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Sample records for modulating lipid membrane

  1. Modulation of Endotoxicity of Shigella Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) by Genetic Lipid A Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Omar; Pesce, Isabella; Giannelli, Carlo; Aprea, Susanna; Caboni, Mariaelena; Citiulo, Francesco; Valentini, Sara; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; MacLennan, Calman Alexander; D'Oro, Ugo; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria are attractive vaccine candidates as they present surface antigens in their natural context. We previously developed a high yield production process for genetically derived particles, called generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA), from Shigella. As GMMA are derived from the outer membrane, they contain immunostimulatory components, especially lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We examined ways of reducing their reactogenicity by modifying lipid A, the endotoxic part of LPS, through deletion of late acyltransferase genes, msbB or htrB, in GMMA-producing Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri strains. GMMA with resulting penta-acylated lipid A from the msbB mutants showed a 600-fold reduced ability, and GMMA from the S. sonnei ΔhtrB mutant showed a 60,000-fold reduced ability compared with GMMA with wild-type lipid A to stimulate human Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in a reporter cell line. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed a marked reduction in induction of inflammatory cytokines (S. sonnei ΔhtrB, 800-fold; ΔmsbB mutants, 300-fold). We found that the residual activity of these GMMA is largely due to non-lipid A-related TLR2 activation. In contrast, in the S. flexneri ΔhtrB mutant, a compensatory lipid A palmitoleoylation resulted in GMMA with hexa-acylated lipid A with ∼10-fold higher activity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells than GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A, mostly due to retained TLR4 activity. Thus, for use as vaccines, GMMA will likely require lipid A penta-acylation. The results identify the relative contributions of TLR4 and TLR2 activation by GMMA, which need to be taken into consideration for GMMA vaccine development. PMID:25023285

  2. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments1-7 and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example in potassium channels8. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity toward lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry (MS) approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL), aquaporin Z (AqpZ), and the ammonia channel (AmtB) using ion mobility MS (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas-phase. By resolving lipid-bound states we then rank bound lipids based on their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Results show that lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability, the highest-ranking lipid however is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation9. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays, we discover that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Analogous experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that reposition AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Overall our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events enabling distinction of lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane protein structure and/or function. We anticipate that these

  3. Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus modulates its membrane lipids in response to hydrogen and nutrient availability

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Gagen, Emma J.; Wörmer, Lars; Broda, Nadine K.; Meador, Travis B.; Wendt, Jenny; Thomm, Michael; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus strain ΔH is a model hydrogenotrophic methanogen, for which extensive biochemical information, including the complete genome sequence, is available. Nevertheless, at the cell membrane lipid level, little is known about the responses of this archaeon to environmental stimuli. In this study, the lipid composition of M. thermautotrophicus was characterized to verify how this archaeon modulates its cell membrane components during growth phases and in response to hydrogen depletion and nutrient limitation (potassium and phosphate). As opposed to the higher abundance of phospholipids in the stationary phase of control experiments, cell membranes under nutrient, and energy stress were dominated by glycolipids that likely provided a more effective barrier against ion leakage. We also identified particular lipid regulatory mechanisms in M. thermautotrophicus, which included the accumulation of polyprenols under hydrogen-limited conditions and an increased content of sodiated adducts of lipids in nutrient-limited cells. These findings suggest that M. thermautotrophicus intensely modulates its cell membrane lipid composition to cope with energy and nutrient availability in dynamic environments. PMID:25657645

  4. Modulating lipid dynamics and membrane fluidity to drive rapid folding of a transmembrane barrel

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Svetlana Rajkumar; Chaturvedi, Deepti; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Lipid-protein interactions, critical for the folding, stability and function of membrane proteins, can be both of mechanical and chemical nature. Mechanical properties of lipid systems can be suitably influenced by physical factors so as to facilitate membrane protein folding. We demonstrate here that by modulating lipid dynamics transiently using heat, rapid folding of two 8-stranded transmembrane β-barrel proteins OmpX and OmpA1–171, in micelles and vesicles, can be achieved within seconds. Folding kinetics using this ‘heat shock’ method shows a dramatic ten to several hundred folds increase in refolding rate along with ~100% folding efficiency. We establish that OmpX thus folded is highly thermostable even in detergent micelles, and retains structural characteristics comparable to the protein in bilayers. PMID:23771099

  5. Membranes as programmable matter: modulating physical-chemical behavior in lipid ensembles derived from archaea and eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Sean Fitzpatrick

    Lipid membranes are of general interest to the scientific community due to their roles as cellular membranes, and because of their interesting material properties, such as tendencies to self-assemble into two- and three-dimensional structures. Further, there is interest in using lipid membranes as a self-assembling template or substrate for other materials, such as membrane proteins. The work presented here explores the physical-chemical interactions in and around artificial lipid membranes. In the first two chapters, lipid membranes are investigated as a form of programmable matter that responds to environmental changes. These responses manifest as two- and three-dimensional reorganization. In the subsequent chapters, the lipids of an extremophilic archaeon are examined in synthetic configurations to 1) identify how ensembles of lipids originating from organisms of different domains on the tree of life may behave in similar ways, and 2) to examine how the lipids of a desiccation-tolerant organism may be used to create robust lipid (bilayer) membranes that do not rely on liquid water to retain their structure. These collected findings expand how living membranes may be modulated or reorganized in vivo, and also suggest new ways to create programmable lipid-based materials.

  6. Biophysical Insights into How Surfaces, Including Lipid Membranes, Modulate Protein Aggregation Related to Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Yates, Elizabeth A.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’s disease (HD), associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein-misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein-misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and non-specific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (sub)cellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes. PMID:23459674

  7. Mitochondrial membrane lipids in life and death and their molecular modulation by diet: tuning the furnace.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, João P; Morais, Catarina M; Oliveira, Paulo J; Jurado, Amália S

    2014-01-01

    The traditional view of mitochondria as cell powerhouses is a matter of common knowledge, but the overall view of these extraordinary organelles has been revolutionized in the last years. In fact, a large number of important and diverse processes take place at the mitochondrial level, which clearly surpass the energy production scope, intruding the critical fragile balance between cell life and death. The entangled biochemistry of mitochondrial membranes has been found to be dependent on specific lipid requirements, with cardiolipin holding a great part of the raised functional interest. Mitochondria contain a complex membrane system, based on a variety of lipids and exquisite asymmetries. Mitochondria lipid membrane composition depends on a tight interplay with the endoplasmic reticulum, from which some of the lipids present in the mitochondrial membranes have to be imported, at least in the form of precursors. Here, we review some external interventions resulting in alterations of mitochondrial lipid content, namely dietary interventions and genetic manipulation. Such manipulations of mitochondrial membrane lipid composition should result in physiological impact, given the importance of lipid-protein interactions within the mitochondrial membrane boundaries. We provide arguments for future experiments using the most modern chemical and biophysical approaches as well as computer simulation studies applied to appropriate biological membrane model systems, in order to identify the effects exerted by diet-induced lipid changes on membrane physical properties. PMID:24953065

  8. Lipid membranes for membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kukol, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of membrane proteins requires the setup of an accurate representation of lipid bilayers. This chapter describes the setup of a lipid bilayer system from scratch using generally available tools, starting with a definition of the lipid molecule POPE, generation of a lipid bilayer, energy minimization, MD simulation, and data analysis. The data analysis includes the calculation of area and volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, self-diffusion constant, and the electron density profile. PMID:25330959

  9. Modulation of ileal bile acid transporter (ASBT) activity by depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol: association with lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Kumar, Pradeep; Saksena, Seema; Turner, Jerrold R.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alrefai, Waddah A.

    2016-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) represents a highly efficient conservation mechanism of bile acids via mediation of their active transport across the luminal membrane of terminal ileum. To gain insight into the cellular regulation of ASBT, we investigated the association of ASBT with cholesterol and sphingolipid-enriched specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts and examined the role of membrane cholesterol in maintaining ASBT function. Human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably transfected with human ASBT, human ileal brush-border membrane vesicles, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were utilized for these studies. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of ASBT protein with lipid rafts. Disruption of lipid rafts by depletion of membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) significantly reduced the association of ASBT with lipid rafts, which was paralleled by a decrease in ASBT activity in Caco-2 and HEK-293 cells treated with MβCD. The inhibition in ASBT activity by MβCD was blocked in the cells treated with MβCD-cholesterol complexes. Kinetic analysis revealed that MβCD treatment decreased the Vmax of the transporter, which was not associated with alteration in the plasma membrane expression of ASBT. Our study illustrates that cholesterol content of lipid rafts is essential for the optimal activity of ASBT and support the association of ASBT with lipid rafts. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which ASBT activity may be rapidly modulated by alterations in cholesterol content of plasma membrane and thus have important implications in processes related to maintenance of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:18063707

  10. Potential scorpionate antibiotics: targeted hydrolysis of lipid II containing model membranes by vancomycin-TACzyme conjugates and modulation of their antibacterial activity by Zn-ions.

    PubMed

    Bauke Albada, H; Arnusch, Christopher J; Branderhorst, Hilbert M; Verel, Anne-Marie; Janssen, Wouter T M; Breukink, Eefjan; de Kruijff, Ben; Pieters, Roland J; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2009-07-15

    The antibiotic vancomycin-that binds lipid II in the bacterial cell membrane-was conjugated to a mono- and tetravalent mimic of the tris-histidine catalytic triad of metalloenzymes. Targeted hydrolysis by the conjugate was observed using model membranes containing lipid II, and in vitro MIC-values of the targeted mimic constructs could be modulated by Zn-ions. PMID:19524434

  11. Plant pentacyclic triterpenic acids as modulators of lipid membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Prades, Jesús; Vögler, Oliver; Alemany, Regina; Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Funari, Sérgio S; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Barceló, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    Free triterpenic acids (TTPs) present in plants are bioactive compounds exhibiting multiple nutriceutical activities. The underlying molecular mechanisms have only been examined in part and mainly focused on anti-inflammatory properties, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, in all of which TTPs frequently affect membrane-related proteins. Based on the structural characteristics of TTPs, we assume that their effect on biophysical properties of cell membranes could play a role for their biological activity. In this context, our study is focused on the compounds, oleanolic (3β-hydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, OLA), maslinic (2α,3β-dihydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, MSL) and ursolic ((3β)-3-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid, URL) as the most important TTPs present in orujo olive oil. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and Laurdan fluorescence data provide experimental evidence that OLA, MSL and URL altered the structural properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC-Cholesterol (Cho) rich membranes, being located into the polar-hydrophobic interphase. Specifically, in DPPC membranes, TTPs altered the structural order of the L(β'), phase without destabilizing the lipid bilayer. The existence of a nonbilayer isotropic phase in coexistence with the liquid crystalline L(α) phase, as observed in DPPC:URL samples, indicated the presence of lipid structures with high curvature (probably inverted micelles). In DPPC:Cho membranes, TTPs affected the membrane phase properties increasing the Laurdan GP values above 40°C. MSL and URL induced segregation of Cho within the bilayer, in contrast to OLA, that reduced the structural organization of the membrane. These results strengthen the relevance of TTP interactions with cell membranes as a molecular mechanism underlying their broad spectrum of biological effects. PMID:21167812

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Britta; Krautkrämer, Ellen; Tibroni, Nadine; Munte, Claudia E; Rauch, Susanne; Leibrecht, Iris; Glass, Bärbel; Breuer, Sebastian; Geyer, Matthias; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Wieland, Felix T; Fackler, Oliver T

    2007-01-01

    Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo. PMID:17908312

  13. The lipid composition of Legionella dumoffii membrane modulates the interaction with Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Reszczyńska, Emilia; Luchowski, Rafał; Kania, Magdalena; Gisch, Nicolas; Waldow, Franziska; Mak, Paweł; Danikiewicz, Witold; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), an insect homologue of human apolipoprotein E (apoE), is a widely used model protein in studies on protein-lipid interactions, and anti-Legionella activity of Galleria mellonella apoLp-III has been documented. Interestingly, exogenous choline-cultured Legionella dumoffii cells are considerably more susceptible to apoLp-III than non-supplemented bacteria. In order to explain these differences, we performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of L. dumoffii lipids and a comparative lipidomic analysis of membranes of bacteria grown without and in the presence of exogenous choline. (31)P NMR analysis of L. dumoffii phospholipids (PLs) revealed a considerable increase in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content in bacteria cultured on choline medium and a decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in approximately the same range. The interactions of G. mellonella apoLp-III with lipid bilayer membranes prepared from PLs extracted from non- and choline-supplemented L. dumoffii cells were examined in detail by means of attenuated total reflection- and linear dichroism-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the kinetics of apoLp-III binding to liposomes formed from L. dumoffii PLs was analysed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using fluorescently labelled G. mellonella apoLp-III. Our results indicated enhanced binding of apoLp-III to and deeper penetration into lipid membranes formed from PLs extracted from the choline-supplemented bacteria, i.e. characterized by an increased PC/PE ratio. This could explain, at least in part, the higher susceptibility of choline-cultured L. dumoffii to G. mellonella apoLp-III. PMID:27094351

  14. Specific ions modulate diffusion dynamics of hydration water on lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinsuk; Franck, John; Pincus, Philip; Kim, Mahn Won; Han, Songi

    2014-02-12

    Effects of specific ions on the local translational diffusion of water near large hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces were measured by Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP). ODNP relies on an unpaired electron spin-containing probe located at molecular or surface sites to report on the dynamics of water protons within ~10 Å from the spin probe, which give rise to spectral densities for electron-proton cross-relaxation processes in the 10 GHz regime. This pushes nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry to more than an order of magnitude higher frequencies than conventionally feasible, permitting the measurement of water moving with picosecond to subnanosecond correlation times. Diffusion of water within ~10 Å of, i.e., up to ~3 water layers around the spin probes located on hydrophilic lipid vesicle surfaces is ~5 times retarded compared to the bulk water translational diffusion. This directly reflects on the activation barrier for surface water diffusion, i.e., how tightly water is bound to the hydrophilic surface and surrounding waters. We find this value to be modulated by the presence of specific ions in solution, with its order following the known Hofmeister series. While a molecular description of how ions affect the hydration structure at the hydrophilic surface remains to be answered, the finding that Hofmeister ions directly modulate the surface water diffusivity implies that the strength of the hydrogen bond network of surface hydration water is directly modulated on hydrophilic surfaces. PMID:24456096

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans PAQR-2 and IGLR-2 Protect against Glucose Toxicity by Modulating Membrane Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Svensk, Emma; Devkota, Ranjan; Ståhlman, Marcus; Ranji, Parmida; Rauthan, Manish; Magnusson, Fredrik; Hammarsten, Sofia; Johansson, Maja; Borén, Jan; Pilon, Marc

    2016-04-01

    In spite of the worldwide impact of diabetes on human health, the mechanisms behind glucose toxicity remain elusive. Here we show that C. elegans mutants lacking paqr-2, the worm homolog of the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1/2, or its newly identified functional partner iglr-2, are glucose intolerant and die in the presence of as little as 20 mM glucose. Using FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching) on living worms, we found that cultivation in the presence of glucose causes a decrease in membrane fluidity in paqr-2 and iglr-2 mutants and that genetic suppressors of this sensitivity act to restore membrane fluidity by promoting fatty acid desaturation. The essential roles of paqr-2 and iglr-2 in the presence of glucose are completely independent from daf-2 and daf-16, the C. elegans homologs of the insulin receptor and its downstream target FoxO, respectively. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we also show that PAQR-2 and IGLR-2 interact on plasma membranes and thus may act together as a fluidity sensor that controls membrane lipid composition. PMID:27082444

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans PAQR-2 and IGLR-2 Protect against Glucose Toxicity by Modulating Membrane Lipid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Svensk, Emma; Devkota, Ranjan; Ståhlman, Marcus; Ranji, Parmida; Rauthan, Manish; Magnusson, Fredrik; Hammarsten, Sofia; Johansson, Maja; Borén, Jan; Pilon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the worldwide impact of diabetes on human health, the mechanisms behind glucose toxicity remain elusive. Here we show that C. elegans mutants lacking paqr-2, the worm homolog of the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1/2, or its newly identified functional partner iglr-2, are glucose intolerant and die in the presence of as little as 20 mM glucose. Using FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching) on living worms, we found that cultivation in the presence of glucose causes a decrease in membrane fluidity in paqr-2 and iglr-2 mutants and that genetic suppressors of this sensitivity act to restore membrane fluidity by promoting fatty acid desaturation. The essential roles of paqr-2 and iglr-2 in the presence of glucose are completely independent from daf-2 and daf-16, the C. elegans homologs of the insulin receptor and its downstream target FoxO, respectively. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we also show that PAQR-2 and IGLR-2 interact on plasma membranes and thus may act together as a fluidity sensor that controls membrane lipid composition. PMID:27082444

  17. Crystal Structure of a Voltage-gated K+ Channel Pore Module in a Closed State in Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Jose S.; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo A.; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Syeda, Ruhma; Cherezov, Vadim; Baker, Kent A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Montal, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels underlie the electrical excitability of cells. Each subunit of the functional tetramer consists of the tandem fusion of two modules, an N-terminal voltage-sensor and a C-terminal pore. To investigate how sensor coupling to the pore generates voltage-dependent channel opening, we solved the crystal structure and characterized the function of a voltage-gated K+ channel pore in a lipid membrane. The structure of a functional channel in a membrane environment at 3.1 Å resolution establishes an unprecedented connection between channel structure and function. The structure is unique in delineating an ion-occupied ready to conduct selectivity filter, a confined aqueous cavity, and a closed activation gate, embodying a dynamic entity trapped in an unstable closed state. PMID:23095758

  18. Painted supported lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Florin, E.-L.; Gaub, H. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report herein measurements on a novel type of supported lipid films, which we call painted supported membranes (PSM). These membranes are formed in a self-assembly process on alkylated gold films from an organic solution. The formation process was investigated with surface plasmon resonance microscopy. The optical and electrical properties of the films were determined for various types of lipids and as a function of temperature by means of cyclic voltammetry and potential relaxation after charge injection. We could show that these films exhibit an extraordinarily high specific resistivity which, depending on the lipid, may be as high as 109 ohm/cm2. We could also show that due to this low conductivity, an electrical polarization across the PSM relaxes with characteristic time constants of up to 20 min. The electrical properties together with their high mechanical stability and accessibility to surface sensitive techniques make these films well suitable model membranes for optical and electrical investigations. Examples for such applications are given in the subsequent article by Seifert et al. ImagesFIGURE 3FIGURE 4 PMID:19431873

  19. Permeability across lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Wataru

    2016-10-01

    Molecular permeation through lipid membranes is a fundamental biological process that is important for small neutral molecules and drug molecules. Precise characterization of free energy surface and diffusion coefficients along the permeation pathway is required in order to predict molecular permeability and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of permeation. Several recent technical developments, including improved molecular models and efficient sampling schemes, are illustrated in this review. For larger penetrants, explicit consideration of multiple collective variables, including orientational, conformational degrees of freedom, are required to be considered in addition to the distance from the membrane center along the membrane normal. Although computationally demanding, this method can provide significant insights into the molecular mechanisms of permeation for molecules of medical and pharmaceutical importance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27085977

  20. Membrane lipid physical state and modulation of the Na+,Mg2+-ATPase activity in Acholeplasma laidlawii B.

    PubMed Central

    Silvius, J R; McElhaney, R N

    1980-01-01

    Careful analysis of the Arrhenius plot of the Na+,Mg2+-ATPase (ATP pyrophosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.8) activity in Acholeplasma laidlawii B membranes of varying fatty acid composition has been combined with differential thermal analysis of the membrane lipid phase transitions to evaluate the effects of membrane lipid properties on the enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the enzyme is active only in association with liquid-crystalline lipids, exhibiting a significant heat capacity of activation, delta Cp++, for the ATP hydrolytic reaction in this case. Quantitative analyses of Arrhenius plots for the enzyme activity in membranes whose lipids exhibit a gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition in the physiological temperature range suggest that the ATPase is inactivated when its boundary lipids undergo a phase transition that is driven by the bulk lipid phase transition but is less cooperative than the latter. Our results suggest that the familiar "biphasic linear" Arrhenius plots obtained for many membrane enzymes may in fact have a more complex shape, analysis of which can furnish useful information regarding the behavior of the enzyme molecule. Images PMID:6445554

  1. Lipid exchange between membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jähnig, F

    1984-01-01

    The exchange of lipid molecules between vesicle bilayers in water and a monolayer forming at the water surface was investigated theoretically within the framework of thermodynamics. The total number of exchanged molecules was found to depend on the bilayer curvature as expressed by the vesicle radius and on the boundary condition for exchange, i.e., whether during exchange the radius or the packing density of the vesicles remains constant. The boundary condition is determined by the rate of flip-flop within the bilayer relative to the rate of exchange between bi- and monolayer. If flip-flop is fast, exchange is independent of the vesicle radius; if flip-flop is slow, exchange increases with the vesicle radius. Available experimental results agree with the detailed form of this dependence. When the theory was extended to exchange between two bilayers of different curvature, the direction of exchange was also determined by the curvatures and the boundary conditions for exchange. Due to the dependence of the boundary conditions on flip-flop and, consequently, on membrane fluidity, exchange between membranes may partially be regulated by membrane fluidity. PMID:6518251

  2. The modulating effect of mechanical changes in lipid bilayers caused by apoE-containing lipoproteins on Aβ induced membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Legleiter, Justin; Fryer, John D; Holtzman, David M; Kowalewski, Andtomasz

    2011-10-19

    A major feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder, is the ordered aggregation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) into fibrils that comprise extracellular neuritic plaques found in the disease brain. One of many potential pathways for Aβ toxicity may be modulation of lipid membrane function. Here, we show by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) that astrocyte secreted lipoprotein particles (ASLPs) containing different isoforms of apolipoprotein E (apoE), of which the apoE4 allele is a major risk factor for the development of AD, can protect total brain lipid extract bilayers from Aβ(1-40) induced disruption. The apoE4 allele was less effective in protecting lipid bilayers from disruption compared with apoE3. Size analysis of apoE-containing ASLPs and mechanical studies of bilayer properties revealed that apoE-containing ASLPs modulate the mechanical properties of bilayers by acquiring some bilayer components (most likely cholesterol and/or oxidatively damaged lipids). Measurement of bilayer mechanical properties was accomplished with scanning probe acceleration microscopy (SPAM). These measurements demonstrated that apoE4 was also less effective in modulating mechanical properties of bilayers in comparison with apoE3. This ability of apoE to alter the mechanical properties of lipid membranes may represent a potential mechanism for the suppression of Aβ(1-40) induced bilayer disruption. PMID:22125665

  3. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Patrik K.; Jullesson, David; Elfwing, Anders; Liin, Sara I.; Musumeci, Chiara; Zeglio, Erica; Elinder, Fredrik; Solin, Niclas; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium:lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes. PMID:26059023

  4. Lipid membranes on nanostructured silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, Andrea Lynn; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Ista, Linnea K.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bisong, Paul; Zeineldin, Reema R.; Last, Julie A.; Brueck, Stephen R. J.

    2004-12-01

    A unique composite nanoscale architecture that combines the self-organization and molecular dynamics of lipid membranes with a corrugated nanotextured silicon wafer was prepared and characterized with fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. The goal of this project was to understand how such structures can be assembled for supported membrane research and how the interfacial interactions between the solid substrate and the soft, self-assembled material create unique physical and mechanical behavior through the confinement of phases in the membrane. The nanometer scale structure of the silicon wafer was produced through interference lithography followed by anisotropic wet etching. For the present study, a line pattern with 100 nm line widths, 200 nm depth and a pitch of 360 nm pitch was fabricated. Lipid membranes were successfully adsorbed on the structured silicon surface via membrane fusion techniques. The surface topology of the bilayer-Si structure was imaged using in situ tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The membrane was observed to drape over the silicon structure producing an undulated topology with amplitude of 40 nm that matched the 360 nm pitch of the silicon structure. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments found that on the microscale those same structures exhibit anisotropic lipid mobility that was coincident with the silicon substructure. The results showed that while the lipid membrane maintains much of its self-assembled structure in the composite architecture, the silicon substructure indeed influences the dynamics of the molecular motion within the membrane.

  5. Sensing voltage across lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Kenton J.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of electrical potentials across lipid bilayers by specialized membrane proteins is required for many fundamental cellular processes such as the generation and propagation of nerve impulses. These membrane proteins possess modular voltage-sensing domains, a notable example being the S1-S4 domains of voltage-activated ion channels. Ground-breaking structural studies on these domains explain how voltage sensors are designed and reveal important interactions with the surrounding lipid membrane. Although further structures are needed to fully understand the conformational changes that occur during voltage sensing, the available data help to frame several key concepts that are fundamental to the mechanism of voltage sensing. PMID:19092925

  6. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  7. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  8. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, J.

    1994-03-15

    A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

  9. Electrostatics of Deformable Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (∼0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation. PMID:20550903

  10. Membrane lipids of Mycoplasma fermentans.

    PubMed

    Salman, M; Deutsch, I; Tarshis, M; Naot, Y; Rottem, S

    1994-11-01

    Membranes of Mycoplasma fermentans, incognitus strain, were isolated by a combination of osmotic lysis and sonication. Analysis of membrane lipids revealed, in addition to free and esterified cholesterol, six major polar lipids dominated by a de novo synthesized compound (compound X), which accounts for 64% of the total lipid phosphorus. Compound X was labeled by palmitate, but not by oleate. Mass spectrometry and gas liquid chromatography analyses of compound X revealed two molecular species with molecular masses of 1048 and 1076 representing, a dipalmitoyl- and a stearoyl-palmitoyl-glycerodiphosphatidylcholine. Compound X has the ability to stimulate human monocytes to secret TNF alpha and to enhance the fusion of small unilamellar vesicles with MOLT-3 lymphocytes. PMID:7988908

  11. Development of electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy to probe the secondary structure of recombinant membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongfu; Sahu, Indra D; Gibson, Kaylee R; Muhammad, Nefertiti B; Bali, Avnika P; Comer, Raven G; Liu, Lishan; Craig, Andrew F; Mccarrick, Robert M; Dabney-Smith, Carole; Sanders, Charles R; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-11-01

    Membrane proteins conduct many important biological functions essential to the survival of organisms. However, due to their inherent hydrophobic nature, it is very difficult to obtain structural information on membrane-bound proteins using traditional biophysical techniques. We are developing a new approach to probe the secondary structure of membrane proteins using the pulsed EPR technique of Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy. This method has been successfully applied to model peptides made synthetically. However, in order for this ESEEM technique to be widely applicable to larger membrane protein systems with no size limitations, protein samples with deuterated residues need to be prepared via protein expression methods. For the first time, this study shows that the ESEEM approach can be used to probe the local secondary structure of a (2) H-labeled d8 -Val overexpressed membrane protein in a membrane mimetic environment. The membrane-bound human KCNE1 protein was used with a known solution NMR structure to demonstrate the applicability of this methodology. Three different α-helical regions of KCNE1 were probed: the extracellular domain (Val21), transmembrane domain (Val50), and cytoplasmic domain (Val95). These results indicated α-helical structures in all three segments, consistent with the micelle structure of KCNE1. Furthermore, KCNE1 was incorporated into a lipid bilayer and the secondary structure of the transmembrane domain (Val50) was shown to be α-helical in a more native-like environment. This study extends the application of this ESEEM approach to much larger membrane protein systems that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography and/or NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26355804

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stability of macroion-decorated lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Sylvio

    2005-08-01

    Adsorption of macroions such as colloidal particles, proteins, or other rigid biopolymers onto oppositely charged, mixed lipid membranes is a ubiquitous phenomenon encountered in biotechnology, drug delivery, and cellular biology. The softness and self-assembled nature of the membrane enable the macroion-membrane complex to laterally reorganize via forming macroion clusters, lipid domains, or separate phases, and to exhibit curvature modulations or even morphological transitions. Almost always, the lateral organization of the membrane and associated macroion layer mutually depend on each other so that neither of the two extreme views—macroion-induced membrane domain formation or membrane-mediated macroion clustering—strictly accounts for the underlying energetics. We review and discuss some recent efforts to describe the lateral organization and stability of macroion-decorated lipid membranes using different levels of mean-field electrostatics, thereby focusing on binary membranes and the destabilizing role of compositional gradients.

