central region of the spicules. Using phage display expression, spicule-binding 12-mer peptides were identified that are rich in histidine residues. In the predicted tertiary structure of PROP, these histidine residues are only present in the α-helical region. The recombinant PROP was found to inhibit self-assembly of silicatein molecules. By light scattering, it was shown that, in the presence of 4 m urea, the recombinant silicatein is obtained in the mono/oligomeric form with a hydrodynamic radius of 4 nm, while lower urea concentrations promote self-aggregation and assembly of the protein. Finally, it is shown that the enzymatic activity of silicatein is abolished by PROP in silicatein samples that predominantly contain mono- or oligomeric silicatein particles, but the enzyme is not affected if present in the filamentous aggregated form. It is concluded that the functions of silicatein, acting as a structural template for its biosilica product and as an enzyme, are modulated and controlled by its propeptide. PMID:23398942

  3. Highly efficient low color temperature organic LED using blend carrier modulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Ching; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Jou, Jwo-Huei

    2012-10-01

    Color temperature (CT) of light has great effect on human physiology and psychology, and low CT light, minimizing melatonin suppression and decreasing the risk of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. We demonstrates the incorporation of a blend carrier modulation interlayer (CML) between emissive layers to improve the device performance of low CT organic light emitting diodes, which exhibits an external quantum efficiency of 22.7% and 36 lm W-1 (54 cd A-1) with 1880 K at 100 cd m-2, or 20.8% and 29 lm W-1 (50 cd A-1) with 1940 K at 1000 cd m-2. The result shows a CT much lower than that of incandescent bulbs, which is 2500 K with 15 lmW-1 efficiency, and even as low as that of candles, which is 2000 K with 0.1 lmW-1. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its CML, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  4. Constraints on Sensitivity to Auditory Modulation in the Perceptual Organization of Speech

    PubMed Central

    Remez, Robert E.; Thomas, Emily F.; Wycoff, Andrea M.; Giglio, Rebecca E.; Crank, Aislinn T.; Cheimets, Chloe B.; Koinis, Stavroula M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The perception of speech requires the integration of sensory details from a rapidly fading trace of a time-varying spectrum. This effortful cognitive function has been difficult to assess. New tests measuring intelligibility of sine-wave replicas of speech provided an assay of this critical function in normal hearing young adults. Method Four time-varying sinusoids replicated the frequency and amplitude variation of the natural resonances of spoken sentences. The temporal tolerance of perceptual integration of speech was measured by determining the effect on intelligibility of desynchronizing a single sine-wave component in each sentence. This method was applied in tests in which the sentences were temporally compressed or expanded over a 40% range. Results Desynchrony was harmful to perceptual integration over a narrow temporal range, indicating that modulation sensitivity is keyed to a rate of 20 Hz. No effect of variation in speech rate was observed on the intelligibility measure, whether rate was accelerated or decelerated relative to the natural rate. Conclusion Performance measures of desynchrony tolerance did not vary when speech rate was accelerated or decelerated, revealing constraints on integration that are arguably primitive, sensory, auditory, and fixed. Because these are not adaptable, they limit the potential for perceptual learning in this aspect of perceptual organization. Implications for describing the elderly listener are noted. PMID:26683038

  5. Activation of Aurora-A is essential for neuronal migration via modulation of microtubule organization.

    PubMed

    Takitoh, Takako; Kumamoto, Kanako; Wang, Chen-Chi; Sato, Makoto; Toba, Shiori; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hirotsune, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Neuronal migration is a critical feature to ensure proper location and wiring of neurons during cortical development. Postmitotic neurons migrate from the ventricular zone into the cortical plate to establish neuronal lamina in an "inside-out" gradient of maturation. Here, we report that the mitotic kinase Aurora-A is critical for the regulation of microtubule organization during neuronal migration via an Aurora-A-NDEL1 pathway in the mouse. Suppression of Aurora-A activity by inhibitors or siRNA resulted in severe impairment of neuronal migration of granular neurons. In addition, in utero injection of the Aurora-A kinase-dead mutant provoked defective migration of cortical neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrated that suppression of Aurora-A impaired microtubule modulation in migrating neurons. Interestingly, suppression of CDK5 by an inhibitor or siRNA reduced Aurora-A activity and NDEL1 phosphorylation by Aurora-A, which led to defective neuronal migration. We found that CDK5RAP2 is a key molecule that mediates functional interaction and is essential for centrosomal targeting of Aurora-A. Our observations demonstrated novel and surprising cross talk between Aurora-A and CDK5 during neuronal migration. PMID:22875938

