Science.gov

Sample records for modulates phagosome maturation

  1. The ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system of Mycobacterium marinum modulates phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tracy; Lee, Warren L; Alexander, David C; Grinstein, Sergio; Liu, Jun

    2006-09-01

    Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related pathogenic mycobacteria requires the secretion of early secretory antigenic 6 kDa (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10), two small proteins that lack traditional signal sequences and are exported through an alternative secretion pathway encoded primarily by the RD1 genetic locus. Mutations affecting the synthesis or secretion of ESAT-6 or CFP-10 attenuate the virulence of M. tuberculosis in murine models of infection. However, the specific functions of these proteins and of their secretion system are currently unclear. In this study, we isolated a mutant of Mycobacterium marinum defective in the secretion of ESAT-6 and CFP-10. The mutation was localized within MM5446, which is orthologous to Rv3871 of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and encodes an ATPase that is a component of the ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system. The mutant bacteria were unable to replicate within J774 macrophages although their growth in 7H9 medium was equivalent to the parental strain. Phagosome maturation and acidification were analysed in infected macrophages by confocal and electron microscopy using the late endosome/lysosome marker LAMP-1, along with various fluid-phase markers such as rhodamine-dextran and ferritin and the acidotropic dye LysoTracker Red. These studies demonstrated that while the wild-type parental strain of M. marinum primarily resides in a poorly acidified, non-lysosomal compartment, a significantly higher percentage of the MM5446 mutant organisms are in acidified compartments. These results suggest that the ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system plays a role in preventing phagolysosomal fusion, a novel function that accounts for the ability of bacteria to survive inside host cells. This finding provides a mechanism by which the ESAT-6/CFP-10 secretion system potentiates the virulence of pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:16922861

  2. A Drosophila model to image phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Shandala, Tetyana; Lim, Chiaoxin; Sorvina, Alexandra; Brooks, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24709696

  3. Contributions of proteomics to understanding phagosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Lindsay D; Foster, Leonard J

    2008-01-01

    In metazoans macrophage cells use phagocytosis, the process of engulfing large particles, to control the spread of pathogens in the body, to clear dead or dying cells, and to aid in tissue remodelling, while the same process is also used by unicellular eukaryotes to ingest food. Phagocytosing cells essentially swallow the particles, trapping them in vacuoles called phagosomes that go through a series of maturation steps, culminating in the destruction of the internalized cargo. Because of their central role in innate immunity and their relatively simple structure (one membrane bilayer surrounding a single particle), phagosomes have been a popular subject for organelle proteomics studies. Qualitative proteomic technologies are now very sensitive so hundreds of different proteins have been identified in phagosomes from several species, revealing new properties of these intriguing compartments. More recently, quantitative proteomic approaches have also been applied, shedding new light on the dynamics and composition of maturing phagosomes. In this review we summarize the studies that have applied proteomic technologies to phagosomes and how they have changed our understanding of phagosome biology. PMID:18331591

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB3 Responds to Vacuolar pH-induced Changes in Mycothiol Redox Potential to Modulate Phagosomal Maturation and Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mansi; Rajmani, Raju S.; Singh, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to resist intraphagosomal stresses, such as oxygen radicals and low pH, is critical for its persistence. Here, we show that a cytoplasmic redox sensor, WhiB3, and the major M. tuberculosis thiol, mycothiol (MSH), are required to resist acidic stress during infection. WhiB3 regulates the expression of genes involved in lipid anabolism, secretion, and redox metabolism, in response to acidic pH. Furthermore, inactivation of the MSH pathway subverted the expression of whiB3 along with other pH-specific genes in M. tuberculosis. Using a genetic biosensor of mycothiol redox potential (EMSH), we demonstrated that a modest decrease in phagosomal pH is sufficient to generate redox heterogeneity in EMSH of the M. tuberculosis population in a WhiB3-dependent manner. Data indicate that M. tuberculosis needs low pH as a signal to alter cytoplasmic EMSH, which activates WhiB3-mediated gene expression and acid resistance. Importantly, WhiB3 regulates intraphagosomal pH by down-regulating the expression of innate immune genes and blocking phagosomal maturation. We show that this block in phagosomal maturation is in part due to WhiB3-dependent production of polyketide lipids. Consistent with these observations, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed intramacrophage survival defect, which can be rescued bypharmacological inhibition of phagosomal acidification. Last, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed marked attenuation in the lungs of guinea pigs. Altogether, our study revealed an intimate link between vacuolar acidification, redox physiology, and virulence in M. tuberculosis and discovered WhiB3 as crucial mediator of phagosomal maturation arrest and acid resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:26637353

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB3 Responds to Vacuolar pH-induced Changes in Mycothiol Redox Potential to Modulate Phagosomal Maturation and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mansi; Rajmani, Raju S; Singh, Amit

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to resist intraphagosomal stresses, such as oxygen radicals and low pH, is critical for its persistence. Here, we show that a cytoplasmic redox sensor, WhiB3, and the major M. tuberculosis thiol, mycothiol (MSH), are required to resist acidic stress during infection. WhiB3 regulates the expression of genes involved in lipid anabolism, secretion, and redox metabolism, in response to acidic pH. Furthermore, inactivation of the MSH pathway subverted the expression of whiB3 along with other pH-specific genes in M. tuberculosis. Using a genetic biosensor of mycothiol redox potential (EMSH), we demonstrated that a modest decrease in phagosomal pH is sufficient to generate redox heterogeneity in EMSH of the M. tuberculosis population in a WhiB3-dependent manner. Data indicate that M. tuberculosis needs low pH as a signal to alter cytoplasmic EMSH, which activates WhiB3-mediated gene expression and acid resistance. Importantly, WhiB3 regulates intraphagosomal pH by down-regulating the expression of innate immune genes and blocking phagosomal maturation. We show that this block in phagosomal maturation is in part due to WhiB3-dependent production of polyketide lipids. Consistent with these observations, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed intramacrophage survival defect, which can be rescued bypharmacological inhibition of phagosomal acidification. Last, MtbΔwhiB3 displayed marked attenuation in the lungs of guinea pigs. Altogether, our study revealed an intimate link between vacuolar acidification, redox physiology, and virulence in M. tuberculosis and discovered WhiB3 as crucial mediator of phagosomal maturation arrest and acid resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:26637353

  6. SNAP-23 regulates phagosome formation and maturation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Chiye; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Arai, Seisuke; Wada, Yoh; Sun-Wada, Ge-Hong; Wada, Ikuo; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka

    2012-12-01

    Synaptosomal associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP-23), a plasma membrane-localized soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE), has been implicated in phagocytosis by macrophages. For elucidation of its precise role in this process, a macrophage line overexpressing monomeric Venus-tagged SNAP-23 was established. These cells showed enhanced Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Detailed analyses of each process of phagocytosis revealed a marked increase in the production of reactive oxygen species within phagosomes. Also, enhanced accumulation of a lysotropic dye, as well as augmented quenching of a pH-sensitive fluorophore were observed. Analyses of isolated phagosomes indicated the critical role of SNAP-23 in the functional recruitment of the NADPH oxidase complex and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase to phagosomes. The data from the overexpression experiments were confirmed by SNAP-23 knockdown, which demonstrated a significant delay in phagosome maturation and a reduction in uptake activity. Finally, for analyzing whether phagosomal SNAP-23 entails a structural change in the protein, an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe was constructed, in which the distance within a TagGFP2-TagRFP was altered upon close approximation of the N-termini of its two SNARE motifs. FRET efficiency on phagosomes was markedly enhanced only when VAMP7, a lysosomal SNARE, was coexpressed. Taken together, our results strongly suggest the involvement of SNAP-23 in both phagosome formation and maturation in macrophages, presumably by mediating SNARE-based membrane traffic. PMID:23087210

  7. Acquisition of Hrs, an essential component of phagosomal maturation, is impaired by mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Otilia V; Harrison, Rene E; Scott, Cameron C; Stenmark, Harald; Alexander, David; Liu, Jun; Gruenberg, Jean; Schreiber, Alan D; Grinstein, Sergio

    2004-05-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria survive within macrophages by precluding the fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes or lysosomes. Because the molecular determinants of normal phagolysosome formation are poorly understood, the sites targeted by mycobacteria remain unidentified. We found that Hrs, an adaptor molecule involved in protein sorting, associates with phagosomes prior to their fusion with late endosomes or lysosomes. Recruitment of Hrs required the interaction of its FYVE domain with phagosomal phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, but two other attachment sites were additionally involved. Depletion of Hrs by use of small interfering RNA impaired phagosomal maturation, preventing the acquisition of lysobisphosphatidic acid and reducing luminal acidification. As a result, the maturation of phagosomes formed in Hrs-depleted cells was arrested at an early stage, characterized by the acquisition and retention of sorting endosomal markers. This phenotype is strikingly similar to that reported to occur in phagosomes of cells infected by mycobacteria. We therefore tested whether Hrs is recruited to phagosomes containing mycobacteria. Hrs associated readily with phagosomes containing inert particles but poorly with mycobacterial phagosomes. Moreover, Hrs was found more frequently in phagosomes containing avirulent Mycobacterium smegmatis than in phagosomes with the more virulent Mycobacterium marinum. These findings suggest that the inability to recruit Hrs contributes to the arrest of phagosomal maturation induced by pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:15121875

  8. Role of JAK-STAT signaling in maturation of phagosomes containing Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Zhou, Yadong; Jiang, Chunxia; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a required mechanism for the defense against pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus, an important bacterial pathogen, can promptly escape from phagosomes and proliferate within the cytoplasm of host. However, the mechanism of phagocytosis against S. aureus has not been intensively investigated. In this study, the S. aureus was engulfed by macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) but not digested by the cells, suggesting that the phagosomes did not maturate in macrophages. Further investigation revealed that peptidoglycan (PG) induced the phagosome maturation of macrophages, resulting in the eradication of S. aureus. Genome-wide analysis and quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the JAK-STAT pathway was activated by PG during the phagosome maturation of macrophages against S. aureus. This finding presented that the PG-activated JAK-STAT pathway was required for phagosome maturation. Therefore, our study contributed evidence that revealed a novel aspect of PG-triggered JAK-STAT pathway in the phagosome maturation of macrophages. PMID:26442670

  9. The HIV-1 protein Vpr impairs phagosome maturation by controlling microtubule-dependent trafficking.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Audrey; Lê-Bury, Gabrielle; Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Herit, Floriane; Mazzolini, Julie; Guilbert, Thomas; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Russell, David G; Benichou, Serge; Zahraoui, Ahmed; Niedergang, Florence

    2015-10-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) impairs major functions of macrophages but the molecular basis for this defect remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that macrophages infected with HIV-1 were unable to respond efficiently to phagocytic triggers and to clear bacteria. The maturation of phagosomes, defined by the presence of late endocytic markers, hydrolases, and reactive oxygen species, was perturbed in HIV-1-infected macrophages. We showed that maturation arrest occurred at the level of the EHD3/MICAL-L1 endosomal sorting machinery. Unexpectedly, we found that the regulatory viral protein (Vpr) was crucial to perturb phagosome maturation. Our data reveal that Vpr interacted with EB1, p150(Glued), and dynein heavy chain and was sufficient to critically alter the microtubule plus end localization of EB1 and p150(Glued), hence altering the centripetal movement of phagosomes and their maturation. Thus, we identify Vpr as a modulator of the microtubule-dependent endocytic trafficking in HIV-1-infected macrophages, leading to strong alterations in phagolysosome biogenesis. PMID:26504171

  10. The HIV-1 protein Vpr impairs phagosome maturation by controlling microtubule-dependent trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Audrey; Lê-Bury, Gabrielle; Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Herit, Floriane; Mazzolini, Julie; Guilbert, Thomas; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Russell, David G.; Benichou, Serge; Zahraoui, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) impairs major functions of macrophages but the molecular basis for this defect remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that macrophages infected with HIV-1 were unable to respond efficiently to phagocytic triggers and to clear bacteria. The maturation of phagosomes, defined by the presence of late endocytic markers, hydrolases, and reactive oxygen species, was perturbed in HIV-1–infected macrophages. We showed that maturation arrest occurred at the level of the EHD3/MICAL-L1 endosomal sorting machinery. Unexpectedly, we found that the regulatory viral protein (Vpr) was crucial to perturb phagosome maturation. Our data reveal that Vpr interacted with EB1, p150Glued, and dynein heavy chain and was sufficient to critically alter the microtubule plus end localization of EB1 and p150Glued, hence altering the centripetal movement of phagosomes and their maturation. Thus, we identify Vpr as a modulator of the microtubule-dependent endocytic trafficking in HIV-1–infected macrophages, leading to strong alterations in phagolysosome biogenesis. PMID:26504171

  11. Identification of Candida glabrata Genes Involved in pH Modulation and Modification of the Phagosomal Environment in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gerwien, Franziska; Allert, Stefanie; Brunke, Sascha; Schwarzmüller, Tobias; Ames, Lauren; Zubiria-Barrera, Cristina; Mansour, Michael K.; Becken, Ulrike; Barz, Dagmar; Vyas, Jatin M.; Reiling, Norbert; Haas, Albert; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl; Hube, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata currently ranks as the second most frequent cause of invasive candidiasis. Our previous work has shown that C. glabrata is adapted to intracellular survival in macrophages and replicates within non-acidified late endosomal-stage phagosomes. In contrast, heat killed yeasts are found in acidified matured phagosomes. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the processes leading to inhibition of phagosome acidification and maturation. We show that phagosomes containing viable C. glabrata cells do not fuse with pre-labeled lysosomes and possess low phagosomal hydrolase activity. Inhibition of acidification occurs independent of macrophage type (human/murine), differentiation (M1-/M2-type) or activation status (vitamin D3 stimulation). We observed no differential activation of macrophage MAPK or NFκB signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors after internalization of viable compared to heat killed yeasts, but Syk activation decayed faster in macrophages containing viable yeasts. Thus, delivery of viable yeasts to non-matured phagosomes is likely not triggered by initial recognition events via MAPK or NFκB signaling, but Syk activation may be involved. Although V-ATPase is abundant in C. glabrata phagosomes, the influence of this proton pump on intracellular survival is low since blocking V-ATPase activity with bafilomycin A1 has no influence on fungal viability. Active pH modulation is one possible fungal strategy to change phagosome pH. In fact, C. glabrata is able to alkalinize its extracellular environment, when growing on amino acids as the sole carbon source in vitro. By screening a C. glabrata mutant library we identified genes important for environmental alkalinization that were further tested for their impact on phagosome pH. We found that the lack of fungal mannosyltransferases resulted in severely reduced alkalinization in vitro and in the delivery of C. glabrata to acidified phagosomes. Therefore, protein

  12. Candida albicans Hypha Formation and Mannan Masking of β-Glucan Inhibit Macrophage Phagosome Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Johanna; Lewis, Leanne E.; Okai, Blessing; Walls, Catriona A.; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Walker, Louise A.; Reid, Delyth; Munro, Carol A.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Brown, Gordon D.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Erwig, Lars P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a major life-threatening human fungal pathogen in the immunocompromised host. Host defense against systemic Candida infection relies heavily on the capacity of professional phagocytes of the innate immune system to ingest and destroy fungal cells. A number of pathogens, including C. albicans, have evolved mechanisms that attenuate the efficiency of phagosome-mediated inactivation, promoting their survival and replication within the host. Here we visualize host-pathogen interactions using live-cell imaging and show that viable, but not heat- or UV-killed C. albicans cells profoundly delay phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines and primary macrophages. The ability of C. albicans to delay phagosome maturation is dependent on cell wall composition and fungal morphology. Loss of cell wall O-mannan is associated with enhanced acquisition of phagosome maturation markers, distinct changes in Rab GTPase acquisition by the maturing phagosome, impaired hyphal growth within macrophage phagosomes, profound changes in macrophage actin dynamics, and ultimately a reduced ability of fungal cells to escape from macrophage phagosomes. The loss of cell wall O-mannan leads to exposure of β-glucan in the inner cell wall, facilitating recognition by Dectin-1, which is associated with enhanced phagosome maturation. PMID:25467440

  13. Phagosome maturation during endosome interaction revealed by partial rhodopsin processing in retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Meschede, Ingrid P.; Seabra, Miguel C.; Futter, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in phagocytosis and degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are associated with aging and retinal disease. The daily burst of rod outer segment (ROS) phagocytosis by the RPE provides a unique opportunity to analyse phagosome processing in vivo. In mouse retinae, phagosomes containing stacked rhodopsin-rich discs were identified by immuno-electron microscopy. Early apical phagosomes stained with antibodies against both cytoplasmic and intradiscal domains of rhodopsin. During phagosome maturation, a remarkably synchronised loss of the cytoplasmic epitope coincided with movement to the cell body and preceded phagosome–lysosome fusion and disc degradation. Loss of the intradiscal rhodopsin epitope and disc digestion occurred upon fusion with cathepsin-D-positive lysosomes. The same sequential stages of phagosome maturation were identified in cultured RPE and macrophages challenged with isolated POS. Loss of the cytoplasmic rhodopsin epitope was insensitive to pH but sensitive to protease inhibition and coincided with the interaction of phagosomes with endosomes. Thus, during pre-lysosomal maturation of ROS-containing phagosomes, limited rhodopsin processing occurs upon interaction with endosomes. This potentially provides a sensitive readout of phagosome–endosome interactions that is applicable to multiple phagocytes. PMID:25074813

  14. The roles of complement receptor 3 and Fcγ receptors during Leishmania phagosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Polando, Rachel; Dixit, Upasna Gaur; Carter, Cristina R.; Jones, Blake; Whitcomb, James P.; Ballhorn, Wibke; Harintho, Melissa; Jerde, Christopher L.; Wilson, Mary E.; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania are intracellular parasites adapted to surviving in macrophages, whose primary function is elimination of invading pathogens. Leishmania entry into host cells is receptor-mediated. These parasites are able to engage multiple host cell-surface receptors, including MR, TLRs, CR3, and FcγRs. Here, we investigated the role of CR3 and FcγR engagement on the maturation of Leishmania-containing phagosomes using CD11b−/− and FcγR−/− macrophages, and assessing EEA1 and lysosome-associated proteins is necessary for the phagosome maturation delay, characteristic of Leishmania infection. Leishmania-containing phagosomes do not fuse with lyosomes until 5 h postinfection in WT mice. Phagolysosome fusion occurs by 1 h in CD11b and FcγR common chain KO macrophages, although receptor deficiency does not influence Leishmania entry or viability. We also investigated the influence of serum components and their effects on phagosome maturation progression. Opsonization with normal mouse serum, complement-deficient serum, or serum from Leishmania-infected mice all influenced phagosome maturation progression. Our results indicate that opsonophagocytosis influences phagosomal trafficking of Leishmania without altering the intracellular fate. PMID:23543768

  15. A novel pathway for phagosome maturation during engulfment of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinchen, Jason M.; Doukoumetzidis, Kimon; Almendinger, Johann; Stergiou, Lilli; Tosello-Trampont, Annie; Sifri, Costi D.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.

    2010-01-01

    The efficient removal of apoptotic cells is critical for the physiological well-being of the organism1â4; defects in corpse removal have been linked to autoimmune disease4, 5. While several players regulating the early steps of corpse recognition and internalization have been characterized6, the molecules and mechanisms relevant to the subsequent processing of the internalized corpses are poorly understood. Here, we identify a novel pathway for the processing of internalized apoptotic cells in C. elegans and in mammals. First, we show that RAB-5 and RAB-7 are sequentially recruited to phagosomes containing apoptotic corpses as they mature within phagocytes, and that both proteins are required for efficient corpse clearance. We then used targeted genetic screens to identify players regulating the recruitment and/or retention of Rab5 and Rab7 to phagosomes. Seven members of the HOPS complex (a Rab7 activator/effector complex) were required for Rab7 localization or retention on phagosomes. In an effort to identify factors that regulate Rab5 recruitment, we undertook an unbiased reverse genetic screen and identified 61 genes potentially required for corpse removal. In-depth analysis of two candidate genes, vps-34 and dyn-1/dynamin, showed accumulation of internalized, but undegraded corpses within abnormal phagosomes that are defective in RAB-5 recruitment. Using a series of genetic and biochemical experiments in worms and mammalian cells, we ordered these proteins in a pathway, with DYN-1 functioning upstream of VPS-34, in the recruitment/retention of Rab5 to the nascent phagosome. Further, we identified a novel biochemical complex containing Vps34, dynamin and Rab5GDP, providing a mechanism for Rab5 recruitment to the nascent phagosome. PMID:18425118

  16. The full-of-bacteria gene is required for phagosome maturation during immune defense in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Tracy, Charles; Kahr, Walter H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a fatal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the VPS33B or VPS16B genes. Both encode homologues of the Vps33p and Vps16p subunits of the HOPS complex necessary for fusions of vacuoles in yeast. Here, we describe a mutation in the full-of-bacteria (fob) gene, which encodes Drosophila Vps16B. Flies null for fob are homozygous viable and fertile. They exhibit, however, a defect in their immune defense that renders them hypersensitive to infections with nonpathogenic bacteria. fob hemocytes (fly macrophages) engulf bacteria but fail to digest them. Phagosomes undergo early steps of maturation and transition to a Rab7-positive stage, but do not mature to fully acidified phagolysosomes. This reflects a specific requirement of fob in the fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, cargo of autophagosomes as well as endosomes exhibit normal lysosomal delivery in fob cells. These findings suggest that defects in phagosome maturation may contribute to symptoms of ARC patients including recurring infections. PMID:21282466

  17. The full-of-bacteria gene is required for phagosome maturation during immune defense in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Tracy, Charles; Kahr, Walter H A; Krämer, Helmut

    2011-02-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a fatal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the VPS33B or VPS16B genes. Both encode homologues of the Vps33p and Vps16p subunits of the HOPS complex necessary for fusions of vacuoles in yeast. Here, we describe a mutation in the full-of-bacteria (fob) gene, which encodes Drosophila Vps16B. Flies null for fob are homozygous viable and fertile. They exhibit, however, a defect in their immune defense that renders them hypersensitive to infections with nonpathogenic bacteria. fob hemocytes (fly macrophages) engulf bacteria but fail to digest them. Phagosomes undergo early steps of maturation and transition to a Rab7-positive stage, but do not mature to fully acidified phagolysosomes. This reflects a specific requirement of fob in the fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, cargo of autophagosomes as well as endosomes exhibit normal lysosomal delivery in fob cells. These findings suggest that defects in phagosome maturation may contribute to symptoms of ARC patients including recurring infections. PMID:21282466

  18. Comparison of the Kinetics of Maturation of Phagosomes Containing Apoptotic Cells and IgG-Opsonized Particles

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Michelle S.; Estronca, Luís M. B. B.; Vieira, Otília V.

    2012-01-01

    Defective clearance of apoptotic cells has emerged as an important contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Although many efforts have been made to understand the machinery involved in the recognition between phagocytes and potential targets, little is known about the intracellular transport of phagosomes containing apoptotic cells within mammalian cells. We have, therefore, performed a detailed study on the maturation of phagosomes containing apoptotic cells in a non-professional phagocytic cell line. This process was compared with the maturation of IgG-opsonized particles, which are internalized via the Fcγ-receptor (Fcγ-R), one of the best characterized phagocytic receptor, in the same cell line stably expressing the Fcγ-RIIA. By comparing markers from different stages of phagosome maturation, we have found that phagosomes carrying apoptotic particles reach the lysosomes with a delay compared to those containing IgG-opsonized particles. Enrichment of the apoptotic particles in phosphatidylserine (PS) neither changed the kinetics of their engulfment nor the maturation process of the phagosome. PMID:23119002

  19. Infection of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages by porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus impairs phagosomal maturation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sibapriya; McKenna, Neil; Balce, Dale R; Yates, Robin M

    2016-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a positive-sense, ssRNA virus of the genus Arterivirus, is a devastating disease of swine worldwide. Key early targets of PRRSV infection in pigs include professional phagocytes in the lung, such as alveolar and interstitial macrophages and dendritic cells, the dysfunction of which is believed to be responsible for much of the associated mortality. In order to study the effect of virus infection on phagocyte function, the development of a robust, reproducible model would be advantageous. Given the limitations of current models, we set out to develop a porcine bone marrow-derived macrophage (PBMMΦ) cell model to study phagosomal maturation and function during PRRSV infection. Derivation of PBMMΦs from marrow using cultured L929 fibroblast supernatant produced a homogeneous population of cells that exhibited macrophage-like morphology and proficiency in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phagosomal maturation. PBMMΦs were permissive to PRRSV infection, resulting in a productive infection that peaked at 24 h. Assessment of the effect of PRRSV infection on the properties of phagosomal maturation in PBMMΦs revealed a significant decrease in phagosomal proteolysis and lowered production of reactive oxygen species, but no change in PBMMΦ viability, phagocytosis or the ability of phagosomes to acidify. In this study, we present a new model to investigate PRRSV infection of phagocytes, which demonstrates a significant effect on phagosomal maturation with the associated implications on proper macrophage function. This model can also be used to study the effect on the phagosomal microenvironment of infection by other viruses targeting porcine macrophages. PMID:26702996

  20. Mycobacterium avium MAV_2941 mimics Phosphoinositol-3-Kinase to interfere with macrophage phagosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Danelishvili, Lia; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis (M. avium) is a pathogen that infects and survives in macrophages. Previously, we have identified the M. avium MAV_2941 gene encoding a 73 amino acid protein exported by the oligopeptide transporter OppA to the macrophage cytoplasm. Mutations in MAV_2941 were associated with significant impairment of M. avium growth in THP-1 macrophages. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of MAV_2941 action and demonstrated that MAV_2941 interacts with the vesicle trafficking proteins syntaxin-8 (STX8), adaptor-related protein complex 3 (AP-3) complex subunit beta-1 (AP3B1) and Archain 1 (ARCN1) in mononuclear phagocytic cells. Sequencing analysis revealed that the binding site of MAV_2941 is structurally homologous to the human phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) chiefly in the region recognized by vesicle trafficking proteins. The β3A subunit of AP-3, encoded by AP3B1, is essential for trafficking cargo proteins, including lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), to the phagosome and lysosome-related organelles. Here, we show that while the heat-killed M. avium when ingested by macrophages co-localizes with LAMP-1 protein, transfection of MAV_2941 in macrophages results in significant decrease of LAMP-1 co-localization with the heat-killed M. avium phagosomes. Mutated MAV_2941, where the amino acids homologous to the binding region of PI3K were changed, failed to interact with trafficking proteins. Inactivation of the AP3B1 gene led to alteration in the trafficking of LAMP-1. These results suggest that M. avium MAV_2941 interferes with the protein trafficking within macrophages altering the maturation of phagosome. PMID:26043821

  1. Mycobacterium avium MAV_2941 mimics phosphoinositol-3-kinase to interfere with macrophage phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Danelishvili, Lia; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis (M. avium) is a pathogen that infects and survives in macrophages. Previously, we have identified the M. avium MAV_2941 gene encoding a 73 amino acid protein exported by the oligopeptide transporter OppA to the macrophage cytoplasm. Mutations in MAV_2941 were associated with significant impairment of M. avium growth in THP-1 macrophages. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of MAV_2941 action and demonstrated that MAV_2941 interacts with the vesicle trafficking proteins syntaxin-8 (STX8), adaptor-related protein complex 3 (AP-3) complex subunit beta-1 (AP3B1) and Archain 1 (ARCN1) in mononuclear phagocytic cells. Sequencing analysis revealed that the binding site of MAV_2941 is structurally homologous to the human phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) chiefly in the region recognized by vesicle trafficking proteins. The β3A subunit of AP-3, encoded by AP3B1, is essential for trafficking cargo proteins, including lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), to the phagosome and lysosome-related organelles. Here, we show that while the heat-killed M. avium when ingested by macrophages co-localizes with LAMP-1 protein, transfection of MAV_2941 in macrophages results in significant decrease of LAMP-1 co-localization with the heat-killed M. avium phagosomes. Mutated MAV_2941, where the amino acids homologous to the binding region of PI3K were changed, failed to interact with trafficking proteins. Inactivation of the AP3B1 gene led to alteration in the trafficking of LAMP-1. These results suggest that M. avium MAV_2941 interferes with the protein trafficking within macrophages altering the maturation of phagosome. PMID:26043821

  2. Attenuated Leishmania induce pro-inflammatory mediators and influence leishmanicidal activity by p38 MAPK dependent phagosome maturation in Leishmania donovani co-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Somenath; Bose, Dipayan; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Das, Tanya; Saha, Krishna Das

    2016-01-01

    Promastigote form of Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, delays phagosome maturation and resides inside macrophages. But till date limited study has been done to manipulate the phagosomal machinery of macrophages to restrict Leishmania growth. Attenuated Leishmania strain exposed RAW 264.7 cells showed a respiratory burst and enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The augmentation of pro-inflammatory activity is mostly attributed to p38 MAPK and p44/42 MAPK. In our study, these activated macrophages are found to induce phagosome maturation when infected with pathogenic Leishmania donovani. Increased co-localization of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester labeled pathogenic L. donovani with Lysosome was found. Moreover, increased co-localization was observed between pathogenic L. donovani and late phagosomal markers viz. Rab7, Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein 1, Cathepsin D, Rab9, and V-ATPase which indicate phagosome maturation. It was also observed that inhibition of V-type ATPase caused significant hindrance in attenuated Leishmania induced phagosome maturation. Finally, it was confirmed that p38 MAPK is the key player in acidification and maturation of phagosome in attenuated Leishmania strain pre-exposed macrophages. To our knowledge, this study for the first time reported an approach to induce phagosome maturation in L. donovani infected macrophages which could potentiate short-term prophylactic response in future. PMID:26928472

  3. Attenuated Leishmania induce pro-inflammatory mediators and influence leishmanicidal activity by p38 MAPK dependent phagosome maturation in Leishmania donovani co-infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Somenath; Bose, Dipayan; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Das, Tanya; Saha, Krishna Das

    2016-01-01

    Promastigote form of Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, delays phagosome maturation and resides inside macrophages. But till date limited study has been done to manipulate the phagosomal machinery of macrophages to restrict Leishmania growth. Attenuated Leishmania strain exposed RAW 264.7 cells showed a respiratory burst and enhanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The augmentation of pro-inflammatory activity is mostly attributed to p38 MAPK and p44/42 MAPK. In our study, these activated macrophages are found to induce phagosome maturation when infected with pathogenic Leishmania donovani. Increased co-localization of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester labeled pathogenic L. donovani with Lysosome was found. Moreover, increased co-localization was observed between pathogenic L. donovani and late phagosomal markers viz. Rab7, Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein 1, Cathepsin D, Rab9, and V-ATPase which indicate phagosome maturation. It was also observed that inhibition of V-type ATPase caused significant hindrance in attenuated Leishmania induced phagosome maturation. Finally, it was confirmed that p38 MAPK is the key player in acidification and maturation of phagosome in attenuated Leishmania strain pre-exposed macrophages. To our knowledge, this study for the first time reported an approach to induce phagosome maturation in L. donovani infected macrophages which could potentiate short-term prophylactic response in future. PMID:26928472

  4. A Conserved Role for SNX9-Family Members in the Regulation of Phagosome Maturation during Engulfment of Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinchen, Jason M.; Kaech, Andres; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2011-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells is of key importance during development, tissue homeostasis and wound healing in multi-cellular animals. Genetic studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have identified a set of genes involved in the early steps of cell clearance, in particular the recognition and internalization of apoptotic cells. A pathway that orchestrates the maturation of phagosomes containing ingested apoptotic cells in the worm has recently been described. However, many steps in this pathway remain elusive. Here we show that the C. elegans SNX9-family member LST-4 (lateral signaling target) and its closest mammalian orthologue SNX33 play an evolutionary conserved role during apoptotic cell corpse clearance. In lst-4 deficient worms, internalized apoptotic cells accumulated within non-acidified, DYN-1-positive but RAB-5-negative phagosomes. Genetically, we show that LST-4 functions at the same step as DYN-1 during corpse removal, upstream of the GTPase RAB-5. We further show that mammalian SNX33 rescue C. elegans lst-4 mutants and that overexpression of truncated SNX33 fragments interfered with phagosome maturation in a mammalian cell system. Taken together, our genetic and cell biological analyses suggest that LST-4 is recruited through a combined activity of DYN-1 and VPS-34 to the early phagosome membrane, where it cooperates with DYN-1 to promote recruitment/retention of RAB-5 on the early phagosomal membrane during cell corpse clearance. The functional conservation between LST-4 and SNX33 indicate that these early steps of apoptotic phagosome maturation are likely conserved through evolution. PMID:21494661

  5. Initial receptor-ligand interactions modulate gene expression and phagosomal properties during both early and late stages of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eik; Marion, Sabrina; Mishra, Bibhuti Bhusan; John, Mathias; Kratzke, Ramona; Ahmad, Syed Furquan; Holzer, Daniela; Anand, Paras Kumar; Weiss, Dieter G; Griffiths, Gareth; Kuznetsov, Sergei A

    2010-09-01

    The receptors engaged during recognition and phagocytic uptake of microorganisms and particles influence signaling events and diverse subcellular responses that occur during phagosome formation and maturation. However, pathogens generally have multiple ligands on their surface, making it difficult to dissect the roles of individual receptors during phagocytosis. Moreover, it remains elusive to which extent receptor-ligand interactions and early binding events define the subsequent intracellular fate of phagosomes. Here, we used latex beads coupled to single ligands, focusing on immunoglobulin G, mannan, bacterial lipopolysaccharides and avidin, and monitored: (1) phagocytic uptake rates, (2) fusion of phagosomes with lysosomal compartments, (3) the gene expression profile during phagocytosis, (4) the protein composition of mature phagosomes and (5) time-dependent dynamics of protein association with phagosomes in J774.A1 mouse macrophages. The differently coated latex beads were internalized at different rates and exhibited different kinetics of phagolysosomal fusion events dependent on their specific ligand. Furthermore, less than 60% of identified phagosomal proteins and only 10-15% of changes in gene expression were common to all investigated ligands. These findings demonstrate that each single ligand induced a distinct pattern of genes and a different protein composition of phagosomes. Taken together, our data argue that phagocytic receptor-specific programs of signaling events direct phagosomes to different physiological states and support the existence of a specific receptor-ligand 'signature' during the whole process of phagocytosis. PMID:20579766

  6. Differential regulation of phagosome maturation in macrophages and dendritic cells mediated by Rho GTPases and ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Erwig, Lars-Peter; McPhilips, Kathleen A.; Wynes, Murray W.; Ivetic, Alexander; Ridley, Anne J.; Henson, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Deletion of apoptotic cells from tissues involves their phagocytosis by macrophages, dendritic cells, and tissue cells. Although much attention has been focused on the participating ligands, receptors, and mechanisms of uptake, little is known of the disposition of the ingested cell within the phagosome. Here we show that uptake of apoptotic cells by macrophages or fibroblasts results in rapid phagosome maturation, whereas macrophage phagosomes containing Ig-opsonized target cells mature at a slower rate. The early maturation was shown to depend on activation of Rho acting through Rho kinase on ezrin–radixin–moesin proteins. Blockade of Rho signaling or inhibition of moesin both delayed maturation rates to those seen with opsonized targets. By contrast, phagosome maturation in dendritic cells was slower, similar between apoptotic and opsonized target cells, and unaffected by Rho inhibition. These observations have direct implications for the clearance of dying cells and the roles played by different phagocytes in antigen digestion and presentation. PMID:16908865

  7. Molecular Complexity Orchestrates Modulation of Phagosome Biogenesis and Escape to the Cytosol of macrophages by Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Rexford; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2010-01-01

    Upon entry of Francisella tularensis to macrophages, the Francisella-containing phagosome (FCP) is trafficked into an acidified late endosome-like phagosome with limited fusion to the lysosomes followed by rapid escape into the cytosol where the organism replicates. Although the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), which encodes a type VI-like secretion apparatus, is required for modulation of phagosome biogenesis and escape into the cytosol, the mechanisms involved are not known. To decipher the molecular bases of modulation of biogenesis of the FCP and bacterial escape into the macrophage cytosol, we have screened a comprehensive mutant library of F. tularensis subsp novicida for their defect in proliferation within human macrophages, followed by characterization of modulation of phagosome biogenesis and bacterial escape into the cytosol. Our data show that at least 202 genes are required for intracellular proliferation within macrophages. Among the 125 most defective mutants in intracellular proliferation, we show that the FCP of at least 91 mutants co-localize persistently with the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1 and fail to escape into the cytosol, as determined by fluorescence-based phagosome integrity assays and transmission electron microscopy. At least 34 genes are required for proliferation within the cytosol but do not play a detectable role in modulation of phagosome biogenesis and bacterial escape into the cytosol. Our data indicate a tremendous adaptation and metabolic reprogramming by F. tularensis to adjust to the micro-environmental and nutritional cues within the FCP, and these adjustments play essential roles in modulation of phagosome biogenesis and escape into the cytosol of macrophages as well as proliferation in the cytosol. The plethora of the networks of genes that orchestrate F. tularensis-mediated modulation of phagosome biogenesis, phagosomal escape, and bacterial proliferation within the cytosol is novel, complex, and involves

  8. Naturally produced opsonizing antibodies restrict the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages by augmenting phagosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashi Kant; Singh, Padam; Sinha, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that serum antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in naturally infected healthy subjects of a tuberculosis (TB) endemic area could create and/or sustain the latent form of infection. All five apparently healthy Indian donors showed high titres of serum antibodies against M. tuberculosis cell membrane antigens, including lipoarabinomannan and alpha crystallin. Uptake and killing of bacilli by the donor macrophages was significantly enhanced following their opsonization with antibody-rich, heat-inactivated autologous sera. However, the capability to opsonize was apparent for antibodies against some and not other antigens. High-content cell imaging of infected macrophages revealed significantly enhanced colocalization of the phagosome maturation marker LAMP-1, though not of calmodulin, with antibody-opsonized compared with unopsonized M. tuberculosis. Key enablers of macrophage microbicidal action—proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-6), phagosome acidification, inducible NO synthase and nitric oxide—were also significantly enhanced following antibody opsonization. Interestingly, heat-killed M. tuberculosis also elevated these mediators to the levels comparable to, if not higher than, opsonized M. tuberculosis. Results of the study support the emerging view that an efficacious vaccine against TB should, apart from targeting cell-mediated immunity, also generate ‘protective’ antibodies. PMID:26674415

  9. Inhalable microparticles of nitric oxide donors induce phagosome maturation and kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rahul Kumar; Agrawal, Atul Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Mohan, Mradul; Gupta, Anuradha; Gupta, Pushpa; Gupta, Umesh Datta; Misra, Amit

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) kills Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vitro, but gaseous NO is difficult to administer to patients. We evaluated the consequences of intracellular delivery of NO using inhalable microparticles (MP) containing NO donors. MP containing 10% w/w of NO donors alone, or in addition to 25% each of isoniazid (INH) and rifabutin (RFB) in a polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) matrix were prepared by spray drying. THP-1-derived macrophages infected with Mtb H37Rv were exposed to MP or soluble NO donors. Phagosome-lysosome fusion (PLF) and bacterial killing were monitored. Colony forming units (cfu) in lungs and spleen of mice infected with a low-dose aerosol and administered inhalations of MP were enumerated. Bacterial DNA in these tissues was estimated by real-time PCR. In vitro studies indicated a bacteriostatic effect of NO donors despite significant enhancement of PLF. Daily inhalation of MP containing 10% diethylenetriamine nitric oxide adduct (DETA/NO) alone reduced log10 cfu in the lungs from 6.1 to 4.4 at the highest dose in four weeks, but did not significantly affect cfu in the spleen. Inhalations of MP containing DETA/NO in combination with INH and RFB significantly (P < 10(-5), ANOVA) reduced cfu in lungs and spleens by 4 log. Gross morphology and histology of the lungs and spleen indicated that inhaled particles were well-tolerated. Inhalable MP containing NO donors need further investigation as an adjunct to standard anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. PMID:23562366

  10. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W-W; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J; Brown, David A; Breit, Samuel N

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1(-/-)) and wild-type (CLIC1(+/+)) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1(-/-) BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1(+/+), but not CLIC1(-/-) cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1(-/-) BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  11. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  12. Intracellular chloride channel protein CLIC1 regulates macrophage function through modulation of phagosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lele; Salao, Kanin; Li, Hui; Rybicka, Joanna M.; Yates, Robin M.; Luo, Xu Wei; Shi, Xin Xin; Kuffner, Tamara; Tsai, Vicky Wang-Wei; Husaini, Yasmin; Wu, Liyun; Brown, David A.; Grewal, Thomas; Brown, Louise J.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Breit, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is a 241 amino acid protein of the glutathione S transferase fold family with redox- and pH-dependent membrane association and chloride ion channel activity. Whilst CLIC proteins are evolutionarily conserved in Metazoa, indicating an important role, little is known about their biology. CLIC1 was first cloned on the basis of increased expression in activated macrophages. We therefore examined its subcellular localisation in murine peritoneal macrophages by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. In resting cells, CLIC1 is observed in punctate cytoplasmic structures that do not colocalise with markers for endosomes or secretory vesicles. However, when these macrophages phagocytose serum-opsonised zymosan, CLIC1 translocates onto the phagosomal membrane. Macrophages from CLIC1−/− mice display a defect in phagosome acidification as determined by imaging live cells phagocytosing zymosan tagged with the pH-sensitive fluorophore Oregon Green. This altered phagosomal acidification was not accompanied by a detectable impairment in phagosomal-lysosomal fusion. However, consistent with a defect in acidification, CLIC1−/− macrophages also displayed impaired phagosomal proteolytic capacity and reduced reactive oxygen species production. Further, CLIC1−/− mice were protected from development of serum transfer induced K/BxN arthritis. These data all point to an important role for CLIC1 in regulating macrophage function through its ion channel activity and suggest it is a suitable target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22956539

  13. Actin-based phagosome motility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangliang; Southwick, Frederick S; Purich, Daniel L

    2002-10-01

    Despite abundant evidence of actin's involvement at the particle internalization stage of phagocytosis, little is known about whether phagosomes undergo the same type of actin-based motility as observed with endocytic vesicles or such intracellular pathogens as Listeria and Shigella. By employing video microscopy to follow the fate of latex bead-containing phagosomes within the cytoplasm of bone marrow macrophages, we have made the novel observation of actin-based phagosome motility. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized, bovine serum albumin (or BSA) -coated or uncoated latex beads all formed actin-rich rocket tails that persisted only during a brief, 1-2 min period of actin-based motility. Average speeds of actin-based phagosome motility were 0.13 +/- 0.06 microm/s for IgG-coated beads, 0.14 +/- 0.04 microm/s for BSA-coated beads, and 0.11+/- 0.03 microm/s for uncoated beads. Moreover, the speeds and motile-phase duration of each type of phagosome were comparable to the behavior of pinosomes [Merrifield et al., 1999: Nat. Cell Biol. 1:72-74.]. Determination of optimal conditions for observing and analyzing actin-based phagosome motility should facilitate future investigations of phagocytosis and phagosome maturation. PMID:12211106

  14. Candida albicans actively modulates intracellular membrane trafficking in mouse macrophage phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arenas, Elena; Bleck, Christopher K E; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha; Griffiths, Gareth; Diez-Orejas, Rosalía

    2009-04-01

    The intracellular trafficking/survival strategies of the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans are poorly understood. Here we investigated the infection of RAW264.7 macrophages with a virulent wild-type (WT) filamentous C. albicans strain and a hyphal signalling-defective mutant (efg1Delta/cph1Delta). A comparative analysis of the acquisition by phagosomes of actin, and of early/late endocytic organelles markers of the different fungal strains was performed and related to Candida's survival inside macrophages. Our results show that both fungal strains have evolved a similar mechanism to subvert the 'lysosomal' system, as seen by the inhibition of the phagosome fusion with compartments enriched in the lysobisphosphatidic acid and the vATPase, and thereby the acquisition of a low pH from the outset of infection. Besides, the virulent WT strain displayed additional specific survival strategies to prevent its targeting to compartmentsdisplaying late endosomal/lysosomal features, such as induction of active recycling out of phagosomes of the lysosomal membrane protein LAMP-1, the lysosomal protease cathepsin D and preinternalized colloidal gold. Finally, both virulent and efg1Delta/cph1Delta mutant fungal strains actively suppressed the production of macrophage nitric oxide (NO), although their cell wall extracts were potent inducers of NO. PMID:19134116

  15. Isolation of bacteria-containing phagosomes by magnetic selection

    PubMed Central

    Lönnbro, Per; Nordenfelt, Pontus; Tapper, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a growing awareness of the importance of intracellular events in determining the outcome of infectious disease. To improve the understanding of such events, like phagosome maturation, we set out to develop a versatile technique for phagosome isolation that is rapid and widely applicable to different pathogens. Results We developed two different protocols to isolate phagosomes containing dead or live bacteria modified with small magnetic particles, in conjunction with a synchronized phagocytosis protocol and nitrogen cavitation. For dead bacteria, we performed analysis of the phagosome samples by microscopy and immunoblot, and demonstrated the appearance of maturation markers on isolated phagosomes. Conclusion We have presented detailed protocols for phagosome isolation, which can be adapted for use with different cell types and prey. The versatility and simplicity of the approach allow better control of phagosome isolation, the parameters of which are critical in studies of host-bacteria interaction and phagosome maturation. PMID:18588680

  16. Insufficient Generation of Mycobactericidal Mediators and Inadequate Level of Phagosomal Maturation Are Related with Susceptibility to Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Ji; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Jung, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and it remains major life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Although, M. tuberculosis has infected one-third of the present human population, only 5-10% of immunocompetent individuals are genetically susceptible to tuberculosis. All inbred strains of mice are susceptible to tuberculosis; however, some mouse strains are much more susceptible than others. In a previous report, we showed that Th1-mediated immunity was not responsible for the differential susceptibility between mouse models. To examine whether these susceptibility differences between inbred mouse strains are due to the insufficient production of effector molecules in the early stage of innate immunity, we investigated mycobacteriostatic function of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in resistant (BALB/c and C57BL/6) and susceptible strains (DBA/2) that were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis (H37Rv) or attenuated M. tuberculosis (H37Ra). The growth rate of virulent M. tuberculosis in infected cells was significantly higher in DBA/2 BMDMs, whereas the growth of the attenuated strain was similar in the three inbred mouse BMDM strains. In addition, the death rate of M. tuberculosis-infected cells increased with the infectious dose when DBA/2 BMDMs were infected with H37Rv. The intracellular reactive oxygen species level was lower in DBA/2 BMDMs that were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis at an early post-infection time point. The expression levels of phagosomal maturation markers, including early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1) and lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), were significantly decreased in DBA/2 BMDM that were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis, whereas IFNγ-treatment restored the phagosomal maturation activity. The nitric oxide (NO) production levels were also significantly lower in DBA/2 BMDMs that were infected with virulent H37Rv at late post-infection points; however, this was not observed

  17. Insufficient Generation of Mycobactericidal Mediators and Inadequate Level of Phagosomal Maturation Are Related with Susceptibility to Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Ji; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Jung, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and it remains major life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Although, M. tuberculosis has infected one-third of the present human population, only 5–10% of immunocompetent individuals are genetically susceptible to tuberculosis. All inbred strains of mice are susceptible to tuberculosis; however, some mouse strains are much more susceptible than others. In a previous report, we showed that Th1-mediated immunity was not responsible for the differential susceptibility between mouse models. To examine whether these susceptibility differences between inbred mouse strains are due to the insufficient production of effector molecules in the early stage of innate immunity, we investigated mycobacteriostatic function of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in resistant (BALB/c and C57BL/6) and susceptible strains (DBA/2) that were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis (H37Rv) or attenuated M. tuberculosis (H37Ra). The growth rate of virulent M. tuberculosis in infected cells was significantly higher in DBA/2 BMDMs, whereas the growth of the attenuated strain was similar in the three inbred mouse BMDM strains. In addition, the death rate of M. tuberculosis-infected cells increased with the infectious dose when DBA/2 BMDMs were infected with H37Rv. The intracellular reactive oxygen species level was lower in DBA/2 BMDMs that were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis at an early post-infection time point. The expression levels of phagosomal maturation markers, including early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1) and lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), were significantly decreased in DBA/2 BMDM that were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis, whereas IFNγ-treatment restored the phagosomal maturation activity. The nitric oxide (NO) production levels were also significantly lower in DBA/2 BMDMs that were infected with virulent H37Rv at late post-infection points; however, this was not observed

  18. Dectin-1 Controls TLR9 Trafficking to Phagosomes Containing β-1,3 Glucan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nida S; Kasperkovitz, Pia V; Timmons, Allison K; Mansour, Michael K; Tam, Jenny M; Seward, Michael W; Reedy, Jennifer L; Puranam, Sravanthi; Feliu, Marianela; Vyas, Jatin M

    2016-03-01

    Dectin-1 and TLR9 play distinct roles in the recognition and induction of innate immune responses to Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. Dectin-1 is a receptor for the major fungal cell wall carbohydrate β-1,3 glucan that induces inflammatory cytokines and controls phagosomal maturation through spleen tyrosine kinase activation. TLR9 is an endosomal TLR that also modulates the inflammatory cytokine response to fungal pathogens. In this study, we demonstrate that β-1,3 glucan beads are sufficient to induce dynamic redistribution and accumulation of cleaved TLR9 to phagosomes. Trafficking of TLR9 to A. fumigatus and C. albicans phagosomes requires Dectin-1 recognition. Inhibition of phagosomal acidification blocks TLR9 accumulation on phagosomes containing β-1,3 glucan beads. Dectin-1-mediated spleen tyrosine kinase activation is required for TLR9 trafficking to β-1,3 glucan-, A. fumigatus-, and C. albicans-containing phagosomes. In addition, Dectin-1 regulates TLR9-dependent gene expression. Collectively, our study demonstrates that recognition of β-1,3 glucan by Dectin-1 triggers TLR9 trafficking to β-1,3 glucan-containing phagosomes, which may be critical in coordinating innate antifungal defense. PMID:26829985

  19. Drosophila mauve mutants reveal a role of LYST homologs late in the maturation of phagosomes and autophagosomes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mokhlasur; Haberman, Adam; Tracy, Charles; Ray, Sanchali; Krämer, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a lethal disease caused by mutations that inactivate the lysosomal trafficking regulator protein (LYST). Patients suffer from diverse symptoms including oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, neutropenia and progressive neurodegeneration. These defects have been traced back to over-sized lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) in different cell types. Here, we explore mutants in the Drosophila mauve gene as a new model system for CHS. The mauve gene (CG42863) encodes a large BEACH domain protein of 3535 amino acids similar to LYST. This reflects a functional homology between these proteins as mauve mutants also display enlarged LROs, such as pigment granules. This Drosophila model also replicates the enhanced susceptibility to infections and we show a defect in the cellular immune response. Early stages of phagocytosis proceed normally in mauve mutant hemocytes but, unlike in wild type, late phagosomes fuse and generate large vacuoles containing many bacteria. Autophagy is similarly affected in mauve fat bodies as starvation-induced autophagosomes grow beyond their normal size. Together these data suggest a model in which Mauve functions to restrict homotypic fusion of different pre-lysosomal organelles and LROs. PMID:22934826

  20. The Early Phagosomal Stage of Francisella tularensis Determines Optimal Phagosomal Escape and Francisella Pathogenicity Island Protein Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D.; Nair, Vinod; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Barker, Jeffrey R.; Klose, Karl E.; Celli, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen that can survive and replicate within macrophages. Following phagocytosis and transient interactions with the endocytic pathway, F. tularensis rapidly escapes from its original phagosome into the macrophage cytoplasm, where it eventually replicates. To examine the importance of the nascent phagosome for the Francisella intracellular cycle, we have characterized early trafficking events of the F. tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu S4 in a murine bone marrow-derived macrophage model. Here we show that early phagosomes containing Schu S4 transiently interact with early and late endosomes and become acidified before the onset of phagosomal disruption. Inhibition of endosomal acidification with the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A prior to infection significantly delayed but did not block phagosomal escape and cytosolic replication, indicating that maturation of the early Francisella-containing phagosome (FCP) is important for optimal phagosomal escape and subsequent intracellular growth. Further, Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) protein expression was induced during early intracellular trafficking events. Although inhibition of endosomal acidification mimicked the early phagosomal escape defects caused by mutation of the FPI-encoded IglCD proteins, it did not inhibit the intracellular induction of FPI proteins, demonstrating that this response is independent of phagosomal pH. Altogether, these results demonstrate that early phagosomal maturation is required for optimal phagosomal escape and that the early FCP provides cues other than intravacuolar pH that determine intracellular induction of FPI proteins. PMID:18852245

  1. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  2. The Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin Phagosome Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Jethwaney, Deepa; Schilling, Birgit; Clemens, Daniel L.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) alter the maturation of their phagosomes and reside within a compartment that resists acidification and fusion with lysosomes. To define the molecular composition of this compartment, we developed a novel method for obtaining highly purified phagosomes from BCG-infected human macrophages and analyzed the phagosomes by Western immunoblotting and mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Our purification procedure revealed that BCG grown on artificial medium becomes less dense after growth in macrophages. By Western immunoblotting, LAMP-2, Niemann-Pick protein C1, and syntaxin 3 were readily detectable on the BCG phagosome but at levels that were lower than on the latex bead phagosome; flotillin-1 and the vacuolar ATPase were barely detectable on the BCG phagosome but highly enriched on the latex bead phagosome. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed the scarcity of flotillin on BCG phagosomes and demonstrated an inverse correlation between bacterial metabolic activity and flotillin on M. tuberculosis phagosomes. By mass spectrometry, 447 human host proteins were identified on BCG phagosomes, and a partially overlapping set of 289 human proteins on latex bead phagosomes was identified. Interestingly, the majority of the proteins identified consistently on BCG phagosome preparations were also identified on latex bead phagosomes, indicating a high degree of overlap in protein composition of these two compartments. It is likely that many differences in protein composition are quantitative rather than qualitative in nature. Despite the remarkable overlap in protein composition, we consistently identified a number of proteins on the BCG phagosomes that were not identified in any of our latex bead phagosome preparations, including proteins involved in membrane trafficking and signal transduction, such as Ras GTPase-activating-like protein IQGAP1, and proteins of unknown function, such as FAM3C. Our

  3. LAMP proteins are required for fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Kassidy K; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Scott, Cameron C; Malevanets, Anatoly; Saftig, Paul; Grinstein, Sergio

    2007-01-24

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are delivered to phagosomes during the maturation process. We used cells from LAMP-deficient mice to analyze the role of these proteins in phagosome maturation. Macrophages from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2-deficient mice displayed normal fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes. Because ablation of both the lamp-1 and lamp-2 genes yields an embryonic-lethal phenotype, we were unable to study macrophages from double knockouts. Instead, we reconstituted phagocytosis in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by transfection of FcgammaIIA receptors. Phagosomes formed by FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs obtained from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2- deficient mice acquired lysosomal markers. Remarkably, although FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs from double-deficient mice ingested particles normally, phagosomal maturation was arrested. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 double-deficient phagosomes acquired Rab5 and accumulated phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, but failed to recruit Rab7 and did not fuse with lysosomes. We attribute the deficiency to impaired organellar motility along microtubules. Time-lapse cinematography revealed that late endosomes/lysosomes as well as phagosomes lacking LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 had reduced ability to move toward the microtubule-organizing center, likely precluding their interaction with each other. PMID:17245426

  4. Induction of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase reduces early endosome autoantigen 1 (EEA1) recruitment to phagosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Fratti, Rutilio A; Chua, Jennifer; Deretic, Vojo

    2003-11-21

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives in the infected host by parasitizing macrophages in which the bacillus resides in a specialized phagosome sequestered from the phagolysosomal degradative pathway. Here we report a role of the stress-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in the component of M. tuberculosis phagosome maturation arrest that has been linked previously to the reduced recruitment of the endosomal and phagosomal membrane-tethering molecule called early endosome autoantigen 1 (EEA1; Fratti, R. A., Backer, J. M., Gruenberg, J., Corvera, S., and Deretic, V. (2001) J. Cell Biol. 154, 631-644). A pharmacological inhibition of M. tuberculosis var. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-induced p38 MAPK activity caused a marked increase in EEA1 colocalization with mycobacterial phagosomes. Consistent with the increase in EEA1 association and its role in phagosomal maturation, the pharmacological block of p38 activity caused phagosomal acidification and enrichment of the late endocytic markers lysobisphosphatidic acid and CD63 (lysosomal integral membrane protein 1) on mycobacterial phagosomes. A negative regulatory role of p38 MAPK activation in phagosome maturation was further demonstrated by converse experiments with latex bead phagosomes. Artificial activation of p38 MAPK caused a decrease in EEA1 colocalization with model latex bead phagosomes, which normally acquire EEA1 and subsequently mature into the phagolysosome. These findings show that p38 MAPK activity contributes to the arrest of M. tuberculosis phagosome maturation and demonstrate a negative regulatory role of p38 in phagolysosome biogenesis. PMID:12963735

  5. Cell-free fusion of bacteria-containing phagosomes with endocytic compartments

    PubMed Central

    Becken, Ulrike; Jeschke, Andreas; Veltman, Katharina; Haas, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Uptake of microorganisms by professional phagocytic cells leads to formation of a new subcellular compartment, the phagosome, which matures by sequential fusion with early and late endocytic compartments, resulting in oxidative and nonoxidative killing of the enclosed microbe. Few tools are available to study membrane fusion between phagocytic and late endocytic compartments in general and with pathogen-containing phagosomes in particular. We have developed and applied a fluorescence microscopy assay to study fusion of microbe-containing phagosomes with different-aged endocytic compartments in vitro. This revealed that fusion of phagosomes containing nonpathogenic Escherichia coli with lysosomes requires Rab7 and SNARE proteins but not organelle acidification. In vitro fusion experiments with phagosomes containing pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium indicated that reduced fusion of these phagosomes with early and late endocytic compartments was independent of endosome and cytosol sources and, hence, a consequence of altered phagosome quality. PMID:21071675

  6. Cell-free fusion of bacteria-containing phagosomes with endocytic compartments.

    PubMed

    Becken, Ulrike; Jeschke, Andreas; Veltman, Katharina; Haas, Albert

    2010-11-30

    Uptake of microorganisms by professional phagocytic cells leads to formation of a new subcellular compartment, the phagosome, which matures by sequential fusion with early and late endocytic compartments, resulting in oxidative and nonoxidative killing of the enclosed microbe. Few tools are available to study membrane fusion between phagocytic and late endocytic compartments in general and with pathogen-containing phagosomes in particular. We have developed and applied a fluorescence microscopy assay to study fusion of microbe-containing phagosomes with different-aged endocytic compartments in vitro. This revealed that fusion of phagosomes containing nonpathogenic Escherichia coli with lysosomes requires Rab7 and SNARE proteins but not organelle acidification. In vitro fusion experiments with phagosomes containing pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium indicated that reduced fusion of these phagosomes with early and late endocytic compartments was independent of endosome and cytosol sources and, hence, a consequence of altered phagosome quality. PMID:21071675

  7. Vacuolar ATPase in Phagosome-Lysosome Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kissing, Sandra; Hermsen, Christina; Repnik, Urska; Nesset, Cecilie Kåsi; von Bargen, Kristine; Griffiths, Gareth; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Lee, Beth S.; Schwake, Michael; De Brabander, Jef; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (v-ATPase) complex is instrumental in establishing and maintaining acidification of some cellular compartments, thereby ensuring their functionality. Recently it has been proposed that the transmembrane V0 sector of v-ATPase and its a-subunits promote membrane fusion in the endocytic and exocytic pathways independent of their acidification functions. Here, we tested if such a proton-pumping independent role of v-ATPase also applies to phagosome-lysosome fusion. Surprisingly, endo(lyso)somes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the V0 a3 subunit of the v-ATPase acidified normally, and endosome and lysosome marker proteins were recruited to phagosomes with similar kinetics in the presence or absence of the a3 subunit. Further experiments used macrophages with a knockdown of v-ATPase accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2) expression, resulting in a strongly reduced level of the V0 sector of the v-ATPase. However, acidification appeared undisturbed, and fusion between latex bead-containing phagosomes and lysosomes, as analyzed by electron microscopy, was even slightly enhanced, as was killing of non-pathogenic bacteria by V0 mutant macrophages. Pharmacologically neutralized lysosome pH did not affect maturation of phagosomes in mouse embryonic cells or macrophages. Finally, locking the two large parts of the v-ATPase complex together by the drug saliphenylhalamide A did not inhibit in vitro and in cellulo fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Hence, our data do not suggest a fusion-promoting role of the v-ATPase in the formation of phagolysosomes. PMID:25903133

  8. Neisseria gonorrhoeae phagosomes delay fusion with primary granules to enhance bacterial survival inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Brittany; Criss, Alison K

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) promotes inflammation driven by polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs, neutrophils), yet some Gc survive PMN exposure during infection. Here we report a novel mechanism of gonococcal resistance to PMNs: Gc phagosomes avoid maturation into phagolysosomes by delayed fusion with primary (azurophilic) granules, which contain antimicrobial components including serine proteases. Reduced phagosome-primary granule fusion was observed in gonorrheal exudates and human PMNs infected ex vivo. Delayed phagosome-granule fusion could be overcome by opsonizing Gc with immunoglobulin. Using bacterial viability dyes along with antibodies to primary granules revealed that Gc survival in PMNs correlated with early residence in primary granule-negative phagosomes. However, when Gc was killed prior to PMN exposure, dead bacteria were also found in primary granule-negative phagosomes. These results suggest that Gc surface characteristics, rather than active bacterial processes, influence phagosome maturation and that Gc death inside PMNs occurs after phagosome-granule fusion. Ectopically increasing primary granule-phagosome fusion, by immunoglobulin opsonization or PMN treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine, reduced intracellular Gc viability, which was attributed in part to serine protease activity. We conclude that one method for Gc to avoid PMN clearance in acute gonorrhoea is by delaying primary granule-phagosome fusion, thus preventing formation of a degradative phagolysosome. PMID:23374609

  9. Modulation of phagosomal pH by Candida albicans promotes hyphal morphogenesis and requires Stp2p, a regulator of amino acid transport.