  13. Effect of surface-potential modulators on the opening of lipid pores in liposomal and mitochondrial inner membranes induced by palmitate and calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Belosludtsev, Konstantin N; Belosludtseva, Natalia V; Agafonov, Alexey V; Penkov, Nikita V; Samartsev, Victor N; Lemasters, John J; Mironova, Galina D

    2015-10-01

    The effect of surface-potential modulators on palmitate/Ca2+-induced formation of lipid pores was studied in liposomal and inner mitochondrial membranes. Pore formation was monitored by sulforhodamine B release from liposomes and swelling of mitochondria. ζ-potential in liposomes was determined from electrophoretic mobility. Replacement of sucrose as the osmotic agent with KCl decreased negative ζ-potential in liposomes and increased resistance of both mitochondria and liposomes to the pore inducers, palmitic acid, and Ca2+. Micromolar Mg2+ also inhibited palmitate/Ca2+-induced permeabilization of liposomes. The rate of palmitate/Ca2+-induced, cyclosporin A-insensitive swelling of mitochondria increased 22% upon increasing pH from 7.0 to 7.8. At below the critical micelle concentration, the cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (10 μM) and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (10-50 μM) made the ζ-potential less and more negative, respectively, and inhibited and stimulated opening of mitochondrial palmitate/Ca2+-induced lipid pores. Taken together, the findings indicate that surface potential regulates palmitate/Ca2+-induced lipid pore opening. PMID:26014488

  14. Effect of surface-potential modulators on the opening of lipid pores in liposomal and mitochondrial inner membranes induced by palmitate and calcium ions

    PubMed Central

    Belosludtsev, Konstantin N.; Belosludtseva, Natalia V.; Agafonov, Alexey V.; Penkov, Nikita V.; Samartsev, Victor N.; Lemasters, John J.; Mironova, Galina D.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of surface-potential modulators on palmitate/Ca2+-induced formation of lipid pores was studied in liposomal and inner mitochondrial membranes. Pore formation was monitored by sulforhodamine B release from liposomes and swelling of mitochondria. ζ-potential in liposomes was determined from electrophoretic mobility. Replacement of sucrose as the osmotic agent with KCl decreased negative ζ-potential in liposomes and increased resistance of both mitochondria and liposomes to the pore inducers, palmitic acid, and Ca2+. Micromolar Mg2+ also inhibited palmitate/Ca2+-induced permeabilization of liposomes. The rate of palmitate/Ca2+-induced, cyclosporin A-insensitive swelling of mitochondria increased 22% upon increasing pH from 7.0 to 7.8. At below the critical micelle concentration, the cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (10 μM) and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (10–50 μM) made the ζ-potential less and more negative, respectively, and inhibited and stimulated opening of mitochondrial palmitate/Ca2+-induced lipid pores. Taken together, the findings indicate that surface potential regulates palmitate/Ca2+-induced lipid pore opening. PMID:26014488

  15. Toll-Like Receptor Activation by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens from Lipid A Mutants of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Omar; Caboni, Mariaelena; Negrea, Aurel; Necchi, Francesca; Alfini, Renzo; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a neglected disease with high mortality in children and HIV-positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, caused primarily by Africa-specific strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. A vaccine using GMMA (generalized modules for membrane antigens) from S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis containing lipid A modifications to reduce potential in vivo reactogenicity is under development. GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed the greatest reduction in the level of cytokine release from human peripheral blood monocytes from that for GMMA with wild-type lipid A. Deletion of the lipid A modification genes msbB and pagP was required to achieve pure penta-acylation. Interestingly, ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA from S. Enteritidis had a slightly higher stimulatory potential than those from S. Typhimurium, a finding consistent with the higher lipopolysaccharide (LPS) content and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) stimulatory potential of the former. Also, TLR5 ligand flagellin was found in Salmonella GMMA. No relevant contribution to the stimulatory potential of GMMA was detected even when the flagellin protein FliC from S. Typhimurium was added at a concentration as high as 10% of total protein, suggesting that flagellin impurities are not a major factor for GMMA-mediated immune stimulation. Overall, the stimulatory potential of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA was close to that of Shigella sonnei GMMA, which are currently in phase I clinical trials. PMID:26865597

  16. Curvature Forces in Membrane Lipid-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael F.

    2012-02-01

    Membrane protein conformational changes, folding, and stability may all involve elastic deformation of the bilayer. Non-specific properties of the bilayer play a significant role in modulating protein conformational energetics. A flexible-surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. The FSM describes elastic coupling of membrane lipids to integral membrane proteins. Curvature and hydrophobic matching to the lipid bilayer entails a stress field that explains membrane protein stability. Rhodopsin provides an important example, where solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy characterize the energy landscape of the dynamically activated receptor. Time-resolved UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopic studies show how membrane lipids affect the metarhodopsin equilibrium due to non-specific material properties. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress on rhodopsin function are all explained by the new biomembrane model. By contrast, the older fluid-mosaic model fails to account for such effects on membrane protein activity. According to the FSM proteins are regulated by membrane lipids whose spontaneous curvature most closely matches the activated state within the lipid membrane.

  17. Sterol Modulation of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase Activity from Corn Roots Reconstituted into Soybean Lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Schuler-Muller, I.; Hartmann, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    A partially purified H+-ATPase from the plasma membrane (PM) of corn (Zea mays L.) roots was inserted into vesicles prepared with soybean (Glycine max L.) phospholipids and various concentrations of individual sterols using either a freeze-thaw sonication or an octylglucoside dilution procedure. Both methods yielded a functional enzyme that retained its native characteristics. We have investigated the effects of typical plant sterols (i.e. sitosterol, stigmasterol, and 24-methylcholesterol) on both ATP hydrolysis and H+ pumping by the reconstituted corn root PM ATPase. We have also checked the influence of cholesterol and of two unusual sterols, 24-methylpollinastanol and 14[alpha],24-dimethylcholest-8-en-3[beta]-ol. Here we present evidence for a sterol modulation of the plant PM H+-ATPase activity. In particular, cholesterol and stigmasterol were found to stimulate the pump, especially when present at 5 mol%, whereas all of the other sterols tested behaved as inhibitors at any concentration in proteoliposomes. In all situations H+ pumping was shown to be more sensitive to a sterol environment than was ATP hydrolysis. Our results suggest the occurrence of binding sites for sterols on the plant PM H+-ATPase. PMID:12223599

  18. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  19. Electrodiffusion of lipids on membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. C.

    2012-05-01

    Lateral translocation of lipids and proteins is a universal process on membrane surfaces. Local aggregation or organization of lipids and proteins can be induced when the random lateral motion is mediated by the electrostatic interactions and membrane curvature. Although the lateral diffusion rates of lipids on membranes of various compositions are measured and the electrostatic free energies of predetermined protein-membrane-lipid systems can be computed, the process of the aggregation and the evolution to the electrostatically favorable states remain largely undetermined. Here we propose an electrodiffusion model, based on the variational principle of the free energy functional, for the self-consistent lateral drift-diffusion of multiple species of charged lipids on membrane surfaces. Finite sizes of lipids are modeled to enforce the geometrical constraint of the lipid concentration on membrane surfaces. A surface finite element method is developed to appropriate the Laplace-Beltrami operators in the partial differential equations of the model. Our model properly describes the saturation of lipids on membrane surfaces, and correctly predicts that the MARCKS peptide can consistently sequester three multivalent phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids through its basic amino acid residues, regardless of a wide range of the percentage of monovalent phosphatidylserine in the membrane.

  20. Concise theory of chiral lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Z. C.; Seifert, U.

    2007-09-01

    A theory of chiral lipid membranes is proposed on the basis of a concise free energy density which includes the contributions of the bending and the surface tension of membranes, as well as the chirality and orientational variation of tilting molecules. This theory is consistent with the previous experiments [J.M. Schnur , Science 264, 945 (1994); M.S. Spector , Langmuir 14, 3493 (1998); Y. Zhao, , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 7438 (2005)] on self-assembled chiral lipid membranes of DC8,9PC . A torus with the ratio between its two generated radii larger than 2 is predicted from the Euler-Lagrange equations. It is found that tubules with helically modulated tilting state are not admitted by the Euler-Lagrange equations and that they are less energetically favorable than helical ripples in tubules. The pitch angles of helical ripples are theoretically estimated to be about 0° and 35°, which are close to the most frequent values 5° and 28° observed in the experiment [N. Mahajan , Langmuir 22, 1973 (2006)]. Additionally, the present theory can explain twisted ribbons of achiral cationic amphiphiles interacting with chiral tartrate counterions. The ratio between the width and pitch of twisted ribbons is predicted to be proportional to the relative concentration difference of left- and right-handed enantiomers in the low relative concentration difference region, which is in good agreement with the experiment [R. Oda , Nature (London) 399, 566 (1999)].

  1. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a ‘slipping mode’ in addition to the conventional ‘bending mode’ for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  2. Dynamics and instabilities of lipid bilayer membrane shapes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    Biological membranes undergo constant shape remodeling involving the formation of highly curved structures. The lipid bilayer represents the fundamental architecture of the cellular membrane with its shapes determined by the Helfrich curvature bending energy. However, the dynamics of bilayer shape transitions, especially their modulation by membrane proteins, and the resulting shape instabilities, are still not well understood. Here, we review in a unifying manner several theories that describe the fluctuations (i.e. undulations) of bilayer shapes as well as their local coupling with lipid or protein density variation. The coupling between local membrane curvature and lipid density gives rise to a 'slipping mode' in addition to the conventional 'bending mode' for damping the membrane fluctuation. This leads to a number of interesting experimental phenomena regarding bilayer shape dynamics. More importantly, curvature-inducing proteins can couple with membrane shape and eventually render the membrane unstable. A criterion for membrane shape instability is derived from a linear stability analysis. The instability criterion reemphasizes the importance of membrane tension in regulating the stability and dynamics of membrane geometry. Recent progresses in understanding the role of membrane tension in regulating dynamical cellular processes are also reviewed. Protein density is emphasized as a key factor in regulating membrane shape transitions: a threshold density of curvature coupling proteins is required for inducing membrane morphology transitions. PMID:24529968

  3. S-layer stabilized lipid membranes (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    The present review focuses on a unique bio-molecular construction kit based on surface-layer (S-layer) proteins as building blocks and patterning elements, but also major classes of biological molecules such as lipids, membrane-active peptides and membrane proteins, and glycans for the design of functional supported lipid membranes. The biomimetic approach copying the supramolecular building principle of most archaeal cell envelopes merely composed of a plasma membrane and a closely associated S-layer lattice has resulted in robust and fluid lipid membranes. Most importantly, S-layer supported lipid membranes spanning an aperture or generated on solid and porous substrates constitute highly interesting model membranes for the reconstitution of responsive transmembrane proteins and membrane-active peptides. This is of particular challenge as one-third of all proteins are membrane proteins such as pore-forming proteins, ion channels, and receptors. S-layer supported lipid membranes are seen as one of the most innovative strategies in membrane protein-based nanobiotechnology with potential applications that range from pharmaceutical (high-throughput) drug screening over lipid chips to the detection of biological warfare agents. PMID:20408666

  4. Model answers to lipid membrane questions.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2011-09-01

    Ever since it was discovered that biological membranes have a core of a bimolecular sheet of lipid molecules, lipid bilayers have been a model laboratory for investigating physicochemical and functional properties of biological membranes. Experimental and theoretical models help the experimental scientist to plan experiments and interpret data. Theoretical models are the theoretical scientist's preferred toys to make contact between membrane theory and experiments. Most importantly, models serve to shape our intuition about which membrane questions are the more fundamental and relevant ones to pursue. Here we review some membrane models for lipid self-assembly, monolayers, bilayers, liposomes, and lipid-protein interactions and illustrate how such models can help answering questions in modern lipid cell biology. PMID:21610116

  5. Characterization of lipid domains in erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, W; Glaser, M

    1991-01-01

    Fluorescence digital imaging microscopy was used to study the lateral distribution of the lipid components in erythrocyte membranes. Intact erythrocytes labeled with phospholipids containing a fluorophore attached to one fatty acid chain showed an uneven distribution of the phospholipids in the membrane thereby demonstrating the presence of membrane domains. The enrichment of the lipotropic compound chlor-promazine in domains in intact erythrocytes also suggested that the domains are lipid-enriched regions. Similar membrane domains were present in erythrocyte ghosts. The phospholipid enrichment was increased in the domains by inducing membrane protein aggregation. Double-labeling experiments were done to determine the relative distributions of different phospholipids in the membrane. Vesicles made from extracted lipids did not show the presence of domains consistent with the conclusion that membrane proteins were responsible for creating the domains. Overall, it was found that large domains exist in the red blood cell membrane with unequal enrichment of the different phospholipid species. Images PMID:1996337

  6. The electrical interplay between proteins and lipids in membranes.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Bramble, Jonathan P; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-09-01

    All molecular interactions that are relevant to cellular and molecular structures are electrical in nature but manifest in a rich variety of forms that each has its own range and influences on the net effect of how molecular species interact. This article outlines how electrical interactions between the protein and lipid membrane components underlie many of the activities of membrane function. Particular emphasis is placed on spatially localised behaviour in membranes involving modulation of protein activity and microdomain structure. The interactions between membrane lipids and membrane proteins together with their role within cell biology represent an enormous body of work. Broad conclusions are not easy given the complexities of the various systems and even consensus with model membrane systems containing two or three lipid types is difficult. By defining two types of broad lipid-protein interaction, respectively Type I as specific and Type II as more non-specific and focussing on the electrical interactions mostly in the extra-membrane regions it is possible to assemble broad rules or a consensus of the dominant features of the interplay between these two fundamentally important classes of membrane component. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25817548

  7. Single molecule dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaug, Michael James

    Lipid membranes are self-assembled molecular materials that form the membranes of cells. Because of their biological function, lipid membranes are important from a biomedical and biotechnological standpoint. Because of their complex fluid properties, they also provide a rich testbed for studying the structure and dynamics in self-assembled materials and for developing other bio-mimetic structures. In this work, we studied the dynamics of single lipid molecules using experimental and computational techniques. Using single molecule fluorescence microscopy, we tracked the diffusive motion of lipids in phase separated lipid membranes. With the additional techniques of atomic force microscopy and Monte Carlo simulation, we were able to, for the first time experimentally, directly correlate the observed obstructed diffusion with lipid membrane organization. The single molecule tracking tracking experiments required the addition of impurity fluorescent molecules and the assumption that the impurities do not alter the dynamics of the system. To test this assumption, we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of a fluorescently labeled lipid in a lipid membrane. We showed that the fluorescent impurity could have a significant impact on some membrane properties, such as phase behavior, but that relative changes in diffusive behavior are unaffected.

  8. S-layer-supported lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Schuster, B; Sleytr, U B

    2000-09-01

    Many prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria) are covered by a regularly ordered surface layer (S-layer) as the outermost cell wall component. S-layers are built up of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membrane developed during evolution. Pores in S-layers are of regular size and morphology, and functional groups on the protein lattice are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations. Due to the high degree of structural regularity S-layers represent unique systems for studying the structure, morphogenesis, and function of layered supramolecular assemblies. Isolated S-layer subunits of numerous organisms are able to assemble into monomolecular arrays either in suspension, at air/water interfaces, on planar mono- and bilayer lipid films, on liposomes and on solid supports (e.g. silicon wafers). Detailed studies on composite S-layer/lipid structures have been performed with Langmuir films, freestanding bilayer lipid membranes, solid supported lipid membranes, and liposomes. Lipid molecules in planar films and liposomes interact via their head groups with defined domains on the S-layer lattice. Electrostatic interactions are the most prevalent forces. The hydrophobic chains of the lipid monolayers are almost unaffected by the attachment of the S-layer and no impact on the hydrophobic thickness of the membranes has been observed. Upon crystallization of a coherent S-layer lattice on planar and vesicular lipid membranes, an increase in molecular order is observed, which is reflected in a decrease of the membrane tension and an enhanced mobility of probe molecules within an S-layer-supported bilayer. Thus, the terminology 'semifluid membrane' has been introduced for describing S-layer-supported lipid membranes. The most important feature of composite S-layer/lipid membranes is an enhanced stability in comparison to unsupported membranes. PMID:11143799

  9. Protein-lipid interactions and non-lamellar lipidic structures in membrane pore formation and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2016-03-01

    Pore-forming proteins and peptides act on their targeted lipid bilayer membranes to increase permeability. This approach to the modulation of biological function is relevant to a great number of living processes, including; infection, parasitism, immunity, apoptosis, development and neurodegeneration. While some pore-forming proteins/peptides assemble into rings of subunits to generate discrete, well-defined pore-forming structures, an increasing number is recognised to form pores via mechanisms which co-opt membrane lipids themselves. Among these, membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) family proteins, Bax/colicin family proteins and actinoporins are especially prominent and among the mechanisms believed to apply are the formation of non-lamellar (semi-toroidal or toroidal) lipidic structures. In this review I focus on the ways in which lipids contribute to pore formation and contrast this with the ways in which lipids are co-opted also in membrane fusion and fission events. A variety of mechanisms for pore formation that involve lipids exists, but they consistently result in stable hybrid proteolipidic structures. These structures are stabilised by mechanisms in which pore-forming proteins modify the innate capacity of lipid membranes to respond to their environment, changing shape and/or phase and binding individual lipid molecules directly. In contrast, and despite the diversity in fusion protein types, mechanisms for membrane fusion are rather similar to each other, mapping out a pathway from pairs of separated compartments to fully confluent fused membranes. Fusion proteins generate metastable structures along the way which, like long-lived proteolipidic pore-forming complexes, rely on the basic physical properties of lipid bilayers. Membrane fission involves similar intermediates, in the reverse order. I conclude by considering the possibility that at least some pore-forming and fusion proteins are evolutionarily related

  10. Stabilization of concentration fluctuations in mixed membranes by hybrid lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Safran, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    Finite-size domains have been observed at the surface of cells. These lipids ``rafts'' are stable nanodomains enriched in saturated lipids and cholesterol. While line tension favors macrodomains, one explanation for raft stabilization suggests that the membrane composition is tuned close to a spinodal temperature. From this point of view, rafts are long-lived concentration fluctuations in the mixed phase. We propose a ternary mixture model for the cell membrane that includes hybrid lipids which have one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. Finite amount of hybrid lipids reduces the packing incompatibility at the saturated/unsaturated lipid interface and stabilizes the concentration fluctuations. Hybrid-Hybrid interactions are included in the model and further increase the life-time of the rafts and decrease their length-scales. Moreover, the hybrid has extra orientational degrees of freedom that may lead to modulated phases.

  11. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-07-21

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw. PMID:26200868

  12. Model Answers to Lipid Membrane Questions

    PubMed Central

    Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since it was discovered that biological membranes have a core of a bimolecular sheet of lipid molecules, lipid bilayers have been a model laboratory for investigating physicochemical and functional properties of biological membranes. Experimental and theoretical models help the experimental scientist to plan experiments and interpret data. Theoretical models are the theoretical scientist’s preferred toys to make contact between membrane theory and experiments. Most importantly, models serve to shape our intuition about which membrane questions are the more fundamental and relevant ones to pursue. Here we review some membrane models for lipid self-assembly, monolayers, bilayers, liposomes, and lipid–protein interactions and illustrate how such models can help answering questions in modern lipid cell biology. PMID:21610116

  13. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  14. Membrane curvature and cholesterol effects on lipids packing and spin-labelled lipids conformational distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukovsky, Nurit; Sanders, Ella; Matalon, Erez; Wolf, Sharon G.; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-10-01

    Nitroxide spin-labelled lipid analogues are often used to study model membrane properties using EPR spectroscopy. Whereas in liquid phase membranes the spin label assumes, on average, its putative location, in gel phases and frozen membrane, depending on its position along the acyl chain, it may exhibit a different average location. Here we used 2H three-pulse Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) of phospholipid spin probes, combined with various deuteration schemes to detect the effect of the model membrane curvature and cholesterol on vertical migrations of the spin label. We compared large and small unilamellar 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) vesicles with and without cholesterol (10%). The vertical displacement of the spin label was manifested as an apparently flat trans-membrane profile of water concentration and of label proximity to the head group choline. The spin-label propensity to migrate was found to increase with vesicle curvature and decrease in the presence of cholesterol. This in turn reflects the effect of packing and ordering of the membrane lipids. The results show that in curved vesicles lacking cholesterol, the label attached to carbon 16 may travel as far high along the membrane normal as the location of the label on carbon 5, due to the presence of U-shaped lipid conformations. This phenomenon must be taken into account when using spin-labelled lipids as membrane depth markers or to trace trans-membrane profiles.

  15. Critical dynamics in multicomponent lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Haataja, Mikko

    2009-08-01

    The formation and dynamics of spatially extended compositional domains in multicomponent lipid membranes both in vivo and in vitro lie at the heart of many important biological and biophysical phenomena. While the thermodynamic basis for domain formation has been explored extensively in the past, the roles of membrane and exterior fluid hydrodynamics on domain formation kinetics have received less attention. A case in point is the impact of hydrodynamics on the dynamics of compositional heterogeneities in lipid membranes in the vicinity of a critical point. In this Rapid Communication it is argued that the asymptotic dynamic behavior of a lipid membrane system in the vicinity of a critical point is strongly influenced by hydrodynamic interactions. More specifically, a mode-coupling argument is developed which predicts a scaling behavior of lipid transport coefficients near the critical point for both symmetric and asymmetric bilayers immersed in a bulk fluid. PMID:19792068

  16. DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Langecker, Martin; Arnaut, Vera; List, Jonathan; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA has been previously shown to be useful as a material for the fabrication of static nanoscale objects, and also for the realization of dynamic molecular devices and machines. In many cases, nucleic acid assemblies directly mimic biological structures, for example, cytoskeletal filaments, enzyme scaffolds, or molecular motors, and many of the applications envisioned for such structures involve the study or imitation of biological processes, and even the interaction with living cells and organisms. An essential feature of biological systems is their elaborate structural organization and compartmentalization, and this most often involves membranous structures that are formed by dynamic assemblies of lipid molecules. Imitation of or interaction with biological systems using the tools of DNA nanotechnology thus ultimately and necessarily also involves interactions with lipid membrane structures, and thus the creation of DNA-lipid hybrid assemblies. Due to their differing chemical nature, however, highly charged nucleic acids and amphiphilic lipids do not seem the best match for the construction of such systems, and in fact they are rarely found in nature. In recent years, however, a large variety of lipid-interacting DNA conjugates were developed, which are now increasingly being applied also for the realization of DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we will present the current state of this emerging class of nanosystems. After a brief overview of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of lipids and lipid bilayer membranes, we will discuss how DNA molecules can interact with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions or via covalent modification with hydrophobic moieties. We will then show how such DNA-lipid interactions have been utilized for the realization of DNA nanostructures attached to or embedded within lipid bilayer membranes. Under certain conditions, DNA nanostructures remain mobile on

  17. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host Lipid Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Lee, Jean; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-11-30

    The default lipid for the bulk of the crystallogenesis studies performed to date using the cubic mesophase method is monoolein. There is no good reason, however, why this 18-carbon, cis-monounsaturated monoacylglycerol should be the preferred lipid for all target membrane proteins. The latter come from an array of biomembrane types with varying properties that include hydrophobic thickness, intrinsic curvature, lateral pressure profile, lipid and protein makeup, and compositional asymmetry. Thus, it seems reasonable that screening for crystallizability based on the identity of the lipid creating the hosting mesophase would be worthwhile. For this, monoacylglycerols with differing acyl chain characteristics, such as length and olefinic bond position, must be available. A lipid synthesis and purification program is in place in the author's laboratory to serve this need. In the current study with the outer membrane sugar transporter, OprB, we demonstrate the utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. Host lipid screening is likely to prove a generally useful strategy for mesophase-based crystallization of membrane proteins.

  18. Membrane species mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2016-08-17

    Processing and managing cell membrane proteins for characterization while maintaining their intact structure is challenging. Hydrodynamic flow has been used to transport membrane species in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) where the hydrophobic cores of the membrane species can be protected during processing. However, the forced convection mechanism of species embedded in lipid bilayers is still unclear. Developing a controlled SLB platform with a practical model to predict the membrane species mobility in the platform under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is imperative to ensure the practical applicability of SLBs in processing and managing membrane species with various geometrical properties. The mobility of membrane species is affected by the driving force from the aqueous environment in addition to the frictions from the lipid bilayer, in which both lipid leaflets may exhibit different speeds relative to that of the moving species. In this study, we developed a model, based on the applied driving force and the possible frictional resistances that the membrane species encounter, to predict how the mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is influenced by the sizes of the species' hydrophilic portion in the aqueous environment and the hydrophobic portion embedded in the membrane. In addition, we used a microfluidic device for controlling the flow to arrange the lipid membrane and the tested membrane species in the desirable locations in order to obtain a SLB platform which can provide clear mobility responses of the species without disturbance from the species dispersion effect. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental observations, with the sliding friction coefficient between the upper leaflet and the hydrophilic portion of the species as the only regressed parameter. The result suggests that not only the lateral drag frictions from the lipid layers but also the sliding frictions between the species and the lipid layer planes

  19. Solid-state membrane module

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Taylor, Dale M.

    2011-06-07

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  20. Micropattern formation in supported lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Groves, Jay T; Boxer, Steven G

    2002-03-01

    Phospholipid vesicles exhibit a natural tendency to fuse and assemble into a continuous single bilayer membrane on silica and several other substrate materials. The resulting supported membrane maintains many of the physical and biological characteristics of free membranes, including lateral fluidity. Recent advances, building on the supported membrane configuration, have created a wealth of opportunities for the manipulation, control, and analysis of membranes and the reaction environments they provide. The work reviewed in this Account, which can be broadly characterized as the science and technology of membrane patterning, contains three basic components: lateral diffusion control (barriers), membrane deposition techniques (microarrays), and electric field-induced lateral reorganization. Collectively, these preparative and analytical patterned membrane techniques offer a broad experimental platform for the study and utilization of lipid membranes. PMID:11900518

  1. Interactions of surfactants with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Heerklotz, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Surfactants are surface-active, amphiphilic compounds that are water-soluble in the micro- to millimolar range, and self-assemble to form micelles or other aggregates above a critical concentration. This definition comprises synthetic detergents as well as amphiphilic peptides and lipopeptides, bile salts and many other compounds. This paper reviews the biophysics of the interactions of surfactants with membranes of insoluble, naturally occurring lipids. It discusses structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of membrane-water partitioning, changes in membrane properties induced by surfactants, membrane solubilisation to micelles and other phases formed by lipid-surfactant systems. Each section defines and derives key parameters, mentions experimental methods for their measurement and compiles and discusses published data. Additionally, a brief overview is given of surfactant-like effects in biological systems, technical applications of surfactants that involve membrane interactions, and surfactant-based protocols to study biological membranes. PMID:19079805

  2. Lipid landscapes and pipelines in membrane homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Holthuis, Joost C M; Menon, Anant K

    2014-06-01

    The lipid composition of cellular organelles is tailored to suit their specialized tasks. A fundamental transition in the lipid landscape divides the secretory pathway in early and late membrane territories, allowing an adaptation from biogenic to barrier functions. Defending the contrasting features of these territories against erosion by vesicular traffic poses a major logistical problem. To this end, cells evolved a network of lipid composition sensors and pipelines along which lipids are moved by non-vesicular mechanisms. We review recent insights into the molecular basis of this regulatory network and consider examples in which malfunction of its components leads to system failure and disease. PMID:24899304

  3. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  4. Micrometric segregation of fluorescent membrane lipids: relevance for endogenous lipids and biogenesis in erythrocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Ludovic; Fenaux, Marisa; Aleksandrowicz, Paulina; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Chantrain, Christophe; Vermylen, Christiane; Vikkula, Miikka; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2013-01-01

    Micrometric membrane lipid segregation is controversial. We addressed this issue in attached erythrocytes and found that fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) analogs of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) [glucosylceramide (BODIPY-GlcCer) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1BODIPY)], sphingomyelin (BODIPY-SM), and phosphatidylcholine (BODIPY-PC inserted into the plasma membrane spontaneously gathered into distinct submicrometric domains. GM1BODIPY domains colocalized with endogenous GM1 labeled by cholera toxin. All BODIPY-lipid domains disappeared upon erythrocyte stretching, indicating control by membrane tension. Minor cholesterol depletion suppressed BODIPY-SM and BODIPY-PC but preserved BODIPY-GlcCer domains. Each type of domain exchanged constituents but assumed fixed positions, suggesting self-clustering and anchorage to spectrin. Domains showed differential association with 4.1R versus ankyrin complexes upon antibody patching. BODIPY-lipid domains also responded differentially to uncoupling at 4.1R complexes [protein kinase C (PKC) activation] and ankyrin complexes (in spherocytosis, a membrane fragility disease). These data point to micrometric compartmentation of polar BODIPY-lipids modulated by membrane tension, cholesterol, and differential association to the two nonredundant membrane:spectrin anchorage complexes. Micrometric compartmentation might play a role in erythrocyte membrane deformability and fragility. PMID:23322884

  5. Dynamic Response of Model Lipid Membranes to Ultrasonic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Martin Loynaz; Oralkan, Ömer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Maduke, Merritt C.