  6. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the DOE

  7. A fixed-jaw method to protect critical organs during intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiayun; Chen, Xinyuan; Huang, Manni; Dai, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plays an important role in cancer radiotherapy. For some patients being treated with IMRT, the extremely low tolerances of critical organs (such as lens, ovaries, and testicles) cannot be met during treatment planning. The aim of this article is to introduce a new planning method to overcome that problem. In current planning practice, jaw positions are automatically set to cover all target volumes by the planning system (e.g., Pinnacle{sup 3} system). Because of such settings, critical organs may be fully blocked by the multileaf collimator (MLC), but they still sit in the field that is shaped by collimator jaws. These critical organs receive doses from the transmission and leakage of MLC leaves. We manually fixed jaw positions to block them to further reduce such doses. This method has been used for different treatment sites in our clinic, and it was thoroughly evaluated in patients with radical hysterectomy plus ovarian transposition after surgery. For each patient, 2 treatment plans were designed with the same optimization parameters: the original plan with automatically chosen jaw positions (called O-plan) and the plan with fixed-jaw positions (named F-plan). In the F-plan, the jaws were manually fixed to block the ovaries. For target coverage, the mean conformity index (CI) of the F-plan (1.28 ± 0.02) was remarkably lower than that of the O-plan (1.53 ± 0.09) (p < 0.05). The F-plan and the O-plan performed similarly in target dose homogeneity. Meanwhile, for the critical organ sparing, the mean dose of both ovaries were much lower in the F-plan than that in the O-plan (p < 0.05). The V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40} of bladder were also lower in the F-plan (93.57 ± 1.98, 73.99 ± 5.76, and 42.33 ± 3.7, respectively) than those in the O-plan (97.98 ± 1.11, 85.07 ± 4.04, and 49.71 ± 3.63, respectively) (p < 0.05). The maximum dose to the spinal cord planning organ at risk (OAR) volume (PRV) in the O-plan (3940

  8. Dose as a Function of Lung Volume and Planned Treatment Volume in Helical Tomotherapy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Small Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, Joseph M.; Romney, Davis A.; Reish, Andrew G.; Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Jones, David R.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M. . E-mail: JML2P@virginia.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the limitations of Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (Middleton, WI) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung lesions, and to provide an initial report on patients treated with this method. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for early-stage, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol is currently evaluating three-dimensional conformal SBRT that delivers 60 Gy in three fractions. Methods and Materials: Inverse treatment planning for hypothetical lung gross tumor volumes (GTV) and planned treatment volume (PTV) expansions were performed. We tested the hypothesis that the maximum acceptable dose (MAD) to be delivered to the lesion by SBRT could be predicted by PTV and lung volume. Dose constraints on normal tissue were as designated by the RTOG protocol. Inverse planning was performed to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy. Results: Regression analysis of the data obtained indicated a linear relationship between MAD, PTV, and lung volume. This generated two equations which may be useful predictive tools. Seven patients with Stage I and II NSCLC treated at University of Virginia with this method tolerated the treatment extremely well, and suffered no greater than grade I toxicity, with no evidence of disease recurrence in follow-up from 2-20 months. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy SBRT for lung lesions is well-tolerated. In addition, the likely MAD for patients considered for this type of treatment can be predicted by PTV and lung volume.

  9. Enabling Light Work in Helical Self-Assembly for Dynamic Amplification of Chirality with Photoreversibility.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunsong; Guo, Zhiqian; Chen, Jianmei; Li, Wenlong; Zhong, Liubiao; Gao, Ya; Jiang, Lin; Chi, Lifeng; Tian, He; Zhu, Wei-Hong

    2016-02-24

    Light-driven transcription and replication are always subordinate to a delicate chirality transfer. Enabling light work in construction of the helical self-assembly with reversible chiral transformation becomes attractive. Herein we demonstrate that a helical hydrogen-bonded self-assembly is reversibly photoswitched between photochromic open and closed forms upon irradiation with alternative UV and visible light, in which molecular chirality is amplified with the formation of helixes at supramolecular level. The characteristics in these superhelixes such as left-handed or right-handed twist and helical length, height, and pitch are revealed by SEM and AFM. The helical photoswitchable nanostructure provides an easily accessible route to an unprecedented photoreversible modulation in morphology, fluorescence, and helicity, with precise assembly/disassembly architectures similar to biological systems such as protein and DNA. PMID:26709946

  10. GABAergic modulation of serotonin release in the rat subfornical organ area.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Nomura, Masahiko; Tanaka, Junichi