    PubMed

    Vylkova, Slavena; Lorenz, Michael C

    2014-03-01

    Candida albicans, the most important fungal pathogen of humans, has a unique interaction with macrophages in which phagocytosis induces a switch from the yeast to hyphal form, allowing it to escape by rupturing the immune cell. While a variety of factors induce this switch in vitro, including neutral pH, it is not clear what triggers morphogenesis within the macrophage where the acidic environment should inhibit this transition. In vitro, C. albicans grown in similar conditions in which amino acids are the primary carbon source generate large quantities of ammonia to raise the extracellular pH and induce the hyphal switch. We show here that C. albicans cells neutralize the macrophage phagosome and that neutral pH is a key inducer of germination in phagocytosed cells by using a mutant lacking STP2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple amino acid permeases, that is completely deficient in alkalinization in vitro. Phagocytosed stp2Δ mutant cells showed significant reduction in hypha formation and escaped from macrophages less readily compared to wild type cells; as a result stp2Δ mutant cells were killed at a higher rate and caused less damage to RAW264.7 macrophages. Stp2p-regulated import leads to alkalinization of the phagosome, since the majority of the wild type cells fail to co-localize with acidophilic dyes, whereas the stp2Δ mutant cells were located in acidic phagosomes. Furthermore, stp2Δ mutant cells were able to form hyphae and escape from neutral phagosomes, indicating that the survival defect in these cells was pH dependent. Finally, these defects are reflected in an attenuation of virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Altogether our results suggest that C. albicans utilizes amino acids to promote neutralization of the phagosomal pH, hyphal morphogenesis, and escape from macrophages. PMID:24626429

  10. Isolation of bead phagosomes to study virulence function of M. tuberculosis cell wall lipids.

    PubMed

    Geffken, Anna C; Patin, Emmanuel C; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Following pathogen recognition by macrophages, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is internalized by receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Phagosomes containing nonpathogenic bacteria usually follow a stepwise maturation process to phagolysosomes where bacteria are eliminated. However, as a hallmark of M. tuberculosis virulence, pathogenic mycobacteria inhibit phagosome maturation in order to generate an intracellular niche for persistence and replication in resting macrophages. In contrast, activation by interferon gamma and tumor necrosis alpha activates microbicidal effectors of macrophages such as nitric oxide synthase, NO-mediated apoptosis and LRG-47-linked autophagy, which drives M. tuberculosis into phagolysosomes. Glycolipid compounds of the mycobacterial cell wall have been suggested as virulence factors and several studies revealed their contribution to mycobacterial interference with phagosome maturation. To study their effect on phagosome maturation and to characterize phagosomal protein and lipid compositions, we developed a reductionist mycobacterial lipid-coated bead model. Here, we provide protocols to "infect" macrophages with lipid-coated magnetic beads for subsequent purification and characterization of bead phagosomes. This model has been successfully employed to characterize the virulence properties of trehalose dimycolate, as one of the cell wall glycolipids essential for inhibition of phagosome maturation. PMID:25779328

  11. Kinetics and strain variation of phagosome proteins of Entamoeba histolytica by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mami; Huston, Christopher D; Oue, Miho; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A; Kita, Kiyoshi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2006-02-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica ingests and feeds on microorganisms and mammalian cells. Phagocytosis is essential for cell growth and implicated in pathogenesis of E. histolytica. We report here the dynamic changes of phagosome proteins during phagosome maturation by proteomic analysis using reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography and ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. Phagosomes were isolated at various intervals after internalization of latex beads. Immunoblot analysis and electron microscopy verified successful isolation of phagosomes. A total of 159 proteins were identified from the reference strain HM1 at different stages of phagosome maturation. Approximately 70% of them were detected in a time-dependent fashion, suggesting dynamism of phagosome biogenesis. The kinetics of representative proteins were verified by immunoblots and also by video microscopy of live transgenic amebae expressing green fluorescent protein-fused EhRab7A. Furthermore, we observed significant differences in phagosome profiles between HM1 and two recent clinical isolates. Approximately 60% of 229 proteins detected in at least one of these three strains were identified only in one strain, while approximately 20% of these proteins were detected in all three strains. These data should provide significant insights into molecular characterization of phagosome biogenesis, and help to elucidate the pathogenesis of this important infection. PMID:16290089

  12. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  13. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-02-11

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  14. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G.; Boynton, Lin S.; Eguchi, Raphael R.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E.; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J.; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Villereal, Mitchel L.; Beacham, Daniel W.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H+ into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  15. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function.

    PubMed

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G; Boynton, Lin S; Eguchi, Raphael R; Deriy, Ludmila V; Hogarth, D Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Villereal, Mitchel L; Beacham, Daniel W; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J

    2015-11-24

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H(+) into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  16. Force dependence of phagosome trafficking in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Rebekah; Koll, Andrew T.; Altman, David

    2014-09-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play an integral role in the renewal of photoreceptor disk membranes. As rod and cone cells shed their outer segments, they are phagocytosed and degraded by the RPE, and a failure in this process can result in retinal degeneration. We have studied the role of myosin VI in nonspecific phagocytosis in a human RPE primary cell line (ARPE-19), testing the hypothesis that this motor generates the forces required to traffic phagosomes in these cells. Experiments were conducted in the presence of forces through the use of in vivo optical trapping. Our results support a role for myosin VI in phagosome trafficking and demonstrate that applied forces modulate rates of phagosome trafficking.

  17. Measuring Phagosome pH by Ratiometric Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula; Guido, Daniele; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental process through which innate immune cells engulf bacteria, apoptotic cells or other foreign particles in order to kill or neutralize the ingested material, or to present it as antigens and initiate adaptive immune responses. The pH of phagosomes is a critical parameter regulating fission or fusion with endomembranes and activation of proteolytic enzymes, events that allow the phagocytic vacuole to mature into a degradative organelle. In addition, translocation of H(+) is required for the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are essential for efficient killing and signaling to other host tissues. Many intracellular pathogens subvert phagocytic killing by limiting phagosomal acidification, highlighting the importance of pH in phagosome biology. Here we describe a ratiometric method for measuring phagosomal pH in neutrophils using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled zymosan as phagocytic targets, and live-cell imaging. The assay is based on the fluorescence properties of FITC, which is quenched by acidic pH when excited at 490 nm but not when excited at 440 nm, allowing quantification of a pH-dependent ratio, rather than absolute fluorescence, of a single dye. A detailed protocol for performing in situ dye calibration and conversion of ratio to real pH values is also provided. Single-dye ratiometric methods are generally considered superior to single wavelength or dual-dye pseudo-ratiometric protocols, as they are less sensitive to perturbations such as bleaching, focus changes, laser variations, and uneven labeling, which distort the measured signal. This method can be easily modified to measure pH in other phagocytic cell types, and zymosan can be replaced by any other amine-containing particle, from inert beads to living microorganisms. Finally, this method can be adapted to make use of other fluorescent probes sensitive to different pH ranges or other phagosomal activities, making it a generalized

  18. Intact Lysosome Transport and Phagosome Function Despite Kinectin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Plitz, Thomas; Pfeffer, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of cargo coupling to kinesin motor proteins is a fundamental issue in organelle transport along microtubules. Kinectin has been postulated to function as a membrane anchor protein that attaches various organelles to the prototype motor protein kinesin. To verify the biological relevance of kinectin in vivo, the murine kinectin gene was disrupted by homologous recombination. Unexpectedly, kinectin-deficient mice were viable and fertile, and no gross abnormalities were observed up to 1 year of age. The assembly of the endoplasmic reticulum was essentially unaffected in kinectin-deficient cells. Mitochondria appeared to be correctly distributed throughout the cytoplasm along the microtubules. Furthermore, the stationary distribution and the bidirectional movement of lysosomes did not depend on kinectin. Kinectin-deficient phagocytes internalized and cleared bacteria, indicating that phagosome trafficking and maturation are functional without kinectin. Thus, these data unequivocally indicate that kinectin is not essential for trafficking of lysosomes, phagosomes, and mitochondria in vivo. PMID:11486041

  19. The Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan excludes the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes by impairing the recruitment of synaptotagmin V.

    PubMed

    Vinet, Adrien F; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Turco, Salvatore J; Descoteaux, Albert

    2009-10-01

    We recently showed that the exocytosis regulator Synaptotagmin (Syt) V is recruited to the nascent phagosome and remains associated throughout the maturation process. In this study, we investigated the possibility that Syt V plays a role in regulating interactions between the phagosome and the endocytic organelles. Silencing of Syt V by RNA interference revealed that Syt V contributes to phagolysosome biogenesis by regulating the acquisition of cathepsin D and the vesicular proton-ATPase. In contrast, recruitment of cathepsin B, the early endosomal marker EEA1 and the lysosomal marker LAMP1 to phagosomes was normal in the absence of Syt V. As Leishmania donovani promastigotes inhibit phagosome maturation, we investigated their potential impact on the phagosomal association of Syt V. This inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis is mediated by the virulence glycolipid lipophosphoglycan, a polymer of the repeating Galbeta1,4Manalpha1-PO(4) units attached to the promastigote surface via an unusual glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Our results showed that insertion of lipophosphoglycan into ganglioside GM1-containing microdomains excluded or caused dissociation of Syt V from phagosome membranes. As a consequence, L. donovani promatigotes established infection in a phagosome from which the vesicular proton-ATPase was excluded and which failed to acidify. Collectively, these results reveal a novel function for Syt V in phagolysosome biogenesis and provide novel insight into the mechanism of vesicular proton-ATPase recruitment to maturing phagosomes. We also provide novel findings into the mechanism of Leishmania pathogenesis, whereby targeting of Syt V is part of the strategy used by L. donovani promastigotes to prevent phagosome acidification. PMID:19834555

  20. Molecular requirements for bi-directional movement of phagosomes along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Blocker, A; Severin, F F; Burkhardt, J K; Bingham, J B; Yu, H; Olivo, J C; Schroer, T A; Hyman, A A; Griffiths, G

    1997-04-01

    Microtubules facilitate the maturation of phagosomes by favoring their interactions with endocytic compartments. Here, we show that phagosomes move within cells along tracks of several microns centrifugally and centripetally in a pH- and microtubule-dependent manner. Phagosome movement was reconstituted in vitro and required energy, cytosol and membrane proteins of this organelle. The activity or presence of these phagosome proteins was regulated as the organelle matured, with "late" phagosomes moving threefold more frequently than "early" ones. The majority of moving phagosomes were minus-end directed; the remainder moved towards microtubule plus-ends and a small subset moved bi-directionally. Minus-end movement showed pharmacological characteristics expected for dyneins, was inhibited by immunodepletion of cytoplasmic dynein and could be restored by addition of cytoplasmic dynein. Plus-end movement displayed pharmacological properties of kinesin, was inhibited partially by immunodepletion of kinesin and fully by addition of an anti-kinesin IgG. Immunodepletion of dynactin, a dynein-activating complex, inhibited only minus-end directed motility. Evidence is provided for a dynactin-associated kinase required for dynein-mediated vesicle transport. Movement in both directions was inhibited by peptide fragments from kinectin (a putative kinesin membrane receptor), derived from the region to which a motility-blocking antibody binds. Polypeptide subunits from these microtubule-based motility factors were detected on phagosomes by immunoblotting or immunoelectron microscopy. This is the first study using a single in vitro system that describes the roles played by kinesin, kinectin, cytoplasmic dynein, and dynactin in the microtubule-mediated movement of a purified membrane organelle. PMID:9105041

  1. Analysis of phagosomal proteomes: From latex-bead to bacterial phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingbo; Jagannath, Chinnaswamy; Rao, Prahlad K.; Singh, Christopher R.; Lostumbo, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Phagosomal proteome characterization has contributed significantly to the understanding of host–pathogen interaction and the mechanism of infectious diseases caused by intracellular bacteria. The latex bead-containing phagosome has been widely used as a model system to study phagosomal proteomes at a global level. In contrast, the study of bacteria-containing phagosomes at a similar level has just begun. A number of intracellular microbial species are studied for their proteomes during the invasion of a host, providing insight into their metabolic adaptation in host cells and interaction with host-cell antimicrobial environments. In this review, we attempt to summarize the most recent advancements in the proteomic study of microbial phagosomes, especially those originating from mouse or human cells. We also briefly describe the proteomics of latex bead-containing phagosomes because they are often used as model phagosomes for study. We provide descriptions on major biological and technological components in phagosomal proteome studies. We also discuss the role of phagosomal proteome study in the broader horizon of systems biology and the technological challenges in phagosomal proteome characterization. PMID:21080496

  2. Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein A is required for diversion of phagosome biogenesis but not for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    von Bargen, Kristine; Polidori, Marco; Becken, Ulrike; Huth, Gitta; Prescott, John F; Haas, Albert

    2009-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause severe bronchopneumonia in foals and AIDS patients. Virulence is plasmid regulated and is accompanied by phagosome maturation arrest and host cell necrosis. A replacement mutant in the gene for VapA (virulence-associated protein A), a major virulence factor of R. equi, was tested for its activities during macrophage infection. Early in infection, phagosomes containing the vapA mutant did not fuse with lysosomes and did not stain with the acidotropic fluor LysoTracker similar to those containing virulent wild-type R. equi. However, vapA mutant phagosomes had a lower average pH. Late in infection, phagosomes containing the vapA mutant were as frequently positive for LysoTracker as phagosomes containing plasmid-cured, avirulent bacteria, whereas those with virulent wild-type R. equi were still negative for the fluor. Macrophage necrosis after prolonged infection with virulent bacteria was accompanied by a loss of organelle staining with LysoTracker, suggesting that lysosome proton gradients had collapsed. The vapA mutant still killed the macrophages and yet did not affect the pH of host cell lysosomes. Hence, VapA is not required for host cell necrosis but is required for neutralization of phagosomes and lysosomes or their disruption. This is the first report of an R. equi mutant with altered phagosome biogenesis. PMID:19797071

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Strain USA300 Perturbs Acquisition of Lysosomal Enzymes and Requires Phagosomal Acidification for Survival inside Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tranchemontagne, Zachary R.; Camire, Ryan B.; O'Donnell, Vanessa J.; Baugh, Jessfor

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes invasive, drug-resistant skin and soft tissue infections. Reports that S. aureus bacteria survive inside macrophages suggest that the intramacrophage environment may be a niche for persistent infection; however, mechanisms by which the bacteria might evade macrophage phagosomal defenses are unclear. We examined the fate of the S. aureus-containing phagosome in THP-1 macrophages by evaluating bacterial intracellular survival and phagosomal acidification and maturation and by testing the impact of phagosomal conditions on bacterial viability. Multiple strains of S. aureus survived inside macrophages, and in studies using the MRSA USA300 clone, the USA300-containing phagosome acidified rapidly and acquired the late endosome and lysosome protein LAMP1. However, fewer phagosomes containing live USA300 bacteria than those containing dead bacteria associated with the lysosomal hydrolases cathepsin D and β-glucuronidase. Inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase activity had no impact on intracellular survival of USA300 or other S. aureus strains, suggesting that S. aureus perturbs acquisition of lysosomal enzymes. We examined the impact of acidification on S. aureus intramacrophage viability and found that inhibitors of phagosomal acidification significantly impaired USA300 intracellular survival. Inhibition of macrophage phagosomal acidification resulted in a 30-fold reduction in USA300 expression of the staphylococcal virulence regulator agr but had little effect on expression of sarA, saeR, or sigB. Bacterial exposure to acidic pH in vitro increased agr expression. Together, these results suggest that S. aureus survives inside macrophages by perturbing normal phagolysosome formation and that USA300 may sense phagosomal conditions and upregulate expression of a key virulence regulator that enables its intracellular survival. PMID:26502911

  4. Modulation of dendritic cell maturation and function by B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Hermine, Olivier; Tough, David F; Kaveri, Srini V

    2005-07-01

    Investigating the signals that regulate the function of dendritic cells (DC), the sentinels of the immune system, is critical to understanding the role of DC in the regulation of immune responses. Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that in addition to innate stimuli and T cell-derived signals, B lymphocytes exert a profound regulatory effect in vitro and in vivo on the Ag-presenting function of DC. The identification of B cells as a cellular source of cytokines, chemokines, and autoantibodies that are critically involved in the process of maturation, migration, and function of DC provides a rationale for immunotherapeutic intervention of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions by targeting B cells. Conversely, efficient cross-presentation of Ags by DC pulsed with immune complexes provides an alternative approach in the immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:15972625

  5. Hypoexpression of major histocompatibility complex molecules on Legionella pneumophila phagosomes and phagolysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, D L; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular pathogen that parasitizes host mononuclear phagocytes. Cell-mediated immunity is pivotal to host defense against L. pneumophila, and the infected host cell may play a central role in processing and presenting parasite antigens to lymphocytes mediating cell-mediated immune response. However, in the case of L. pneumophila and intracellular parasites in general, little is known about the intracellular trafficking of parasite antigens, the influence of parasite infection on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression, or the relationship of MHC molecules to sites of parasite replication. To learn more about this, we have used flow cytometry to study the expression of HLA-DR by monocytes infected with L. pneumophila and cryosection immunogold electron microscopy to study the distribution of MHC class I and II molecules on L. pneumophila phagosomes. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that L. pneumophila infection has little effect on the overall expression of HLA-DR by monocytes. Cryosection immunogold studies revealed abundant staining for MHC class I and II molecules on the plasma membrane of infected monocytes but little or no staining on the membranes of mature L. pneumophila phagosomes. Cryosection immunogold studies of an avirulent mutant of L. pneumophila that, unlike the wild type, does not inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion and subsequently survives but does not multiply in a phagolysosome yielded similar results. We have previously found that MHC class I and II molecules are excluded from nascent phagosomes during coiling and conventional phagocytosis. The present work demonstrates that MHC molecules do not accumulate appreciably in the L. pneumophila phagosome as it matures and at a point in the life cycle of the organism in which it is replicating and producing immunoprotective T-cell antigens. This suggests that L. pneumophila does not reside in a typical endosomal compartment in the host cell and

  6. Host Resistance to Intracellular Infection: Mutation of Natural Resistance-associated Macrophage Protein 1 (Nramp1) Impairs Phagosomal Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Hackam, David J.; Rotstein, Ori D.; Zhang, Wei-jian; Gruenheid, Samantha; Gros, Philippe; Grinstein, Sergio

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the survival of intracellular parasites such as mycobacteria in host macrophages remain poorly understood. In mice, mutations at the Nramp1 gene (for natural resistance-associated macrophage protein), cause susceptibility to mycobacterial infections. Nramp1 encodes an integral membrane protein that is recruited to the phagosome membrane in infected macrophages. In this study, we used microfluorescence ratio imaging of macrophages from wild-type and Nramp1 mutant mice to analyze the effect of loss of Nramp1 function on the properties of phagosomes containing inert particles or live mycobacteria. The pH of phagosomes containing live Mycobacterium bovis was significantly more acidic in Nramp1- expressing macrophages than in mutant cells (pH 5.5 ± 0.06 versus pH 6.6 ± 0.05, respectively; P <0.005). The enhanced acidification could not be accounted for by differences in proton consumption during dismutation of superoxide, phagosomal buffering power, counterion conductance, or in the rate of proton “leak”, as these were found to be comparable in wild-type and Nramp1-deficient macrophages. Rather, after ingestion of live mycobacteria, Nramp1-expressing cells exhibited increased concanamycin-sensitive H+ pumping across the phagosomal membrane. This was associated with an enhanced ability of phagosomes to fuse with vacuolar-type ATPase–containing late endosomes and/or lysosomes. This effect was restricted to live M. bovis and was not seen in phagosomes containing dead M. bovis or latex beads. These data support the notion that Nramp1 affects intracellular mycobacterial replication by modulating phagosomal pH, suggesting that Nramp1 plays a central role in this process. PMID:9670047

  7. Filamentous morphology of bacteria delays the timing of phagosome morphogenesis in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Prashar, Akriti; Bhatia, Sonam; Gigliozzi, Darren; Martin, Tonya; Duncan, Carla; Guyard, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Although filamentous morphology in bacteria has been associated with resistance to phagocytosis, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms behind this process is limited. To investigate this, we followed the phagocytosis of both viable and dead Legionella pneumophila filaments. The engulfment of these targets occurred gradually and along the longitudinal axis of the filament, therefore defining a long-lasting phagocytic cup stage that determined the outcome of phagocytosis. We found that these phagocytic cups fused with endosomes and lysosomes, events linked to the maturation of phagosomes according to the canonical pathway, and not with the remodeling of phagocytic cups. Nevertheless, despite acquiring phagolysosomal features these phagocytic cups failed to develop hydrolytic capacity before their sealing. This phenomenon hampered the microbicidal activity of the macrophage and enhanced the capacity of viable filamentous L. pneumophila to escape phagosomal killing in a length-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that key aspects in phagocytic cup remodeling and phagosomal maturation could be influenced by target morphology. PMID:24368810

  8. Phagosomal TLR signaling upon Borrelia burgdorferi infection

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Jorge L.; Hawley, Kelly L.; Benjamin, Sarah J.; Weinerman, Bennett; Luu, Stephanie M.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Internalization and degradation of live Bb within phagosomal compartments of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), allows for the release of lipoproteins, nucleic acids and other microbial products, triggering a broad and robust inflammatory response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key players in the recognition of spirochetal ligands from whole viable organisms (i.e., vita-PAMPs). Herein we will review the role of endosomal TLRs in the response to the Lyme disease spirochete. PMID:24904837

  9. KefB inhibits phagosomal acidification but its role is unrelated to M. tuberculosis survival in host

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Garima; Reddy, P. Vineel; Sidhwani, Pragya; Tyagi, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    kefB is annotated as a potassium/proton antiporter in M. tuberculosis. There have been divergent reports on the involvement of KefB in phagosomal maturation in M. bovis BCG and no investigation has been carried out on its role in M. tuberculosis, the pathogenic species responsible for causing tuberculosis. This study was taken up to ascertain the involvement of KefB in the growth of M. tuberculosis and its role in phagosomal maturation and survival of the pathogen in guinea pigs. Our findings show that kefB mutant of M. tuberculosis (MtbΔkefB) was impaired i) for growth in high concentrations of potassium and ii) in arresting phagosomal acidification. However, the disruption of kefB had no adverse effect on the survival of M. tuberculosis in macrophages as well as in guinea pigs suggesting that the role of KefB in phagosomal acidification is unrelated to the survival of the pathogen in the host. PMID:24346161

  10. Activation of caspase-1 by the NLRP3 inflammasome regulates the NADPH oxidase NOX2 to control phagosome function

    PubMed Central

    Sokolovska, Anna; Becker, Christine E.; Eddie Ip, WK; Rathinam, Vijay A.K.; Brudner, Matthew; Paquette, Nicholas; Tanne, Antoine; Vanaja, Sivapriya K.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Stuart, Lynda M.

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental cellular process that is pivotal for immunity as it coordinates microbial killing, innate immune activation and antigen presentation. An essential step in this process is phagosome acidification, which regulates a number of functions of these organelles that allow them to participate in processes essential to both innate and adaptive immunity. Here we report that acidification of phagosomes containing Gram-positive bacteria is regulated by the NLRP3-inflammasome and caspase-1. Active caspase-1 accumulates on phagosomes and acts locally to control the pH by modulating buffering by the NADPH oxidase NOX2. These data provide insight into a mechanism by which innate immune signals can modify cellular defenses and establish a new function for the NLRP3-inflammasome and caspase-1 in host defense. PMID:23644505

  11. Affinity maturation generates greatly improved xyloglucan-specific carbohydrate binding modules

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Molecular evolution of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM) is a new approach for the generation of glycan-specific molecular probes. To date, the possibility of performing affinity maturation on CBM has not been investigated. In this study we show that binding characteristics such as affinity can be improved for CBM generated from the CBM4-2 scaffold by using random mutagenesis in combination with phage display technology. Results Two modified proteins with greatly improved affinity for xyloglucan, a key polysaccharide abundant in the plant kingdom crucial for providing plant support, were generated. Both improved modules differ from other existing xyloglucan probes by binding to galactose-decorated subunits of xyloglucan. The usefulness of the evolved binders was verified by staining of plant sections, where they performed better than the xyloglucan-binding module from which they had been derived. They discriminated non-fucosylated from fucosylated xyloglucan as shown by their ability to stain only the endosperm, rich in non-fucosylated xyloglucan, but not the integument rich in fucosylated xyloglucan, on tamarind seed sections. Conclusion We conclude that affinity maturation of CBM selected from molecular libraries based on the CBM4-2 scaffold is possible and has the potential to generate new analytical tools for detection of plant carbohydrates. PMID:19878581

  12. Phagosomes Induced by Cytokines Function as anti-Listeria Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Rodriguez-Del Rio, Estela; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Tobes, Raquel; Pareja, Eduardo; Lecea-Cuello, M. Jesús; Ruiz-Sáez, Marta; Madrazo-Toca, Fidel; Hölscher, Christoph; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Phagosomes are critical compartments for innate immunity. However, their role in the protection against murine listeriosis has not been examined. We describe here that listericidal phago-receptosomes are induced by the function of IFN-γ or IL-6 as centralized compartments for innate and adaptive immunity because they are able to confer protection against murine listeriosis. These phago-receptosomes elicited LLO(91–99)/CD8+- and LLO(189–201)/CD4+-specific immune responses and recruited mature dendritic cells to the vaccination sites controlled by T cells. Moreover, they present exceptional features as efficient vaccine vectors. First, they compartmentalize a novel listericidal STAT-1-mediated signaling pathway that confines multiple innate immune components to the same environment. Second, they show features of MHC class II antigen-loading competent compartments for cathepsin-D-mediated LLO processing. Third, murine cathepsin-D deficiencies fail to develop protective immunity after vaccination with listericidal phago-receptosomes induced by IFN-γ or IL-6. Therefore, it appears that the connection of STAT-1 and cathepsin-D in a single compartment is relevant for protection against listeriosis. PMID:22337873

  13. Natural Resistance to Infection with Intracellular Pathogens: The Nramp1 Protein Is Recruited to the Membrane of the Phagosome

    PubMed Central

    Gruenheid, Samantha; Pinner, Elhanan; Desjardins, Michel; Gros, Philippe

    1997-01-01

    The Nramp1 (natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1) locus (Bcg, Ity, Lsh) controls the innate resistance or susceptibility of mice to infection with a group of unrelated intracellular parasites which includes Salmonella, Leishmania, and Mycobacterium. Nramp1 is expressed exclusively in professional phagocytes and encodes an integral membrane protein that shares structural characteristics with ion channels and transporters. Its function and mechanism of action remain unknown. The intracellular localization of the Nramp1 protein was analyzed in control 129/sv and mutant Nramp1−/− macrophages by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy and by biochemical fractionation. In colocalization studies with a specific anti-Nramp1 antiserum and a panel of control antibodies directed against known cellular structures, Nramp1 was found not to be expressed at the plasma membrane but rather localized to the late endocytic compartments (late endosome/lysosome) of resting macrophages in a Lamp1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1)-positive compartment. Double immunofluorescence studies and direct purification of latex bead–containing phagosomes demonstrated that upon phagocytosis, Nramp1 is recruited to the membrane of the phagosome and remains associated with this structure during its maturation to phagolysosome. After phagocytosis, Nramp1 is acquired by the phagosomal membrane with time kinetics similar to Lamp1, but clearly distinct from those of the early endosomal marker Rab5. The targeting of Nramp1 from endocytic vesicles to the phagosomal membrane supports the hypothesis that Nramp1 controls the replication of intracellular parasites by altering the intravacuolar environment of the microbe-containing phagosome. PMID:9034150

  14. Toll-like receptor 9 modulates macrophage antifungal effector function during innate recognition of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kasperkovitz, Pia V; Khan, Nida S; Tam, Jenny M; Mansour, Michael K; Davids, Peter J; Vyas, Jatin M

    2011-12-01

    Phagocytic responses are critical for effective host defense against opportunistic fungal pathogens. Macrophages sample the phagosomal content and orchestrate the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes unmethylated CpG DNA and is activated by fungal DNA. Here we demonstrate that specific triggering of TLR9 recruitment to the macrophage phagosomal membrane is a conserved feature of fungi of distinct phylogenetic origins, including Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Malassezia furfur, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The capacity to trigger phagosomal TLR9 recruitment was not affected by a loss of fungal viability or cell wall integrity. TLR9 deficiency has been linked to increased resistance to murine candidiasis and to restriction of fungal growth in vivo. Macrophages lacking TLR9 demonstrate a comparable capacity for phagocytosis and normal phagosomal maturation compared to wild-type macrophages. We now show that TLR9 deficiency increases macrophage tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production in response to C. albicans and S. cerevisiae, independent of yeast viability. The increase in TNF-α production was reversible by functional complementation of the TLR9 gene, confirming that TLR9 was responsible for negative modulation of the cytokine response. Consistently, TLR9 deficiency enhanced the macrophage effector response by increasing macrophage nitric oxide production. Moreover, microbicidal activity against C. albicans and S. cerevisiae was more efficient in TLR9 knockout (TLR9KO) macrophages than in wild-type macrophages. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TLR9 is compartmentalized selectively to fungal phagosomes and negatively modulates macrophage antifungal effector functions. Our data support a model in which orchestration of antifungal innate immunity involves a complex interplay of fungal ligand combinations, host cell machinery rearrangements, and TLR cooperation and antagonism. PMID:21947771

  15. Mature neurons modulate neurogenesis through chemical signals acting on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pardal, Ricardo; López Barneo, José

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of neural stem cells has revealed a much higher structural and functional plasticity in the adult nervous system than previously anticipated. Progenitor cells are able to give rise to new neurons and glial cells when needed, thanks to their surveillance of the environment from the germinal niches. Multiple different factors define neural stem cell niches, including cellular and non-cellular components. Innervation of neurogenic centers is crucial, as it allows the functional connection between stem cell behavior and surrounding neuronal activity. Although the association between organismal behavior and neurogenesis is well documented, much less is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which neurons control stem cell activity. In this review we discuss the existing data on this type of regulation from the three best characterized germinal niches in the adult nervous system: the subventricular zone, the hippocampal subgranular zone, and the carotid body. In all cases, neuronal activity modulates stem cell behavior either by neurotransmitter spillover or by synaptic-like contacts. Currently, the molecular mechanisms underlying mature neuron-stem cell interaction are being clarified. Functional consequences and potential clinical relevance of these phenomena are also discussed. PMID:27101323

  16. A Novel, Noncanonical BMP Pathway Modulates Synapse Maturation at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Mikolaj J.; Han, Tae Hee; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Qi; Verheyen, Esther M.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Serpe, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    At the Drosophila NMJ, BMP signaling is critical for synapse growth and homeostasis. Signaling by the BMP7 homolog, Gbb, in motor neurons triggers a canonical pathway—which modulates transcription of BMP target genes, and a noncanonical pathway—which connects local BMP/BMP receptor complexes with the cytoskeleton. Here we describe a novel noncanonical BMP pathway characterized by the accumulation of the pathway effector, the phosphorylated Smad (pMad), at synaptic sites. Using genetic epistasis, histology, super resolution microscopy, and electrophysiology approaches we demonstrate that this novel pathway is genetically distinguishable from all other known BMP signaling cascades. This novel pathway does not require Gbb, but depends on presynaptic BMP receptors and specific postsynaptic glutamate receptor subtypes, the type-A receptors. Synaptic pMad is coordinated to BMP’s role in the transcriptional control of target genes by shared pathway components, but it has no role in the regulation of NMJ growth. Instead, selective disruption of presynaptic pMad accumulation reduces the postsynaptic levels of type-A receptors, revealing a positive feedback loop which appears to function to stabilize active type-A receptors at synaptic sites. Thus, BMP pathway may monitor synapse activity then function to adjust synapse growth and maturation during development. PMID:26815659

  17. Circular non-coding RNA ANRIL modulates ribosomal RNA maturation and atherosclerosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Holdt, Lesca M; Stahringer, Anika; Sass, Kristina; Pichler, Garwin; Kulak, Nils A; Wilfert, Wolfgang; Kohlmaier, Alexander; Herbst, Andreas; Northoff, Bernd H; Nicolaou, Alexandros; Gäbel, Gabor; Beutner, Frank; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Musunuru, Kiran; Krohn, Knut; Mann, Matthias; Teupser, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are broadly expressed in eukaryotic cells, but their molecular mechanism in human disease remains obscure. Here we show that circular antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (circANRIL), which is transcribed at a locus of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease on chromosome 9p21, confers atheroprotection by controlling ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation and modulating pathways of atherogenesis. CircANRIL binds to pescadillo homologue 1 (PES1), an essential 60S-preribosomal assembly factor, thereby impairing exonuclease-mediated pre-rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages. As a consequence, circANRIL induces nucleolar stress and p53 activation, resulting in the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, which are key cell functions in atherosclerosis. Collectively, these findings identify circANRIL as a prototype of a circRNA regulating ribosome biogenesis and conferring atheroprotection, thereby showing that circularization of long non-coding RNAs may alter RNA function and protect from human disease. PMID:27539542

  18. Circular non-coding RNA ANRIL modulates ribosomal RNA maturation and atherosclerosis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Holdt, Lesca M.; Stahringer, Anika; Sass, Kristina; Pichler, Garwin; Kulak, Nils A.; Wilfert, Wolfgang; Kohlmaier, Alexander; Herbst, Andreas; Northoff, Bernd H.; Nicolaou, Alexandros; Gäbel, Gabor; Beutner, Frank; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Musunuru, Kiran; Krohn, Knut; Mann, Matthias; Teupser, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are broadly expressed in eukaryotic cells, but their molecular mechanism in human disease remains obscure. Here we show that circular antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (circANRIL), which is transcribed at a locus of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease on chromosome 9p21, confers atheroprotection by controlling ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation and modulating pathways of atherogenesis. CircANRIL binds to pescadillo homologue 1 (PES1), an essential 60S-preribosomal assembly factor, thereby impairing exonuclease-mediated pre-rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages. As a consequence, circANRIL induces nucleolar stress and p53 activation, resulting in the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, which are key cell functions in atherosclerosis. Collectively, these findings identify circANRIL as a prototype of a circRNA regulating ribosome biogenesis and conferring atheroprotection, thereby showing that circularization of long non-coding RNAs may alter RNA function and protect from human disease. PMID:27539542

  19. The phagosomal nutrient transporter (Pht) family.

    PubMed

    Chen, Derek E; Podell, Sheila; Sauer, John-Demian; Swanson, Michele S; Saier, Milton H

    2008-01-01

    Phagosomal transporters (Phts), required for intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila, comprise a novel family of multispanning alpha-helical proteins within the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). The members of this family derive exclusively from bacteria. Multiple paralogues are present in a restricted group of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, but single members were also found in Chlamydia and Cyanobacteria. Their protein sequences were aligned, yielding a phylogenetic tree showing the relations of the proteins to each other. Topological analyses revealed a probable 12 alpha-helical transmembrane segment (TMS) topology. Motif identification and statistical analyses provided convincing evidence that these proteins arose from a six TMS precursor by intragenic duplication. The phylogenetic tree revealed some potential orthologous relationships, suggestive of common function. However, several probable examples of lateral transfer of the encoding genetic material between bacteria were identified and analysed. The Pht family most closely resembles a smaller MFS family (the UMF9 family) with no functionally characterized members. However, the UMF9 family occurs in a broader range of prokaryotic organism types, including Archaea. These two families differ in that organisms bearing members of the Pht family often have numerous paralogues, whereas organisms bearing members of the UMF9 family never have more than two. This work serves to characterize two novel families within the MFS and provides compelling evidence for horizontal transfer of some of the family members. PMID:18174124

  20. Perturbation of cellular proteostasis networks identifies pathways that modulate precursor and intermediate but not mature levels of frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Nabhan, Joseph F.; Gooch, Renea L.; Piatnitski Chekler, Eugene L.; Pierce, Betsy; Bulawa, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich’s Ataxia is a genetic disease caused by expansion of an intronic trinucleotide repeat in the frataxin (FXN) gene yielding diminished FXN expression and consequently disease. Since increasing FXN protein levels is desirable to ameliorate pathology, we explored the role of major cellular proteostasis pathways and mitochondrial proteases in FXN processing and turnover. We targeted p97/VCP, the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP), and autophagy with chemical inhibitors in cell lines and patient-derived cells. p97 inhibition by DBeQ increased precursor FXN levels, while UPP and autophagic flux modulators had variable effects predominantly on intermediate FXN. Our data suggest that these pathways cannot be modulated to influence mature functional FXN levels. We also targeted known mitochondrial proteases by RNA interference and discovered a novel protease PITRM1 that regulates intermediate FXN levels. Treatment with the aforementioned chemical and genetic modulators did not have a differential effect in patient cells containing lower amounts of FXN. Interestingly, a number of treatments caused a change in total amount of FXN protein, without an effect on mature FXN. Our results imply that regulation of FXN protein levels is complex and that total amounts can be modulated chemically and genetically without altering the absolute amount of mature FXN protein. PMID:26671574

  1. REST and CoREST Modulate Neuronal Subtype Specification, Maturation and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gokhan, Solen; Zheng, Deyou; Bergman, Aviv; Mehler, Mark F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) is a master regulator of neuronal gene expression. REST functions as a modular scaffold for dynamic recruitment of epigenetic regulatory factors including its primary cofactor, the corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor (CoREST), to genomic loci that contain the repressor element-1 (RE1) binding motif. While REST was initially believed to silence RE1 containing neuronal genes in neural stem cells (NSCs) and non-neuronal cells, emerging evidence shows an increasingly complex cell type- and developmental stage-specific repertoire of REST target genes and functions that include regulation of neuronal lineage maturation and plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation on chip (ChIP-chip) analysis to examine REST and CoREST functions during NSC-mediated specification of cholinergic neurons (CHOLNs), GABAergic neurons (GABANs), glutamatergic neurons (GLUTNs), and medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs). We identified largely distinct but overlapping profiles of REST and CoREST target genes during neuronal subtype specification including a disproportionately high percentage that are exclusive to each neuronal subtype. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that the differential deployment of REST and CoREST is an important regulatory mechanism that mediates neuronal subtype specification by modulating specific gene networks responsible for inducing and maintaining neuronal subtype identity. Our observations also implicate a broad array of factors in the generation of neuronal diversity including but not limited to those that mediate homeostasis, cell cycle dynamics, cell viability, stress responses and epigenetic regulation. PMID:19997604

  2. Structural basis of substrate recognition by a bacterial deubiquitinase important for dynamics of phagosome ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Sheedlo, Michael J.; Qiu, Jiazhang; Tan, Yunhao; Paul, Lake N.; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Das, Chittaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of the host’s ubiquitin network is emerging as an important strategy for counteracting and repurposing the posttranslational modification machineries of the host by pathogens. Ubiquitin E3 ligases encoded by infectious agents are well known, as are a variety of viral deubiquitinases (DUBs). Bacterial DUBs have been discovered, but little is known about the structure and mechanism underlying their ubiquitin recognition. In this report, we found that members of the Legionella pneumophila SidE effector family harbor a DUB module important for ubiquitin dynamics on the bacterial phagosome. Structural analysis of this domain alone and in complex with ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester (Ub-VME) reveals unique molecular contacts used in ubiquitin recognition. Instead of relying on the Ile44 patch of ubiquitin, as commonly used in eukaryotic counterparts, the SdeADub module engages Gln40 of ubiquitin. The architecture of the active-site cleft presents an open arrangement with conformational plasticity, permitting deubiquitination of three of the most abundant polyubiquitin chains, with a distinct preference for Lys63 linkages. We have shown that this preference enables efficient removal of Lys63 linkages from the phagosomal surface. Remarkably, the structure reveals by far the most parsimonious use of molecular contacts to achieve deubiquitination, with less than 1,000 Å2 of accessible surface area buried upon complex formation with ubiquitin. This type of molecular recognition appears to enable dual specificity toward ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier NEDD8. PMID:26598703

  3. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Modulates Macrophage Antifungal Effector Function during Innate Recognition of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kasperkovitz, Pia V.; Khan, Nida S.; Tam, Jenny M.; Mansour, Michael K.; Davids, Peter J.; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytic responses are critical for effective host defense against opportunistic fungal pathogens. Macrophages sample the phagosomal content and orchestrate the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes unmethylated CpG DNA and is activated by fungal DNA. Here we demonstrate that specific triggering of TLR9 recruitment to the macrophage phagosomal membrane is a conserved feature of fungi of distinct phylogenetic origins, including Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Malassezia furfur, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The capacity to trigger phagosomal TLR9 recruitment was not affected by a loss of fungal viability or cell wall integrity. TLR9 deficiency has been linked to increased resistance to murine candidiasis and to restriction of fungal growth in vivo. Macrophages lacking TLR9 demonstrate a comparable capacity for phagocytosis and normal phagosomal maturation compared to wild-type macrophages. We now show that TLR9 deficiency increases macrophage tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production in response to C. albicans and S. cerevisiae, independent of yeast viability. The increase in TNF-α production was reversible by functional complementation of the TLR9 gene, confirming that TLR9 was responsible for negative modulation of the cytokine response. Consistently, TLR9 deficiency enhanced the macrophage effector response by increasing macrophage nitric oxide production. Moreover, microbicidal activity against C. albicans and S. cerevisiae was more efficient in TLR9 knockout (TLR9KO) macrophages than in wild-type macrophages. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TLR9 is compartmentalized selectively to fungal phagosomes and negatively modulates macrophage antifungal effector functions. Our data support a model in which orchestration of antifungal innate immunity involves a complex interplay of fungal ligand combinations, host cell machinery rearrangements, and TLR cooperation and antagonism. PMID:21947771

  4. [The mechanism of bactericidal activity in phagosomes of neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, R A; But, P G; Fomina, V A; Rogovin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase plays the key role in antimicrobial of phagocytes. This enzyme uses hydrogen peroxide and chloride to catalyze hypochlorous acid formation. HOCl is the most probable agent in the oxygen-dependent bactericidal activity in the phagocyte phagosome. Chlorination markers indicate HOCl generation in the quantities lethal for bacteria. Enzymatic assay for myeloperoxidase indicates proceeding of other reactions involved in bactericidal activity. Superoxide integrates many activities of this kind and is important for physiological function of myeloperoxidase. Elucidation of phagosomes biochemistry can help us to understand why certain pathogens survive in such unfavorable environment. PMID:12180008

  5. High‐resolution quantitative proteome analysis reveals substantial differences between phagosomes of RAW 264.7 and bone marrow derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Manman; Härtlova, Anetta; Dill, Brian D.; Prescott, Alan R.; Gierliński, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are important immune cells operating at the forefront of innate immunity by taking up foreign particles and microbes through phagocytosis. The RAW 264.7 cell line is commonly used for experiments in the macrophage and phagocytosis field. However, little is known how its functions compare to primary macrophages. Here, we have performed an in‐depth proteomics characterization of phagosomes from RAW 264.7 and bone marrow derived macrophages by quantifying more than 2500 phagosomal proteins. Our data indicate that there are significant differences for a large number of proteins including important receptors such as mannose receptor 1 and Siglec‐1. Moreover, bone marrow derived macrophages phagosomes mature considerably faster by fusion with endosomes and the lysosome which we validated using fluorogenic phagocytic assays. We provide a valuable resource for researcher in the field and recommend careful use of the RAW 264.7 cell line when studying phagosome functions. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001293 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001293). PMID:25504905

  6. The look of fear and anger: facial maturity modulates recognition of fearful and angry expressions.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Donald F; Hugenberg, Kurt

    2009-02-01

    The current series of studies provide converging evidence that facial expressions of fear and anger may have co-evolved to mimic mature and babyish faces in order to enhance their communicative signal. In Studies 1 and 2, fearful and angry facial expressions were manipulated to have enhanced babyish features (larger eyes) or enhanced mature features (smaller eyes) and in the context of a speeded categorization task in Study 1 and a visual noise paradigm in Study 2, results indicated that larger eyes facilitated the recognition of fearful facial expressions, while smaller eyes facilitated the recognition of angry facial expressions. Study 3 manipulated facial roundness, a stable structure that does not vary systematically with expressions, and found that congruency between maturity and expression (narrow face-anger; round face-fear) facilitated expression recognition accuracy. Results are discussed as representing a broad co-evolutionary relationship between facial maturity and fearful and angry facial expressions. PMID:19186915

  7. Biochemistry of the Phagosome: The Challenge to Study a Transient Organelle

    PubMed Central

    Nüsse, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytes are specialized cells of the immune system, designed to engulf and destroy harmful microorganisms inside the newly formed phagosome. The latter is an intracellular organelle that is transformed into a toxic environment within minutes and disappears once the pathogen is destroyed. Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are produced inside the phagosome. Intracellular granules or lysosomes of the phagocyte fuse with the phagosome and liberate their destructive enzymes. This process of phagocytosis efficiently protects against most infections; however, some microorganisms avoid their destruction and cause severe damage. To understand such failure of phagosomal killing, we need to learn more about the actual destruction process in the phagosome. This paper summarizes methods to investigate the biochemistry of the phagosome and discusses some of their limitations. In accordance with the nature of the phagosome, the issue of localization and temporal dynamics is emphasized, and recent developments are highlighted. PMID:22194668

  8. Bordetella parapertussis Survives inside Human Macrophages in Lipid Raft-Enriched Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Harvill, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella parapertussis is a human pathogen that causes whooping cough. The increasing incidence of B. parapertussis has been attributed to the lack of cross protection induced by pertussis vaccines. It was previously shown that B. parapertussis is able to avoid bacterial killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) if specific opsonic antibodies are not present at the site of interaction. Here, we evaluated the outcome of B. parapertussis innate interaction with human macrophages, a less aggressive type of cell and a known reservoir of many persistent pathogens. The results showed that in the absence of opsonins, O antigen allows B. parapertussis to inhibit phagolysosomal fusion and to remain alive inside macrophages. The O antigen targets B. parapertussis to lipid rafts that are retained in the membrane of phagosomes that do not undergo lysosomal maturation. Forty-eight hours after infection, wild-type B. parapertussis bacteria but not the O antigen-deficient mutants were found colocalizing with lipid rafts and alive in nonacidic compartments. Taken together, our data suggest that in the absence of opsonic antibodies, B. parapertussis survives inside macrophages by preventing phagolysosomal maturation in a lipid raft- and O antigen-dependent manner. Two days after infection, about 15% of macrophages were found loaded with live bacteria inside flotillin-enriched phagosomes that had access to nutrients provided by the host cell recycling pathway, suggesting the development of an intracellular infection. IgG opsonization drastically changed this interaction, inducing efficient bacterial killing. These results highlight the need for B. parapertussis opsonic antibodies to induce bacterial clearance and prevent the eventual establishment of cellular reservoirs of this pathogen. PMID:25267839

  9. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis. PMID:26720149

  10. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis. PMID:26720149

  11. Triggering of B7h by the ICOS modulates maturation and migration of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Sergio; Dianzani, Chiara; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Boggio, Elena; Clemente, Nausicaa; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Minelli, Rosalba; Fantozzi, Roberto; Yagi, Jungi; Rojo, Josè Maria; Sblattero, Daniele; Giovarelli, Mirella; Dianzani, Umberto

    2013-02-01

    B7h, expressed by several cell types, binds ICOS expressed by activated T cells. We have previously shown that B7h triggering by ICOS-Fc inhibits human endothelial cell adhesiveness. This work investigated the effect of ICOS-Fc on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). We found that DCs matured with LPS in the presence of ICOS-Fc (mDCs(ICOS)) produced greater amounts of IL-23 and IL-10, and promoted a higher secretion of IL-17A and IL-17F in MLCs than did those DCs matured with LPS alone (mDCs). Moreover, mDCs(ICOS) pulsed with the keyhole limpet hemocyanin Ag during the maturation phase were better stimulators of Ag-specific MHC class I-, but not class II-restricted T cells than mDCs. This was probably due to promotion of cross-presentation because it was not detected when the Flu-MA(58-66) Ag was directly loaded on already matured DCs and mDCs(ICOS). Finally, ICOS-Fc inhibited the adhesion of both immature DCs and mDCs to vascular and lymphoid endothelial cells, their migratory activity, and the expression of the Rac-1 activator β-Pix involved in cell motility. These data suggest that B7h stimulation modulates DC function with effects on their maturation and recruitment into tissues. This opens a novel view on the use of interactors of the ICOS:B7h system as immunomodulatory drugs. PMID:23275603

  12. Modulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation by combined biochemical and mechanical cues

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Tânia; Paes de Faria, Joana; Bippes, Christian A.; Maia, João; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Relvas, João B.; Grãos, Mário

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play a key role during oligodendrogenesis. While fibronectin (FN) is involved in the maintenance and proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), merosin (MN) promotes differentiation into oligodendrocytes (OLs). Mechanical properties of the ECM also seem to affect OL differentiation, hence this study aimed to clarify the impact of combined biophysical and biochemical elements during oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation using synthetic elastic polymeric ECM-like substrates. CG-4 cells presented OPC- or OL-like morphology in response to brain-compliant substrates functionalised with FN or MN, respectively. The expression of the differentiation and maturation markers myelin basic protein — MBP — and proteolipid protein — PLP — (respectively) by primary rat oligodendrocytes was enhanced in presence of MN, but only on brain-compliant conditions, considering the distribution (MBP) or amount (PLP) of the protein. It was also observed that maturation of OLs was attained earlier (by assessing PLP expression) by cells differentiated on MN-functionalised brain-compliant substrates than on standard culture conditions. Moreover, the combination of MN and substrate compliance enhanced the maturation and morphological complexity of OLs. Considering the distinct degrees of stiffness tested ranging within those of the central nervous system, our results indicate that 6.5 kPa is the most suitable rigidity for oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:26879561

  13. Maturity and Ripening-Stage Specific Modulation of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Fruit Transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit is a model to study molecular basis of fleshy fruit development and ripening. We profiled gene expression in immature green and mature green fruit (fruit development program), and during advanced ripening from breaker (BR) stage onwards to obtain a global perspect...