    2013-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound can modulate action potential firing in neurons in vitro and in vivo. It has been suggested that this effect is mediated by mechanical interactions of ultrasound with neural cell membranes. We investigated whether these proposed interactions could be reproduced for further study in a synthetic lipid bilayer system. We measured the response of protein-free model membranes to low-intensity ultrasound using electrophysiology and laser Doppler vibrometry. We find that ultrasonic radiation force causes oscillation and displacement of lipid membranes, resulting in small (<1%) changes in membrane area and capacitance. Under voltage-clamp, the changes in capacitance manifest as capacitive currents with an exponentially decaying sinusoidal time course. The membrane oscillation can be modeled as a fluid dynamic response to a step change in pressure caused by ultrasonic radiation force, which disrupts the balance of forces between bilayer tension and hydrostatic pressure. We also investigated the origin of the radiation force acting on the bilayer. Part of the radiation force results from the reflection of the ultrasound from the solution/air interface above the bilayer (an effect that is specific to our experimental configuration) but part appears to reflect a direct interaction of ultrasound with the bilayer, related to either acoustic streaming or scattering of sound by the bilayer. Based on these results, we conclude that synthetic lipid bilayers can be used to study the effects of ultrasound on cell membranes and membrane proteins. PMID:24194863

  6. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  7. The physics of stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Das, Chinmay; Olmsted, Peter D

    2016-07-28

    The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of skin, comprises rigid corneocytes (keratin-filled dead cells) in a specialized lipid matrix. The continuous lipid matrix provides the main barrier against uncontrolled water loss and invasion of external pathogens. Unlike all other biological lipid membranes (such as intracellular organelles and plasma membranes), molecules in the SC lipid matrix show small hydrophilic groups and large variability in the length of the alkyl tails and in the numbers and positions of groups that are capable of forming hydrogen bonds. Molecular simulations provide a route for systematically probing the effects of each of these differences separately. In this article, we present the results from atomistic molecular dynamics of selected lipid bilayers and multi-layers to probe the effect of these polydispersities. We address the nature of the tail packing in the gel-like phase, the hydrogen bond network among head groups, the bending moduli expected for leaflets comprising SC lipids and the conformation of very long ceramide lipids in multi-bilayer lipid assemblies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298438

  8. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 μm Teflon sheet with a 120 μm aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  9. Nanosecond Lipid Dynamics in Membranes Containing Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Haeussler, Wolfgang; Seydel, Tilo; Katsaras, John; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2014-01-01

    Lipid dynamics in the cholesterol-rich (40 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes were studied using neutron spin-echo and neutron backscattering. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence supports the notion of the liquid-ordered phase in phospholipid membranes as a locally structured liquid, with small ordered domains of a highly dynamic nature in equilibrium with a disordered matrix [S. Meinhardt, R. L. C. Vink and F. Schmid, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2013, 110(12), 4476 4481, C. L. Armstrong et al., PLoS One, 2013, 8(6), e66162]. This local structure was found to have a pronounced impact on the membranes' dynamical properties. We found that the long-wavelength dynamics in the liquid-ordered phase, associated with the elastic properties of the membranes, were faster by two orders of magnitude as compared to the liquid disordered phase. At the same time, collective nanoscale diffusion was significantly slower. The presence of a soft-mode (a slowing down) in the longwavelength dispersion relationship suggests an upper size limit for the ordered lipid domain of ~220 A. Moreover, from the relaxation rate of the collective lipid diffusion of lipid lipid distances, the lifetime of these domains was estimated to be about 100 nanoseconds.

  10. Anesthetic Diffusion Through Lipid Membranes Depends on the Protonation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Isidoro, Rosendo; Sierra-Valdez, F. J.; Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of substances possess anesthetic action. However, despite decades of research and tests, a golden rule is required to reconcile the diverse hypothesis behind anesthesia. What makes an anesthetic to be local or general in the first place? The specific targets on proteins, the solubility in lipids, the diffusivity, potency, action time? Here we show that there could be a new player equally or even more important to disentangle the riddle: the protonation rate. Indeed, such rate modulates the diffusion speed of anesthetics into lipid membranes; low protonation rates enhance the diffusion for local anesthetics while high ones reduce it. We show also that there is a pH and membrane phase dependence on the local anesthetic diffusion across multiple lipid bilayers. Based on our findings we incorporate a new clue that may advance our understanding of the anesthetic phenomenon. PMID:25520016

  11. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  12. Nonlinear adhesion dynamics of confined lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Tung; Le Goff, Thomas; Pierre-Louis, Olivier

    Lipid membranes, which are ubiquitous objects in biological environments are often confined. For example, they can be sandwiched between a substrate and the cytoskeleton between cell adhesion, or between other membranes in stacks, or in the Golgi apparatus. We present a study of the nonlinear dynamics of membranes in a model system, where the membrane is confined between two flat walls. The dynamics derived from the lubrication approximation is highly nonlinear and nonlocal. The solution of this model in one dimension exhibits frozen states due to oscillatory interactions between membranes caused by the bending rigidity. We develope a kink model for these phenomena based on the historical work of Kawasaki and Otha. In two dimensions, the dynamics is more complex, and depends strongly on the amount of excess area in the system. We discuss the relevance of our findings for experiments on model membranes, and for biological systems. Supported by the grand ANR Biolub.

  13. Adaptable Lipid Matrix Promotes Protein-Protein Association in Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Polyansky, Anton A; Fleck, Markus; Volynsky, Pavel E; Efremov, Roman G

    2015-09-01

    The cell membrane is "stuffed" with proteins, whose transmembrane (TM) helical domains spontaneously associate to form functionally active complexes. For a number of membrane receptors, a modulation of TM domains' oligomerization has been shown to contribute to the development of severe pathological states, thus calling for detailed studies of the atomistic aspects of the process. Despite considerable progress achieved so far, several crucial questions still remain: How do the helices recognize each other in the membrane? What is the driving force of their association? Here, we assess the dimerization free energy of TM helices along with a careful consideration of the interplay between the structure and dynamics of protein and lipids using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in the hydrated lipid bilayer for three different model systems - TM fragments of glycophorin A, polyalanine and polyleucine peptides. We observe that the membrane driven association of TM helices exhibits a prominent entropic character, which depends on the peptide sequence. Thus, a single TM peptide of a given composition induces strong and characteristic perturbations in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which may facilitate the initial "communication" between TM helices even at the distances of 20-30 Å. Upon tight helix-helix association, the immobilized lipids accommodate near the peripheral surfaces of the dimer, thus disturbing the packing of the surrounding. The dimerization free energy of the modeled peptides corresponds to the strength of their interactions with lipids inside the membrane being the lowest for glycophorin A and similarly higher for both homopolymers. We propose that the ability to accommodate lipid tails determines the dimerization strength of TM peptides and that the lipid matrix directly governs their association. PMID:26575933

  14. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC) local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA) for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol. PMID:24469314

  15. Role of charged lipids in membrane structures - Insight given by simulations.

    PubMed

    Pöyry, Sanja; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-10-01

    Lipids and proteins are the main components of cell membranes. It is becoming increasingly clear that lipids, in addition to providing an environment for proteins to work in, are in many cases also able to modulate the structure and function of those proteins. Particularly charged lipids such as phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines are involved in several examples of such effects. Molecular dynamics simulations have proved an invaluable tool in exploring these aspects. This so-called computational microscope can provide both complementing explanations for the experimental results and guide experiments to fruitful directions. In this paper, we review studies that have utilized molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the roles of charged lipids in membrane structures. We focus on lipids as active constituents of the membranes, affecting both general membrane properties as well as non-lipid membrane components, mainly proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27003126

  16. Triacontanol and jasmonic acid differentially modulate the lipid organization as evidenced by the fluorescent probe behavior and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance shifts in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar Swamy, G; Swamy, Sivakumar G; Ramanarayan, K; Inamdar, Laxmi S; Inamdar, Sanjeev R

    2009-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), time-resolved fluorescence and anisotropy decays were determined in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of egg phosphatidylcholine with the FRET pair N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine as donor and lissamine rhodamine B 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine as acceptor, using 2-ps pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser on LUVs with incorporated plant growth regulators: triacontanol (TRIA) and jasmonic acid (JA). FRET efficiency, energy transfer rate, rotation correlation time, microviscosity, and diffusion coefficient of lateral diffusion of lipids were calculated from these results. It was observed that TRIA and JA differentially modulated all parameters studied. The effect of JA in such modulations was always partially reversed by TRIA. Also, the generalized polarization of laurdan fluorescence indicated that JA enhances the degree of hydration in lipid bilayers to a larger extent than does TRIA. Solid-state (31)P magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of LUVs showed two chemical shifts, at 0.009 and -11.988 ppm, at low temperatures (20 degrees C), while at increasing temperatures (20-60 degrees C) only one (at -11.988 ppm) was prominent and the other (0.009 ppm) gradually became obscure. However, LUVs with TRIA exhibited only one of the shifts at 0.353 ppm even at lower temperatures and JA did not affect the chemical shifts. PMID:19418089

  17. Solid-state membrane module

    SciTech Connect

    Hinklin, Thomas Ray; Lewinsohn, Charles Arthur

    2015-06-30

    A module for separating oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture comprising planar solid-state membrane units, each membrane unit comprising planar dense mixed conducting oxides layers, planar channel-free porous support layers, and one or more planar intermediate support layers comprising at least one channeled porous support layer. The porosity of the planar channeled porous support layers is less than the porosity of the planar channel-free porous support layers.

  18. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wynn, Nicholas P; Fulton, Donald A.

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  19. Tryptophan orientation in model lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Esbjoerner, Elin K.

    2007-09-28

    Tryptophans in membrane proteins display strong preference for the lipid membrane interface and are important for anchoring proteins at the proper longitudinal level. Linear dichroism spectroscopy on indoles in shear-deformed liposomes has been used to show that this positioning is accompanied by an intrinsically adopted orientation, also observed for tryptophans in membrane-bound peptides. Similarities in orientation of different indoles suggest that tryptophan will adopt this orientation independent of the protein it is part of. From the orientation of indole electronic transition moments L{sub a}, L{sub b} and B{sub b}, a binding model is proposed where the indole long axis is {approx}60-65 deg. from the membrane normal and the indole plane is at an oblique angle. We propose that dipole-dipole interactions and steric constraints in the membrane hydrocarbon region determine positioning and orientation of tryptophans whereas hydrogen bonding and cation-{pi} interactions with lipid head-groups, though contributing to the membrane affinity of indoles, are less important.

  20. Modulation of Membrane Lipid Composition and Homeostasis in Salmon Hepatocytes Exposed to Hypoxia and Perfluorooctane Sulfonamide, Given Singly or in Combination

    PubMed Central

    Olufsen, Marianne; Cangialosi, Maria V.; Arukwe, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    The relative importance of environmental hypoxia due to global climate change on organismal ability to adapt to chemical insult and/or mechanisms of these responses is not well understood. Therefore, we have studied the effects of combined exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) and chemically induced hypoxia on membrane lipid profile and homeostasis. Primary salmon hepatocytes were exposed to PFOSA at 0, 25 and 50 µM singly or in combination with either cobalt chloride (CoCl2: 0 and 150 µM) or deferroxamine (DFO: 0 and 100 µM) for 24 and 48 h. CoCl2 and DFO were used to induce cellular hypoxia because these two chemicals have been commonly used in animal experiments for this purpose and have been shown to increase hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Fatty acid (FA) profiles were determined by GC-MS, while gene expression patterns were determined by quantitative PCR. Hypoxic condition was confirmed with time-related increases of HIF-1α mRNA levels in CoCl2 and DFO exposed cells. In general, significant alterations of genes involved in lipid homeostasis were predominantly observed after 48 h exposure. Gene expression analysis showed that biological responses related to peroxisome proliferation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and acyl coenzyme A (ACOX)) and FA desaturation (Δ5- and Δ6-desaturases: FAD5 and FAD6, respectively) and elongation (FAE) were elevated slightly by single exposure (i.e. either PFOSA, CoCl2 or DFO exposure alone), and these responses were potentiated in combined exposure conditions. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clustering of peroxisome proliferation responses at transcript levels and FA desaturation against membrane FAs levels whose changes were explained by PFOSA and chemically induced hypoxia exposures. Overall, our data show that most of the observed responses were stronger in combined stressor exposure conditions, compared to

  1. Micropatterned composite membranes of polymerized and fluid lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Kiyosue, Kazuyuki; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2004-08-31

    Micropatterned composite membranes of polymerized and fluid lipid bilayers were constructed on solid substrates. Lithographic photopolymerization of a diacetylene-containing phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DiynePC), and subsequent removal of nonreacted monomers by a detergent solution (0.1 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) yielded a patterned polymeric bilayer matrix on the substrate. Fluid lipid bilayers of phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk (egg-PC) were incorporated into the lipid-free wells surrounded by the polymeric bilayers through the process of fusion and reorganization of suspended small unilamellar vesicles. Spatial distribution of the fluid bilayers in the patterned bilayer depended on the degree of photopolymerization that in turn could be modulated by varying the applied UV irradiation dose. The polymeric bilayer domains blocked lateral diffusion of the fluid lipid bilayers and confined them in the defined areas (corrals), if the polymerization was conducted with a sufficiently large UV dose. On the other hand, lipid molecules of the fluid bilayers penetrated into the polymeric bilayer domains, if the UV dose was relatively small. A direct correlation was observed between the applied UV dose and the lateral diffusion coefficient of fluorescent marker molecules in the fluid bilayers embedded within the polymeric bilayer domains. Artificial control of lateral diffusion by polymeric bilayers may lead to the creation of complex and versatile biomimetic model membrane arrays. PMID:15323525

  2. Membrane lipids and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Holzer, G.; Rao, M.; Tornabene, T. G.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of knowledge regarding the development of biological systems is briefly reviewed. At a crucial stage concerning the evolution of such systems, the mechanisms leading to more complex structures must have evolved within the confines of a protected microenvironment, similar to those provided by the contemporary cell membranes. The major components found normally in biomembranes are phospholipids. The structure of the biomembrane is examined, and attention is given to questions concerning the availability of the structural components which are necessary in the formation of primitive lipid membranes. Two approaches regarding the study of protomembranes are discussed. The probability of obtaining ether lipids under prebiotic conditions is considered, taking into account the formation of cyclic and acyclic isoprenoids by the irradiation of isoprene with UV.

  3. Lipidic phase membrane protein serial femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Linda C; Arnlund, David; White, Thomas A; Katona, Gergely; DePonte, Daniel P; Weierstall, Uwe; Doak, R Bruce; Shoeman, Robert L; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Nass, Karol; Liang, Mengning; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Caleman, Carl; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Nicola; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y; Hartmann, Robert; Hartmann, Andreas; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Hunter, Mark S; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kirian, Richard A; Maia, Filipe R N C; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M Marvin; Sierra, Raymond G; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weidenspointner, Georg; Wunderer, Cornelia; Fromme, Petra; Chapman, Henry N; Spence, John C H; Neutze, Richard

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron laser (X-feL)-based serial femtosecond crystallography is an emerging method with potential to rapidly advance the challenging field of membrane protein structural biology. here we recorded interpretable diffraction data from micrometer-sized lipidic sponge phase crystals of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center delivered into an X-feL beam using a sponge phase micro-jet. PMID:22286383

  4. Bioactive lipids as modulators of immunity, inflammation and emotions.

    PubMed

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are not only constituents of cellular membranes but also key signaling mediators, thus acting as 'bioactive lipids'. Among the prominent roles exerted by bioactive lipids are immune regulation, inflammation and maintenance of homeostasis. Accumulated evidence indicates the existence of a bidirectional relationship between immune and nervous systems, whereby inflammatory mediators can directly modulate emotions that, in turn, can strongly influence immune responses, thus affecting health. This review summarizes current knowledge on the ability of several families of bioactive lipids to regulate immunity and inflammation (through pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory effects), as well as to control emotions and mood-related manifestations, advocating these substances as an attractive interface between 'mind' and 'body', and as a potential target to treat inflammatory/immune-mediated mood disorders. PMID:27372887

  5. Melittin-Induced Lipid Extraction Modulated by the Methylation Level of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroups.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Alexandre; Lafleur, Michel

    2016-01-19

    Protein- and peptide-induced lipid extraction from membranes is a critical process for many biological events, including reverse cholesterol transport and sperm capacitation. In this work, we examine whether such processes could display specificity for some lipid species. Melittin, the main component of dry bee venom, was used as a model amphipathic α-helical peptide. We specifically determined the modulation of melittin-induced lipid extraction from membranes by the change of the methylation level of phospholipid headgroups. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers were demethylated either by substitution with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or chemically by using mono- and dimethylated PE. It is shown that demethylation reduces the association of melittin with membranes, likely because of the resulting tighter chain packing of the phospholipids, which reduces the capacity of the membranes to accommodate inserted melittin. This reduced binding of the peptide is accompanied by an inhibition of the lipid extraction caused by melittin. We demonstrate that melittin selectively extracts PC from PC/PE membranes. This selectivity is proposed to be a consequence of a PE depletion in the surroundings of bound melittin to minimize disruption of the interphospholipid interactions. The resulting PC-enriched vicinity of melittin would be responsible for the observed formation of PC-enriched lipid/peptide particles resulting from the lipid efflux. These findings reveal that modulating the methylation level of phospholipid headgroups is a simple way to control the specificity of lipid extraction from membranes by peptides/proteins and thereby modulate the lipid composition of the membranes. PMID:26789763

  6. Multichannel taste sensors with lipid, lipid like polymer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpakowska, M.; Szwacki, J.; Marjańska, E.

    2008-08-01

    The elaboration of a sensitive taste sensor for discrimination of different soft drinks is very important in food industry. The short review of taste sensors described in the literature is presented. Two types of potentiometric taste sensors, one with lipophilic compound-polymer membranes (ISE) and the other with lipid polymer membrane and a conducting polymer film (All solid state electrode, ASSE) were tested in appropriate taste solutions. Five channel ISE sensor was examined in acid, sour and sweet solutions. This sensor was sensitive to bitter and sour substances and not too sensitive to sucrose concentration. It was successfully used for discrimination of different kind of soft drinks. Four channel ASSE sensor was examined in sour solutions. It was found that stability and sensitivity of ASSE are lower than ISE. Therefore, it seems that the previous one cannot be applied in taste sensor.

  7. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26940626

  8. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  9. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Evan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer. In yeast, cortical ER is stapled to the PM through membrane-tethering proteins, which establish a direct connection between the membranes. In this review, we consider passive and facilitated models for lipid transfer at PM–ER contact sites. Besides the tethering proteins, we examine the roles of an additional repertoire of lipid and protein regulators that prime and propagate PM–ER membrane association. We conclude that instead of being simple mediators of membrane association, regulatory components of membrane contact sites have complex and multilayered functions. PMID:26949334

  10. Force Field Development for Lipid Membrane Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Rabinovich, Alexander L

    2016-10-01

    With the rapid development of computer power and wide availability of modelling software computer simulations of realistic models of lipid membranes, including their interactions with various molecular species, polypeptides and membrane proteins have become feasible for many research groups. The crucial issue of the reliability of such simulations is the quality of the force field, and many efforts, especially in the latest several years, have been devoted to parametrization and optimization of the force fields for biomembrane modelling. In this review, we give account of the recent development in this area, covering different classes of force fields, principles of the force field parametrization, comparison of the force fields, and their experimental validation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26766518

  11. The effects of non-lamellar forming lipids on membrane protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, C D; Slater, S J

    1996-07-15

    The role of lipid polymorphism in the regulation of membrane-associated protein function is examined, based on recent studies which showed that changes in the levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), cholesterol and phospholipid unsaturation, modulate the activity of the key signal transduction enzyme, protein kinase C (PKC). It is shown that effects of membrane compositional changes on PKC activity involve a perturbation of protein-lipid interactions with the head group region rather than with the hydrophobic interior of the bilayer. A key determinant in the perturbation of these interactions is suggested to be an elastic curvature energy, termed curvature stress, which results from the unfavorable packing of non-lamellar forming lipids in a planar bilayer. PKC activity is shown to be a biphasic function of curvature stress, with an optimum value of this parameter corresponding to an optimally active PKC conformation. Thus, it is shown that the maximal activity of conformationally distinct PKC isoforms may require a different optimum value of curvature stress. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that curvature stress may have differing effects on the conformation of membrane-associated PKC activity induced by diacylglycerols, phorbol esters or other activators, based on recent studies showing that these agents induce the formation of disparate active conformers of the enzyme. PMID:8810048

  12. Negatively Charged Lipid Membranes Catalyze Supramolecular Hydrogel Formation.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Frank; van Elsland, Daphne M; Mytnyk, Serhii; Perrier, Dayinta L; Trausel, Fanny; Poolman, Jos M; Maity, Chandan; le Sage, Vincent A A; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-20

    In this contribution we show that biological membranes can catalyze the formation of supramolecular hydrogel networks. Negatively charged lipid membranes can generate a local proton gradient, accelerating the acid-catalyzed formation of hydrazone-based supramolecular gelators near the membrane. Synthetic lipid membranes can be used to tune the physical properties of the resulting multicomponent gels as a function of lipid concentration. Moreover, the catalytic activity of lipid membranes and the formation of gel networks around these supramolecular structures are controlled by the charge and phase behavior of the lipid molecules. Finally, we show that the insights obtained from synthetic membranes can be translated to biological membranes, enabling the formation of gel fibers on living HeLa cells. PMID:27359373

  13. Specific Membrane Lipid Composition Is Important for Plasmodesmata Function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Grison, Magali S.; Brocard, Lysiane; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nicolas, William; Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Nacir, Houda; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Claverol, Stéphane; Germain, Véronique; Boutté, Yohann; Mongrand, Sébastien; Bayer, Emmanuelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are nano-sized membrane-lined channels controlling intercellular communication in plants. Although progress has been made in identifying PD proteins, the role played by major membrane constituents, such as the lipids, in defining specialized membrane domains in PD remains unknown. Through a rigorous isolation of “native” PD membrane fractions and comparative mass spectrometry-based analysis, we demonstrate that lipids are laterally segregated along the plasma membrane (PM) at the PD cell-to-cell junction in Arabidopsis thaliana. Remarkably, our results show that PD membranes display enrichment in sterols and sphingolipids with very long chain saturated fatty acids when compared with the bulk of the PM. Intriguingly, this lipid profile is reminiscent of detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains, although our approach is valuably detergent-free. Modulation of the overall sterol composition of young dividing cells reversibly impaired the PD localization of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Plasmodesmata Callose Binding 1 and the β-1,3-glucanase PdBG2 and altered callose-mediated PD permeability. Altogether, this study not only provides a comprehensive analysis of the lipid constituents of PD but also identifies a role for sterols in modulating cell-to-cell connectivity, possibly by establishing and maintaining the positional specificity of callose-modifying glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins at PD. Our work emphasizes the importance of lipids in defining PD membranes. PMID:25818623

  14. Lipid diffusibility in the intact erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, J A; Webb, W W

    1983-01-01

    The lateral diffusion of fluorescent lipid analogues in the plasma membrane of intact erythrocytes from man, mouse, rabbit, and frog has been measured by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR). Intact cells from dystrophic, normoblastic, hemolytic, and spherocytotic mouse mutants; from hypercholesterolemic rabbits and humans; and from prenatal, neonatal, and juvenile mice have been compared with corresponding normals. The lateral diffusion coefficient (D) for 3,3'-dioctadecylindodicarbocyanine iodide (DiI[5]) in intact normal human erythrocytes is D = 8.2 +/- 1.2 X 10(-9) cm2/s at 25 degrees C and D = 2.1 +/- 0.4 X 10(-8) cm2/s at 37 degrees C, and varies approximately 50-fold between 1 degree and 42 degrees C. The diffusion constants of lipid analogue rhodamine-B phosphatidylethanolamine (RBPE) are about twice those of DiI[5]. The temperature dependence and magnitude of D vary by up to a factor of 3 between species and are only influenced by donor age in prenatals. DiI[5] diffusibility is not perturbed by the presence of calcium or local anesthetics or by spectrin depletion (via mutation). However, lipid-analogue diffusibility in erythrocyte ghosts may differ from intact cells. Dietary hypercholesterolemia in rabbits reduces the diffusion coefficient and eliminates the characteristic break in Arrhenius plots of D found in all other cells studied except frog. PMID:6603237

  15. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins Using Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    A detailed protocol for crystallizing membrane proteins that makes use of lipidic mesophases is described. This has variously been referred to as the lipid cubic phase or in meso method. The method has been shown to be quite general in that it has been used to solve X-ray crystallographic structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins, proteins that are monomeric, homo- and hetero-multimeric, chromophore-containing and chromophore-free, and α-helical and β-barrel proteins. Its most recent successes are the human engineered β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A G protein-coupled receptors. Protocols are provided for preparing and characterizing the lipidic mesophase, for reconstituting the protein into the monoolein-based mesophase, for functional assay of the protein in the mesophase, and for setting up crystallizations in manual mode. Methods for harvesting micro-crystals are also described. The time required to prepare the protein-loaded mesophase and to set up a crystallization plate manually is about one hour. PMID:19390528

  16. Order of lipid phases in model and plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Lingwood, Daniel; Levental, Ilya; Sampaio, Julio L.; Kalvodova, Lucie; Rajendran, Lawrence; Simons, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are nanoscopic assemblies of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and specific membrane proteins that contribute to lateral heterogeneity in eukaryotic membranes. Separation of artificial membranes into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered phases is regarded as a common model for this compartmentalization. However, tight lipid packing in Lo phases seems to conflict with efficient partitioning of raft-associated transmembrane (TM) proteins. To assess membrane order as a component of raft organization, we performed fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy with the membrane probes Laurdan and C-laurdan. First, we assessed lipid packing in model membranes of various compositions and found cholesterol and acyl chain dependence of membrane order. Then we probed cell membranes by using two novel systems that exhibit inducible phase separation: giant plasma membrane vesicles [Baumgart et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:3165–3170] and plasma membrane spheres. Notably, only the latter support selective inclusion of raft TM proteins with the ganglioside GM1 into one phase. We measured comparable small differences in order between the separated phases of both biomembranes. Lateral packing in the ordered phase of giant plasma membrane vesicles resembled the Lo domain of model membranes, whereas the GM1 phase in plasma membrane spheres exhibited considerably lower order, consistent with different partitioning of lipid and TM protein markers. Thus, lipid-mediated coalescence of the GM1 raft domain seems to be distinct from the formation of a Lo phase, suggesting additional interactions between proteins and lipids to be effective. PMID:19805351

  17. Film Balance Studies of Membrane Lipids and Related Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadenhead, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses apparatus, techniques, and measurements used to determine cell membrane composition. The use of a film balance to study monolayer membranes of selected lipids is described and results reported. (TS)

  18. [Role of membrane lipids in myocardial cytoprotection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grynberg, A.

    2000-01-01

    The cardiomyocyte capacity to regulate ATP production to face any change in energy demand is a major determinant of cardiac function. This process is based on a balanced fatty acid (FA) metabolism, because FA is the main fuel of the heart, although the most expensive one in oxygen. The pathway is, however, weakly controlled by the cardiac myocyte which can well regulate FA mitochondrial entry but not cell FA uptake. For this reason, several pathological situations often result from either harmful accumulation of FA and derivatives or excess FA-oxidation. Control of the FA/glucose balance by decreased energy production from FA would thus offer an alternative strategy in the treatment of ischaemia, providing the cardiomyocytes weak ability in handling the non-metabolised FA is controlled. The initiation and the regulation of cardiac contraction both result from membrane activity; the other major role of lipids in the heart is their contribution to membrane homeostasis through phospholipid synthesis pathways and phospholipases. The anti-anginal activity of Trimetazidine, reported as a cytoprotective effect without a haemo-dynamic component; is associated with reduced use of FA for energy. However, accumulation of FA and derivatives has never been observed. Trimetazidine is reported to increase significantly the synthesis of phospholipids without influencing the other lipid classes, thus increasing the incorporation of FA in membrane structures. This cytoprotection appears to be based on the redirection of the use of FA to phospholipid synthesis, which would decrease their availability for energy production. This class of compounds, with the same properties as Trimetazidine, offers a metabolic approach to the treatment of ischaemia.