    2016-09-01

    The present study was carried out to examine whether γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor mechanisms are involved in the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the subfornical organ (SFO) using intracerebral microdialysis techniques. Perfusion with the GABA receptor antagonists as well as agonists was performed in the region of the SFO through a microdialysis probe and extracellular concentrations of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured in freely moving rats. Perfusion with the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 and 50μM), but not the GABAB receptor antagonist phaclofen (10 and 50μM), increased dialysate 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the SFO area, suggesting that the GABAergic system may tonically inhibit the 5-HT release in the SFO area through GABAA receptors. Higher perfusion with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (50μM) or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (250μM) decreased extracellular levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the SFO area. Nonhypotensive hypovolemia induced by subcutaneous injection of polyethylene glycol (PEG, 30%, 5ml) significantly enhanced the 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the SFO area. The enhanced 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels elicited the PEG treatment were reduced by perfusion with muscimol (10μM), but not by baclofen (50μM). These results show the involvement of both GABAA and GABAB receptors in the modulation of the 5-HT release in the SFO area, and imply that the GABAA receptor mechanism may be importance for the serotonergic regulatory system of body fluid balance. PMID:27453060

  11. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. Results The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV Dmin and PTV Dmin pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel Dmax (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and Dmax by 25% (0.022). Conclusions TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors

  12. Selective control for helical microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsamba, Panayiota; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    One of the greatest aspirations for artificial microswimmers is their application in non-invasive medicine. For any practical use, adequate mechanisms enabling control of multiple artificial swimmers is of paramount importance. Here we propose a multi-helical, freely-jointed motor as a novel selective control mechanism. We show that the nonlinear step-out behavior of a magnetized helix driven by a rotating magnetic field can be exploited, when used in conjunction with other helices, to obtain a velocity profile that is non-negligible only within a chosen interval of operating frequencies. Specifically, the force balance between the competing opposite-handed helices is tuned to give no net motion at low frequencies while in the middle frequency range, the swimming velocity increases monotonically with the driving frequency if two opposite helices are used, thereby allowing speed adjustment by varying the driving frequency. We illustrate this idea in detail on a two-helix system, and demonstrate how to generalize to N helices, both numerically and theoretically. We finish by explaining how to solve the inverse problem and design an artificial swimmer with an arbitrarily-complex velocity vs. frequency relationship.

  13. Helicity Injected Torus Program Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Aboulhosn, R. Z.; Akcay, C.; Hamp, W. T.; Marklin, G.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Sutphin, G. L.; Wrobel, J. S.; Mueller, D.; Roquemore, L.

    2006-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT--SI) spheromak experiment [Sieck, Nucl. Fusion v.46, p.254 (2006)] addresses critical issues for spheromaks, including current drive, high-beta operation, confinement quality and efficient steady-state operation. HIT--SI has a ``bow-tie'' shaped axisymmetric confinement region (major radius R=0.33 m, axial extent of 0.57 m) and two half-torus helicity injectors, one mounted on each end of the flux conserver. HIT--SI has produced spheromaks with up to 30 kA of toroidal current, using less than 4 MW of applied power, demonstrating that Steady Inductive Helicity Injection can generate and sustain discharges with modest power requirements. Fast camera images of HIT--SI discharges indicate a toroidally rotating n=1 structure, driven by the helicity injectors. The direction of the toroidal current is determined by the direction of rotation of the driven n=1. Measured surface and internal magnetic fields in HIT--SI discharges are consistent with that of the true 3D Taylor state, including the injectors. Recent HIT--SI physics studies, diagnostic improvements and machine upgrades will also be summarized.

  14. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  15. Information Identification and Organization. Student Study Guide. Module III: Information Types and Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolvin, Boyd M.; Dupras, Rheba

    This third module, in a three module program, begins with a discussion of basic reference sources such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, almanacs, atlases, and periodical indexes. It then describes the uses of special Alaska resources such as Alaska Almanac, Alaska Blue Book, Milepost, Education Directory, AULS (Alaska Union List of Serials), and…

  16. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We developed a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along nonconvex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implemented the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of nonconvex trajectories, thereby opening up a route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical applications.

  17. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buniy, Roman V.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  18. Rational design of helical architectures

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Fejer, Szilard N.; Wales, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Nature has mastered the art of creating complex structures through self-assembly of simpler building blocks. Adapting such a bottom-up view provides a potential route to the fabrication of novel materials. However, this approach suffers from the lack of a sufficiently detailed understanding of the noncovalent forces that hold the self-assembled structures together. Here we demonstrate that nature can indeed guide us, as we explore routes to helicity with achiral building blocks driven by the interplay between two competing length scales for the interactions, as in DNA. By characterizing global minima for clusters, we illustrate several realizations of helical architecture, the simplest one involving ellipsoids of revolution as building blocks. In particular, we show that axially symmetric soft discoids can self-assemble into helical columnar arrangements. Understanding the molecular origin of such spatial organisation has important implications for the rational design of materials with useful optoelectronic applications.

  19. Test results of an organic Rankine-cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    The organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power conversion assembly was tested. Qualification testing of the electrical transport subsystem was also completed. Test objectives were to verify compatibility of all system elements with emphasis on control of the power conversion assembly, to evaluate the performance and efficiency of the components, and to validate operating procedures. After 34 hours of power generation under a wide range of conditions, the net module efficiency exceeded 18% after accounting for all parasitic losses.