  14. Midostaurin (PKC412) modulates differentiation and maturation of human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2010-09-01

    Midostaurin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown efficacy against acute myeloid leukemia and various other malignancies in clinical trials. Prior studies indicate midostaurin affects the function of immune cells such as lymphocytes and macrophages. To understand the effect of midostaurin on human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), we conducted an ex vivo study using immature DCs differentiated from CD14(+) monocytes and further maturated using lipopolysaccharide. Addition of midostaurin to a culture of starting CD14(+) monocytes markedly and dose-dependently reduced DC recovery. Mature DCs differentiating in the presence of midostaurin had fewer, shorter cell projections than those differentiating in the absence of midostaurin. Changes in morphological features characteristic of apoptotic cells were also evident. Moreover, midostaurin affected DC differentiation and maturation patterns; CD83 expression levels decreased, whereas CD14 and CD80 expressions increased. Additionally, DCs derived in the presence of midostaurin possessed a lower endocytotic capacity and less allostimulatory activity on naive CD4(+)CD45(+)RA(+) T cell proliferation than those derived in its absence, suggesting that midostaurin redirects DC differentiation toward a less mature stage and that this effect is not solely due to its cytotoxicity. Whether this effect underlies immune suppression or tolerance to disease treatments with unwanted immune reactions needs further evaluation. PMID:20685248

  15. Myosin Va bound to phagosomes binds to F-actin and delays microtubule-dependent motility.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, A; Shonn, M A; Redlich, B; Blocker, A; Burkhardt, J K; Yu, H; Hammer, J A; Weiss, D G; Steffen, W; Griffiths, G; Kuznetsov, S A

    2001-09-01

    We established a light microscopy-based assay that reconstitutes the binding of phagosomes purified from mouse macrophages to preassembled F-actin in vitro. Both endogenous myosin Va from mouse macrophages and exogenous myosin Va from chicken brain stimulated the phagosome-F-actin interaction. Myosin Va association with phagosomes correlated with their ability to bind F-actin in an ATP-regulated manner and antibodies to myosin Va specifically blocked the ATP-sensitive phagosome binding to F-actin. The uptake and retrograde transport of phagosomes from the periphery to the center of cells in bone marrow macrophages was observed in both normal mice and mice homozygous for the dilute-lethal spontaneous mutation (myosin Va null). However, in dilute-lethal macrophages the accumulation of phagosomes in the perinuclear region occurred twofold faster than in normal macrophages. Motion analysis revealed saltatory phagosome movement with temporarily reversed direction in normal macrophages, whereas almost no reversals in direction were observed in dilute-lethal macrophages. These observations demonstrate that myosin Va mediates phagosome binding to F-actin, resulting in a delay in microtubule-dependent retrograde phagosome movement toward the cell center. We propose an "antagonistic/cooperative mechanism" to explain the saltatory phagosome movement toward the cell center in normal macrophages. PMID:11553713

  16. Endogenous and exogenous pathways maintain the reductive capacity of the phagosome.

    PubMed

    Balce, Dale R; Greene, Catherine J; Tailor, Pankaj; Yates, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Although endosomes, lysosomes, and phagosomes require a reductive environment for the optimal activity of disulfide reductases and other thiol-dependent enzymes, how these reductive environments are established and maintained remain unknown. Our goal in this study was to begin to elucidate the redox control systems responsible for maintaining redox-sensitive enzymatic activities in the phagolysosome of murine macrophages. Through the use of specific inhibitors and genetic knockdown of known redox enzymes, we identified redox pathways that influence phagosomal disulfide reduction. In particular, known inhibitors of the NADPH-dependent selenoprotein, thioredoxin reductase, were shown to inhibit phagosomal disulfide reduction and phagosomal proteolysis. This was supported by the observation that conditional deletion of the selenocysteine tRNA in macrophages decreased phagosomal disulfide reduction capacity. In addition, pharmacologic inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway decreased rates of disulfide reduction and proteolysis in the phagosome, implicating NADPH as a source of phagosomal reductive energy. Finally, by analyzing the effect of extracellular redox couples, such as cysteine:cystine on thiol-dependent phagosomal processes, we demonstrated that the extracellular space can additionally supply the phagosome with reductive energy. Collectively, these data demonstrate that defined cytosolic reductive pathways act in concert with the uptake of cysteine from the extracellular space to support thiol-dependent chemistries in the phagosome. PMID:26710800

  17. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae Exhibits Reduced Survival in Human Neutrophils Via Src Family Kinase-Mediated Bacterial Trafficking Into Mature Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Ball, Louise M.; Daily, Kylene P.; Martin, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During gonorrheal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial content. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signaling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signaling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils’ full antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:25346239

  18. Developmental Competence of Vitrified-Warmed Bovine Oocytes at the Germinal-Vesicle Stage is Improved by Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Modulators during In Vitro Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Ezoe, Kenji; Yabuuchi, Akiko; Tani, Tetsuya; Mori, Chiemi; Miki, Tetsuya; Takayama, Yuko; Beyhan, Zeki; Kato, Yoko; Okuno, Takashi; Kobayashi, Tamotsu; Kato, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation of mature oocytes and embryos has provided numerous benefits in reproductive medicine. Although successful cryopreservation of germinal-vesicle stage (GV) oocytes holds promise for further advances in reproductive biology and clinical embryology fields, reports regarding cryopreservation of immature oocytes are limited. Oocyte survival and maturation rates have improved since vitrification is being performed at the GV stage, but the subsequent developmental competence of GV oocytes is still low. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation of the maturation medium with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) modulators on the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed GV bovine oocytes. GV oocytes were vitrified-warmed and cultured to allow for oocyte maturation, and then parthenogenetically activated or fertilized in vitro. Our results indicate that addition of a cAMP modulator forskolin (FSK) or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to the maturation medium significantly improved the developmental competence of vitrified-warmed GV oocytes. We also demonstrated that vitrification of GV oocytes led to a decline in cAMP levels and maturation-promoting factor (MPF) activity in the oocytes during the initial and final phases of maturation, respectively. Nevertheless, the addition of FSK or IBMX to the maturation medium significantly elevated cAMP levels and MPF activity during IVM. Taken together, our results suggest that the cryopreservation-associated meiotic and developmental abnormalities observed in GV oocytes may be ameliorated by an artificial increase in cAMP levels during maturation culture after warming. PMID:25965267

  19. Adult-born hippocampal dentate granule cells undergoing maturation modulate learning and memory in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Saxe, Michael D.; Gallina, Iryna S.; Gage, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    Adult-born dentate granule cells (DGCs) contribute to learning and memory, yet it remains unknown when adult-born DGCs become involved in the cognitive processes. During neurogenesis, immature dentate granule cells (DGCs) display distinctive physiological characteristics while undergoing morphological maturation before final integration into the neural circuits. The survival and activity of the adult-born DGCs can be influenced by the experience of the animal during a critical period when newborn DGCs are still immature. To assess the temporal importance of adult neurogenesis, we developed a transgenic mouse model that allowed us to transiently reduce the numbers of adult-born DGCs in a temporally regulatable manner. We found that mice with a reduced population of adult-born DGCs at the immature stage were deficient in forming robust, long-term spatial memory and displayed impaired performance in extinction tasks. These results suggest that immature DGCs that undergo maturation make important contributions to learning and memory. PMID:19864566

  20. Immune control of phagosomal bacteria by p47 GTPases.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2005-02-01

    Sequestered from the action of complement, antibody and lytic peptides, phagosomal pathogens pose a unique problem for the innate immune system both in terms of detection and disposal. An immunologically induced 47-kDa (p47) GTPase family recruited to nascent phagosomes (PGs) has provided new insights into how vertebrates deal with facultative bacteria occupying a vacuolar niche. Research over the past 2 years in particular has identified several molecular determinants that underlie the membrane trafficking functions of LRG-47 and other p47 GTPases as part of a PG remodeling program. When coupled to signals issuing from pathogen-specific Toll-like receptors, the p47 proteins may constitute a novel sensory system enlisted by mammals, birds and fish to decode the language of immune recognition against this particular class of infectious agents. PMID:15694860

  1. Modulation of T-bet and Eomes during Maturation of Peripheral Blood NK Cells Does Not Depend on Licensing/Educating KIR.

    PubMed

    Pradier, Amandine; Simonetta, Federico; Waldvogel, Sophie; Bosshard, Carine; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Roosnek, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral natural killer (NK) cells upregulate T-bet and downregulate Eomes, the key transcription factors regulating NK cell maturation and function during the last maturation steps toward terminally differentiated effector cells. During this process, NK cells acquire killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and effector functions, such as cytotoxicity and target cell-induced cytokine production. Inhibitory KIR are pivotal in the control of effector functions, but whether they also modulate T-bet/Eomes expression is unknown. We have measured T-bet/Eomes levels, KIR expression, and effector functions of maturing CD94(neg)CD56(dim)NK cells using CD57 as surface marker for maturation. Our cohort consisted of 23 healthy blood donors (HBD) homozygous for the KIR A haplotype that contains only inhibitory KIR2DL1 (ligand HLA-C2), KIR2DL3 (ligand HLA-C1), and KIR3DL1 (ligand HLA-Bw4). We confirm that during maturation of NK cells, the number of KIR increases, levels of T-bet/Eomes are modulated, and that cells acquire effector functions, such as cytotoxicity (CD107) and target cell-induced cytokine production (TNF-α). Because maturation was associated with the increase of the number of KIR as well as with the modulation of T-bet/Eomes, the number of KIR correlated with the extent of T-bet/Eomes modulation. However, whether the KIR were triggered by their cognate HLA ligands or not had no impact on T-bet and Eomes expression, indicating that modulation of T-box transcription factors during NK cell maturation does not depend on signals conveyed by KIR. We discuss the relevance of this finding in the context of models of NK cell maturation while cautioning that results obtained in a perhaps quite heterogeneous cohort of HBD are not necessarily conclusive. PMID:27605928

  2. Modulation of T-bet and Eomes during Maturation of Peripheral Blood NK Cells Does Not Depend on Licensing/Educating KIR

    PubMed Central

    Pradier, Amandine; Simonetta, Federico; Waldvogel, Sophie; Bosshard, Carine; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Roosnek, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral natural killer (NK) cells upregulate T-bet and downregulate Eomes, the key transcription factors regulating NK cell maturation and function during the last maturation steps toward terminally differentiated effector cells. During this process, NK cells acquire killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and effector functions, such as cytotoxicity and target cell-induced cytokine production. Inhibitory KIR are pivotal in the control of effector functions, but whether they also modulate T-bet/Eomes expression is unknown. We have measured T-bet/Eomes levels, KIR expression, and effector functions of maturing CD94negCD56dimNK cells using CD57 as surface marker for maturation. Our cohort consisted of 23 healthy blood donors (HBD) homozygous for the KIR A haplotype that contains only inhibitory KIR2DL1 (ligand HLA-C2), KIR2DL3 (ligand HLA-C1), and KIR3DL1 (ligand HLA-Bw4). We confirm that during maturation of NK cells, the number of KIR increases, levels of T-bet/Eomes are modulated, and that cells acquire effector functions, such as cytotoxicity (CD107) and target cell-induced cytokine production (TNF-α). Because maturation was associated with the increase of the number of KIR as well as with the modulation of T-bet/Eomes, the number of KIR correlated with the extent of T-bet/Eomes modulation. However, whether the KIR were triggered by their cognate HLA ligands or not had no impact on T-bet and Eomes expression, indicating that modulation of T-box transcription factors during NK cell maturation does not depend on signals conveyed by KIR. We discuss the relevance of this finding in the context of models of NK cell maturation while cautioning that results obtained in a perhaps quite heterogeneous cohort of HBD are not necessarily conclusive. PMID:27605928

  3. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  4. Early postnatal GABAA receptor modulation reverses deficits in neuronal maturation in a conditional neurodevelopmental mouse model of DISC1

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Yu; Rannals, Matthew D.; Merfeld, Emily B.; Ballinger, Michael D.; Koga, Minori; Ohtani, Yoshikazu; Gurley, David A.; Sedlak, Thomas W.; Cross, Alan; Moss, Stephen J.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Maher, Brady J.; Kamiya, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Exploring drug targets based on disease-associated molecular mechanisms during development is crucial for the generation of novel prevention and treatment strategies for neurodevelopmental psychiatric conditions. We report that prefrontal cortex-specific postnatal knockdown of DISC1 via in utero electroporation combined with an inducible knockdown expression system drives deficits in synaptic GABAA function and dendritic development in pyramidal neurons, as well as abnormalities in sensorimotor gating, albeit without profound memory deficits. We show for the first time that DISC1 is specifically involved in regulating cell surface expression of α2 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in immature developing neurons, but not after full maturation. Notably, pharmacological intervention with α2/3 subtype-selective GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators during the early postnatal period ameliorates dendritic deficits and behavioral abnormalities induced by knockdown of DISC1. These findings highlight a critical role of DISC1-mediated disruption of postnatal GABA signaling in aberrant prefrontal cortex maturation and function. PMID:26728564

  5. Myeloid deletion of SIRT1 suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice by modulating dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Ji; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Lim, Hye Song; Hah, Young-Sool; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Cheon, Yun-Hong; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Park, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il

    2016-01-01

    The type III histone deacetylase silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is an enzyme that is critical for the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. However, the data on its role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are limited and controversial. To better understand how SIRT1 regulates adaptive immune responses in RA, we evaluated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in myeloid cell-specific SIRT1 knockout (mSIRT1 KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Arthritis severity was gauged on the basis of clinical, radiographic and pathologic scores. Compared with their WT counterparts, the mSIRT1 KO mice exhibited less severe arthritis, which was less destructive to the joints. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and ROR-γT were also reduced in the mSIRT1 KO mice compared with the WT mice and were paralleled by reductions in the numbers of Th1 and Th17 cells and CD80- or CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs). In addition, impaired DC maturation and decreases in the Th1/Th17 immune response were observed in the mSIRT1 KO mice. T-cell proliferation was also investigated in co-cultures with antigen-pulsed DCs. In the co-cultures, the DCs from the mSIRT1 KO mice showed decreases in T-cell proliferation and the Th1/Th17 immune response. In this study, myeloid cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 appeared to suppress CIA by modulating DC maturation. Thus, a careful investigation of DC-specific SIRT1 downregulation is needed to gauge the therapeutic utility of agents targeting SIRT1 in RA. PMID:26987484

  6. External Volume Expansion Modulates Vascular Growth and Functional Maturation in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Chih; Chen, Bin; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Guo, Lifei

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing application of the pre-grafting expansion during autologous fat transplantation in breast reconstruction, little is known about its mechanism of action. To address that, ventral skins of miniature pigs were treated over a 10-day or 21-day period, with continuous suction at −50 mm Hg via a 7-cm diameter rubber-lined suction-cup device. Soft tissue thickness increased immediately after this external volume expansion (EVE) treatment, such increase completely disappeared by the next day. In the dermis and subcutaneous fat, the EVE treated groups showed significant increases in blood vessel density evident by CD31 staining as well as in vascular networks layered with smooth muscle cells when compared with the control group. This finding was corroborated by the increased percentage of endothelial cells present in the treatment groups. There was no significant difference in the percentages of proliferating basal keratinocytes or adipocytes, nor in epidermal thickness. Moreover, the EVE had no effect on proliferation or differentiation potential of adipose stem cells. Taken together, the major effects of EVE appeared to be vascular remodeling and maturation of functional blood vessels. This understanding may help clinicians optimize the vascularity of the recipient bed to further improve fat graft survival. PMID:27174509

  7. External Volume Expansion Modulates Vascular Growth and Functional Maturation in a Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Chih; Chen, Bin; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Guo, Lifei

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing application of the pre-grafting expansion during autologous fat transplantation in breast reconstruction, little is known about its mechanism of action. To address that, ventral skins of miniature pigs were treated over a 10-day or 21-day period, with continuous suction at -50 mm Hg via a 7-cm diameter rubber-lined suction-cup device. Soft tissue thickness increased immediately after this external volume expansion (EVE) treatment, such increase completely disappeared by the next day. In the dermis and subcutaneous fat, the EVE treated groups showed significant increases in blood vessel density evident by CD31 staining as well as in vascular networks layered with smooth muscle cells when compared with the control group. This finding was corroborated by the increased percentage of endothelial cells present in the treatment groups. There was no significant difference in the percentages of proliferating basal keratinocytes or adipocytes, nor in epidermal thickness. Moreover, the EVE had no effect on proliferation or differentiation potential of adipose stem cells. Taken together, the major effects of EVE appeared to be vascular remodeling and maturation of functional blood vessels. This understanding may help clinicians optimize the vascularity of the recipient bed to further improve fat graft survival. PMID:27174509

  8. Junctate boosts phagocytosis by recruiting endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores near phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Guido, Daniele; Demaurex, Nicolas; Nunes, Paula

    2015-11-15

    Local intracellular Ca(2+) elevations increase the efficiency of phagocytosis, a process that is essential for innate and adaptive immunity. These local Ca(2+) elevations are generated in part by the store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) sensor STIM1, which recruits endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae to phagosomes and opens phagosomal Ca(2+) channels at ER-phagosome junctions. However, residual ER-phagosome contacts and periphagosomal Ca(2+) hotspots remain in Stim1(-/-) cells. Here, we tested whether junctate (also called ASPH isoform 8), a molecule that targets STIM1 to ER-plasma-membrane contacts upon Ca(2+)-store depletion, cooperates with STIM1 at phagosome junctions. Junctate expression in Stim1(-/-) and Stim1(-/-); Stim2(-/-) phagocytic fibroblasts increased phagocytosis and periphagosomal Ca(2+) elevations, yet with only a minimal impact on global SOCE. These Ca(2+) hotspots were only marginally reduced by the SOCE channel blocker lanthanum chloride (La(3+)) but were abrogated by inositol trisphosphate receptor inhibitors 2-APB and xestospongin-C, revealing that unlike STIM1-mediated hotspots, junctate-mediated Ca(2+) originates predominantly from periphagosomal Ca(2+) stores. Accordingly, junctate accumulates near phagosomes and elongates ER-phagosome junctions in Stim1(-/-) cells. Thus, junctate mediates an alternative mechanism for generating localized Ca(2+) elevations within cells, promoting Ca(2+) release from internal stores recruited to phagosomes, thereby boosting phagocytosis. PMID:26446257

  9. Temperature-dependent sex determination modulates cardiovascular maturation in embryonic snapping turtles Chelydra serpentina.

    PubMed

    Alvine, Travis; Rhen, Turk; Crossley, Dane A

    2013-03-01

    We investigated sex differences in cardiovascular maturation in embryos of the snapping turtle Chelydra serpentina, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination. One group of eggs was incubated at 26.5°C to produce males. Another group of eggs was incubated at 26.5°C until embryos reached stage 17; eggs were then shifted to 31°C for 6 days to produce females, and returned to 26.5°C for the rest of embryogenesis. Thus, males and females were at the same temperature when autonomic tone was determined and for most of development. Cholinergic blockade increased resting blood pressure (P(m)) and heart rate (f(H)) in both sexes at 75% and 90% of incubation. However, the magnitude of the f(H) response was enhanced in males compared with females at 90% of incubation. β-adrenergic blockade increased P(m) at 75% of incubation in both sexes but had no effect at 90% of incubation. β-adrenergic blockade reduced f(H) at both time points but produced a stronger response at 90% versus 75% of incubation. We found that α-adrenergic blockade decreased P(m) in both sexes at 75% and 90% of incubation and decreased f(H) at 75% of incubation in both sexes. At 90% of incubation, f(H) decreased in females but not males. Although these data clearly demonstrate sexual dimorphism in the autonomic regulation of cardiovascular physiology in embryos, further studies are needed to test whether differences are caused by endocrine signals from gonads or by a hormone-independent temperature effect. PMID:23125337

  10. Cognitive flexibility modulates maturation and music-training-related changes in neural sound discrimination.

    PubMed

    Saarikivi, Katri; Putkinen, Vesa; Tervaniemi, Mari; Huotilainen, Minna

    2016-07-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that musicians show superior neural sound discrimination when compared to non-musicians, and that these changes emerge with accumulation of training. Our aim was to investigate whether individual differences in executive functions predict training-related changes in neural sound discrimination. We measured event-related potentials induced by sound changes coupled with tests for executive functions in musically trained and non-trained children aged 9-11 years and 13-15 years. High performance in a set-shifting task, indexing cognitive flexibility, was linked to enhanced maturation of neural sound discrimination in both musically trained and non-trained children. Specifically, well-performing musically trained children already showed large mismatch negativity (MMN) responses at a young age as well as at an older age, indicating accurate sound discrimination. In contrast, the musically trained low-performing children still showed an increase in MMN amplitude with age, suggesting that they were behind their high-performing peers in the development of sound discrimination. In the non-trained group, in turn, only the high-performing children showed evidence of an age-related increase in MMN amplitude, and the low-performing children showed a small MMN with no age-related change. These latter results suggest an advantage in MMN development also for high-performing non-trained individuals. For the P3a amplitude, there was an age-related increase only in the children who performed well in the set-shifting task, irrespective of music training, indicating enhanced attention-related processes in these children. Thus, the current study provides the first evidence that, in children, cognitive flexibility may influence age-related and training-related plasticity of neural sound discrimination. PMID:26797826

  11. Annexin A1 Is a Physiological Modulator of Neutrophil Maturation and Recirculation Acting on the CXCR4/CXCL12 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Spatti, Marina; Hastreiter, Araceli; Santin, José Roberto; Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Gil, Cristiane Damas; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Perretti, Mauro; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2016-11-01

    Neutrophil production and traffic in the body compartments is finely controlled, and the strong evidences support the role of CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway on neutrophil trafficking to and from the bone marrow (BM). We recently showed that the glucocorticoid-regulated protein, Annexin A1 (AnxA1) modulates neutrophil homeostasis and here we address the effects of AnxA1 on steady-state neutrophil maturation and trafficking. For this purpose, AnxA1(-/-) and Balb/C wild-type mice (WT) were donors of BM granulocytes and mesenchymal stem cells and blood neutrophils. In vivo treatments with the pharmacological AnxA1 mimetic peptide (Ac2-26) or the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) antagonist (Boc-2) were used to elucidate the pathway of AnxA1 action, and with the cytosolic glucocorticoid antagonist receptor RU 38486. Accelerated maturation of BM granulocytes was detected in AnxA1(-/-) and Boc2-treated WT mice, and was reversed by treatment with Ac2-26 in AnxA1(-/-) mice. AnxA1 and FPR2 were constitutively expressed in bone marrow granulocytes, and their expressions were reduced by treatment with RU38486. Higher numbers of CXCR4(+) neutrophils were detected in the circulation of AnxA1(-/-) or Boc2-treated WT mice, and values were rescued in Ac2-26-treated AnxA1(-/-) mice. Although circulating neutrophils of AnxA1(-/-) animals were CXCR4(+) , they presented reduced CXCL12-induced chemotaxis. Moreover, levels of CXCL12 were reduced in the bone marrow perfusate and in the mesenchymal stem cell supernatant from AnxA1(-/-) mice, and in vivo and in vitro CXCL12 expression was re-established after Ac2-26 treatment. Collectively, these data highlight AnxA1 as a novel determinant of neutrophil maturation and the mechanisms behind blood neutrophil homing to BM via the CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2418-2427, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892496

  12. Morphine Modulates Adult Neurogenesis and Contextual Memory by Impeding the Maturation of Neural Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Xu, Chi; Zheng, Hui; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of adult neurogenesis by opiates has been implicated in modulating different addiction cycles. At which neurogenesis stage opiates exert their action remains unresolved. We attempt to define the temporal window of morphine’s inhibition effect on adult neurogenesis by using the POMC-EGFP mouse model, in which newborn granular cells (GCs) can be visualized between days 3–28 post-mitotic. The POMC-EGFP mice were trained under the 3-chambers conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm with either saline or morphine. We observed after 4 days of CPP training with saline, the number of EGFP-labeled newborn GCs in sub-granular zone (SGZ) hippocampus significantly increased compared to mice injected with saline in their homecage. CPP training with morphine significantly decreased the number of EGFP-labeled GCs, whereas no significant difference in the number of EGFP-labeled GCs was observed with the homecage mice injected with the same dose of morphine. Using cell-type selective markers, we observed that morphine reduced the number of late stage progenitors and immature neurons such as Doublecortin (DCX) and βIII Tubulin (TuJ1) positive cells in the SGZ but did not reduce the number of early progenitors such as Nestin, SOX2, or neurogenic differentiation-1 (NeuroD1) positive cells. Analysis of co-localization between different cell markers shows that morphine reduced the number of adult-born GCs by interfering with differentiation of early progenitors, but not by inducing apoptosis. In addition, when NeuroD1 was over-expressed in DG by stereotaxic injection of lentivirus, it rescued the loss of immature neurons and prolonged the extinction of morphine-trained CPP. These results suggest that under the condition of CPP training paradigm, morphine affects the transition of neural progenitor/stem cells to immature neurons via a mechanism involving NeuroD1. PMID:27078155

  13. Morphine Modulates Adult Neurogenesis and Contextual Memory by Impeding the Maturation of Neural Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Xu, Chi; Zheng, Hui; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of adult neurogenesis by opiates has been implicated in modulating different addiction cycles. At which neurogenesis stage opiates exert their action remains unresolved. We attempt to define the temporal window of morphine's inhibition effect on adult neurogenesis by using the POMC-EGFP mouse model, in which newborn granular cells (GCs) can be visualized between days 3-28 post-mitotic. The POMC-EGFP mice were trained under the 3-chambers conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm with either saline or morphine. We observed after 4 days of CPP training with saline, the number of EGFP-labeled newborn GCs in sub-granular zone (SGZ) hippocampus significantly increased compared to mice injected with saline in their homecage. CPP training with morphine significantly decreased the number of EGFP-labeled GCs, whereas no significant difference in the number of EGFP-labeled GCs was observed with the homecage mice injected with the same dose of morphine. Using cell-type selective markers, we observed that morphine reduced the number of late stage progenitors and immature neurons such as Doublecortin (DCX) and βIII Tubulin (TuJ1) positive cells in the SGZ but did not reduce the number of early progenitors such as Nestin, SOX2, or neurogenic differentiation-1 (NeuroD1) positive cells. Analysis of co-localization between different cell markers shows that morphine reduced the number of adult-born GCs by interfering with differentiation of early progenitors, but not by inducing apoptosis. In addition, when NeuroD1 was over-expressed in DG by stereotaxic injection of lentivirus, it rescued the loss of immature neurons and prolonged the extinction of morphine-trained CPP. These results suggest that under the condition of CPP training paradigm, morphine affects the transition of neural progenitor/stem cells to immature neurons via a mechanism involving NeuroD1. PMID:27078155

  14. [Juvenile experience and learning modulate the functional maturation of the brain: relevance for the genesis and therapy of mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Braun, K; Bogerts, B

    2000-11-01

    This article summarizes experimental data that indicate how juvenile experience and learning events modulate the functional maturation of the brain, shaping thereby the neuronal substrate for the development of intellectual and socio-emotional abilities. The fact that early experience occurs during early postnatal brain development, i.e. phases of elevated neuronal and synaptic plasticity, results in an "imprinting" of synaptic connectivity and neural circuitry in the infant brain. Results from experimental research in animal models support the hypothesis that impoverished intellectual stimulation and disturbance of the socio-emotional environment during early childhood may disturb the formation of functional brain pathways, in particular of the limbic circuits, which play a major role in emotion and learning. Such defective brain systems, representing neurofunctional "scars" in the brain, may be the neuronal basis of a variety of mental disorders and clinical symptoms caused by early stressful psychosocial environment. Ultimately, the goal will be to apply the knowledge gained to the development of biological and psychosocial intervention strategies by utilizing remaining plasticity of the adult human brain aimed at promoting human health, decreasing susceptibility and increasing resistance to disease. PMID:11130142

  15. Diversion of phagosome trafficking by pathogenic Rhodococcus equi depends on mycolic acid chain length.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Tobias; von Bargen, Kristine; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Huth, Gitta; Holst, Otto; Wohlmann, Jens; Becken, Ulrike; Dykstra, Tobias; Söhl, Kristina; Lindner, Buko; Prescott, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2013-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a close relative of Mycobacterium spp. and a facultative intracellular pathogen which arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages before the late endocytic stage. We have screened a transposon mutant library of R. equi for mutants with decreased capability to prevent phagolysosome formation. This screen yielded a mutant in the gene for β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein)-synthase A (KasA), a key enzyme of the long-chain mycolic acid synthesizing FAS-II system. The longest kasA mutant mycolic acid chains were 10 carbon units shorter than those of wild-type bacteria. Coating of non-pathogenic E. coli with purified wild-type trehalose dimycolate reduced phagolysosome formation substantially which was not the case with shorter kasA mutant-derived trehalose dimycolate. The mutant was moderately attenuated in macrophages and in a mouse infection model, but was fully cytotoxic.Whereas loss of KasA is lethal in mycobacteria, R. equi kasA mutant multiplication in broth was normal proving that long-chain mycolic acid compounds are not necessarily required for cellular integrity and viability of the bacteria that typically produce them. This study demonstrates a central role of mycolic acid chain length in diversion of trafficking by R. equi. PMID:23078612

  16. Ligation of FcγR Alters Phagosomal Processing of Protein via Augmentation of NADPH Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Balce, Dale R; Rybicka, Joanna M; Greene, Catherine J; Ewanchuk, Benjamin W; Yates, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Proteolysis and the reduction of disulfides, both major components of protein degradation, are profoundly influenced by phagosomal redox conditions in macrophages. We evaluated the activation of phagocytic receptors that are known to influence activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (NOX2), and its effect on phagosomal protein degradation. Population-based and single phagosome analyses of phagosomal chemistries in murine macrophages revealed that activation of NOX2 via the Fcγ receptor (FcγR) during phagocytosis decreased rates of proteolysis and disulfide reduction. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the inhibition of phagosomal proteolysis and disulfide reduction were dependent on NOX2, FcγR and protein kinase C (PKC)/spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) signaling. In contrast, low levels of ROS production were observed following the phagocytosis of unopsonized beads, which resulted in higher rates of phagosomal proteolysis and disulfide reduction. Phagosomes displayed autonomy with respect to FcγR-mediated differences in NOX2 activation and proteolysis, as phagosomes containing unopsonized cargo retained low NOX2 activation and high proteolysis even in the presence of phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized cargo in the same macrophage. These results show that opsonization of phagocytic cargo results in vastly different phagosomal processing of proteins through the FcγR-triggered, PKC/Syk-dependent local assembly and activation of NOX2. PMID:27020146

  17. Fetal lipopolysaccharide exposure modulates diet-dependent gut maturation and sensitivity to necrotising enterocolitis in pre-term pigs.

    PubMed

    Cilieborg, Malene S; Schmidt, Mette; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Boye, Mette; Weber, Nicolai R; Heegaard, Peter M; Burrin, Douglas G; Sangild, Per T

    2011-09-01

    Uterine infections during pregnancy predispose to pre-term birth and postnatal morbidity, but it is unknown how prenatal bacterial exposure affects maturation of the immature gut. We hypothesised that a prenatal exposure to gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has immunomodulatory effects that improve resistance towards necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in pre-term neonates. At approximately 85 % gestation, pig fetuses were injected intramuscularly with saline or LPS (0·014 mg/kg), or intra-amniotically with LPS (0·4 mg/kg). Pigs were delivered by caesarean section 3-5 d later and fed colostrum (C) or formula (F) for 48 h. Gut indices did not differ between pigs injected intramuscularly with saline or LPS, and these groups were therefore pooled into two control groups according to diet (control-F, n 32 and control-C, n 11). Control-F pigs showed reduced villus heights, mucosal structure, gut integrity, digestive enzymes, elevated NEC incidence (38 v. 0 %, P < 0·05) and several differentially expressed immune-related genes, relative to control-C pigs. Compared with the control-F and control-C groups, values in formula-fed pigs given intra-amniotic LPS formula (n 17) were intermediate for villus height, enzyme activities, intestinal permeability and NEC incidence (18 %, P = 0·2 relative to control-F), and numbers of differentially expressed immune genes. In conclusion, prenatal exposure of the fetal gut to Gram-negative bacteria may modulate the immediate postnatal response to an enteral diet and colonising bacteria. PMID:21676273

  18. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Temporally Resolved Phagosomes Following Uptake Via Key Phagocytic Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Brian D.; Gierlinski, Marek; Härtlova, Anetta; Arandilla, Alba González; Guo, Manman; Clarke, Rosemary G.; Trost, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages operate at the forefront of innate immunity and their discrimination of foreign versus “self” particles is critical for a number of responses including efficient pathogen killing, antigen presentation, and cytokine induction. In order to efficiently destroy the particles and detect potential threats, macrophages express an array of receptors to sense and phagocytose prey particles. In this study, we accurately quantified a proteomic time-course of isolated phagosomes from murine bone marrow-derived macrophages induced by particles conjugated to seven different ligands representing pathogen-associated molecular patterns, immune opsonins or apoptotic cell markers. We identified a clear functional differentiation over the three timepoints and detected subtle differences between certain ligand-phagosomes, indicating that triggering of receptors through a single ligand type has mild, but distinct, effects on phagosome proteome and function. Moreover, our data shows that uptake of phosphatidylserine-coated beads induces an active repression of NF-κB immune responses upon Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activation by recruitment of anti-inflammatory regulators to the phagosome. This data shows for the first time a systematic time-course analysis of bone marrow-derived macrophages phagosomes and how phagosome fate is regulated by the receptors triggered for phagocytosis. PMID:25755298

  19. CCL-34, a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 activator, modulates differentiation and maturation of myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Liu, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-03-01

    CCL-34, a synthetic α-galactosylceramide analog, has been reported as an activator of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. TLR4 is highly expressed in dendritic cell (DC) and several TLR4 agonists are known to trigger DC maturation. We herein evaluated the effect of CCL-34 on DC maturation. Human CD14+ monocyte-derived immature DC were treated with CCL-34, its inactive structural analog CCL-44, or LPS to assess the DC maturation. CCL-34 induced DC maturation according to their characteristically dendrite-forming morphology, CD83 expression and IL-12p70 production. The allostimulatory activity of DC on proliferation of naive CD4+CD45+RA+ T cells and their secretion of interferon-γ was increased by CCL-34. Phagocytosis, an important function of immature DC, was reduced after CCL-34 treatment. All these effects related to DC maturation were evidently induced by positive control LPS but not by CCL-44 treatment. TLR4 neutralization impaired human DC maturation triggered by CCL-34. The induction of IL-12, a hallmark of DC maturation, by CCL-34 and LPS was only evident in TLR4-competent C3H/HeN, but not in TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. CCL-34 could further elicit the antigen presentation capability in mice inoculated with doxorubicin-treated colorectal cancer cells. In summary, CCL-34 triggers DC maturation via a TLR4-dependent manner, which supports its potential application as an immunostimulator. PMID:26883191

  20. CCL-34, a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 activator, modulates differentiation and maturation of myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Liu, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    CCL-34, a synthetic α-galactosylceramide analog, has been reported as an activator of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. TLR4 is highly expressed in dendritic cell (DC) and several TLR4 agonists are known to trigger DC maturation. We herein evaluated the effect of CCL-34 on DC maturation. Human CD14+ monocyte-derived immature DC were treated with CCL-34, its inactive structural analog CCL-44, or LPS to assess the DC maturation. CCL-34 induced DC maturation according to their characteristically dendrite-forming morphology, CD83 expression and IL-12p70 production. The allostimulatory activity of DC on proliferation of naive CD4+CD45+RA+ T cells and their secretion of interferon-γ was increased by CCL-34. Phagocytosis, an important function of immature DC, was reduced after CCL-34 treatment. All these effects related to DC maturation were evidently induced by positive control LPS but not by CCL-44 treatment. TLR4 neutralization impaired human DC maturation triggered by CCL-34. The induction of IL-12, a hallmark of DC maturation, by CCL-34 and LPS was only evident in TLR4-competent C3H/HeN, but not in TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice. CCL-34 could further elicit the antigen presentation capability in mice inoculated with doxorubicin-treated colorectal cancer cells. In summary, CCL-34 triggers DC maturation via a TLR4-dependent manner, which supports its potential application as an immunostimulator. PMID:26883191

  1. V-ATPase-mediated phagosomal acidification is impaired by Streptococcus pyogenes through Mga-regulated surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Grinstein, Sergio; Björck, Lars; Tapper, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a significant bacterial pathogen in humans, interferes with the membrane traffic of human neutrophils and survives following phagocytosis. The mechanism(s) behind this property is not known, but in contrast to wild-type bacteria, mutant bacteria lacking virulence factors regulated by the transcriptional regulator Mga, are phagocytosed and killed. In the present work we investigated whether differences in phagosomal acidification may contribute to this difference. Phagosomal pH in neutrophil-differentiated HL-60 cells was studied by fluorescence ratio imaging, and phagosomes containing wild-type S. pyogenes bacteria of the M1 serotype exhibited little or no acidification, whereas Mga mutant bacteria were found in more acidic phagosomes. With phagosomes containing these bacteria, proton delivery was inhibited by adding folimycin, a vacuolar-type adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) inhibitor. This inhibitor had no effect on phagosomes containing wild-type bacteria, indicating either inactivation or removal of V-ATPases by the bacteria. Analysis of isolated bacteria-containing phagosomes confirmed the latter scenario and showed a more efficient delivery of V-ATPases to phagosomes containing Mga mutant bacteria. The results demonstrate that V-ATPase-mediated phagosomal proton delivery is reduced during phagocytosis of wild-type S. pyogenes, leading to impaired acidification, and that surface proteins of the mga regulon are responsible for this effect. PMID:22981599

  2. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease).

    PubMed

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T; Calvi, Alessandra A; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C; Cutler, Daniel F; Futter, Clare E; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2015-12-15

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3(Δex1-6) null mice, revealing classic 'fingerprint' lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3(Δex1) (-6) RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6)-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6) RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  3. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Calvi, Alessandra A.; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C.; Cutler, Daniel F.; Futter, Clare E.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3Δex1-6 null mice, revealing classic ‘fingerprint’ lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3Δex1-6-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  4. A novel role for nuclear factor-erythroid 2 in erythroid maturation by modulation of mitochondrial autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Monika; Wehrle, Julius; Aumann, Konrad; Zimmermann, Vanessa; Gründer, Albert; Pahl, Heike L

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2, which is critical for erythroid maturation and globin gene expression, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Myeloproliferative neoplasm patients display elevated levels of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 and transgenic mice overexpressing the transcription factor develop myeloproliferative neoplasm, albeit, surprisingly without erythrocytosis. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 transgenic mice show both a reticulocytosis and a concomitant increase in iron deposits in the spleen, suggesting both enhanced erythrocyte production and increased red blood cell destruction. We therefore hypothesized that elevated nuclear factor-erythroid 2 levels may lead to increased erythrocyte destruction by interfering with organelle clearance during erythroid maturation. We have previously shown that nuclear factor-erythroid 2 overexpression delays erythroid maturation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Here we report that increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 levels also impede murine maturation by retarding mitochondrial depolarization and delaying mitochondrial elimination. In addition, ribosome autophagy is delayed in transgenics. We demonstrate that the autophagy genes NIX and ULK1 are direct novel nuclear factor-erythroid 2 target genes, as these loci are bound by nuclear factor-erythroid 2 in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, Nix and Ulk1 expression is increased in transgenic mice and in granulocytes from polycythemia vera patients. This is the first report implying a role for nuclear factor-erythroid 2 in erythroid maturation by affecting autophagy. PMID:27479815

  5. Age and feeding system (supplemental feeding versus grazing) modulates colonic bacterial succession and host mucosal immune maturation in goats.

    PubMed

    Jiao, J; Lu, Q; Forster, R J; Zhou, C; Wang, M; Kang, J; Tan, Z

    2016-06-01

    The gut microbiome plays important roles in the regulation of gastrointestinal tract functional development and host mucosal immune maturation. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that age and feeding system (supplemental feeding [Sup] vs. grazing [G]) could alter colonic bacterial diversity and host mucosal immune maturation. Thirty Liuyang black goat kids ( = 4) were slaughtered on d 0, d 7 (nonrumination), d 28, d 42 (transition), and d 70 (rumination). The colonic microbiota was profiled by Miseq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Host colonic mucosal immune maturation was examined using mRNA level expression of Toll-like receptors (TLR), proinflammatory cytokines, and the Toll-IL-1R (TIR) domain-containing adaptor. A correlation analysis was conducted to elucidate the relationship between bacterial diversity and fermentation parameters and host immune maturation variables. The results showed that α diversity indexes ( < 0.05), abundances of genera ( = 0.003) and ( = 0.024), ( = 0.004), and ( = 0.046) mRNA expressions were lower for Sup than for G, whereas the abundance of genera and ( < 0.05) was greater for Sup than for G. Regardless of the feeding system, bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number and α diversity indexes increased ( < 0.05), whereas Proteobacteria abundance decreased linearly from d 0 to 70 after birth ( = 0.026). At the genus level, dominated the first week and declined sharply afterward, whereas abundance was greatest on d 7. abundance decreased linearly ( = 0.021), whereas abundances of , , , , and increased with age ( < 0.05). These findings coincided with increased , , and myeloid differentiation factor 88 () mRNA expressions with age ( < 0.05). Finally, correlation analysis revealed that different genera participated in different roles in fermentation capacity and host mucosal immune maturation. Collectively, colonic bacterial diversity and host mucosal immune maturation are age related, and concentrate supplement could alter

  6. Dynamin-Actin Cross Talk Contributes to Phagosome Formation and Closure.

    PubMed

    Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Mazzolini, Julie; Herit, Floriane; Niedergang, Florence

    2016-05-01

    Phagocytosis is a mechanism used by macrophages to internalize and eliminate microorganisms or cellular debris. It relies on profound rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton that is the driving force allowing plasma membrane extension around the particle. The closure step of phagocytosis, however, remains poorly defined. We used a dedicated experimental setup with Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) to monitor phagosome formation and closure in three dimensions in living cells. We show that dynamin-2, which mediates the scission of endocytic vesicles, was recruited early and concomitantly with actin during phagosome formation. Dynamin-2 accumulated at the site of phagosome closure in living macrophages. Inhibition of its activity with dominant negative mutants or drugs demonstrated that dynamin-2 is implicated in actin dynamics and pseudopod extension. Depolymerization of actin led to impaired dynamin-2 recruitment or activity. Finally, we show that dynamin-2 plays a critical role in the effective scission of the phagosome from the plasma membrane. Thus, we establish that a cross talk between actin and dynamin takes place for phagosome formation and closure before dynamin functions for scission. PMID:26847957

  7. Fetal lipopolysaccharide exposure modulates diet-dependent gut maturation and sensitivity to necrotising enterocolitis in pre-term pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uterine infections during pregnancy predispose to pre-term birth and postnatal morbidity, but it is unknown how prenatal bacterial exposure affects maturation of the immature gut. We hypothesised that a prenatal exposure to gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has immunomodulatory effects that imp...

  8. Cytosolic Access of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Critical Impact of Phagosomal Acidification Control and Demonstration of Occurrence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Roxane; Sayes, Fadel; Song, Okryul; Gröschel, Matthias I.; Brodin, Priscille; Brosch, Roland; Majlessi, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) uses efficient strategies to evade the eradication by professional phagocytes, involving—as recently confirmed—escape from phagosomal confinement. While Mtb determinants, such as the ESX-1 type VII secretion system, that contribute to this phenomenon are known, the host cell factors governing this important biological process are yet unexplored. Using a newly developed flow-cytometric approach for Mtb, we show that macrophages expressing the phagosomal bivalent cation transporter Nramp-1, are much less susceptible to phagosomal rupture. Together with results from the use of the phagosome acidification inhibitor bafilomycin, we demonstrate that restriction of phagosomal acidification is a prerequisite for mycobacterial phagosomal rupture and cytosolic contact. Using different in vivo approaches including an enrichment and screen for tracking rare infected phagocytes carrying the CD45.1 hematopoietic allelic marker, we here provide first and unique evidence of M. tuberculosis-mediated phagosomal rupture in mouse spleen and lungs and in numerous phagocyte types. Our results, linking the ability of restriction of phagosome acidification to cytosolic access, provide an important conceptual advance for our knowledge on host processes targeted by Mtb evasion strategies. PMID:25658322

  9. Mycobacterial escape from macrophage phagosomes to the cytoplasm represents an alternate adaptation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Mehrotra, Parul; Singh, Archana; Siddiqui, Zaved; Basu, Atanu; Rao, Kanury V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) within the host macrophage is mediated through pathogen-dependent inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, which enables bacteria to persist within the immature phagosomal compartment. By employing ultrastructural examination of different field isolates supported by biochemical analysis, we found that some of the Mtb strains were in fact poorly adapted for subsistence within endocytic vesicles of infected macrophages. Instead, through a mechanism involving activation of host cytosolic phospholipase A2, these bacteria rapidly escaped from phagosomes, and established residence in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Interestingly, by facilitating an enhanced suppression of host cellular autophagy, this translocation served as an alternate virulence acquisition mechanism. Thus, our studies reveal plasticity in the adaptation strategies employed by Mtb, for survival in the host macrophage. PMID:26980157

  10. Dectin-1–Dependent LC3 Recruitment to Phagosomes Enhances Fungicidal Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Jenny M.; Mansour, Michael K.; Khan, Nida S.; Seward, Michael; Puranam, Sravanthi; Tanne, Antoine; Sokolovska, Anna; Becker, Christine E.; Acharya, Mridu; Baird, Michelle A.; Choi, Augustine M. K.; Davidson, Michael W.; Segal, Brahm H.; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Stuart, Lynda M.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has been postulated to play role in mammalian host defense against fungal pathogens, although the molecular details remain unclear. Here, we show that primary macrophages deficient in the autophagic factor LC3 demonstrate diminished fungicidal activity but increased cytokine production in response to Candida albicans stimulation. LC3 recruitment to fungal phagosomes requires activation of the fungal pattern receptor dectin-1. LC3 recruitment to the phagosome also requires Syk signaling but is independent of all activity by Toll-like receptors and does not require the presence of the adaptor protein Card9. We further demonstrate that reactive oxygen species generation by NADPH oxidase is required for LC3 recruitment to the fungal phagosome. These observations directly link LC3 to the inflammatory pathway against C. albicans in macrophages. PMID:24842831

  11. Dectin-1-dependent LC3 recruitment to phagosomes enhances fungicidal activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tam, Jenny M; Mansour, Michael K; Khan, Nida S; Seward, Michael; Puranam, Sravanthi; Tanne, Antoine; Sokolovska, Anna; Becker, Christine E; Acharya, Mridu; Baird, Michelle A; Choi, Augustine M K; Davidson, Michael W; Segal, Brahm H; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Stuart, Lynda M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Vyas, Jatin M

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy has been postulated to play role in mammalian host defense against fungal pathogens, although the molecular details remain unclear. Here, we show that primary macrophages deficient in the autophagic factor LC3 demonstrate diminished fungicidal activity but increased cytokine production in response to Candida albicans stimulation. LC3 recruitment to fungal phagosomes requires activation of the fungal pattern receptor dectin-1. LC3 recruitment to the phagosome also requires Syk signaling but is independent of all activity by Toll-like receptors and does not require the presence of the adaptor protein Card9. We further demonstrate that reactive oxygen species generation by NADPH oxidase is required for LC3 recruitment to the fungal phagosome. These observations directly link LC3 to the inflammatory pathway against C. albicans in macrophages. PMID:24842831

  12. [Modulating the survival and maturation system of B lymphocytes: Current and future new therapeutic strategies in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Valor, Lara; López-Longo, Francisco Javier

    2015-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease associated with an aberrant production of autoantibodies by self-reactive B lymphocytes. The study of the phenotypic characteristics of B lymphocytes and the identification of their surface receptors such as BAFF-R, TACI and BCMA, which are responsible of their survival and maturation, have contributed to the development of new therapeutic strategies in recent years. PMID:25433780

  13. Calmodulin kinase II regulates the maturation and antigen presentation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Tara L; Morita, Craig T; Lee, Kelvin; Kusner, David J

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells, which activate the adaptive immune system. Upon receiving a danger signal, they undergo a maturation process, which increases their antigen presentation capacity, but the responsible regulatory mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A Ca2+-calmodulin (Cam)-Cam kinase II (CamK II) pathway regulates phagosome maturation in macrophages, and this pathway is inhibited by pathogenic microbes. Our hypothesis is that signal transduction events which control phagosome maturation also regulate antigen presentation. Stimulation of primary human DC or the human DC line KG-1, with particulate antigen, resulted in the activation of CamK II and its localization to the phagosome and plasma membrane. Two mechanistically distinct inhibitors of CamK II significantly reduced DC maturation, as determined by up-regulation of surface costimulatory and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and secretion of cytokines. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the CamK II inhibitors blocked the antigen-induced increase in total cellular MHC class molecules as well as their trafficking to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of CamK II was associated with decreased presentation of particulate and soluble MHC class II-restricted antigen, with a greater effect on the former. These data support a model in which CamK II regulates critical stages of the maturation and antigen presentation capacity of human DC, particularly in response to stimulation via phagocytosis. PMID:16204647

  14. Translocation of annexin I to plasma membranes and phagosomes in human neutrophils upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan: possible role in phagosome function.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, M; Leto, T; Levy, R

    1996-01-01

    Annexin I in the cytosol of resting neutrophils was translocated to the plasma membranes upon addition of opsonized zymosan (OZ). Maximum translocation could be detected 1 min after stimulation with OZ, and decreased thereafter. Subcellular fractionation studies demonstrated that annexin I could not be detected in the granule fractions in either resting or activated cells, but was found in association with the phagosome fraction. The marked translocation of annexin I was unique to OZ, since formyl-Met-Leu-Phe induced only slight translocation of annexin I to the plasma membranes, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate had no effect at all. The mechanism regulating the translocation of annexin I is not clear. Annexin I is not phosphorylated in resting or stimulated cells. The correlation between the elevation in the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the degree of translocation of annexin I to the plasma membranes induced by the different stimuli, together with the inhibition of these processes by the addition of EGTA, indicate that the translocation of annexin I can probably be attributed to the rise in [Ca2+]i. However, this cannot be the sole mechanism since ionomycin, which caused an increase in [CA2+]i similar to that induced by OZ, was less efficient than OZ in inducing translocation of annexin I. The induction of annexin I translocation to the plasma membrane by OZ, which was the only agent that induced phagosome formation, and the detection of annexin I in the phagosome fraction, suggest that annexin I participates in phagosome function. PMID:8645229

  15. Affinity maturation of anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl antibodies accompanies a modulation of antigen specificity.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masayuki; Azuma, Takachika

    2016-02-01

    Anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NP) antibodies bearing λ1 chains are known to possess fine specificity, referred to as heterocliticity, which causes these antibodies to bind to hapten analogues such as (4-hydroxy-3-iodo-5-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NIP) and (4-hydroxy-3,5-dinitrophenyl)acetyl (NNP) with higher affinity than to the autologous hapten, NP. They also show preferential binding to the phenolate form of hapten than to the phenolic form. We address here the question of whether affinity maturation accompanies in the fine specificity of these antibodies by analyzing the interaction between NP1-, NIP1-, or NNP1-hen egg lysozyme and anti-NP antibodies that possess different association constants to NP using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor. We measured interactions at various pH values and found that heterocliticity as well as preferential binding to the phenolate form of hapten were most prominent in a germline antibody having immature affinity and that fine specificity becomes less evident, i.e., anti-NP antibodies become more specific to the immunizing antigen, NP during the process of affinity maturation. PMID:26688069

  16. Tfap2a Promotes Specification and Maturation of Neurons in the Inner Ear through Modulation of Bmp, Fgf and Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kantarci, Husniye; Edlund, Renee K.; Groves, Andrew K.; Riley, Bruce B.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) transmit auditory and vestibular information from the inner ear to the hindbrain. SAG neuroblasts originate in the floor of the otic vesicle. New neuroblasts soon delaminate and migrate towards the hindbrain while continuing to proliferate, a phase known as transit amplification. SAG cells eventually come to rest between the ear and hindbrain before terminally differentiating. Regulation of these events is only partially understood. Fgf initiates neuroblast specification within the ear. Subsequently, Fgf secreted by mature SAG neurons exceeds a maximum threshold, serving to terminate specification and delay maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Notch signaling also limits SAG development, but how it is coordinated with Fgf is unknown. Here we show that transcription factor Tfap2a coordinates multiple signaling pathways to promote neurogenesis in the zebrafish inner ear. In both zebrafish and chick, Tfap2a is expressed in a ventrolateral domain of the otic vesicle that includes neurogenic precursors. Functional studies were conducted in zebrafish. Loss of Tfap2a elevated Fgf and Notch signaling, thereby inhibiting SAG specification and slowing maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Conversely, overexpression of Tfap2a inhibited Fgf and Notch signaling, leading to excess and accelerated SAG production. However, most SAG neurons produced by Tfap2a overexpression died soon after maturation. Directly blocking either Fgf or Notch caused less dramatic acceleration of SAG development without neuronal death, whereas blocking both pathways mimicked all observed effects of Tfap2a overexpression, including apoptosis of mature neurons. Analysis of genetic mosaics showed that Tfap2a acts non-autonomously to inhibit Fgf. This led to the discovery that Tfap2a activates expression of Bmp7a, which in turn inhibits both Fgf and Notch signaling. Blocking Bmp signaling reversed the effects of overexpressing Tfap2a. Together, these data

  17. Tfap2a promotes specification and maturation of neurons in the inner ear through modulation of Bmp, Fgf and notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Husniye; Edlund, Renee K; Groves, Andrew K; Riley, Bruce B

    2015-03-01

    Neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) transmit auditory and vestibular information from the inner ear to the hindbrain. SAG neuroblasts originate in the floor of the otic vesicle. New neuroblasts soon delaminate and migrate towards the hindbrain while continuing to proliferate, a phase known as transit amplification. SAG cells eventually come to rest between the ear and hindbrain before terminally differentiating. Regulation of these events is only partially understood. Fgf initiates neuroblast specification within the ear. Subsequently, Fgf secreted by mature SAG neurons exceeds a maximum threshold, serving to terminate specification and delay maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Notch signaling also limits SAG development, but how it is coordinated with Fgf is unknown. Here we show that transcription factor Tfap2a coordinates multiple signaling pathways to promote neurogenesis in the zebrafish inner ear. In both zebrafish and chick, Tfap2a is expressed in a ventrolateral domain of the otic vesicle that includes neurogenic precursors. Functional studies were conducted in zebrafish. Loss of Tfap2a elevated Fgf and Notch signaling, thereby inhibiting SAG specification and slowing maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Conversely, overexpression of Tfap2a inhibited Fgf and Notch signaling, leading to excess and accelerated SAG production. However, most SAG neurons produced by Tfap2a overexpression died soon after maturation. Directly blocking either Fgf or Notch caused less dramatic acceleration of SAG development without neuronal death, whereas blocking both pathways mimicked all observed effects of Tfap2a overexpression, including apoptosis of mature neurons. Analysis of genetic mosaics showed that Tfap2a acts non-autonomously to inhibit Fgf. This led to the discovery that Tfap2a activates expression of Bmp7a, which in turn inhibits both Fgf and Notch signaling. Blocking Bmp signaling reversed the effects of overexpressing Tfap2a. Together, these data

  18. Listeria species escape from the phagosomes of interleukin-4-deactivated human macrophages independent of listeriolysin.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Katja; Eppler, Elisabeth; Filgueira, Luis; Groscurth, Peter; Gasal, Eduard; Schaffner, Andreas; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schneemann, Markus

    2003-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of infections like sepsis and meningitis, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Human macrophages are able to phagocytose and digest L. monocytogenes but IL-4 prevents human macrophages from killing the bacteria, the mechanisms of which are unknown. In the present study, we examined various listeria species and strains including wild-type and deletion mutants in human macrophages pretreated with IL-4. To analyse the IL-4-mediated deactivation process, we combined quantitative infection assays with various morphologic methods. IL-4 facilitates survival and escape of the pathogenic L. monocytogenes wild-type strain 10403S from the macrophage phagosomes. In untreated macrophages, the isogenic listeriolysin deletion mutant strain DP-L2161 was killed and did not escape from the phagolysosomes. However, after macrophage deactivation with IL-4 DP-L2161 survived and escaped from the phagosomes. This was also the case, but to a lesser extent, even for the naturally avirulent L. innocua. As detected by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy, IL-4 permitted the escape of all listeria species tested, including DP-L2161 and L. innocua from the phagosomal compartment of the macrophages. We conclude that escape from the phagosome and survival of the listeria species tested in IL-4-deactivated human macrophages is independent of the virulence factor listeriolysin. PMID:14636240

  19. Foxa2 and Hif1ab regulate maturation of intestinal goblet cells by modulating agr2 expression in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yun-Ren; Lu, Yu-Fen; Lien, Huang-Wei; Huang, Chang-Jen; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian anterior gradient 2 (AGR2), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein disulfide-isomerase (PDI), is involved in cancer cell growth and metastasis, asthma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Mice lacking Agr2 exhibit decreased Muc2 protein in intestinal goblet cells, abnormal Paneth cell development, ileitis and colitis. Despite its importance in cancer biology and inflammatory diseases, the mechanisms regulating agr2 expression in the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms that control agr2 expression in the pharynx and intestine of zebrafish by transient/stable transgenesis, coupled with motif mutation, morpholino knockdown, mRNA rescue and ChIP. A 350 bp DNA sequence with a hypoxia-inducible response element (HRE) and forkhead-response element (FHRE) within a region -4.5 to -4.2 kbp upstream of agr2 directed EGFP expression specifically in the pharynx and intestine. No EGFP expression was detected in the intestinal goblet cells of Tg(HREM:EGFP) or Tg(FHREM:EGFP) embryos with mutated HRE or FHRE, whereas EGFP was expressed in the pharynx of Tg(HREM:EGFP), but not Tg(FHREM:EGFP), embryos. Morpholino knockdown of foxa1 (forkhead box A1) reduced agr2 levels in the pharynx, whereas knockdown of foxa2 or hif1ab decreased intestinal agr2 expression and affected the differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells. These results demonstrate that Foxa1 regulates agr2 expression in the pharynx, whereas both Foxa2 and Hif1ab control agr2 expression in intestinal goblet cells to regulate maturation of these cells. PMID:27222589

  20. Retrieval of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase from Phagosomes Revealed by Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Margaret; Maddera, Lucinda; Engel, Ulrike; Gerisch, Günther

    2010-01-01

    Background The vacuolar H+-ATPase, or V-ATPase, is a highly-conserved multi-subunit enzyme that transports protons across membranes at the expense of ATP. The resulting proton gradient serves many essential functions, among them energizing transport of small molecules such as neurotransmitters, and acidifying organelles such as endosomes. The enzyme is not present in the plasma membrane from which a phagosome is formed, but is rapidly delivered by fusion with endosomes that already bear the V-ATPase in their membranes. Similarly, the enzyme is thought to be retrieved from phagosome membranes prior to exocytosis of indigestible material, although that process has not been directly visualized. Methodology To monitor trafficking of the V-ATPase in the phagocytic pathway of Dictyostelium discoideum, we fed the cells yeast, large particles that maintain their shape during trafficking. To track pH changes, we conjugated the yeast with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Cells were labeled with VatM-GFP, a fluorescently-tagged transmembrane subunit of the V-ATPase, in parallel with stage-specific endosomal markers or in combination with mRFP-tagged cytoskeletal proteins. Principal Findings We find that the V-ATPase is commonly retrieved from the phagosome membrane by vesiculation shortly before exocytosis. However, if the cells are kept in confined spaces, a bulky phagosome may be exocytosed prematurely. In this event, a large V-ATPase-rich vacuole coated with actin typically separates from the acidic phagosome shortly before exocytosis. This vacuole is propelled by an actin tail and soon acquires the properties of an early endosome, revealing an unexpected mechanism for rapid recycling of the V-ATPase. Any V-ATPase that reaches the plasma membrane is also promptly retrieved. Conclusions/Signficance Thus, live cell microscopy has revealed both a usual route and alternative means of recycling the V-ATPase in the endocytic pathway. PMID:20052281

  1. Modulating the biochemical and biophysical culture environment to enhance osteogenic differentiation and maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the fields of stem cell biology, biomaterials, and tissue engineering over the last decades have brought the possibility of constructing tissue substitutes with a broad range of applications in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug discovery. Different types of human stem cells have been used, each presenting a unique set of advantages and limitations with regard to the desired research goals. Whereas adult stem cells are at the frontier of research for tissue and organ regeneration, pluripotent stem cells represent a more challenging cell source for clinical translation. However, with their unlimited growth and wide differentiation potential, pluripotent stem cells represent an unprecedented resource for the construction of advanced human tissue models for biological studies and drug discovery. At the heart of these applications lies the challenge to reproducibly expand, differentiate, and organize stem cells into mature, stable tissue structures. In this review, we focus on the derivation of mesenchymal tissue progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells and the control of their osteogenic differentiation and maturation by modulation of the biophysical culture environment. Similarly to enhancing bone development, the described principles can be applied to the construction of other mesenchymal tissues for basic and applicative studies. PMID:24004835

  2. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Haq, Samina Hyder

    2016-06-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  3. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  4. Oleoresinosis in Grand Fir (Abies grandis) Saplings and Mature Trees (Modulation of this Wound Response by Light and Water Stresses).