  19. Lateral Membrane Diffusion Modulated by a Minimal Actin Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Fabian; Vogel, Sven K.; Schwille, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion of lipids and proteins within the cell membrane is essential for numerous membrane-dependent processes including signaling and molecular interactions. It is assumed that the membrane-associated cytoskeleton modulates lateral diffusion. Here, we use a minimal actin cortex to directly study proposed effects of an actin meshwork on the diffusion in a well-defined system. The lateral diffusion of a lipid and a protein probe at varying densities of membrane-bound actin was characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A clear correlation of actin density and reduction in mobility was observed for both the lipid and the protein probe. At high actin densities, the effect on the protein probe was ∼3.5-fold stronger compared to the lipid. Moreover, addition of myosin filaments, which contract the actin mesh, allowed switching between fast and slow diffusion in the minimal system. Spot variation FCS was in accordance with a model of fast microscopic diffusion and slower macroscopic diffusion. Complementing Monte Carlo simulations support the analysis of the experimental FCS data. Our results suggest a stronger interaction of the actin mesh with the larger protein probe compared to the lipid. This might point toward a mechanism where cortical actin controls membrane diffusion in a strong size-dependent manner. PMID:23561523

  20. Membrane lipid rafts and neurobiology: age-related changes in membrane lipids and loss of neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Junji; Pearn, Matthew L; Lemkuil, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of the cellular physiological role that plasma membrane lipids, fatty acids and sterols play in various cellular systems may yield more insight into how cellular and whole organ function is altered during the ageing process. Membrane lipid rafts (MLRs) within the plasma membrane of most cells serve as key organizers of intracellular signalling and tethering points of cytoskeletal components. MLRs are plasmalemmal microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and scaffolding proteins; they serve as a platform for signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization and vesicular trafficking. Within MLRs are the scaffolding and cholesterol binding proteins named caveolin (Cav). Cavs not only organize a multitude of receptors including neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA and AMPA receptors), signalling proteins that regulate the production of cAMP (G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, phosphodiesterases (PDEs)), and receptor tyrosine kinases involved in growth (Trk), but also interact with components that modulate actin and tubulin cytoskeletal dynamics (e.g. RhoGTPases and actin binding proteins). MLRs are essential for the regulation of the physiology of organs such as the brain, and age-related loss of cholesterol from the plasma membrane leads to loss of MLRs, decreased presynaptic vesicle fusion, and changes in neurotransmitter release, all of which contribute to different forms of neurodegeneration. Thus, MLRs provide an active membrane domain that tethers and reorganizes the cytoskeletal machinery necessary for membrane and cellular repair, and genetic interventions that restore MLRs to normal cellular levels may be exploited as potential therapeutic means to reverse the ageing and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26332795

  1. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  2. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  3. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  4. Study of polytopic membrane protein topological organization as a function of membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Heacock, Philip N; Dowhan, William

    2010-01-01

    A protocol is described using lipid mutants and thiol-specific chemical reagents to study lipid-dependent and host-specific membrane protein topogenesis by the substituted-cysteine accessibility method as applied to transmembrane domains (SCAM). SCAM is adapted to follow changes in membrane protein topology as a function of changes in membrane lipid composition. The strategy described can be adapted to any membrane system. PMID:20419405

  5. Anionic Lipids Modulate the Activity of the Aquaglyceroporin GlpF

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Noreen; Hellmann, Nadja; Schneider, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The structure and composition of a biological membrane can severely influence the activity of membrane-embedded proteins. Here, we show that the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF has only little activity in lipid bilayers formed from native E. coli lipids. Thus, at first glance, GlpF appears to not be optimized for its natural membrane environment. In fact, we found that GlpF activity was severely affected by negatively charged lipids regardless of the exact chemical nature of the lipid headgroup, whereas GlpF was not sensitive to changes in the lateral membrane pressure. These observations illustrate a potential mechanism by which the activity of an α-helical membrane protein is modulated by the negative charge density around the protein. PMID:26287624

  6. MemProtMD: Automated Insertion of Membrane Protein Structures into Explicit Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Goose, Joseph E.; Caffrey, Martin; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Parker, Joanne L.; Newstead, Simon; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been exponential growth in the number of membrane protein structures determined. Nevertheless, these structures are usually resolved in the absence of their lipid environment. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations enable insertion of membrane proteins into explicit models of lipid bilayers. We have automated the CGMD methodology, enabling membrane protein structures to be identified upon their release into the PDB and embedded into a membrane. The simulations are analyzed for protein-lipid interactions, identifying lipid binding sites, and revealing local bilayer deformations plus molecular access pathways within the membrane. The coarse-grained models of membrane protein/bilayer complexes are transformed to atomistic resolution for further analysis and simulation. Using this automated simulation pipeline, we have analyzed a number of recently determined membrane protein structures to predict their locations within a membrane, their lipid/protein interactions, and the functional implications of an enhanced understanding of the local membrane environment of each protein. PMID:26073602

  7. Theoretical analysis of protein organization in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Gil, T; Ipsen, J H; Mouritsen, O G; Sabra, M C; Sperotto, M M; Zuckermann, M J

    1998-11-10

    The fundamental physical principles of the lateral organization of trans-membrane proteins and peptides as well as peripheral membrane proteins and enzymes are considered from the point of view of the lipid-bilayer membrane, its structure, dynamics, and cooperative phenomena. Based on a variety of theoretical considerations and model calculations, the nature of lipid-protein interactions is considered both for a single protein and an assembly of proteins that can lead to aggregation and protein crystallization in the plane of the membrane. Phenomena discussed include lipid sorting and selectivity at protein surfaces, protein-lipid phase equilibria, lipid-mediated protein-protein interactions, wetting and capillary condensation as means of protein organization, mechanisms of two-dimensional protein crystallization, as well as non-equilibrium organization of active proteins in membranes. The theoretical findings are compared with a variety of experimental data. PMID:9804966

  8. Biophysical perturbations induced by ethylazinphos in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Videira, R A; Antunes-Madeira, M C; Madeira, V M

    1999-02-01

    Perturbations induced by ethylazinphos on the physical organization of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/cholesterol membranes were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fluorescence polarization of 2-, 6-, 12-(9-anthroyloxy) stearic acids and 16-(9-anthroyloxy) palmitic acid. Ethylazinphos (50 and 100 microM) increases the fluorescence polarization of the probes, either in the gel or in the fluid phase of DPPC bilayers, and this concentration dependent effect decreases from the surface to the bilayer core. Additionally, the insecticide displaces the phase transition to a lower temperature range and broadens the transition profile of DPPC. A shifting and broadening of the phase transition is also observed by DSC. Furthermore at insecticide/lipid molar ratios higher than 1/7, DSC thermograms, in addition to the normal transition centered at 41 degrees C, also display a new phase transition centered at 45.5 degrees C. The enthalpy of this new transition increases with insecticide concentration, with a corresponding decrease of the main transition enthalpy. Ethylazinphos in DPPC bilayers with low cholesterol (< or = 20 mol%) perturbs the membrane organization as described above for pure DPPC. However, cholesterol concentrations higher than 20 mol% prevent insecticide interaction, as revealed by fluorescence polarization and DSC data. Apparently, cholesterol significantly modulates insecticide interaction by competition for similar distribution domains in the membrane. The present results strongly support our previous hypothesis that ethylazinphos locates in the cooperativity region, i.e. the region of C1-C9 atoms of the acyl chains, and extends to the lipid-water interface, where it increases lipid packing order sensed across all the thickness of the bilayer. Additionally, and, on the basis of DSC data, a lateral regionalization of ethylazinphos is here tentatively suggested. PMID:10192930

  9. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Slochower, David R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from −1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such has phosphatidylserine, to near −7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence of the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. PMID:24556233

  10. Lipid oxidation induces structural changes in biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Georges; Charitat, Thierry; Baptista, Maurício S; Uchoa, Adjaci F; Pavani, Christiane; Junqueira, Helena C; Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A; Itri, Rosangela; Marques, Carlos M; Schroder, André P

    2014-06-28

    Oxidation can intimately influence and structurally compromise the levels of biological self-assembly embodied by intracellular and plasma membranes. Lipid peroxidation, a natural metabolic outcome of life with oxygen under light, is also a salient oxidation reaction in photomedicine treatments. However, the effect of peroxidation on the fate of lipid membranes remains elusive. Here we use a new photosensitizer that anchors and disperses in the membrane to achieve spatial control of the oxidizing species. We find, surprisingly, that the integrity of unsaturated unilamellar vesicles is preserved even for fully oxidized membranes. Membrane survival allows for the quantification of the transformations of the peroxidized bilayers, providing key physical and chemical information to understand the effect of lipid oxidation on protein insertion and on other mechanisms of cell function. We anticipate that spatially controlled oxidation will emerge as a new powerful strategy for tuning and evaluating lipid membranes in biomimetic media under oxidative stress. PMID:24871383

  11. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates Superwarfarin Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, M Natalia; Martynowycz, Michael W; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Braun, David; Polak, Paul E; Weinberg, Guy; Rubinstein, Israel; Gidalevitz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2016-04-26

    Superwarfarins are modified analogs of warfarin with additional lipophilic aromatic rings, up to 100-fold greater potency, and longer biological half-lives. We hypothesized that increased hydrophobicity allowed interactions with amphiphilic membranes and modulation of biological responses. We find that superwarfarins brodifacoum and difenacoum increase lactate production and cell death in neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, neither causes changes in glioma cells that have higher cholesterol content. After choleterol depletion, lactate production was increased and cell viability was reduced. Drug-membrane interactions were examined by surface X-ray scattering using Langmuir monolayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and/or cholesterol. Specular X-ray reflectivity data revealed that superwarfarins, but not warfarin, intercalate between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine molecules, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction demonstrated changes in lateral crystalline order of the film. Neither agent showed significant interactions with monolayers containing >20% cholesterol. These findings demonstrate an affinity of superwarfarins to biomembranes and suggest that cellular responses to these agents are regulated by cholesterol content. PMID:27119638

  12. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Darcie J.; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.

    2010-11-09

    DesT is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the genes that control the unsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio available for membrane lipid synthesis. DesT bound to unsaturated acyl-CoA has a high affinity for its cognate palindromic DNA-binding site, whereas DesT bound to saturated acyl-CoA does not bind this site. Structural analyses of the DesT-oleoyl-CoA-DNA and DesT-palmitoyl-CoA complexes reveal that acyl chain shape directly influences the packing of hydrophobic core residues within the DesT ligand-binding domain. These changes are propagated to the paired DNA-binding domains via conformational changes to modulate DNA binding. These structural interpretations are supported by the in vitro and in vivo characterization of site-directed mutants. The regulation of DesT by the unsaturated:saturated ratio of acyl chains rather than the concentration of a single ligand is a paradigm for understanding transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis.

  13. Interaction of aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pizzimenti, Stefania; Ciamporcero, Eric; Daga, Martina; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Gianpaolo; Minelli, Rosalba; Dianzani, Chiara; Lepore, Alessio; Gentile, Fabrizio; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA) and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24027536

  14. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites. PMID:27015007

  15. Lipid membrane domains in cell surface and vacuolar systems.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Detergent insoluble sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched 'raft'-like membrane microdomains have been implicated in a variety of biological processes including sorting, trafficking, and signaling. Mutant cells and knockout animals of sphingolipid biosynthesis are clearly useful to understand the biological roles of lipid components in raft-like domains. It is suggested that raft-like domains distribute in internal vacuolar membranes as well as plasma membranes. In addition to sphingolipid-cholesterol-rich membrane domains, recent studies suggest the existence of another lipid-membrane domain in the endocytic pathway. This domain is enriched with a unique phospholipid, lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and localized in the internal membrane of multivesicular endosome. LBPA-rich membrane domains are involved in lipid and protein sorting within the endosomal system. Possible interaction between sphingolipids and LBPA in sphingolipid-storage disease is discussed. PMID:11201787

  16. Functional crosstalk between membrane lipids and TLR biology.

    PubMed

    Köberlin, Marielle S; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important transmembrane proteins of the innate immune system that detect invading pathogens and subsequently orchestrate an immune response. The ensuing inflammatory processes are connected to lipid metabolism at multiple levels. Here, we describe different aspects of how membrane lipids can shape the response of TLRs. Recent reports have uncovered the role of individual lipid species on membrane protein function and mouse models have contributed to the understanding of how changes in lipid metabolism alter TLR signaling, endocytosis, and cytokine secretion. Finally, we discuss the importance of systematic approaches to identify the function of individual lipid species or the composition of membrane lipids in TLR-related processes. PMID:26895312

  17. Concerted diffusion of lipids in raft-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Apajalahti, Touko; Niemelä, Perttu; Govindan, Praveen Nedumpully; Miettinen, Markus S; Salonen, Emppu; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is no comprehensive model for the dynamics of cellular membranes. The understanding of even the basic dynamic processes, such as lateral diffusion of lipids, is still quite limited. Recent studies of one-component membrane systems have shown that instead of single-particle motions, the lateral diffusion is driven by a more complex, concerted mechanism for lipid diffusion (E. Falck et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 44-45), where a lipid and its neighbors move in unison in terms of loosely defined clusters. In this work, we extend the previous study by considering the concerted lipid diffusion phenomena in many-component raft-like membranes. This nature of diffusion phenomena emerge in all the cases we have considered, including both atom-scale simulations of lateral diffusion within rafts and coarse-grained MARTINI simulations of diffusion in membranes characterized by coexistence of raft and non-raft domains. The data allows us to identify characteristic time scales for the concerted lipid motions, which turn out to range from hundreds of nanoseconds to several microseconds. Further, we characterize typical length scales associated with the correlated lipid diffusion patterns and find them to be about 10 nm, or even larger if weak correlations are taken into account. Finally, the concerted nature of lipid motions is also found in dissipative particle dynamics simulations of lipid membranes, clarifying the role of hydrodynamics (local momentum conservation) in membrane diffusion phenomena. PMID:20158041

  18. Anomalous diffusion of proteins in sheared lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2013-09-01

    We use coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate diffusion properties of sheared lipid membranes with embedded transmembrane proteins. In membranes without proteins, we find normal in-plane diffusion of lipids in all flow conditions. Protein embedded membranes behave quite differently: by imposing a simple shear flow and sliding the monolayers of the membrane over each other, the motion of protein clusters becomes strongly superdiffusive in the shear direction. In such a circumstance, the subdiffusion regime is predominant perpendicular to the flow. We show that superdiffusion is a result of accelerated chaotic motions of protein-lipid complexes within the membrane voids, which are generated by hydrophobic mismatch or the transport of lipids by proteins. PMID:24125292

  19. Amino acid-containing membrane lipids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Otto; González-Silva, Napoleón; López-Lara, Isabel M; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In the bacterial model organism Escherichia coli only the three major membrane lipids phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin occur, all of which belong to the glycerophospholipids. The amino acid-containing phosphatidylserine is a major lipid in eukaryotic membranes but in most bacteria it occurs only as a minor biosynthetic intermediate. In some bacteria, the anionic glycerophospholipids phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin can be decorated with aminoacyl residues. For example, phosphatidylglycerol can be decorated with lysine, alanine, or arginine whereas in the case of cardiolipin, lysine or d-alanine modifications are known. In few bacteria, diacylglycerol-derived lipids can be substituted with lysine or homoserine. Acyl-oxyacyl lipids in which the lipidic part is amide-linked to the alpha-amino group of an amino acid are widely distributed among bacteria and ornithine-containing lipids are the most common version of this lipid type. Only few bacterial groups form glycine-containing lipids, serineglycine-containing lipids, sphingolipids, or sulfonolipids. Although many of these amino acid-containing bacterial membrane lipids are produced in response to certain stress conditions, little is known about the specific molecular functions of these lipids. PMID:19703488

  20. Molecular Dynamics Study of Bipolar Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Wataru; Shinoda, Keiko; Baba, Teruhiko; Mikami, Masuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Membranes composed of bipolar tetraether lipids have been studied by a series of 25-ns molecular dynamics simulations to understand the microscopic structure and dynamics as well as membrane area elasticity. By comparing macrocyclic and acyclic tetraether and diether archaeal lipids, the effect of tail linkage of the two phytanyl-chained lipids on the membrane properties is elucidated. Tetraether lipids show smaller molecular area and lateral mobility. For the latter, calculated diffusion coefficients are indeed one order-of-magnitude smaller than that of the diether lipid. These two tetraether membranes are alike in many physical properties except for membrane area elasticity. The macrocyclic tetraether membrane shows a higher elastic area expansion modulus than its acyclic counterpart by a factor of three. Free energy profiles of a water molecule crossing the membranes show no major difference in barrier height; however, a significant difference is observed near the membrane center due to the lack of the slip-plane in tetraether membranes. PMID:16100279

  1. Membrane-lipid unsaturation and mitochondrial function in Saacharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K; Houghton, R L; Bertoli, E; Griffiths, D E

    1975-01-01

    The lipid composition of yeast cells was manipulated by the use of an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a 2-3-fold decrease in the concentration of cytochromes a+a3 when the unsaturated fatty acid content of the cells was decreased from 60-70% of the total fatty acid to 20-30%. The amounts of cytochromes b and c were also decreased under these conditions, but to a lesser extent. Further lipid depletion, to proportions of less than 20% unsaturated fatty acid, led to a dramatic decrease in the content of all cytochromes, particularly cytochromes a+a3. The ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase), succinate oxidase and NADH oxidase activities of the isolated mitochondria also varied with the degree of unsaturation of the membrane lipids. The lower the percentage of unsaturated fatty acid, the lower was the enzymic activity. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATPase by oligomycin, on the other hand, was not markedly influenced by the membrane-lipid unsaturation. Npn-linear Arrenius plots of mitochondrial membrane-bound enzymes showed transition temperatures that were dependent on the degree of membrane-lipid unsaturation. The greater the degree of lipid unsaturation, the lower was the transition temperature. It was concluded that the degree of unsaturation of the membrane lipids plays an important role in determining the properties of mitochondrial membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:125585

  2. Lipid-engineered Escherichia coli Membranes Reveal Critical Lipid Headgroup Size for Protein Function*

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Malin; Kelly, Amélie A.; Georgiev, Alexander; Eriksson, Hanna M.; Klement, Maria Rosén; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William; Wieslander, Åke

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli membranes have a substantial bilayer curvature stress due to a large fraction of the nonbilayer-prone lipid phosphatidylethanolamine, and a mutant (AD93) lacking this lipid is severely crippled in several membrane-associated processes. Introduction of four lipid glycosyltransferases from Acholeplasma laidlawii and Arabidopsis thaliana, synthesizing large amounts of two nonbilayer-prone, and two bilayer-forming gluco- and galacto-lipids, (i) restored the curvature stress with the two nonbilayer lipids, and (ii) diluted the high negative lipid surface charge in all AD93 bilayers. Surprisingly, the bilayer-forming diglucosyl-diacylglycerol was almost as good in improving AD93 membrane processes as the two nonbilayer-prone glucosyl-diacylglycerol and galactosyl-diacylglycerol lipids, strongly suggesting that lipid surface charge dilution by these neutral lipids is very important for E. coli. Increased acyl chain length and unsaturation, plus cardiolipin (nonbilayer-prone) content, were probably also beneficial in the modified strains. However, despite a correct transmembrane topology for the transporter LacY in the diglucosyl-diacylglycerol clone, active transport failed in the absence of a nonbilayer-prone glycolipid. The corresponding digalactosyl-diacylglycerol bilayer lipid did not restore AD93 membrane processes, despite analogous acyl chain and cardiolipin contents. Chain ordering, probed by bis-pyrene lipids, was substantially lower in the digalactosyl-diacylglycerol strain lipids due to its extended headgroup. Hence, a low surface charge density of anionic lipids is important in E. coli membranes, but is inefficient if the headgroup of the diluting lipid is too large. This strongly indicates that a certain magnitude of the curvature stress is crucial for the bilayer in vivo. PMID:18981182

  3. Insights into thermophilic archaebacterial membrane stability from simplified models of lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Charles H.; Nie, Huifen; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2007-05-01

    Lipid aggregation into fluid bilayers is an essential process for sustaining life. Simplified models of lipid structure, which allow for long time scales or large length scales not obtainable with all-atom simulations, have recently been developed and show promise for describing lipid dynamics in biological systems. Here, we describe two simplified models, a reduced-lipid model and a bola-lipid model for thermophilic bacterial membranes, developed for use with the rapid discrete molecular dynamics simulation method. In the reduced-lipid model, we represent the lipid chain by a series of three beads interacting through pairwise discrete potentials that model hydrophobic attractions between hydrocarbon tails in implicit solvent. Our phase diagram recapitulates those produced by continuous potential models with similar coarse-grained lipid representations. We also find that phase transition temperatures for our reduced-lipid model are dependent upon the flexibility of the lipid chain, giving an insight into archaebacterial membrane stability and prompting development of a bola-lipid model specific for archaebacteria lipids. With both the reduced-lipid and bola-lipid model, we find that the reduced flexibility inherent in archaebacteria lipids yields more stable bilayers as manifested by increased phase transition temperatures. The results of these studies provide a simulation methodology for lipid molecules in biological systems and show that discrete molecular dynamics is applicable to lipid aggregation and dynamics.

  4. Chain ordering of hybrid lipids can stabilize domains in saturated/hybrid/cholesterol lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Brewster, R.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    We use a liquid-crystal model to predict that hybrid lipids (lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated tail) can stabilize line interfaces between domains in mixed membranes of saturated lipids, hybrid lipids, and cholesterol (SHC membranes). The model predicts the phase separation of SHC membranes with both parabolic and loop binodals depending on the cholesterol concentration, modeled via an effective pressure. In some cases, the hybrid lipids can reduce the line tension to zero in SHC membranes at temperatures that approach the critical temperature as the pressure is increased. The differences in the hybrid saturated tail conformational order in bulk and at the interface are responsible for the reduction of the line tension.

  5. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes. PMID:26811291

  6. Electro-hydrodynamic effects on lipid membranes in giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staykova, Margarita; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-11-01

    Electric fields are widely applied for cell manipulation in numerous micron-scale systems. Here, we show for the first time that alternating electric fields may cause pronounced flows in the membrane of giant lipid vesicles as well as in the surrounding fluid media.^ The lipid vesicles are not only biomimetic model for the cell membrane but also have many potential biotechnological applications, e.g. as drug-delivery systems and micro-reactors. The reported effects should be considered in electric micro-manipulation procedures on cells and vesicles. They might be useful for applications in microfluidic technologies, for lipid mixing, trapping and displacement, as will be demonstrated. We also believe that our method for visualization of the lipid flows by fluorescently labeled intra-membrane domains will be helpful for studies on membrane behavior in vesicles subjected to shear or mechanical stresses.

  7. Differential Effect of Plant Lipids on Membrane Organization

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Kevin; Mongrand, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The high diversity of the plant lipid mixture raises the question of their respective involvement in the definition of membrane organization. This is particularly the case for plant plasma membrane, which is enriched in specific lipids, such as free and conjugated forms of phytosterols and typical phytosphingolipids, such as glycosylinositolphosphoceramides. This question was here addressed extensively by characterizing the order level of membrane from vesicles prepared using various plant lipid mixtures and labeled with an environment-sensitive probe. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed that among major phytosterols, campesterol exhibits a stronger ability than β-sitosterol and stigmasterol to order model membranes. Multispectral confocal microscopy, allowing spatial analysis of membrane organization, demonstrated accordingly the strong ability of campesterol to promote ordered domain formation and to organize their spatial distribution at the membrane surface. Conjugated sterol forms, alone and in synergy with free sterols, exhibit a striking ability to order membrane. Plant sphingolipids, particularly glycosylinositolphosphoceramides, enhanced the sterol-induced ordering effect, emphasizing the formation and increasing the size of sterol-dependent ordered domains. Altogether, our results support a differential involvement of free and conjugated phytosterols in the formation of ordered domains and suggest that the diversity of plant lipids, allowing various local combinations of lipid species, could be a major contributor to membrane organization in particular through the formation of sphingolipid-sterol interacting domains. PMID:25575593

  8. Interaction of mammalian Hsp22 with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Tirumala Kumar; Raman, Bakthisaran; Ramakrishna, Tangirala; Rao, Ch. Mohan

    2006-01-01

    Hsp22/HspB8 is a member of the small heat-shock protein family, whose function is not yet completely understood. Our immunolocalization studies in a human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH, using confocal microscopy show that a significant fraction of Hsp22 is localized to the plasma membrane. We therefore investigated its interactions with lipid vesicles in vitro. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence is quenched in the presence of lipid vesicles derived from either bovine brain lipid extract or purified lipids. Time-resolved fluorescence studies show a decrease in the lifetimes of the tryptophan residues. Both of these results indicate burial of some tryptophan residues of Hsp22 upon interaction with lipid vesicles. Membrane interactions also lead to increase in fluorescence polarization of Hsp22. Gel-filtration chromatography shows that Hsp22 binds stably with lipid vesicles; the extent of binding depends on the nature of the lipid. Hsp22 binds more strongly to vesicles made of lipids containing a phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol or phosphatidylserine headgroup (known to be present in the inner leaflet of plasma membrane) compared with lipid vesicles made of a phosphatidylcholine head-group alone. Far-UV CD spectra reveal conformational changes upon binding to the lipid vesicles or in membrane-mimetic solvent, trifluoroethanol. Thus our fluorescence, CD and gel-filtration studies show that Hsp22 interacts with membrane and this interaction leads to stable binding and conformational changes. The present study therefore clearly demonstrates that Hsp22 exhibits potential membrane interaction that may play an important role in its cellular functions. PMID:17020537

  9. Designing lipids for selective partitioning into liquid ordered membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Momin, Noor; Lee, Stacey; Gadok, Avinash K; Busch, David J; Bachand, George D; Hayden, Carl C; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2015-04-28

    Self-organization of lipid molecules into specific membrane phases is key to the development of hierarchical molecular assemblies that mimic cellular structures. While the packing interaction of the lipid tails should provide the major driving force to direct lipid partitioning to ordered or disordered membrane domains, numerous examples show that the headgroup and spacer play important but undefined roles. We report here the development of several new biotinylated lipids that examine the role of spacer chemistry and structure on membrane phase partitioning. The new lipids were prepared with varying lengths of low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (EGn) spacers to examine how spacer hydrophilicity and length influence their partitioning behavior following binding with FITC-labeled streptavidin in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexisting membranes. Partitioning coefficients (Kp Lo/Ld) of the biotinylated lipids were determined using fluorescence measurements in studies with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Compared against DPPE-biotin, DPPE-cap-biotin, and DSPE-PEG2000-biotin lipids, the new dipalmityl-EGn-biotin lipids exhibited markedly enhanced partitioning into liquid ordered domains, achieving Kp of up to 7.3 with a decaethylene glycol spacer (DP-EG10-biotin). We further demonstrated biological relevance of the lipids with selective partitioning to lipid raft-like domains observed in giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from mammalian cells. Our results found that the spacer group not only plays a pivotal role for designing lipids with phase selectivity but may also influence the structural order of the domain assemblies. PMID:25772372

  10. Non-Brownian diffusion in lipid membranes: Experiments and simulations.

    PubMed

    Metzler, R; Jeon, J-H; Cherstvy, A G

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of constituents and the surface response of cellular membranes-also in connection to the binding of various particles and macromolecules to the membrane-are still a matter of controversy in the membrane biophysics community, particularly with respect to crowded membranes of living biological cells. We here put into perspective recent single particle tracking experiments in the plasma membranes of living cells and supercomputing studies of lipid bilayer model membranes with and without protein crowding. Special emphasis is put on the observation of anomalous, non-Brownian diffusion of both lipid molecules and proteins embedded in the lipid bilayer. While single component, pure lipid bilayers in simulations exhibit only transient anomalous diffusion of lipid molecules on nanosecond time scales, the persistence of anomalous diffusion becomes significantly longer ranged on the addition of disorder-through the addition of cholesterol or proteins-and on passing of the membrane lipids to the gel phase. Concurrently, experiments demonstrate the anomalous diffusion of membrane embedded proteins up to macroscopic time scales in the minute time range. Particular emphasis will be put on the physical character of the anomalous diffusion, in particular, the occurrence of ageing observed in the experiments-the effective diffusivity of the measured particles is a decreasing function of time. Moreover, we present results for the time dependent local scaling exponent of the mean squared displacement of the monitored particles. Recent results finding deviations from the commonly assumed Gaussian diffusion patterns in protein crowded membranes are reported. The properties of the displacement autocorrelation function of the lipid molecules are discussed in the light of their appropriate physical anomalous diffusion models, both for non-crowded and crowded membranes. In the last part of this review we address the upcoming field of membrane distortion by elongated membrane

  11. Lipid partitioning at the nuclear envelope controls membrane biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Sembongi, Hiroshi; Su, Wen-Min; Abreu, Susana; Reggiori, Fulvio; Carman, George M.; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2015-01-01

    Partitioning of lipid precursors between membranes and storage is crucial for cell growth, and its disruption underlies pathologies such as cancer, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms and signals that regulate this process are largely unknown. In yeast, lipid precursors are mainly used for phospholipid synthesis in nutrient-rich conditions in order to sustain rapid proliferation but are redirected to triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in lipid droplets during starvation. Here we investigate how cells reprogram lipid metabolism in the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that the conserved phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase Pah1, which generates diacylglycerol from PA, targets a nuclear membrane subdomain that is in contact with growing lipid droplets and mediates TAG synthesis. We find that cytosol acidification activates the master regulator of Pah1, the Nem1-Spo7 complex, thus linking Pah1 activity to cellular metabolic status. In the absence of TAG storage capacity, Pah1 still binds the nuclear membrane, but lipid precursors are redirected toward phospholipids, resulting in nuclear deformation and a proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We propose that, in response to growth signals, activation of Pah1 at the nuclear envelope acts as a switch to control the balance between membrane biogenesis and lipid storage. PMID:26269581