  20. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  1. Brownian motion of helical flagella.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, H; Saito, N

    1979-07-01

    We develops a theory of the Brownian motion of a rigid helical object such as bacterial flagella. The statistical properties of the random forces acting on the helical object are discussed and the coefficients of the correlations of the random forces are determined. The averages , and are also calculated where z and theta are the position along and angle around the helix axis respectively. Although the theory is limited to short time interval, direct comparison with experiment is possible by using the recently developed cinematography technique. PMID:16997210

  2. OPE for all helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Caetano, João; Córdova, Lucía; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM to account for all possible helicities of the external states. This is done by constructing a simple map between helicity configurations and so-called charged pentagon transitions. These OPE building blocks are generalizations of the bosonic pentagons entering MHV amplitudes and they can be bootstrapped at finite coupling from the integrable dynamics of the color flux tube. A byproduct of our map is a simple realization of parity in the super Wilson loop picture.

  3. Intra-helical salt-bridge and helix destabilizing residues within the same helical turn: Role of functionally important loop E half-helix in channel regulation of major intrinsic proteins.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ravi Kumar; Prabh, Neel Duti; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2015-06-01

    The superfamily of major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) includes aquaporin (AQP) and aquaglyceroporin (AQGP) and it is involved in the transport of water and neutral solutes across the membrane. Diverse MIP sequences adopt a unique hour-glass fold with six transmembrane helices (TM1 to TM6) and two half-helices (LB and LE). Loop E contains one of the two conserved NPA motifs and contributes two residues to the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter. Function and regulation of majority of MIP channels are not yet characterized. We have analyzed the loop E region of 1468 MIP sequences and their structural models from six different organism groups. They can be phylogenetically clustered into AQGPs, AQPs, plant MIPs and other MIPs. The LE half-helix in all AQGPs contains an intra-helical salt-bridge and helix-breaking residues Gly/Pro within the same helical turn. All non-AQGPs lack this salt-bridge but have the helix destabilizing Gly and/or Pro in the same positions. However, the segment connecting LE half-helix and TM6 is longer by 10-15 residues in AQGPs compared to all non-AQGPs. We speculate that this longer loop in AQGPs and the LE half-helix of non-AQGPs will be relatively more flexible and this could be functionally important. Molecular dynamics simulations on glycerol-specific GlpF, water-transporting AQP1, its mutant and a fungal AQP channel confirm these predictions. Thus two distinct regions of loop E, one in AQGPs and the other in non-AQGPs, seem to be capable of modulating the transport. These regions can also act in conjunction with other extracellular residues/segments to regulate MIP channel transport. PMID:25797519

  4. Self-assembly of magnetite nanocubes into helical superstructures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurvinder; Chan, Henry; Baskin, Artem; Gelman, Elijah; Repnin, Nikita; Král, Petr; Klajn, Rafal

    2014-09-01

    Organizing inorganic nanocrystals into complex architectures is challenging and typically relies on preexisting templates, such as properly folded DNA or polypeptide chains. We found that under carefully controlled conditions, cubic nanocrystals of magnetite self-assemble into arrays of helical superstructures in a template-free manner with >99% yield. Computer simulations revealed that the formation of helices is determined by the interplay of van der Waals and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, Zeeman coupling, and entropic forces and can be attributed to spontaneous formation of chiral nanocube clusters. Neighboring helices within their densely packed ensembles tended to adopt the same handedness in order to maximize packing, thus revealing a novel mechanism of symmetry breaking and chirality amplification. PMID:25061133

  5. Low Cost, Light Weight SOlar Modules Based on Organic Photovoltaic Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Russell Gaudiana; David GInley; Robert Birkmeyer

    2009-09-20

    Objectives - In order to produce solar modules for rooftop applications the performance and the lifetime must be improved to 5% - 7% and >10 year life. Task 1 Stability - (1) Flexible modules are stable to 1000 hrs at 65 C/85%RH, (2) Flexible modules in glass are stable to >2000 hrs at 85 C/85%RH (no decrease in performance); (3) Adhesive + filler helps stabilize modules; and (4) Solution coatable barriers exhibit good WVTR; work in-progress. Task 2 Performance: n-type charge carriers - (1) N-type polymers could not be synthesized; and (2) More than 30 fullerene derivatives synthesized and tested, Several deep LUMO derivatives accept charge from deep LUMO polymers, higher voltage observed, Improvement in cell efficiency not observed, morphology problem. Task 3 Performance: grid electrode - (1) Exceeded flatness and roughness goals; (2) Exceeds sheet resistance goals; (3) Achieved %T goals; and (4) Performance equivalent to ITO - 2% Efficiency ( av.); work in-progress.