    PubMed Central

    Lewinsohn, E.; Gijzen, M.; Muzika, R. M.; Barton, K.; Croteau, R.

    1993-01-01

    The stem content of diterpene resin acids (rosin) increases dramatically following wounding of grand fir (Abies grandis) saplings, but the level of monoterpene olefins (turpentine) in the stem decreases following injury, in spite of a significant increase in monoterpene cyclase (synthase) activity. However, this observation was explained when rapid evaporative losses of the volatile monoterpenes from the wound site was demonstrated by trapping experiments, a finding consistent with a role of turpentine as a solvent for the mobilization and deposition of rosin to seal the injury. Mature forest trees responded to stem wounding by the enhancement of monoterpene cyclization capacity in a manner similar to 2-year-old grand fir saplings raised in the greenhouse. Light and water stresses greatly reduced the constitutive level of monoterpene cyclase activity and abolished the wound-induced response. The diminution in monoterpene biosynthetic capacity was correlated with a dramatic decrease in cyclase protein as demonstrated by immunoblotting. Relief of stress conditions resulted in the restoration of cyclase activity (both constitutive and wound induced) to control levels. The results of these experiments indicate that grand fir saplings are a suitable model for studies of the regulation of defensive oleoresinosis in conifers. PMID:12231755

  5. Microtubule motors transport phagosomes in the RPE, and lack of KLC1 leads to AMD-like pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mei; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Lopes, Vanda S.; Diemer, Tanja; Lillo, Concepción; Rump, Agrani

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of phagosomes, derived from the ingestion of photoreceptor outer segment (POS) disk membranes, is a major role of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Here, POS phagosomes were observed to associate with myosin-7a, and then kinesin-1, as they moved from the apical region of the RPE. Live-cell imaging showed that the phagosomes moved bidirectionally along microtubules in RPE cells, with kinesin-1 light chain 1 (KLC1) remaining associated in both directions and during pauses. Lack of KLC1 did not inhibit phagosome speed, but run length was decreased, and phagosome localization and degradation were impaired. In old mice, lack of KLC1 resulted in RPE pathogenesis that was strikingly comparable to aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), with an excessive accumulation of RPE and sub-RPE deposits, as well as oxidative and inflammatory stress responses. These results elucidate mechanisms of POS phagosome transport in relation to degradation, and demonstrate that defective microtubule motor transport in the RPE leads to phenotypes associated with AMD. PMID:26261180

  6. Avirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii infect macrophages by active invasion from the phagosome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanlin; Marple, Andrew H; Ferguson, David J P; Bzik, David J; Yap, George S

    2014-04-29

    Unlike most intracellular pathogens that gain access into host cells through endocytic pathways, Toxoplasma gondii initiates infection at the cell surface by active penetration through a moving junction and subsequent formation of a parasitophorous vacuole. Here, we describe a noncanonical pathway for T. gondii infection of macrophages, in which parasites are initially internalized through phagocytosis, and then actively invade from within a phagosomal compartment to form a parasitophorous vacuole. This phagosome to vacuole invasion (PTVI) pathway may represent an intermediary link between the endocytic and the penetrative routes for host cell entry by intracellular pathogens. The PTVI pathway is preferentially used by avirulent strains of T. gondii and confers an infectious advantage over virulent strains for macrophage tropism. PMID:24733931

  7. Avirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii infect macrophages by active invasion from the phagosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanlin; Marple, Andrew H.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike most intracellular pathogens that gain access into host cells through endocytic pathways, Toxoplasma gondii initiates infection at the cell surface by active penetration through a moving junction and subsequent formation of a parasitophorous vacuole. Here, we describe a noncanonical pathway for T. gondii infection of macrophages, in which parasites are initially internalized through phagocytosis, and then actively invade from within a phagosomal compartment to form a parasitophorous vacuole. This phagosome to vacuole invasion (PTVI) pathway may represent an intermediary link between the endocytic and the penetrative routes for host cell entry by intracellular pathogens. The PTVI pathway is preferentially used by avirulent strains of T. gondii and confers an infectious advantage over virulent strains for macrophage tropism. PMID:24733931

  8. Early Events in Phagosome Establishment Are Required for Intracellular Survival of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Wiater, Lawrence A.; Dunn, Kenneth; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Shuman, Howard A.

    1998-01-01

    During infection, the Legionnaires’ disease bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, survives and multiplies within a specialized phagosome that is near neutral pH and does not fuse with host lysosomes. In order to understand the molecular basis of this organism’s ability to control its intracellular fate, we have isolated and characterized a group of transposon-generated mutants which were unable to kill macrophages and were subsequently found to be defective in intracellular multiplication. These mutations define a set of 20 genes (19 icm [for intracellular multiplication] genes and dotA [for defect in organelle trafficking]). In this report, we describe a quantitative assay for phagosome-lysosome fusion (PLF) and its use to measure the levels of PLF in cells that have been infected with either wild-type L. pneumophila or one of several mutants defective in different icm genes or dotA. By using quantitative confocal fluorescence microscopy, PLF could be scored on a per-bacterium basis by determining the extent to which fluorescein-labeled L. pneumophila colocalized with host lysosomes prelabeled with rhodamine-dextran. Remarkably, mutations in the six genes that were studied resulted in maximal levels of PLF as quickly as 30 min following infection. These results indicate that several, and possibly all, of the icm and dotA gene products act at an early step during phagosome establishment to determine whether L. pneumophila-containing phagosomes will fuse with lysosomes. Although not ruled out, subsequent activity of these gene products may not be necessary for successful intracellular replication. PMID:9712800

  9. Assessment of phagosomes infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a vaccine candidate against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjana; Parihar, Pankaj; Sharma, Juhi

    2014-11-01

    The present study describes a novel and simple vaccination strategy that involve culturing of M. tuberculosis in the macrophage cells. Isolation of phagosome from macrophage (cell line J774) infected with M. tuberculosis (H37) and M. bovis (BCG) at early and late phase of infection was done ensuing the identification and characterization of these phagosome. In vitro study of apoptosis induced by phagosome infected with (H37) and (BCG) was performed. The vaccine candidate with H1137 MOI- 1:10 at 3 h, MOI- 1:20 at 1, 1.5, 2.5 and 3 h and BCG MOI- 1:20 at 3.5 h showed percentage apoptosis as 38.64, 39.93, 34.66, 22.56,34.59 and 37.81% respectively. The results designates that macrophages provide cellular niche during infection and illustrate considerable immunogenic property. Novel antigens expressed or secreted by H37 in infected macrophages can provide evidence to be a successful vaccine candidate as it endures enhanced immune response than BCG. PMID:25434104

  10. Glutamate Utilization Couples Oxidative Stress Defense and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Francisella Phagosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Rigard, Mélanie; Dairou, Julien; Dupuis, Marion; Dubail, Iharilalao; Meibom, Karin; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to avoid degradation by the host innate immune defense mechanisms triggered upon phagocytocis. Upon infection of mammalian host cells, the intracellular pathogen Francisella replicates exclusively in the cytosolic compartment. Hence, its ability to escape rapidly from the phagosomal compartment is critical for its pathogenicity. Here, we show for the first time that a glutamate transporter of Francisella (here designated GadC) is critical for oxidative stress defense in the phagosome, thus impairing intra-macrophage multiplication and virulence in the mouse model. The gadC mutant failed to efficiently neutralize the production of reactive oxygen species. Remarkably, virulence of the gadC mutant was partially restored in mice defective in NADPH oxidase activity. The data presented highlight links between glutamate uptake, oxidative stress defense, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and phagosomal escape. This is the first report establishing the role of an amino acid transporter in the early stage of the Francisella intracellular lifecycle. PMID:24453979

  11. Discrepancy in assessment of phagosome-lysosome fusion with two lysosomal markers in murine macrophages infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Mor, N; Goren, M B

    1987-01-01

    Phagosome-lysosome fusion (P-LF) was studied in cultured mouse resident peritoneal macrophages after phagocytosis of Candida albicans. The macrophages were labeled with acridine orange (AO), the electronopaque colloidal Thorotrast, or both markers. After phagocytosis of heat-killed C. albicans, both markers were delivered to more than 95% of phagosomes. After ingestion of viable C. albicans by labeled cells, delivery of AO to phagosomes was highly suppressed (90%), and yet Thorotrast delivery was almost universal. After phagocytosis and 60 min of incubation, about 10 to 20% of the yeasts were killed, and a similar fraction of phagosomes was stained by the fluorescent marker. The evidence from Thorotrast transfer and assessment of yeast viability indicates that C. albicans largely resists intracellular killing by resident macrophages in the face of entirely uninhibited P-LF. We infer that AO must transfer to nearly all of the phagosomes but that it is evidently recognizable only in those in which the yeasts have been killed or possibly severely injured. This conclusion constitutes yet another limitation in the usefulness of AO for studying P-LF. Images PMID:3298062

  12. Importance of Host Cell Arginine Uptake in Francisella Phagosomal Escape and Ribosomal Protein Amounts*

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Chhuon, Cerina; Dupuis, Marion; Rigard, Mélanie; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Upon entry into mammalian host cells, the pathogenic bacterium Francisella must import host cell arginine to multiply actively in the host cytoplasm. We identified and functionally characterized an arginine transporter (hereafter designated ArgP) whose inactivation considerably delayed bacterial phagosomal escape and intracellular multiplication. Intramacrophagic growth of the ΔargP mutant was fully restored upon supplementation of the growth medium with excess arginine, in both F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS, demonstrating the importance of arginine acquisition in these two subspecies. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that arginine limitation reduced the amount of most of the ribosomal proteins in the ΔargP mutant. In response to stresses such as nutritional limitation, repression of ribosomal protein synthesis has been observed in all kingdoms of life. Arginine availability may thus contribute to the sensing of the intracellular stage of the pathogen and to trigger phagosomal egress. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange database with identifier PXD001584 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001584). PMID:25616868

  13. Targeted Protein Degradation by Salmonella under Phagosome-Mimicking Culture Conditions Investigated Using Comparative Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, Nathan P.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Mottaz, Heather M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2007-04-01

    The pathogen Salmonella enterica is known to cause both food poisoning and typhoid fever. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant isolates and the threat of bioterrorism (e.g., contamination of the food supply), there is a growing need to study this bacterium. In this investigation, comparative peptidomics was used to study Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cultured in either a rich medium or in an acidic, low magnesium, and minimal nutrient medium designed to roughly mimic the macrophage phagosomal compartment (within which Salmonella are known to survive). Native peptides from cleared cell lysates were enriched by using isopropanol extraction and analyzed by using both LC-MS/MS and LC-FTICR-MS. We identified 5,163 distinct peptides originating from 682 proteins and the data clearly indicated that compared to cells cultured in the rich medium, Salmonella cultured in the phagosome-mimicking medium had dramatically higher abundances of a wide variety of protein degradation products, especially from ribosomal proteins. Salmonella from the same cultures were also analyzed by using bottom-up proteomics, and when the peptidomic and proteomic data were analyzed together, two clusters of proteins targeted for proteolysis were tentatively identified. Possible roles of targeted proteolysis by phagocytosed Salmonella are discussed.

  14. Phagosomes induced by cytokines function as anti-Listeria vaccines: novel role for functional compartmentalization of STAT-1 protein and cathepsin-D.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Rodriguez-Del Rio, Estela; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Tobes, Raquel; Pareja, Eduardo; Lecea-Cuello, M Jesús; Ruiz-Sáez, Marta; Madrazo-Toca, Fidel; Hölscher, Christoph; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2012-04-27

    Phagosomes are critical compartments for innate immunity. However, their role in the protection against murine listeriosis has not been examined. We describe here that listericidal phago-receptosomes are induced by the function of IFN-γ or IL-6 as centralized compartments for innate and adaptive immunity because they are able to confer protection against murine listeriosis. These phago-receptosomes elicited LLO(91-99)/CD8(+)- and LLO(189-201)/CD4(+)-specific immune responses and recruited mature dendritic cells to the vaccination sites controlled by T cells. Moreover, they present exceptional features as efficient vaccine vectors. First, they compartmentalize a novel listericidal STAT-1-mediated signaling pathway that confines multiple innate immune components to the same environment. Second, they show features of MHC class II antigen-loading competent compartments for cathepsin-D-mediated LLO processing. Third, murine cathepsin-D deficiencies fail to develop protective immunity after vaccination with listericidal phago-receptosomes induced by IFN-γ or IL-6. Therefore, it appears that the connection of STAT-1 and cathepsin-D in a single compartment is relevant for protection against listeriosis. PMID:22337873

  15. Maturation of Rhodococcus equi-containing vacuoles is arrested after completion of the early endosome stage.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mora, Eugenia; Polidori, Marco; Lührmann, Anja; Schaible, Ulrich E; Haas, Albert

    2005-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium that can cause bronchopneumonia in foals and AIDS patients. Here, we have analyzed R. equi-containing vacuoles (RCVs) in murine macrophages by confocal laser scanning microscopy, by transmission electron microscopy and by immunochemistry upon purification. We show that RCVs progress normally through the early stages of phagosome maturation acquiring PI3P, early endosome antigen-1, and Rab5, and loosing all or much of them within minutes. Although mature RCVs possess the normally late endocytic markers, lysosome-associated membrane proteins, lysobisphosphatidic acid and Rab7, they lack other hallmark features of late endocytic organelles such as possession of cathepsin D, acid beta-glucuronidase, proton-pumping ATPase and the ability to fuse with prelabeled lysosomes. Bacterial strains possessing a virulence-associated plasmid maintain a nonacidified compartment for 48 h, whereas isogenic strains lacking such plasmids acidify progressively. In summary, RCVs represent a novel phagosome maturation stage positioned after completion of the early endosome stage and before reaching a fully mature late endosome compartment. In addition, vacuole biogenesis can be influenced by bacterial plasmids. PMID:15998320

  16. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  17. Live-Cell Imaging of Phagosome Motility in Primary Mouse RPE Cells.

    PubMed

    Hazim, Roni; Jiang, Mei; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Diemer, Tanja; Lopes, Vanda S; Williams, David S

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a post-mitotic epithelial monolayer situated between the light-sensitive photoreceptors and the choriocapillaris. Given its vital functions for healthy vision, the RPE is a primary target for insults that result in blinding diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). One such function is the phagocytosis and digestion of shed photoreceptor outer segments. In the present study, we examined the process of trafficking of outer segment disk membranes in live cultures of primary mouse RPE, using high speed spinning disk confocal microscopy. This approach has enabled us to track phagosomes, and determine parameters of their motility, which are important for their efficient degradation. PMID:26427485

  18. Silica crystals and aluminum salts mediate NALP-3 inflammasome activation via phagosomal destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Hornung, Veit; Bauernfeind, Franz; Halle, Annett; Samstad, Eivind O.; Kono, Hajime; Rock, Kenneth L.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Latz, Eicke

    2010-01-01

    Inhalation of silica crystals causes inflammation in the alveolar space. Prolonged silica exposure can lead to the development of silicosis, an irreversible, fibrotic pulmonary disease. The mechanisms by which silica and other crystals activate immune cells are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that silica and aluminum salt crystals activate the NALP3 inflammasome. NALP3 activation requires crystal phagocytosis and crystal uptake leads to lysosomal damage and rupture. Sterile lysosomal damage is also sufficient to induce NALP3 activation and inhibition of phagosomal acidification or cathepsin B impairs NALP3 activation. These results indicate that the NALP3 inflammasome can sense lysosomal damage induced by various means as an endogenous danger signal. PMID:18604214

  19. Salmonella transcriptional signature in Tetrahymena phagosomes and role of acid tolerance in passage through the protist

    PubMed Central

    Rehfuss, Marc Yi Ming; Parker, Craig Thomas; Brandl, Maria Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Typhimurium remains undigested in the food vacuoles of the common protist, Tetrahymena. Contrary to its interaction with Acanthamoeba spp., S. Typhimurium is not cytotoxic to Tetrahymena and is egested as viable cells in its fecal pellets. Through microarray gene expression profiling we investigated the factors in S. Typhimurium that are involved in its resistance to digestion by Tetrahymena. The transcriptome of S. Typhimurium in Tetrahymena phagosomes showed that 989 and 1282 genes were altered in expression compared with that in water and in LB culture medium, respectively. A great proportion of the upregulated genes have a role in anaerobic metabolism and the use of alternate electron acceptors. Many genes required for survival and replication within macrophages and human epithelial cells also had increased expression in Tetrahymena, including mgtC, one of the most highly induced genes in all three cells types. A ΔmgtC mutant of S. Typhimurium did not show decreased viability in Tetrahymena, but paradoxically, was egested at a higher cell density than the wild type. The expression of adiA and adiY, which are involved in arginine-dependent acid resistance, also was increased in the protozoan phagosome. A ΔadiAY mutant had lower viability after passage through Tetrahymena, and a higher proportion of S. Typhimurium wild-type cells within pellets remained viable after exposure to pH 3.4 as compared with uningested cells. Our results provide evidence that acid resistance has a role in the resistance of Salmonella to digestion by Tetrahymena and that passage through the protist confers physiological advantages relevant to its contamination cycle. PMID:20686510

  20. Cytoplasmic replication of Staphylococcus aureus upon phagosomal escape triggered by phenol-soluble modulin α.

    PubMed

    Grosz, Magdalena; Kolter, Julia; Paprotka, Kerstin; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Schäfer, Daniel; Chatterjee, Som Subra; Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane; Ohlsen, Knut; Otto, Michael; Rudel, Thomas; Sinha, Bhanu; Fraunholz, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is readily internalized by professional phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils but also by non-professional phagocytes such as epithelial or endothelial cells. Intracellular bacteria have been proposed to play a role in evasion of the innate immune system and may also lead to dissemination within migrating phagocytes. Further, S. aureus efficiently lyses host cells with a battery of cytolytic toxins. Recently, phenol-soluble modulins (PSM) have been identified to comprise a genus-specific family of cytolytic peptides. Of these the PSMα peptides have been implicated in killing polymorphonuclear leucocytes after phagocytosis. We questioned if the peptides were active in destroying endosomal membranes to avoid lysosomal killing of the pathogen and monitored integrity of infected host cell endosomes by measuring the acidity of the intracellular bacterial microenvironment via flow cytometry and by a reporter recruitment technique. Isogenic mutants of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains USA300 LAC, USA400 MW2 as well as the strongly cytolytic methicillin-sensitive strain 6850 were compared with their respective wild type strains. In all three genetic backgrounds, PSMα mutants were unable to escape from phagosomes in non-professional (293, HeLa, EAhy.926) and professional phagocytes (THP-1), whereas mutants in PSMβ and δ-toxin as well as β-toxin, phosphatidyl inositol-dependent phospholipase C and Panton Valentine leucotoxin escaped with efficiencies of the parental strains. S. aureus replicated intracellularly only in presence of a functional PSMα operon thereby illustrating that bacteria grow in the host cell cytoplasm upon phagosomal escape. PMID:24164701

  1. Cytoplasmic replication of Staphylococcus aureus upon phagosomal escape triggered by phenol-soluble modulin α

    PubMed Central

    Grosz, Magdalena; Kolter, Julia; Paprotka, Kerstin; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Schäfer, Daniel; Chatterjee, Som Subra; Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane; Ohlsen, Knut; Otto, Michael; Rudel, Thomas; Sinha, Bhanu; Fraunholz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is readily internalized by professional phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils but also by non-professional phagocytes such as epithelial or endothelial cells. Intracellular bacteria have been proposed to play a role in evasion of the innate immune system and may also lead to dissemination within migrating phagocytes. Further, S. aureus efficiently lyses host cells with a battery of cytolytic toxins. Recently, phenol-soluble modulins (PSM) have been identified to comprise a genus-specific family of cytolytic peptides. Of these the PSMα peptides have been implicated in killing polymorphonuclear leukocytes after phagocytosis. We questioned if the peptides were active in destroying endosomal membranes to avoid lysosomal killing of the pathogen and monitored integrity of infected host cell endosomes by measuring the acidity of the intracellular bacterial microenvironment via flow cytometry and by a reporter recruitment technique. Isogenic mutants of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains USA300 LAC, USA400 MW2 as well as the strongly cytolytic methicillin-sensitive strain 6850 were compared to their respective wild type strains. In all three genetic backgrounds, PSMα mutants were unable to escape from phagosomes in non-professional (293, HeLa, EAhy.926) and professional phagocytes (THP-1), whereas mutants in PSMβ and δ-toxin as well as β-toxin, phosphatidyl inositol-dependent phospholipase C and Panton Valentine leukotoxin escaped with efficiencies of the parental strains. S. aureus replicated intracellularly only in presence of a functional PSMα operon thereby illustrating that bacteria grow in the host cell cytoplasm upon phagosomal escape. PMID:24164701

  2. Ammonium chloride, an inhibitor of phagosome-lysosome fusion in macrophages, concurrently induces phagosome-endosome fusion, and opens a novel pathway: studies of a pathogenic mycobacterium and a nonpathogenic yeast.

    PubMed

    Hart, P D; Young, M R

    1991-10-01

    The weak base ammonium chloride has been previously reported to inhibit lysosomal movements and phagosome-lysosome (Ph-L) fusion in cultured mouse macrophages (M phi), thus reducing delivery, to an intraphagosomal infection, of endocytosed solutes that have concentrated in secondary lysosomes. We have now addressed the question, whether NH4Cl might affect any direct interaction (if it exists) between such infection phagosomes and earlier, nonlysosomal compartments of the endocytic pathway, i.e., solute-containing endosomes. The phagosomes studied were formed after ingestion of the mouse pathogen Mycobacterium microti and the nonpathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae; and the endosomes were formed after nonreceptor-mediated endocytosis of electronopaque and fluorescent soluble markers. By electron microscopy, survey of the cell profiles of M phi that had been treated with 10 mM NH4Cl so that Ph-L fusion was prevented, and that displayed many ferritin-labeled endosomes, revealed numerous examples of the fusion of electronlucent endosomes, revealed numerous examples of the fusion of electronlucent vesicles with phagosomes, whether containing M. microti bacilli or S. cerevisiae yeasts. Fusion was recognized by transfer of label and by morphological evidence of fusion in progress. The fusing vesicles were classed as endosomes, not NH4Cl-lysosomes, by their appearance and provenance, and because lysosome participation was excluded by the concurrent, NH4Cl-caused block of Ph-L fusion and associated lysosomal stasis. No evidence of such phagosome-endosome (Ph-E) fusion was observed in profiles from M phi treated with chloroquine, nor in those from normal, untreated M phi. NH4Cl-treated living M phi that had ingested yeasts at 37 degrees C, followed by endocytosis of lucifer yellow at 17 degrees C (to accumulate labeled endosomes and postpone label passing to lysosomes), were then restored to 37 degrees C. Fluorescence microscopy showed that as many as half of the yeast

  3. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of dendritic cells is insufficient to mature dendritic cells to generate CTLs from naive polyclonal CD8+ T cells in vitro, whereas CD40 ligation is essential.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, M; Beverley, P C

    2001-12-01

    Many cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses are dependent on the interactions between CD40 ligand on the helper CD4+ T cell and CD40 on the APC. Although CD40 triggering of dendritic cells (DC) has been shown to mature the DC by increasing the level of expression of costimulatory molecules and inducing IL-12 secretion, the precise mechanisms by which CD40-CD40 ligand interactions allow DC to drive CTL responses remain unknown. We have used an in vitro model in which naive polyclonal CD8+ T cells can be activated by bone marrow-derived DC to investigate factor(s) that are responsible for this CD40-dependent generation of CTLs. DC modulated with agonistic anti-CD40 mAb (aCD40) are able to generate Ag-specific CTL responses while DC modulated with the microbial stimulus LPS alone do not. We compared the Ag-presenting capacity, levels of costimulatory molecules, and release of cytokines and chemokines of DC modulated with aCD40 to that of DC modulated by LPS. None of the factors assayed account for the unique capacity of anti-CD40-matured DC to drive CTL but this model provides a simplified system for further investigation. Although we attempted to use an LPS-free system for these studies, we are unable to rule out the possibility that very low levels of endotoxin (<20 pg/ml) may synergize with CD40 ligation in the generation of CTLs. PMID:11714787

  4. Market maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, B.; Bowden, S.; Ellis, M

    1995-02-01

    The power sector in the Philipines provides one of the most mature independent power markets in Asia. Over the past five years, National Power Corp. (NPC), the government owned utility, has actively invited the power sector into power generation. Distribution has remained in the hands of private and rural cooperative utilities. Private utilities have been operating as full requirements customers of NPC while the growth in capacity additions by independent power producers (IPPs) has outpaced NPC`s for the second year in a row. With a recovering economy and regulatory reform proceeding, the outlook for independent power remains strong through the end of the decade. The Philipine Congress is now reviewing draft legislation that will decentralize NPC and begin the process of privatization and market-based reforms throughout the country`s power sector.

  5. FcγR-stimulated activation of the NADPH oxidase: phosphoinositide-binding protein p40phox regulates NADPH oxidase activity after enzyme assembly on the phagosome

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei; Li, Xing Jun; Stull, Natalie D.; Ming, Wenyu; Suh, Chang-Il; Bissonnette, Sarah A.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Grinstein, Sergio; Atkinson, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase generates superoxide for microbial killing, and includes a membrane-bound flavocytochrome b558 and cytosolic p67phox, p47phox, and p40phox subunits that undergo membrane translocation upon cellular activation. The function of p40phox, which binds p67phox in resting cells, is incompletely understood. Recent studies showed that phagocytosis-induced superoxide production is stimulated by p40phox and its binding to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P), a phosphoinositide enriched in membranes of internalized phagosomes. To better define the role of p40phox in FcγR-induced oxidase activation, we used immunofluorescence and real-time imaging of FcγR-induced phagocytosis. YFP-tagged p67phox and p40phox translocated to granulocyte phagosomes before phagosome internalization and accumulation of a probe for PI3P. p67phox and p47phox accumulation on nascent and internalized phagosomes did not require p40phox or PI3 kinase activity, although superoxide production before and after phagosome sealing was decreased by mutation of the p40phox PI3P-binding domain or wortmannin. Translocation of p40phox to nascent phagosomes required binding to p67phox but not PI3P, although the loss of PI3P binding reduced p40phox retention after phagosome internalization. We conclude that p40phox functions primarily to regulate FcγR-induced NADPH oxidase activity rather than assembly, and stimulates superoxide production via a PI3P signal that increases after phagosome internalization. PMID:18711001

  6. Genetic manipulation of RPS5 gene expression modulates the initiation of commitment of MEL cells to erythroid maturation: Implications in understanding ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Vizirianakis, Ioannis S; Papachristou, Eleni T; Andreadis, Panagiotis; Zopounidou, Elena; Matragkou, Christina N; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S

    2015-07-01

    Impairment of ribosome biogenesis contributes to the molecular pathophysiology of ribosomopathies by deregulating cell-lineage specific proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis decisions of haematopoietic progenitor cells. Here, using pro-erythroblast-like murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells, a model system of erythroid maturation, we aimed to investigate whether genetic manipulation of RPS5 expression affects the capacity of cells to grow and differentiate in culture. Parental MEL cells stably transfected with full length RPS5 cDNA in sense (MEL-C14 culture) or antisense (MEL-antisenseRPS5 culture) orientation, as well as MEL cells transiently transfected with siRNAs specific for RPS5 gene silencing (MEL-RPS5siRNA culture) were assessed for their ability to fully execute their erythroid maturation program in culture. The data obtained thus far indicate that: a) MEL-antisenseRPS5 exhibit a pronounced delay in the initiation of differentiation, as well as an impairment of commitment, since the continuous presence of the inducer in culture is required for the cells to fully execute their erythroid maturation program. b) RNAi-mediating silencing of RPS5 gene expression resulted in the inability of MEL cells to differentiate; however, when these cells were allowed to recapitulate normal RPS5 gene expression levels they regained their differentiation capacity by accumulating high proportion of erythroid mature cells. c) Interestingly the latter, is accompanied by morphological changes of cells and an impairment of their proliferation and apoptosis potential. Such data for the first time correlate the RPS5 gene expression levels with the differentiation capacity of MEL cells in vitro, a fact that might also have implications in understanding ribosomopathies. PMID:25998414

  7. Visualizing Toll-like Receptor-dependent Phagosomal Dynamics in Murine Dendritic Cells Using Live Cell Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Adriana R.; Marks, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells are professional phagocytes that are highly specialized to process and present antigens from internalized particles to prime naïve T cells. To achieve their functions, the phagocytic machinery and membrane dynamics of these cells have been adapted to optimize presentation of antigens from phagocytosed particles that bear ligands of pattern recognition receptors, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), and that are thus perceived of as “dangerous”. We have recently shown that phagosomes that are engaged in TLR signaling in dendritic cells emit numerous long tubules that facilitate content exchange with other signaling phagosomes and favor presentation of particle-derived antigens. This chapter describes the methods used to study the formation of these tubules, which we refer to as “phagotubules”, by live cell imaging of mouse dendritic cells after the phagocytosis of fluorescent latex beads. We also describe methods to assess the effect of TLR signaling on this process. PMID:25702119

  8. Dental pulp in mature replanted human teeth: morphological alterations and metalloproteineses-2 and -9, Annexin-5, BCL-2 and iNOS modulation.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Angelova Volponi, A; Uzzo, M L; Spatola, G F; Jurjus, A; Vandevska-Radunovic, V

    2015-01-01

    Tooth replantation, as a treatment concept, has been subject to controversies regarding the mechanism as well as the various parameters underlying this process. This work aimed to study time-related changes in the pulp of replanted mature human premolars through the changes in the levels of certain factors involved in the underlying mechanisms of pulpal tissue healing after replantation. Eleven experimental mature teeth were extracted, immediately replanted in the original socket and left without any other intervention for 1, 2, 3 and 12 weeks before re-extraction. Three premolars served as control. All specimens were subject to histological analysis and the levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, Annexin V, iNOS and BCL-2 (anti-apoptotic family) were analyzed employing immunohistochemistry. The results showed degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammatory cell infiltrate, loss in pulpo-dentine interface and loss of odontoblasts in the dental pulp tissue. This was accompanied by increase over time of MMP-9, Annexin V, iNOS and a decrease of BCL-2 and MMP-2, suggesting that apoptosis increased throughout the experimental period. PMID:26753662

  9. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Mediates Adult OPC Maturation and Myelin Repair through Modulation of Akt and GsK-3β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, FuCheng; Burke, Kathryn; Kantor, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Failure of remyelination in diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), leads to permanent axonal damage and irreversible functional loss. The mechanisms controlling remyelination are currently poorly understood. Recent studies implicate the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in regulating oligodendrocyte (OL) development and myelination in CNS. In this study, we show that Cdk5 is also an important regulator of remyelination. Pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 inhibits repair of lysolecithin lesions. This inhibition is a consequence of Cdk5 disruption in neural cells because remyelination in slice cultures is blocked by Cdk5 inhibitors, whereas specific deletion of Cdk5 in OLs inhibits myelin repair. In CNP-Cre;Cdk5fl/fl conditional knock-out mouse (Cdk5 cKO), myelin repair was delayed significantly in response to focal demyelinating lesions compared with wild-type animals. The lack of myelin repair was reflected in decreased expression of MBP and proteolipid protein and a reduction in the total number of myelinated axons in the lesion. The number of CC1+ cells in the lesion sites was significantly reduced in Cdk5 cKO compared with wild-type animals although the total number of oligodendrocyte lineage cells (Olig2+ cells) was increased, suggesting that Cdk5 loss perturbs the transition of early OL lineage cell into mature OL and subsequent remyelination. The failure of remyelination in Cdk5 cKO animals was associated with a reduction in signaling through the Akt pathway and an enhancement of Gsk-3β signaling pathways. Together, these data suggest that Cdk5 is critical in regulating the transition of adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells to mature OLs that is essential for myelin repair in adult CNS. PMID:25080600

  10. Kit transduced signals counteract erythroid maturation by MAPK-dependent modulation of erythropoietin signaling and apoptosis induction in mouse fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Haas, N; Riedt, T; Labbaf, Z; Baßler, K; Gergis, D; Fröhlich, H; Gütgemann, I; Janzen, V; Schorle, H

    2015-05-01

    Signaling by the stem cell factor receptor Kit in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is functionally associated with the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation and survival. Expression of the receptor is downregulated upon terminal differentiation in most lineages, including red blood cell terminal maturation, suggesting that omission of Kit transduced signals is a prerequisite for the differentiation process to occur. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Kit signaling preserves the undifferentiated state of progenitor cells are not yet characterized in detail. In this study, we generated a mouse model for inducible expression of a Kit receptor carrying an activating mutation and studied its effects on fetal liver hematopoiesis. We found that sustained Kit signaling leads to expansion of erythroid precursors and interferes with terminal maturation beyond the erythroblast stage. Primary KIT(D816V) erythroblasts stimulated to differentiate fail to exit cell cycle and show elevated rates of apoptosis because of insufficient induction of survival factors. They further retain expression of progenitor cell associated factors c-Myc, c-Myb and GATA-2 and inefficiently upregulate erythroid transcription factors GATA-1, Klf1 and Tal1. In KIT(D816V) erythroblasts we found constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, elevated expression of the src kinase family member Lyn and impaired Akt activation in response to erythropoietin. We demonstrate that the block in differentiation is partially rescued by MAPK inhibition, and completely rescued by the multikinase inhibitor Dasatinib. These results show that a crosstalk between Kit and erythropoietin receptor signaling cascades exists and that continuous Kit signaling, partly mediated by the MAPK pathway, interferes with this crosstalk. PMID:25323585

  11. Kit transduced signals counteract erythroid maturation by MAPK-dependent modulation of erythropoietin signaling and apoptosis induction in mouse fetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Haas, N; Riedt, T; Labbaf, Z; Baßler, K; Gergis, D; Fröhlich, H; Gütgemann, I; Janzen, V; Schorle, H

    2015-01-01

    Signaling by the stem cell factor receptor Kit in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is functionally associated with the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation and survival. Expression of the receptor is downregulated upon terminal differentiation in most lineages, including red blood cell terminal maturation, suggesting that omission of Kit transduced signals is a prerequisite for the differentiation process to occur. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Kit signaling preserves the undifferentiated state of progenitor cells are not yet characterized in detail. In this study, we generated a mouse model for inducible expression of a Kit receptor carrying an activating mutation and studied its effects on fetal liver hematopoiesis. We found that sustained Kit signaling leads to expansion of erythroid precursors and interferes with terminal maturation beyond the erythroblast stage. Primary KITD816V erythroblasts stimulated to differentiate fail to exit cell cycle and show elevated rates of apoptosis because of insufficient induction of survival factors. They further retain expression of progenitor cell associated factors c-Myc, c-Myb and GATA-2 and inefficiently upregulate erythroid transcription factors GATA-1, Klf1 and Tal1. In KITD816V erythroblasts we found constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, elevated expression of the src kinase family member Lyn and impaired Akt activation in response to erythropoietin. We demonstrate that the block in differentiation is partially rescued by MAPK inhibition, and completely rescued by the multikinase inhibitor Dasatinib. These results show that a crosstalk between Kit and erythropoietin receptor signaling cascades exists and that continuous Kit signaling, partly mediated by the MAPK pathway, interferes with this crosstalk. PMID:25323585

  12. The Crohn's disease-associated adherent-invasive Escherichia coli strain LF82 replicates in mature phagolysosomes within J774 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Glasser, Anne-Lise; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Méresse, Stéphane; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2006-03-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) bacteria isolated from Crohn's disease patients are able to extensively replicate within macrophages in large vacuoles. The mechanism by which AIEC bacteria survive within phagocytic cells is unknown. This report describes the maturation of AIEC LF82-containing phagosomes within J774 macrophages. LF82-containing phagosomes traffic through the endocytic pathway as shown by the sequential acquisition and loss of EEA1 and Rab7 and by accumulation of Lamp-1, Lamp-2 and cathepsin D. We demonstrated that AIEC LF82-containing phagosomes mature into active phagolysosomes where bacteria are exposed to low pH and to the degradative activity of cathepsin D. Finally, we showed that an acidic environment is necessary for replication of AIEC LF82 bacteria within J774 macrophages. Thus, evidence is provided that AIEC LF82 bacteria do not escape from the endocytic pathway but undergo normal interaction with host endomembrane organelles and replicate within acidic and cathepsin D-positive vacuolar phagolysosomes. PMID:16469058

  13. Spacious phagosome formation within mouse macrophages correlates with Salmonella serotype pathogenicity and host susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Alpuche-Aranda, C M; Berthiaume, E P; Mock, B; Swanson, J A; Miller, S I

    1995-01-01

    Light microscopic studies indicated a correlation between the virulence for mice of different Salmonella serotypes and the ability to form or maintain spacious phagosomes (SP) within mouse macrophages. Although Salmonella typhimurium induced membrane ruffling, macropinocytosis, and SP formation in macrophages from BALB/c mice, serotypes which are nonpathogenic for mice produced markedly fewer SP. SP formation correlated with both serotype survival within mouse macrophages and reported lethality for mice. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that the human pathogen S. typhi induced generalized macropinocytosis and SP formation in human monocyte-derived macrophages, indicating a similar morphology for the initial phases of this host-pathogen interaction. In contrast to bone marrow-derived macrophages from BALB/c mice, macrophages from S. typhimurium-resistant outbred (CD-1) and inbred (CBA/HN) mice did not initiate generalized macropinocytosis after bacterial infection and formed markedly fewer SP. These deficiencies were not due to the Ihy resistance genotype of these mice, as macrophages from mice that were congenic except for the Ihy locus demonstrated equal SP formation in response to S. typhimurium. The observation that S. typhimurium-resistant CD-1 and CBA/HN mice are deficient in the ability to form and/or maintain SP indicates that a variable host component is important for SP formation and suggests that the ability to induce or form SP affects susceptibility to S. typhimurium. When serotypes nonpathogenic for mice were used to infect BALB/c macrophages, or when CD-1 or CBA/HN mouse macrophages were infected by S. typhimurium, some of the SP that formed shrank within seconds. This rapid shrinkage suggests that SP maintenance is also important for S. typhimurium survival within macrophages. These studies indicate that both host and bacterial factors contribute to SP formation and maintenance, which correlate with Salmonella intracellular survival and the

  14. Implication of phagosome-lysosome fusion in restriction of Mycobacterium avium growth in bone marrow macrophages from genetically resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    de Chastellier, C; Fréhel, C; Offredo, C; Skamene, E

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the host to resist infection to a variety of intracellular pathogens, including mycobacteria, is strongly dependent upon the expression of the Bcg gene. Mouse strains which express the resistance phenotype (Bcgr) restrict bacterial growth, whereas susceptible strains (Bcgs) allow bacterial growth. Expression of the Bcg allele is known to influence the priming of host macrophages (M phi s) for bactericidal function. In the present work, bone marrow-derived M phi s from congenic BALB/c (Bcgs) and C.D2 (BALB/c.Bcgr) mice were infected with the virulent strain Mycobacterium avium TMC 724 to define the mechanism involved in growth restriction of M. avium. By combining CFU measurements and ultrastructural analyses, we show that growth of this bacterium is restricted in marrow M phi s from resistant mice. Using acid phosphatase as a lysosomal marker, we provide evidence that the hydrolytic activity of M phi s, as measured by the capacity of lysosomes to fuse with and transfer active hydrolytic enzymes to phagosomes in which M. avium resides, is an expression of the Bcg gene and that this phenomenon is a key antibacterial activity responsible for growth restriction of M. avium: (i) the percentage of phagosome-lysosome fusions was twice as high in Bcgr M phi s as in Bcgs M phi s, and (ii) the percentage of intact viable bacteria residing in acid phosphatase-negative phagosomes was twice as low in Bcgr M phi s as in the Bcgs counterparts. These differences are not due to a lower activity of the enzyme in Bcgr M phi s. The mechanism by which the Bcg gene exerts control over the phagolysosomal fusion is discussed. Images PMID:8359899

  15. Dictyostelium Nramp1, which is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian DMT1 transporter, mediates phagosomal iron efflux.

    PubMed

    Buracco, Simona; Peracino, Barbara; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Signoretto, Elena; Vollero, Alessandra; Imperiali, Francesca; Castagna, Michela; Bossi, Elena; Bozzaro, Salvatore

    2015-09-01

    The Nramp (Slc11) protein family is widespread in bacteria and eukaryotes, and mediates transport of divalent metals across cellular membranes. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has two Nramp proteins. Nramp1, like its mammalian ortholog (SLC11A1), is recruited to phagosomal and macropinosomal membranes, and confers resistance to pathogenic bacteria. Nramp2 is located exclusively in the contractile vacuole membrane and controls, synergistically with Nramp1, iron homeostasis. It has long been debated whether mammalian Nramp1 mediates iron import or export from phagosomes. By selectively loading the iron-chelating fluorochrome calcein in macropinosomes, we show that Dictyostelium Nramp1 mediates iron efflux from macropinosomes in vivo. To gain insight in ion selectivity and the transport mechanism, the proteins were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Using a novel assay with calcein, and electrophysiological and radiochemical assays, we show that Nramp1, similar to rat DMT1 (also known as SLC11A2), transports Fe(2+) and manganese, not Fe(3+) or copper. Metal ion transport is electrogenic and proton dependent. By contrast, Nramp2 transports only Fe(2+) in a non-electrogenic and proton-independent way. These differences reflect evolutionary divergence of the prototypical Nramp2 protein sequence compared to the archetypical Nramp1 and DMT1 proteins. PMID:26208637

  16. Dictyostelium Nramp1, which is structurally and functionally similar to mammalian DMT1 transporter, mediates phagosomal iron efflux

    PubMed Central

    Buracco, Simona; Peracino, Barbara; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Signoretto, Elena; Vollero, Alessandra; Imperiali, Francesca; Castagna, Michela; Bossi, Elena; Bozzaro, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Nramp (Slc11) protein family is widespread in bacteria and eukaryotes, and mediates transport of divalent metals across cellular membranes. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has two Nramp proteins. Nramp1, like its mammalian ortholog (SLC11A1), is recruited to phagosomal and macropinosomal membranes, and confers resistance to pathogenic bacteria. Nramp2 is located exclusively in the contractile vacuole membrane and controls, synergistically with Nramp1, iron homeostasis. It has long been debated whether mammalian Nramp1 mediates iron import or export from phagosomes. By selectively loading the iron-chelating fluorochrome calcein in macropinosomes, we show that Dictyostelium Nramp1 mediates iron efflux from macropinosomes in vivo. To gain insight in ion selectivity and the transport mechanism, the proteins were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Using a novel assay with calcein, and electrophysiological and radiochemical assays, we show that Nramp1, similar to rat DMT1 (also known as SLC11A2), transports Fe2+ and manganese, not Fe3+ or copper. Metal ion transport is electrogenic and proton dependent. By contrast, Nramp2 transports only Fe2+ in a non-electrogenic and proton-independent way. These differences reflect evolutionary divergence of the prototypical Nramp2 protein sequence compared to the archetypical Nramp1 and DMT1 proteins. PMID:26208637

  17. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  18. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Michely C; Costa, Marcília P; Pacheco, Ana C L; Kamimura, Michel T; Silva, Samara C; Carneiro, Laura D G; Sousa, Ana P L; Soares, Carlos E A; Souza, Celeste S F; de Oliveira, Diana Magalhães

    2009-07-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  19. Cytosolic Delivery of Liposomal Vaccines by Means of the Concomitant Photosensitization of Phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Hjálmsdóttir, Ásdís; Bühler, Céline; Vonwil, Vera; Roveri, Maurizio; Håkerud, Monika; Wäckerle-Men, Ying; Gander, Bruno; Johansen, Pål

    2016-02-01

    One of the greatest pharmaceutical challenges in vaccinology is the delivery of antigens to the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in order to allow for the stimulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted CD8(+) T-cell responses, which may act on intracellular infections or cancer. Recently, we described a novel method for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) vaccination by combining antigens with a photosensitizer and light for cytosolic antigen delivery. The goal of the current project was to test this immunization method with particle-based formulations. Liposomes were prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, and the antigen ovalbumin (OVA) or the photosensitizer tetraphenyl chlorine disulfonate (TPCS2a) was separately encapsulated. C57BL/6 mice were immunized intradermally with OVA liposomes or a combination of OVA and TPCS2a liposomes, and light was applied the next day for activation of the photosensitizer resulting in cytosolic release of antigen from phagosomes. Immune responses were tested both after a prime only regime and after a prime-boost scheme with a repeat immunization 2 weeks post priming. Antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses and antibody responses were analyzed ex vivo by flow cytometry and ELISA methods. The physicochemical stability of liposomes upon storage and light exposure was analyzed in vitro. Immunization with both TPCS2a- and OVA-containing liposomes greatly improved CD8(+) T-cell responses as compared to immunization without TPCS2a and as measured by proliferation in vivo and cytokine secretion ex vivo. In contrast, OVA-specific antibody responses (IgG1 and IgG2c) were reduced after immunization with TPCS2a-containing liposomes. The liposomal formulation protected the photosensitizer from light-induced inactivation during storage. In conclusion, the photosensitizer TPCS2a was successfully formulated in liposomes and enabled a shift from MHC class II to MHC class I antigen processing and

  20. Evidence for a fence that impedes the diffusion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate out of the forming phagosomes of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Kay, Jason G; Masters, Thomas; Grinstein, Sergio; Im, Wonpil; Pastor, Richard W; Scarlata, Suzanne; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2011-09-01

    To account for the many functions of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), several investigators have proposed that there are separate pools of PIP(2) in the plasma membrane. Recent experiments show the surface concentration of PIP(2) is indeed enhanced in regions where phagocytosis, exocytosis, and cell division occurs. Kinases that produce PIP(2) are also concentrated in these regions. However, how is the PIP(2) produced by these kinases prevented from diffusing rapidly away? First, proteins could act as "fences" around the perimeter of these regions. Second, some factor could markedly decrease the diffusion coefficient, D, of PIP(2) within these regions. We used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to investigate these two possibilities in the forming phagosomes of macrophages injected with fluorescent PIP(2). FCS measurements show that PIP(2) diffuses rapidly (D ~ 1 μm(2)/s) in both the forming phagosomes and unengaged plasma membrane. FRAP measurements show that the fluorescence from PIP(2) does not recover (>100 s) after photobleaching the entire forming phagosome but recovers rapidly (~10 s) in a comparable area of membrane outside the cup. These results (and similar data for a plasma membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein) support the hypothesis that a fence impedes the diffusion of PIP(2) into and out of forming phagosomes. PMID:21795401

  1. Vacuolar Protein Sorting Protein 13A, TtVPS13A, Localizes to the Tetrahymena thermophila Phagosome Membrane and Is Required for Efficient Phagocytosis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Samaranayake, Haresha S.; Cowan, Ann E.; Klobutcher, Lawrence A.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting 13 (VPS13) proteins have been studied in a number of organisms, and mutations in VPS13 genes have been implicated in two human genetic disorders, but the function of these proteins is poorly understood. The TtVPS13A protein was previously identified in a mass spectrometry analysis of the Tetrahymena thermophila phagosome proteome (M. E. Jacobs et al., Eukaryot. Cell 5:1990–2000, 2006), suggesting that it is involved in phagocytosis. In this study, we analyzed the structure of the macronuclear TtVPS13A gene, which was found to be composed of 17 exons spanning 12.5 kb and was predicted to encode a protein of 3,475 amino acids (aa). A strain expressing a TtVPS13A-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was constructed, and the protein was found to associate with the phagosome membrane during the entire cycle of phagocytosis. In addition, Tetrahymena cells with a TtVPS13A knockout mutation displayed impaired phagocytosis. Specifically, they grew slowly under conditions where phagocytosis is essential, they formed few phagosomes, and the digestion of phagosomal contents was delayed compared to wild-type cells. Overall, these results provide evidence that the TtVPS13A protein is required for efficient phagocytosis. PMID:21764909

  2. Mature Teachers Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  3. Cone Early Maturity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop cone early maturity is thought to be caused by diffuse infections of cone, just prior to harvest, by Podosphaera macularis. The disease is best managed by limiting the amount of leaf infection by P. macularis prior to bloom. The yield and quality reductions associated with Hop cone early matur...

  4. Virulent Mycobacterium fortuitum restricts NO production by a gamma interferon-activated J774 cell line and phagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Tânia Regina Marques; De Freitas, Juliana Ribeiro; Silva, Queilan Chagas; Figueira, Cláudio Pereira; Roxo, Eliana; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; De Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2002-10-01

    The virulence of different isolates of Mycobacterium has been associated with two morphologically distinguishable colonial variants: opaque (SmOp) and transparent (SmTr). In this report we used an in vitro assay to compare macrophage (Mphi) responses to SmOp and SmTr Mycobacterium fortuitum variants, taking advantage of the fact that these variants were derived from the same isolate. Cells preactivated or not with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) were infected with SmOp or SmTr M. fortuitum. We showed that SmOp and SmTr induced different levels of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFN-gamma-stimulated Mphi. Indeed, the amount of IFN-gamma-induced NO production by J774 cells was 4.8 to 9.0 times higher by SmOp (23.1 to 37.7 micro M) compared to SmTr infection (3.9 to 4.8 micro M) (P = 0.0332), indicating that virulent SmTr bacilli restricted NO production. In addition, IFN-gamma-induced NO production by Mphi was higher when correlated with reduction of only avirulent SmOp bacillus viability. SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine)-induced NO production did not modify SmTr viability, indicating its resistance to nitrogen radicals. Electron microscopy studies were performed to evaluate the capacity of phagosomes to fuse with lysosomes labeled with bovine serum albumin-colloidal gold particles. By 24 h postinfection, 69% more phagosome-containing SmOp variant had fused with lysosomes compared to the SmTr-induced phagosomes. In conclusion, these data indicate that virulent SmTr bacilli may escape host defense by restricting IFN-gamma-induced NO production, resisting nitrogen toxic radicals, and limiting phagosome fusion with lysosomes. PMID:12228291

  5. Posttesticular sperm maturation, infertility, and hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Marjorie; Pollet-Villard, Xavier; Levy, Rachel; Drevet, Joël R; Saez, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is a key molecule in the mammalian physiology of especial particular importance for the reproductive system as it is the common precursor for steroid hormone synthesis. Cholesterol is also a recognized modulator of sperm functions, not only at the level of gametogenesis. Cholesterol homeostasis regulation is crucial for posttesticular sperm maturation, and imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect these posttesticular events. Metabolic lipid disorders (dyslipidemia) affect male fertility but are most of the time studied from the angle of endocrine/testicular consequences. This review will focus on the deleterious effects of a particular dyslipidemia, i.e., hypercholesterolemia, on posttesticular maturation of mammalian spermatozoa. PMID:26067871

  6. Data Product Maturity

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-25

    ... document, maturity levels are provided separately for each scientific data set (SDS) included with the data files. The data product ... indiscriminate use of these data products as the basis for research findings, journal publications, and/or presentations.   ...

  7. The Francisella tularensis Pathogenicity Island Encodes a Secretion System that is required for Phagosome Escape and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jeffrey R.; Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Rodriguez, Stephen A.; Liu, Jirong; Celli, Jean; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Klose, Karl E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Francisella tularensis causes the human disease tularemia. F. tularensis is able to survive and replicate within macrophages, a trait that has been correlated with its high virulence, but it is unclear the exact mechanism(s) this organism uses to escape killing within this hostile environment. F. tularensis virulence is dependent upon the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), a cluster of genes that we show here shares homology with Type VI secretion gene clusters in Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that two FPI proteins, VgrG and IglI, are secreted into the cytosol of infected macrophages. VgrG and IglI are required for F. tularensis phagosomal escape, intramacrophage growth, inflammasome activation, and virulence in mice. Interestingly, VgrG secretion does not require the other FPI genes. However, VgrG and other FPI genes, including PdpB (an IcmF homologue), are required for the secretion of IglI into the macrophage cytosol, suggesting VgrG and other FPI factors are components of a secretion system. This is the first report of F. tularensis FPI virulence proteins required for intramacrophage growth that are translocated into the macrophage. PMID:20054881

  8. Members of the Francisella tularensis Phagosomal Transporter Subfamily of Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporters Are Critical for Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marohn, Mark E.; Santiago, Araceli E.; Shirey, Kari Ann; Lipsky, Michael; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Due to its aerosolizable nature and low infectious dose, F. tularensis is classified as a category A select agent and, therefore, is a priority for vaccine development. Survival and replication in macrophages and other cell types are critical to F. tularensis pathogenesis, and impaired intracellular survival has been linked to a reduction in virulence. The F. tularensis genome is predicted to encode 31 major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters, and the nine-member Francisella phagosomal transporter (Fpt) subfamily possesses homology with virulence factors in other intracellular pathogens. We hypothesized that these MFS transporters may play an important role in F. tularensis pathogenesis and serve as good targets for attenuation and vaccine development. Here we show altered intracellular replication kinetics and attenuation of virulence in mice infected with three of the nine Fpt mutant strains compared with wild-type (WT) F. tularensis LVS. The vaccination of mice with these mutant strains was protective against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge. Additionally, we observed pronounced differences in cytokine profiles in the livers of mutant-infected mice, suggesting that alterations in in vivo cytokine responses are a major contributor to the attenuation observed for these mutant strains. These results confirm that this subset of MFS transporters plays an important role in the pathogenesis of F. tularensis and suggest that a focus on the development of attenuated Fpt subfamily MFS transporter mutants is a viable strategy toward the development of an efficacious vaccine. PMID:22508856

  9. The transcriptomic response of the coral Acropora digitifera to a competent Symbiodinium strain: the symbiosome as an arrested early phagosome.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, A R; Cumbo, V; Harii, S; Shinzato, C; Chan, C X; Ragan, M A; Bourne, D G; Willis, B L; Ball, E E; Satoh, N; Miller, D J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the ecological significance of the relationship between reef-building corals and intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in its establishment. Indeed, microarray-based analyses point to the conclusion that host gene expression is largely or completely unresponsive during the establishment of symbiosis with a competent strain of Symbiodinium. In this study, the use of Illumina RNA-Seq technology allowed detection of a transient period of differential expression involving a small number of genes (1073 transcripts; <3% of the transcriptome) 4 h after the exposure of Acropora digitifera planulae to a competent strain of Symbiodinium (a clade B strain). This phenomenon has not previously been detected as a consequence of both the lower sensitivity of the microarray approaches used and the sampling times used. The results indicate that complex changes occur, including transient suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and protein synthesis, but are also consistent with the hypothesis that the symbiosome is a phagosome that has undergone early arrest, raising the possibility of common mechanisms in the symbiotic interactions of corals and symbiotic sea anemones with their endosymbionts. PMID:27094992

  10. Defects in lysosomal maturation facilitate the activation of innate sensors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Andrew J; Kang, SunAh; Scott, Eric; Hillman, Kai; Rajfur, Zenon; Jacobson, Ken; Costello, M Joseph; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-04-12

    Defects in clearing apoptotic debris disrupt tissue and immunological homeostasis, leading to autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Herein, we report that macrophages from lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice have impaired lysosomal maturation, resulting in heightened ROS production and attenuated lysosomal acidification. Impaired lysosomal maturation diminishes the ability of lysosomes to degrade apoptotic debris contained within IgG-immune complexes (IgG-ICs) and promotes recycling and the accumulation of nuclear self-antigens at the membrane 72 h after internalization. Diminished degradation of IgG-ICs prolongs the intracellular residency of nucleic acids, leading to the activation of Toll-like receptors. It also promotes phagosomal membrane permeabilization, allowing dsDNA and IgG to leak into the cytosol and activate AIM2 and TRIM21. Collectively, these events promote the accumulation of nuclear antigens and activate innate sensors that drive IFNα production and heightened cell death. These data identify a previously unidentified defect in lysosomal maturation that provides a mechanism for the chronic activation of intracellular innate sensors in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27035940

  11. Jealousy and Moral Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; Deuger, Donna J.

    Jealousy may be perceived as either good or bad depending upon the moral maturity of the individual. To investigate this conclusion, a study was conducted testing two hypothesis: a positive relationship exists between conventional moral reasoning (reference to norms and laws) and the endorsement and level of jealousy; and a negative relationship…

  12. Phagosomal pH and glass fiber dissolution in cultured nasal epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, N F

    1994-01-01

    The dissolution rate of glass fibers has been shown to be pH sensitive using in vitro lung fluid simulant models. The current study investigated whether there is a difference in phagosomal pH (ppH) between rat alveolar macrophages (AM) and rat nasal epithelial cells (RNEC) and whether such a difference would influence the dissolution of glass fibers. The ppH was measured in cultured AM and RNEC using flow cytometric, fluorescence-emission rationing techniques with fluorescein-labeled, amorphous silica particles. Glass fiber dissolution was determined in AM and RNEC cultured for 3 weeks with fast dissolving glass fibers (GF-A) or slow dissolving ones (GF-B). The mean diameters of GF-A were 2.7 microns and of GF-B, 2.6 microns, the average length of both fibers was approximately 22 to 25 microns. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the length and diameter of intracellular fibers and estimating the volume, assuming a cylindrical morphology. The ppH of AM was 5.2 to 5.8, and the ppH of RNEC was 7.0 to 7.5. The GF-A dissolved more slowly in RNEC than in AM, and no dissolution was evident in either cell type with GF-B. The volume loss with GF-A after a 3-week culture with AM was 66% compared to 45% for cultured RNEC. These results are different from those obtained using in vitro lung fluid-simulant models where dissolution is faster at higher pH. This difference suggests that dissolution rates of glass fibers in AM should not be applied to the dissolution of fibers in epithelial cells. Images Figure 1. a Figure 1. b Figure 2. a Figure 2. b Figure 3. a Figure 3. b PMID:7882965

  13. Actin-based endosome and phagosome rocketing in macrophages: activation by the secretagogue antagonists lanthanum and zinc.