  12. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  13. Tolerance to Changes in Membrane Lipid Composition as a Selected Trait of Membrane Proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Charles R.; Mittendorf, Kathleen F.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition can vary dramatically across the three domains of life and even within single organisms. Here we review evidence that the lipid-exposed surfaces of membrane proteins have generally evolved to maintain correct structure and function in the face of major changes in lipid composition. Such tolerance has allowed evolution to extensively remodel membrane lipid compositions during the emergence of new species without having to extensively remodel the associated membrane proteins. The tolerance of membrane proteins also permits single-celled organisms to vary membrane lipid composition in response to their changing environments and enables dynamic and organelle-specific variations in the lipid compositions of eukaryotic cells. Membrane protein structural biology has greatly benefited from this seemingly intrinsic property of membrane proteins: the majority of structures determined to date have been characterized under model membrane conditions that little-resemble native membranes. Nevertheless, with a few notable exceptions most experimentally-determined membrane protein structures appear, to a good approximation, to faithfully report on native structure. PMID:21848311

  14. Modulation of Innate Immune Signalling by Lipid-Mediated MAVS Transmembrane Domain Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Ron, David; Volmer, Romain

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I-like receptors detect viral RNA in infected cells and promote oligomerization of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS to induce innate immunity to viral infection through type I interferon production. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) have been shown to enhance anti-viral MAVS signalling, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Using a biochemical oligomerization-reporter fused to the transmembrane domain of MAVS, we found that mROS inducers promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization in the plane of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These events were mirrored by Sendai virus infection, which similarly induced lipid peroxidation and promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization. Our observations point to a role for mROS-induced changes in lipid bilayer properties in modulating antiviral innate signalling by favouring the oligomerization of MAVS transmembrane domain in the outer-mitochondrial membrane. PMID:26317833

  15. Effects of Phospholipase A2 Inhibitors on Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dubinin, Mikhail V; Astashev, Maxim E; Penkov, Nikita V; Gudkov, Sergey V; Dyachenko, Igor A; Samartsev, Victor N; Belosludtsev, Konstantin N

    2016-06-01

    The work examines the effect of inhibitors of cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent phospholipases A2 on bilayer lipid membranes. It was established that trifluoroperazine (TFP) and, to a lesser extent, arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF3) and palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone (PACOCF3) were able to permeabilize artificial lipid membranes (BLM and liposomes). It was shown that AACOCF3 lowered the temperature of phase transition of DMPC liposomes, inducing disordering of the hydrophobic region of lipid bilayer. TFP disordered membranes both in the hydrophobic region and in the region of hydrophilic heads, this being accompanied by changes in the membrane permeability: appearance of a channel-like BLM activity and leakage of sulforhodamine B from liposomes. In contrast to AACOCF3 and TFP, PACOCF3 increased membrane orderliness in the hydrophobic region (heightened the temperature of phase transition of DMPC liposomes) and in the region of lipid heads. The effectiveness of AACOCF3 and PACOCF3 as inductors of BLM and liposome permeabilization was considerably lower comparatively to TFP. As revealed by dynamic light scattering, incorporation of TFP, AACOCF3 and PACOCF3 into the membrane of liposomes resulted in the increase of the average size of particles in the suspension, presumably due to their aggregation or fusion. The paper discusses possible mechanisms of the influence of phospholipase A2 inhibitors on bilayer lipid membranes. PMID:26762382

  16. Solvent-exposed lipid tail protrusions depend on lipid membrane composition and curvature.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Mukarram A; Van Lehn, Reid C; Choi, S H; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-06-01

    The stochastic protrusion of hydrophobic lipid tails into solution, a subclass of hydrophobic membrane defects, has recently been shown to be a critical step in a number of biological processes like membrane fusion. Understanding the factors that govern the appearance of lipid tail protrusions is critical for identifying membrane features that affect the rate of fusion or other processes that depend on contact with solvent-exposed lipid tails. In this work, we utilize atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the likelihood of tail protrusions in phosphotidylcholine lipid bilayers of varying composition, curvature, and hydration. We distinguish two protrusion modes corresponding to atoms near the end of the lipid tail or near the glycerol group. Through potential of mean force calculations, we demonstrate that the thermodynamic cost for inducing a protrusion depends on tail saturation but is insensitive to other bilayer structural properties or hydration above a threshold value. Similarly, highly curved vesicles or micelles increase both the overall frequency of lipid tail protrusions as well as the preference for splay protrusions, both of which play an important role in driving membrane fusion. In multi-component bilayers, however, the incidence of protrusion events does not clearly depend on the mismatch between tail length or tail saturation of the constituent lipids. Together, these results provide significant physical insight into how system components might affect the appearance of protrusions in biological membranes, and help explain the roles of composition or curvature-modifying proteins in membrane fusion. PMID:26828121

  17. Pushing the lipid envelope: using bio-inspired nanocomposites to understand and exploit lipid membrane limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montano, Gabriel

    Lipids serve as the organizing matrix material for biological membranes, the site of interaction of cells with the external environment. . As such, lipids play a critical role in structure/function relationships of an extraordinary number of critical biological processes. In this talk, we will look at bio-inspired membrane assemblies to better understand the roles of lipids in biological systems as well as attempt to generate materials that can mimic and potentially advance upon biological membrane processes. First, we will investigate the response of lipids to adverse conditions. In particular, I will present data that demonstrates the response of lipids to harsh conditions and how such responses can be exploited to generate nanocomposite rearrangements. I will also show the effect of adding the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to lipid bilayer assemblies and describe implications on our understanding of LPS organization in biological systems as well as describe induced lipid modifications that can be exploited to organize membrane composites with precise, two-dimensional geometric control. Lastly, I will describe the use of amphiphilic block copolymers to create membrane nanocomposites capable of mimicking biological systems. In particular, I will describe the use of our polymer-based membranes in creating artificial photosynthetic assemblies that rival biological systems in function in a more flexible, dynamic matrix.

  18. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J.; White, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  19. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Nablo, Brian J; Panchal, Rekha G; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E; Robertson, Joseph W F; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M; Kasianowicz, John J

    2013-08-14

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891

  20. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J; White, Stephen

    2014-12-16

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  1. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  2. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Míriam; Mejía-Morales, John E.; Culi, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP). We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them. PMID:26121667

  3. Prolonged Intake of Dietary Lipids Alters Membrane Structure and T Cell Responses in LDLr-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Abigail H; Tedla, Nicodemus; Hancock, Sarah E; Cornely, Rhea; Mitchell, Todd W; Yang, Zhengmin; Kockx, Maaike; Parton, Robert G; Rossy, Jérémie; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-05-15

    Although it is recognized that lipids and membrane organization in T cells affect signaling and T cell activation, to what extent dietary lipids alter T cell responsiveness in the absence of obesity and inflammation is not known. In this study, we fed low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice a Western high-fat diet for 1 or 9 wk and examined T cell responses in vivo along with T cell lipid composition, membrane order, and activation ex vivo. Our data showed that high levels of circulating lipids for a prolonged period elevated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation and resulted in an increased proportion of CD4(+) central-memory T cells within the draining lymph nodes following induction of contact hypersensitivity. In addition, the 9-wk Western high-fat diet elevated the total phospholipid content and monounsaturated fatty acid level, but decreased saturated phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin within the T cells. The altered lipid composition in the circulation, and of T cells, was also reflected by enhanced membrane order at the activation site of ex vivo activated T cells that corresponded to increased IL-2 mRNA levels. In conclusion, dietary lipids can modulate T cell lipid composition and responses in lipoprotein receptor knockout mice even in the absence of excess weight gain and a proinflammatory environment. PMID:27183636

  4. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T

    2015-10-01

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid-Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200-11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. A model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell. PMID:26074009

  5. Lipid Bilayer Membrane Perturbation by Embedded Nanopores: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fandiño, Rebeca; Piñeiro, Ángel; Trick, Jemma L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-03-22

    A macromolecular nanopore inserted into a membrane may perturb the dynamic organization of the surrounding lipid bilayer. To better understand the nature of such perturbations, we have undertaken a systematic molecular dynamics simulation study of lipid bilayer structure and dynamics around three different classes of nanopore: a carbon nanotube, three related cyclic peptide nanotubes differing in the nature of their external surfaces, and a model of a β-barrel nanopore protein. Periodic spatial distributions of several lipid properties as a function of distance from the nanopore were observed. This was especially clear for the carbon nanotube system, for which the density of lipids, the bilayer thickness, the projection of lipid head-to-tail vectors onto the membrane plane, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficients exhibited undulatory behavior as a function of the distance from the surface of the channel. Overall, the differences in lipid behavior as a function of the nanopore structure reveal local adaptation of the bilayer structure and dynamics to different embedded nanopore structures. Both the local structure and dynamic behavior of lipids around membrane-embedded nanopores are sensitive to the geometry and nature of the outer surface of the macromolecule/molecular assembly forming the pore. PMID:26943498

  6. The adrenal specific toxicant mitotane directly interacts with lipid membranes and alters membrane properties depending on lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Haralampiev, Ivan; Theisgen, Stephan; Schirbel, Andreas; Sbiera, Silviu; Huster, Daniel; Kroiss, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Mitotane (o,p'.-DDD) is an orphan drug approved for the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma. The mechanisms, which are responsible for this activity of the drug, are not completely understood. It can be hypothesized that an impact of mitotane is mediated by the interaction with cellular membranes. However, an interaction of mitotane with (lipid) membranes has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we characterized the interaction of mitotane and its main metabolite o,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroacetic acid (o,p'-DDA) with lipid membranes by applying a variety of biophysical approaches of nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that mitotane and o,p'-DDA bind to lipid membranes by inserting into the lipid-water interface of the bilayer. Mitotane but not o,p'-DDA directly causes a disturbance of bilayer structure leading to an increased permeability of the membrane for polar molecules. Mitotane induced alterations of the membrane integrity required the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and/or cholesterol. Collectively, our data for the first time characterize the impact of mitotane on the lipid membrane structure and dynamics, which may contribute to a better understanding of specific mitotane effects and side effects. PMID:27002491

  7. High-throughput formation of lipid bilayer membrane arrays with an asymmetric lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Yamanaka, Tomoko; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present a micro-device in which more than 10,000 asymmetric lipid bilayer membranes are formed at a time on micro-chamber arrays. The arrayed asymmetric lipid bilayers, where lipid compositions are different between the inner and outer leaflets, are formed with high efficiency of over 97% by injecting several types of liquids into a micro-device that has hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic surfaces. The lipid compositional asymmetry is an intrinsic property of bio-membranes, and therefore, this micro-device extends the versatility of artificial lipid-bilayer systems, which were previously limited to symmetric bilayer formation, and could contribute to the understanding of the role of lipid compositional asymmetry in cell physiology and also to further analytical and pharmacological applications. PMID:25399694

  8. Influence of membrane phospholipid composition and structural organization on spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes.

    PubMed

    Pankov, R; Markovska, T; Antonov, P; Ivanova, L; Momchilova, A

    2006-09-01

    Investigations were carried out on the influence of phospholipid composition of model membranes on the processes of spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes. Acceptor vesicles were prepared from phospholipids extracted from plasma membranes of control and ras-transformed fibroblasts. Acceptor model membranes with manipulated levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin and phosphatidic acid were also used in the studies. Donor vesicles were prepared of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and contained two fluorescent lipid analogues, NBD-PC and N-Rh-PE, at a self-quenching concentration. Lipid transfer rate was assessed by measuring the increase of fluorescence in acceptor membranes due to transfer of fluorescent lipid analogues from quenched donor to unquenched acceptor vesicles. The results showed that spontaneous NBD-PC transfer increased upon fluidization of acceptor vesicles. In addition, elevation of PE concentration in model membranes was also accompanied by an increase of lipid transfer to all series of acceptor vesicles. The results are discussed with respect to the role of lipid composition and structural order of cellular plasma membranes in the processes of spontaneous lipid exchange between membrane bilayers. PMID:17197729

  9. Why Hydrophilic Water can Permeate Hydrophobic Interior of Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baofu; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Water molecules as well as some small molecules have long been found to be able to diffuse across lipid membranes. Such permeation is of significant biological and biotechnological importance. For instance, the permeation of water across lipid membrane plays a important role in regulating ionic concentrations inside of cells. Such water permeation without the assistance of proteins embedded in membranes has been found to be a energetically unfavorable process. We, for the first time, explicitly depict the driving force for such an energetically unfavorable process. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate water diffusion in both liquid-crystalline and ordered gel phases of membranes containing zwitterionic DPPC or anionic DLPS lipid. The membrane conformation is calculated to have a critical role in water permeation, regardless of the type of lipid. The fluctuations in the potential energy are found to have a significant, if not the exclusive, role in the transportation of water across lipid membranes. Our results are also informative for the diffusion of small molecules of CO2, O2 and drug molecules, the absence of diffusion of ions, and the diffusion of water into the hydrophobic pores of carbon nanotubes. The authors acknowledge the support from the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR & E) under Award No. FA9550-10-1-0167.

  10. Probing DNA-lipid membrane interactions with a lipopeptide nanopore.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Andrey; Takemoto, Jon Y; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-04-24

    Association of DNA molecules with lipid bilayer membranes is of considerable interest for a large variety of applications in biotechnology. Here we introduce syringomycin E (SRE), a small pore-forming lipopeptide produced by the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, as a facile sensor for the detection of DNA interactions with lipid membranes. SRE forms highly reproducible pores in cellular and artificial membranes. The pore structure involves bilayer lipids, which have a pronounced influence on open channel conductance and gating. SRE channels act as ionic diodes that serve as current rectifiers sensitive to the charge of the bilayer. We employ this intrinsic property to electronically monitor the association of DNA molecules with the membrane in a variety of different settings. We show that SRE can be used for quantitatively probing electrostatic interactions of DNA and DNA-cholesterol conjugates with a lipid membrane. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SRE channels allow monitoring of hybridization reactions between lipid-anchored probe strands and complementary strands in solution. In the presence of double-stranded DNA, SRE channels display a particularly high degree of rectification. Finally, the formation of multilayered structures assembled from poly-(L)-lysine and DNA oligonucleotides on the membrane was precisely monitored with SRE. PMID:22424398

  11. Impact of two different saponins on the organization of model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Korchowiec, Beata; Gorczyca, Marcelina; Wojszko, Kamila; Janikowska, Maria; Henry, Max; Rogalska, Ewa

    2015-10-01

    Saponins, naturally occurring plant compounds are known for their biological and pharmacological activity. This activity is strongly related to the amphiphilic character of saponins that allows them to aggregate in aqueous solution and interact with membrane components. In this work, Langmuir monolayer techniques combined with polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and Brewster angle microscopy were used to study the interaction of selected saponins with lipid model membranes. Two structurally different saponins were used: digitonin and a commercial Merck Saponin. Membranes of different composition, namely, cholesterol, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) were formed at the air/water and air/saponin solution interfaces. The saponin-lipid interaction was characterized by changes in surface pressure, surface potential, surface morphology and PM-IRRAS signal. Both saponins interact with model membranes and change the physical state of membranes by perturbing the lipid acyl chain orientation. The changes in membrane fluidity were more significant upon the interaction with Merck Saponin. A higher affinity of saponins for cholesterol than phosphatidylglycerols was observed. Moreover, our results indicate that digitonin interacts strongly with cholesterol and solubilize the cholesterol monolayer at higher surface pressures. It was shown, that digitonin easily penetrate to the cholesterol monolayer and forms a hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl groups. These findings might be useful in further understanding of the saponin action at the membrane interface and of the mechanism of membrane lysis. PMID:26055895

  12. Elastic deformation and failure of lipid bilayer membranes containing cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, D; Nunn, R S

    1990-01-01

    Giant bilayer vesicles were reconstituted from several lipids and lipid/cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures: stearolyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), bovine sphingomyelin (BSM), diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine (DAPC), SOPC/CHOL, BSM/CHOL, DAPC/CHOL, and extracted red blood cell (RBC) lipids with native cholesterol. Single-walled vesicles were manipulated by micropipette suction and several membrane material properties were determined. The properties measured were the elastic area compressibility modulus K, the critical areal strain alpha c, and the tensile strength tau lys, from which the failure energy or membrane toughness Tf was calculated. The elastic area expansion moduli for these lipid and lipid/cholesterol bilayers ranged from 57 dyn/cm for DAPC to 1,734 dyn/cm for BSM/CHOL. The SOPC/CHOL series and RBC lipids had intermediate values. The results indicated that the presence of cholesterol is the single most influential factor in increasing bilayer cohesion, but only for lipids where both chains are saturated, or mono- or diunsaturated. Multiple unsaturation in both lipid chains inhibits the condensing effect of cholesterol in bilayers. The SOPC/CHOL system was studied in more detail. The area expansion modulus showed a nonlinear increase with increasing cholesterol concentration up to a constant plateau, indicating a saturation limit for cholesterol in the bilayer phase of approximately 55 mol% CHOL. The membrane compressibility was modeled by a property-averaging composite theory involving two bilayer components, namely, uncomplexed lipid and a lipid/cholesterol complex of stoichiometry 1/1.22. The area expansion modulus of this molecular composite membrane was evaluated by a combination of the expansion moduli of each component scaled by their area fractions in the bilayer. Bilayer toughness, which is the energy stored in the bilayer at failure, showed a maximum value at approximately 40 mol% CHOL. This breakdown energy was found to be only a fraction of the

  13. Preparation of supported lipid membranes for aquaporin Z incorporation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesong; Wang, Rong; Tang, Chuyang; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Zhao, Yang; Torres, Jaume; Fane, Tony

    2012-06-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest to mimic the performance of natural cellular membranes by incorporating water channel proteins-aquaporins (AQPs) into various ultrathin films for water filtration applications. To make biomimetic membranes one of the most crucial steps is preparing a defect-free platform for AQPs incorporation on a suitable substrate. In this study two methods were used to prepare supported lipid membranes on NF membrane surfaces under a benign pH condition of 7.8. One method was direct vesicle fusion on a hydrophilic membrane NF-270; the other was vesicle fusion facilitated by hydraulic pressure on a modified hydrophilic NF-270 membrane whose surface has been spin-coated with positively charged lipids. Experiments revealed that the supported lipid membrane without AQPs prepared by the spin coating plus vesicle fusion had a much lower defect density than that prepared by vesicle fusion alone. It appears that the surface roughness and charge are the main factors determining the quality of the supported lipid membrane. Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) proteins were successfully incorporated into 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes and its permeability was measured by the stopped-flow experimental procedure. However, after the proteoliposomes have been fused onto the modified substrate, the AqpZ function in the resultant membrane was not observed and AFM images showed distinct aggregations of unfused proteoliposomes or AqpZ proteins on the substrate surface. It is speculated that the inhibition of AqpZ function may be caused by the low lipid mobility on the NF membrane surface. Further investigations to evaluate and optimize the structure-performance relationship are required. PMID:22386862

  14. Interactions of Polyethylenimines with Zwitterionic and Anionic Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kwolek, Urszula; Jamróz, Dorota; Janiczek, Małgorzata; Nowakowska, Maria; Wydro, Paweł; Kepczynski, Mariusz

    2016-05-17

    Interactions between polyethylenimines (PEIs) and phospholipid membranes are of fundamental importance for various biophysical applications of these polymers such as gene delivery. Despite investigations into the nature of these interactions, their molecular basis remains poorly understood. In this article, we combined experimental methods and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain comprehensive insight into the effect of linear and branched PEIs on zwitterionic and anionic bilayers used as simple models of mammalian cellular membranes. Our results show that PEIs adsorb only partially on the surface of zwitterionic membranes by forming hydrogen bonds to the lipid headgroups, whereas a large part of the polymer chains dangles freely in the aqueous phase. In contrast, PEIs readily adhere to and insert into the anionic membrane. The attraction of the polymer chains to the membrane is due to electrostatic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding between the amine groups of PEI and the phosphate groups of lipids. These interactions were found to induce a substantial reorganization of the bilayer in the polymer vicinity due to the reorientation of lipid molecules. The lipid headgroups were pulled toward the center of the membrane, which can facilitate transmembrane translocations of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the PEI-lipid interactions affect the stability of liposomal dispersions, but we did not see any evidence of disruption of the vesicular structures into small fragments at polymer concentrations typically used in gene therapy. Our results provide a detailed molecular-level description of the lipid organization in the membrane in the presence of polycations that can be useful in understanding their mechanisms of in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity. PMID:27115556

  15. Characterization of 3D Voronoi Tessellation Nearest Neighbor Lipid Shells Provides Atomistic Lipid Disruption Profile of Protein Containing Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sara Y.; Duong, Hai V.; Compton, Campbell; Vaughn, Mark W.; Nguyen, Hoa; Cheng, Kwan H.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying protein-induced lipid disruptions at the atomistic level is a challenging problem in membrane biophysics. Here we propose a novel 3D Voronoi tessellation nearest-atom-neighbor shell method to classify and characterize lipid domains into discrete concentric lipid shells surrounding membrane proteins in structurally heterogeneous lipid membranes. This method needs only the coordinates of the system and is independent of force fields and simulation conditions. As a proof-of-principle, we use this multiple lipid shell method to analyze the lipid disruption profiles of three simulated membrane systems: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol, and beta-amyloid/phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol. We observed different atomic volume disruption mechanisms due to cholesterol and beta-amyloid Additionally, several lipid fractional groups and lipid-interfacial water did not converge to their control values with increasing distance or shell order from the protein. This volume divergent behavior was confirmed by bilayer thickness and chain orientational order calculations. Our method can also be used to analyze high-resolution structural experimental data. PMID:25637891

  16. Methodologies for the Analysis of Instantaneous Lipid Diffusion in MD Simulations of Large Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chavent, Matthieu; Reddy, Tyler; Goose, Joseph; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Stone, John E.; Jobard, Bruno; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between lipids and membrane proteins play a key role in determining the nanoscale dynamic and structural properties of biological membranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a valuable tool for studying membrane models, complementing experimental approaches. It is now possible to simulate large membrane systems, such as simplified models of bacterial and viral envelope membranes. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop tools to visualize and quantify the dynamics of these immense systems, which typically are comprised of millions of particles. To tackle this issue, we have developed visual and quantitative analyses of molecular positions and their velocity field using path line, vector field and streamline techniques. This allows us to highlight large, transient flow-like movements of lipids and to better understand crowding within the lipid bilayer. The current study focuses on visualization and analysis of lipid dynamics. However, the methods are flexible and can be readily applied to e.g. proteins and nanoparticles within large complex membranes. The protocols developed here are readily accessible both as a plugin for the molecular visualization program VMD and as a module for the MDAnalysis library. PMID:25341001

  17. Specific Adhesion of Lipid Membranes Can Simultaneously Produce Two Types of Lipid and Protein Heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Orrin; Micah, Natalie; Ritzer, Max; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Living cells adhere to one another and their environment. Adhesion is associated with re-organization of the lipid and protein components of the cell membrane. The resulting heterogeneities are functional structures involved in biological processes. We use artificial lipid membranes that contain a single type of binding protein. Before adhesion, the lipid, protein, and dye components in the membrane are well-mixed and constitute a single disordered-liquid phase (Ld) . After adhesion, two distinct types of heterogeneities coexist in the adhesion zone: a central domain of ordered lipid phase that excludes both binding proteins and membrane dye, and a peripheral domain of disordered lipid phase that is densely packed with adhesion proteins and enriched in membrane dye relative to the non-adhered portion of the vesicle. Thus, we show that adhesion that is mediated by only one type of protein can organize the lipid and protein components of the membranes into heterogeneities that resemble those found in biology, for example the immune synapse.

  18. Modulation of a Small Two-Domain Lipid Vesicle by Linactants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Linactants, molecules that preferentially localize at the boundary of lipid membrane domains, are attracting considerable attention in recent years due to the recognition that they might regulate lipid-phase separation and thereby modulate membrane morphology. Recent studies have also shown that clustering of some line active agents enhances their ability to modulate membrane curvature. However, the molecular origin of this phenomenon, and the degree to which it impacts biological membranes, remains poorly understood. In this work, we have investigated how linactants induce shape change in multidomain small unilamallar vesicles (SUVs) using extensive dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The linactant was modeled as a two-tailed hybrid lipid with the two tails differing in preference for different lipid domains. We found that addition of a small amount of linactants (∼1%) to a two-domain vesicle leads to substantial reduction in the line tension and neck curvature at the domain boundary. Using cross-linking as a surrogate for clustering, we further show that linactant clusters substantially enhance the boundary preference and therefore the reduction in neck curvature. Moreover, on the basis of analyses of the corresponding changes in the membrane energetics, we highlight how linactants might stabilize nanoscale domains. These results have important implications for the potential existence and physical explanations of nanosized domains in biological membranes. PMID:25003709

  19. Highly stabilized, polymer-lipid membranes prepared on silica microparticles as stationary phases for capillary chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Elyssia S.; Adem, Seid M.; Baker, Christopher A.; Ratnayaka, Saliya N.; Jones, Ian W.; Hall, Henry K.; Saavedra, S. Scott; Aspinwall, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to rapidly screen complex libraries of pharmacological modulators is paramount to modern drug discovery efforts. This task is particularly challenging for agents that interact with lipid bilayers or membrane proteins due to the limited chemical, physical, and temporal stability of conventional lipid-based chromatographic stationary phases. Here, we describe the preparation and characterization of a novel stationary phase material composed of highly stable, polymeric-phospholipid bilayers self-assembled onto silica microparticles. Polymer lipid membranes were prepared by photochemical or redox initiated polymerization of 1,2-bis[10-(2′,4′-hexadieoyloxy)decanoyl]-sn-glycero-2-phosphocholine (bis-SorbPC), a synthetic, polymerizable lipid. The resulting polymerized bis-SorbPC (poly(bis-SorbPC)) stationary phases exhibited enhanced stability compared to particles coated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (unpolymerized) phospholipid bilayers when exposed to chemical (50mM triton X-100 or 50% acetonitrile) and physical (15 min sonication) insults after 30 days of storage. Further, poly(bis-SorbPC)-coated particles survived slurry packing into fused silica capillaries, compared to unpolymerized lipid membranes, where the lipid bilayer was destroyed during packing. Frontal chromatographic analyses of the lipophilic small molecules acetylsalicylic acid, benzoic acid, and salicylic acid showed > 44% increase in retention times (P < 0.0001) for all analytes on poly(bis-SorbPC)-functionalized stationary phase compared to bare silica microspheres, suggesting a lipophilic retention mechanism. Phospholipid membrane-functionalized stationary phases that withstand the chemical and physical rigors of capillary LC conditions can substantially increase the efficacy of lipid membrane affinity chromatography, and represents a key advance towards the development of robust membrane protein-functionalized chromatographic stationary phases. PMID:25670414

  20. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Lipids and Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Dennis, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics, a major part of metabolomics, constitutes the detailed analysis and global characterization, both spatial and temporal, of the structure and function of lipids (the lipidome) within a living system. As with proteomics, mass spectrometry has earned a central analytical role in lipidomics, and this role will continue to grow with technological developments. Currently, there exist two mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approaches, one based on a division of lipids into categories and classes prior to analysis, the “comprehensive lipidomics analysis by separation simplification” (CLASS), and the other in which all lipid species are analyzed together without prior separation, shotgun. In exploring the lipidome of various living systems, novel lipids are being discovered, and mass spectrometry is helping characterize their chemical structure. Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) is being used to investigate the association of lipids and membranes with proteins and enzymes, and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is being applied to the in situ analysis of lipids in tissues. PMID:21469951

  1. Simulation modeling of supported lipid membranes - a review.

    PubMed

    Hirtz, Michael; Kumar, Naresh; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are of great importance for many biological systems and biotechnological applications. One method to gain a profound understanding of the dynamics in lipid membranes and their interaction with other system components is by modeling these systems by computer simulations. Many different approaches have been undertaken in this endeavor that have led to molecular level insights into the underlying mechanisms of several experimental observations and biological processes with an extremely high temporal resolution. As compared to the free-standing lipid bilayers, there are fewer simulation studies addressing the systems of supported lipid membranes. Nevertheless, these have significantly enhanced our understanding of the behavior of lipid layers employed in applications spanning from biosensors to drug delivery and for biological processes such as the breathing cycle of lung surfactants. In this review, we give an account of the state of the art of methods and applications of the simulations of supported lipid bilayers, interfacial membranes at the air/water interface and on solid surfaces. PMID:24444165

  2. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those that cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.