  6. Functional tetrametallic linker modules for coordination polymers and metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Frank B; Bond, Andrew D; McKenzie, Christine J

    2007-03-19

    The new biphenol-based tetranucleating ligand, 2,2',6,6'-tetrakis(N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl)-4,4'-biphenolate, dbpbp2-, comprises two linearly disposed phenolato-hinged dinucleating heptadentate units, each of which offer one O and three N donors to a total of four metal ions. The ligand has been isolated as the zinc chloride complex [Zn4(dbpbp)Cl4]2+, and the ZnII ions have been completely or partially substituted by CuII, FeIII, CoII, and CoIII in metathesis reactions. Similarly, the chloride ligands of [Zn4(dbpbp)Cl4]2+ have been exchanged for solvent molecules (acetonitrile and/or water) and bridging carboxylate ligands. The resulting complexes have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, ESI mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and EPR spectroscopy. The structures containing [M4(dbpbp)Cl4]2+ with M = ZnII or CuII exhibit 2-D polymeric honeycomb sheets in which intermolecular M...Cl interactions bridge between adjacent [M4(dbpbp)Cl4]2+ cations. Two mixed-metal tetrabenzoate complexes [M4(dbpbp)(O2CC6H5)4]2+/3+ have also been prepared, namely a stoichiometric CuII2ZnII2 complex and a nonstoichiometric FeIII/ZnII system. In the latter case, ESI-MS identifies FeZn3, Fe2Zn2, and Zn4 species, and X-ray crystallography suggests an average composition of Fe0.8Zn3.2. Preparation of a CoII4 complex by metathesis was considerably more difficult than preparation of [Cu4(dbpbp)Cl4]2+, requiring both a large excess of the cobalt source and the presence of auxiliary benzoate. In the presence of 2 equiv of benzoate per starting [Zn4(dbpbp)Cl4]2+ unit and excess CoII, dioxygen binds as peroxide at each end of the molecule to give the CoIII4 complex [Co4(dbpbp)(O2)2(O2CC6H5)2]4+. This latter complex, together with new tetra- and hexametallic benzenedicarboxylato- and benzenetricarboxylato-bridged complexes of dinuclear [Co2(O2)(bpbp)]3+ units (bpbp- = 2,6-bis(N,N-bis-(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl)-4-tert-butyl-phenolate), is a module for

  7. Structural Basis by Which Alternative Splicing Modulates the Organizer Activity of FGF8 in the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen,S.; Li, J.; Eliseenkova, A.; Ibrahimi, O.; Lao, Z.; Zhang, F.; Linhardt, R.; Joyner, A.; Mohammadi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Two of the four human FGF8 splice isoforms, FGF8a and FGF8b, are expressed in the mid-hindbrain region during development. Although the only difference between these isoforms is the presence of an additional 11 amino acids at the N terminus of FGF8b, these isoforms possess remarkably different abilities to pattern the midbrain and anterior hindbrain. To reveal the structural basis by which alternative splicing modulates the organizing activity of FGF8, we solved the crystal structure of FGF8b in complex with the 'c' splice isoform of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2c). Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we also characterized the receptor-binding specificity of FGF8a and FGF8b, the 'b' isoform of FGF17 (FGF17b), and FGF18. The FGF8b-FGFR2c structure shows that alternative splicing permits a single additional contact between phenylalanine 32 (F32) of FGF8b and a hydrophobic groove within Ig domain 3 of the receptor that is also present in FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4. Consistent with the structure, mutation of F32 to alanine reduces the affinity of FGF8b toward all these receptors to levels characteristic of FGF8a. More importantly, analysis of the mid-hindbrain patterning ability of the FGF8b{sup F32A} mutant in chick embryos and murine midbrain explants shows that this mutation functionally converts FGF8b to FGF8a. Moreover, our data suggest that the intermediate receptor-binding affinities of FGF17b and FGF18, relative to FGF8a and FGF8b, also account for the distinct patterning abilities of these two ligands. We also show that the mode of FGF8 receptor-binding specificity is distinct from that of other FGFs and provide the first biochemical evidence for a physiological FGF8b-FGFR1c interaction during mid-hindbrain development. Consistent with the indispensable role of FGF8 in embryonic development, we show that the FGF8 mode of receptor binding appeared as early as in nematodes and has been preserved throughout evolution.

  8. The transport of relative canonical helicity

    SciTech Connect

    You, S.

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive boundary conditions.