    PubMed

    Southwick, Frederick S; Li, Wei; Zhang, Fangliang; Zeile, William L; Purich, Daniel L

    2003-01-01

    Although motile endocytic vesicles form actin-rich rocket tails [Merrifield et al., 1999: Nature Cell Biol 1:72-74], the mechanism of intracellular organelle locomotion remains poorly understood. We now demonstrate that bone marrow macrophages treated with lanthanum and zinc ions, well-known secretagogue antagonists, reliably exhibit vesicle motility. This treatment results in accentuated membrane ruffling and the formation of phagosomes and early endosomes that move rapidly through the cytoplasm by assembling actin filament rocket tails. Protein-specific immunolocalization demonstrated the presence of Arp2/3 complex in the polymerization zone and throughout the actin-rich tail, whereas N-WASP was most abundant in the polymerization zone. Although Arp2/3 and N-WASP play essential roles in nucleating filament assembly, other processes (i.e., elongation and filament cross-linking) are required to produce forces needed for motility. Efficient elongation was found to require zyxin, VASP, and profilin, proteins that interact by means of their ABM-1 and ABM-2 proline-rich motifs. The functional significance of these motifs was demonstrated by inhibition of vesicle motility by the motif-specific ABM-1 and ABM-2 analogues. Furthermore, lanthanum/zinc treatment also facilitated the early onset of actin-based vaccinia motility, a process that also utilizes Arp2/3 and N-WASP for nucleation and the zyxin-VASP-profilin complex for efficient elongation. Although earlier studies using cell extracts clouded the role of oligoproline sequences in activating the polymerization zone, our studies emphasize the importance of evaluating motility in living cells. PMID:12451594

  14. Coordination of Actin- and Microtubule-Based Cytoskeletons Supports Transport of Spermatids and Residual Bodies/Phagosomes During Spermatogenesis in the Rat Testis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Elizabeth I; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-04-01

    Germ cell transport across the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesis requires the intricate coordination of cell junctions, signaling proteins, and both actin- and microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeletons. Although the involvement of cytoskeletons in germ cell transport has been suggested, the precise mechanism(s) remains elusive. Based on growing evidence that actin and MT interactions underlie fundamental cellular processes, such as cell motility, it is unlikely that actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons work independently to regulate germ cell transport in the testis. Using rats treated with adjudin, a potential male contraceptive that disrupts spermatid adhesion and transport in the testis, as a study model, we show herein that actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons are both necessary for transport of spermatids and residual bodies/phagosomes across the seminiferous epithelium in adult rat testes. Analysis of intratubular expression of F-actin and tubulin revealed disruption of both actin and MT networks, concomitant with misdirected spermatids and phagosomes in rats treated with adjudin. Actin regulatory proteins, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 and actin-related protein 3, were mislocalized and down-regulated at the actin-rich anchoring junction between germ and Sertoli cells (apical ectoplasmic specialization) after adjudin treatment. Nonreceptor tyrosine kinase p-FAK-Tyr(407), known to regulate F-actin nucleation via actin-related protein 3, was also mislocalized and down-regulated at the apical ectoplasmic specialization, corroborating the observation of actin cytoskeleton disruption. Additionally, spatiotemporal expression of MT regulatory protein end-binding protein 1, shown to be involved in MT-actin cross talk herein, was also disrupted after adjudin treatment. In summary, spermatid/phagosome transport across the epithelium during spermatogenesis requires the coordination between actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons. PMID:26894662

  15. The Type I NADH Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Counters Phagosomal NOX2 Activity to Inhibit TNF-α-Mediated Host Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica L.; Velmurugan, Kamalakannan; Cowan, Mark J.; Briken, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The capacity of infected cells to undergo apoptosis upon insult with a pathogen is an ancient innate immune defense mechanism. Consequently, the ability of persisting, intracellular pathogens such as the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to inhibit infection-induced apoptosis of macrophages is important for virulence. The nuoG gene of Mtb, which encodes the NuoG subunit of the type I NADH dehydrogenase, NDH-1, is important in Mtb-mediated inhibition of host macrophage apoptosis, but the molecular mechanism of this host pathogen interaction remains elusive. Here we show that the apoptogenic phenotype of MtbΔnuoG was significantly reduced in human macrophages treated with caspase-3 and -8 inhibitors, TNF-α-neutralizing antibodies, and also after infection of murine TNF−/− macrophages. Interestingly, incubation of macrophages with inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduced not only the apoptosis induced by the nuoG mutant, but also its capacity to increase macrophage TNF-α secretion. The MtbΔnuoG phagosomes showed increased ROS levels compared to Mtb phagosomes in primary murine and human alveolar macrophages. The increase in MtbΔnuoG induced ROS and apoptosis was abolished in NOX-2 deficient (gp91−/−) macrophages. These results suggest that Mtb, via a NuoG-dependent mechanism, can neutralize NOX2-derived ROS in order to inhibit TNF-α-mediated host cell apoptosis. Consistently, an Mtb mutant deficient in secreted catalase induced increases in phagosomal ROS and host cell apoptosis, both of which were dependent upon macrophage NOX-2 activity. In conclusion, these results serendipitously reveal a novel connection between NOX2 activity, phagosomal ROS, and TNF-α signaling during infection-induced apoptosis in macrophages. Furthermore, our study reveals a novel function of NOX2 activity in innate immunity beyond the initial respiratory burst, which is the sensing of persistent intracellular pathogens and subsequent induction of host

  16. Vocational Maturity and Self Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, Hans

    The relationship between separate dimensions of vocational maturity and different self-concept and identity variables were examined. Subjects were Dutch students, age 14-18 years. The vocational maturity dimensions were measured by Dutch adaptations of American vocational maturity scales. Instruments for self-concept and identity measurement were…

  17. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  18. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  19. Transcriptional Landscape of Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Uosaki, Hideki; Cahan, Patrick; Lee, Dong I.; Wang, Songnan; Miyamoto, Matthew; Fernandez, Laviel; Kass, David A.; Kwon, Chulan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation. However, control of CM maturation which is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes, remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atlas of integrated gene expression, biological pathways, transcriptional regulators, and gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which show discrete sets of key transcriptional regulators and pathways activated or suppressed during CM maturation. We developed a GRN-based program named MatStatCM that indexes CM maturation status. MatStatCM reveals that pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs mature early in culture, but are arrested at the late embryonic stage with aberrant regulation of key transcription factors. Our study provides a foundation for understanding CM maturation. PMID:26586429

  20. Dendritic cell maturation and cross-presentation: timing matters!

    PubMed

    Alloatti, Andrés; Kotsias, Fiorella; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    As a population, dendritic cells (DCs) appear to be the best cross-presenters of internalized antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the mouse. To do this, DCs have developed a number of unique and dedicated means to control their endocytic and phagocytic pathways: among them, the capacity to limit acidification of their phagosomes, to prevent proteolytic degradation, to delay fusion of phagosomes to lysosomes, to recruit ER proteins to phagosomes, and to export phagocytosed antigens to the cytosol. The regulation of phagocytic functions, and thereby of antigen processing and presentation by innate signaling, represents a critical level of integration of adaptive and innate immune responses. Understanding how innate signals control antigen cross-presentation is critical to define effective vaccination strategies for CD8(+) T-cell responses. PMID:27319345

  1. Maturational and Non-Maturational Factors in Heritage Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to understand the maturational and non-maturational aspects of early bilingualism and language attrition in heritage speakers who have acquired their L1 incompletely in childhood. The study highlights the influential role of age and input dynamics in early L1 development, where the timing of reduction in L1 input and the…

  2. IL-1R/TLR2 through MyD88 Divergently Modulates Osteoclastogenesis through Regulation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells c1 (NFATc1) and B Lymphocyte-induced Maturation Protein-1 (Blimp1).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihong; Su, Lingkai; Xu, Qingan; Katz, Jenny; Michalek, Suzanne M; Fan, Mingwen; Feng, Xu; Zhang, Ping

    2015-12-11

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) and the receptor for interleukin-1 (IL-1R) signaling play an important role in bacteria-mediated bone loss diseases including periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Recent studies have shown that TLR ligands inhibit the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from un-committed osteoclast precursors, whereas IL-1 potentiates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. However, IL-1R and TLR belong to the same IL-1R/TLR superfamily, and activate similar intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the distinct effects of IL-1 and Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS-PG) on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Our results show that LPS-PG and IL-1 differentially regulate RANKL-induced activation of osteoclast genes encoding Car2, Ctsk, MMP9, and TRAP, as well as expression of NFATc1, a master transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis. Regulation of osteoclast genes and NFATc1 by LPS-PG and IL-1 is dependent on MyD88, an important signaling adaptor for both TLR and IL-1R family members. Furthermore, LPS-PG and IL-1 differentially regulate RANKL-costimulatory receptor OSCAR (osteoclast-associated receptor) expression and Ca(2+) oscillations induced by RANKL. Moreover, LPS-PG completely abrogates RANKL-induced gene expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp1), a global transcriptional repressor of anti-osteoclastogenic genes encoding Bcl6, IRF8, and MafB. However, IL-1 enhances RANKL-induced blimp1 gene expression but suppresses the gene expression of bcl6, irf8, and mafb. Our study reveals the involvement of multiple signaling molecules in the differential regulation of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by TLR2 and IL-1 signaling. Understanding the signaling cross-talk among TLR, IL-1R, and RANK is critical for identifying therapeutic strategies to control bacteria-mediated bone loss. PMID:26483549

  3. The Mature Athlete

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Moira M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Aging changes the biology, healing capacity, and biomechanical function of tendons and ligaments and results in common clinical pathologies that present to orthopedic surgeons, primary care physicians, physical therapists, and athletic trainers. A better understanding of the age-related changes in these connective tissues will allow better patient care. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in December 2012 for English-language articles pertaining to age-related changes in tendons and ligaments. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges associated with age-dependent changes in the rotator cuff, Achilles tendon, lateral humeral epicondylar tendons, quadriceps tendon, and patellar tendon. The anterior cruciate ligament and the medial collateral ligament are the most studied intra-articular and extra-articular ligaments, and both are associated with age-dependent changes. Conclusion: Tendons and ligaments are highly arranged connective tissue structures that maintain joint motion and joint stability. These structures are subject to vascular and compositional changes with increasing age that alter their mechanotransduction, biology, healing capacity, and biomechanical function. Emerging research into the etiology of age-dependent changes will provide further information to help combat the age-related clinical complications associated with the injuries that occur to tendons and ligaments. PMID:24427441

  4. Career Maturity of Welfare Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckman, Carol M.

    To investigate the career maturity of welfare recipients, this thesis examines six independent variables: (1) race; (2) sex; (3) age; (4) level of formal education; (5) general intelligence; and (6) locus of control. Scales taken from the Career Maturity Inventory served as the dependent variables. The sample consisted of 83 welfare recipients who…

  5. Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM).

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Urbina, Angel

    2010-10-01

    Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a communication tool that must include a dicussion of the supporting evidence. PCMM is a tool for managing risk in the use of modeling and simulation. PCMM is in the service of organizing evidence to help tell the modeling and simulation (M&S) story. PCMM table describes what activities within each element are undertaken at each of the levels of maturity. Target levels of maturity can be established based on the intended application. The assessment is to inform what level has been achieved compared to the desired level, to help prioritize the VU activities & to allocate resources.

  6. ARC Syndrome-Linked Vps33B Protein Is Required for Inflammatory Endosomal Maturation and Signal Termination.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Mandraju, Rajakumar; Tracy, Charles; Hu, Wei; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Krämer, Helmut

    2016-08-16

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) sense microbial ligands and initiate signaling to induce inflammatory responses. Although the quality of inflammatory responses is influenced by internalization of TLRs, the role of endosomal maturation in clearing receptors and terminating inflammatory responses is not well understood. Here, we report that Drosophila and mammalian Vps33B proteins play critical roles in the maturation of phagosomes and endosomes following microbial recognition. Vps33B was necessary for clearance of endosomes containing internalized PRRs, failure of which resulted in enhanced signaling and expression of inflammatory mediators. Lack of Vps33B had no effect on trafficking of endosomes containing non-microbial cargo. These findings indicate that Vps33B function is critical for determining the fate of signaling endosomes formed following PRR activation. Exaggerated inflammatory responses dictated by persistence of receptors in aberrant endosomal compartments could therefore contribute to symptoms of ARC syndrome, a disease linked to loss of Vps33B. PMID:27496733

  7. Cerebellar mature teratoma in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zavanone, M; Alimehmeti, R; Campanella, R; Ram-Pini, P; Locatelli, M; Egidi, M; Righini, A; Bauer, D

    2002-03-01

    Mature teratoma of the posterior cranial fossa in adults is extremely rare. We report a particularly rare case of medio-lateral cerebellar mature teratoma that became symptomatic in a middle-aged man. The CT revealed the lesion of heterogeneous density with calcifications in the solid medial portion. Only the MRI could reliably define the borders of the cystic component extending into the left cerebellar lobe. Histologically the presence of fully matured representative tissues of the 3 germ layers ensured the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We suggest that the cyst formation from progressive latent hemorrhage and/or secretion from the gland cells of the tumor, may be responsible for the clinical decompensation even in adulthood. PMID:12118223

  8. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  9. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  10. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  11. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will...

  12. 7 CFR 51.3746 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Honey Dew and Honey Ball Type Melons Definitions § 51.3746 Mature. Mature means that the melon has reached the stage of maturity which will insure the proper completion of the...

  13. Toward the Decision Tree for Inferring Requirements Maturation Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Takako; Kondo, Narihito; Shirogane, Junko; Kaiya, Haruhiko; Hori, Shozo; Katamine, Keiichi

    Requirements are elicited step by step during the requirements engineering (RE) process. However, some types of requirements are elicited completely after the scheduled requirements elicitation process is finished. Such a situation is regarded as problematic situation. In our study, the difficulties of eliciting various kinds of requirements is observed by components. We refer to the components as observation targets (OTs) and introduce the word “Requirements maturation.” It means when and how requirements are elicited completely in the project. The requirements maturation is discussed on physical and logical OTs. OTs Viewed from a logical viewpoint are called logical OTs, e.g. quality requirements. The requirements of physical OTs, e.g., modules, components, subsystems, etc., includes functional and non-functional requirements. They are influenced by their requesters' environmental changes, as well as developers' technical changes. In order to infer the requirements maturation period of each OT, we need to know how much these factors influence the OTs' requirements maturation. According to the observation of actual past projects, we defined the PRINCE (Pre Requirements Intelligence Net Consideration and Evaluation) model. It aims to guide developers in their observation of the requirements maturation of OTs. We quantitatively analyzed the actual cases with their requirements elicitation process and extracted essential factors that influence the requirements maturation. The results of interviews of project managers are analyzed by WEKA, a data mining system, from which the decision tree was derived. This paper introduces the PRINCE model and the category of logical OTs to be observed. The decision tree that helps developers infer the maturation type of an OT is also described. We evaluate the tree through real projects and discuss its ability to infer the requirements maturation types.

  14. Cheese maturity assessment using ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Benedito, J; Carcel, J; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2000-02-01

    The relationship between Mahon cheese maturity and ultrasonic velocity was examined. Moisture and textural properties were used as maturity indicators. The ultrasonic velocity of the cheese varied between 1630 and 1740 m/s, increasing with the curing time mainly because of loss of water, which also produced an increase of the textural properties. Because of the nature of low-intensity ultrasonics, velocity was better related to those textural parameters that involved small displacements. Ultrasonic velocity decreased with increasing temperature because of the negative temperature coefficient of the ultrasonic velocity of fat and the melting of fat. These results highlight the potential use of ultrasonic velocity measurements to rapidly and nondestructively assess cheese maturity. PMID:10714857

  15. Oocyte Maturation: The Coming of Age of a Germ Cell

    PubMed Central

    Jamnongjit, Michelle; Hammes, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Normal female fertility relies on proper development of the oocyte. This growth culminates just prior to ovulation, when oocyte maturation occurs. Oocyte maturation refers to a release of meiotic arrest that allows oocytes to advance from prophase I to metaphase II of meiosis. This precisely regulated meiotic progression is essential for normal ovulation and subsequent fertilization, and involves changes in the delicate balance between factors promoting meiotic arrest and others that are stimulating maturation. Most of the inhibitory mechanisms appear to involve the upregulation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels. These processes may include direct transport of the nucleotide into oocytes via gap junctions, G protein-mediated stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, and inhibition of intracellular phosphodiesterases. In contrast, potential factors that play roles in triggering oocyte maturation include gonadotropins (e.g., follicle-stimulating factor and luteinizing hormone), growth factors (e.g., amphiregulin and epiregulin), sterols (e.g., follicular fluid-derived meiosis-activating sterol), and steroids (e.g., testosterone progesterone, and estradiol). Delineating the complex interactions between these positive and negative components is critical for determining the role that oocyte maturation plays in regulating follicle development and ovulation, and may lead to novel methods that can be used to modulate these processes in women with both normal and aberrant fertility. PMID:16059829

  16. Understanding HIV-Mycobacteria synergism through comparative proteomics of intra-phagosomal mycobacteria during mono- and HIV co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Rakesh; Dhali, Snigdha; Rizvi, Arshad; Rapole, Srikanth; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the most common co-infection in HIV patients and a serious co-epidemic. Apart from increasing the risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB), HIV infection also permits opportunistic infection of environmental non-pathogenic mycobacteria. To gain insights into mycobacterial survival inside host macrophages and identify mycobacterial proteins or processes that influence HIV propagation during co-infection, we employed proteomics approach to identify differentially expressed intracellular mycobacterial proteins during mono- and HIV co-infection of human THP-1 derived macrophage cell lines. Of the 92 proteins identified, 30 proteins were upregulated during mycobacterial mono-infection and 40 proteins during HIV-mycobacteria co-infection. We observed down-regulation of toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, up-regulation of cation transporters, Type VII (Esx) secretion systems, proteins involved in cell wall lipid or protein metabolism, glyoxalate pathway and branched chain amino-acid synthesis during co-infection. The bearings of these mycobacterial factors or processes on HIV propagation during co-infection, as inferred from the proteomics data, were validated using deletion mutants of mycobacteria. The analyses revealed mycobacterial factors that possibly via modulating the host environment, increased viral titers during co-infection. The study provides new leads for investigations towards hitherto unknown molecular mechanisms explaining HIV-mycobacteria synergism, helping address diagnostics and treatment challenges for effective co-epidemic management. PMID:26916387

  17. Understanding HIV-Mycobacteria synergism through comparative proteomics of intra-phagosomal mycobacteria during mono- and HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Rakesh; Dhali, Snigdha; Rizvi, Arshad; Rapole, Srikanth; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the most common co-infection in HIV patients and a serious co-epidemic. Apart from increasing the risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB), HIV infection also permits opportunistic infection of environmental non-pathogenic mycobacteria. To gain insights into mycobacterial survival inside host macrophages and identify mycobacterial proteins or processes that influence HIV propagation during co-infection, we employed proteomics approach to identify differentially expressed intracellular mycobacterial proteins during mono- and HIV co-infection of human THP-1 derived macrophage cell lines. Of the 92 proteins identified, 30 proteins were upregulated during mycobacterial mono-infection and 40 proteins during HIV-mycobacteria co-infection. We observed down-regulation of toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, up-regulation of cation transporters, Type VII (Esx) secretion systems, proteins involved in cell wall lipid or protein metabolism, glyoxalate pathway and branched chain amino-acid synthesis during co-infection. The bearings of these mycobacterial factors or processes on HIV propagation during co-infection, as inferred from the proteomics data, were validated using deletion mutants of mycobacteria. The analyses revealed mycobacterial factors that possibly via modulating the host environment, increased viral titers during co-infection. The study provides new leads for investigations towards hitherto unknown molecular mechanisms explaining HIV-mycobacteria synergism, helping address diagnostics and treatment challenges for effective co-epidemic management. PMID:26916387

  18. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  19. Enticing Mature Females into College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loseth, Lexie; Moreau, Linda

    Following a review of the literature on mature female students, this paper examines enrollment trends in a selection of colleges in Alberta (Canada) and presents the findings of a survey of returning women students at Red Deer College. The literature review highlights factors related to the personal and professional development of women graduates…

  20. Adolescent Maturation in Transitioning Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulroy, Kevin; Palacios, Anna; Reid, Robert E.

    This is a theoretical study of adolescent maturation within a cultural context. Personality development and disintegration due to the pressure of a dominant culture on a minority culture is considered. An attempt is made to understand how teachers might assist students to work out their psychological growth by story telling. The need for cultural…

  1. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  2. Chyloabdomen in a mature cat.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, K L

    2001-01-01

    A mature, castrated male cat presented with progressive lethargy and a severely distended abdomen. Abdominal radiographs, abdominocentesis, and evaluation of the fluid obtained led to a diagnosis of chyloabdomen. The underlying pathology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment associated with this disease are discussed. PMID:11360862

  3. Mature Cystic Teratoma of Liver

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Bansal, Kalpana; Manchanda, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    A four-year-old boy presented with constipation and mild abdominal distention for one year. Radiologic investigations showed a multiloculated cystic lesion in the caudate lobe of liver with focal calcification in the wall. The child underwent laparotomy with marsupialization of the cystic lesion. Histopathologic examination showed mature teratoma of liver. PMID:24040591

  4. The Legionella Kinase LegK2 Targets the ARP2/3 Complex To Inhibit Actin Nucleation on Phagosomes and Allow Bacterial Evasion of the Late Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Michard, Céline; Sperandio, Daniel; Baïlo, Nathalie; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; LeClaire, Lawrence; Chadeau-Argaud, Elise; Pombo-Grégoire, Isabel; Hervet, Eva; Vianney, Anne; Gilbert, Christophe; Faure, Mathias; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of legionellosis, replicates within phagocytic cells. Crucial to biogenesis of the replicative vacuole is the Dot/Icm type 4 secretion system, which translocates a large number of effectors into the host cell cytosol. Among them is LegK2, a protein kinase that plays a key role in Legionella infection. Here, we identified the actin nucleator ARP2/3 complex as a target of LegK2. LegK2 phosphorylates the ARPC1B and ARP3 subunits of the ARP2/3 complex. LegK2-dependent ARP2/3 phosphorylation triggers global actin cytoskeleton remodeling in cells, and it impairs actin tail formation by Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known ARP2/3-dependent process. During infection, LegK2 is addressed to the Legionella-containing vacuole surface and inhibits actin polymerization on the phagosome, as revealed by legK2 gene inactivation. Consequently, LegK2 prevents late endosome/lysosome association with the phagosome and finally contributes to remodeling of the bacterium-containing phagosome into a replicative niche. The inhibition of actin polymerization by LegK2 and its effect on endosome trafficking are ARP2/3 dependent since it can be phenocopied by a specific chemical inhibitor of the ARP2/3 complex. Thus, LegK2-ARP2/3 interplay highlights an original mechanism of bacterial virulence with an unexpected role in local actin remodeling that allows bacteria to control vesicle trafficking in order to escape host defenses. PMID:25944859

  5. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  6. Maturation of the adolescent brain

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Mariam; Haque, Maliha; Johal, Lina; Mathur, Puja; Nel, Wynand; Rais, Afsha; Sandhu, Ranbir; Sharma, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults – intellectually, physically, hormonally, and socially. Adolescence is a tumultuous time, full of changes and transformations. The pubertal transition to adulthood involves both gonadal and behavioral maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have discovered that myelinogenesis, required for proper insulation and efficient neurocybernetics, continues from childhood and the brain’s region-specific neurocircuitry remains structurally and functionally vulnerable to impulsive sex, food, and sleep habits. The maturation of the adolescent brain is also influenced by heredity, environment, and sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone), which play a crucial role in myelination. Furthermore, glutamatergic neurotransmission predominates, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission remains under construction, and this might be responsible for immature and impulsive behavior and neurobehavioral excitement during adolescent life. The adolescent population is highly vulnerable to driving under the influence of alcohol and social maladjustments due to an immature limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Synaptic plasticity and the release of neurotransmitters may also be influenced by environmental neurotoxins and drugs of abuse including cigarettes, caffeine, and alcohol during adolescence. Adolescents may become involved with offensive crimes, irresponsible behavior, unprotected sex, juvenile courts, or even prison. According to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the major cause of death among the teenage population is due to injury and violence related to sex and substance abuse. Prenatal neglect, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption may also significantly impact maturation of the adolescent brain. Pharmacological interventions to regulate adolescent behavior have been attempted with limited success. Since several factors, including age, sex

  7. Maturity model for enterprise interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2015-01-01

    Historically, progress occurs when entities communicate, share information and together create something that no one individually could do alone. Moving beyond people to machines and systems, interoperability is becoming a key factor of success in all domains. In particular, interoperability has become a challenge for enterprises, to exploit market opportunities, to meet their own objectives of cooperation or simply to survive in a growing competitive world where the networked enterprise is becoming a standard. Within this context, many research works have been conducted over the past few years and enterprise interoperability has become an important area of research, ensuring the competitiveness and growth of European enterprises. Among others, enterprises have to control their interoperability strategy and enhance their ability to interoperate. This is the purpose of the interoperability assessment. Assessing interoperability maturity allows a company to know its strengths and weaknesses in terms of interoperability with its current and potential partners, and to prioritise actions for improvement. The objective of this paper is to define a maturity model for enterprise interoperability that takes into account existing maturity models while extending the coverage of the interoperability domain. The assessment methodology is also presented. Both are demonstrated with a real case study.

  8. 7 CFR 51.2651 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2651 Mature. Mature means that the cherries have reached the stage of growth which will insure the...

  9. Young Children's Social Maturity and Their Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Norejane J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The relationship between preschool children's level of social maturity and their drawing expressions was tested; findings stregthened the contention that the drawings of preschoolers are not appropriate indicators of their social maturity. (SDH)

  10. Induction of Bulb Maturity of Ornithogalum Thyrsoides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of bulb maturity at bulb harvest on growth and flowering response of Ornithogalum thyrsoides Jacq. ‘Chesapeake Starlight’ was investigated. Experiments were designed to determine if bulb maturity can be induced by bulb storage temperatures and whether bulb maturity can be evaluated by...

  11. Cerebral maturation in adolescence: behavioral vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Ernst, M; Korelitz, Katherine E

    2009-12-01

    Recent neurodevelopmental research has been focusing on the transition period of adolescence into adulthood. This growing interest was spurred by the long-standing realization of the high cost of this transition period in terms of morbidity and mortality, and the emergence of research tools that permit direct examination of brain function in humans. The cost of reaching adulthood is understood as resulting from the typical behavioral and environmental changes that accompany adolescence [4]. The present review describes how the current research helps formulate neurobiological models that can be used to guide future work. One example of such a model, the triadic neural systems model [8], will be examined in more detail. This review will proceed in three stages. First, we will show how neural development results from the confluence of maturational changes that are quantitatively and qualitatively heterogeneous across brain regions, neurochemical and molecular systems. This normative developmental heterogeneity is translated into typical adolescent behavioral patterns, including risk-taking, novelty-seeking, emotional intensity and lability, and peer-group social primacy [5, 9]. Second, based on the notion that motivated behavior can be operationally decomposed into the three core modules of approach, avoidance and control, any alteration in the balance of these three core entities can affect behavior in unique ways. This formulation will serve as the foundation of the neural systems model framework proposed in this review. Third, functional neuroimaging is being used to examine how neural systems underlie this balance within the neural systems model. We will provide a summary of the state of research in this area. Finally, we will show how this research is important for understanding not only normal development, but also the psychopathology. The role of genetic or environmental factors will not be addressed here, despite their critical roles in determining and

  12. SNAREs in the maturation and function of LROs

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Riddhi Atul; Mahanty, Sarmistha; Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2016-01-01

    abstract The early/recycling endosomes of an eukaryotic cell perform diverse cellular functions. In addition, the endosomal system generates multiple organelles, including certain cell type-specific organelles called lysosome-related organelles (LROs). The biosynthesis of these organelles possibly occurs through a sequential maturation process in which the cargo-containing endosomal vesicular/tubular structures are fused with the maturing organelle. The molecular machinery that regulates the cargo delivery or the membrane fusion during LRO biogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we describe the known key molecules, such as SNAREs, that regulate both the biogenesis and secretion of multiple LROs. Moreover, we also describe other regulatory molecules, such as Rab GTPases and their effectors that modulate the SNARE activity for cargo delivery to one such LRO, the melanosome. Overall, this review will increase our current understanding of LRO biogenesis and function. PMID:26760525

  13. Sexual maturation of female Saguinus oedipus oedipus

    SciTech Connect

    Tardif, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    This study is an examination of the process of female sexual maturation in the cotton-top tamarin, Saguinus oedipus oedipus, a South-American primate of the family, Callitrichidae. Two types of questions are addressed. The first question is whether the type of social grouping in which a young female lives affects the rate of her sexual maturation. Specifically, is there a difference between the maturation rate of a female housed with a strange adult male and a female housed with her natal group (i.e., her parents and various siblings). Second, the effect of sexual maturation on various social interactions is examined. Specifically are male-female interactions in mated pairs and mother-daughter interactions in natal groups changed by the sexual maturation of the young females. The mother's presence was not related to the daughter's maturation age. However, whether the natal group, as a whole, inhibited maturation, or unrelated males accelerated maturation, or both, remains unknown. Most of the behavioral interactions involving maturing females were unchanged by maturation. There was some indication that certain behaviors were affected by maturation, but only if a strange unrelated male was present.

  14. Structure of the Legionella Virulence Factor, SidC Reveals a Unique PI(4)P-Specific Binding Domain Essential for Its Targeting to the Bacterial Phagosome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xi; Wasilko, David J.; Liu, Yao; Sun, Jiayi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Mao, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila delivers nearly 300 effector proteins into host cells for the establishment of a replication-permissive compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). SidC and its paralog SdcA are two effectors that have been shown to anchor on the LCV via binding to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4)P] to facilitate the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. We recently reported that the N-terminal SNL (SidC N-terminal E3 Ligase) domain of SidC is a ubiquitin E3 ligase, and its activity is required for the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. Here we report the crystal structure of SidC (1-871). The structure reveals that SidC contains four domains that are packed into an arch-like shape. The P4C domain (PI(4)P binding of SidC) comprises a four α-helix bundle and covers the ubiquitin ligase catalytic site of the SNL domain. Strikingly, a pocket with characteristic positive electrostatic potentials is formed at one end of this bundle. Liposome binding assays of the P4C domain further identified the determinants of phosphoinositide recognition and membrane interaction. Interestingly, we also found that binding with PI(4)P stimulates the E3 ligase activity, presumably due to a conformational switch induced by PI(4)P from a closed form to an open active form. Mutations of key residues involved in PI(4)P binding significantly reduced the association of SidC with the LCV and abolished its activity in the recruitment of ER proteins and ubiquitin signals, highlighting that PI(4)P-mediated targeting of SidC is critical to its function in the remodeling of the bacterial phagosome membrane. Finally, a GFP-fusion with the P4C domain was demonstrated to be specifically localized to PI(4)P-enriched compartments in mammalian cells. This domain shows the potential to be developed into a sensitive and accurate PI(4)P probe in living cells. PMID

  15. Pain perception development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Simons, Sinno H P; Tibboel, Dick

    2006-08-01

    Newborn infants are not small adults. The pharmacokinetics and dynamics of analgesic drugs are immature at birth. Volumes of distribution, drug clearances, side-effects and drug efficacy all differ in newborns as compared to adults. Interestingly, these parameters develop before birth and during the postnatal period, reaching adult values after a period of months or years. This means that clinicians should anticipate on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) changes in newborns with increasing post-conceptual age. The ability to perceive pain might also be immature at birth. Lower pain thresholds due to the absence of inhibitory descending spinothalamic fibers and a not yet fully developed cortical pain memory system are points of interest for our understanding of differences in pain perception in the newborn infant. Although this is a relatively unexplored area of research in humans, we will discuss the maturation and development of neonatal pain experience and perception in this paper. PMID:16621747

  16. Maturation of the MOUTh Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski-Jaudon, Rita A.; Kolanowski, Ann M.; Winstead, Vicki; Jones-Townsend, Corteza; Azuero, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current article is to describe a personalized practice originally conceived as a way to prevent and minimize care-resistant behavior to provide mouth care to older adult with dementia. The original intervention, Managing Oral Hygiene Using Threat Reduction Strategies (MOUTh), matured during the clinical trial study into a relationship-centered intervention with emphasis on developing strategies that support residents behavioral health and staff involved in care. Relationships that were initially pragmatic (i.e., focused on the task of completing mouth care) developed into more personal and responsive relationships that involved deeper engagement between mouth care providers and nursing home (NH) residents. Mouth care was accomplished and completed in a manner enjoyable to NH residents and mouth care providers. The MOUTh intervention may also concurrently affirm the dignity and personhood of the care recipient because of its emphasis on connecting with older adults. PMID:26934969

  17. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Phagosome Formation.

    PubMed

    Jaumouillé, Valentin; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    Phagocytosis refers to the active process that allows cells to take up large particulate material upon binding to surface receptors. The discovery of phagocytosis in 1883 by Elie Metchnikoff, leading to the concept that specialized cells are implicated in the defense against microbes, was one of the starting points of the field of immunology. After more than a century of research, phagocytosis is now appreciated to be a widely used process that enables the cellular uptake of a remarkable variety of particles, including bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, dead cells, and assorted debris and solid materials. Uptake of foreign particles is performed almost exclusively by specialized myeloid cells, commonly termed "professional phagocytes": neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Phagocytosis of microbes not only stops or at least restricts the spread of infection but also plays an important role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune responses. Activation of the myeloid cells upon phagocytosis leads to the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that convey signals to a variety of immune cells. Moreover, foreign antigens generated by the degradation of microbes following phagocytosis are loaded onto the major histocompatibility complex for presentation to specific T lymphocytes. However, phagocytosis is not restricted to professional myeloid phagocytes; an expanding diversity of cell types appear capable of engulfing apoptotic bodies and debris, playing a critical role in tissue remodeling and in the clearance of billions of effete cells every day. PMID:27337463

  19. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott; Collins, Josh; Wilson, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) development effort was initiated by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with contractor Sunpower Inc. to develop high efficiency thermal-to-electric power conversion technology for NASA Radioisotope Power Systems. Early successful performance demonstrations led to the expansion of the project as well as adoption of the technology by the Department of Energy (DOE) and system integration contractor Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company as part of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) flight project. The ASRG integrates a pair of ASCs to convert the heat from a pair of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules into electrical power. The expanded NASA ASC effort included development of several generations of ASC prototypes or Engineering Units to help prepare the ASC technology and Sunpower for flight implementation. Sunpower later had two parallel contracts allowing the last of the NASA Engineering Units called ASC-E3 to serve as pathfinders for the ASC-F flight convertors being built for DOE. The ASC-E3 convertors utilized the ASC-F flight specifications and were built using the ASC-F design and process documentation. Shortly after the first ASC-F Pair achieved initial operation, due to budget constraints, the DOE ASRG flight development contract was terminated. NASA continues to invest in the development of Stirling RPS technology including continued production of the ASC-E3 convertors, seven of which have been delivered with one additional unit in production. Starting in FY2015, Stirling Convertor Technology Maturation has been reorganized as an element of the RPS Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project and long-term plans for continued Stirling technology advancement are in reformulation. This paper provides a status on the ASC project, an overview of advancements made in the design and production of the ASC at Sunpower, and a summary of acceptance tests, reliability tests, and tactical tests at NASA

  20. Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott; Collins, Josh; Wilson, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) development effort was initiated by NASA Glenn Research Center with contractor Sunpower, Inc., to develop high-efficiency thermal-to-electric power conversion technology for NASA Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs). Early successful performance demonstrations led to the expansion of the project as well as adoption of the technology by the Department of Energy (DOE) and system integration contractor Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company as part of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) flight project. The ASRG integrates a pair of ASCs to convert the heat from a pair of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules into electrical power. The expanded NASA ASC effort included development of several generations of ASC prototypes or engineering units to help prepare the ASC technology and Sunpower for flight implementation. Sunpower later had two parallel contracts allowing the last of the NASA engineering units called ASC-E3 to serve as pathfinders for the ASC-F flight convertors being built for DOE. The ASC-E3 convertors utilized the ASC-F flight specifications and were built using the ASC-F design and process documentation. Shortly after the first ASC-F pair achieved initial operation, due to budget constraints, the DOE ASRG flight development contract was terminated. NASA continues to invest in the development of Stirling RPS technology including continued production of the ASC-E3 convertors, seven of which have been delivered with one additional unit in production. Starting in fiscal year 2015, Stirling Convertor Technology Maturation has been reorganized as an element of the RPS Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project and long-term plans for continued Stirling technology advancement are in reformulation. This paper provides a status on the ASC project, an overview of advancements made in the design and production of the ASC at Sunpower, and a summary of acceptance tests, reliability tests, and tactical

  1. Effect of maturity and hybrid on ruminal and intestinal digestion of corn silage in dry cows.

    PubMed

    Peyrat, J; Baumont, R; Le Morvan, A; Nozière, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of stage of maturity at harvest on extent of starch, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and protein digestion, and rumen fermentation in dry cows fed whole-plant corn silage from different hybrids. Four nonlactating Holstein cows cannulated at the rumen and proximal duodenum were fed 4 corn silages differing in hybrid (flint vs. flint-dent) and maturity stage (early vs. late) in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. From early to late maturity, starch content increased (from 234.5 to 348.5 g/kg), whereas total-tract (99.7 to 94.5%) and ruminal starch digestibility (91.3 to 86.5%) decreased significantly. The decrease in ruminal starch digestibility with increasing maturity was similar between hybrids. No effects were found of maturity, hybrid, or maturity × hybrid interaction on total-tract NDF digestibility, ruminal NDF digestibility, true digestibility of N and organic matter in the rumen, or microbial synthesis. Harvesting at later maturity led to increased ruminal ammonia, total volatile fatty acid concentrations, and acetate/propionate ratio but not pH. This study concludes that delaying date of harvest modifies the proportions of digestible starch and NDF supplied to cattle. Adjusting date of corn harvest to modulate amount of rumen-digested starch could be used as a strategy to control nutrient delivery to ruminants. PMID:26585483

  2. An siRNA-based method for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Isidor, Marie S; Winther, Sally; Basse, Astrid L; Petersen, M Christine H; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; Hansen, Jacob B

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a promising therapeutic target for opposing obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The ability to modulate gene expression in mature brown adipocytes is important to understand brown adipocyte function and delineate novel regulatory mechanisms of non-shivering thermogenesis. The aim of this study was to optimize a lipofection-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection protocol for efficient silencing of gene expression in mature brown adipocytes. We determined that a critical parameter was to deliver the siRNA to mature adipocytes by reverse transfection, i.e. transfection of non-adherent cells. Using this protocol, we effectively knocked down both high- and low-abundance transcripts in a model of mature brown adipocytes (WT-1) as well as in primary mature mouse brown adipocytes. A functional consequence of the knockdown was confirmed by an attenuated increase in uncoupled respiration (thermogenesis) in response to β-adrenergic stimulation of mature WT-1 brown adipocytes transfected with uncoupling protein 1 siRNA. Efficient gene silencing was also obtained in various mouse and human white adipocyte models (3T3-L1, primary mouse white adipocytes, hMADS) with the ability to undergo "browning." In summary, we report an easy and versatile reverse siRNA transfection protocol to achieve specific silencing of gene expression in various models of mature brown and browning-competent white adipocytes, including primary cells. PMID:27386153

  3. Pet-1 Switches Transcriptional Targets Postnatally to Regulate Maturation of Serotonin Neuron Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wyler, Steven C.; Spencer, W. Clay; Green, Noah H.; Rood, Benjamin D.; Crawford, LaTasha; Craige, Caryne; Gresch, Paul; McMahon, Douglas G.; Beck, Sheryl G.

    2016-01-01

    Newborn neurons enter an extended maturation stage, during which they acquire excitability characteristics crucial for development of presynaptic and postsynaptic connectivity. In contrast to earlier specification programs, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms that control neuronal maturation. The Pet-1 ETS (E26 transformation-specific) factor is continuously expressed in serotonin (5-HT) neurons and initially acts in postmitotic precursors to control acquisition of 5-HT transmitter identity. Using a combination of RNA sequencing, electrophysiology, and conditional targeting approaches, we determined gene expression patterns in maturing flow-sorted 5-HT neurons and the temporal requirements for Pet-1 in shaping these patterns for functional maturation of mouse 5-HT neurons. We report a profound disruption of postmitotic expression trajectories in Pet-1−/− neurons, which prevented postnatal maturation of 5-HT neuron passive and active intrinsic membrane properties, G-protein signaling, and synaptic responses to glutamatergic, lysophosphatidic, and adrenergic agonists. Unexpectedly, conditional targeting revealed a postnatal stage-specific switch in Pet-1 targets from 5-HT synthesis genes to transmitter receptor genes required for afferent modulation of 5-HT neuron excitability. 5-HT1a autoreceptor expression depended transiently on Pet-1, thus revealing an early postnatal sensitive period for control of 5-HT excitability genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing revealed that Pet-1 regulates 5-HT neuron maturation through direct gene activation and repression. Moreover, Pet-1 directly regulates the 5-HT neuron maturation factor Engrailed 1, which suggests Pet-1 orchestrates maturation through secondary postmitotic regulatory factors. The early postnatal switch in Pet-1 targets uncovers a distinct neonatal stage-specific function for Pet-1, during which it promotes maturation of 5-HT neuron excitability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The

  4. Motivational maturity and helping behavior.

    PubMed

    Haymes, M; Green, L

    1977-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the independent influences of conative development (the Maslow needs hierarchy) upon behavioral aspects of prosocial orientations. It provides a behavioral demonstration of conative effects in a helping paradigm, among college-age men. A comparison of the conative data across the ages of 15-22 provided a cross-sectional view of conative development itself. Conative maturity was found to be predictive of greater helping among college-age men. Situational demands were demonstrated which tended to mask, but not override, these predispositional influences on helping. The cross-sectional data on conative development point to probable movement to early esteem concerns among high school men who have reached the conative level of love and belonging. On the other hand, the stability across the years of 15-22 of proportion of safety concerns suggests fixation of such concerns in those exhibiting them in high school. Results are discussed in terms of conative growth for development of prosocial orientations. PMID:24408562

  5. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  6. Egg maturation dynamics of Homalodisca vitripennis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The egg maturation dynamics of holometabolous insects are particularly well studied compared to those of hemimetabolous insects. The wealth of knowledge produced from studies on holometabolous insects has allowed researchers to test for correlations between egg maturation schedule and specific life...

  7. New definitions for cotton fiber maturity ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber maturity affects fiber physical, mechanical, and chemical properties, as well as the processability and qualities of yarn and fabrics. New definitions of cotton fiber maturity ratio are introduced. The influences of sampling, sample preparation, measurement method, and correlations am...

  8. Biased experimental fineness and maturity results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Part I of this series, models were developed and computer simulations were performed to understand the variability in coefficients of determination (R2) between fineness and maturity, micronaire and fineness, and micronaire and maturity of cotton. Part II concentrated on derivation and testing of...

  9. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  11. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1158 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... § 51.1158 Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, Florida Department of Citrus, Post Office Box 148... Mature. Mature shall have the same meaning assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February...

  15. The FMI: Dimensions of Follower Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Loren I.

    1976-01-01

    The Follower Maturity Index (FMI) is an instrument derived from leadership theory and based on observations of verbal and nonverbal behavior of followers in task groups. Dimensions of follower maturity--achievement, responsibility, experience, activity, dependence, variety, interests, perspective, position, and awareness--are discussed. For…

  16. Canopy temperature and maturity in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat units are a widely used indicator of maturity in cotton. It is generally assumed that it takes approximately 2200°F (1222°C) heat units for a cotton plant on the South High Plains of Texas to mature. This value is based on a typical planting date of May 15 with ample irrigation. As water for c...

  17. Motivation and Maturity Patterns in Marital Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Married couples rated their marital satisfaction and played interpersonal competitive games which revealed the success with which they interacted. Younger husbands who scored more maturely on the Stewart measure of psychosocial maturity belonged to more successful marriages, as did college-educated wives who showed less immaturity and more phallic…

  18. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  19. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the stage of development which will insure the proper completion of the ripening process. Before a mature apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of...

  20. Thinned Mature Deciduous Forest Silvopastures for Appalachia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available on effective management and utilization of silvopastures developed from the ubiquitous mature woodlots which comprise 40-50% of small Appalachian farm acreage. We thinned a white oak dominated mature second growth forested area establishing two 0.5 ha, eight-paddock,...

  1. Effects of glucose metabolism during in vitro maturation on cytoplasmic maturation of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Li; Wang, Yan-Bo; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Kong, De-Ling; Li, Qing; Li, Hong; Zheng, Liang-Liang; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    Although there are many reports on the effect of glucose metabolism on oocyte nuclear maturation, there are few studies on its effect on ooplasmic maturation. By manipulating glucose metabolism pathways using a maturation medium that could support oocyte nuclear maturation but only a limited blastocyst formation without glucose, this study determined effects of glucose metabolism pathways on ooplasmic maturation. During maturation of cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs) with glucose, the presence of PPP inhibitor, DHEA or glycolysis inhibitor, iodoacetate significantly decreased blastocyst rates, intraoocyte glutathione and ATP. While blastocyst rates, GSH/GSSG ratio and NADPH were higher, ROS was lower significantly in COCs matured with iodoacetate than with DHEA. Fructose-6-phosphate overcame the inhibitory effect of DHEA on PPP. During maturation of COCs with pyruvate, electron transport inhibitor, rotenone or monocarboxylate transfer inhibitor, 4-CIN significantly decreased blastocyst rates. Cumulus-denuded oocytes had a limited capacity to use glucose or lactate, but they could use pyruvate to support maturation. In conclusion, whereas glycolysis promoted ooplasmic maturation mainly by supplying energy, PPP facilitated ooplasmic maturation to a greater extent by both reducing oxidative stress and supplying energy through providing fructose-6-phosphate for glycolysis. Pyruvate was transferred by monocarboxylate transporters and utilized through mitochondrial electron transport to sustain ooplasmic maturation. PMID:26857840

  2. Effects of glucose metabolism during in vitro maturation on cytoplasmic maturation of mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hong-Li; Wang, Yan-Bo; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Kong, De-Ling; Li, Qing; Li, Hong; Zheng, Liang-Liang; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    Although there are many reports on the effect of glucose metabolism on oocyte nuclear maturation, there are few studies on its effect on ooplasmic maturation. By manipulating glucose metabolism pathways using a maturation medium that could support oocyte nuclear maturation but only a limited blastocyst formation without glucose, this study determined effects of glucose metabolism pathways on ooplasmic maturation. During maturation of cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs) with glucose, the presence of PPP inhibitor, DHEA or glycolysis inhibitor, iodoacetate significantly decreased blastocyst rates, intraoocyte glutathione and ATP. While blastocyst rates, GSH/GSSG ratio and NADPH were higher, ROS was lower significantly in COCs matured with iodoacetate than with DHEA. Fructose-6-phosphate overcame the inhibitory effect of DHEA on PPP. During maturation of COCs with pyruvate, electron transport inhibitor, rotenone or monocarboxylate transfer inhibitor, 4-CIN significantly decreased blastocyst rates. Cumulus-denuded oocytes had a limited capacity to use glucose or lactate, but they could use pyruvate to support maturation. In conclusion, whereas glycolysis promoted ooplasmic maturation mainly by supplying energy, PPP facilitated ooplasmic maturation to a greater extent by both reducing oxidative stress and supplying energy through providing fructose-6-phosphate for glycolysis. Pyruvate was transferred by monocarboxylate transporters and utilized through mitochondrial electron transport to sustain ooplasmic maturation. PMID:26857840

  3. Leishmania major Promastigotes Evade LC3-Associated Phagocytosis through the Action of GP63

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Christine; Casgrain, Pierre-André; Séguin, Olivier; Moradin, Neda; Hong, Wan Jin; Descoteaux, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan Leishmania parasitizes macrophages and evades the microbicidal consequences of phagocytosis through the inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis. In this study, we investigated the impact of this parasite on LC3-associated phagocytosis, a non-canonical autophagic process that enhances phagosome maturation and functions. We show that whereas internalization of L. major promastigotes by macrophages promoted LC3 lipidation, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes was inhibited through the action of the parasite surface metalloprotease GP63. Reactive oxygen species generated by the NOX2 NADPH oxidase are necessary for LC3-associated phagocytosis. We found that L. major promastigotes prevented, in a GP63-dependent manner, the recruitment of NOX2 to phagosomes through a mechanism that does not involve NOX2 cleavage. Moreover, we found that the SNARE protein VAMP8, which regulates phagosomal assembly of the NADPH oxidase NOX2, was down-modulated by GP63. In the absence of VAMP8, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes containing GP63-deficient parasites was inhibited, indicating that VAMP8 is involved in the phagosomal recruitment of LC3. These findings reveal a role for VAMP8 in LC3-associated phagocytosis and highlight a novel mechanism exploited by L. major promastigotes to interfere with the host antimicrobial machinery. PMID:27280768

  4. Leishmania major Promastigotes Evade LC3-Associated Phagocytosis through the Action of GP63.

    PubMed

    Matte, Christine; Casgrain, Pierre-André; Séguin, Olivier; Moradin, Neda; Hong, Wan Jin; Descoteaux, Albert

    2016-06-01

    The protozoan Leishmania parasitizes macrophages and evades the microbicidal consequences of phagocytosis through the inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis. In this study, we investigated the impact of this parasite on LC3-associated phagocytosis, a non-canonical autophagic process that enhances phagosome maturation and functions. We show that whereas internalization of L. major promastigotes by macrophages promoted LC3 lipidation, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes was inhibited through the action of the parasite surface metalloprotease GP63. Reactive oxygen species generated by the NOX2 NADPH oxidase are necessary for LC3-associated phagocytosis. We found that L. major promastigotes prevented, in a GP63-dependent manner, the recruitment of NOX2 to phagosomes through a mechanism that does not involve NOX2 cleavage. Moreover, we found that the SNARE protein VAMP8, which regulates phagosomal assembly of the NADPH oxidase NOX2, was down-modulated by GP63. In the absence of VAMP8, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes containing GP63-deficient parasites was inhibited, indicating that VAMP8 is involved in the phagosomal recruitment of LC3. These findings reveal a role for VAMP8 in LC3-associated phagocytosis and highlight a novel mechanism exploited by L. major promastigotes to interfere with the host antimicrobial machinery. PMID:27280768

  5. Physiological and behavioral responses in Drosophila melanogaster to odorants present at different plant maturation stages.

    PubMed

    Versace, Elisabetta; Eriksson, Anna; Rocchi, Federico; Castellan, Irene; Sgadò, Paola; Haase, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds and oviposits on fermented fruit, hence its physiological and behavioral responses are expected to be tuned to odorants abundant during later stages of fruit maturation. We used a population of about two-hundred isogenic lines of D. melanogaster to assay physiological responses (electroantennograms (EAG)) and behavioral correlates (preferences and choice ratio) to odorants found at different stages of fruit maturation. We quantified electrophysiological and behavioral responses of D. melanogaster for the leaf compound β-cyclocitral, as well as responses to odorants mainly associated with later fruit maturation stages. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses were modulated by the odorant dose. For the leaf compound we observed a steep dose-response curve in both EAG and behavioral data and shallower curves for odorants associated with later stages of maturation. Our data show the connection between sensory and behavioral responses and are consistent with the specialization of D. melanogaster on fermented fruit and avoidance of high doses of compounds associated with earlier stages of maturation. Odor preferences were modulated in a non-additive way when flies were presented with two alternative odorants, and combinations of odorants elicited higher responses than single compounds. PMID:27195459

  6. Salt restrains maturation in subsalt plays

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, U.T. ); Anderson, R.N.; Karner, G.D. . Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

    1994-01-31

    The thermal positive anomaly associated with the top of salt diapirs has attracted significant attention in modifying the temperature structure and history of a sedimentary basin. Here the authors explore the role of the negative thermal anomaly beneath salt in modifying the maturation history of the source rocks in subsalt sediments. Organic matter maturation is believed to follow temperature dependent chemical reactions. Therefore, any temperature anomaly associated with salt masses affects the nearby maturation of potential source rocks. The level of maturity of source rocks close to salt diapirs will differ from that predicted based on regional trends. The impact of the thermal anomaly on a given point will depend on the duration and distance of the thermal anomaly to this particular point. Consequently, the maturation history of source rocks in salt basins is closely related to the salt motion history, implying that a transient thermal analysis is necessary to evaluate the sure impact on maturation of the thermal anomalies associated with salt diapirism. The paper describes vitrinite kinetics, salt in evolving basins, correlation of salt and temperature, salt dome heat drains, and restrained maturation.

  7. Protein syntehsis during soybean seed maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, L.A.; Rinne, R.W.

    1987-04-01

    The authors previous work has demonstrated that physiological and biochemical changes specifically associated with soybean seed maturation can be separated from events associated with seed development. The objective of this study was to determine if soybean seed metabolism is altered during maturation drying at the level of protein synthesis. Seed harvested 35 days after flowering (0% seedling growth) were induced to mature (100% seedling growth) through controlled dehydration. Proteins labeled with (/sup 35/S)-methionine were extracted and analyzed by 1-D PAGE coupled with autoradiography and densitometry. Results show a 31 kD and 128 kD polypeptide synthesized de novo during dehydration and precocious maturation. The same two polypeptides are synthesized during natural dehydration and maturation (>60 days after flowering). Furthermore, these polypeptides persist during rehydration and germination of both precociously and naturally matured seed, but specifically disappear during early seedling growth. The authors are currently investigating the role of protein synthesis during soybean seed maturation and if it is required for establishment of a soybean seedling.

  8. Paraoxonase 1 and HDL maturation.

    PubMed

    Gugliucci, Alejandro; Menini, Teresita

    2015-01-15

    Understanding the kinetics and function of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is becoming an important issue in atherosclerosis. Low PON1 activity has been consistently linked with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events in the setting of secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have shown that there is a specific interaction of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-apoAI-PON1 on HDL surface that seems to be germane to atherogenesis. MPO specifically inhibits PON1 and PON1 mitigates MPO effects. Surprisingly, very little is known about the routes by which PON1 gets integrated into HDL or its fate during HDL remodeling in the intravascular space. We have developed a method that assesses PON1 activity in the individual HDL subclasses with the aid of which we have shown that PON1 is present across the HDL particle range and preferentially in HDL3, confirming data from ultracentrifugation (UC) studies. Upon HDL maturation ex vivo PON1 is activated and it shows a flux to both smaller and larger HDL particles as well as to VLDL and sdLDL. At the same time apoE, AI and AII are shifted across particle sizes. PON1 activation and flux across HDL particles are blocked by CETP and LCAT inhibitors. In a group of particles with such a complex biology as HDL, knowledge of the interaction between apo-lipoproteins, lipids and enzymes is key for an increased understanding of the yet multiple unknown features of its function. Solving the HDL paradox will necessitate the development of techniques to explore HDL function that are practical and well adapted to clinical studies and eventually become useful in patient monitoring. The confluence of proteomic, functional studies, HDL subclasses, PON1 assays and zymogram will yield data to draw a more elaborate and comprehensive picture of the function of HDL. It must be noted that all these studies are static and conducted in the fasting state. The crucial phase will be achieved when human kinetic studies (both in the fasting and post

  9. Sexual maturity in western Atlantic bluefin tuna.

    PubMed

    Heinisch, Gilad; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Knapp, Jessica M; Gordin, Hillel; Lutcavage, Molly E

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel endocrine approach for assessing the unresolved matter of the timing of sexual maturation in western Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABFT), a highly migratory population whose status remains uncertain. Ratios of follicle stimulating hormone to luteinizing hormone, a sexual maturity indicator, in all ABFT ≥ 134 cm curved fork length (CFL) were <0.4, similar to Mediterranean spawners, indicating that western ABFT mature at considerably smaller sizes and at a much younger age than currently assumed (≥ 185 cm CFL). PMID:25431301

  10. Delayed visual maturation and lead pollution.

    PubMed

    Gulson, B L; Yui, L A; Howarth, D

    1998-12-11

    Three children were born in the Broken Hill Australia lead mining community with delayed visual maturation of the optic nerve (blindness) within a period of 19 months. Because of the association with the lead pollution, the delayed visual maturation was attributed to lead exposure of the fetus during pregnancy. Lead isotopic analyses of the shed deciduous teeth from the three children demonstrate that they were not exposed to increased levels of lead from a mining or any other source during pregnancy and the etiology of the delayed visual maturation must be sought elsewhere. PMID:9926437

  11. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  12. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  13. LC3-associated phagocytosis: a crucial mechanism for antifungal host defence against Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Sprenkeler, Evelien G G; Gresnigt, Mark S; van de Veerdonk, Frank L

    2016-09-01

    LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) is a non-canonical autophagy pathway involved in the maturation of single-membrane phagosomes and subsequent killing of ingested pathogens by phagocytes. This pathway is initiated following recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors and leads to the recruitment of LC3 into the phagosomal membrane. This form of phagocytosis is utilized for the antifungal host defence and is required for an efficient fungal killing. Here, we provide an overview of the LAP pathway and review the role of LAP in anti-Aspergillus host defence, as well as mechanisms induced by Aspergillus that modulate LAP to promote its survival in the host. PMID:27185357

  14. 7 CFR 51.1218 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1218 Mature. “Mature” means that the peach has reached the stage of growth which will ensure a proper completion of...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1218 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Definitions § 51.1218 Mature. “Mature” means that the peach has reached the stage of growth which will ensure a proper completion of...