  3. Melittin-induced cholesterol reorganization in lipid bilayer membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2015-06-12

    The peptide melittin, a 26 amino acid, cationic peptide from honey bee (Apis mellifera) venom, disrupts lipid bilayer membranes in a concentration-dependent manner. Rather than interacting with a specific receptor, the peptide interacts directly with the lipid matrix of the membrane in a manner dependent on the lipid composition. Here, a small-angle neutron scattering study of the interaction of melittin with lipid bilayers made of mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and cholesterol (Chol) is presented. Through the use of deuterium-labeled DMPC, changes in the distribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles were observed for peptide concentrations below those thatmore » cause pores to form. In addition to disrupting the in-plane organization of Chol, melittin produces vesicles having inner and outer leaflet compositions that depend on the lipid–Chol molar ratio and on the peptide concentration. The changes seen at high cholesterol and low peptide concentration are similar to those produced by alamethicin (Qian, S. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2014, 118, 11200–11208), which points to an underlying physical mechanism driving the redistribution of Chol, but melittin displays an additional effect not seen with alamethicin. Furthermore, a model for how the peptide drives the redistribution of Chol is proposed. The results suggest that redistribution of the lipids in a target cell membrane by membrane active peptides takes places as a prelude to the lysis of the cell.« less

  4. Cholesterol modulates alkaline phosphatase activity of rat intestinal microvillus membranes.

    PubMed

    Brasitus, T A; Dahiya, R; Dudeja, P K; Bissonnette, B M

    1988-06-25

    Experiments were conducted, using a nonspecific lipid transfer protein, to vary the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of rat proximal small intestinal microvillus membranes in order to assess the possible role of cholesterol in modulating enzymatic activities of this plasma membrane. Cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratios from 0.71 to 1.30 were produced from a normal value of 1.05 by incubation with the transfer protein and an excess of either phosphatidylcholine or cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Cholesterol loading or depletion of the membranes was accompanied by a decrease or increase, respectively, in their lipid fluidity, as assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization techniques using the lipid-soluble fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Increasing the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio also decreased alkaline phosphatase specific activity by approximately 20-30%, whereas decreasing this ratio increased this enzymatic activity by 20-30%. Sucrase, maltase, and lactase specific activities were not affected in these same preparations. Since the changes in alkaline phosphatase activity could be secondary to alterations in fluidity, cholesterol, or both, additional experiments were performed using benzyl alcohol, a known fluidizer. Benzyl alcohol (25 mM) restored the fluidity of cholesterol-enriched preparations to control levels, did not change the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio, and failed to alter alkaline phosphatase activity. These findings, therefore, indicate that alterations in the cholesterol content and cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of microvillus membranes can modulate alkaline phosphatase but not sucrase, maltase, or lactase activities. Moreover, membrane fluidity does not appear to be an important physiological regulator of these enzymatic activities. PMID:3379034

  5. DNA release from lipoplexes by anionic lipids: correlation with lipid mesomorphism, interfacial curvature, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tarahovsky, Yury S.; Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    DNA release from lipoplexes is an essential step during lipofection and is probably a result of charge neutralization by cellular anionic lipids. As a model system to test this possibility, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between DNA and lipid covalently labeled with Cy3 and BODIPY, respectively, was used to monitor the release of DNA from lipid surfaces induced by anionic liposomes. The separation of DNA from lipid measured this way was considerably slower and less complete than that estimated with noncovalently labeled DNA, and depends on the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and anionic liposomes. This result was confirmed by centrifugal separation of released DNA and lipid. X-ray diffraction revealed a clear correlation of the DNA release capacity of the anionic lipids with the interfacial curvature of the mesomorphic structures developed when the anionic and cationic liposomes were mixed. DNA release also correlated with the rate of fusion of anionic liposomes with lipoplexes. It is concluded that the tendency to fuse and the phase preference of the mixed lipid membranes are key factors for the rate and extent of DNA release. The approach presented emphasizes the importance of the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and target membranes and suggests optimal transfection may be obtained by tailoring lipoplex composition to the lipid composition of target cells.

  6. Effect of membrane tension on the physical properties of DOPC lipid bilayer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, A. Srinivas; Warshaviak, Dora Toledo; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer were performed to explore its mechanosensitivity. Variations in the bilayer properties, such as area per lipid, volume, thickness, hydration depth (HD), hydration thickness (HT), lateral diffusion coefficient, and changes in lipid structural order were computed in the membrane tension range 0 to 15 dyn/cm. We determined that an increase in membrane tension results in a decrease in the bilayer thickness and HD of ∼5% and ∼5.7% respectively, whereas area per lipid, volume, and HT/HD increased by 6.8%, 2.4%, and 5% respectively. The changes in lipid conformation and orientation were characterized using orientational (S2) and deuterium (SCD) order parameters. Upon increase of membrane tension both order parameters indicated an increase in lipid disorder by 10– 20%, mostly in the tail end region of the hydrophobic chains. The effect of membrane tension on lipid lateral diffusion in the DOPC bilayer was analyzed on three different time scales corresponding to inertial motion, anomalous diffusion and normal diffusion. The results showed that lateral diffusion of lipid molecules is anomalous in nature due to the non-exponential distribution of waiting times. The anomalous and normal diffusion coefficients increased by 20% and 52% when the membrane tension changed from 0 to 15 dyn/cm, respectively. In conclusion, our studies showed that membrane tension causes relatively significant changes in the area per lipid, volume, polarity, membrane thickness, and fluidity of the membrane suggesting multiple mechanisms by which mechanical perturbation of the membrane could trigger mechanosensitive response in cells. PMID:22588133

  7. Model lipid bilayer with facile diffusion of lipids and integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Ingram, Colin; Weisshaar, James C

    2010-07-01

    A model membrane system is formed by the rupture of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) onto a passivating layer comprising a PEG polymer cushion anchored in a lipid bilayer supported on glass. The novel use of pH-dependent electrostatic interactions between NeutrAvidin in the passivating layer and anionic lipids in the GUV drives vesicle rupture. The resulting "GUV pancakes" are single, planar lipid bilayer patches whose diameters vary from approximately 20 to 50 microm. The pancakes have several potential advantages for the in vitro study of protein-lipid interactions and integral membrane protein function. All components are commercially available. The pancakes resist nonspecific binding of vesicles containing protein. Both lipids and integral membrane proteins exhibit good lateral mobility in the GUV pancakes, as evidenced by single-particle tracking (SPT) of the DiD double-tailed fluorescent probe and of the integral membrane protein syntaxin-1A, labeled with AlexaFluor 633 (AF633-Syx). At least 80% of both probes exhibit free, homogeneous diffusion with a diffusion coefficient of approximately 5.5 microm(2) s(-1), which is more than 10 times faster than diffusion in a GUV pancake supported on bare glass. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) suggests that the polymer cushion has a height of approximately 4 nm. The mobility of a large fraction of the AF633-Syx probe suggests that even integral membrane proteins with large domains on both sides of the lipid bilayer should exhibit free diffusion within a GUV pancake. PMID:20459075

  8. Stability of DNA-Tethered Lipid Membranes with Mobile Tethers

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Minsub; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    We recently introduced two approaches for tethering planar lipid bilayers as membrane patches to either a supported lipid bilayer or DNA-functionalized surface using DNA hybridization (Chung, M., Lowe, R. D., Chan, Y-H. M., Ganesan, P. V., Boxer, S. G. J. Struct. Biol. 2009, 168, 190–9). When mobile DNA tethers are used, the tethered bilayer patches become unstable, while they are stable if the tethers are fixed on the surface. Because the mobile tethers between a patch and a supported lipid bilayer offer a particularly interesting architecture for studying the dynamics of membrane-membrane interactions, we have investigated the sources of instability, focusing on membrane composition. The most stable patches were made with a mixture of saturated lipids and cholesterol, suggesting an important role for membrane stiffness. Other factors such as the effect of tether length, lateral mobility and patch membrane edge were also investigated. Based on these results, a model for the mechanism of patch destruction is developed. PMID:21452847

  9. Membrane-Sculpting BAR Domains Generate Stable Lipid Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxia; Michelot, Alphée; Koskela, Essi V.; Tkach, Vadym; Stamou, Dimitrios; Drubin, David G.; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by “freezing” phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved role for BAR superfamily proteins in regulating lipid dynamics within membranes. Stable microdomains induced by BAR domain scaffolds and specific lipids can generate phase boundaries and diffusion barriers, which may have profound impacts on diverse cellular processes. PMID:24055060

  10. Hybrid and Nonhybrid Lipids Exert Common Effects on Membrane Raft Size and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterolrich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chainasymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains.

  11. Hybrid and nonhybrid lipids exert common effects on membrane raft size and morphology.

    PubMed

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2013-10-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterol-rich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chain-asymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains. PMID:24041024

  12. The Unsaturation of Membrane Lipids Stabilizes Photosynthesis against Heat Stress.

    PubMed Central

    Gombos, Z.; Wada, H.; Hideg, E.; Murata, N.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of the unsaturation of glycerolipids of thylakoid membranes on the heat tolerance of the photosynthetic evolution of oxygen was studied in vivo by mutation and transformation of fatty-acid desaturases in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803. The experimental results indicate that elimination of dienoic lipid molecules decreases, to a small but distinct extent, the heat tolerance of photosynthetic oxygen evolution, but that elimination of trienoic lipid molecules has no effect on the heat tolerance. This conclusion contrasts with the previous hypothesis that the heat tolerance of photosynthesis is enhanced upon an increase in the level of saturation of membrane lipids. It is also shown that light does not affect the nature of the effect of lipid unsaturation on the heat tolerance of photosynthesis. PMID:12232106

  13. Membrane protein biosensing with plasmonic nanopore arrays and pore-spanning lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hyungsoon; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Lesuffleur, Antoine; Lindquist, Nathan C.; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Integration of solid-state biosensors and lipid bilayer membranes is important for membrane protein research and drug discovery. In these sensors, it is critical that the solid-state sensing material does not have adverse effects on the conformation or functionality of membrane-bound molecules. In this work, pore-spanning lipid membranes are formed over an array of periodic nanopores in free-standing gold films for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) kinetic binding assays. The ability to perform kinetic assays with a transmembrane protein is demonstrated with α-hemolysin (α-HL). The incorporation of α-HL into the membrane followed by specific antibody binding (anti-α-HL) red-shifts the plasmon resonance of the gold nanopore array, which is optically monitored in real time. Subsequent fluorescence imaging reveals that the antibodies primarily bind in nanopore regions, indicating that α-HL incorporation preferentially occurs into areas of pore-spanning lipid membranes. PMID:21218136

  14. Oxygen permeability of the lipid bilayer membrane made of calf lens lipids

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen permeability coefficient across the membrane made of the total lipid extract from the plasma membrane of calf lens was estimated from the profile of the oxygen transport parameter (local oxygen diffusion-concentration product) and compared with those estimated for membranes made of an equimolar 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (POPC/Chol) mixture and of pure POPC. Profiles of the oxygen transport parameter were obtained by observing the collision of molecular oxygen with nitroxide radical spin labels placed at different depths in the membrane using the saturation-recovery EPR technique and were published by us earlier (J. Widomska, M. Raguz, J. Dillon, E. R. Gaillard, W. K. Subczynski, Biochim. Biophys. Acta. Epub 2007 March 20). At 35°C, the estimated oxygen permeability coefficients were 51.3, 49.7, and 157.4 cm/s for lens lipid, POPC/Chol, and POPC membranes, respectively (compared with 53.3 cm/s for a water layer with the same thickness as a membrane). Membrane permeability significantly decreases at lower temperatures. In the lens lipid membrane, resistance to the oxygen transport is located in and near the polar headgroup region of the membrane to the depth of the ninth carbon, which is approximately where the steroid-ring structure of cholesterol reaches into the membrane. In the central region of the membrane, oxygen transport is enhanced, significantly exceeding that in bulk water. It is concluded that the high level of cholesterol in lens lipids is responsible for these unique membrane properties. PMID:17662231

  15. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  16. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jakob; Köper, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties. PMID:27249006

  17. Domain formation in membranes caused by lipid wetting of protein.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Sergey A; Frolov, Vladimir A J; Kuzmin, Peter I; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Chizmadzhev, Yuri A; Cohen, Fredric S

    2008-05-01

    Formation of rafts and other domains in cell membranes is considered as wetting of proteins by lipids. The membrane is modeled as a continuous elastic medium. Thermodynamic functions of the lipid films that wet proteins are calculated using a mean-field theory of liquid crystals as adapted to biomembranes. This approach yields the conditions necessary for a macroscopic wetting film to form; its thickness could also be determined. It is shown that films of macroscopic thicknesses form around large (tens nanometers in diameter) lipid-protein aggregates; only thin adsorption films form around single proteins or small complexes. The means by which wetting films can facilitate the merger of these aggregates is considered. It is shown that a wetting film prevents a protein from leaving an aggregate. Using experimentally derived values of elastic moduli and spontaneous curvatures as well as height mismatch between aggregates and bulk membrane, we obtained numerical results, which can be compared with the experimental data. PMID:18643096

  18. The interaction of polyglutamine peptides with lipid membranes is regulated by flanking sequences associated with huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kathleen A; Kauffman, Karlina J; Umbaugh, C Samuel; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-05-24

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (poly(Q)) repeat near the N terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded poly(Q) facilitates formation of htt aggregates, eventually leading to deposition of cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies containing htt. Flanking sequences directly adjacent to the poly(Q) domain, such as the first 17 amino acids on the N terminus (Nt17) and the polyproline (poly(P)) domain on the C-terminal side of the poly(Q) domain, heavily influence aggregation. Additionally, htt interacts with a variety of membraneous structures within the cell, and Nt17 is implicated in lipid binding. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid membranes, a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy, Langmuir trough techniques, and vesicle permeability assays were used to directly monitor the interaction of a variety of synthetic poly(Q) peptides with different combinations of flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q35-P10-KK, Nt17-Q35-KK, and Nt17-Q35-P10-KK) on model membranes and surfaces. Each peptide aggregated on mica, predominately forming extended, fibrillar aggregates. In contrast, poly(Q) peptides that lacked the Nt17 domain did not appreciably aggregate on or insert into lipid membranes. Nt17 facilitated the interaction of peptides with lipid surfaces, whereas the poly(P) region enhanced this interaction. The aggregation of Nt17-Q35-P10-KK on the lipid bilayer closely resembled that of a htt exon1 construct containing 35 repeat glutamines. Collectively, this data suggests that the Nt17 domain plays a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes, and this lipid/htt interaction can be further modulated by the presence of the poly(P) domain. PMID:23572526

  19. The Interaction of Polyglutamine Peptides with Lipid Membranes Is Regulated by Flanking Sequences Associated with Huntingtin*

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Kauffman, Karlina J.; Umbaugh, C. Samuel; Frey, Shelli L.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (poly(Q)) repeat near the N terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded poly(Q) facilitates formation of htt aggregates, eventually leading to deposition of cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies containing htt. Flanking sequences directly adjacent to the poly(Q) domain, such as the first 17 amino acids on the N terminus (Nt17) and the polyproline (poly(P)) domain on the C-terminal side of the poly(Q) domain, heavily influence aggregation. Additionally, htt interacts with a variety of membraneous structures within the cell, and Nt17 is implicated in lipid binding. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid membranes, a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy, Langmuir trough techniques, and vesicle permeability assays were used to directly monitor the interaction of a variety of synthetic poly(Q) peptides with different combinations of flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q35-P10-KK, Nt17-Q35-KK, and Nt17-Q35-P10-KK) on model membranes and surfaces. Each peptide aggregated on mica, predominately forming extended, fibrillar aggregates. In contrast, poly(Q) peptides that lacked the Nt17 domain did not appreciably aggregate on or insert into lipid membranes. Nt17 facilitated the interaction of peptides with lipid surfaces, whereas the poly(P) region enhanced this interaction. The aggregation of Nt17-Q35-P10-KK on the lipid bilayer closely resembled that of a htt exon1 construct containing 35 repeat glutamines. Collectively, this data suggests that the Nt17 domain plays a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes, and this lipid/htt interaction can be further modulated by the presence of the poly(P) domain. PMID:23572526

  20. Role of lipids in the translocation of proteins across membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Van Voorst, F; De Kruijff, B

    2000-01-01

    The architecture of cells, with various membrane-bound compartments and with the protein synthesizing machinery confined to one location, dictates that many proteins have to be transported through one or more membranes during their biogenesis. A lot of progress has been made on the identification of protein translocation machineries and their sorting signals in various organelles and organisms. Biochemical characterization has revealed the functions of several individual protein components. Interestingly, lipid components were also found to be essential for the correct functioning of these translocases. This led to the idea that there is a very intimate relationship between the lipid and protein components that enables them to fulfil their intriguing task of transporting large biopolymers through a lipid bilayer without leaking their contents. In this review we focus on the Sec translocases in the endoplasmic reticulum and the bacterial inner membrane. We also highlight the interactions of lipids and proteins during the process of translocation and integrate this into a model that enables us to understand the role of membrane lipid composition in translocase function. PMID:10769162

  1. Divergent Diffusion Coefficients in Simulations of Fluids and Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Vögele, Martin; Hummer, Gerhard

    2016-08-25

    We investigate the dependence of single-particle diffusion coefficients on the size and shape of the simulation box in molecular dynamics simulations of fluids and lipid membranes. We find that the diffusion coefficients of lipids and a carbon nanotube embedded in a lipid membrane diverge with the logarithm of the box width. For a neat Lennard-Jones fluid in flat rectangular boxes, diffusion becomes anisotropic, diverging logarithmically in all three directions with increasing box width. In elongated boxes, the diffusion coefficients normal to the long axis diverge linearly with the height-to-width ratio. For both lipid membranes and neat fluids, this behavior is predicted quantitatively by hydrodynamic theory. Mean-square displacements in the neat fluid exhibit intermediate regimes of anomalous diffusion, with t ln t and t(3/2) components in flat and elongated boxes, respectively. For membranes, the large finite-size effects, and the apparent inability to determine a well-defined lipid diffusion coefficient from simulation, rationalize difficulties in comparing simulation results to each other and to those from experiments. PMID:27385207

  2. Investigating lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions in model membranes by ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; McQuaw, C. M.; Baker, M. J.; Lockyer, N. P.; Vickerman, J. C.; Ewing, A. G.; Winograd, N.

    2008-12-01

    With the chemical imaging capability of ToF-SIMS, biological molecules are identified and localized in membranes without any chemical labels. We have developed a model membrane system made with supported Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers. This simplified model can be used with different combinations of molecules to form a membrane, and thus represents a bottom-up approach to study individual lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions. We have used ternary mixtures of sphingomyelin (SM), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and cholesterol (CH) in the model membrane to study the mechanism of domain formation and interactions between phospholipids and cholesterol. Domain structures are observed only when the acyl chain saturation is different for SM and PC in the mixture. The saturated lipid, whether it is SM or PC, is found to be localized with cholesterol, while the unsaturated one is excluded from the domain area. More complicated model membranes which involve a functional membrane protein glycophorin are also investigated and different membrane properties are observed compared to the systems without glycophorin.

  3. Modulation and interactions of charged biomimetic membranes with bivalent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe

    biomolecules in a dynamic environment and the lack of appropriate physical and biochemical tools. In contrast, biomimetic membrane models that rely on the amphiphilic properties of phospholipids are powerful tools that enable the study of these molecules in vitro. By having control over the different experimental parameters such as temperature and pH, reliable and repeatable experimental conditions can be created. One of the key questions I investigated in this thesis is related to the clustering mechanism of PtdIns(4, 5)P2 into pools or aggregates that enable independent cellular control of this species by geometric separation. The lateral aggregation of PtdIns(4, 5)P2 and its underlying physical causes is still a matter of debate. In the first part of this thesis I introduce the general information on lipid membranes with a special focus on the PtdIns family and their associated signaling events. In addition, I explain the Langmuir-Blodgett film balance (LB) system as tool to study lipid membranes and lipid interactions. In the second chapter, I describe my work on the lateral compressibility of PtdIns(4, 5)P2, PtdIns and DOPG monolayers and its modulation by bivalent ions using Langmuir monolayers. In addition, a theoretical framework of compressibility that depends on a surface potential induced by a planar layer of charged molecules and ions in the bulk was provided. In the third part, I present my work on the excess Gibbs free energy of the lipid systems PtdIns(4, 5)P2 --POPC, PtdIns(4, 5)P2, and POPC as they are modulated by bivalent ions. In the fourth part, I report on my foray in engineering a light-based system that relies on different dye properties to simulate calcium induced calcium release (CICR) that occurs in many cell types. In the final chapter, I provide a general conclusion and present directions for future research that would build on my findings.

  4. Lipid Bilayer Domain Fluctuations as a Probe of Membrane Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Camley, Brian A.; Esposito, Cinzia; Baumgart, Tobias; Brown, Frank L.H.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that membrane viscosity, ηm, plays a prominent role in the thermal fluctuation dynamics of micron-scale lipid domains. A theoretical expression is presented for the timescales of domain shape relaxation, which reduces to the well-known ηm = 0 result of Stone and McConnell in the limit of large domain sizes. Experimental measurements of domain dynamics on the surface of ternary phospholipid and cholesterol vesicles confirm the theoretical results and suggest domain flicker spectroscopy as a convenient means to simultaneously measure both the line tension, σ, and the membrane viscosity, ηm, governing the behavior of individual lipid domains. PMID:20858410

  5. Lipocarbazole, an efficient lipid peroxidation inhibitor anchored in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Gabin; Hänchen, Anne; Calliste, Claude-Alain; Berka, Karel; Banala, Srinivas; Otyepka, Michal; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Trouillas, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a major deleterious effect caused by oxidative stress. It is involved in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases. In order to inhibit lipid peroxidation, antioxidants must efficiently scavenge free radicals and penetrate inside biological membranes. Lipocarbazole has recently been shown to be a powerful antioxidant in solution. Here, we show its powerful capacity as lipid peroxidation inhibitor. Its mechanism of action is rationalized based on molecular dynamics simulations on a biomembrane model, quantum calculations and experimental evaluation. The role of the lipocarbazole side chain is particularly highlighted as a critical chemical feature responsible for its antioxidant activity. PMID:26068016

  6. Intermonolayer Friction and Surface Shear Viscosity of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    den Otter, W. K.; Shkulipa, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The flow behavior of lipid bilayer membranes is characterized by a surface viscosity for in-plane shear deformations, and an intermonolayer friction coefficient for slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. Both properties have been studied for a variety of coarse-grained double-tailed model lipids, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For lipids with two identical tails, the surface shear viscosity rises rapidly with tail length, while the intermonolayer friction coefficient is less sensitive to the tail length. Interdigitation of lipid tails across the bilayer midsurface, as observed for lipids with two distinct tails, strongly enhances the intermonolayer friction coefficient, but hardly affects the surface shear viscosity. The simulation results are compared against the available experimental data. PMID:17468168

  7. Hybrid lipids increase nanoscale fluctuation lifetimes in mixed membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-09-01

    A recently proposed ternary mixture model is used to predict fluctuation domain lifetimes in the one phase region. The membrane is made of saturated, unsaturated, and hybrid lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. The hybrid lipid is a natural linactant which can reduce the packing incompatibility between saturated and unsaturated lipids. The fluctuation lifetimes are predicted as a function of the hybrid lipid fraction and the fluctuation domain size. These lifetimes can be increased by up to three orders of magnitude compared to the case of no hybrids. With hybrid, small length scale fluctuations have sizable amplitudes even close to the critical temperature and, hence, benefit from enhanced critical slowing down. The increase in lifetime is particularly important for nanometer scale fluctuation domains where the hybrid orientation and the other lipids composition are highly coupled.

  8. Watching individual molecules flex within lipid membranes using SERS

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Richard W.; Benz, Felix; Sigle, Daniel O.; Bowman, Richard W.; Bao, Peng; Roth, Johannes S.; Heath, George R.; Evans, Stephen D.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Interrogating individual molecules within bio-membranes is key to deepening our understanding of biological processes essential for life. Using Raman spectroscopy to map molecular vibrations is ideal to non-destructively ‘fingerprint’ biomolecules for dynamic information on their molecular structure, composition and conformation. Such tag-free tracking of molecules within lipid bio-membranes can directly connect structure and function. In this paper, stable co-assembly with gold nano-components in a ‘nanoparticle-on-mirror’ geometry strongly enhances the local optical field and reduces the volume probed to a few nm3, enabling repeated measurements for many tens of minutes on the same molecules. The intense gap plasmons are assembled around model bio-membranes providing molecular identification of the diffusing lipids. Our experiments clearly evidence measurement of individual lipids flexing through telltale rapid correlated vibrational shifts and intensity fluctuations in the Raman spectrum. These track molecules that undergo bending and conformational changes within the probe volume, through their interactions with the environment. This technique allows for in situ high-speed single-molecule investigations of the molecules embedded within lipid bio-membranes. It thus offers a new way to investigate the hidden dynamics of cell membranes important to a myriad of life processes. PMID:25113088

  9. Membrane-Active Peptides and the Clustering of Anionic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwani, P.; Epand, R.F.; Heidenreich, N.; Bürck, J.; Ulrich, A.S.; Epand, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is some overlap in the biological activities of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We compared nine AMPs, seven CPPs, and a fusion peptide with regard to their ability to cluster anionic lipids in a mixture mimicking the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, as measured by differential scanning calorimetry. We also studied their bacteriostatic effect on several bacterial strains, and examined their conformational changes upon membrane binding using circular dichroism. A remarkable correlation was found between the net positive charge of the peptides and their capacity to induce anionic lipid clustering, which was independent of their secondary structure. Among the peptides studied, six AMPs and four CPPs were found to have strong anionic lipid clustering activity. These peptides also had bacteriostatic activity against several strains (particularly Gram-negative Escherichia coli) that are sensitive to lipid clustering agents. AMPs and CPPs that did not cluster anionic lipids were not toxic to E. coli. As shown previously for several types of AMPs, anionic lipid clustering likely contributes to the mechanism of antibacterial action of highly cationic CPPs. The same mechanism could explain the escape of CPPs from intracellular endosomes that are enriched with anionic lipids. PMID:22853904

  10. Permeability and electrical properties of planar lipid membranes from thylakoid lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Fuks, B; Homblé, F

    1994-01-01

    Electrical measurements were carried out on planar lipid membranes from thylakoid lipids. The specific capacitance of membranes formed from decane-containing monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which accounts for 57% of the total lipid content of thylakoids, showed that it adopted a bilayer structure. Solvent-free bilayers of MGDG were not formed, with very rare exceptions, indicating that decane is required to stabilize the planar conformation. However, this cone-shaped lipid produces bilayer structures in combination with other cylindrical thylakoid lipids even in the absence of organic solvent. We compared the properties of solvent-free and decane-containing bilayers from MGDG, soybean lecithin, and the quaternary mixture of lipids similar to that found in vivo. The conductance of decane-MGDG was 26 times higher than that of decane-lecithin. The flux through the decane-lecithin bilayer was found to be slightly dependent on pH, whereas the decane-MGDG membrane was not. The specific conductance of bilayers formed from the quaternary mixture of lipids was 5 to 10 times larger than lecithin (with alkane or not). Further experiments with bilayers made in the presence of a KCl gradient showed that decane-MGDG, decane-MGDG/DGDG/SQDG/PG, and solvent-free MGDG/DGDG/SQDG/PG were cation-selective. The permeability coefficient for potassium ranged from 4.9 to 8.3 x 10(-11) cm s-1. The permeability coefficient for protons in galactolipids, however, was determined to be about six orders of magnitude higher than the value for potassium ions. The HCl permeation mechanism through the lipid membranes was determined from diffusion potentials measured in HCl gradients. Our results suggest that HCl was not transported as neutral molecules. The data is discussed with regard to the function of galactolipids in the ion transport through thylakoid membranes. PMID:8061192

  11. Single, stretched membrane, structural module experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.L.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes tests done on stretched-membrane heliostats used to reflect solar radiation onto a central receiver. The tests were used to validate prior analysis and mathematical models developed to describe module performance. The modules tested were three meters in diameter and had reflective polymer film laminated to the membrane. The frames were supported at three points equally spaced around the ring. Three modules were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended at the bottom support, two were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended from the upper mounts, and one was rigidly attached with its weight suspended at the bottom mount. By varying the membrane tension we could simulate a uniform wind loading normal to the mirror's surface. A video camera 15+ meters away from the mirror recorded the virtual image of a target grid as reflected by the mirrors' surface. The image was digitized and stored on a microcomputer. Using the law of reflection and analytic geometry, we computed the surface slopes of a sampling of points on the surface. The dominant module response was consistent with prior SERI analyses. The simple analytical model is quite adequate for designing and sizing single-membrane modules if the initial imperfections and their amplification are appropriately controlled. To avoid potential problems resulting from the fundamentally n = 2 deformation phenomena, we advise using either relatively stiffer ring frames or more than three support points.