  9. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  10. Helicity Generation by Heat Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    In a large laboratory plasma (ne ~= 10^12 cm-3, k Te ~= 2 eV, B0 ~= 30 G, 1 m ⊥ B_0, 2.5 m allel B_0), the electrons are heated locally by a short intense current pulse (100 A, 0.2 μs) using a magnetic loop antenna or a biased electrode. The heat transport along the field establishes a flux tube with strong radial and weak axial temperature gradients. The time scale of temperature relaxation (Δ t ~= 50 μs) is much longer than that of the transient whistler wave pulse excited by the initial current pulse (Δ t < 2 μs). The temperature gradients drive linked field-aligned and diamagnetic currents which, due to their linkage, exhibit helicity and form a flux rope with J × B ~= 0.(R. L. Stenzel and J. M. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1469 (1996). Alternatively, the helicity generation can be understood by the twisting of magnetic field lines which, in the parameter regime of electron MHD, are frozen into the electron fluid. The electron heating at one end of the flux tube causes a nonuniform diamagnetic rotation, hence the helicity. The heat transport by helical convection and conduction is investigated. The slowly time-varying magnetic field may excite Alfvénic perturbations.

  11. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-15

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

  12. Note: helical nanobelt force sensors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, G; Hashimoto, H

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (~10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (~20 μm without the plug-in support), light (~5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (~μN) and high resolution (~nN) force sensors. PMID:23278031

  13. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10-10 Pa-1), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (˜10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (˜20 μm without the plug-in support), light (˜5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (˜μN) and high resolution (˜nN) force sensors.

  14. Tetraspanin CD82 regulates bone marrow homing of acute myeloid leukemia by modulating the molecular organization of N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Marjon, K D; Termini, C M; Karlen, K L; Saito-Reis, C; Soria, C E; Lidke, K A; Gillette, J M

    2016-08-01

    Communication between acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the bone marrow microenvironment is known to control disease progression. Therefore, regulation of AML cell trafficking and adhesion to the bone marrow is of significant interest. In this study, we demonstrate that differential expression of the membrane scaffold CD82 modulates the bone marrow homing of AML cells. By combining mutational analysis and super-resolution imaging, we identify membrane protein clustering by CD82 as a regulator of AML cell adhesion and bone marrow homing. Cluster analysis of super-resolution data indicates that N-linked glycosylation and palmitoylation of CD82 are both critical modifications that control the microdomain organization of CD82 as well as the nanoscale clustering of associated adhesion protein, N-cadherin. We demonstrate that the inhibition of CD82 glycosylation increases the molecular packing of N-cadherin and promotes the bone marrow homing of AML cells. In contrast, we find that the inhibition of CD82 palmitoylation disrupts the formation and organization of N-cadherin clusters and significantly diminishes bone marrow trafficking of AML. Taken together, these data establish a mechanism where the membrane organization of CD82, through specific posttranslational modifications, regulates N-cadherin clustering and membrane density, which impacts the in vivo trafficking of AML cells. As such, these observations provide an alternative model for targeting AML where modulation of protein organization within the membrane may be an effective treatment therapy to disrupt the bone marrow homing potential of AML cells. PMID:26592446

  15. Tetraspanin CD82 regulates bone marrow homing of acute myeloid leukemia by modulating the molecular organization of N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Marjon, Kristopher D.; Termini, Christina M.; Karlen, Karin L.; Saito-Reis, Chelsea; Soria, Cesar E.; Lidke, Keith A.; Gillette, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Communication between acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the bone marrow microenvironment is known to control disease progression. Therefore, regulation of AML cell trafficking and adhesion to the bone marrow is of significant interest. In this study, we demonstrate that differential expression of the membrane scaffold CD82 modulates the bone marrow homing of AML cells. By combining mutational analysis and super-resolution imaging, we identify membrane protein clustering by CD82 as a regulator of AML cell adhesion and bone marrow homing. Cluster analysis of super-resolution data indicates that N-linked glycosylation and palmitoylation of CD82 are both critical modifications that control the microdomain organization of CD82 as well as the nanoscale clustering of associated adhesion protein, N-cadherin. We demonstrate that inhibition of CD82 glycosylation increases the molecular packing of N-cadherin and promotes the bone marrow homing of AML cells. In contrast, we find that inhibition of CD82 palmitoylation disrupts the formation and organization of N-cadherin clusters and significantly diminishes bone marrow trafficking of AML. Taken together, these data establish a mechanism where the membrane organization of CD82, through specific post-translational modifications, regulates N-cadherin clustering and membrane density, which impacts the in vivo trafficking of AML cells. As such, these observations provide an alternative model for targeting AML where modulation of protein organization within the membrane may be an effective treatment therapy to disrupt the bone marrow homing potential of AML cells. PMID:26592446