  16. Quantifying Semantic Linguistic Maturity in Children.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Kristina; Bååth, Rasmus; Löhndorf, Simone; Sahlén, Birgitta; Sikström, Sverker

    2016-10-01

    We propose a method to quantify semantic linguistic maturity (SELMA) based on a high dimensional semantic representation of words created from the co-occurrence of words in a large text corpus. The method was applied to oral narratives from 108 children aged 4;0-12;10. By comparing the SELMA measure with maturity ratings made by human raters we found that SELMA predicted the rating of semantic maturity made by human raters over and above the prediction made using a child's age and number of words produced. We conclude that the semantic content of narratives changes in a predictable pattern with children's age and argue that SELMA is a measure quantifying semantic linguistic maturity. The study opens up the possibility of using quantitative measures for studying the development of semantic representation in children's narratives, and emphasizes the importance of word co-occurrences for understanding the development of meaning. PMID:26440529

  17. Structure, Function and Dynamics in Adenovirus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed. PMID:25421887

  18. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  19. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  20. Effect of hemiplegia on skeletal maturation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C D; Vogtle, L; Stevenson, R D

    1994-11-01

    Children with cerebral palsy have been reported to have poor growth and delayed skeletal maturation, but it is unclear whether these effects are related to the underlying brain injury or to concomitant malnutrition. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of hemiplegic cerebral palsy on skeletal maturation and growth, with the unaffected side used as each subject's control. Bilateral hand-wrist radiographs were obtained for 19 children with spastic hemiplegia. Skeletal maturation was determined in a blinded fashion with the Fels method. The skeletal age of the affected (hemiplegic) side was less than that of the unaffected (control) side in all 19 subjects; the mean difference in skeletal age was 7.3 months (p < 0.001). The delay in skeletal maturation of the affected side correlated linearly with age and upper extremity function. These findings show that brain injury results in delayed skeletal maturation independent of malnutrition. This effect on skeletal maturation may explain, in part, the reason that some children with cerebral palsy grow poorly. PMID:7965443

  1. Review of Sexual Maturity in the Minipig.

    PubMed

    Howroyd, Paul C; Peter, Birgit; de Rijk, Eveline

    2016-06-01

    It is important to know whether the animals used in toxicology studies are sexually mature. As minipigs are being used increasingly in toxicity studies, we reviewed published data on the age of sexual maturity in the minipig. Maturity in females was assessed on the basis either of normal cycles of progesterone secretion or of the histological presence of corpora lutea and, in males, was assessed on the histological appearance of the seminiferous tubules and epididymides. In female Göttingen minipigs, the first progesterone peak was at 3.7 to 4.2 or 6.1 to 6.5 months of age. These animals were in the presence of a boar. In female Göttingen minipigs in toxicology studies, which were not in the presence of a boar, at least 1 corpus luteum in the ovaries was present in only 50% of the females by 6.5 months of age, while all were mature by 7.7 months of age. Histological maturity in the male Yucatan minipig is reported to be attained at about 4.4 months old, but in male Göttingen minipigs at about 2 months old, although the definition of maturity may have been different in the 2 studies. PMID:27102651

  2. Color back projection for fruit maturity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    In general, fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and dates are harvested before they fully ripen. After harvesting, they continue to ripen and their color changes. Color is a good indicator of fruit maturity. For example, tomatoes change color from dark green to light green and then pink, light red, and dark red. Assessing tomato maturity helps maximize its shelf life. Color is used to determine the length of time the tomatoes can be transported. Medjool dates change color from green to yellow, and the orange, light red and dark red. Assessing date maturity helps determine the length of drying process to help ripen the dates. Color evaluation is an important step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. This paper presents an efficient color back projection and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time maturity evaluation of fruits. This color processing method requires very simple training procedure to obtain the frequencies of colors that appear in each maturity stage. This color statistics is used to back project colors to predefined color indexes. Fruit maturity is then evaluated by analyzing the reprojected color indexes. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production.

  3. Maturation processing and characterization of streptopain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Luo, Shih-Chi; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lin, Ming T; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2003-05-01

    Streptopain is a cysteine protease expressed by Streptococcus pyogenes. To study the maturation mechanism of streptopain, wild-type and Q186N, C192S, H340R, N356D and W357A mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Proteolytic analyses showed that the maturation of prostreptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B zymogen (pro-SPE B) involves eight intermediates with a combination of cis- and trans-processing. Based on the sequences of these intermediates, the substrate specificity of streptopain favors a hydrophobic residue at the P2 site. The relative autocatalytic rates of these mutants exhibited the order Q186N > W357A > N356D, C192S, H340R. Interestingly, the N356D mutant containing protease activity could not be converted into the 28-kDa form by autoprocessing. This observation suggested that Asn(356) might involve the cis-processing of the propeptide. In addition, the maturation rates of pro-SPE B with trypsin and plasmin were 10- and 60-fold slower than that with active mature streptopain. These findings indicate that active mature streptopain likely plays the most important role in the maturation of pro-SPE B under physiological conditions. PMID:12621045

  4. Deciphering the roles of phosphoinositide lipids in phagolysosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Andreas; Haas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Professional phagocytes engulf microbial invaders into plasma membrane-derived phagosomes. These mature into microbicidal phagolysosomes, leading to killing of the ingested microbe. Phagosome maturation involves sequential fusion of the phagosome with early endosomes, late endosomes, and the main degradative compartments in cells, lysosomes. Some bacterial pathogens manipulate the phosphoinositide (PIP) composition of phagosome membranes and are not delivered to phagolysosomes, pointing at a role of PIPs in phagosome maturation. This hypothesis is supported by comprehensive microscopic studies. Recently, cell-free reconstitution of fusion between phagosomes and endo(lyso)somes identified phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] as key regulators of phagolysosome biogenesis. Here, we describe the emerging roles of PIPs in phagosome maturation and we present tools to study PIP involvement in phagosome trafficking using intact cells or purified compartments. PMID:27489580

  5. Comparison of maturity based on steroid and vanadyl porphyrin parameters: A new vanadyl porphyrin maturity parameter for higher maturities

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararaman, P. ); Moldowan, J.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Correlations are demonstrated between steriod maturity parameters and the porphyrin maturity parameter (PMP) which is based on the ratio of specific vanadyl porphyrins C[sub 28]E/(C[sub 28]E + C[sub 32]D) measured by HPLC. Measurements from a global selection of >100 rock extracts and oils show that PMP parallels changes in the C[sub 29]-sterane 20S/(20S + 20R) and tri/(tri + mono) aromatic steroid ratios, and that all three parameters appear to attain their maximum values at similar maturity levels. The triaromatic steroid side chain cracking parameter, TA I/(I + II), reaches approximately 20% of its maximum value when PMP has reached 100%. These results suggest that PMP is effective in the early to peak portion of the oil window. A new parameter, PMP-2, based on changes in the relative concentrations of two peaks in the HPLC fingerprint (vanadyl [open quotes]etio[close quotes] porphyrins), appears effective in assessing the maturity of source rocks beyond peak oil generation. In combination with PMP this parameter extends the effective range of vanadyl porphyrins parameters to higher maturities as demonstrated by a suite of oils from the Oriente Basin, Ecuador, South America. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Adolescent Emotional Maturation through Divergent Models of Brain Organization.

    PubMed

    Oron Semper, Jose V; Murillo, Jose I; Bernacer, Javier

    2016-01-01

    In this article we introduce the hypothesis that neuropsychological adolescent maturation, and in particular emotional management, may have opposing explanations depending on the interpretation of the assumed brain architecture, that is, whether a componential computational account (CCA) or a dynamic systems perspective (DSP) is used. According to CCA, cognitive functions are associated with the action of restricted brain regions, and this association is temporally stable; by contrast, DSP argues that cognitive functions are better explained by interactions between several brain areas, whose engagement in specific functions is temporal and context-dependent and based on neural reuse. We outline the main neurobiological facts about adolescent maturation, focusing on the neuroanatomical and neurofunctional processes associated with adolescence. We then explain the importance of emotional management in adolescent maturation. We explain the interplay between emotion and cognition under the scope of CCA and DSP, both at neural and behavioral levels. Finally, we justify why, according to CCA, emotional management is understood as regulation, specifically because the cognitive aspects of the brain are in charge of regulating emotion-related modules. However, the key word in DSP is integration, since neural information from different brain areas is integrated from the beginning of the process. Consequently, although the terms should not be conceptually confused, there is no cognition without emotion, and vice versa. Thus, emotional integration is not an independent process that just happens to the subject, but a crucial part of personal growth. Considering the importance of neuropsychological research in the development of educational and legal policies concerning adolescents, we intend to expose that the holistic view of adolescents is dependent on whether one holds the implicit or explicit interpretation of brain functioning. PMID:27602012

  7. Adolescent Emotional Maturation through Divergent Models of Brain Organization

    PubMed Central

    Oron Semper, Jose V.; Murillo, Jose I.; Bernacer, Javier

    2016-01-01

    In this article we introduce the hypothesis that neuropsychological adolescent maturation, and in particular emotional management, may have opposing explanations depending on the interpretation of the assumed brain architecture, that is, whether a componential computational account (CCA) or a dynamic systems perspective (DSP) is used. According to CCA, cognitive functions are associated with the action of restricted brain regions, and this association is temporally stable; by contrast, DSP argues that cognitive functions are better explained by interactions between several brain areas, whose engagement in specific functions is temporal and context-dependent and based on neural reuse. We outline the main neurobiological facts about adolescent maturation, focusing on the neuroanatomical and neurofunctional processes associated with adolescence. We then explain the importance of emotional management in adolescent maturation. We explain the interplay between emotion and cognition under the scope of CCA and DSP, both at neural and behavioral levels. Finally, we justify why, according to CCA, emotional management is understood as regulation, specifically because the cognitive aspects of the brain are in charge of regulating emotion-related modules. However, the key word in DSP is integration, since neural information from different brain areas is integrated from the beginning of the process. Consequently, although the terms should not be conceptually confused, there is no cognition without emotion, and vice versa. Thus, emotional integration is not an independent process that just happens to the subject, but a crucial part of personal growth. Considering the importance of neuropsychological research in the development of educational and legal policies concerning adolescents, we intend to expose that the holistic view of adolescents is dependent on whether one holds the implicit or explicit interpretation of brain functioning. PMID:27602012

  8. Source rock maturation, San Juan sag

    SciTech Connect

    Gries, R.R.; Clayton, J.L.

    1989-09-01

    Kinetic modeling for thermal histories was simulated for seven wells in the San Juan sag honoring measured geochemical data. Wells in the area of Del Norte field (Sec. 9, T40N, R5E), where minor production has been established from an igneous sill reservoir, show that the Mancos Shale source rocks are in the mature oil generation window as a combined result of high regional heat flow and burial by approximately 2,700 m of Oligocene volcanic rocks. Maturation was relatively recent for this area and insignificant during Laramide subsidence. In the vicinity of Gramps field (Sec. 24, T33N, R2E) on the southwest flank of the San Juan sag, these same source rocks are exposed due to erosion of the volcanic cover but appear to have undergone a similar maturation history. At the north and south margins of the sag, two wells (Champlin 34A-13, Sec. 13, T35N, R4.5E; and Champlin 24A-1, Sec. 1, T44N, R5E) were analyzed and revealed that although the regional heat flow was probably similar to other wells, the depth of burial was insufficient to cause maturation (except where intruded by thick igneous sills that caused localized maturation). The Meridian Oil 23-17 South Fork well (Sec. 17, T39N, R4E) was drilled in a deeper part of the San Juan sag, and source rocks were intruded by numerous igneous sills creating a complex maturation history that includes overmature rocks in the lowermost Mancos Shale, possible CO{sub 2} generation from the calcareous Niobrara Member of the Mancos Shale, and mature source rocks in the upper Mancos Shale.

  9. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  10. Need for speed: Sexual maturation precedes social maturation in gray mouse lemurs.

    PubMed

    Hohenbrink, Sarah; Zimmermann, Elke; Radespiel, Ute

    2015-10-01

    The life history of mammals underlies a fast-slow continuum, ranging from "slow" species with large body size, delayed sexual maturation, low fertility, and long lifespan, to "fast" species showing the opposite traits. Primates fall into the "slow" category, considering their relatively low offspring numbers and delayed juvenile development. However, social and sexual maturation processes do not necessarily have to be completed simultaneously. The comparison of the timeframes for sexual and social maturation is largely lacking for primates, with the prominent exception of humans. Here, we compare both maturation processes in a basal primate, the gray mouse lemur, which ranges in many aspects at the fast end of the slow-fast life history continuum among primates. We compared the patterns and frequencies of various social and solitary behaviors in young adults (YA, 12-13 months old) and older individuals (A, ≥2 years) of both sexes outside estrus. Observations were conducted during mix-sexed dyadic encounter experiments under controlled captive conditions (eight dyads per age class). Results indicate that although all young adults were sexually mature, social maturation was not yet completed in all behavioral domains: Age-dependent differences were found in the number of playing dyads, female marking behavior, female aggression, and social tolerance. Thus, this study provides a first indication that social maturation lags behind sexual maturation in an ancestral nocturnal primate model, indicating that these two developmental schemes may have been decoupled early and throughout the primate lineage. PMID:26119105

  11. A rapid measurement for cotton breeders of maturity and fineness from developing and mature fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fiber’s maturity and fineness are important fiber properties that can impact the fiber’s downstream processing and the quality of yarn and fabric. The Cottonscope is a new instrument that simultaneously measures the fiber’s maturity and fineness using a very small amount of fiber sample. Previ...

  12. Genome-wide association mapping of flowering time and maturity dates in early mature soybean germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is a photoperiod-sensitive and short-day major crop grown worldwide. Days to flowering (DTF) and maturity (DTM) are two traits affecting soybean adaptability and yield. Some genes conditioning soybean flowering and maturity have been recently characterized. However, ...

  13. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16231.001 PMID:27542195

  14. HIV-1 Assembly, Budding, and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Sundquist, Wesley I.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    A defining property of retroviruses is their ability to assemble into particles that can leave producer cells and spread infection to susceptible cells and hosts. Virion morphogenesis can be divided into three stages: assembly, wherein the virion is created and essential components are packaged; budding, wherein the virion crosses the plasma membrane and obtains its lipid envelope; and maturation, wherein the virion changes structure and becomes infectious. All of these stages are coordinated by the Gag polyprotein and its proteolytic maturation products, which function as the major structural proteins of the virus. Here, we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of HIV-1 assembly, budding, and maturation, starting with a general overview and then providing detailed descriptions of each of the different stages of virion morphogenesis. PMID:22762019

  15. Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events

    PubMed Central

    Tosti, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    During maturation, the last phase of oogenesis, the oocyte undergoes several changes which prepare it to be ovulated and fertilized. Immature oocytes are arrested in the first meiotic process prophase, that is morphologically identified by a germinal vesicle. The removal of the first meiotic block marks the initiation of maturation. Although a large number of molecules are involved in complex sequences of events, there is evidence that a calcium increase plays a pivotal role in meiosis re-initiation. It is well established that, during this process, calcium is released from the intracellular stores, whereas less is known on the role of external calcium entering the cell through the plasma membrane ion channels. This review is focused on the functional role of calcium currents during oocyte maturation in all the species, from invertebrates to mammals. The emerging role of specific L-type calcium channels will be discussed. PMID:16684344

  16. Viral and host control of cytomegalovirus maturation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ritesh; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation in herpesviruses initiates in the nucleus of the infected cell with encapsidation of viral DNA to form nucleocapsids and concludes with envelopment in the cytoplasm to form infectious virions that egress the cell. The entire process of virus maturation is orchestrated by protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities of viral and host origin. Viral tegument proteins play important roles in maintaining the structural stability of capsids and directing the acquisition of virus envelope. Envelopment occurs at modified host membranes and exploits host vesicular trafficking. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and concepts in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) maturation and their parallels in other herpesviruses with an emphasis on viral and host factors regulating this process. PMID:22633075

  17. Stacking the odds for Golgi cisternal maturation.

    PubMed

    Mani, Somya; Thattai, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    What is the minimal set of cell-biological ingredients needed to generate a Golgi apparatus? The compositions of eukaryotic organelles arise through a process of molecular exchange via vesicle traffic. Here we statistically sample tens of thousands of homeostatic vesicle traffic networks generated by realistic molecular rules governing vesicle budding and fusion. Remarkably, the plurality of these networks contain chains of compartments that undergo creation, compositional maturation, and dissipation, coupled by molecular recycling along retrograde vesicles. This motif precisely matches the cisternal maturation model of the Golgi, which was developed to explain many observed aspects of the eukaryotic secretory pathway. In our analysis cisternal maturation is a robust consequence of vesicle traffic homeostasis, independent of the underlying details of molecular interactions or spatial stacking. This architecture may have been exapted rather than selected for its role in the secretion of large cargo. PMID:27542195

  18. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  19. Examination of potential measures of vine maturity in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant maturity is a complex physiological trait. The criteria used to characterize plant maturity are not universal among crop plants. In potato, vine characteristics are typically used to estimate plant maturity. This study investigates several reported measures of vine maturity in potato cultivars...

  20. The Maturely, Immature Orientale Impact Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, J. T.; Lawrence, D. J.; Stickle, A. M.; Delen, O.; Patterson, G.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar surface maturity is consistently examined using the NIR optical maturity parameter (OMAT) [1]. However, the NIR only provides a perspective of the upper microns of the lunar surface. Recent studies of Lunar Prospector (LP) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter data sets are now demonstrating additional measures of maturity with sensitivities to greater depths (~2 m) in the regolith. These include thermal infrared, S-band radar, and epithermal neutron data sets [2-4]. Interestingly, each of these parameters is directly comparable to OMAT despite each measuring slightly different aspects of the regolith. This is demonstrated by Lawrence et al. [3] where LP-measured non-polar highlands epithermal neutrons trend well with albedo, OMAT, and the Christensen Feature (CF). Lawrence et al. [3] used these data to derive and map highlands hydrogen (H) which is dominantly a function of H-implantation. With this in mind, areas of enriched-H are mature, while areas of depleted H are immature. Surface roughness as measured by S-band radar [4], also provides a measure of maturity. In this case, the circular polarization ratio (CPR) is high when rough and immature, and low when smooth and mature. Knowing this, one can recognize areas in the non-polar lunar highlands that show contradictory measures of maturity. For example, while many lunar localities show consistently immature albedo, OMAT, CF, CPR, and H concentrations (e.g., Tycho), others do not. Orientale basin is the most prominent example, shown to have immature CPR, CF, and H concentrations despite a relatively mature albedo and OMAT values as well as an old age determination (~3.8 Ga). To better understand how the lunar regolith is weathering in the upper 1-2 m of regolith with time we examine the Orientale basin relative to other highlands regions. [1] Lucey et al. (2000) JGR, 105, 20377; [2] Lucey et al. (2013) LPSC, 44, 2890; [3] Lawrence et al. (2015) Icarus, j.icarus.2015.01.005; [4] Neish et al. (2013) JGR, 118

  1. Maturation of Lesions Induced by Myocardial Cavitation-Enabled Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofang; Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Zhu, Yiying I; Fabiilli, Mario L; Owens, Gabe E; Kripfgans, Oliver D

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography at enhanced therapeutic parameters may be a novel means of tissue reduction therapy, as for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dahl/SS rats were anesthetized and treated with high-amplitude pulsed ultrasound guided by 10-MHz ultrasound images. Contrast microbubbles were infused via the tail vein during intermittent pulse-burst exposure at 4 MPa. A sham group, a low-impact group (group A, 5 cycle pulses with Gaussian modulation and 1:4 trigger for 5 min) and a high-impact group (group B, 10 cycle pulses with 4-ms square modulation and 1:8 trigger for 10 min) were tested. The higher exposure used in group B yielded more substantial injury than the lower exposure in group A. Treated rats in both groups A and B had significant increases in wall thickness measured by echocardiography the next day, which returned to normal by the end of 6 wk. Six weeks after ultrasound exposure, heart tissue samples exhibited tissue fibrosis in Masson's trichrome stained histology. Maturation of lesions involved fibrosis replacement, preserving structural tissue integrity. This study indicates that myocardial injury noted previously progresses into permanent loss of myocardial tissue that may be sufficient for possible hypertrophic cardiomyopathy therapy. More research is needed to define the treatment parameters required for symptomatic relief for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27087693

  2. Using measurable physical characteristics to forecast beef heifer maturity: the identification of a maturity index.

    PubMed

    Stockton, M C; Wilson, R K; Feuz, D M; Stalker, L A; Funston, R N

    2013-09-01

    A target BW is often used to estimate sexual maturity in beef heifers. The target BW, a percentage of mature BW, is generally an average for the breed, herd, or both. Heifer development is done in groups or herds, and not all heifers respond similarly to the same development regimen. Generally, heifers fed at a higher plane of nutrition gain more BW and tend to have increased pregnancy rates, but this usually increases feed costs. Therefore, determining when increased feed costs exceed the economic gains resulting from greater conception rates is critical and requires the inclusion of economic information and relationships. This research focused on the individual heifer as the decision point, and identification of the individual heifer target BW was based on clearly defined biological relationships observed before breeding. These relationships were captured in a maturity index (MI) identified through a series of steps and guided by current, accepted knowledge of heifer growth and development. Using an in-sample mean absolute percent error comparison, it was determined the MI was more accurate than the current group or herd methods in forecasting actual maturity and target BW. Maturity index demonstrated the flexibility in achieving similar maturities with beef heifers of varying characteristics using alternative nutritional programs. The MI was also the only significant predictor of first pregnancy. These results allow for more precision in determining sexual maturity and probability of first pregnancy in beef heifers and serve as the basis for future studies in determining profit differences among heifers. PMID:23825325

  3. 7 CFR 51.888 - Maturity requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, in the case of Arizona maturity..., Standardization Section, Room 2065-S, 14th and Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20250 or at the National....5 Cardinal, Emperor, Perlette, Ribier, Olivette Blanche, Rish Baba, Red Malaga, and...

  4. 7 CFR 51.888 - Maturity requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, in the case of Arizona maturity..., Standardization Section, Room 2065-S, 14th and Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20250 or at the National....5 Cardinal, Emperor, Perlette, Ribier, Olivette Blanche, Rish Baba, Red Malaga, and...

  5. Depressive Symptomatology among Very Early Maturing Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rierdan, Jill; Koff, Elissa

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between very early menarche and depression was studied in a sample of 488 girls (336 sixth graders and 152 seventh graders), less than 10 percent of whom were very early maturers. Very early menarche was associated with higher levels of depression than was more normative development. (SLD)

  6. Teaching Copywriting Students about the Mature Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewniany, Bonnie

    Advertising educators have a responsibility to make students aware of the importance of the mature market (older people) and to teach them methods to reach this group. An assignment in a copywriting class asked students to write and design ads to promote blue jeans to adults over 50. The assignment accomplished three things: (1) helped students…

  7. Vaccinia Virus Infection Requires Maturation of Macropinosomes.

    PubMed

    Rizopoulos, Zaira; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Kilcher, Samuel; Martin, Caroline K; Syedbasha, Mohammedyaseen; Helenius, Ari; Mercer, Jason

    2015-08-01

    The prototypic poxvirus, vaccinia virus (VACV), occurs in two infectious forms, mature virions (MVs) and extracellular virions (EVs). Both enter HeLa cells by inducing macropinocytic uptake. Using confocal microscopy, live-cell imaging, targeted RNAi screening and perturbants of endosome maturation, we analyzed the properties and maturation pathway of the macropinocytic vacuoles containing VACV MVs in HeLa cells. The vacuoles first acquired markers of early endosomes [Rab5, early endosome antigen 1 and phosphatidylinositol(3)P]. Prior to release of virus cores into the cytoplasm, they contained markers of late endosomes and lysosomes (Rab7a, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 and sorting nexin 3). RNAi screening of endocytic cell factors emphasized the importance of late compartments for VACV infection. Follow-up perturbation analysis showed that infection required Rab7a and PIKfyve, confirming that VACV is a late-penetrating virus dependent on macropinosome maturation. VACV EV infection was inhibited by depletion of many of the same factors, indicating that both infectious particle forms share the need for late vacuolar conditions for penetration. PMID:25869659

  8. Thermal maturity of carboniferous strata, Ouachita Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Matthews, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    The Ouachita Mountains, a relatively untested, potential hydrocarbon province, contain a thick Paleozoic section of apparently favorable source beds, reservoir beds, and trap configurations. To estimate the thermal maturity of these strata, vitrinite reflectance was measured on 89 samples collected mostly from Carboniferous rocks from throughout the Ouachita outcrop area.

  9. Young Carers: Mature before Their Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Grant; Stainton, Tim; Marshall, Sheila

    2009-01-01

    There is a population of remarkable young people who may go unnoticed due to the absence of overt acting out behaviors. Often mature beyond their age, they are forced by family situations to assume care-giving roles which are usually the responsibility of parents and elders. Being placed prematurely in adult caring roles potentially may have both…

  10. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  11. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  12. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Winter Pears 1 Definitions § 51.1313 Mature. (a... also be given. (1) The following terms should be used for describing the ground color: Green, Light Green, Yellowish Green, and Yellow. (2) The following terms should be used for describing the...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1272 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Summer and Fall Pears 1 Definitions § 51.1272 Mature... also be given. (1) The following terms should be used for describing the ground color: Green, Light Green, Yellowish Green, and Yellow. (2) The following terms should be used for describing the...

  15. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA...

  16. 7 CFR 1421.101 - Maturity dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity dates. 1421.101 Section 1421.101 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF... ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 2008 THROUGH 2012 Marketing Assistance Loans §...

  17. Prenatal Antecedents of Newborn Neurological Maturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Rubin, Suzanne E.; Shiffler, Dorothy E.; Henderson, Janice L.; Pillion, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral development was modeled longitudinally using data collected at weekly intervals from 24 to 38 weeks gestation in a sample of 112 healthy pregnancies. Predictive associations between 3 measures of fetal neurobehavioral functioning and their developmental trajectories to neurological maturation in the first weeks after birth…

  18. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51. Copies may be... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity...

  20. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity...

  1. 7 CFR 51.767 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These grapefruit maturity...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1823 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be... assigned the term in the Florida Citrus Code, Chapter 601, 1995 Edition, and the Official Rules Affecting the Florida Citrus Industry, in effect as of February 12, 1995. These tangerine maturity...

  3. Neuropsychological and Early Maturational Correlates of Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denno, Deborah J.

    A study designed to examine biological, sociological, and early maturational correlates of intelligence collected data prospectively, from birth to 15 years of age, on a sample of 987 black children. Multiple indicators of eight independent and three dependent variables were tested in a structural equation model. Altogether, clear sex differences…

  4. The Measurement of Cognitive Vocational Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; Parry-Hill, Joseph W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an instrument designed to measure an individual's level of cognitive vocational maturity in six areas: Fields of Work, Job Selection, Work Conditions, Education Required, Attributes Required, and Duties. When vocational choices were in agreement with field of interest and ability level, scores on the subtests were higher. Mean scores on…

  5. Field Instruction and the Mature Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    As increasing numbers of mature students enter schools of social work, it is a challenge and an obligation for field instructors to discover ways to recruit and sustain them in the educational endeavor. Building upon three theoretical perspectives--Freire's pedagogy of the oppressed, Knowles's andragogy, and Schon's reflective learning and…

  6. Sperm Proteome Maturation in the Mouse Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew A.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Karr, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, transit through the epididymis, which involves the acquisition, loss and modification of proteins, is required to confer motility and fertilization competency to sperm. The overall dynamics of maturation is poorly understood, and a systems level understanding of the complex maturation process will provide valuable new information about changes occurring during epididymal transport. We report the proteomes of sperm collected from the caput, corpus and cauda segments of the mouse epididymis, identifying 1536, 1720 and 1234 proteins respectively. This study identified 765 proteins that are present in sperm obtained from all three segments. We identified 1766 proteins that are potentially added (732) or removed (1034) from sperm during epididymal transit. Phenotypic analyses of the caput, corpus and cauda sperm proteomes identified 60 proteins that have known sperm phenotypes when mutated, or absent from sperm. Our analysis indicates that as much as one-third of proteins with known sperm phenotypes are added to sperm during epididymal transit. GO analyses revealed that cauda sperm are enriched for specific functions including sperm-egg recognition and motility, consistent with the observation that sperm acquire motility and fertilization competency during transit through the epididymis. In addition, GO analyses revealed that the immunity protein profile of sperm changes during sperm maturation. Finally, we identified components of the 26S proteasome, the immunoproteasome, and a proteasome activator in mature sperm. PMID:26556802

  7. Career Maturity: A Priority for Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Manuel Alvarez

    2008-01-01

    This study reviews the current state of career maturity in secondary education--a period of education which is critical for development of this construct, when students are faced with ongoing academic and occupational decisions over the course of their studies. This paper is organized in three parts: first we focus on the concept, models,…

  8. 7 CFR 51.1313 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.1313 Section 51.1313 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1272 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mature. 51.1272 Section 51.1272 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND...

  10. Elevated Social Anxiety among Early Maturing Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Babson, Kimberly A.; Gahr, Jessica L.; Trainor, Casey D.; Frala, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a key period in terms of the development of anxiety psychopathology. An emerging literature suggests that early pubertal maturation is associated with enhanced vulnerability for anxiety symptomatology, although few studies have examined this association with regard to social anxiety. Accordingly, the current study was designed to…

  11. Gene expression associated with tuber periderm maturation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato periderm maturation and associated resistance to tuber excoriation, i.e. skinning injury, is of scientific and agricultural importance because of the losses created by shrinkage, tuber market quality defects and infections. The cells and cellular changes responsible for the development of re...

  12. Bluetongue virus capsid assembly and maturation.

    PubMed

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2014-08-01

    Maturation is an intrinsic phase of the viral life cycle and is often intertwined with egress. In this review we focus on orbivirus maturation by using Bluetongue virus (BTV) as a representative. BTV, a member of the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae, has over the last three decades been subjected to intense molecular study and is thus one of the best understood viruses. BTV is a non-enveloped virus comprised of two concentric protein shells that encapsidate 10 double-stranded RNA genome segments. Upon cell entry, the outer capsid is shed, releasing the core which does not disassemble into the cytoplasm. The polymerase complex within the core then synthesizes transcripts from each genome segment and extrudes these into the cytoplasm where they act as templates for protein synthesis. Newly synthesized ssRNA then associates with the replicase complex prior to encapsidation by inner and outer protein layers of core within virus-triggered inclusion bodies. Maturation of core occurs outside these inclusion bodies (IBs) via the addition of the outer capsid proteins, which appears to be coupled to a non-lytic, exocytic pathway during early infection. Similar to the enveloped viruses, BTV hijacks the exocytosis and endosomal sorting complex required for trafficking (ESCRT) pathway via a non-structural glycoprotein. This exquisitely detailed understanding is assembled from a broad array of assays, spanning numerous and diverse in vitro and in vivo studies. Presented here are the detailed insights of BTV maturation and egress. PMID:25196482

  13. 24 CFR 200.82 - Maturity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maturity. 200.82 Section 200.82 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  14. Job Search Manual for Mature Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Fred L.

    This document is designed to help mature persons find the "right" professional, managerial, or technical jobs. Section 1 introduces the materials. Section 2 shows job seekers how to write a general statement that defines the nature of the position desired and how to assess their skills, abilities, interests, work values, and personal qualities…

  15. Late Maturation of Auditory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyck, Julia Jones; Wright, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    Adults can improve their performance on many perceptual tasks with training, but when does the response to training become mature? To investigate this question, we trained 11-year-olds, 14-year-olds and adults on a basic auditory task (temporal-interval discrimination) using a multiple-session training regimen known to be effective for adults. The…

  16. Evaluating Hass Avocado Maturity Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maturity of avocado fruit is usually assessed by measuring its dry matter content(DM), which is a destructive and time consuming process. The aim of this study is tointroduce a non-destructive and quick technique that can estimate the DM content of an avocado fruit. 'Hass' avocado fruits at diff...

  17. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  18. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  19. 7 CFR 51.312 - Mature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.312 Mature. “Mature” means that the apples have reached the... apple becomes overripe it will show varying degrees of firmness, depending upon the stage of the ripening process. The following terms are used for describing different stages of firmness of apples:...

  20. Adolescent Naturalistic Conceptions of Moral Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Sam A.; Walker, Lawrence J.; Olsen, Joseph A.; Skalski, Jonathan E.; Basinger, Jason C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding lay conceptions of morality is important not only because they can guide moral psychology theory but also because they may play a role in everyday moral functioning. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine adolescent conceptions of moral maturity. Study 1 (200 adolescents 12-18 years) involved a free-listing procedure to…

  1. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  2. 7 CFR 989.213 - Maturity dockage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between handler and tenderer, Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless, Monukka... dockage table applicable to lots of Natural (sun-dried) Seedless, Golden Seedless, Dipped Seedless... dockage factor for the preceding increment. (c) Maturity dockage table applicable to lots of Natural...

  3. Do Young Children Modulate Their Cognitive Control?

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Solène; Lemaire, Patrick; Blaye, Agnès

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic, trial-by-trial modulations of inhibitory control are well documented in adults but rarely investigated in children. Here, we examined whether 5-to-7 year-old children, an age range when inhibitory control is still partially immature, achieve such modulations. Fifty three children took flanker, Simon, and Stroop tasks. Above and beyond classic congruency effects, the present results showed two crucial findings. First, we found evidence for sequential modulations of congruency effects in these young children in the three conflict tasks. Second, our results showed both task specificities and task commonalities. These findings in young children have important implications as they suggest that, to be modulated, inhibitory control does not require full maturation and that the precise pattern of trial-by-trial modulations may depend on the nature of conflict. PMID:27221602

  4. Histology of salmonid testes during maturation.

    PubMed

    Dziewulska, Katarzyna; Domagała, Józef

    2003-03-01

    The commonly applied classification systems of fish gonad maturity divide the maturation process into certain stages. However, the scales do not entirely reflect the continuity of the maturation process. Based on light microscope observations, the paper describes a comprehensive pattern of testicular transformations during maturation. The study was carried out on precocious underyearling and 1-year-old males of sea trout (Salmo trutta m. trutta L.), 1-year-old males of salmon (Salmo salar L.), and males of brown trout (Salmo trutta m. fario L.) aged from 7 months to 4 years. A total of 821 gonads collected during all seasons of the year were examined. The fish were fixed in Bouin's fluid. Histological slides of the mid-part of the gonad were made using the standard paraffin technique. The 3-6 microm sections were stained with Heidenhain haematoxylin. Histological changes of testes during maturation were similar in the three species studied. Immature and resting gonads contained type A spermatogonia in lobules only. The appearance of cystic structures containing type B spermatogonia in the lobules signalled the beginning of the sexual cycle in male gonads. Type B spermatogonia underwent synchronous mitotic divisions resulting in an increase in the total number of spermatogonia. As the spermatogenesis continued, the gonads showed a gradual increase in the number of cysts containing cells at all the spermatogenetic stages: type B spermatogonia, primary and secondary spermatocytes, spermatids, and spermatozoa. The well-formed spermatozoa were released to the lobule lumen once the Sertoli cells and spermatozoa connections broke up and the cyst disappeared. This was a continuous process observed throughout the spawning season. The spermatozoa were moved to the efferent duct. While some of the germ cells were completing spermatogenesis, the lobules contained less and less cysts with type B spermatogonia, primary and secondary spermatocytes, and spermatids; eventually all

  5. An Unexpected Twist in Viral Capsid Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Lambda-like dsDNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm. of pressure during genome packaging1. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids is unlikely to form in a single assembly step, therefore requiring formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Though various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage that undergoes large scale conformational changes. We present a procapsid x-ray structure at 3.65Å resolution, termed Prohead II, of the lambda like bacteriophage HK97, whose mature capsid structure was previously solved to 3.44 Å2. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and Hydrogen/Deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrates that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and β-sheet regions. We have also discovered conserved subunit interactions at each 3-fold of the virus capsid, from which capsid subunits maintain their integrity during refolding, facilitating the rotational and translational motions of maturation. Calormetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90KJ/mol of energy3. We propose the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic maturation process likely present in many ds

  6. Leveraging People-Related Maturity Issues for Achieving Higher Maturity and Capability Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buglione, Luigi

    During the past 20 years Maturity Models (MM) become a buzzword in the ICT world. Since the initial Crosby's idea in 1979, plenty of models have been created in the Software & Systems Engineering domains, addressing various perspectives. By analyzing the content of the Process Reference Models (PRM) in many of them, it can be noticed that people-related issues have little weight in the appraisals of the capabilities of organizations while in practice they are considered as significant contributors in traditional process and organizational performance appraisals, as stressed instead in well-known Performance Management models such as MBQA, EFQM and BSC. This paper proposes some ways for leveraging people-related maturity issues merging HR practices from several types of maturity models into the organizational Business Process Model (BPM) in order to achieve higher organizational maturity and capability levels.

  7. Transcriptional Programs Controlling Perinatal Lung Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; Besnard, Valérie; Ikegami, Machiko; Wert, Susan E.; Heffner, Caleb; Murray, Stephen A.; Donahue, Leah Rae; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The timing of lung maturation is controlled precisely by complex genetic and cellular programs. Lung immaturity following preterm birth frequently results in Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) and Broncho-Pulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Mechanisms synchronizing gestational length and lung maturation remain to be elucidated. In this study, we designed a genome-wide mRNA expression time-course study from E15.5 to Postnatal Day 0 (PN0) using lung RNAs from C57BL/6J (B6) and A/J mice that differ in gestational length by ∼30 hr (B6maturation. We identified both temporal and strain dependent gene expression patterns during lung maturation. For time dependent changes, cell adhesion, vasculature development, and lipid metabolism/transport were major bioprocesses induced during the saccular stage of lung development at E16.5–E17.5. CEBPA, PPARG, VEGFA, CAV1 and CDH1 were found to be key signaling and transcriptional regulators of these processes. Innate defense/immune responses were induced at later gestational ages (E18.5–20.5), STAT1, AP1, and EGFR being important regulators of these responses. Expression of RNAs associated with the cell cycle and chromatin assembly was repressed during prenatal lung maturation and was regulated by FOXM1, PLK1, chromobox, and high mobility group families of transcription factors. Strain dependent lung mRNA expression differences peaked at E18.5. At this time, mRNAs regulating surfactant and innate immunity were more abundantly expressed in lungs of B6 (short gestation) than in A/J (long gestation) mice, while expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and histone modification were expressed at lower levels in B6 than in A/J mice. The present study systemically mapped key regulators, bioprocesses

  8. MicroRNA Profile of Granulosa Cells after Ovarian Stimulation Differs According to Maturity of Retrieved Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y. J.; Ku, S.-Y.; Kim, Y. Y.; Suh, C. S.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent animal studies demonstrated that regulating the microRNA (miRNA) in granulosa cells (GCs) modulates the meiotic competence of oocytes. However, the difference in expression profiles of miRNAs in human GCs according to the maturity of the oocyte still remains to be elucidated. Objective: This observational study investigated whether the miRNA profile of human GCs differs according to the maturity of the retrieved oocyte after controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Methods: Ten women who underwent ovarian stimulation cycles with GnRH agonist long protocols were recruited. The follicular fluid (FF) from dominant follicles was individually aspirated at oocyte retrieval. Oocytes were divided into two groups according to oocyte maturity (“mature group” vs. “immature group”). GCs were collected from the FF and miRNA was analyzed using real-time PCR. Results: Mean number of MII oocytes in the mature group was 1.6 ± 0.9 with none in the immature group (p = 0.008). Mean number of MI oocytes was 5.6 ± 2.1 in the mature group and 1.0 ± 0.0 in the immature group (p = 0.008). The total number of retrieved oocytes was 8.8 ± 1.9 in the mature group and 2.0 ± 1.2 in the immature group (p = 0.008). The GCs of the mature group showed a significantly lower expression of hsa-let-7b compared to the GCs of the immature group (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Taken together, the miRNA expression profiles of human GCs obtained from dominant follicles are associated with maturity of the adjacent oocyte and may be useful as a prognosticator of IVF outcome. PMID:27365541

  9. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  10. Firefighting Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  11. Biomarker tests for fetal lung maturity.

    PubMed

    Leung-Pineda, Van; Gronowski, Ann M

    2010-12-01

    The production of surfactant is a key step in fetal lung development. Surfactant decreases alveolar surface tension, thereby preventing alveolar collapse and allowing efficient gas exchange. The lack of adequate amounts of lung surfactant results in respiratory distress syndrome. Tests that assess surfactant concentrations in amniotic fluid are good predictors of infants that will not develop respiratory distress syndrome. The most frequently used test to assess fetal lung maturity (TDx FLM II) will not be available after December 2011. Therefore, we review the currently available tests for fetal lung maturity including lecithin:sphingomyelin ratio, phosphatidyl glycerol, surfactant:albumin ratio and lamellar body counts. Herein, we discuss their clinical utility and consider a suitable replacement for the future. PMID:21133706

  12. Remotely sensing wheat maturation with radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    The scattering properties of wheat were studied in the 8-18 GHz band as a function of frequency, polarization, incidence angle, and crop maturity. Supporting ground truth was collected at the time of measurement. The data indicate that the radar backscattering coefficient is sensitive to both radar system parameters and crop characteristics particularly at incidence angles near nadir. Linear regression analyses of the radar backscattering coefficient on both time and plant moisture content result in rather good correlation. Furthermore, by calculating the average time rate of change of the radar backscattering coefficient it is found that it undergoes rapid variations shortly before and after the wheat is harvested. Both of these analyses suggest methods for estimating wheat maturity and for monitoring the progress of harvest.

  13. Visualizing antibody affinity maturation in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Tas, Jeroen M J; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Mano, Yasuko M; Chen, Casie S; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with nonimmunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  14. Mature brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Ghimire, Pradeep; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Jwarchan, Bishnu; Lalchan, Subita; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete mature brain tissue in sacrococcygeal region is a rare congenital anomaly in a newborn, which usually is misdiagnosed for sacrococcygeal teratoma. Glial tumor-like ependymoma is also common in sacrococcygeal area but mostly appears later in life. We present a case of complete heterotopic brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region. The patient underwent total excision of mass with coccygectomy. To our knowledge it is the second case being reported. PMID:27194682

  15. Mature brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Binod Bade; Ghimire, Pradeep; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Jwarchan, Bishnu; Lalchan, Subita; Karmacharya, Mikesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete mature brain tissue in sacrococcygeal region is a rare congenital anomaly in a newborn, which usually is misdiagnosed for sacrococcygeal teratoma. Glial tumor-like ependymoma is also common in sacrococcygeal area but mostly appears later in life. We present a case of complete heterotopic brain tissue in the sacrococcygeal region. The patient underwent total excision of mass with coccygectomy. To our knowledge it is the second case being reported. PMID:27194682

  16. Maturation of Fetal Responses to Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisilevsky, B. S.; Hains, S. M. J.; Jacquet, A.-Y.; Granier-Deferre, C.; Lecanuet, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    Maturation of fetal response to music was characterized over the last trimester of pregnancy using a 5-minute piano recording of Brahms' Lullaby, played at an average of 95, 100, 105 or 110 dB (A). Within 30 seconds of the onset of the music, the youngest fetuses (28-32 weeks GA) showed a heart rate increase limited to the two highest dB levels;…

  17. Thermionic modules

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-18

    Modules of assembled microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures manufactured using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices and modules can be fabricated at modest costs.

  18. Maturity schedules of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    We determined maturity schedules of male and female lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan from nearshore populations and from an offshore population on Sheboygan Reef, which is located in midlake. Gill nets and bottom trawls were used to catch lake trout in fall 1994 and 1995 from two nearshore sites and Sheboygan Reef. Each lake trout was judged immature or mature, based on visual examination of gonads. Probit analysis, coupled with relative potency testing, revealed that age-at-maturity and length-at-maturity were similar at the two nearshore sites, but that lake trout from the nearshore sites matured at a significantly earlier age than lake trout from Sheboygan Reef. However, length at maturity for the nearshore populations was nearly identical to that for the offshore population, suggesting that rate of lake trout maturation in Lake Michigan was governed by growth rather than age. Half of the lake trout males reached maturity at a total length of 580 mm, whereas half of the females were mature at a length of 640 mm. Over half of nearshore males were mature by age 5, and over half the nearshore females matured by age 6. Due to a slower growth rate, maturity was delayed by 2 years on Sheboygan Reef compared with the nearshore populations. Documentation of this delay in maturation may be useful in deciding stocking allocations for lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Michigan.

  19. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  20. Human mature erythroblasts are resistant to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hristoskova, Sashka; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Hahn, Sinuhe; Rusterholz, Corinne

    2007-03-10

    Apoptosis plays an important role in red blood cell development, notably by regulating the fate of early erythroid progenitors. We show here that, by contrast, mature erythroblasts are resistant to apoptosis. Treatment of these cells with several apoptosis-inducing agents failed to trigger caspase activation and oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, we find that cytochrome c levels are dramatically reduced even though the cells contain mitochondria. Supplementation of cytosolic extracts from mature erythroblasts with cytochrome c, however, did not rescue caspase activation. This was not due to the presence of inhibitors of apoptosis, as these proteins were also missing in these cells. We also show that cytochrome c depletion is a normal event during erythroblast differentiation, which follows transient, developmentally induced caspase activation and correlates with the loss of response to cytokine withdrawal or drug-induced apoptosis. Our data therefore suggest that erythroblasts acquire resistance to apoptosis during maturation through the developmentally induced depletion of cytochrome c and other crucial regulators of the apoptotic machinery. PMID:17289021

  1. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimir; Sakakibara, Yogo; Brzakova, Adela; Ferencova, Ivana; Motlik, Jan; Kitajima, Tomoya S; Schultz, Richard M; Solc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Because low levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) appear not to activate the ATM-mediated prophase I checkpoint in full-grown oocytes, there may exist mechanisms to protect chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. Using live imaging we demonstrate that low levels of DSBs induced by the radiomimetic drug Neocarzinostatin (NCS) increase the incidence of chromosome fragments and lagging chromosomes but do not lead to APC/C activation and anaphase onset delay. The number of DSBs, represented by γH2AX foci, significantly decreases between prophase I and metaphase II in both control and NCS-treated oocytes. Transient treatment with NCS increases >2-fold the number of DSBs in prophase I oocytes, but less than 30% of these oocytes enter anaphase with segregation errors. MRE11, but not ATM, is essential to detect DSBs in prophase I and is involved in H2AX phosphorylation during metaphase I. Inhibiting MRE11 by mirin during meiotic maturation results in anaphase bridges and also increases the number of γH2AX foci in metaphase II.  Compromised DNA integrity in mirin-treated oocytes indicates a role for MRE11 in chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. PMID:26745237

  2. Technology Maturation of Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Uckun, Serdar; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite two decades of significant investments in R&D of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), mission-critical applications of it in aerospace are few and far between. ISHM is subject to the general difficulty of transitioning technologies out of R&D labs and into practical applications. New and unproven methods such as ISHM introduce multiple mission risks (technology, schedule, cost), and may require a transition to unconventional and as-yet-unproven operations concepts in order to be effective. Laboratory and flight demonstrations are necessary but insufficient to adequately reduce those risks. What is needed is a solid business case before a new technology can be considered for fleetwide deployment. To address these problems, we recently applied a technology maturation assessment process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to study the challenges of ISHM technology maturation. This application resulted in identification of the technologies (and technology maturation activities) that would result in the greatest risk reduction per investment dollar. Our approach and its results are described herein.

  3. Decelerating Mature Adipocyte Dedifferentiation by Media Composition.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-12-01

    The establishment of adipose tissue test systems is still a major challenge in the investigation of cellular and molecular interactions responsible for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases involving adipose tissue. Mature adipocytes are mainly involved in these pathologies, but rarely used in vitro, due to the lack of an appropriate culture medium which inhibits dedifferentiation and maintains adipocyte functionality. In our study, we showed that Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/Ham's F-12 with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) reported for the culture of mature adipocytes favors dedifferentiation, which was accompanied by a high glycerol release, a decreasing release of leptin, and a low expression of the adipocyte marker perilipin A, but high expression of CD73 after 21 days. Optimized media containing FCS, biotin, pantothenate, insulin, and dexamethasone decelerated the dedifferentiation process. These cells showed a lower lipolysis rate, a high level of leptin release, as well as a high expression of perilipin A. CD73-positive dedifferentiated fat cells were only found in low quantity. In this work, we showed that mature adipocytes when cultured under optimized conditions could be highly valuable for adipose tissue engineering in vitro. PMID:26228997

  4. Epigenetic mechanisms in pubertal brain maturation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kathleen E.; Rodgers, Ali B.; Morgan, Christopher P.; Bale, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a critical period of development during which the reemergence of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion from the hypothalamus triggers a cascade of hormone-dependent processes. Maturation of specific brain regions including the prefrontal cortex occurs during this window, but the complex mechanisms underlying these dynamic changes are not well understood. Particularly, the potential involvement of epigenetics in this programming has been under-examined. The epigenome is known to guide earlier stages of development, and it is similarly poised to regulate vital pubertal-driven brain maturation. Further, as epigenetic machinery is highly environmentally responsive, its involvement may also lend this period of growth to greater vulnerability to external insults, resulting in reprogramming and increased disease risk. Importantly, neuropsychiatric diseases commonly present in individuals during or immediately following puberty, and environmental perturbations including stress may precipitate disease onset by disrupting the normal trajectory of pubertal brain development via epigenetic mechanisms. In this review, we discuss epigenetic processes involved in pubertal brain maturation, the potential points of derailment, and the importance of future studies for understanding this dynamic developmental window and gaining a better understanding of neuropsychiatric disease risk. PMID:24239720

  5. Maturation modeling in Otway Basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, M.F.; Falvey, D.A.

    1983-02-01

    The Otway basin is a Jurassic to Pliocene sedimentary basin formed on the southern Australian continental margin. Its formation is associated with rifting and breakup of the Australian and Antarctic plates. Lithospheric cooling and contraction have probably produced post-breakup subsidence. Either lithospheric stretching or deep crustal metamorphism may have produced pre-breakup subsidence. These mechanisms have identifiable thermal histories. Organic diagenesis (specifically the reflectance of vitrinite in oil) is empirically determined by the thermal and depositional history of an organic sediment. Thus, the stages of hydrocarbon maturity of Otway basin sediments can be modeled. Depositional history is determined from ''geohistory analysis'' and thermal history depends on the subsidence mechanism applied to the basin. A paleo-heat-flow history derived from the deep crustal metamorphism model of subsidence produces a maturation profile with depth that is consistent with observed vitrinite reflectance data, although organic diagenesis modeling is relatively insensitive to precise details of thermal history. Depositional and maturation history modeling for the present day, 20 Ma ago, 40 Ma ago, and 60 Ma ago is applied to a seismic profile across the southern Australian continental shelf in the Otway basin as a demonstration of the projection backward in time of sedimentation and organic diagenesis.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of embryo maturation in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maize is one of the most important crops in the world. With the exponentially increasing population and the need for ever increased food and feed production, an increased yield of maize grain (as well as rice, wheat and other grains) will be critical. Maize grain development is understood from the perspective of morphology, hormone responses, and storage reserve accumulation. This includes various studies on gene expression during embryo development and maturation but a global study of gene expression of the embryo has not been possible until recently. Transcriptome analysis is a powerful new tool that can be used to understand the genetic basis of embryo maturation. Results We undertook a transcriptomic analysis of normal maturing embryos at 15, 21 and 27 days after pollination (DAP), of one elite maize germplasm line that was utilized in crosses to transgenic plants. More than 19,000 genes were analyzed by this method and the challenge was to select subsets of genes that are vitally important to embryo development and maturation for the initial analysis. We describe the changes in expression for genes relating to primary metabolic pathways, DNA synthesis, late embryogenesis proteins and embryo storage proteins, shown through transcriptome analysis and confirmed levels of transcription for some genes in the transcriptome using qRT-PCR. Conclusions Numerous genes involved in embryo maturation have been identified, many of which show changes in expression level during the progression from 15 to 27 DAP. An expected array of genes involved in primary metabolism was identified. Moreover, more than 30% of transcripts represented un-annotated genes, leaving many functions to be discovered. Of particular interest are the storage protein genes, globulin-1, globulin-2 and an unidentified cupin family gene. When expressing foreign proteins in maize, the globulin-1 promoter is most often used, but this cupin family gene has much higher expression and may be a

  7. 7 CFR 51.1555 - Fairly well matured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....1555 Fairly well matured. Fairly well matured means that the skins of the potatoes are generally fairly firmly set and not more than 10 percent of the potatoes in the lot have more than one-fourth of the...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1555 - Fairly well matured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....1555 Fairly well matured. Fairly well matured means that the skins of the potatoes are generally fairly firmly set and not more than 10 percent of the potatoes in the lot have more than one-fourth of the...

  9. Morphology of preovulatory bovine follicles as related to oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    de Loos, F A; Bevers, M M; Dieleman, S J; Kruip, T A

    1991-03-01

    Thirty-three preovulatory bovine oocytes and their follicles were collected during the period of final maturation in normally cyclic cows. Cell density of the membrana granulosa, mitotic index of the membrana granulosa, and the occurrence of eosinophilic granulocytes around the basal membrane as well as the maturational stage of the oocyte were determined. Cell density decreased during the period of final maturation. Mitotic indices also decreased after an initial high level in the first hours of the final maturation. Eosinophilic granulocytes were only seen during the last hours of final maturation. The maturational stages of the oocytes were related to distinct maturational stages of the follicular wall as determined by morphological characteristics. We propose a scoring system for the maturity of the follicular wall based on cell density, presence of mitotic figures and the presence of eosinophilic granulocytes outside the vascular compartment. PMID:16726922

  10. Modulation of lymphopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, C.

    1991-01-01

    During the current project period we have demonstrated correspondence between animal models and in vitro models of modulated lymphopoiesis. Our finding that G-CSF, a growth factor for neutrophil granulocytes, suppresses lymphopoiesis in long term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) has important implications both for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of hemopoiesis and for clinical use of recombinant growth factors that are beginning to be widely used for the treatment of a variety of diseases. During the present project period we adopted LTBMC systems developed by others for the purposes of our specific aims. Also we developed a novel long term culture system for NK cells. The discovery of a new growth factor, O-CSF, specific for osteoclasts and the establishment of a clonal assay system that provides evidence for a new class of hemopoietic progenitor cells, the osteoclast progenitor, are important contributions. Given the important role T cells play in the immune response and in the regulation of other lymphohemopoietic cell lineages through the lymphokines they secrete, the need for an in vitro system that lends itself to the analysis of T cell maturation and to the testing of factors that may adversely affect T lymphopoiesis cannot be overemphasized. We believe that we can exploit an advantageous set of circumstances that present an excellent opportunity for initiating a focused experimental program for developing such a system. By a systematic and selective analysis of molecular interactions between heterogenous thymic stromal cells and T cell progenitors at different stages of maturation, it will be possible for our program to define the complement of critical cellular interactions on which successive stages of T lymphopoiesis depend. The experiments we propose will lay a rational foundation for the development of a long term culture system for T lymphopoiesis. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate regulate phagolysosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Andreas; Zehethofer, Nicole; Lindner, Buko; Krupp, Jessica; Schwudke, Dominik; Haneburger, Ina; Jovic, Marko; Backer, Jonathan M.; Balla, Tamas; Hilbi, Hubert; Haas, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Professional phagocytic cells ingest microbial intruders by engulfing them into phagosomes, which subsequently mature into microbicidal phagolysosomes. Phagosome maturation requires sequential fusion of the phagosome with early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes. Although various phosphoinositides (PIPs) have been detected on phagosomes, it remained unclear which PIPs actually govern phagosome maturation. Here, we analyzed the involvement of PIPs in fusion of phagosomes with various endocytic compartments and identified phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P], phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P], and the lipid kinases that generate these PIPs, as mediators of phagosome–lysosome fusion. Phagosome–early endosome fusion required PI(3)P, yet did not depend on PI(4)P. Thus, PI(3)P regulates phagosome maturation at early and late stages, whereas PI(4)P is selectively required late in the pathway. PMID:25825728

  12. Polyphenol administration impairs T-cell proliferation by imprinting a distinct dendritic cell maturational profile.

    PubMed

    Delvecchio, Francesca Romana; Vadrucci, Elisa; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; De Santis, Stefania; Kunde, Dale; Vacca, Michele; Myers, Jay; Allen, Frederick; Bianco, Giusy; Huang, Alex Y; Monsurro, Vladia; Santino, Angelo; Chieppa, Marcello

    2015-09-01

    Currently little is known as to how nutritionally derived compounds may affect dendritic cell (DC) maturation and potentially prevent inappropriate inflammatory responses that are characteristic of chronic inflammatory syndromes. Previous observations have demonstrated that two polyphenols quercetin and piperine delivered through reconstituted oil bodies (ROBs-QP) can influence DC maturation in response to LPS leading to a modulated inflammatory response. In the present study, we examined the molecular effects of ROBs-QP exposure on DC differentiation in mice and identified a unique molecular signature in response to LPS administration that potentially modulates DC maturation and activity in inflammatory conditions. Following LPS administration, ROBs-QP-exposed DCs expressed an altered molecular profile as compared with control DCs, including cytokine and chemokine production, chemokine receptor repertoire, and antigen presentation ability. In vivo ROBs-QP administration suppresses antigen-specific T-cell division in the draining lymph nodes resulting from a reduced ability to create stable immunological synapse. Our data demonstrate that polyphenols exposure can drive DCs toward a new anti-inflammatory molecular profile capable of dampening the inflammatory response, highlighting their potential as complementary nutritional approaches in the treatment of chronic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26096294

  13. Effects of sex pheromones and sexual maturation on locomotor activity in female sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Walaszczyk, Erin J; Johnson, Nicholas S; Steibel, Juan Pedro; Li, Weiming

    2013-06-01

    Synchronization of male and female locomotor rhythmicity can play a vital role in ensuring reproductive success. Several physiological and environmental factors alter these locomotor rhythms. As sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, progress through their life cycle, their locomotor activity rhythm changes multiple times. The goal of this study was to elucidate the activity patterns of adult female sea lamprey during the sexual maturation process and discern the interactions of these patterns with exposure to male pheromones. During these stages, preovulated and ovulated adult females are exposed to sex pheromone compounds, which are released by spermiated males and attract ovulated females to the nest for spawning. The locomotor behavior of adult females was monitored in a natural stream with a passive integrated tag responder system as they matured, and they were exposed to a sex pheromone treatment (spermiated male washings) or a control (prespermiated male washings). Results showed that, dependent on the hour of day, male sex pheromone compounds reduce total activity (p < 0.05) and cause increases in activity during several daytime hours in preovulated and ovulated females. These results are one of the first examples of how sex pheromones modulate a locomotor rhythm in a vertebrate, and they suggest that the interaction between maturity stage and sex pheromone exposure contributes to the differential locomotor rhythms found in adult female sea lamprey. This phenomenon may contribute to the reproductive synchrony of mature adults, thus increasing reproductive success in this species. PMID:23735501

  14. Effects of sex pheromones and sexual maturation on locomotor activity in female sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Steibel, Juan Pedro; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization of male and female locomotor rhythmicity can play a vital role in ensuring reproductive success. Several physiological and environmental factors alter these locomotor rhythms. As sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, progress through their life cycle, their locomotor activity rhythm changes multiple times. The goal of this study was to elucidate the activity patterns of adult female sea lamprey during the sexual maturation process and discern the interactions of these patterns with exposure to male pheromones. During these stages, preovulated and ovulated adult females are exposed to sex pheromone compounds, which are released by spermiated males and attract ovulated females to the nest for spawning. The locomotor behavior of adult females was monitored in a natural stream with a passive integrated tag responder system as they matured, and they were exposed to a sex pheromone treatment (spermiated male washings) or a control (prespermiated male washings). Results showed that, dependent on the hour of day, male sex pheromone compounds reduce total activity (p < 0.05) and cause increases in activity during several daytime hours in preovulated and ovulated females. These results are one of the first examples of how sex pheromones modulate a locomotor rhythm in a vertebrate, and they suggest that the interaction between maturity stage and sex pheromone exposure contributes to the differential locomotor rhythms found in adult female sea lamprey. This phenomenon may contribute to the reproductive synchrony of mature adults, thus increasing reproductive success in this species.