  12. Screening for lipid requirements of membrane proteins by combining cell-free expression with nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (CF) protein expression has emerged as one of the most efficient production platforms for membrane proteins. Central bottlenecks prevalent in conventional cell-based expression systems such as mistargeting, inclusion body formation, degradation as well as product toxicity can be addressed by taking advantage of the reduced complexity of CF expression systems. However, the open accessibility of CF reactions offers the possibility to design customized artificial expression environments by supplying synthetic hydrophobic compounds such as micelles or membranes of defined composition. The open nature of CF systems therefore generally allows systematic screening approaches for the identification of efficient cotranslational solubilization environments of membrane proteins. Synergies exist in particular with the recently developed nanodisc (ND) technology enabling the synthesis of stable and highly soluble particles containing membrane discs of defined composition. Specific types of lipids frequently modulate folding, stability, and activity of integrated membrane proteins. One recently reported example are phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide (MraY) translocases that catalyze a crucial step in bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis making them interesting as future drug targets. Production of functionally active MraY homologues from most human pathogens in conventional cellular production systems was so far not successful due to their obviously strict lipid dependency for functionally folding. We demonstrate that the combination of CF expression with ND technologies is an efficient strategy for the production of folded MraY translocases, and we present a general protocol for the rapid screening of lipid specificities of membrane proteins. PMID:25857790

  13. A Variational Approach to Particles in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Charles M.; Gräser, Carsten; Hobbs, Graham; Kornhuber, Ralf; Wolf, Maren-Wanda

    2016-06-01

    A variety of models for the membrane-mediated interaction of particles in lipid membranes, mostly well-established in theoretical physics, is reviewed from a mathematical perspective. We provide mathematically consistent formulations in a variational framework, relate apparently different modelling approaches in terms of successive approximation, and investigate existence and uniqueness. Numerical computations illustrate that the new variational formulations are directly accessible to effective numerical methods.

  14. Lipidic cubic phase injector facilitates membrane protein serial femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Weierstall, Uwe; James, Daniel; Wang, Chong; White, Thomas A.; Wang, Dingjie; Liu, Wei; Spence, John C.H.; Doak, R. Bruce; Nelson, Garrett; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Liu, Haiguang; Basu, Shibom; Wacker, Daniel; Han, Gye Won; Katritch, Vsevolod; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Klinker, Markus; Gati, Cornelius; Shoeman, Robert L.; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Kirian, Richard A.; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Li, Dianfan; Shah, Syed T.A.; Howe, Nicole; Caffrey, Martin; Cherezov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization has proven successful for high-resolution structure determination of challenging membrane proteins. Here we present a technique for extruding gel-like LCP with embedded membrane protein microcrystals, providing a continuously-renewed source of material for serial femtosecond crystallography. Data collected from sub-10 μm-sized crystals produced with less than 0.5 mg of purified protein yield structural insights regarding cyclopamine binding to the Smoothened receptor. PMID:24525480

  15. Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes: Formation, Stability and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Haw Zan

    This thesis presents a comprehensive investigation of the formation of supported lipid membranes with vesicle hemifusion, their stability under detergents and organic solvents and their applications in molecular biology. In Chapter 3, we describe how isolated patches of DOPC bilayers supported on glass surfaces are dissolved by various detergents (decyl maltoside, dodecyl maltoside, CHAPS, CTAB, SDS, TritonX-100 and Tween20) at their CMC, as investigated by fluorescence video microscopy. In general, detergents partition into distal leaflets of bilayers and lead to the expansion of the bilayers through a rolling motion of the distal over the proximal leaflets, in agreement with the first stage of the established 3-stage model of lipid vesicle solubilization by detergents. Subsequently, we study the partitioning of organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, propanol, acetone and chloroform) into isolated bilayer patches on glass in Chapter 4 with fluorescence microscopy. The area expansion of bilayers due to the partitioning of organic solvents is measured. From the titration of organic solvents, we measured the rate of area expansion as a function of the volume fraction of organic solvents, which is proposed to be a measure of strength of interactions between solvents and membranes. From the same experiments, we also measure the maximum expansion of bilayers (or the maximum binding stoichiometry between organic solvents and lipids) before structural breakdown, which depends on the depth of penetration of solvents to the membranes. In Chapter 5, we investigate the formation of sparsely-tethered bilayer lipid membranes (stBLMs) with vesicle hemifusion. In vesicle hemifusion, lipid vesicles in contact with a hydrophobic alkyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) deposit a lipid monolayer to the SAM surface, thus completing the bilayer. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy and Neutron Reflectivity are used to probe the integrity of stBLMs in terms of their

  16. α-Synuclein Senses Lipid Packing Defects and Induces Lateral Expansion of Lipids Leading to Membrane Remodeling*

    PubMed Central

    Ouberai, Myriam M.; Wang, Juan; Swann, Marcus J.; Galvagnion, Celine; Guilliams, Tim; Dobson, Christopher M.; Welland, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the involvement of lipid membranes in both the functional and pathological properties of α-synuclein (α-Syn). Despite many investigations to characterize the binding of α-Syn to membranes, there is still a lack of understanding of the binding mode linking the properties of lipid membranes to α-Syn insertion into these dynamic structures. Using a combination of an optical biosensing technique and in situ atomic force microscopy, we show that the binding strength of α-Syn is related to the specificity of the lipid environment (the lipid chemistry and steric properties within a bilayer structure) and to the ability of the membranes to accommodate and remodel upon the interaction of α-Syn with lipid membranes. We show that this interaction results in the insertion of α-Syn into the region of the headgroups, inducing a lateral expansion of lipid molecules that can progress to further bilayer remodeling, such as membrane thinning and expansion of lipids out of the membrane plane. We provide new insights into the affinity of α-Syn for lipid packing defects found in vesicles of high curvature and in planar membranes with cone-shaped lipids and suggest a comprehensive model of the interaction between α-Syn and lipid bilayers. The ability of α-Syn to sense lipid packing defects and to remodel membrane structure supports its proposed role in vesicle trafficking. PMID:23740253

  17. Reversible control of current across lipid membranes by local heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Patrick; Kirchner, Silke R.; Mühlbauer, Christian; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    Lipid membranes are almost impermeable for charged molecules and ions that can pass the membrane barrier only with the help of specialized transport proteins. Here, we report how temperature manipulation at the nanoscale can be employed to reversibly control the electrical resistance and the amount of current that flows through a bilayer membrane with pA resolution. For this experiment, heating is achieved by irradiating gold nanoparticles that are attached to the bilayer membrane with laser light at their plasmon resonance frequency. We found that controlling the temperature on the nanoscale renders it possible to reproducibly regulate the current across a phospholipid membrane and the membrane of living cells in absence of any ion channels.

  18. Reversible control of current across lipid membranes by local heating

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Patrick; Kirchner, Silke R.; Mühlbauer, Christian; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Lipid membranes are almost impermeable for charged molecules and ions that can pass the membrane barrier only with the help of specialized transport proteins. Here, we report how temperature manipulation at the nanoscale can be employed to reversibly control the electrical resistance and the amount of current that flows through a bilayer membrane with pA resolution. For this experiment, heating is achieved by irradiating gold nanoparticles that are attached to the bilayer membrane with laser light at their plasmon resonance frequency. We found that controlling the temperature on the nanoscale renders it possible to reproducibly regulate the current across a phospholipid membrane and the membrane of living cells in absence of any ion channels. PMID:26940847

  19. Automated Lipid Bilayer Membrane Formation Using a Polydimethylsiloxane Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sangbaek; Yoon, Sunhee; Ryu, Hyunil; Kim, Sun Min; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    An artificial lipid bilayer, or black lipid membrane (BLM), is a powerful tool for studying ion channels and protein interactions, as well as for biosensor applications. However, conventional BLM formation techniques have several drawbacks and they often require specific expertise and laborious processes. In particular, conventional BLMs suffer from low formation success rates and inconsistent membrane formation time. Here, we demonstrate a storable and transportable BLM formation system with controlled thinning-out time and enhanced BLM formation rate by replacing conventionally used films (polytetrafluoroethylene, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene) to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In this experiment, a porous-structured polymer such as PDMS thin film is used. In addition, as opposed to conventionally used solvents with low viscosity, the use of squalene permitted a controlled thinning-out time via slow solvent absorption by PDMS, prolonging membrane lifetime. In addition, by using a mixture of squalene and hexadecane, the freezing point of the lipid solution was increased (~16 °C), in addition, membrane precursors were produced that can be indefinitely stored and readily transported. These membrane precursors have reduced BLM formation time of < 1 hr and achieved a BLM formation rate of ~80%. Moreover, ion channel experiments with gramicidin A demonstrated the feasibility of the membrane system. PMID:27501114

  20. Temperature-induced membrane-lipid adaptation in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Hann, A C; Harwood, J L; Lloyd, D

    1993-02-15

    A method has been developed for the separation of the major membrane fractions of Acanthamoeba castellanii after growth at different temperatures. The acyl-lipid compositions of individual membrane fractions, microsomal membranes, plasma membrane and mitochondria were analysed after a shift in culture temperature from 30 degrees C to 15 degrees C. The major change in lipid composition observed was an alteration in the relative proportions of oleate and linoleate. This reciprocal change was seen in all the membrane fractions, but occurred most rapidly in the phosphatidylcholine of the microsomal fraction. Thus, there appears to be a rapid induction of delta 12-desaturase activity in A. castellanii after a downward shift in growth temperature. Changes were also seen in the proportions of the n-6 C20 fatty acids, with a decrease in the proportions of icosadienoate and increases of icosatrienoate and arachidonate. However, unlike the alteration in oleate/linoleate ratios, this change was not seen in all the individual lipids of each membrane fraction. PMID:8439295

  1. Controlling water flow inside carbon nanotube with lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jia-Wei; Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2014-09-07

    Understanding and controlling the transportation of water molecules across carbon nanotube (CNT) is of great importance in bio-nanotechnology. In this paper, we systematically investigate the water transporting behaviors (i.e., water flow rate) inside the CNT in the presence of lipid membranes by using all atom molecular dynamic simulations. Our results show that the hydrophilicity of CNT as well as membrane thickness can have important impacts on the water flow rate. Interestingly, since the membrane thickness is temperature-dependent, the water flow rate can exhibit thermo-responsive behaviors. Further, we also provide insights into the effect of CNT on lipid membranes. It is found that all CNTs can increase the lipid tail order parameters and thicken the membrane at 320 K; while these effects are not obvious at 290 K. Importantly, we observe that the CNT with specific hydrophobicity has the least effect on membranes. The present study may give some useful advice on future experimental design of novel devices and sensors.

  2. Lipid bilayer membrane affinity rationalizes inhibition of lipid peroxidation by a natural lignan antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Podloucká, Pavlína; Berka, Karel; Fabre, Gabin; Paloncýová, Markéta; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Otyepka, Michal; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a degenerative oxidative process that modifies the structure of membranes, influencing their biological functions. Lignans, natural polyphenolic antioxidants widely distributed in plants, can prevent this membrane damage by free-radical scavenging. Here, we rationalize the difference in lipid peroxidation inhibition activity of argenteane, a natural dilignan isolated from wild nutmeg, and 3,3'-dimethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-2,2'-diol, which represents the central part of argenteane responsible for its antioxidant activity. Although both compounds have the same capacity to scavenge free radicals, argenteane is a more active inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. We show that both compounds penetrate into DOPC and PLPC lipid bilayers and adopt similar positions and orientations, which therefore does not explain the difference in their lipid peroxidation inhibition activity. However, free energy profiles indicate that argenteane has a significantly higher affinity to the lipid bilayer, and thus a higher effective concentration to scavenge radicals formed during lipid peroxidation. This finding explains the higher activity of argenteane to inhibit lipid peroxidation. PMID:23560800

  3. Modeling Lipid-Lipid Correlations across a Bilayer Membrane Using the Quasi-chemical Approximation.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Roth, Joseph; May, Sylvio

    2015-09-15

    Mixed fluid-like lipid membranes exhibit interactions not only among the lipids within a given leaflet but also across the bilayer. The ensuing collective interleaflet coupling of entire membrane domains has been modeled previously using various mean-field approaches. Yet, also on the level of individual lipids have correlations across the bilayer been observed experimentally for binary mixtures of charged/uncharged lipids with mismatching combinations of short and long acyl chain lengths. The present study proposes a lattice gas model to quantify these correlations. To this end, we represent a macroscopically homogeneous lipid bilayer by two coupled two-dimensional lattice gases that we study using the quasi-chemical approximation. We demonstrate that the rationalization of previous experimental results is only possible if besides two-body lipid-lipid interactions within and across the bilayer our model also accounts for an additional multibody interaction mechanism, namely the local hydrophobic height mismatch created by pairing short and long chain lipids together. The robustness of the quasi-chemical approximation is verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26302019

  4. Undulation instability in a bilayer lipid membrane due to electric field interaction with lipid dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Richard J.; Olmsted, Peter D.; Smye, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are an essential component of all biological systems, forming a functional barrier for cells and organelles from the surrounding environment. The lipid molecules that form membranes contain both permanent and induced dipoles, and an electric field can induce the formation of pores when the transverse field is sufficiently strong (electroporation). Here, a phenomenological free energy is constructed to model the response of a BLM to a transverse static electric field. The model contains a continuum description of the membrane dipoles and a coupling between the headgroup dipoles and the membrane tilt. The membrane is found to become unstable through buckling modes, which are weakly coupled to thickness fluctuations in the membrane. The thickness fluctuations, along with the increase in interfacial area produced by membrane buckling, increase the probability of localized membrane breakdown, which may lead to pore formation. The instability is found to depend strongly on the strength of the coupling between the dipolar headgroups and the membrane tilt as well as the degree of dipolar ordering in the membrane.

  5. Lipid packing drives the segregation of transmembrane helices into disordered lipid domains in model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Lars V.; de Jong, Djurre H.; Holt, Andrea; Rzepiela, Andrzej J.; de Vries, Alex H.; Poolman, Bert; Killian, J. Antoinette; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes are comprised of multicomponent lipid and protein mixtures that exhibit a complex partitioning behavior. Regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity play a major role in the sorting and self-assembly of proteins, and their clustering into higher-order oligomers. Here, we use computer simulations and optical microscopy to study the sorting of transmembrane helices into the liquid-disordered domains of phase-separated model membranes, irrespective of peptide–lipid hydrophobic mismatch. Free energy calculations show that the enthalpic contribution due to the packing of the lipids drives the lateral sorting of the helices. Hydrophobic mismatch regulates the clustering into either small dynamic or large static aggregates. These results reveal important molecular driving forces for the lateral organization and self-assembly of transmembrane helices in heterogeneous model membranes, with implications for the formation of functional protein complexes in real cells. PMID:21205902

  6. Stabilization of composition fluctuations in mixed membranes by hybrid lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, Samuel; Palmieri, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    A ternary mixture model is proposed to describe composition fluctuations in mixed membranes composed of saturated, unsaturated and hybrid lipids. The asymmetric hybrid lipid has one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain and it can reduce the packing incompatibility between saturated and unsaturated lipids. A methodology to recast the free-energy of the lattice in terms of a continuous isotropic field theory is proposed and used to analyze composition fluctuations above the critical temperature. The effect of hybrid lipids on fluctuations domains rich in saturated/unsaturated lipids is predicted. The correlation length of such fluctuations decreases significantly with increasing amounts of hybrids even if the temperature is maintained close to the critical temperature. This provides an upper bound for the domain sizes expected in rafts stabilized by hybrids, above the critical temperature. When the hybrid composition of the membrane is increased further, a crossover value is found above which ``stripe-like'' fluctuations are observed. The wavelength of these fluctuations decreases with increasing hybrid fraction and tends toward a molecular size in a membrane that contains only hybrids.

  7. Lipid-II forms potential “landing terrain” for lantibiotics in simulated bacterial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Chugunov, Anton; Pyrkova, Darya; Nolde, Dmitry; Polyansky, Anton; Pentkovsky, Vladimir; Efremov, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cell wall is targeted by many antibiotics. Among them are lantibiotics, which realize their function via interaction with plasma membrane lipid-II molecule — a chemically conserved part of the cell wall synthesis pathway. To investigate structural and dynamic properties of this molecule, we have performed a series of nearly microsecond-long molecular dynamics simulations of lipid-II and some of its analogs in zwitterionic single component and charged mixed simulated phospholipid bilayers (the reference and the mimic of the bacterial plasma membrane, respectively). Extensive analysis revealed that lipid-II forms a unique “amphiphilic pattern” exclusively on the surface of the simulated bacterial membrane (and not in the reference one). We hypothesize that many lantibiotics exploit the conserved features of lipid-II along with characteristic modulation of the bacterial membrane as the “landing site”. This putative recognition mechanism opens new opportunities for studies on lantibiotics action and design of novel armament against resistant bacterial strains. PMID:23588060

  8. Ordered Nanoclusters in Lipid-Cholesterol Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Maria K.; Chi, Eva Y.; Frey, Shelli L.; Cao, Kathleen D.; Luther, Laura M.; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Kjaer, Kristian

    2009-07-01

    X-ray diffraction of sphingomyelin-dihydrocholesterol (SM-DChol) monolayers revealed short-ranged (˜25Å) 2D ordering. These nanoclusters show two distinct regions: below the cusp point of the phase diagram (35 mol% DChol), a constant d spacing was observed; above the cusp, the d spacing increases linearly with DChol in accordance to Vegard’s law for binary alloys. The components in this lipidic alloy are thus a 65∶35 SM-DChol entity and excess DChol. Reflectivity data further support the emergence above the cusp of an uncomplexed DChol population with greater vertical mobility.

  9. Discriminating Lipid- from Protein-Calcium Binding To Understand the Interaction between Recoverin and Phosphatidylglycerol Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Potvin-Fournier, Kim; Lefèvre, Thierry; Picard-Lafond, Audrey; Marcotte, Catherine; Dufresne, Caroline; Cantin, Line; Salesse, Christian; Auger, Michèle

    2016-06-21

    Recoverin is a protein involved in the phototransduction cascade by regulating the activity of rhodopsin kinase through a calcium-dependent binding process at the surface of rod outer segment disk membranes. Understanding how calcium modulates these interactions and how it interacts with anionic lipid membranes is necessary to gain insights into the function of recoverin. In this work, infrared spectroscopy allowed us to show that the availability of calcium to recoverin is modulated by the presence of complexes involving phosphatidylglycerol (PG), which in turn regulates its interactions with this negatively charged lipid. Calcium can indeed be sequestered into strongly bound complexes with PG and is thus sparingly available to recoverin. The thermal stability of recoverin then decreases, which results in weakened interactions with PG. By contrast, when calcium is fully available to recoverin, the protein is thermally stable, indicating that it binds two calcium ions, which results in favorable interactions with negatively charged lipids. Consequently, the protein induces an increase in the chain-melting phase transition temperature of PG, which is indicative of an enhanced lipid chain packing resulting from the peripheral location of the protein. The secondary structure of recoverin is not affected by its interactions with anionic membrane lipids. Similar results have been obtained with saturated and unsaturated anionic lipids. This work shows that the recruitment of recoverin at the surface of anionic lipid membranes is dependent on the availability of calcium. PMID:27240971

  10. Respiration and ecological niche influence bacterial membrane lipid compositions.

    PubMed

    Bay, Denice C; Booth, Sean C; Turner, Raymond J

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial membrane compositions vary widely between phyla and within related species. The types of lipids within membranes are as diverse as the selective pressures that influence bacterial lifestyles such as their mode of respiration and habitat. This study has examined the extent that respiration and habitat affect bacterial fatty acid (FA) and polar lipid (PL) compositions. To accomplish this, over 300 FA and PL profiles from 380 previously characterized species were assembled and subjected to multivariate statistical analyses in order to determine lipid to habitat/respiration associations. It was revealed that PL profiles showed a slight advantage over FA profiles for discriminating taxonomic relationships between species. FA profiles showed greater correlation with respiration and habitat than PL. This study identified that respiration did not consistently favour uniform FA or PL changes when lipid profiles were compared between examined phyla. This suggests that although phyla may adopt similar respiration methods, it does not result in consistent lipid attributes within one respiration state. Examination of FA and PL compositions were useful to identify taxonomic relationships between related species and provides insight into lipid variations influenced by the niche of its host. PMID:25297716

  11. Golgi Membrane Dynamics Viewed Through a Lens of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, Vytas A.; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Mousley, Carl J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The striking morphology of the Golgi complex has fascinated cell biologists since its discovery over 100 years ago. Yet, despite intense efforts to understand how membrane flow relates to Golgi form and function, this organelle continues to baffle cell biologists and biochemists alike. Fundamental questions regarding Golgi function, while hotly debated, remain unresolved. While Golgi function is historically described from a protein-centric point of view, we now appreciate that conceptual frameworks for how lipid metabolism is integrated with Golgi biogenesis and function are essential for a mechanistic understanding of this fascinating organelle. It is from a lipid-centric perspective that we discuss the larger question of Golgi dynamics and membrane trafficking. We review the growing body of evidence for how lipid metabolism is integrally written into the engineering of the Golgi system, and highlight questions for future study. PMID:22625862

  12. Lipid Bilayer Membrane-Triggered Presynaptic Vesicle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of functional synapses on artificial substrates is a very important step in the development of engineered in vitro neural networks. Spherical supported bilayer lipid membranes (SS-BLMs) are used here as a novel substrate to demonstrate presynaptic vesicle accumulation at an in vitro synaptic junction. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments have been used to characterize the SS-BLMs. Conventional immunocytochemistry combined with confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the formation of presynaptic vesicles at the neuron−SS-BLM contacts. These results indicate that lipid phases may play a role in the observed phenomenon, in addition to the chemical and electrostatic interactions between the neurons and SS-BLMs. The biocompatibility of lipid bilayers along with their membrane tunability makes the suggested approach a useful “toolkit” for many neuroengineering applications including artificial synapse formation and synaptogenesis in vivo. PMID:22778819

  13. Cyclohexane Rings Reduce Membrane Permeability to Small Ions in Archaea-Inspired Tetraether Lipids.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takaoki; Leriche, Geoffray; Onofrei, David; Holland, Gregory P; Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2016-01-26

    Extremophile archaeal organisms overcome problems of membrane permeability by producing lipids with structural elements that putatively improve membrane integrity compared to lipids from other life forms. Herein, we describe a series of lipids that mimic some key structural features of archaeal lipids, such as: 1) single tethering of lipid tails to create fully transmembrane tetraether lipids and 2) the incorporation of small rings into these tethered segments. We found that membranes formed from pure tetraether lipids leaked small ions at a rate that was about two orders of magnitude slower than common bilayer-forming lipids. Incorporation of cyclopentane rings into the tetraether lipids did not affect membrane leakage, whereas a cyclohexane ring reduced leakage by an additional 40 %. These results show that mimicking certain structural features of natural archaeal lipids results in improved membrane integrity, which may help overcome limitations of many current lipid-based technologies. PMID:26695717

  14. Poloxamer 188 decreases susceptibility of artificial lipid membranes to electroporation.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, V; Stebe, K; Murphy, J C; Tung, L

    1996-01-01

    The effect of a nontoxic, nonionic block co-polymeric surface active agent, poloxamer 188, on electroporation of artificial lipid membranes made of azolectin, was investigated. Two different experimental protocols were used in our study: charge pulse and voltage clamp. For the charge pulse protocol, membranes were pulsed with a 10-micronsecond rectangular voltage waveform, after which membrane voltage decay was observed through an external 1-M omega resistance. For the voltage clamp protocol the membranes were pulsed with a waveform that consisted of an initial 10-microsecond rectangular phase, followed by a negative sloped ramp that decayed to zero in the subsequent 500 microseconds. Several parameters characterizing the electroporation process were measured and compared for the control membranes and membranes treated with 1.0 mM poloxamer 188. For both the charge pulse and voltage clamp experiments, the threshold voltage (amplitude of initial rectangular phase) and latency time (time elapsed between the end of rectangular phase and the onset of membrane electroporation) were measured. Membrane conductance (measured 200 microseconds after the initial rectangular phase) and rise time (tr; the time required for the porated membrane to reach a certain conductance value) were also determined for the voltage clamp experiments, and postelectroporation time constant (PE tau; the time constant for transmembrane voltage decay after onset of electroporation) for the charge pulse experiments. The charge pulse experiments were performed on 23 membranes with 10 control and 13 poloxamer-treated membranes, and voltage pulse experiments on 49 membranes with 26 control and 23 poloxamer-treated membranes. For both charge pulse and voltage clamp experiments, poloxamer 188-treated membranes exhibited a statistically higher threshold voltage (p = 0.1 and p = 0.06, respectively), and longer latency time (p = 0.04 and p = 0.05, respectively). Also, poloxamer 188-treated membranes were

  15. Measuring Lipid Membrane Viscosity Using Rotational and Translational Probe Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormel, Tristan T.; Kurihara, Sarah Q.; Brennan, M. Kathleen; Wozniak, Matthew C.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-05-01

    The two-dimensional fluidity of lipid bilayers enables the motion of membrane-bound macromolecules and is therefore crucial to biological function. Microrheological methods that measure fluid viscosity via the translational diffusion of tracer particles are challenging to apply and interpret for membranes, due to uncertainty about the local environment of the tracers. Here, we demonstrate a new technique in which determination of both the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of membrane-linked particles enables quantification of viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer radii, presumably due to a variable number of lipids linked to each tracer particle. Furthermore, we show for the first time that a protein involved in generating membrane curvature, the vesicle trafficking protein Sar1p, dramatically increases membrane viscosity. Using the rheological method presented here, therefore, we are able to reveal a class of previously unknown couplings between protein activity and membrane mechanics.

  16. Determining the pivotal plane of fluid lipid membranes in simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Deserno, Markus

    2015-10-28

    Each leaflet of a curved lipid membrane contains a surface at which the area strain vanishes, the so-called pivotal plane. Its distance z0 from the bilayer's midplane arises in numerous contexts, for instance the connection between monolayer and bilayer moduli, stress-profile moments, or area-difference elasticity theories. Here, we propose two precise methods for determining the location of the pivotal plane in computer simulations, both of which rely on monitoring the lipid imbalance across a curved bilayer. The first method considers the ratio of lipid number between the two leaflets of cylindrical or spherical vesicles; it hence requires lipid flip-flop for equilibration. The second method looks at the leaflet difference across local sections cut out from a buckled membrane; this observable equilibrates even in the absence of flip-flop. We apply our methods to two different coarse-grained lipid models, the generic three-bead solvent-free Cooke model and a ten-bead representation of dimyristoylphosphocholine with the explicit solvent MARTINI model. The Cooke model is amenable to both methods and gives results that agree at the percent level. Using it, we also show that the pivotal plane moves outward as lipid curvature becomes more positive. The MARTINI model can only be analyzed with the buckling method; the obtained value z0 = 0.850(11) nm lies about 0.4 nm inwards of the glycerol backbone and is hence unexpectedly small. We attribute this to limitations of the coarse-grained description, suggesting that the location of the pivotal plane might be a good indicator for how well lipid models capture the microscopic origins of curvature elasticity. Finally, we also show that the pivotal plane position itself moves as the membrane is bent. The leading correction is linear in curvature, dependent on the Poisson ratio, and can matter when analyzing experimental results obtained from highly curved inverse hexagonal phases. PMID:26520500

  17. Determining the pivotal plane of fluid lipid membranes in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Deserno, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Each leaflet of a curved lipid membrane contains a surface at which the area strain vanishes, the so-called pivotal plane. Its distance z0 from the bilayer's midplane arises in numerous contexts, for instance the connection between monolayer and bilayer moduli, stress-profile moments, or area-difference elasticity theories. Here, we propose two precise methods for determining the location of the pivotal plane in computer simulations, both of which rely on monitoring the lipid imbalance across a curved bilayer. The first method considers the ratio of lipid number between the two leaflets of cylindrical or spherical vesicles; it hence requires lipid flip-flop for equilibration. The second method looks at the leaflet difference across local sections cut out from a buckled membrane; this observable equilibrates even in the absence of flip-flop. We apply our methods to two different coarse-grained lipid models, the generic three-bead solvent-free Cooke model and a ten-bead representation of dimyristoylphosphocholine with the explicit solvent MARTINI model. The Cooke model is amenable to both methods and gives results that agree at the percent level. Using it, we also show that the pivotal plane moves outward as lipid curvature becomes more positive. The MARTINI model can only be analyzed with the buckling method; the obtained value z0 = 0.850(11) nm lies about 0.4 nm inwards of the glycerol backbone and is hence unexpectedly small. We attribute this to limitations of the coarse-grained description, suggesting that the location of the pivotal plane might be a good indicator for how well lipid models capture the microscopic origins of curvature elasticity. Finally, we also show that the pivotal plane position itself moves as the membrane is bent. The leading correction is linear in curvature, dependent on the Poisson ratio, and can matter when analyzing experimental results obtained from highly curved inverse hexagonal phases.