  16. Standard and Nonstandard Craniospinal Radiotherapy Using Helical TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, William; Brodeur, Marylene; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To show the advantages of planning and delivering craniospinal radiotherapy with helical TomoTherapy (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI) by presenting 4 cases treated at our institution. Methods and Materials: We first present a standard case of craniospinal irradiation in a patient with recurrent myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) and follow this with 2 cases requiring differential dosing to multiple target volumes. One of these, a patient with recurrent medulloblastoma, required a lower dose to be delivered to the posterior fossa because the patient had been previously irradiated to the full dose, and the other required concurrent boosts to leptomeningeal metastases as part of his treatment for newly diagnosed MPE. The final case presented is a patient with pronounced scoliosis who required spinal irradiation for recurrent MPE. Results: The four cases presented were planned and treated successfully with Helical Tomotherapy. Conclusions: Helical TomoTherapy delivers continuous arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy that gives high conformality and excellent dose homogeneity for the target volumes. Increased healthy tissue sparing is achieved at higher doses albeit at the expense of larger volumes of tissue receiving lower doses. Helical TomoTherapy allows for differential dosing of multiple targets, resulting in very elegant dose distributions. Daily megavoltage computed tomography imaging allows for precision of patient positioning, permitting a reduction in planning margins and increased healthy tissue sparing in comparison with standard techniques.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of helical tomotherapy with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterpin, E.; Salvat, F.; Cravens, R.; Ruchala, K.; Olivera, G. H.; Vynckier, S.

    2008-04-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the simultaneous movement of the couch, the gantry and the binary multileaf collimator (MLC), a procedure that differs from conventional dynamic or step-and-shoot IMRT. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of HT in the helical mode therefore requires a new approach. Using validated phase-space files (PSFs) obtained through the MC simulation of the static mode with PENELOPE, an analytical model of the binary MLC, called the 'transfer function' (TF), was first devised to perform the transport of particles through the MLC much faster than time-consuming MC simulation and with no significant loss of accuracy. Second, a new tool, called TomoPen, was designed to simulate the helical mode by rotating and translating the initial coordinates and directions of the particles in the PSF according to the instantaneous position of the machine, transporting the particles through the MLC (in the instantaneous configuration defined by the sinogram), and computing the dose distribution in the CT structure using PENELOPE. Good agreement with measurements and with the treatment planning system of tomotherapy was obtained, with deviations generally well within 2%/1 mm, for the simulation of the helical mode for two commissioning procedures and a clinical plan calculated and measured in homogeneous conditions.

  18. The Strip-Hippo Pathway Regulates Synaptic Terminal Formation by Modulating Actin Organization at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Synapses.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chisako; Saito, Yoshie; Umehara, Tomoki; Kamimura, Keisuke; Maeda, Nobuaki; Mosca, Timothy J; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2016-08-30

    Synapse formation requires the precise coordination of axon elongation, cytoskeletal stability, and diverse modes of cell signaling. The underlying mechanisms of this interplay, however, remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Strip, a component of the striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex that regulates these processes, is required to ensure the proper development of synaptic boutons at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. In doing so, Strip negatively regulates the activity of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ size whose role in synapse formation is currently unappreciated. Strip functions genetically with Enabled, an actin assembly/elongation factor and the presumptive downstream target of Hpo signaling, to modulate local actin organization at synaptic termini. This regulation occurs independently of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie, the canonical downstream target of the Hpo pathway. Our study identifies a previously unanticipated role of the Strip-Hippo pathway in synaptic development, linking cell signaling to actin organization. PMID:27545887

  19. Measurement-guided volumetric dose reconstruction for helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin; Wolf, Theresa; Mueller, Richard; Geurts, Mark; Opp, Daniel; Moros, Eduardo; Zhang, Geoffrey; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that dose delivered by a conventional linear accelerator using IMRT or VMAT can be reconstructed - on patient or phantom datasets - using helical diode array measurements and a technique called planned dose perturbation (PDP). This allows meaningful and intuitive analysis of the agreement between the planned and delivered dose, including direct comparison of the dose-volume histograms. While conceptually similar to modulated arc techniques, helical tomotherapy introduces significant challenges to the PDP formalism, arising primarily from TomoTherapy delivery dynamics. The temporal characteristics of the delivery are of the same order or shorter than the dosimeter's update interval (50 ms). Additionally, the prevalence of often small and complex segments, particularly with the 1 cm Y jaw setting, lead to challenges related to detector spacing. Here, we present and test a novel method of tomotherapy-PDP (TPDP) designed to meet these challenges. One of the novel techniques introduced for TPDP is organization of the subbeams into larger subunits called sectors, which assures more robust synchronization of the measurement and delivery dynamics. Another important change is the optional application of a correction based on ion chamber (IC) measurements in the phantom. The TPDP method was validated by direct comparisons to the IC and an independent, biplanar diode array dosimeter previously evaluated for tomotherapy delivery quality assurance. Nineteen plans with varying complexity were analyzed for the 2.5 cm tomotherapy jaw setting and 18 for the 1 cm opening. The dose differences between the TPDP and IC were 1.0% ± 1.1% and 1.1% ± 1.1%, for 2.5 and 1.0 cm jaw plans, respectively. Gamma analysis agreement rates between TPDP and the independent array were: 99.1%± 1.8% (using 3% global normalization/3 mm criteria) and 93.4% ± 7.1% (using 2% global/2 mm) for the 2.5 cm jaw plans; for 1 cm plans, they were 95.2% ± 6.7% (3% G/3) and 83.8%