  15. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wijewardana, Viskam; Sugiura, Kikuya; Wijesekera, Daluthgamage Patsy H; Hatoya, Shingo; Nishimura, Toshiya; Kanegi, Ryoji; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Inaba, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  16. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs

    PubMed Central

    WIJEWARDANA, Viskam; SUGIURA, Kikuya; WIJESEKERA, Daluthgamage Patsy H.; HATOYA, Shingo; NISHIMURA, Toshiya; KANEGI, Ryoji; USHIGUSA, Takahiro; INABA, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of the Cephalothorax and Eyestalk in Penaeus Monodon during Ovarian Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Philip; Elizur, Abigail; Williams, Richard; Cummins, Scott F.; Knibb, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    In crustaceans, a range of physiological processes involved in ovarian maturation occurs in organs of the cephalothorax including the hepatopancrease, mandibular and Y-organ. Additionally, reproduction is regulated by neuropeptide hormones and other proteins released from secretory sites within the eyestalk. Reproductive dysfunction in captive-reared prawns, Penaeus monodon, is believed to be due to deficiencies in these factors. In this study, we investigated the expression of gene transcripts in the cephalothorax and eyestalk from wild-caught and captive-reared animals throughout ovarian maturation using custom oligonucleotide microarray screening. We have isolated numerous transcripts that appear to be differentially expressed throughout ovarian maturation and between wild-caught and captive-reared animals. In the cephalothorax, differentially expressed genes included the 1,3-β-D-glucan-binding high-density lipoprotein, 2/3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase and vitellogenin. In the eyestalk, these include gene transcripts that encode a protein that modulates G-protein coupled receptor activity and another that encodes an architectural transcription factor. Each may regulate the expression of reproductive neuropeptides, such as the crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone and molt-inhibiting hormone. We could not identify differentially expressed transcripts encoding known reproductive neuropeptides in the eyestalk of either wild-caught or captive-reared prawns at any ovarian maturation stage, however, this result may be attributed to low relative expression levels of these transcripts. In summary, this study provides a foundation for the study of target genes involved in regulating penaeid reproduction. PMID:22355268

  18. Transcriptome landmarks of the functional maturity of rat beta-cells, from lactation to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Larqué, Carlos; Velasco, Myrian; Barajas-Olmos, Francisco; García-Delgado, Neyvis; Chávez-Maldonado, Juan Pablo; García-Morales, Jazmín; Orozco, Lorena; Hiriart, Marcia

    2016-07-01

    Research on the postnatal development of pancreatic beta-cells has become an important subject in recent years. Understanding the mechanisms that govern beta-cell postnatal maturation could bring new opportunities to therapeutic approaches for diabetes. The weaning period consists of a critical postnatal window for structural and physiologic maturation of rat beta-cells. To investigate transcriptome changes involved in the maturation of beta-cells neighboring this period, we performed microarray analysis in fluorescence-activated cell-sorted (FACS) beta-cell-enriched populations. Our results showed a variety of gene sets including those involved in the integration of metabolism, modulation of electrical activity, and regulation of the cell cycle that play important roles in the maturation process. These observations were validated using reverse hemolytic plaque assay, electrophysiological recordings, and flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, we suggest some unexplored pathways such as sphingolipid metabolism, insulin-vesicle trafficking, regulation of transcription/transduction by miRNA-30, trafficking proteins, and cell cycle proteins that could play important roles in the process mentioned above for further investigation. PMID:27220619

  19. Mechanisms of intracellular calcium homeostasis in developing and mature bovine corpora lutea.

    PubMed

    Wright, Marietta F; Bowdridge, Elizabeth; McDermott, Erica L; Richardson, Samuel; Scheidler, James; Syed, Qaisar; Bush, Taylor; Inskeep, E Keith; Flores, Jorge A

    2014-03-01

    Although calcium (Ca(2+)) is accepted as an intracellular mediator of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2alpha) actions on luteal cells, studies defining mechanisms of Ca(2+) homeostasis in bovine corpora lutea (CL) are lacking. The increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) induced by PGF2alpha in steroidogenic cells from mature CL is greater than in those isolated from developing CL. Our hypothesis is that differences in signal transduction associated with developing and mature CL contribute to the increased efficacy of PGF2alpha to induce a Ca(2+) signal capable of inducing regression in mature CL. To test this hypothesis, major genes participating in Ca(2+) homeostasis in the bovine CL were identified, and expression of mRNA, protein, or activity, in the case of phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta), in developing and mature bovine CL was compared. In addition, we examined the contribution of external and internal Ca(2+) to the PGF2alpha stimulated rise in [Ca(2+)]i in LLCs isolated from developing and mature bovine CL. Three differences were identified in mechanisms of calcium homeostasis between developing and mature CL, which could account for the lesser increase in [Ca(2+)]i in response to PGF2alpha in developing than in mature CL. First, there were lower concentrations of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) after similar PGF2alpha challenge, indicating reduced phospholipase C beta (PLCbeta) activity, in developing than mature CL. Second, there was an increased expression of sorcin (SRI) in developing than in mature CL. This cytoplasmic Ca(2+) binding protein modulates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) release channel, ryanodine receptor (RyR), to be in the closed configuration. Third, there was greater expression of ATP2A2 or SERCA, which causes calcium reuptake into the ER, in developing than in mature CL. Developmental differences in expression detected in whole CL were confirmed by Western blots using protein samples from steroidogenic cells

  20. Career Maturity Determinants: Individual Development, Social Context, and Historical Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

    1998-01-01

    Compares adolescents from East Germany who experienced an educational system offering little choice with adolescents from West Germany who experienced more leeway to investigate career maturity. East German adolescents reported more career maturity. Person-related variables predicted career maturity in both groups; family and peer context were…

  1. Using the Reading Maturity Survey in Teacher Education Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theiss, Deb; Philbrick, Anita; Jarman, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    This study surveyed pre-service teachers to determine their reading maturity using The Reading Maturity Survey (Thomas, 2001). Results indicate that pre-service teachers self-report high levels of confidence in their reading maturity with the exception of two areas that may relate to developing skills in critical reflection and transformational…

  2. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  3. Military Service and Self-Perceived Maturation among Israeli Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dar, Yechezkel; Kimhi, Shaul

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed self-perceived maturation associated with service in the Israeli army according to gender, rank, service trajectory (unit or role), and the socialization environment of the individual (urban or kibbutz). Results for 633 subjects suggest that army service contributes to the maturation of Israeli youth, and maturation is moderately affected…

  4. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  5. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  6. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  7. 7 CFR 1427.174 - Maturity of seed cotton loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maturity of seed cotton loans. 1427.174 Section 1427..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.174 Maturity of seed cotton loans. Seed cotton loans mature on demand by CCC but no later than May 31...

  8. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Firefly II pump module is NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's commercial offshoot of a NASA/US Coast Guard program involving development of a lightweight, helicopter-transportable firefighting module for a quick response in combating shipboard or harbor fires. Operable on land or water, the Amphib One is equipped with 3 water cannons. When all 3 are operating, unit pumps more than 3,000 gallons a minute. Newly developed model used by U.S. Coast Guard can pump 5,000 gallons per minute. It was designed for applications such as firefighting onboard ship fires, emergency dockside water pumping, dewatering ships in danger of sinking, flood control, and emergency water supply at remote locations.

  9. Performance, growth, and maturity of Nellore bulls.

    PubMed

    Costa e Silva, Luiz Fernando; Valadares Filho, Sebastião de Campos; Detmann, Edenio; Rotta, Polyana Pizzi; Zanetti, Diego; Villadiego, Faider Alberto Castaño; Pellizzoni, Samantha Gusmão; Pereira, Rafael Moura Guimarães

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility, average daily gain (ADG), microbial efficiency, empty body weight (EBW) gain, and body composition of Nellore bulls. Additionally, Nellore bull maturity was estimated, and the prediction equation for DMI, suggested by the Brazilian nutrient requirements system (BR CORTE; Azevêdo et al. 2010), was evaluated. Thirty-three Nellore bulls, with a mean initial weight of 259 ± 25 kg and age of 14 ± 1 months, were used in this study. Five animals were slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment (control group), and the remaining 28 were divided into 4 groups, each slaughtered at 42-day intervals. Their diet was composed of corn silage and concentrate (55:45). The power model was used to estimate muscle tissue, bone tissue, crude protein (CP), mineral matter (MM), and water present in the empty body, while the exponential model was used to estimate adipose tissue and ether extract (EE) present in the empty body. When expressed in kilograms per day, differences were observed (P < 0.05) only for the intake of EE and neutral detergent fiber as a function of feedlot time periods. Although there was a difference in relation to nutrient intake, it did not affect (P > 0.05) digestibility, with the exception of EE digestibility. The equation suggested by BR CORTE correctly estimates the DMI of Nellore bulls. ADG was not affected (P > 0.05) by time spent in the feedlot. No differences were observed (P > 0.05) for microbial efficiency; a mean value of 142 g microbial crude protein/kg total digestible nutrients was achieved. The muscle and bone tissues, CP, MM, and water present in the empty body increased as the animal grew, although at a lower rate. The adipose tissue and EE present in the empty body increased their deposition rate when the animal reached its mature weight. Maturity is defined as when an animal reaches 22 % EE in the empty body, which

  10. Meeting maturational needs in the group setting.

    PubMed

    Ormont, L R

    2001-07-01

    Many people who enter treatment with intrapsychic conflicts also bring with them developmental deficits. These deficits stem from early environmental failures: Parenting figures did not provide needed maturational input, creating a gap that leaves the child with developmental deficits in their personality. These, like intrapsychic conflicts, engender formidable resistances to progress in treatment. This article intends to show that group treatment is ideally suited to the task of filling in these emotional voids. To enable members to address the deficit of a co-member, the group leader systematically initiates and oversees five basic steps. PMID:11447784

  11. The Homo Energeticus: maturity, inheritance, identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Arthur

    2013-03-01

    In this letter, modern society’s intimate bond to the convenience and reliability of delivered energy services results in a form of identification I call the Homo Energeticus. The Homo Energeticus relies upon a mature system of services for achieving an equivalency of status and prestige that is historically similar to the morality of a noble class. I describe the uniqueness of this identity by its imperative for acquiring experience through an invisibility of energy expenditures. In this way, the Homo Energeticus cultivates a highly individualized life whose ambience of perfection, while created personally, is only successful insofar as it conceals energy expenditures in labor and supply.

  12. Distinct Domains of the GATA-1 Cofactor FOG-1 Differentially Influence Erythroid versus Megakaryocytic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Alan B.; Katz, Samuel G.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2002-01-01

    FOG family zinc finger proteins play essential roles in development through physical interaction with GATA factors. FOG-1, like its interacting partner GATA-1, is required for normal differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic cells. Here, we have developed a functional assay for FOG-1 based on its ability to rescue erythroid and megakaryocytic maturation of a genetically engineered FOG-1−/− cell line. We demonstrate that interaction through only one of FOG-1's four GATA-binding zinc fingers is sufficient for rescue, providing evidence against a model in which FOG-1 acts to bridge multiple GATA-binding DNA elements. Importantly, we find that distinct regions of FOG-1 differentially influence erythroid versus megakaryocyte maturation. As such, we propose that FOG-1 may modulate the fate of a bipotential erythroid/megakaryocytic precursor cell. PMID:12024038

  13. Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) in T cell differentiation, maturation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Douglas C.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines are key modulators of T cell biology but their influence can be attenuated by suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS), a family of proteins comprised of eight members, SOCS1-7 and CIS. SOCS proteins regulate cytokine signals that control the polarization of CD4+ T cells into Th1, Th2, Th17, and T regulatory cell lineages, the maturation of CD8+ T cells from naïve to “stem-cell memory” (Tscm), central memory (Tcm), and effector memory (Tem) states, and the activation of these lymphocytes. Understanding how SOCS family members regulate T cell maturation, differentiation and function might prove critical in improving adoptive immunotherapy for cancer and therapies aimed at treating autoimmune and infectious diseases. PMID:19879803

  14. Thermoelectric module

    DOEpatents

    Kortier, William E.; Mueller, John J.; Eggers, Philip E.

    1980-07-08

    A thermoelectric module containing lead telluride as the thermoelectric mrial is encapsulated as tightly as possible in a stainless steel canister to provide minimum void volume in the canister. The lead telluride thermoelectric elements are pressure-contacted to a tungsten hot strap and metallurgically bonded at the cold junction to iron shoes with a barrier layer of tin telluride between the iron shoe and the p-type lead telluride element.

  15. Validation of the Psychological Work Maturity Scale in Chinese employees.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jiajin; Wang, Lei

    2010-12-01

    Psychological work maturity is an important concept in situational leadership theory. The present research revised the Psychological Work Maturity Scale for use in Chinese organizations. Three samples of full-time employees (Ns = 205, 266, and 283) from different companies and industries participated in the present study. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that a single-factor structure fit the data. The scale had acceptable reliabilities, convergent and criterion-related validities, and was shown to be an appropriate measure of psychological work maturity in Chinese employees. Maturity differences in several demographic variables were not found, but employees with longer tenure in Sample 2 scored higher on maturity, which shows that psychological work maturity may be dependent on personal development in the interaction with the varying situational factors, especially in the work domain. Implications for research and practice on psychological work maturity in China are discussed. PMID:21323139

  16. Alternative functions for the multifarious inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Martel, Jan; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Ko, Yun-Fei; Young, John D; Ojcius, David M

    2016-06-01

    The inflammasome has been mainly studied in innate immune cells in which it senses microbes and cellular damage, and induces secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This process induces an inflammatory response that is critical for the resolution of infections and repair of tissue damage following injury. Recent studies indicate that inflammasome complex formation also participates in many other cellular and physiological processes beyond modulation of inflammation, such as autophagy, metabolism, eicosanoids production, and phagosome maturation. PMID:27621119

  17. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  18. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  19. Electrophysiologic analysis of regional cortical maturation.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, H G

    1975-10-01

    Some issues in the study of human neurobehavioral development are briefly set forth. Attention is called to the limitations of strictly structural and behavioral approaches. The value of correlative morphophysiological and psychophysiological investigations is emphasized. By averaging brain activity with respect to stimuli and motor responses, event-related cortical potentials (ERP) can be reliably detected in the scalp EEG. Longitudinal topographic studies of ERP permit the definition of a sequence of regional cortical maturation during infancy and childhood. We have found that evoked potentials in the three major sensory modalities arise from both primary and secondary projection areas by 30 weeks of conceptional age. Frontocentral responses appear shortly thereafter. Thus, cortical mechanisms show a precocious development of electrogenesis which indicates the possibility for an early environmental impact on brain maturation. In contrast to the evoked potentials, association cortex potentials (ACP) do not seem to appear until early childhood. The behavioral significance of these neuroelectric phenomena is being sought in studies employing techniques which permit the concurrent recording of brain activity and behavioral responses in the waking infant and child. Some of the problems confronting the application of these methods to studies of infants are outlined. PMID:1203402

  20. New alignment marks for improved measurement maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidenmueller, U.; Alves, H.; Schnabel, B.; Icard, B.; Pain, L.; Le Denmat, J.-C.; Manakli, S.; Pradelles, J.

    2008-04-01

    With shrinking dimensions in the semiconductor industry the lithographic demands are exceeding the parameters of the standard optical lithography. Electron beam direct write (EBDW) presents a good solution to overcome these limits and to successfully use this technology in R&D as well as in prototyping and some niche applications. For the industrial application of EBDW an alignment strategy adapted to the industrial standards is required to be compatible with optical lithography. In this context the crucial factor is the overlay performance, i.e. the maturity of the alignment strategy under different process conditions. New alignment marks improve the alignment repeatability and increase the window of the signal-to-noise ratio towards smaller or noisier signals. Particularly the latter has proved to be a major contribution to a higher maturity of the alignment. A comparison between the double cross and the new Barker mark type is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the mark reading repeatability and the final overlay results achieved are discussed.

  1. Pitch perception prior to cortical maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Bonnie K.

    Pitch perception plays an important role in many complex auditory tasks including speech perception, music perception, and sound source segregation. Because of the protracted and extensive development of the human auditory cortex, pitch perception might be expected to mature, at least over the first few months of life. This dissertation investigates complex pitch perception in 3-month-olds, 7-month-olds and adults -- time points when the organization of the auditory pathway is distinctly different. Using an observer-based psychophysical procedure, a series of four studies were conducted to determine whether infants (1) discriminate the pitch of harmonic complex tones, (2) discriminate the pitch of unresolved harmonics, (3) discriminate the pitch of missing fundamental melodies, and (4) have comparable sensitivity to pitch and spectral changes as adult listeners. The stimuli used in these studies were harmonic complex tones, with energy missing at the fundamental frequency. Infants at both three and seven months of age discriminated the pitch of missing fundamental complexes composed of resolved and unresolved harmonics as well as missing fundamental melodies, demonstrating perception of complex pitch by three months of age. More surprisingly, infants in both age groups had lower pitch and spectral discrimination thresholds than adult listeners. Furthermore, no differences in performance on any of the tasks presented were observed between infants at three and seven months of age. These results suggest that subcortical processing is not only sufficient to support pitch perception prior to cortical maturation, but provides adult-like sensitivity to pitch by three months.

  2. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  3. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2013-08-27

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame, The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  4. Requirements for Ion and Solute Transport, and pH Regulation During Enamel Maturation

    PubMed Central

    LACRUZ, RODRIGO S.; SMITH, CHARLES E.; MOFFATT, PIERRE; CHANG, EUGENE H.; BROMAGE, TIMOTHY G.; BRINGAS, PABLO; NANCI, ANTONIO; BANIWAL, SANJEEV K.; ZABNER, JOSEPH; WELSH, MICHAEL J.; KURTZ, IRA; PAINE, MICHAEL L.

    2012-01-01

    Transcellular bicarbonate transport is suspected to be an important pathway used by ameloblasts to regulate extracellular pH and support crystal growth during enamel maturation. Proteins that play a role in amelogenesis include members of the ABC transporters (SLC gene family and CFTR). A number of carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have also been identified. The defined functions of these genes are likely interlinked during enamel mineralization. The purpose of this study is to quantify relative mRNA levels of individual SLC, Cftr, and CAs in enamel cells obtained from secretory and maturation stages on rat incisors. We also present novel data on the enamel phenotypes for two animal models, amutant porcine(CFTR-ΔF508) and the NBCe1-null mouse.Our data show that two SLCs(AE2 and NBCe1),Cftr,and Car2, Car3,Car6,and Car12 are all significantly up-regulated at the onset of the maturation stage of amelogenesis when compared to the secretory stage. The remaining SLCs and CA gene transcripts showed negligible expression or no significant change in expression from secretory to maturation stages. The enamel of Cftr-ΔF508 adult pigs was hypomineralized and showed abnormal crystal growth. NBCe1-null mice enamel was structurally defective and had a marked decrease in mineral content relative to wild-type. These data demonstrate the importance of many non-matrix proteins to amelogenesis and that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating extracellular pH are modulated during enamel maturation in response to an increased need for pH buffering during hydroxyapatite crystal growth. PMID:21732355

  5. Requirements for ion and solute transport, and pH regulation during enamel maturation.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Smith, Charles E; Moffatt, Pierre; Chang, Eugene H; Bromage, Timothy G; Bringas, Pablo; Nanci, Antonio; Baniwal, Sanjeev K; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J; Kurtz, Ira; Paine, Michael L

    2012-04-01

    Transcellular bicarbonate transport is suspected to be an important pathway used by ameloblasts to regulate extracellular pH and support crystal growth during enamel maturation. Proteins that play a role in amelogenesis include members of the ABC transporters (SLC gene family and CFTR). A number of carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have also been identified. The defined functions of these genes are likely interlinked during enamel mineralization. The purpose of this study is to quantify relative mRNA levels of individual SLC, Cftr, and CAs in enamel cells obtained from secretory and maturation stages on rat incisors. We also present novel data on the enamel phenotypes for two animal models, a mutant porcine (CFTR-ΔF508) and the NBCe1-null mouse. Our data show that two SLCs (AE2 and NBCe1), Cftr, and Car2, Car3, Car6, and Car12 are all significantly up-regulated at the onset of the maturation stage of amelogenesis when compared to the secretory stage. The remaining SLCs and CA gene transcripts showed negligible expression or no significant change in expression from secretory to maturation stages. The enamel of CFTR-ΔF508 adult pigs was hypomineralized and showed abnormal crystal growth. NBCe1-null mice enamel was structurally defective and had a marked decrease in mineral content relative to wild-type. These data demonstrate the importance of many non-matrix proteins to amelogenesis and that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating extracellular pH are modulated during enamel maturation in response to an increased need for pH buffering during hydroxyapatite crystal growth. PMID:21732355

  6. Allopregnanolone increases mature excitatory synapses along dendrites via protein kinase A signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Ishizuka, Y; Yamazaki, H; Shirao, T

    2015-10-01

    Allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one) is synthesized in both the periphery and central nervous system and is known to be a potent positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor. Because APα was suggested to improve the symptoms of depression and Alzheimer's disease (AD), which involve synaptic dysfunction and loss, we examined whether APα affects excitatory synapses. Drebrin, which is an actin-binding protein, forms a unique stable actin structure in dendritic spines, and drebrin levels correlate positively with cognitive levels in AD and mild cognitive impairment. We investigated whether APα increases excitatory synapse density along dendrites of mature hippocampal neurons using drebrin-imaging-based evaluation of mature synapses. We prepared primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and either transfected them with GFP or immunostained them against drebrin. Morphological analysis of GFP-transfected neurons revealed that a 24-h exposure to 0.3 or 1 μM APα significantly increased dendritic spine density without any morphological changes to spines. Drebrin cluster density was also increased by 0.3 and 1 μM APα. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 inhibited the APα-induced increase in drebrin cluster density. These data demonstrate that APα increases mature excitatory synapses via activation of PKA. Therefore, the PKA-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling pathway is likely to be involved in the APα-induced increase of mature excitatory synapses. Another possibility is that the PKA-dependent increase in AMPA receptors at dendritic spines mediates the APα function. In conclusion, our study indicates that APα may improve neuropsychiatric disorder outcomes via increasing the numbers of mature excitatory synapses. PMID:26241343

  7. Mannosylated Lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Paratuberculosis Alters the Inflammatory Response by Bovine Macrophages and Suppresses Killing of Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Avium Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Cleverson; Davis, William C.; Eckstein, Torsten M.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Weiss, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the mechanisms through which pathogenic mycobacteria interfere with macrophage activation and phagosome maturation have shown that engagement of specific membrane receptors with bacterial ligands is the initiating event. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (Man-LAM) has been identified as one of the ligands that modulates macrophage function. We evaluated the effects of Man-LAM derived from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) on bovine macrophages. Man-LAM induced a rapid and prolonged expression of IL-10 message as well as transient expression of TNF-α. Preincubation with Man-LAM for up to 16 h did not suppress expression of IL-12 in response to interferon-γ. Evaluation of the effect of Man-LAM on phagosome acidification, phagosome maturation, and killing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) showed that preincubation of macrophages with Man-LAM before addition of MAA inhibited phagosome acidification, phagolysosome fusion, and reduced killing. Analysis of signaling pathways provided indirect evidence that inhibition of killing was associated with activation of the MAPK-p38 signaling pathway but not the pathway involved in regulation of expression of IL-10. These results support the hypothesis that MAP Man-LAM is one of the virulence factors facilitating survival of MAP in macrophages. PMID:24098744

  8. Effect of thrombin on maturing human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, E. M.; Massé, J. M.; Caen, J. P.; Garcia, I.; Breton-Gorius, J.; Debili, N.; Vainchenker, W.

    1993-01-01

    Thrombin causes platelet activation and secretion. In some nucleated cells, it is mitogenic. In this study, we have investigated how human megakaryocytes (MKs) respond to this agonist and whether the response depends on the maturation stage. MKs were cultured from bone marrow precursors in liquid culture in the presence of normal plasma. To determine whether thrombin can activate MKs, 14-day MK cultures were incubated with thrombin for 5 minutes, and cells were studied by electron microscopy, either by standard techniques or after embedding in glycol-methacrylate for immunoelectron microscopy. Ultrastructural examination of thrombin-treated MKs revealed dramatic morphological changes reminiscent of those found in platelets, including shape change and organelle centralization that involved immature as well as mature cells. MKs were also able to secrete alpha-granule proteins in the dilated cisternae of the demarcation membrane system, as shown by immunogold staining for thrombospondin and glycoprotein Ib. These changes were rapid (less than 5 minutes) but despite them, MKs remained viable for more than 24 hours. To determine whether thrombin has a mitogenic activity, it was added to the culture of MKs from day 3 to day 10 of culture at concentrations varying from 0.1 to 10 U/ml. Cells were subsequently studied by a double staining technique using flow cytometry to determine MK number and ploidy. No changes were observed in these two parameters, showing that thrombin is not mitogenic for MKs at the concentrations used. In conclusion, this study confirms for human MKs previous observations made about guinea pig MKs (Fedorko et al, Lab Invest 1977, 36:32). In addition, it demonstrates that immature MKs are able to respond to thrombin and that more mature cells can secrete alpha-granule proteins into the demarcation membrane system, which is in continuity with the extracellular space. This phenomenon may have implications for pathological states such as myelofibrosis

  9. Moving Toward Quantifying Reliability - The Next Step in a Rapidly Maturing PV Industry: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah; Sample, Tony; Wohlgemuth, John; Zhou, Wei; Bosco, Nick; Althaus, Joerg; Phillips, Nancy; Deceglie, Michael; Flueckiger, Chris; Hacke, Peter; Miller, David; Kempe, Michael; Yamamichi, Masaaki; Kondo, Michio

    2015-12-07

    Some may say that PV modules are moving toward being a simple commodity, but most major PV customers ask: 'How can I minimize chances of a module recall?' Or, 'How can I quantify the added value of a 'premium' module?' Or, 'How can I assess the value of an old PV system that I'm thinking of purchasing?' These are all questions that PVQAT (the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force) and partner organizations are working to answer. Defining standard methods for ensuring minimal acceptable quality of PV modules, differentiating modules that provide added value in the toughest of environments, and creating a process (e.g. through IECRE [1]) that can follow a PV system from design through installation and operation are tough tasks, but having standard approaches for these will increase confidence, reduce costs, and be a critical foundation of a mature PV industry. This paper summarizes current needs for new tests, some challenges for defining those tests, and some of the key efforts toward development of international standards, emphasizing that meaningful quantification of reliability (as in defining a service life prediction) must be done in the context of a specific product with design parameters defined through a quality management system.

  10. Moving Toward Quantifying Reliability - The Next Step in a Rapidly Maturing PV Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Sarah; Sample, Tony; Wohlgemuth, John; Zhou, Wei; Bosco, Nick; Althaus, Joerg; Phillips, Nancy; Deceglie, Michael; Flueckiger, Chris; Hacke, Peter; Miller, David; Kempe, Michael; Yamamichi, Masaaki; Kondo, Michio

    2015-06-14

    Some may say that PV modules are moving toward being a simple commodity, but most major PV customers ask: 'How can I minimize chances of a module recall?' Or, 'How can I quantify the added value of a 'premium' module?' Or, 'How can I assess the value of an old PV system that I'm thinking of purchasing?' These are all questions that PVQAT (the International PV Quality Assurance Task Force) and partner organizations are working to answer. Defining standard methods for ensuring minimal acceptable quality of PV modules, differentiating modules that provide added value in the toughest of environments, and creating a process (e.g. through IECRE [1]) that can follow a PV system from design through installation and operation are tough tasks, but having standard approaches for these will increase confidence, reduce costs, and be a critical foundation of a mature PV industry. This paper summarizes current needs for new tests, some challenges for defining those tests, and some of the key efforts toward development of international standards, emphasizing that meaningful quantification of reliability (as in defining a service life prediction) must be done in the context of a specific product with design parameters defined through a quality management system.

  11. Mononuclear phagocyte proliferation, maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Territo, M C; Cline, M J

    1975-10-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system is a continuum of cells beginning with the bone marrow monoblast and promonocyte, through the monocyte to the larger tissue macrophages and multinucleate giant cells. This system of cells is widely distributed throughout the body in the blood and bone marrow; the pleural, peritoneal, and alveolar spaces; the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and other parenchymal organs. The activity and composition of the cell varies with the level of maturation, changes in cellular environment, and with various cellular activities. The monocyte-macrophage group of cells plays an active role in defense reactions against certain microorganisms, and in the removal of dying cells and cell debris. They are an integral part of both the inductive phase of the immune response, and of cell-mediated immune reactions. In addition, they probably play a role in the defence against spontaneously arising tumours, in the control of granulopoiesis, and possibly in erythropoiesis. PMID:53114

  12. PERSISTENT WRIST PAIN IN A MATURE GOLFER

    PubMed Central

    Hazle, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Clients presenting with ulnar-sided wrist pain can provide diagnostic and management challenges for physical therapists. Symptoms in this region may originate from multiple structures. Integration of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging results is often required for optimal decision-making and patient management. To obtain the most informative imaging results, practitioners need an understanding of injury patterns and their detection by various imaging modalities. This case describes a mature golfer who presented with persistent ulnar-sided wrist pain and was eventually determined to have a fracture of the hook of the hamate accompanied by neighboring soft tissue involvement also contributing to his symptom complex. His history and the diagnostic process are detailed along with a brief discussion of his subsequent management post-operatively. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:22893862

  13. Exploration maturity key to ranking search areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The study area of US Geological Survey Circular 1288, the world outside the US and Canada, was partitioned into 44 countries and country groups. Map figures such as Fig. 2 and graphs similar to Figs. 3 and 4 provide a visual summary of maturity of oil and gas exploration. From 1992 through 2001, exploration data show that in the study area the delineated prospective area expanded at a rate of about 50,000 sq miles/year, while the explored area grew at a rate of 11,000 sq miles/year. The delineated prospective area established by 1970 accounts for less than 40% of total delineated prospective area but contains 75% of the oil discovered to date in the study area. From 1991 through 2000, offshore discoveries accounted for 59% of the oil and 77% of the gas discovered in the study area.

  14. Development and maturation of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Theresa L; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that are critical for host protection against pathogens and cancer due to their ability to rapidly release inflammatory cytokines and kill infected or transformed cells. In the 40 years since their initial discovery, much has been learned about how this important cellular lineage develops and functions. We now know that NK cells are the founding members of an expanded family of lymphocyte known as innate lymphoid cells (ILC). Furthermore, we have recently discovered that NK cells can possess features of adaptive immunity such as antigen specificity and long-lived memory responses. Here we will review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving development of NK cells from the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP) to mature NK cells, and from activated effectors to long-lived memory NK cells. PMID:26845614

  15. Thermal Maturation of Gas Shale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sylvain; Horsfield, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Shale gas systems serve as sources, reservoirs, and seals for unconventional natural gas accumulations. These reservoirs bring numerous challenges to geologists and petroleum engineers in reservoir characterization, most notably because of their heterogeneous character due to depositional and diagenetic processes but also because of their constituent rocks' fine-grained nature and small pore size -- much smaller than in conventional sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. Significant advances have recently been achieved in unraveling the gaseous hydrocarbon generation and retention processes that occur within these complex systems. In addition, cutting-edge characterization technologies have allowed precise documentation of the spatial variability in chemistry and structure of thermally mature organic-rich shales at the submicrometer scale, revealing the presence of geochemical heterogeneities within overmature gas shale samples and, notably, the presence of nanoporous pyrobitumen. Such research advances will undoubtedly lead to improved performance, producibility, and modeling of such strategic resources at the reservoir scale.

  16. Tyro3 Modulates Mertk-Associated Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vollrath, Douglas; Yasumura, Douglas; Benchorin, Gillie; Matthes, Michael T.; Feng, Wei; Nguyen, Natalie M.; Sedano, Cecilia D.; Calton, Melissa A.; LaVail, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited photoreceptor degenerations (IPDs) are the most genetically heterogeneous of Mendelian diseases. Many IPDs exhibit substantial phenotypic variability, but the basis is usually unknown. Mutations in MERTK cause recessive IPD phenotypes associated with the RP38 locus. We have identified a murine genetic modifier of Mertk-associated photoreceptor degeneration, the C57BL/6 (B6) allele of which acts as a suppressor. Photoreceptors degenerate rapidly in Mertk-deficient animals homozygous for the 129P2/Ola (129) modifier allele, whereas animals heterozygous for B6 and 129 modifier alleles exhibit an unusual intermixing of degenerating and preserved retinal regions, with females more severely affected than males. Mertk-deficient mice homozygous for the B6 modifier allele display degeneration only in the far periphery, even at 8 months of age, and have improved retinal function compared to animals homozygous for the 129 allele. We genetically mapped the modifier to an approximately 2-megabase critical interval that includes Tyro3, a paralog of Mertk. Tyro3 expression in the outer retina varies with modifier genotype in a manner characteristic of a cis-acting expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL), with the B6 allele conferring an approximately three-fold higher expression level. Loss of Tyro3 function accelerates the pace of photoreceptor degeneration in Mertk knockout mice, and TYRO3 protein is more abundant in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) adjacent to preserved central retinal regions of Mertk knockout mice homozygous for the B6 modifier allele. Endogenous human TYRO3 protein co-localizes with nascent photoreceptor outer segment (POS) phagosomes in a primary RPE cell culture assay, and expression of murine Tyro3 in cultured cells stimulates phagocytic ingestion of POS. Our findings demonstrate that Tyro3 gene dosage modulates Mertk-associated retinal degeneration, provide strong evidence for a direct role for TYRO3 in RPE phagocytosis, and suggest

  17. Healthcare quality maturity assessment model based on quality drivers.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Nadia; Arafeh, Mazen

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Healthcare providers differ in their readiness and maturity levels regarding quality and quality management systems applications. The purpose of this paper is to serve as a useful quantitative quality maturity-level assessment tool for healthcare organizations. Design/methodology/approach - The model proposes five quality maturity levels (chaotic, primitive, structured, mature and proficient) based on six quality drivers: top management, people, operations, culture, quality focus and accreditation. Findings - Healthcare managers can apply the model to identify the status quo, quality shortcomings and evaluating ongoing progress. Practical implications - The model has been incorporated in an interactive Excel worksheet that visually displays the quality maturity-level risk meter. The tool has been applied successfully to local hospitals. Originality/value - The proposed six quality driver scales appear to measure healthcare provider maturity levels on a single quality meter. PMID:27120510

  18. Strawberry Maturity Neural Network Detectng System Based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liming

    The quick and non-detective detection of agriculture product is one of the measures to increase the precision and productivity of harvesting and grading. Having analyzed H frequency of different maturities in different light intensities, the results show that H frequency for the same maturity has little influence in different light intensities; Under the same light intensity, three strawberry maturities are changing in order. After having confirmed the H frequency section to distinguish the different strawberry maturity, the triplelayer feed-forward neural network system to detect strawberry maturity was designed by using genetic algorithm. The test results show that the detecting precision ratio is 91.7%, it takes 160ms to distinguish one strawberry. Therefore, the online non-detective detecting the strawberry maturity could be realized.

  19. Successful Surgical Treatment of Mature Teratoma Arising From the Sella

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaxiong; Zhang, Yuekang; Xu, Jianguo; Chen, Ni

    2015-01-01

    Mature teratoma of the pituitary-hypothalamic region is rarely reported in the literature. In this article, we present a 13-year-old girl with clinical and radiological findings that were initially considered as germinoma. However, histological examinations disclosed a mature teratoma. This case highlights that the radiation-induced cerebral edema caused acute hydrocephalus. The mature teratoma is not radiosensitive, and the most appropriate treatment is direct surgery. PMID:25436031

  20. Relationship between DNA content and nuclear morphology of mature granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Berger, J; Kotelnikov, V M; Kozinec, G I

    1986-01-01

    Increased nuclear segmentation was experimentally induced in rat mature granulocytes. Some mature hypersegmented granulocytes were tetraploid, other hypersegmented granulocytes were diploid. The phenomenon of the formation of tetraploid mature granulocytes has not been observed till the present time. Our data suggest that the increase in nuclear segmentation of granulocytes can be stimulated by elevated DNA content, but the process of nuclear lobe formation is not dependent on cellular content of DNA. PMID:3803627

  1. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; Gilbert, Jack A; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipid catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. The results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality. PMID:26911915

  2. Metatranscriptomics reveals temperature-driven functional changes in microbiome impacting cheese maturation rate

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Francesca; Genovese, Alessandro; Ferranti, Pasquale; Gilbert, Jack A.; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Traditional cheeses harbour complex microbial consortia that play an important role in shaping typical sensorial properties. However, the microbial metabolism is considered difficult to control. Microbial community succession and the related gene expression were analysed during ripening of a traditional Italian cheese, identifying parameters that could be modified to accelerate ripening. Afterwards, we modulated ripening conditions and observed consistent changes in microbial community structure and function. We provide concrete evidence of the essential contribution of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in ripening-related activities. An increase in the ripening temperature promoted the expression of genes related to proteolysis, lipolysis and amino acid/lipid catabolism and significantly increases the cheese maturation rate. Moreover, temperature-promoted microbial metabolisms were consistent with the metabolomic profiles of proteins and volatile organic compounds in the cheese. The results clearly indicate how processing-driven microbiome responses can be modulated in order to optimize production efficiency and product quality. PMID:26911915

  3. Canonical NF-κB signaling is uniquely required for the long-term persistence of functional mature B cells.

    PubMed

    Derudder, Emmanuel; Herzog, Sebastian; Labi, Verena; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Köchert, Karl; Janz, Martin; Villunger, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Although canonical NF-κB signaling is crucial to generate a normal mature B-cell compartment, its role in the persistence of resting mature B cells is controversial. To resolve this conflict, we ablated NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) and IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), two essential mediators of the canonical pathway, either early on in B-cell development or specifically in mature B cells. Early ablation severely inhibited the generation of all mature B-cell subsets, but follicular B-cell numbers could be largely rescued by ectopic expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), despite a persisting block at the transitional stage. Marginal zone (MZ) B and B1 cells were not rescued, indicating a possible role of canonical NF-κB signals beyond the control of cell survival in these subsets. When canonical NF-κB signaling was ablated specifically in mature B cells, the differentiation and/or persistence of MZ B cells was still abrogated, but follicular B-cell numbers were only mildly affected. However, the mutant cells exhibited increased turnover as well as functional deficiencies upon activation, suggesting that canonical NF-κB signals contribute to their long-term persistence and functional fitness. PMID:27099294

  4. Ovarian follicle maturation and ovulation: An integrated perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Thomas, P.; Yoshizaki, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies with teleosts have addressed the regulation and mechanisms of oocyte maturation, but largely at the exclusion of ovulation. A smaller but still considerable number of studies have focused on ovulation, and ignored maturation. Consequently, little is known about the mechanistic linkages between these two events. New information is presented here indicating that luteinizing hormone regulates the acquisition not only of oocyte maturational competence, but also ovulatory competence. The thesis is presented that maturation and ovulation are closely integrated and overlapping events that are best viewed conceptually and experimentally as parts of a functional whole. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  5. Report to the administrator by the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel on the Skylab program. Volume 2: Program implementation and maturity. [systems management evaluation and design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results of the design and manufacturing reviews on the maturity of the Skylab modules are presented along with results of investigations on the scope of the cluster risk assessment efforts. The technical management system and its capability to assess and resolve problems are studied.

  6. Balloon-assisted maturation for arteriovenous fistula maturation failure: an early period experience

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Cheol; Ko, Seung Yeon; Kim, Ji Il; Moon, In Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Balloon-assisted maturation (BAM) is emerging as a salvage management for arteriovenous fistula maturation failure (AVF MF). However, BAM is a relatively new, yet controversial technique for AVF maturation. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of BAM for AVF MF. Methods Between January 2012 and December 2014, 249 AVFs were created. The total MF rate was 24.8%. But, only 110 AVFs were enrolled, including 74 brachiocephalic (BC) AVFs and 36 radiocephalic (RC) AVFs. The follow-up period was 12 months. Among those, there were 42 MFs (22 BC AVFs and 20 RC AVFs) and 68 maturation successes (MS) (52 BC AVFs and 16 RC AVFs). BAM was involved in MF group. We compared the clinical characteristics, AVF flows, and AVF flow ratios of MF and MS groups. Also, we evaluated the etiology, management, and result of MF. Results There was no difference in clinical characteristics between MF and MS groups. In MF group, 39 balloon angioplasties (BAs) for 42 AVF MFs were performed. Number of BA was 1.45 ± 0.57 and duration of BA was 21.30 ± 21.24 weeks. BAM rate was 46.2%. For 1 year after AVF creation, AVF flows of MS group were significantly larger than those of MF group (P < 0.05) but there was no difference in AVF flow ratio between MF and MS groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion BA for AVF MF is a relatively applicable and effective modality. Although a large volume study is necessary, we suggest BAM is an effective salvage management for AVF MF. PMID:27186572

  7. The role of androgens in follicle maturation and ovulation induction: friend or foe of infertility treatment?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of androgens on follicle maturation have been controversial for some time. Here, we review the potential of their applications in improving human ovulation induction, based on human and animal data, reported in the literature. Methods We reviewed the published literature for the years 2005-2011, using relevant key words, in PubMed, Medline and Cochrane reviews, and then performed secondary reviews of referenced articles, which previously had not been known or preceded the searched time period. A total of 217 publications were reviewed. Results Contrary to widely held opinion, recent data, mostly developed in the mouse, convincingly demonstrate essential contribution of androgens to normal follicle maturation and, therefore, female fertility. Androgens appear most engaged at preantral and antral stages, primarily affect granulosa cells, and exert effects via androgen receptors (AR) through transcriptional regulation but also in non-genomic ways, with ligand-activated AR modulating follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) activity in granulosa cells. While some androgens, like testosterone (T) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), appear effective in improving functional ovarian reserve (FOR) in women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR), others may even exert opposite effects. Such differences in androgens may, at least partially, reflect different levels of agonism to AR. Discussion Selective androgens appear capable of improving early stages of folliculogenesis. They, therefore, may represent forerunners of a completely new class of ovulation-inducing medications, which, in contrast to gonadotropins, affect follicle maturation at much earlier stages. PMID:21849061

  8. Maturation of polarization and luminance contrast sensitivities in cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis).

    PubMed

    Cartron, Lelia; Dickel, Ludovic; Shashar, Nadav; Darmaillacq, Anne-Sophie

    2013-06-01

    Polarization sensitivity is a characteristic of the visual system of cephalopods. It has been well documented in adult cuttlefish, which use polarization sensitivity in a large range of tasks such as communication, orientation and predation. Because cuttlefish do not benefit from parental care, their visual system (including the ability to detect motion) must be efficient from hatching to enable them to detect prey or predators. We studied the maturation and functionality of polarization sensitivity in newly hatched cuttlefish. In a first experiment, we examined the response of juvenile cuttlefish from hatching to the age of 1 month towards a moving, vertically oriented grating (contrasting and polarized stripes) using an optomotor response apparatus. Cuttlefish showed differences in maturation of polarization versus luminance contrast motion detection. In a second experiment, we examined the involvement of polarization information in prey preference and detection in cuttlefish of the same age. Cuttlefish preferentially chose not to attack transparent prey whose polarization contrast had been removed with a depolarizing filter. Performances of prey detection based on luminance contrast improved with age. Polarization contrast can help cuttlefish detect transparent prey. Our results suggest that polarization is not a simple modulation of luminance information, but rather that it is processed as a distinct channel of visual information. Both luminance and polarization sensitivity are functional, though not fully matured, in newly hatched cuttlefish and seem to help in prey detection. PMID:23430993

  9. Physical fitness for the mature woman.

    PubMed

    Idiculla, A A; Goldberg, G

    1987-01-01

    postmenopausal phase of life. Every mature woman ought to carefully consider choosing to pursue an appropriate goal: active participation in a specific exercise program under medical supervision. The health care system should be fully responsive to the special needs of the mature woman, and the importance of providing programs of physical activity designed to address these needs should be recognized. For the postmenopausal woman, the advantages of achieving a state of physical fitness are many.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3543540

  10. Towards a Regolith Maturity Index for Howardites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Cartwright, J. A.; Herrin, J. S.; Johnson, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has just arrived at asteroid 4 Vesta, parent of the howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites [1], to begin a yearlong surface study from orbit [2]. As Dawn will view a debris-covered surface, understanding the formation and mixing processes for the debris layer will strongly aid surface data interpretations. Howardites are polymict breccias mainly composed of clasts derived from basaltic (eucritic) and orthopy-roxenitic (diogenitic) parent materials [3]. Some howardites are poorly reworked (fragmental howardites) whilst others have been extensively gardened in an active regolith (regolithic howardites) [4]. The latter may represent an ancient, well-mixed regolith, whilst the former may be from more recent ejecta deposits [4]. Due to environmental differences, regolith development on Vesta differs in detail from that on the Moon [4-6]. We have been developing petrological criteria to apply to howardite thin sections to determine their relative regolithic maturity, which we are fine-tuning with comparison to noble gas data [7, 8]. Whilst we previously emphasized the abundance of reworked clasts (fragmental and impact-melt breccia clasts), this is an imperfect criterion: one howardite with abundant re-worked clasts (EET 99408) shows no evidence of solar wind Ne (SW-Ne), yet, two of our alleged fragmental howardites have clear SW-Ne signatures (LEW 85313, MET 00423) [7, 8]. We are now investigating the diversity in minor and trace element contents of low-Ca pyroxene clasts in howardites as a measure of regolith grade, and will begin analyses of such grains within reworked clasts. Our hypothesis is that regolithic howardites (and the breccia clasts they contain) will show greater diversity because they sampled more diverse diogenitic plutons than fragmental howardites, which formed from ejecta from only a few impacts [e.g. 4]. Our initial LA-ICP-MS work showed ranges in trace element diversity in low-Ca pyroxenes (estimated from the standard

  11. Supported PV module assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  12. Pixel multichip module development at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Turqueti, M A; Cardoso, G; Andresen, J; Appel, J A; Christian, D C; Kwan, S W; Prosser, A; Uplegger, L

    2005-10-01

    At Fermilab, there is an ongoing pixel detector R&D effort for High Energy Physics with the objective of developing high performance vertex detectors suitable for the next generation of HEP experiments. The pixel module presented here is a direct result of work undertaken for the canceled BTeV experiment. It is a very mature piece of hardware, having many characteristics of high performance, low mass and radiation hardness driven by the requirements of the BTeV experiment. The detector presented in this paper consists of three basic devices; the readout integrated circuit (IC) FPIX2A [2][5], the pixel sensor (TESLA p-spray) [6] and the high density interconnect (HDI) flex circuit [1][3] that is capable of supporting eight readout ICs. The characterization of the pixel multichip module prototype as well as the baseline design of the eight chip pixel module and its capabilities are presented. These prototypes were characterized for threshold and noise dispersion. The bump-bonds of the pixel module were examined using an X-ray inspection system. Furthermore, the connectivity of the bump-bonds was tested using a radioactive source ({sup 90}Sr), while the absolute calibration of the modules was achieved using an X-ray source. This paper provides a view of the integration of the three components that together comprise the pixel multichip module.

  13. Phospholipid Scramblase 1 Modulates FcR-Mediated Phagocytosis in Differentiated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Herate, Cecile; Ramdani, Ghania; Grant, Nancy J.; Marion, Sabrina; Gasman, Stephane; Niedergang, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid Scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) was initially characterized as a type II transmembrane protein involved in bilayer movements of phospholipids across the plasma membrane leading to the cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine, but other cellular functions have been ascribed to this protein in signaling processes and in the nucleus. In the present study, expression and functions of PLSCR1 were explored in specialized phagocytic cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of PLSCR1 was found to be markedly increased in monocyte-derived macrophages compared to undifferentiated primary monocytes. Surprisingly, this 3-fold increase in PLSCR1 expression correlated with an apparent modification in the membrane topology of the protein at the cell surface of differentiated macrophages. While depletion of PLSCR1 in the monocytic THP-1 cell-line with specific shRNA did not inhibit the constitutive cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine observed in differentiated macrophages, a net increase in the FcR-mediated phagocytic activity was measured in PLSCR1-depleted THP-1 cells and in bone marrow-derived macrophages from PLSCR1 knock-out mice. Reciprocally, phagocytosis was down-regulated in cells overexpressing PLSCR1. Since endogenous PLSCR1 was recruited both in phagocytic cups and in phagosomes, our results reveal a specific role for induced PLSCR1 expression in the modulation of the phagocytic process in differentiated macrophages. PMID:26745724

  14. Maturation of steroid receptors: an example of functional cooperation among molecular chaperones and their associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimmins, S; MacRae, T H

    2000-04-01

    The selective modulation of transcription exerted by steroids depends upon recognition of signalling molecules by properly folded cytoplasmic receptors and their subsequent translocation into the nucleus. These events require a sequential and dynamic series of protein-protein interactions in order to fashion receptors that bind stably to steroids. Central to receptor maturation, therefore, are several molecular chaperones and their accessory proteins; Hsp70, Hsp40, and hip modulate the 3-dimensional conformation of steroid receptors, permitting reaction via hop with Hsp90, arguably the central protein in the process. Binding to Hsp90 leads to dissociation of some proteins from the receptor complex while others are recruited. Notably, p23 stabilizes receptors in a steroid binding state, and the immunophilins, principally CyP40 and Hsp56, arrive late in receptor complex assembly. In this review, the functions of molecular chaperones during steroid receptor maturation are explored, leading to a general mechanistic model indicative of chaperone cooperation in protein folding. PMID:11147968

  15. Stretched Lens Array Squarerigger (SLASR) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A.J.; Howell, Joe; Lollar, Louis; Carrington, Connie; Hoppe, David; Piszczor, Michael; Suszuki, Nantel; Eskenazi, Michael; Aiken, Dan; Fulton, Michael; Brandhorst, Henry; Schuller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005, our team has been underway on a competitively awarded program sponsored by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop, refine, and mature the unique solar array technology known as Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, including the following: Areal Power Density = 300 W/m2 (2005) - 400 W/m2 (2008 Target) Specific Power = 300 W/kg (2005) - 500 W/kg (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Stowed Power = 80 kW/cu m (2005) - 120 kW/m3 (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Scalable Array Capacity = 100 s of W s to 100 s of kW s Super-Insulated Small Cell Circuit = High-Voltage (300-600 V) Operation at Low Mass Penalty Super-Shielded Small Cell Circuit = Excellent Radiation Hardness at Low Mass Penalty 85% Cell Area Savings = 75% Lower Array Cost per Watt than One-Sun Array Modular, Scalable, & Mass-Producible at MW s per Year Using Existing Processes and Capacities

  16. Thermal maturation of Eagle basin, northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccio, V.F.; Schenk, C.J.

    1986-05-01

    Mean random vitrinite reflectance (R/sub m/) was measured on 120 surface samples from Lower Pennsylvanian through Upper Cretaceous rocks in the Eagle basin for the purpose of mapping thermal maturity. The Eagle basin is a trough that formed during the Pennsylvanian between the ancestral Front Range to the northeast and the ancestral Uncompahgre uplift to the southwest. For comparative purposes, the stratigraphic section in the basin was divided into four intervals, each with a range of R/sub m/ values; 2.70-3.70% for Lower Pennsylvanian rocks, 0.70-2.30 for Middle Pennsylvanian rocks, 0.80-1.50 for Upper Pennsylvanian-Triassic rocks, and 0.60-1.70 for Cretaceous rocks. R/sub m/ values decrease from Lower Pennsylvanian rocks to Cretaceous rocks throughout the basin. Variability in R/sub m/ values within each stratigraphic interval may be due to structural deformation, variations in source material and depositional environment, and spatial and temporal fluctuations in geothermal gradients. R/sub m/ values indicate that most of the Middle Pennsylvanian and Upper Pennsylvanian-Triassic rocks are in the oil window (0.60-1.35%) and gas window (0.75-3.0%). Although R/sub m/ values indicate that Cretaceous rocks are in the oil and gas windows, geochemical data suggest that mainly gas would be generated.

  17. Maintaining Ancient Organelles: Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Rick B.; Horton, Julie L.; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the cardiac myocyte is remarkable for the high density of mitochondria tightly packed between sarcomeres. This structural organization is designed to provide energy in the form of ATP to fuel normal pump function of the heart. A complex system comprised of regulatory factors and energy metabolic machinery, encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, is required for the coordinate control of cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis, maturation, and high-capacity function. This process involves the action of a transcriptional regulatory network that builds and maintains the mitochondrial genome, and to drive the expression of the energy transduction machinery. This finely tuned system is responsive to developmental and physiological cues as well as changes in fuel substrate availability. Deficiency of components critical for mitochondrial energy production frequently manifests as a cardiomyopathic phenotype, underscoring the requirement to maintain high respiration rates in the heart. Although a precise causative role is not clear, there is increasing evidence that perturbations in this regulatory system occur in the hypertrophied and failing heart. This review summarizes current knowledge and highlights recent advances in our understanding of the transcriptional regulatory factors and signaling networks that serve to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the mammalian heart. PMID:25999422

  18. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  19. Mapping mouse hemangioblast maturation from headfold stages

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jerry M.; Iannaccone, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    The mouse posterior primitive streak at neural plate/headfold stages (NP/HF, ~7.5dpc–8dpc) represents an optimal window from which hemangioblasts can be isolated. We performed immunohistochemistry on this domain using established monoclonal antibodies for proteins that affect blood and endothelial fates. We demonstrate that HoxB4 and GATA1 are the first set of markers that segregate independently to endothelial or blood populations during NP/HF stages of mouse embryonic development. In a subset of cells, both proteins are co-expressed and immunoreactivities appear mutually excluded within nuclear spaces. We searched for this particular state at later sites of hematopoietic stem cell emergence, viz., the aorta-gonadmesonephros (AGM) and the fetal liver at 10.5–11.5dpc, and found that only a rare number of cells displayed this character. Based on this spatial-temporal argument, we propose that the earliest blood progenitors emerge either directly from the epiblast or through segregation within the allantoic core domain (ACD) through reduction of cell adhesion and pSmad1/5 nuclear signaling, followed by a stochastic decision toward a blood or endothelial fate that involves GATA1 and HoxB4, respectively. A third form in which binding distributions are balanced may represent a common condition shared by hemangioblasts and HSCs. We developed a heuristic model of hemangioblast maturation, in part, to be explicit about our assumptions. PMID:22426104

  20. Characterization of pre-mature nanocomposite crazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toepperwein, Gregory N.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2011-03-01

    Crazing is a unique mode of failure by which polymer strands are stretched into a periodic array of columns. It has been shown that these crazes follow cavitation under deformation. Inclusion of nanoparticles drastically alters the glass transition temperature and the globally measurable mechanical properties of these polymer glasses. However, limited literature exists to explain the behavior on the lengths scales of the heterogeneous domains within the glass in the context of nanocomposites. In this work, we investigate the nucleation and growth of voids that precede craze formation to elucidate the role these inclusions play in failure and further characterize the pre-mature craze itself. Extensive Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of highly entangled polymer nanocomposites allow for calculation of local densities, local elastic moduli, and local orientation of additives. We find that the site of void formation is inexorably linked to the local mechanical properties of polymer. This relationship is more evident upon the inclusion of reinforcing additives which induce a broader distribution of local moduli leading to the nucleation of more, smaller voids. Within the developing craze, larger additives resist incorporation, but those that do are subject to ordering.