  18. Lipids and Membrane Microdomains in HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Abdul A.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Several critical steps in the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) – entry, assembly and budding – are complex processes that take place at the plasma membrane of the host cell. A growing body of data indicates that these early and late steps in HIV-1 replication take place in specialized plasma membrane microdomains, and that many of the viral and cellular components required for entry, assembly, and budding are concentrated in these microdomains. In particular, a number of studies have shown that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains known as lipid rafts play important roles in multiple steps in the virus replication cycle. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the involvement of lipids and membrane microdomains in HIV-1 replication. PMID:19383519

  19. Anomalous Dynamics of a Lipid Recognition Protein on a Membrane Surface

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Kalli, Antreas C.; Akimoto, Takuma; Yasuoka, Kenji; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains are lipid-binding modules present in peripheral membrane proteins which interact with phosphatidyl-inositol phosphates (PIPs) in cell membranes. We use multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the localization and anomalous dynamics of the DAPP1 PH domain on the surface of a PIP-containing lipid bilayer. Both translational and rotational diffusion of the PH domain on the lipid membrane surface exhibit transient subdiffusion, with an exponent α ≈ 0.5 for times of less than 10 ns. In addition to a PIP3 molecule at the canonical binding site of the PH domain, we observe additional PIP molecules in contact with the protein. Fluctuations in the number of PIPs associated with the PH domain exhibit 1/f noise. We suggest that the anomalous diffusion and long-term correlated interaction of the PH domain with the membrane may contribute to an enhanced probability of encounter with target complexes on cell membrane surfaces. PMID:26657413

  20. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: A lattice model

    PubMed Central

    Pink, David A.; Chapman, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure—area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T0, which locates the gel—fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a “smooth” homogeneous surface (“cholesterol-like”) and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T0 can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken “annulus” of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T0 does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10-7 sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed. PMID:286996

  1. Biopolymer-Lipid Bilayer Interaction Modulates the Physical Properties of Liposomes: Mechanism and Structure.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chen; Zhang, Yating; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Wenshui; Xia, Shuqin

    2015-08-19

    This study was conducted to elucidate the conformational dependence of the modulating ability of chitosan, a positively charged biopolymer, on a new type of liposome composed of mixed lipids including egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) and nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). Analysis of the dynamic and structure of bilayer membrane upon interaction with chitosan by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques demonstrated that, in addition to providing a physical barrier for the membrane surface, the adsorption of chitosan extended and crimped chains rigidified the lipid membrane. However, the decrease in relative microviscosity and order parameter suggested that the presence of chitosan coils disturbed the membrane organization. It was also noted that the increase of fluidity in the lipid bilayer center was not pronounced, indicating the shallow penetration of coils into the hydrophobic interior of bilayer. Microscopic observations revealed that chitosan adsorption not only affected the morphology of liposomes but also modulated the particle aggregation and fusion. Especially, a number of very heterogeneous particles were visualized, which tended to confirm the role of chitosan coils as a "polymeric surfactant". In addition to particle deformation, the membrane permeability was also tuned. These findings may provide a new perspective to understand the physiological functionality of biopolymer and design biopolymer-liposome composite structures as delivery systems for bioactive components. PMID:26173584

  2. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  3. Atomistic simulation of lipid and DiI dynamics in membrane bilayers under tension.

    PubMed

    Muddana, Hari S; Gullapalli, Ramachandra R; Manias, Evangelos; Butler, Peter J

    2011-01-28

    Membrane tension modulates cellular processes by initiating changes in the dynamics of its molecular constituents. To quantify the precise relationship between tension, structural properties of the membrane, and the dynamics of lipids and a lipophilic reporter dye, we performed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DiI-labeled dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers under physiological lateral tensions ranging from -2.6 mN m(-1) to 15.9 mN m(-1). Simulations showed that the bilayer thickness decreased linearly with tension consistent with volume-incompressibility, and this thinning was facilitated by a significant increase in acyl chain interdigitation at the bilayer midplane and spreading of the acyl chains. Tension caused a significant drop in the bilayer's peak electrostatic potential, which correlated with the strong reordering of water and lipid dipoles. For the low tension regime, the DPPC lateral diffusion coefficient increased with increasing tension in accordance with free-area theory. For larger tensions, free area theory broke down due to tension-induced changes in molecular shape and friction. Simulated DiI rotational and lateral diffusion coefficients were lower than those of DPPC but increased with tension in a manner similar to DPPC. Direct correlation of membrane order and viscosity near the DiI chromophore, which was just under the DPPC headgroup, indicated that measured DiI fluorescence lifetime, which is reported to decrease with decreasing lipid order, is likely to be a good reporter of tension-induced decreases in lipid headgroup viscosity. Together, these results offer new molecular-level insights into membrane tension-related mechanotransduction and into the utility of DiI in characterizing tension-induced changes in lipid packing. PMID:21152516

  4. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes. PMID:26361975

  5. Controlled Transport of Functionalized Nanochannel though Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics approach, we study the directed transport of a transmembrane nanochannel to a desired location within a lipid bilayer. Each nanochannel encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) with two hydrophilic ends (A). One of the ends of the nanochannel is functionalized with hydrophilic functional groups, or hairs. The hydrophilic hairs serve a dual role: (a) control transport across the membrane barrier, and (b) enable the channel relocation to a specific membrane site. Our system comprises a lipid membrane with an embedded transmembrane nanochannel with the hairs extending into solution. First, we hold a suitably functionalized pipette above the membrane while the nanochannel freely diffuses within the membrane. For an optimal range of parameters, we demonstrate that the hairs find the pipette and spontaneously anchor onto it. We then show that by moving the pipette for a range of velocities, we can effectively transport the channel to any location within the membrane. This prototype assembly can provide guidelines for designing a number of systems for biomimetic applications.

  6. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozovsky, Sharon; Forstner, Martin B.; Sondermann, Holger; Groves, Jay T.

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  7. Adaptive Lipid Packing and Bioactivity in Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Gutmann, Theresia; Buhl, Tomasz; Dirkx, Ron; Grzybek, Michal; Coskun, Ünal; Solimena, Michele; Simons, Kai; Levental, Ilya; Schwille, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Lateral compositional and physicochemical heterogeneity is a ubiquitous feature of cellular membranes on various length scales, from molecular assemblies to micrometric domains. Segregated lipid domains of increased local order, referred to as rafts, are believed to be prominent features in eukaryotic plasma membranes; however, their exact nature (i.e. size, lifetime, composition, homogeneity) in live cells remains difficult to define. Here we present evidence that both synthetic and natural plasma membranes assume a wide range of lipid packing states with varying levels of molecular order. These states may be adapted and specifically tuned by cells during active cellular processes, as we show for stimulated insulin secretion. Most importantly, these states regulate both the partitioning of molecules between coexisting domains and the bioactivity of their constituent molecules, which we demonstrate for the ligand binding activity of the glycosphingolipid receptor GM1. These results confirm the complexity and flexibility of lipid-mediated membrane organization and reveal mechanisms by which this flexibility could be functionalized by cells. PMID:25905447

  8. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ran; Wang, Weijie; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Sun, Lixiang; He, Wei; Fan, Rong; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets. PMID:23638186

  9. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 108-109 V m-1, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ˜1 V (˜2 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ˜1.4 V (˜2.8 ṡ 108 V m-1) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC

  10. Snake Cytotoxins Bind to Membranes via Interactions with Phosphatidylserine Head Groups of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Konshina, Anastasia G.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Utkin, Yuri N.; Omel'kov, Anton V.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2011-01-01

    The major representatives of Elapidae snake venom, cytotoxins (CTs), share similar three-fingered fold and exert diverse range of biological activities against various cell types. CT-induced cell death starts from the membrane recognition process, whose molecular details remain unclear. It is known, however, that the presence of anionic lipids in cell membranes is one of the important factors determining CT-membrane binding. In this work, we therefore investigated specific interactions between one of the most abundant of such lipids, phosphatidylserine (PS), and CT 4 of Naja kaouthia using a combined, experimental and modeling, approach. It was shown that incorporation of PS into zwitterionic liposomes greatly increased the membrane-damaging activity of CT 4 measured by the release of the liposome-entrapped calcein fluorescent dye. The CT-induced leakage rate depends on the PS concentration with a maximum at approximately 20% PS. Interestingly, the effects observed for PS were much more pronounced than those measured for another anionic lipid, sulfatide. To delineate the potential PS binding sites on CT 4 and estimate their relative affinities, a series of computer simulations was performed for the systems containing the head group of PS and different spatial models of CT 4 in aqueous solution and in an implicit membrane. This was done using an original hybrid computational protocol implementing docking, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. As a result, at least three putative PS-binding sites with different affinities to PS molecule were delineated. Being located in different parts of the CT molecule, these anion-binding sites can potentially facilitate and modulate the multi-step process of the toxin insertion into lipid bilayers. This feature together with the diverse binding affinities of the sites to a wide variety of anionic targets on the membrane surface appears to be functionally meaningful and may adjust CT action against different types of

  11. A C-terminal Membrane Anchor Affects the Interactions of Prion Proteins with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Nam K.; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A.; Becker, Christian F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrPC into pathogenic PrPSc. Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23–231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90–231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105–125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions. PMID:25217642

  12. Maleimide-functionalized lipids that anchor polypeptides to lipid bilayers and membranes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J T; Prestwich, G D

    2000-01-01

    Two maleimide-containing diacylglycerol derivatives were synthesized to permit the anchoring of short peptides and longer polypeptides to phospholipid bilayers and membranes. The maleimide was introduced at the site normally occupied by a phospholipid headgroup. The first lipid, the dipalmitoyl ester of 1-maleimido-2,3-propanediol, was developed as a membrane anchor for extracellular domains of transmembrane proteins. The second anchoring lipid, in which the 3-position contained a 6-aminohexanoate, was designed for convenient modification with amine-reactive reporter groups. Specifically, the NBD fluorophore, 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-aminohexanoic-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester, was attached to give an fluorescent anchoring reagent. Next, these reagents were applied to the anchoring of a C-terminally cysteamine-modified 8 kDa polypeptide that comprises the extracellular N-terminal domain of the human thrombin receptor, a transmembrane protease-activated receptor (PAR-1). Gel filtration and fluorescence analysis showed that the fluorescent lipopolypeptide spontaneously inserted into preformed phospholipid vesicles, but it did not insert into whole cell membranes. In contrast, the dipalmitoyl derivative could only be reconstituted into artificial membranes by mixing the lipopolypeptide and phospholipid before vesicle formation. These results suggest that biophysical interactions governing the lipopolypeptide insertion into artificial and cellular membranes may differ. The thiol-reactive lipidating reagents should be valuable materials for studying the structure and function of peptides and polypeptides at phospholipid bilayer surfaces. PMID:11087332

  13. Tubular lipid membranes pulled from vesicles: Dependence of system equilibrium on lipid bilayer curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golushko, I. Yu.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of joint equilibrium and stability are derived for a spherical lipid vesicle and a tubular lipid membrane (TLM) pulled from this vesicle. The obtained equations establish relationships between the geometric and physical characteristics of the system and the external parameters, which have been found to be controllable in recent experiments. In particular, the proposed theory shows that, in addition to the pressure difference between internal and external regions of the system, the variable spontaneous average curvature of the lipid bilayer (forming the TLM) also influences the stability of the lipid tube. The conditions for stability of the cylindrical phase of TLMs after switching off the external force that initially formed the TLM from a vesicle are discussed. The loss of system stability under the action of a small axial force compressing the TLM is considered.

  14. Ion-Induced Defect Permeation of Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyov, Igor; Olson, Timothy E.; Kim, Jung H.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Allen, Toby W.

    2014-01-01

    We have explored the mechanisms of uncatalyzed membrane ion permeation using atomistic simulations and electrophysiological recordings. The solubility-diffusion mechanism of membrane charge transport has prevailed since the 1960s, despite inconsistencies in experimental observations and its lack of consideration for the flexible response of lipid bilayers. We show that direct lipid bilayer translocation of alkali metal cations, Cl–, and a charged arginine side chain analog occurs via an ion-induced defect mechanism. Contrary to some previous suggestions, the arginine analog experiences a large free-energy barrier, very similar to those for Na+, K+, and Cl–. Our simulations reveal that membrane perturbations, due to the movement of an ion, are central for explaining the permeation process, leading to both free-energy and diffusion-coefficient profiles that show little dependence on ion chemistry and charge, despite wide-ranging hydration energies and the membrane’s dipole potential. The results yield membrane permeabilities that are in semiquantitative agreement with experiments in terms of both magnitude and selectivity. We conclude that ion-induced defect-mediated permeation may compete with transient pores as the dominant mechanism of uncatalyzed ion permeation, providing new understanding for the actions of a range of membrane-active peptides and proteins. PMID:24507599

  15. pH regulation of amphotericin B channels activity in the bilayer lipid membrane

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Tahereh; Sepehry, Hamid; Ashrafpour, Manuchehr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene antibiotic frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections in spite of its secondary effects. The pH plays a crucial role in modulating biophysical features of ion channels in the bilayer lipid membranes. Aim: In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of AmB channel was assessed by single channel recording of ion channel incorporated in the artificial membrane. Materials and Methods: Bilayer lipid membrane was formed by phosphatidylcholine in a 350 μm diameter aperture between two chambers, cis and trans contained 200/50 mMKCl solutions, respectively; then AmB was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single channel recordings were used to indicate the effects of pH changes on AmB channels activity. The records were analyzed by Clamp fit 10 software. Results: A kinetic analysis of single channel currents indicated a cation ion channel with 500 pS conductance and voltage-dependence of the open probability of the AmB channel (Po). A reduction of cis pH to 6 decreased Po and conductance. This effect was also voltage-dependent, being greater at a more positive above −40. The pH changes in the range of 6-8 had no effect on the reversal potential and ion selectivity. Conclusion: Our data indicated that extracellular acidity can reduce AmB activity. PMID:27003977

  16. Supported lipid bilayer membranes for water purification by reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yair; Berman, Amir; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2010-05-18

    Some biological plasma membranes pass water with a permeability and selectivity largely exceeding those of commercial membranes for water desalination using specialized trans-membrane proteins aquaporins. However, highly selective transport of water through aquaporins is usually driven by an osmotic rather mechanical pressure, which is not as attractive from the engineering point of view. The feasibility of adopting biomimetic membranes for water purification driven by a mechanical pressure, i.e., filtration is explored in this paper. Toward this goal, it is proposed to use a commercial nanofiltration (NF) membrane as a support for biomimetic lipid bilayer membranes to render them robust enough to withstand the required pressures. It is shown in this paper for the first time that by properly tuning molecular interactions supported phospholipid bilayers (SPB) can be prepared on a commercial NF membrane. The presence of SPB on the surface was verified and quantified by several spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which showed morphology close to the desired one with very few defects. As an ultimate test it is shown that hydraulic permeability of the SPB supported on the NF membrane (NTR-7450) approaches the values deduced from the typical osmotic permeabilities of intact continuous bilayers. This permeability was unaffected by the trans-membrane flow of water and by repeatedly releasing and reapplying a 10 bar pressure. Along with a parallel demonstration that aquaporins could be incorporated in a similar bilayer on mica, this demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed approach. The prepared SPB structure may be used as a platform for preparing biomimetic filtration membranes with superior performance based on aquaporins. The concept of SPBs on permeable substrates of the present type may also be useful in the future for studying transport of various molecules through trans-membrane proteins. PMID:20099798

  17. Photopolymerization of Dienoyl Lipids Creates Planar Supported Poly(lipid) Membranes with Retained Fluidity.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Kristina S; Jones, Ian W; Keogh, John P; Smith, Christopher M; Griffin, Kaitlyn R; Xu, Juhua; Comi, Troy J; Hall, H K; Saavedra, S Scott

    2016-02-16

    Polymerization of substrate-supported bilayers composed of dienoylphosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids is known to greatly enhance their chemical and mechanical stability; however, the effects of polymerization on membrane fluidity have not been investigated. Here planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs) composed of dienoyl PCs on glass substrates were examined to assess the degree to which UV-initiated polymerization affects lateral lipid mobility. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was used to measure the diffusion coefficients (D) and mobile fractions of rhodamine-DOPE in unpolymerized and polymerized PSLBs composed of bis-sorbyl phosphatidylcholine (bis-SorbPC), mono-sorbyl-phosphatidylcholine (mono-SorbPC), bis-dienoyl-phosphatidylcholine (bis-DenPC), and mono-dienoyl phosphatidylcholine (mono-DenPC). Polymerization was performed in both the Lα and Lβ phase for each lipid. In all cases, polymerization reduced membrane fluidity; however, measurable lateral diffusion was retained which is attributed to a low degree of polymerization. The D values for sorbyl lipids were less than those of the denoyl lipids; this may be a consequence of the distal location of polymerizable group in the sorbyl lipids which may facilitate interleaflet bonding. The D values measured after polymerization were 0.1-0.8 of those measured before polymerization, a range that corresponds to fluidity intermediate between that of a Lα phase and a Lβ phase. This D range is comparable to ratios of D values reported for liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) lipid phases and indicates that the effect of UV polymerization on lateral diffusion in a dienoyl PSLB is similar to the transition from a Ld phase to a Lo phase. The partial retention of fluidity in UV-polymerized PSLBs, their enhanced stability, and the activity of incorporated transmembrane proteins and peptides is discussed. PMID:26794208

  18. Cell-Free and Cell-Based Approaches to Explore the Roles of Host Membranes and Lipids in the Formation of Viral Replication Compartment Induced by Tombusviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Peter D.; Pogany, Judit; Xu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Plant positive strand RNA viruses are intracellular infectious agents that take advantage of cellular lipids and membranes to support replication and protect viral RNA from degradation by host antiviral responses. In this review, we discuss how Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) co-opts lipid transfer proteins and modulates lipid metabolism and transport to facilitate the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase complexes within intricate replication compartments. Identification and characterization of the proviral roles of specific lipids and proteins involved in lipid metabolism based on results from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model host and cell-free approaches are discussed. The review also highlights the advantage of using liposomes with chemically defined composition to identify specific lipids required for TBSV replication. Remarkably, all the known steps in TBSV replication are dependent on cellular lipids and co-opted membranes. PMID:26950140

  19. Electrochemical characterization of bilayer lipid membrane-semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao Kang; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-03-08

    Three different systems of glyceryl monooleate (GMO), bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) supported semiconductor particles have been prepared and characterized. A single composition of particulate semiconductor deposited only on one side of the BLM constituted system A, two different compositions of particulate semiconductors sequentially deposited on the same side of the BLM represented system B, and two different compositions of particulate semiconductors deposited on the opposite sides of the BLM made up system C.

  20. Nonbilayer lipids affect peripheral and integral membrane proteins via changes in the lateral pressure profile.

    PubMed

    van den Brink-van der Laan, Els; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-01

    Nonbilayer lipids can be defined as cone-shaped lipids with a preference for nonbilayer structures with a negative curvature, such as the hexagonal phase. All membranes contain these lipids in large amounts. Yet, the lipids in biological membranes are organized in a bilayer. This leads to the question: what is the physiological role of nonbilayer lipids? Different models are discussed in this review, with a focus on the lateral pressure profile within the membrane. Based on this lateral pressure model, predictions can be made for the effect of nonbilayer lipids on peripheral and integral membrane proteins. Recent data on the catalytic domain of Leader Peptidase and the potassium channel KcsA are discussed in relation to these predictions and in relation to the different models on the function of nonbilayer lipids. The data suggest a general mechanism for the interaction between nonbilayer lipids and membrane proteins via the membrane lateral pressure. PMID:15519321

  1. Forming lipid bilayer membrane arrays on micropatterned polyelectrolyte film surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xuejing; Qi, Guodong; Han, Xiaojun

    2013-07-01

    A novel method of forming lipid bilayer membrane arrays on micropatterned polyelectrolyte film surfaces is introduced. Polyelectrolyte films were fabricated by the layer-by-layer technique on a silicon oxide surface modified with a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) monolayer. The surface pK(a) value of the APTES monolayer was determined by cyclic voltammetry to be approximately 5.61, on the basis of which a pH value of 2.0 was chosen for layer-by-layer assembly. Micropatterned polyelectrolyte films were obtained by deep-UV (254 nm) photolysis though a mask. Absorbed fluorescent latex beads were used to visualize the patterned surfaces. Lipid bilayer arrays were fabricated on the micropatterned surfaces by immersing the patterned substrates into a solution containing egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies yielded a lateral diffusion coefficient for probe molecules of 1.31±0.17 μm(2) s(-1) in the bilayer region, and migration of the lipid NBD PE in bilayer lipid membrane arrays was observed in an electric field. PMID:23695862

  2. Polymer-Induced Swelling of Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Martin; Trapp, Marcus; Dahint, Reiner; Steitz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction of charged polymers with solid-supported 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes by in-situ neutron reflectivity. We observe an enormous swelling of the oligolamellar lipid bilayer stacks after incubation in solutions of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) in D2O. The positively charged polyelectrolyte molecules interact with the lipid bilayers and induce a drastic increase in their d-spacing by a factor of ~4. Temperature, time, and pH influence the swollen interfacial lipid linings. From our study, we conclude that electrostatic interactions introduced by the adsorbed PAH are the main cause for the drastic swelling of the lipid coatings. The DMPC membrane stacks do not detach from their solid support at T > Tm. Steric interactions, also introduced by the PAH molecules, are held responsible for the stabilizing effect. We believe that this novel system offers great potential for fundamental studies of biomembrane properties, keeping the membrane’s natural fluidity and freedom, decoupled from a solid support at physiological conditions. PMID:26703746

  3. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, which catalyse downstream reactions. The concept of raft lipid-based membrane domains provides a different principle for compartmentalization and segregation of membrane constituents. Accordingly, rafts are defined by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer and function by selective partitioning of membrane lipids and proteins into membrane domains of specific phase behaviour and lipid packing. Here, I will discuss the interplay of these independent principles of protein scaffolds and raft lipid microdomains leading to the generation of biologically functional membrane domains. PMID:12803918

  4. Fractional hereditariness of lipid membranes: Instabilities and linearized evolution.

    PubMed

    Deseri, L; Pollaci, P; Zingales, M; Dayal, K

    2016-05-01

    In this work lipid ordering phase changes arising in planar membrane bilayers is investigated both accounting for elasticity alone and for effective viscoelastic response of such assemblies. The mechanical response of such membranes is studied by minimizing the Gibbs free energy which penalizes perturbations of the changes of areal stretch and their gradients only (Deseri and Zurlo, 2013). As material instabilities arise whenever areal stretches characterizing homogeneous configurations lie inside the spinoidal zone of the free energy density, bifurcations from such configurations are shown to occur as oscillatory perturbations of the in-plane displacement. Experimental observations (Espinosa et al., 2011) show a power-law in-plane viscous behavior of lipid structures allowing for an effective viscoelastic behavior of lipid membranes, which falls in the framework of Fractional Hereditariness. A suitable generalization of the variational principle invoked for the elasticity is applied in this case, and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equation is found together with a set of boundary and initial conditions. Separation of variables allows for showing how Fractional Hereditariness owes bifurcated modes with a larger number of spatial oscillations than the corresponding elastic analog. Indeed, the available range of areal stresses for material instabilities is found to increase with respect to the purely elastic case. Nevertheless, the time evolution of the perturbations solving the Euler-Lagrange equation above exhibits time-decay and the large number of spatial oscillation slowly relaxes, thereby keeping the features of a long-tail type time-response. PMID:26897568

  5. On the Importance of Hydrodynamic Interactions in Lipid Membrane Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Tadashi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions (HI) give rise to collective motions between molecules, which are known to be important in the dynamics of random coil polymers and colloids. However, their role in the biological self-assembly of many molecule systems has not been investigated. Here, using Brownian dynamics simulations, we evaluate the importance of HI on the kinetics of self-assembly of lipid membranes. One-thousand coarse-grained lipid molecules in periodic simulation boxes were allowed to assemble into stable bilayers in the presence and absence of intermolecular HI. Hydrodynamic interactions reduce the monomer-monomer association rate by 50%. In contrast, the rate of association of lipid clusters is much faster in the presence of intermolecular HI. In fact, with intermolecular HI, the membrane self-assembly rate is 3–10 times faster than that without intermolecular HI. We introduce an analytical model to describe the size dependence of the diffusive encounter rate of particle clusters, which can qualitatively explain our simulation results for the early stage of the membrane self-assembly process. These results clearly suggest that HI greatly affects the kinetics of self-assembly and that simulations without HI will significantly underestimate the kinetic parameters of such processes. PMID:23332062

  6. Lipid membrane-mediated attraction between curvature inducing objects.

    PubMed

    van der Wel, Casper; Vahid, Afshin; Šarić, Anđela; Idema, Timon; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of membrane proteins is vital for many biological processes, such as cellular transport, cell division, and signal transduction between nerve cells. Theoretical considerations have led to the idea that the membrane itself mediates protein self-organization in these processes through minimization of membrane curvature energy. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study in which we quantify these interactions directly for the first time. In our experimental model system we control the deformation of a lipid membrane by adhering colloidal particles. Using confocal microscopy, we establish that these membrane deformations cause an attractive interaction force leading to reversible binding. The attraction extends over 2.5 times the particle diameter and has a strength of three times the thermal energy (-3.3 kBT). Coarse-grained Monte-Carlo simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and prove that the measured interaction is independent of length scale. Our combined experimental and numerical results reveal membrane curvature as a common physical origin for interactions between any membrane-deforming objects, from nanometre-sized proteins to micrometre-sized particles. PMID:27618764

  7. Toxicity inhibitors protect lipid membranes from disruption by Aβ42.

    PubMed

    Malishev, Ravit; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Jelinek, Raz

    2015-11-18

    Although the precise molecular factors linking amyloid β-protein (Aβ) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been deciphered, interaction of Aβ with cellular membranes has an important role in the disease. However, most therapeutic strategies targeting Aβ have focused on interfering with Aβ self-assembly rather than with its membrane interactions. Here, we studied the impact of three toxicity inhibitors on membrane interactions of Aβ42, the longer form of Aβ, which is associated most strongly with AD. The inhibitors included the four-residue C-terminal fragment Aβ(39-42), the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and the lysine-specific molecular tweezer, CLR01, all of which previously were shown to disrupt different steps in Aβ42 self-assembly. Biophysical experiments revealed that incubation of Aβ42 with each of the three modulators affected membrane interactions in a distinct manner. Interestingly, EGCG and CLR01 were found to have significant interaction with membranes themselves. However, membrane bilayer disruption was reduced when the compounds were preincubated with Aβ42, suggesting that binding of the assembly modulators to the peptide attenuated their membrane interactions. Importantly, our study reveals that even though the three tested compounds affect Aβ42 assembly differently, membrane interactions were significantly inhibited upon incubation of each compound with Aβ42, suggesting that preventing the interaction of Aβ42 with the membrane contributes substantially to inhibition of its toxicity by each compound. The data suggest that interference with membrane interactions is an important factor for Aβ42 toxicity inhibitors and should be taken into account in potential therapeutic strategies, in addition to disruption or remodeling of amyloid assembly. PMID:26317327

  8. Lipid modulation of thermal transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, Enrique; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    There is a subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels that are responsive to temperature (thermo-TRP channels). These are important to a variety of sensory and physiological phenomena such as pain and taste perception. All thermo-TRP channels known to date are subject to modulation by lipidic molecules of many kinds, from the ubiquitous cholesterol to more specialized molecules such as prostaglandins. Although the mechanisms and sites of binding of lipids on thermo-TRPs are largely unknown, the explosion on research of lipids and ion channels has revealed previously unsuspected roles for them. Diacyl glycerol is a lipid produced by phospholipase C (PLC) and it was discovered to modulate TRP channels in the eye of the fly, and many mammal TRP channels have been found to interact with lipids. While most of the lipids acting on thermo-TRP channels have been found to activate them, there are a few capable of inhibition. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is even capable of both inhibition and activation on a couple of thermo-TRPs, depending on the cellular context. More data is required to assess the mechanism through which lipids affect thermo-TRP channel activity and the physiological importance of this interaction. PMID:25366236

  9. The assembly and use of tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs).

    PubMed

    Cranfield, Charles; Carne, Sonia; Martinac, Boris; Cornell, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Because they are firmly held in place, tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are considerably more robust than supported lipid bilayers such as black lipid membranes (BLMs) (Cornell et al. Nature 387(6633): 580-583, 1997). Here we describe the procedures required to assemble and test tethered lipid bilayers that can incorporate various lipid species, peptides, and ion channel proteins. PMID:25331126

  10. Alteration of macrophage membrane lipids following processing of bacterial peptidoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Polanski, M.; Gray, G.R.

    1986-03-01

    As part of the continuing investigation into the role played by macrophages in antigen presentation and bacterial adjuvant activation, the authors have examined the metabolites produced by macrophages after encounter with peptidoglycan. Peptidoglycan was chosen because it contains N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide), a known adjuvant whose primary target cell is the macrophage. In previous work, the authors established that a series of muramyl dipeptide-like glycopeptides was released into the medium following phagocytosis of peptidoglycan by a macrophage cell line. Here the authors report on the finding that, additionally, a membrane lipid has been covalently altered by the addition of a peptidoglycan fragment. Bacillus subtilis cell walls which had been radiolabeled in their muramic acid, glucosamine and alanine residues, were incubated with the murine macrophage cell line RAW264. Using standard lipid extraction procedures, a lipid was isolated and found to contain equal molar ratios of alanine, glutamic acid and diaminopimelic acid. Since lipidated peptidoglycan peptides have been shown to be immunoactivators, the isolated lipid derivative may serve as a signal for interactions with other lymphocytes.