  20. Mechanism of optical terahertz-transmission modulation in an organic/inorganic semiconductor interface and its application to active metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Tatsunosuke; Takagi, Ryosuke; Takano, Keisuke; Hangyo, Masanori

    2013-11-15

    Terahertz (THz) transmission modulation through copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-coated Si under various laser light irradiation conditions was investigated using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The charge carrier transfer from Si to CuPc is crucial for photo-induced metallization, and the thickness of the CuPc layer is a critical parameter for achieving high charge carrier density for metallization. Transmission through a split-ring resonator array metamaterial, fabricated on CuPc-coated Si, can be efficiently modulated by laser light irradiation. Our findings may open the way for various types of metamaterials using organic conjugated materials that are suitable for easy device fabrication using printing technologies. PMID:24322092

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF PILOT-SCALE PERVAPORATION SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND REMOVAL FROM A SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION FLUID. II. HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANE MODULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale demonstration of pervaporation-based removal of volatile organic compounds from a surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) fluid has been conducted at USEPA's Test & Evaluation Facility using hollow fiber membrane modules. The membranes consisted of microporous...

  2. Architecture of the Mediator head module.

    PubMed

    Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Calero, Guillermo; Cai, Gang; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yamada, Kentaro; Cardelli, Francesco; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Berger, Imre; Kornberg, Guy Lorch; Asturias, Francisco J; Kornberg, Roger D; Takagi, Yuichiro

    2011-07-14

    Mediator is a key regulator of eukaryotic transcription, connecting activators and repressors bound to regulatory DNA elements with RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator comprises 25 subunits with a total mass of more than one megadalton (refs 5, 6) and is organized into three modules, called head, middle/arm and tail. Our understanding of Mediator assembly and its role in regulating transcription has been impeded so far by limited structural information. Here we report the crystal structure of the essential Mediator head module (seven subunits, with a mass of 223 kilodaltons) at a resolution of 4.3 ångströms. Our structure reveals three distinct domains, with the integrity of the complex centred on a bundle of ten helices from five different head subunits. An intricate pattern of interactions within this helical bundle ensures the stable assembly of the head subunits and provides the binding sites for general transcription factors and Pol II. Our structural and functional data suggest that the head module juxtaposes transcription factor IIH and the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest subunit of Pol II, thereby facilitating phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of Pol II. Our results reveal architectural principles underlying the role of Mediator in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:21725323

  3. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-11-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths.

  4. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-01-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths. PMID:25387544

  5. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  6. Lamb Wave Helical Ultrasonic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, K. R.; Hinders, M. K.

    2004-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT). This new technique, among other things, has direct application to advanced pipe inspection. HUT uses guided ultrasonic waves along with an adaptation of the tomographic reconstruction algorithms developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel in various helical crisscross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar crisscross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. We demonstrate the feasibility of the HUT technique via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  7. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  8. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  9. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers. PMID:26829250

  10. Micromechanical Models of Helical Superstructures in Ligament and Tendon Fibers Predict Large Poisson’s Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Shawn P.; Maas, Steve A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the Poisson’s ratio in tendon and ligament tissue greatly exceed the isotropic limit of 0.5. This is indicative of volume loss during tensile loading. The microstructural origin of the large Poisson’s ratios is unknown. It was hypothesized that a helical organization of fibrils within a fiber would result in a large Poisson’s ratio in ligaments and tendons, and that this helical organization would be compatible with the crimped nature of these tissues, thus modeling their classic nonlinear stress strain behavior. Micromechanical finite element models were constructed to represent crimped fibers with a super helical organization, composed of fibrils embedded within a matrix material. A homogenization procedure was performed to determine both the effective Poisson’s ratio and the Poisson function. The results showed that helical fibril organization within a crimped fiber was capable of simultaneously predicting large Poisson’s ratios and the nonlinear stress strain behavior seen experimentally. Parametric studies revealed that the predicted Poisson’s ratio was strongly dependent on the helical pitch, crimp angle and the material coefficients. The results indicated that, for physiologically relevant parameters, the models were capable of predicting the large Poisson’s ratios seen experimentally. It was concluded that helical organization within a crimped fiber can produce both the characteristic nonlinear stress strain behavior and large Poisson’s ratios, while fiber crimp alone could only account for the nonlinear stress-strain behavior. PMID:20181336