  1. Optimum harvest maturity for Leymus chinensis seed

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jixiang; Wang, Yingnan; Qi, Mingming; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Chunxue; Wang, Yongcui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Timely harvest is critical to achieve maximum seed viability and vigour in agricultural production. However, little information exists concerning how to reap the best quality seeds of Leymus chinensis, which is the dominant and most promising grass species in the Songnen Grassland of Northern China. The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate possible quality indices of the seeds at different days after peak anthesis. Seed quality at different development stages was assessed by the colours of the seed and lemmas, seed weight, moisture content, electrical conductivity of seed leachate and germination indices. Two consecutive years of experimental results showed that the maximum seed quality was recorded at 39 days after peak anthesis. At this date, the colours of the seed and lemmas reached heavy brown and yellow, respectively. The seed weight was highest and the moisture content and the electrical conductivity of seed leachate were lowest. In addition, the seed also reached its maximum germination percentage and energy at this stage, determined using a standard germination test (SGT) and accelerated ageing test (AAT). Thus, Leymus chinensis can be harvested at 39 days after peak anthesis based on the changes in parameters. Colour identification can be used as an additional indicator to provide a more rapid and reliable measure of optimum seed maturity; approximately 10 days after the colour of the lemmas reached yellow and the colour of the seed reached heavy brown, the seed of this species was suitable for harvest. PMID:27170257

  2. Arnold Gesell and the maturation controversy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the work of Arnold Lucius Gesell and argues that he not only paved the way for contemporary research in motor development, but that he and colleagues anticipated fundamental issues about growth that must be addressed by psychologists and neuroscientists who are committed to the advancement of developmental science. Arnold Lucius Gesell was a pioneer in developmental psychology when the field was in its infancy. He worked diligently for the rights of physically and mentally handicapped children to receive special education that would enable them to find gainful employment. Gesell's writings in books and popular magazines increased public awareness of and support for preschool education and better foster care for orphans. Despite these achievements, many of his successors have questioned his views about infant development. Developmental psychologists have criticized Gesell for proposing a stage theory of infant growth that has fallen into disfavor among contemporary researchers. His conception of development as a maturational process has been challenged for allegedly reducing complex behavioral, perceptual, and learning processes to genetic factors. The author rejects this overly simplistic interpretation and contends that Gesell's work continues to stand the test of time. PMID:17549936

  3. Optimum harvest maturity for Leymus chinensis seed.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jixiang; Wang, Yingnan; Qi, Mingming; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Chunxue; Wang, Yongcui; Mu, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Timely harvest is critical to achieve maximum seed viability and vigour in agricultural production. However, little information exists concerning how to reap the best quality seeds of Leymus chinensis, which is the dominant and most promising grass species in the Songnen Grassland of Northern China. The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate possible quality indices of the seeds at different days after peak anthesis. Seed quality at different development stages was assessed by the colours of the seed and lemmas, seed weight, moisture content, electrical conductivity of seed leachate and germination indices. Two consecutive years of experimental results showed that the maximum seed quality was recorded at 39 days after peak anthesis. At this date, the colours of the seed and lemmas reached heavy brown and yellow, respectively. The seed weight was highest and the moisture content and the electrical conductivity of seed leachate were lowest. In addition, the seed also reached its maximum germination percentage and energy at this stage, determined using a standard germination test (SGT) and accelerated ageing test (AAT). Thus, Leymus chinensis can be harvested at 39 days after peak anthesis based on the changes in parameters. Colour identification can be used as an additional indicator to provide a more rapid and reliable measure of optimum seed maturity; approximately 10 days after the colour of the lemmas reached yellow and the colour of the seed reached heavy brown, the seed of this species was suitable for harvest. PMID:27170257

  4. Regulation of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Maturation and Anterograde Trafficking by an Interaction with Rab Geranylgeranyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Véronik; Cartier, Andréane; Génier, Samuel; Munger, Sandra; Germain, Pascale; Labrecque, Pascale; Parent, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports by us and others demonstrated that G protein-coupled receptors interact functionally with Rab GTPases. Here, we show that the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) interacts with the Rab geranylgeranyltransferase α-subunit (RGGTA). Confocal microscopy showed that β2AR co-localizes with RGGTA in intracellular compartments and at the plasma membrane. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that RGGTA binds to the L339L340 motif in the β2AR C terminus known to be involved in the transport of the receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. Modulation of the cellular levels of RGGTA protein by overexpression or siRNA-mediated knockdown of the endogenous protein demonstrated that RGGTA has a positive role in the maturation and anterograde trafficking of the β2AR, which requires the interaction of RGGTA with the β2AR L339L340 motif. Furthermore, the β2AR modulates the geranylgeranylation of Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, but not of other Rab proteins tested in this study. Regulation of Rab geranylgeranylation by the β2AR was dependent on the RGGTA-interacting L339L340 motif. Interestingly, a RGGTA-Y107F mutant was unable to regulate Rab geranylgeranylation but still promoted β2AR maturation, suggesting that RGGTA may have functions independent of Rab geranylgeranylation. We demonstrate for the first time an interaction between a transmembrane receptor and RGGTA which regulates the maturation and anterograde transport of the receptor, as well as geranylgeranylation of Rab GTPases. PMID:21990357

  5. IL-12 directs further maturation of ex vivo differentiated NK cells with improved therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Sturtzel, Caterina; Tordoir, Marleen; Schlechta, Bernhard; Groenewegen, Dirk; Hofer, Erhard

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to modulate ex vivo human NK cell differentiation towards specific phenotypes will contribute to a better understanding of NK cell differentiation and facilitate tailored production of NK cells for immunotherapy. In this study, we show that addition of a specific low dose of IL-12 to an ex vivo NK cell differentiation system from cord blood CD34(+) stem cells will result in significantly increased proportions of cells with expression of CD62L as well as KIRs and CD16 which are preferentially expressed on mature CD56(dim) peripheral blood NK cells. In addition, the cells displayed decreased expression of receptors such as CCR6 and CXCR3, which are typically expressed to a lower extent by CD56(dim) than CD56(bright) peripheral blood NK cells. The increased number of CD62L and KIR positive cells prevailed in a population of CD33(+)NKG2A(+) NK cells, supporting that maturation occurs via this subtype. Among a series of transcription factors tested we found Gata3 and TOX to be significantly downregulated, whereas ID3 was upregulated in the IL-12-modulated ex vivo NK cells, implicating these factors in the observed changes. Importantly, the cells differentiated in the presence of IL-12 showed enhanced cytokine production and cytolytic activity against MHC class I negative and positive targets. Moreover, in line with the enhanced CD16 expression, these cells exhibited improved antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity for B-cell leukemia target cells in the presence of the clinically applied antibody rituximab. Altogether, these data provide evidence that IL-12 directs human ex vivo NK cell differentiation towards more mature NK cells with improved properties for potential cancer therapies. PMID:24498025

  6. Low dose naltrexone (LDN) enhances maturation of bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs).

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingjuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicholas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrexone, a non-peptidic δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist and opioid receptors on BMDCs have been detected [1]. However, there is little prior data published on naltrexone and DCs. Therefore, we hypothesized that LDN could exert modulating effect on BMDCs. In present study, we studied influence of LDN on both phenotypic and functional maturation of BMDCs. Changes of BMDC post-treatment with LDN were evaluated using conventional light microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); flow cytometry(FCM); cytochemistry; acid phosphatase activity(ACP) test; FITC-dextran bio-assay; mixed lymphocytes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances maturation of BMDCs as evidenced by 1) up-regulating the expression of MHC II, CD40, CD83, CD80 and CD86 molecules on BMDCs; 2) down-regulating the rates of pinocytosis and phagocytosis accompanied by the results of decreased ACP, and FITC-dextran bio-assay; 3) mounting potential of BMDCs to drive T cell; and 4) inducing secretion of higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-α. It is therefore concluded that LDN can efficiently promote the maturation of BMDCs via precise modulation inside and outside BMDCs. Our study has provided meaningful mode of action on the role of LDN in immunoregulation, and rationale on future application of LDN for enhancing host immunity in cancer therapy and potent use in the design of DC-based vaccines for a number of diseases. PMID:24455776

  7. Novel maturity parameters for mature to over-mature source rocks and oils based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixiang; Wang, Yongli; Wu, Baoxiang; Wang, Gen; Sun, Zepeng; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Shenzhen; Sun, Lina; Wei, Zhifu

    2016-03-01

    Pyrolysis experiments of a low-mature bitumen sample originated from Cambrian was conducted in gold capsules. Abundance and distribution of phenanthrene series compounds in pyrolysis products were measured by GC-MS to investigate their changes with thermal maturity. Several maturity parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds have been discussed. The results indicate that the distribution changes of phenanthrene series compounds are complex, and cannot be explained by individual reaction process during thermal evolution. The dealkylation cannot explain the increase of phenanthrene within the EasyRo range of 0.9% ∼ 2.1%. Adding of phenanthrene into maturity parameters based on the methylphenanthrene isomerization is unreasonable, even though MPI 1 and MPI 2 could be used to some extent. Two additional novel and an optimized maturation parameters based on the distribution of phenanthrene series compounds are proposed and their relationships to EasyRo% (x) are established: log(MPs/P) = 0.19x + 0.08 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 2.1%); log(MPs/P) = 0.64x - 0.86 (2.1% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(DMPs/TMPs) = 0.71x - 0.55 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%); log(MTR) = 0.84x - 0.75 (0.9% < EasyRo% < 3.4%). These significant positive correlations are strong argument for using log(MPs/P), log(DMPs/TMPs) and log(MTR) as maturity parameters, especially for mature to over-mature source rocks. PMID:27441263

  8. Mechanical Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Particles: Effect of Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kol, Nitzan; Gladnikoff, Micha; Barlam, David; Shneck, Roni Z.; Rein, Alan; Rousso, Itay

    2006-01-01

    After budding from the host cell, retroviruses undergo a process of internal reorganization called maturation, which is prerequisite to infectivity. Viral maturation is accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, which are poorly understood in physical/mechanistic terms. Here, we study the mechanical properties of live mature and immature murine leukemia virus particles by indentation-type experiments conducted with an atomic force microscope tip. We find that both mature and immature particles have an elastic shell. Strikingly, the virus shell is twofold stiffer in the immature (0.68 N/m) than the mature (0.31 N/m) form. However, finite-element simulation shows that the average Young's modulus of the immature form is more than fourfold lower than that of the mature form. This finding suggests that per length unit, the protein-protein interactions in the mature shell are stronger than those in the immature shell. We also show that the mature virus shell is brittle, since it can be broken by application of large loading forces, by firm attachment to a substrate, or by repeated application of force. Our results are the first analysis of the mechanical properties of an animal virus, and demonstrate a linkage between virus morphology and mechanical properties. PMID:16632508

  9. Predicting Two Components of Career Maturity in School Based Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creed, Peter A.; Patton, Wendy A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple regression analyses of data on career maturity, work commitment, work values, self-efficacy, age, and career decidedness were conducted for 367 Australian students in grades 8-12. Chief predictors of career maturity attitudes were age, gender, and career certainty. Commitment and career indecision were the main predictors of career…

  10. Maturation Rate, Endocrine Functioning and Female Career Typicalness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sue W.; McCullers, John C.

    1987-01-01

    Compared maturation rate and endocrine functioning according to career typicalness in 28 employed women. Results provided only limited evidence that women in nontraditional careers matured later than women in traditional careers. Found subjects in traditional categories married and had children at earlier age than did subjects in nontraditional…

  11. MATURITY AND TEMPERATURE AFFECTS THE GERMINATION OF STYRAX JAPONICUS SEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of seed maturity, warm (18oC) or cold (5.5oC) temperature, and gibberellic acid (GA3) on seed germination of Styrax japonicus Sieb. et. Zucc was investigated. Seed maturity and morphological changes were observed using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI). Fruits harvested on July 22,...

  12. In vitro maturation alters gene expression in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Adona, Paulo R; Leal, Cláudia L V; Biase, Fernando H; De Bem, Tiago H; Mesquita, Lígia G; Meirelles, Flávio V; Ferraz, André L; Furlan, Luiz R; Monzani, Paulo S; Guemra, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Gene expression profiling of in vivo- and in vitro-matured bovine oocytes can identify transcripts related to the developmental potential of oocytes. Nonetheless, the effects of in vitro culturing oocytes are yet to be fully understood. We tested the effects of in vitro maturation on the transcript profile of oocytes collected from Bos taurus indicus cows. We quantified the expression of 1488 genes in in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes. Of these, 51 genes were up-regulated, whereas 56 were down-regulated (≥2-fold) in in vivo-matured oocytes in comparison with in vitro-matured oocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nine genes confirmed the microarray results of differential expression between in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes (EZR, EPN1, PSEN2, FST, IGFBP3, RBBP4, STAT3, FDPS and IRS1). We interrogated the results for enrichment of Gene Ontology categories and overlap with protein-protein interactions. The results revealed that the genes altered by in vitro maturation are mostly related to the regulation of oocyte metabolism. Additionally, analysis of protein-protein interactions uncovered two regulatory networks affected by the in vitro culture system. We propose that the differentially expressed genes are candidates for biomarkers of oocyte competence. In vitro oocyte maturation can affect the abundance of specific transcripts and are likely to deplete the developmental competence. PMID:26885679

  13. Practice Ethical Behavior. Work Maturity Skills. Competency 4.0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    Designed for use as a part of the Work Maturity Skills Training Program, this unit consists of instructional materials dealing with practicing ethical behavior. (The Work Maturity Skills Training Program is a set of individualized competency-based units that are designed to help participants develop the competencies they need to find and retain…

  14. Gene expression profiles of auxin metabolism in maturing apple fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation exists among apple genotypes in fruit maturation and ripening patterns that influences at-harvest fruit firmness and postharvest storability. Based on the results from our previous large-scale transcriptome profiling on apple fruit maturation and well-documented auxin-ethylene crosstalk, t...

  15. Canopy Characteristics and their Ability to Predict Peanut Maturity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To ensure maximum economic return, a peanut producer must accurately predict harvest time when the crop has reached optimal maturity without risking losses through mechanical damage due to deteriorating peg attachments. Currently utilized methods for predicting peanut maturity are based on hull col...

  16. Fascin1 promotes cell migration of mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamakita, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Fumio; Lipscomb, Michael W; Chou, Po-chien; Werlen, Guy; Burkhardt, Janis K; Yamashiro, Shigeko

    2011-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play central roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Upon maturation, DCs assemble numerous veil-like membrane protrusions, disassemble podosomes, and travel from the peripheral tissues to lymph nodes to present Ags to T cells. These alterations in morphology and motility are closely linked to the primary function of DCs, Ag presentation. However, it is unclear how and what cytoskeletal proteins control maturation-associated alterations, in particular, the change in cell migration. Fascin1, an actin-bundling protein, is specifically and greatly induced upon maturation, suggesting a unique role for fascin1 in mature DCs. To determine the physiological roles of fascin1, we characterized bone marrow-derived, mature DCs from fascin1 knockout mice. We found that fascin1 is critical for cell migration: fascin1-null DCs exhibit severely decreased membrane protrusive activity. Importantly, fascin1-null DCs have lower chemotactic activity toward CCL19 (a chemokine for mature DCs) in vitro, and in vivo, Langerhans cells show reduced emigration into draining lymph nodes. Morphologically, fascin1-null mature DCs are flatter and fail to disassemble podosomes, a specialized structure for cell-matrix adhesion. Expression of exogenous fascin1 in fascin1-null DCs rescues the defects in membrane protrusive activity, as well as in podosome disassembly. These results indicate that fascin1 positively regulates migration of mature DCs into lymph nodes, most likely by increasing dynamics of membrane protrusions, as well as by disassembling podosomes. PMID:21263068

  17. Chemical Interruption of Flowering to Improve Harvested Peanut Maturity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is a botanically indeterminate plant where flowering, fruit initiation, and pod maturity occurs over an extended time period during the growing season. As a result, the maturity and size of individual peanut pods varies considerably at harvest. Immature kernels that meet...

  18. Black-White Differences in Psychosocial Maturity: A Further Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen; Marini, Margaret Mooney

    Following up on an earlier study which found that blacks and whites differed significantly on a 54-item development scale designed to measure effective individual functioning, or "maturity," this report considers whether the content of the Psychosocial Maturity Scale (PSM) is biased in favor of white children and if this bias invalidates the scale…

  19. The Vocational Maturity of Inner-City Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.

    1974-01-01

    The maturity of vocational attitudes of 103 narcotic addicts from New York City and of 46 of their peers was assessed. Comparison between scores of the addicts and their peers showed the former to have significantly lower maturity of vocational attitudes. (Author)

  20. Self-Esteem and Emotional Maturity in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Jupian J.; Sand, Margaret C.

    1981-01-01

    Determined if self-esteem is related to emotional maturity. Scores from 200 male and female college students on Coopersmith's Self-Esteem Inventory and on the Washburne Social-Adjustment Inventory were correlated. Students high in self-esteem were found to be more emotionally mature than students low in self-esteem. (Author)

  1. Kinetics of mature T-cell development in the thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Egerton, M.; Scollay, R.; Shortman, K. )

    1990-04-01

    We have reexamined the balance between cell birth, cell maturation, and cell death in the thymus by labeling dividing thymocytes and their progeny in vivo with (3H)-thymidine, isolating clearly defined subpopulations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and determining the distribution of label by autoradiography. When mature thymocytes were precisely defined (as CD4+CD8- CD3+ or CD4-CD8+ CD3+) and separated from immature single positives (CD4+CD8- CD3- and CD4-CD8+ CD3-), a lag was observed in the rate of entry of (3H)thymidine into mature cells. Thus, many of the mature thymocytes appear to derive from a small nondividing cortical thymocyte pool, rather than originating directly from the earliest dividing CD4+CD8+ blasts. There was little evidence for cell division during or after mature thymocyte formation, suggesting a one-for-one differentiation from cortical cells rather than selective clonal expansion. The rate of production of mature single positive thymocytes agreed closely with estimates of the rate of export of mature T cells from the thymus and was only 3% of the rate of production of double-positive cortical thymocytes. This was compatible with a stringent selection process and extensive intrathymic cell death and suggested that no extensive negative selection occurred after the mature cells were formed.

  2. Noninvasive maturity detection of citrus with machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yibin; Xu, Zhenggang; Fu, Xiaping; Liu, Yande

    2004-03-01

    A computer vision system was established to explore a method for citrus maturity detection. The surface color information and the ratio of total soluble solid to titratable acid (TSS/TA) were used as maturity indexes of citrus. The spectral reflectance properties with different color were measured by UV-240 ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer. The biggest discrepancy of gray levels between citrus pixels and background pixels was in blue component image by image background segmentation. Dynamic threshold method for background segmentation had best result in blue component image. Methods for citrus image color description were studied. The citrus spectral reflectance experiments showed that green surface and saffron surface of citrus were of highest spectral reflectance at the wavelength of 700nm, the difference between them reached to maximum, about 53%, and the image acquired at this wavelength was of more color information for maturity detection. A triple-layer feed forward network was established to map citrus maturity from the hue frequency sequence by the mean of artificial neural network. After training, the network mapper was used to detect the maturity of the test sample set, which was composed of 252 Weizhang citrus with different maturity. The identification accuracy of mature citrus reached 79.1%, that of immature citrus was 63.6%, and the mean identification accuracy was 77.8%. This study suggested that it is feasible to detect citrus maturity non-invasively by using the computer vision system and hue frequency sequence method.

  3. Debt-maturity structures should match risk preferences.

    PubMed

    Gapenski, L C

    1999-12-01

    Key to any debt-maturity matching strategy is financing assets with the appropriate debt structure. Financial managers need to establish an optimal capital structure and then choose the best maturity-matching structure for their debt. Two maturity-matching strategies that are available to healthcare financial managers are the accounting approach and the finance approach. The accounting approach, which defines asset maturities as current or fixed, is a riskier financing strategy than the finance approach, which defines asset maturities as permanent or temporary. The added risk occurs because of the accounting approach's heavy reliance on short-term debt. The accounting approach offers the potential for lower costs at the expense of higher risk. Healthcare financial managers who believe the financing function should support the organization's operations without adding undue risk should use the finance approach to maturity matching. Asset maturities in those organizations then should be considered permanent or temporary rather than current or fixed, and the debt-maturity structure should reflect this. PMID:11066697

  4. Career Maturity in Relation to Differences in School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Sar B.; Alvi, Sabir A.

    1985-01-01

    Examined differences in career maturity among four curriculum groups: academic, business, technical, and general. In Study I, administered Crites' Career Maturity Inventory to students in grades 9-12. In Study II, administered a specially developed measure of career development to students in grade 12. Results indicated that the academic group…

  5. Phenomenological Aspects of Psychosocial Maturity in Adolescence. Report No. 198.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josselson, Ruthellen; And Others

    Forty-one subjects who score at the high and low extremes of the Psychosocial Maturity (PSM) Inventory were intensively interviewed. These interview data were analyzed to contrast the phenomenological and psychodynamic forces in the lives of these subjects that influence their current state of psychosocial maturity. Case material is presented.…

  6. Psychosocial Aspects of Vocational Maturity: Implications for Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Elfriede

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between vocational maturity and a set of developmental and/or psychological characteristics--moral development and social interest among adolescents. The conclusions and counselling implications suggest that vocational maturity is significantly correlated with social interest and moral development. (Author/BL)

  7. Mammalian Septins Are Required for Phagosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Yan, Ming; Collins, Richard F.; DiCiccio, Jessica E.; Grinstein, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Septins are members of a highly conserved family of filamentous proteins that are required in many organisms for the completion of cytokinesis. In addition, septins have been implicated in a number of important cellular processes and have been suggested to have roles in regulating membrane traffic. Given the proposed role of septins in cell membrane dynamics, we investigated the function of septins during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis. We show that several septins are expressed in RAW264.7 and J774 mouse macrophage cell lines and that SEPT2 and SEPT11 are colocalized with submembranous actin-rich structures during the early stages of FcγR-mediated phagocytosis. In addition, SEPT2 accumulation is seen in primary human neutrophils and in nonprofessional phagocytes. The time course of septin accumulation mirrors actin accumulation and is inhibited by latrunculin and genistein, but not other inhibitors of phagocytosis. Inhibition of septin function by transient expression of the BD3 domain of BORG3, known to cause septin aggregation, or depletion of SEPT2 or SEPT11 by RNAi, significantly inhibited FcγR-mediated phagocytosis of IgG-coated latex beads. Interestingly, this occurred without affecting the accumulation of actin or the actin-associated protein coronin-1. These observations show that, although not necessary for actin recruitment, septins are required for efficient FcγR-mediated phagocytosis. PMID:18272790

  8. What really happens in the neutrophil phagosome?

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Current viewpoints concerning the bactericidal mechanisms of neutrophils are reviewed from a perspective that emphasizes challenges presented by the inability to duplicate ex vivo the intracellular milieu. Among the challenges considered are the influences of confinement upon substrate availability and reaction dynamics, direct and indirect synergistic interactions between individual toxins, and bacterial responses to stressors. Approaches to gauging relative contributions of various oxidative and nonoxidative toxins within neutrophils using bacteria and bacterial mimics as intrinsic probes are also discussed. PMID:22609248

  9. Cathepsin L maturation and activity is impaired in macrophages harboring M. avium and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Rajeev M; Mampe, Stephanie; Shaffer, Brian; Erickson, Ann H; Bryant, Paula

    2006-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages demonstrate diminished capacity to present antigens via class II MHC molecules. Since successful class II MHC-restricted antigen presentation relies on the actions of endocytic proteases, we asked whether the activities of cathepsins (Cat) B, S and L-three major lysosomal cysteine proteases-are modulated in macrophages infected with pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. Infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with either Mycobacterium avium or M. tuberculosis had no obvious effect on Cat B or Cat S activity. In contrast, the activity of Cat L was altered in infected cells. Specifically, whereas the 24-kDa two-chain mature form of active Cat L predominated in uninfected cells, we observed an increase in the steady-state activity of the precursor single-chain (30 kDa) and 25-kDa two-chain forms of the enzyme in cells infected with either M. avium or M. tuberculosis. Pulse-chase analyses revealed that maturation of nascent, single-chain Cat L into the 25-kDa two-chain form was impaired in infected macrophages, and that maturation into the 24-kDa two-chain form did not occur. Consistent with these data, M. avium infection inhibited the IFNgamma-induced secretion of active two-chain Cat L by macrophages. Viable bacilli were not required to disrupt Cat L maturation, suggesting that a constitutively expressed mycobacterial component was responsible. The absence of the major active form of lysosomal Cat L in M. avium- and M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages may influence the types of T cell epitopes generated in these antigen-presenting cells, and/or the rate of class II MHC peptide loading. PMID:16636015

  10. Modulation of lymphopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, C.

    1990-01-01

    Ongoing experiments contribute to the four specific aims in our current 3-year project period studying lymphopoiesis using CE mammary adenocarcinoma (CE maca) mice. Specific Aim 1: Function of Bone Marrow Stroma in CE Maca Bearing Mice. We have concluded that bone marrow stromal cells from tumor bearing animals are as effective as bone marrow stromal cells from normal animals at supporting B lymphopoiesis in culture. If stromal cell disfunction occurs in tumor bearing animals, the effect is not long lasting. Specific Aim 2: Factors Elaborated by CE Maca. Conditioned medium from CE maca cultures induces bone resorbing activity in bone organ cultures. We have identified a 32 kDa protein that meets the criteria for an osteoclast specific growth factor in this medium. However, we have also found that even though an osteoclast specific growth factor exists, a growth factor whose primary targets are granulocyte precursors will also stimulate osteoclast activity. Specific Aim 3: In Vitro Systems for Investigating Modulation of NK Lymphopoiesis by CE Maca. CE maca is shown to inhibit NK all production as well as B all production. In the course of the these experiments, we have established conditions for enriching NK precursors and have established a prototype long term bone marrow culture system which shows NK cell production. Specific Aim 4: Relationship Between Myclogenic and Intrathymic T Cell Precursors. There is evidence for a stream of T all maturation in both host (or intrathymic) cells and non-host (both hematogenous and intrathymic) cells. If thymic atrophy is induced by cortisone (a depopulation equivalent to that caused by 1000 rad) our data conclusively show thymic recovery is effected almost exclusively by intrathymic cells. This assigns a much greater importance to intrathymic T all progenitors in the maintenance of T cell production in the thymus than has been hitherto recognized. (MHB)

  11. Lunar Module Ascent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Lunar Module 'Spider' ascent stage is photographed from the Command/Service Module on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The Lunar Module's descent stage had already been jettisoned.

  12. Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment: A Maturity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luftman, Jerry; Brown, Carol V.; Balaji, S.

    This chapter presents a new model for assessing the maturity of a ­customer-provider relationship from a collaborative service delivery perspective: the Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment Maturity (CPSAM) Model. This model builds on recent research for effectively managing the customer-provider relationship in IT service outsourcing contexts and a validated model for assessing alignment across internal IT service units and their business customers within the same organization. After reviewing relevant literature by service science and information systems researchers, the six overarching components of the maturity model are presented: value measurements, governance, partnership, communications, human resources and skills, and scope and architecture. A key assumption of the model is that all of the components need be addressed to assess and improve customer-provider alignment. Examples of specific metrics for measuring the maturity level of each component over the five levels of maturity are also presented.

  13. Transient domain formation in membrane-bound organelles undergoing maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Sens, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The membrane components of cellular organelles have been shown to segregate into domains as the result of biochemical maturation. We propose that the dynamical competition between maturation and lateral segregation of membrane components regulates domain formation. We study a two-component fluid membrane in which enzymatic reaction irreversibly converts one component into another and phase separation triggers the formation of transient membrane domains. The maximum domain size is shown to depend on the maturation rate as a power law similar to the one observed for domain growth with time in the absence of maturation, despite this time dependence not being verified in the case of irreversible maturation. This control of domain size by enzymatic activity could play a critical role in regulating exchange between organelles or within compartmentalized organelles such as the Golgi apparatus.

  14. Multi-parametric evaluation of the white matter maturation.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, S; Hertz-Pannier, L; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Buzmakov, A; Poupon, C; Dubois, J

    2015-11-01

    In vivo evaluation of the brain white matter maturation is still a challenging task with no existing gold standards. In this article we propose an original approach to evaluate the early maturation of the white matter bundles, which is based on comparison of infant and adult groups using the Mahalanobis distance computed from four complementary MRI parameters: quantitative qT1 and qT2 relaxation times, longitudinal λ║ and transverse λ⊥ diffusivities from diffusion tensor imaging. Such multi-parametric approach is expected to better describe maturational asynchrony than conventional univariate approaches because it takes into account complementary dependencies of the parameters on different maturational processes, notably the decrease in water content and the myelination. Our approach was tested on 17 healthy infants (aged 3- to 21-week old) for 18 different bundles. It finely confirmed maturational asynchrony across the bundles: the spino-thalamic tract, the optic radiations, the cortico-spinal tract and the fornix have the most advanced maturation, while the superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi, the anterior limb of the internal capsule and the external capsule have the most delayed maturation. Furthermore, this approach was more reliable than univariate approaches as it revealed more maturational relationships between the bundles and did not violate a priori assumptions on the temporal order of the bundle maturation. Mahalanobis distances decreased exponentially with age in all bundles, with the only difference between them explained by different onsets of maturation. Estimation of these relative delays confirmed that the most dramatic changes occur during the first post-natal year. PMID:25183543

  15. Maturation of Jejunum and Ileum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Younoszai, M. K.; Sapario, R. S.; Laughlin, M.

    1978-01-01

    During osmotic diarrhea, loss of water and electrolytes appears to be greater in infants than in adults. In 2-, 3-, and 7-wk-old rats, we studied net transport of H2O, Na, and Cl, during in vivo perfusion of segments of the jejunum and ileum, from solutions with osmolalities of 300, 375, 500, or 700 mosmol/kg. In the jejunal segments, from the hypertonic solutions net transport of H2O, Na, and Cl was into the lumen and greater in the 2- than 7-wk-old rats. In the ileal segments, transport of water was into the lumen, transport of Na was minimal and variable, whereas transport of Cl was usually out the lumen. In 3-wk-old rats, transport rates were intermediate between those in 2- and 7-wk-old rats. The calculated filtration coefficient (microliters of H2O transported per hour per unit osmolality gradient—lumen-serum—per gram dry weight) of water suggested that the resistance to water flow did not increase with rise in luminal hypertonicity in the jejunum of the 2- and 3-wk-old rats, whereas in jejunum of the 7-wk-old rats and in ileum of rats in all three ages, the resistance to water flow increased with the rise in luminal osmolality. The differences in the transport rates and the resistance to water flow, between segments of the 2-, 3-, and 7-wk-old rats, suggested a maturational phenomenon that appears to continue beyond the 3rd wk of life and could have been due to differences in some physical property of the mucosal membrane. PMID:670394

  16. Puberty Influences Medial Temporal Lobe and Cortical Gray Matter Maturation Differently in Boys Than Girls Matched for Sexual Maturity

    PubMed Central

    Hranilovich, Jennifer A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Forbes, Erika E.; Chen, Jessica; Toga, Arthur W.; Dinov, Ivo D.; Worthman, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in age- and puberty-related maturation of human brain structure have been observed in typically developing age-matched boys and girls. Because girls mature 1–2 years earlier than boys, the present study aimed at assessing sex differences in brain structure by studying 80 adolescent boys and girls matched on sexual maturity, rather than age. We evaluated pubertal influences on medial temporal lobe (MTL), thalamic, caudate, and cortical gray matter volumes utilizing structural magnetic resonance imaging and 2 measures of pubertal status: physical sexual maturity and circulating testosterone. As predicted, significant interactions between sex and the effect of puberty were observed in regions with high sex steroid hormone receptor densities; sex differences in the right hippocampus, bilateral amygdala, and cortical gray matter were greater in more sexually mature adolescents. Within sex, we found larger volumes in MTL structures in more sexually mature boys, whereas smaller volumes were observed in more sexually mature girls. Our results demonstrate puberty-related maturation of the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortical gray matter that is not confounded by age, and is different for girls and boys, which may contribute to differences in social and cognitive development during adolescence, and lasting sexual dimorphisms in the adult brain. PMID:20713504

  17. On the Validity of the Psychosocial Maturity Inventory: An Examination of Psychosocial Maturity and Dogmatism. Report No. 203.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Lloyd; And Others

    Form D of the Psychosocial Maturity (PSM) Inventory and the Rokeach Dogmatism Scale were administered to 325 10th grade students to test a predicted correlation between the Dogmatism Scale and the Change and Tolerance subscales of the PSM battery, and to examine the pattern of covariation between psychosocial maturity and dogmatism. A substantial…

  18. Anaplasma marginale actively modulates vacuolar maturation during intracellular infection of its tick vector dermacentor andersoni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tick-borne transmission of bacterial pathogens in the Order Rickettsiales is responsible for a diversity of infectious diseases, many of them severe, in both humans and animals. Transmission dynamics differ among these pathogens and are reflected in the pathogen-vector interaction. Anaplasma margina...

  19. Photoperiod-modulated testis maturation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, L.).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fernanda F L; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Norberg, Birgitta; Karlsen, Orjan; Bogerd, Jan; Schulz, Rüdiger W

    2009-04-01

    Precocious male puberty is a significant problem in Atlantic cod aquaculture. While photoperiod manipulation can inhibit testis growth, a detailed analysis of effects on spermatogenesis is missing. Starting July 1, 2004, prepubertal fish were exposed to different photoperiod regimens in indoor tanks for 17 mo. Testis histology, germ cell dynamics (proliferation and apoptosis), and plasma androgen levels were analyzed. In the natural light (NL) group, testis growth started in September 2004 and was completed in February 2005, when a 2-mo spawning period started. In the constant light (LL) group, none or very few spermatogenic cysts were recruited into spermatogenesis, and apoptotic germ cell loss was high. A change of photoperiod from NL to LL at winter solstice (December 21, 2004) resulted in premature (2 mo) completion of the reproductive cycle, while changing from LL to NL at winter solstice triggered faster than normal testis development. Plasma testosterone levels increased in the NL group from spermatogonial proliferation toward meiosis, while those of 11-ketotestosterone increased toward spermiogenesis and spermiation. Plasma androgen levels did not rise under LL conditions. Comparing fish with developing testes from all groups indicated that low androgen levels were associated with a high incidence of spermatogonial apoptosis; we also found that androgen receptor mRNA expression was most prominent in Sertoli cells in contact with growing spermatogonial clones. Our data show that an inhibitory photoperiod (LL) reduced or blocked differentiation of spermatogonia, increased apoptosis (particularly among proliferating spermatogonia), and was associated with reduced androgen levels, a situation possibly reflecting insufficient gonadotropic stimulation. PMID:19038862

  20. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt

    2011-11-29

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  1. Localization of sequences within the C-terminal domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator which impact maturation and stability.

    PubMed

    Gentzsch, M; Riordan, J R

    2001-01-12

    Some disease-associated truncations within the 100-residue domain C-terminal of the second nucleotide-binding domain destabilize the mature protein (Haardt, M., Benharouga, M., Lechardeur, D., Kartner, N., and Lukacs, G. L. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 21873-21877). We now have identified three short oligopeptide regions in the C-terminal domain which impact cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) maturation and stability in different ways. A highly conserved hydrophobic patch (region I) formed by residues 1413-1416 (FLVI) was found to be crucial for the stability of the mature protein. Nascent chain stability was severely decreased by shortening the protein by 81 amino acids (1400X). This accelerated degradation was sensitive to proteasome inhibitors but not influenced by brefeldin A, indicating that it occurred at the endoplasmic reticulum. The five residues at positions 1400 to 1404 (region II) normally maintain nascent CFTR stability in a positional rather than a sequence-specific manner. A third modulating region (III) constituted by residues 1390 to 1394 destabilizes the protein. Hence the nascent form regains stability on further truncation back to residues 1390 or 1380, permitting some degree of maturation and a low level of cyclic AMP-stimulated chloride channel activity at the cell surface. Thus while not absolutely essential, the C-terminal domain strongly modulates the biogenesis and maturation of CFTR. PMID:11022033

  2. Physical activity and biological maturation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bacil, Eliane Denise Araújo; Mazzardo, Oldemar; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Legnani, Rosimeide Francisco dos Santos; de Campos, Wagner

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between physical activity (PA) and biological maturation in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCE: We performed a systematic review in April 2013 in the electronic databases of PubMed/MEDLINE, SportDiscus, Web of Science and LILACS without time restrictions. A total of 628 potentially relevant articles were identified and 10 met the inclusion criteria for this review: cross-sectional or longitudinal studies, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, with schoolchildren aged 9-15 years old of both genders. DATA SYNTHESIS: Despite the heterogeneity of the studies, there was an inverse association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increased biological and chronological age in both genders. Boys tend to be more physically active than girls; however, when controlling for biological age, the gender differences disappear. The association between PA and timing of maturation varies between the genders. Variation in the timing of biological maturation affects the tracking of PA in early adolescent girls. This review suggests that mediators (BMI, depression, low self-esteem, and concerns about body weight) can explain the association between PA and biological maturation. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increasing biological age with no differences between genders. As for the timing of biological maturation, this association varies between genders. PMID:25583624

  3. Provisional bilateral symmetry in Xenopus eggs is established during maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Margelot, K. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1994-01-01

    Dorsal-ventral patterning in the Xenopus egg becomes established midway through the first cell cycle during a 30 degree rotation of the subcortical yolk mass relative to the egg cortex. This 'rotation of symmetrisation' is microtubule dependent, and its direction is thought to be cued by the usually eccentric sperm centrosome. The fact that parthenogenetically activated eggs also undergo a directed rotation, despite the absence of a sperm centrosome, suggests that an endogenous asymmetry in the unfertilised egg supports the directed polymerisation of microtubules in the vegetal cortex, in the way that an eccentric sperm centrosome would in fertilised eggs. Consistent with this idea, we noticed that the maturation spot is usually located an average of more than 15 degrees from the geometric centre of the pigmented animal hemisphere. In parthenogenetically activated eggs, this eccentric maturation spot can be used to predict the direction of rotation. Although in most fertilised eggs the yolk mass rotates toward the sperm entry point (SEP) meridian, occasionally this relationship is perturbed significantly; in such eggs, the maturation spot is never on the same side of the egg as the SEP. In oocytes tilted 90 degrees from upright during maturation in vitro, the maturation spot developed 15 degrees or more from the centre of the pigmented hemisphere, always displaced towards the point on the equator that was up during maturation. This experimentally demonstrated lability is consistent with an off-axis oocyte orientation during oogenesis determining its eccentric maturation spot position, and, in turn, its endogenous rotational bias.

  4. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN DENTAL AND SKELETAL MATURATION STAGES IN CROATIAN SUBJECTS.

    PubMed

    Srkoc, Tamara; Mestrović, Senka; Anić-Milosević, Sandra; Slaj, Mladen

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the relationships between the stages of calcification of teeth and cervical vertebral maturation. The sample consisted of 295 subjects (129 male and 166 female), mean age 13.36 ± 2.65 (range 7-18) years. Dental age was evaluated from panoramic radiographs according to the method of Demirjian. Cervical vertebral maturation was determined on lateral cephalometric radiographs using cervical vertebrae maturation stages (CVS). For assessing the relationship between cervical vertebral and dental maturation, percentage distributions of the stages of calcification for each studied tooth were calculated. Only in the first CVS stage, boys and girls were of the same age. In all other stages (CVS 2-CVS 6) girls were by 0.98 (range 0.23-1.86) younger than boys. Gender differences in the mineralization pattern were also observed. It was found that dental maturation was finished earlier in female subjects. The highest correlation coefficient between dental and skeletal maturity was found for second premolars. Mineralization pattern of second premolars could be considered as a guideline for prediction of the pubertal growth spurt. Dental maturation stages might be clinically useful as a reliable indicator of facial growth. PMID:27017718

  5. Haemoglobin polymorphism in Gadus morhua: Genotypic differences in maturing age and within-season gonad maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mork, J.; Giskeödegård, R.; Sundnes, G.

    1983-09-01

    276 specimens of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua L.) were caught during spawning in a restricted area of the Trondheimsfjord, Norway, in April and May 1979. Genotypes at the polymorphic haemoglobin locus Hbl differed significantly with respect to mean age at maturation (in males) and mean gonadic development stage (in females). There was no indication of population mixing in the genotypic composition at Hbl or at any of the 4 polymorphic tissue enzyme loci investigated ( LDH-3, IDH-1, PGM, and PGI-1. The findings obtained were considered with regard to temperature-related differences in the functional properties of Hbl molecules, and genotypic differences in growth, age at maturation, and fishing mortality. At the present stage of investigation, the natural selection pattern seems directional and strong. However, the Hbl allele frequencies observed in cod from the examined areas reveal no detectable changes over a period of two decades (˜ 4 generations). The current pattern of commercial exploitation causes, through size selection, a modification of the rate of erosion of the inferior allele, but additional factors must be in force, which play a role in its current abundance in an evolutionary perspective. The observed Hbl genotypic differences in the exact within-season time for spawning might be one such factor. A potential sexual difference in genotypic fitness might be another, but this has yet to be confirmed. The apparent existence of considerable natural and artificial selection forces acting upon cod haemoglobin genotypes makes Hbl allele frequencies unreliable for use in population structure analyses.

  6. Human gene expression as a tool to determine horticultural maturity in a bioactive plant (Echinacea purpurea L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Brovelli, Ernesto Antonio; Rua, Diego; Roh-Schmidt, Haeri; Chandra, Amitabh; Lamont, Erin; Noratto, Giuliana Doris

    2005-10-19

    A phenological study was conducted to determine the impact of harvest maturity on the immune-modulating properties of Echinacea purpurea. The aerial parts of this plant were collected during seven stages of development and were assayed for a common botanical marker for this species, cichoric acid. Plants of selected development stages were also assayed for total polysaccharides and compared for their immune-modulating effects on the THP-1 monocyte/macrophage cell line by means of a gene expression study. Although the concentration of cichoric acid did not change significantly during the course of the study, stage 1 (advanced vegetative) had the highest concentration of total polysaccharides and exhibited the most potent induction activity on immune-modulating cytokines such as interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These findings suggest that the use of gene expression may be an effective tool not only to standardize botanical extracts but also to optimize harvest time. PMID:16218658

  7. Thermal and hydrocarbon maturation models for coastal California

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Surdam, R.C.

    1985-02-01

    Hydrocarbon maturation models for coastal California must consider thermal and geochemical constraints imposed by plate tectonics, diagenetic reactions, and the sedimentation history of the region. Plate tectonism drastically effects the thermal history of California basins in many ways. Initially, temperatures in the crust of coastal California are suppressed during subduction of the Farallon plate. With the passage of the Mendocino triple junction, subduction ceases and a void is created into which asthenosphere moves. This elevates temperatures in the basins in a complex manner depending on the time of passage of the Mendocino triple junction and the location of a specific basin. Finite-difference numerical models were developed to approximate the thermal effects of subduction and lithospheric upwelling. Diagenetic reactions and sedimentation history affect both the maturation model and thermal history of a basin. Diagenetic reactions through time in the Miocene Monterey Formation may change thermal conductivity values by 70%. Facies changes also have an important effect on sediment thermal conductivity and hence sediment temperatures. Maturation models indicate varying levels of maturity depending on the method used. Models using the Time Temperature Index of Lopatin indicate the lowest level of maturity. Tissot and Espitalie's method, which uses multiple activation energies and varying constants for the kerogen types, results in an intermediate level of maturity. The highest level of maturity results in an intermediate level of maturity. The highest level of maturity results from the use of the Tissot and Espitalie method modified by using a single activation energy of 178.69 kJ mole/sup -1/ and a constant of 4.92 x 10/sup 13/ hour/sup -1/ as reported by M.D. Lewan for shale from the Phosphoria Formation.

  8. Quality Management Systems Implementation Compared With Organizational Maturity in Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Tayebeh; Jafari, Mehdi; Maleki, Mohammad Reza; Naghdi, Seyran; Ghiyasvand, Hesam

    2016-01-01

    Background: A quality management system can provide a framework for continuous improvement in order to increase the probability of customers and other stakeholders’ satisfaction. The test maturity model helps organizations to assess the degree of maturity in implementing effective and sustained quality management systems; plan based on the current realities of the organization and prioritize their improvement programs. Objectives: We aim to investigate and compare the level of organizational maturity in hospitals with the status of quality management systems implementation. Materials and Methods: This analytical cross sectional study was conducted among hospital administrators and quality experts working in hospitals with over 200 beds located in Tehran. In the first step, 32 hospitals were selected and then 96 employees working in the selected hospitals were studied. The data were gathered using the implementation checklist of quality management systems and the organization maturity questionnaire derived from ISO 10014. The content validity was calculated using Lawshe method and the reliability was estimated using test - retest method and calculation of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data using SPSS 18 software. Results: According to the table, the mean score of organizational maturity among hospitals in the first stage of quality management systems implementation was equal to those in the third stage and hypothesis was rejected (p-value = 0.093). In general, there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the first and third level hospitals (in terms of implementation of quality management systems). Conclusions: Overall, the findings of the study show that there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the hospitals in different levels of the quality management systems implementation and in fact, the maturity of the organizations cannot be

  9. Thermal maturation of incrementally assembled plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Coleman, D. S.; Heizler, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Cretaceous zoned intrusive suites of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) were each assembled over 8-11 million years through incremental amalgamation of sheeted intrusions. Emplacement as small sheet-like increments inhibits development of a voluminous zone of melt bearing rock; instead the active magma body represents only a small portion of the total volume intruded. Plutons formed incrementally will have a protracted thermal history (T-t) that can be elucidated using thermochronologic techniques yielding insights into the thermal evolution of the lithosphere at magma chamber-pluton scales. Thermal histories are derived for plutons from the dike-like John Muir Intrusive Suite (JMIS) and the laccolithic Mount Whitney Intrusive Suite (MWIS), both located in the eastern-central SNB, by correlating estimated zircon saturation and argon closure temperatures with U-Pb zircon and titanite, 40Ar/39Ar amphibole, biotite, and K-feldspar ages. Close agreement among zircon and hornblende ages indicate rapid cooling following intrusion. However, hornblende and biotite ages are separated by 6-9 million years indicating slow protracted cooling. We interpret these data to reflect the thermal maturation of an incrementally assembled magma system in which temperatures cycled between ~500-300°C for millions of years. Hornblende ages were not reset by younger intrusions, therefore maximum reheating temperatures did not exceed ~500°C for geologically significant durations. T-t cooling curves from the intrusive suites are used to calibrate finite difference numerical simulations of pluton assembly. Intrusion geometries are modeled (HEAT 3D, Wohletz, 2007) by stacking horizontal increments from the top-down and bottom-up and vertical increments are emplaced syntaxially and antitaxially and are designed to generate plutons of the approximate dimensions, depth of emplacement, and age range of the Sierran suites. Numerical simulations yield the following general observations: 1) an

  10. Pulsed Lidar Performance/Technical Maturity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimmestad, Gary G.; West, Leanne L.; Wood, Jack W.; Frehlich, Rod

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of investigations performed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under a task entitled 'Pulsed Lidar Performance/Technical Maturity Assessment' funded by the Crew Systems Branch of the Airborne Systems Competency at the NASA Langley Research Center. The investigations included two tasks, 1.1(a) and 1.1(b). The Tasks discussed in this report are in support of the NASA Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) program and are designed to evaluate a pulsed lidar that will be required for active wake vortex avoidance solutions. The Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) WindTracer LIDAR is an eye-safe, 2-micron, coherent, pulsed Doppler lidar with wake tracking capability. The actual performance of the WindTracer system was to be quantified. In addition, the sensor performance has been assessed and modeled, and the models have been included in simulation efforts. The WindTracer LIDAR was purchased by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for use in near-term field data collection efforts as part of a joint NASA/FAA wake vortex research program. In the joint research program, a minimum common wake and weather data collection platform will be defined. NASA Langley will use the field data to support wake model development and operational concept investigation in support of the VAMS project, where the ultimate goal is to improve airport capacity and safety. Task 1.1(a), performed by NCAR in Boulder, Colorado to analyze the lidar system to determine its performance and capabilities based on results from simulated lidar data with analytic wake vortex models provided by NASA, which were then compared to the vendor's claims for the operational specifications of the lidar. Task 1.1(a) is described in Section 3, including the vortex model, lidar parameters and simulations, and results for both detection and tracking of wake vortices generated by Boeing 737s and 747s. Task 1

  11. Development and maturation of primary feathers of redhead ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smart, M.G.

    1965-01-01

    A comparison of the maturation rates of the primaries of redheads (Aythya americana) hatched very early with those hatched very late was made in the 1961 season. Primaries of the early-hatched birds emerged when the birds were 36-38 days old, those of the late-hatched birds when they were 7-10 days younger. This difference was also found in the age at first flight and the age at eventual maturation of all primaries. Primaries of late-hatched birds were significantly shorter in length when mature than were the primaries of early-hatched birds.

  12. Strategies to guide the antibody affinity maturation process.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Joyce, M Gordon

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies with protective activity are critical for vaccine efficacy. Affinity maturation increases antibody activity through multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and selection in the germinal center. Identification of HIV-1 specific and influenza-specific antibody developmental pathways, as well as characterization of B cell and virus co-evolution in patients, has informed our understanding of antibody development. In order to counteract HIV-1 and influenza viral diversity, broadly neutralizing antibodies precisely target specific sites of vulnerability and require high levels of affinity maturation. We present immunization strategies that attempt to recapitulate these natural processes and guide the affinity maturation process. PMID:25913818

  13. Strategies to guide the antibody affinity maturation process

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Joyce, M. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies with protective activity are critical for vaccine efficacy. Affinity maturation increases antibody activity through multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and selection in the germinal center. Identification of HIV-1 specific and influenza-specific antibody developmental pathways, as well as characterization of B cell and virus co-evolution in patients, has informed our understanding of antibody development. In order to counteract HIV-1 and Influenza viral diversity, broadly neutralizing antibodies precisely target specific sites of vulnerability and require high levels of affinity maturation. We present immunization strategies that attempt to recapitulate these natural processes and guide the affinity maturation process. PMID:25913818

  14. Predicting technology operational availability using technical maturity assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenley, C.R.; Creque, T.R.

    1998-07-01

    A technical maturity assessment method was performed by systems engineers in collaboration with an advisory panel composed of team members from different Department of Energy sites and from different engineering and science disciplines. Various stabilization technologies were assessed annually as to their relative maturity and availability for use in stabilizing nuclear materials. After three years of assessments, several of the technologies are now components of operational systems. A regression analysis of the historical assessments was performed, and it was concluded that the numerical technical maturity score produced by a team of experts can provide a powerful predictor of the time remaining until the operational application of technologies.

  15. Endotoxin-induced nitric oxide production rescues airway growth and maturation in atrophic fetal rat lung explants

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, C.; Cherry, J.I.; Land, F.M.; Land, S.C. . E-mail: s.c.land@dundee.ac.uk

    2006-10-13

    Inflammation induces premature maturation of the fetal lung but the signals causing this effect remain unclear. We determined if nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, evoked by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 {mu}g ml{sup -1}), participated in this process. Fetal rat lung airway surface complexity rose 2.5-fold over 96 h in response to LPS and was associated with increased iNOS protein expression and activity. iNOS inhibition by N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine-2HCl (L-NIL) abolished this and induced airway atrophy similar to untreated explants. Surfactant protein-C (SP-C) expression was also induced by LPS and abolished by L-NIL. As TGF{beta} suppresses iNOS activity, we determined if feedback regulation modulated NO-dependent maturation. LPS induced TGF{beta}1 release and SMAD4 nuclear translocation 96 h after treatment. Treatment of explants with a blocking antibody against TGF{beta}1 sustained NO production and airway morphogenesis whereas recombinant TGF{beta}1 antagonized these effects. Feedback regulation of NO synthesis by TGF{beta} may, thus, modulate airway branching and maturation of the fetal lung.

  16. Module utilization committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.; Praver, G.

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules on a national basis and to act as a broker for requests for these modules originating outside of the National Photovoltaics Program.

  17. Implication of the estrogen receptors GPER, ESR1, ESR2 in post-testicular maturations of equine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Camille; Barrier-Battut, Isabelle; Guénon, Isabelle; Goux, Didier; Delalande, Christelle; Bouraïma-Lelong, Hélène

    2016-07-01

    Estrogen receptors ESR1, ESR2 and GPER are present on mature ejaculated horse spermatozoa, suggesting these cells as putative targets for estrogens. Indeed, spermatozoa are exposed to high level of estrogens during the transit in the male and female genital tracts but their roles are not investigated. So, we evaluated in vitro the role of 17β-estradiol during post-testicular maturations: regulation of motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction. Moreover according to the pseudo-seasonal breeder status of the stallion, we analyzed the putative seasonal variations in the presence of ESRs in spermatozoa. We showed that ESRs are more present on stallion sperm during the breeding season. We showed that capacitation and acrosome reaction are independent of estradiol action in horse. Estradiol can weakly modulate the motility and this effect is strictly associated with GPER and not with ESR1 and ESR2. The subcellular localization of GPER in the neck on stallion sperm is coherent with this effect. It seems that estrogens are not major regulators of sperm maturations associated to mare genital tract, so they could act during the epididymal maturations. PMID:27222348

  18. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 induces dendritic cell maturation and enhances the immune response against inactivated avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Qin, Tao; Yin, YinYan; Gao, Xue; Lin, Jian; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the stimulatory effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQR9 on dendritic cells (DCs) and to verify its ability to enhance the immune response by modulating DC maturation. The results demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can adhere to the nasal epithelium and be taken up by DCs in the nasal mucosa, thereby inducing DC maturation and resulting in increased CD80, CD86, CD40 and MHCII expression and cytokine secretion. The frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD69+ memory T cells were increased in spleens after nasal immunization with virus plus B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 compared to immunization with inactivated H9N2 AIV alone. Moreover, the levels of sIgA in the nasal cavity, the trachea, and the lung and the levels of IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a in serum were significantly increased in mice administered WIV plus SQR9 compared to mice administered H9N2 WIV alone. The results of this study demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens SQR9 can stimulate DC maturation to effectively induce an immune response. In conclusion, an effective immune response may result from the uptake of H9N2 by DCs in the nasal mucosa, thereby stimulating DC maturation and migration to cervical lymph nodes to initiate immune response. PMID:26892720

  19. Relative dental maturity and associated skeletal maturity in prehistoric native Americans of the Ohio valley area.

    PubMed

    Sciulli, Paul W

    2007-04-01

    Estimation of age-at-death of subadults in prehistoric skeletal samples based on modern reference standards rests on a number of assumptions of which many are untestable. If these assumptions are not met error of unknown magnitude and direction will be introduced to the subadult age estimates. This situation suggests that an independent estimate or estimates of age-related features, free of most of the assumptions made when using modern reference standards may be useful supplements in evaluating the age of subadults in prehistoric samples. The present study provides an internally consistent, population-specific measure of maturity for prehistoric Ohio valley Native Americans based on the seriation of dental development that may be used as a supplement to age-estimation. The developing dentition of 581 subadults from eight Ohio valley prehistoric-protohistoric groups was seriated within and among individuals resulting in a sequence of tooth development and a sequence of individuals from least to most mature. Dental maturity stages or sorting categories were then defined based on exclusive, easily observable, and highly repeatable tooth-formation stages. Tooth eruption (into occlusion), bone lengths, and fusion of skeletal elements are summarized by dental maturity stage. This procedure provides maturity estimates for skeletal features ordered by dental maturity stages derived from the same sample thus making explicit the relationship between dental and skeletal maturity. PMID:17243123

  20. Almond brush module cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Zohns, M.A.; Jenkins, B.M.; Mehlschau, J.J.; Morrison, D.

    1983-06-01

    This paper addresses the design, construction, and evaluation of an almond brush module cutter. The module cutter is one link in a system which processes tree prunings for fuel and fiber. This system includes a modified cotton module builder, a module mover, the cutter, and a tub grinder. An economic analysis of the cutter is presented along with the problems involved in cutting brush modules.