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Sample records for modulation infrared reflection

  1. Electrically actuated phase-change pixels for transmissive and reflective spatial light modulators in the near and mid infrared.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Joshua; Liang, Haibo; Soref, Richard; Mu, Jianwei

    2015-12-20

    Transmissive and reflective spatial light modulators have been designed and simulated for the 1.55 to 2.10 μm spectral region. An electrically actuated layer of phase-change material (PCM) was employed as the electro-optical medium for two-state self-holding "light-to-dark" intensity modulation of free-space light beams. The PCM was sandwiched between transparent conductive N-doped Si or indium tin oxide contact layers in a simple planar structure. A 100 to 500 nm PCM layer of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) was employed for optimum performance at 1.55 μm where the transmissive-modulator insertion loss was around 4.5 dB. The GST light-dark contrast was found to be 32 dB. For the GST reflection device, an included metal film (Ag) improved the 1.55 μm performance metrics to 0.7 dB of insertion loss with a contrast around 26 dB. The calculated performance for both types of spatial light modulators was robust to changes in the input incidence angle near normal incidence. Applications include infrared scene generation and signal processing. PMID:26837038

  2. Digital infrared fundus reflectance.

    PubMed

    Packer, S; Schneider, K; Lin, H Z; Feldman, M

    1980-06-01

    An infrared sensor was inserted at the film plane of a fundus camera. The signal was visualized on an oscilloscope. In this manner we measured infrared reflectance from the surface of the fundus. The purpose was to characterize choroidal malignant melanomas more reliably than is done with infrared color translation photography. Control lesions were choroidal nevi, metastatic tumors, and disciform macular degenerations. Correlations were made with radioactive phosphorus (32P) uptake, fluorescein angiography, and histopathologic findings. Several cases are presented, one in which this new method of infrared detection was the first diagnostic test to detect the spread of a choroidal melanoma. The simplicity of this technique and its increased accuracy justify the needed further refinements. PMID:7413142

  3. Spectral phase, amplitude, and spatial modulation from ultraviolet to infrared with a reflective MEMS pulse shaper.

    PubMed

    Extermann, Jérôme; Weber, Stefan M; Kiselev, Denis; Bonacina, Luigi; Lani, Sébastien; Jutzi, Fabio; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico F; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2011-04-11

    We describe the performance of a reflective pulse-shaper based on a Micro-ElectroMechanical System (MEMS) linear mirror array. It represents a substantial upgrade of a preceding release [Opt. Lett. 35, 3102 (2010)] as it allows simultaneous piston and tilt mirror motion, allowing both phase- and binary amplitude-shaping with no wavelength restriction. Moreover, we show how the combination of in-axis and tilt movement can be used for active correction of spatial chirp. PMID:21503066

  4. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  5. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Wendt, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  6. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed. PMID:25498816

  7. Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Near infrared leaf reflectance modeling using Fresnel's equation (Kumar and Silva, 1973) and Snell's Law successfully approximated the spectral curve for a 0.25-mm turgid oak leaf lying on a Halon background. Calculations were made for ten interfaces, air-wax, wax-cellulose, cellulose-water, cellulose-air, air-water, and their inverses. A water path of 0.5 mm yielded acceptable results, and it was found that assignment of more weight to those interfaces involving air versus water or cellulose, and less to those involving wax, decreased the standard deviation of the error for all wavelengths. Data suggest that the air-cell interface is not the only important contributor to the overall reflectance of a leaf. Results also argue against the assertion that the near infrared plateau is a function of cell structure within the leaf.

  8. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-15

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  9. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, R; Schade, U; Kleber, Ch; Schreiner, M

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations. PMID:24985826

  10. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  11. Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation

    DOEpatents

    Goldner, Ronald B.; Gerouki, Alexandra; Liu, Te-Yang; Goldner, Mark A.; Haas, Terry E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 .mu.m.

  12. Reflective coherent spatial light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Richards, Roger K.; Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.

    2003-04-22

    A reflective coherent spatial light modulator (RCSLM) includes a subwavelength resonant grating structure (SWS), the SWS including at least one subwavelength resonant grating layer (SWL) have a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels. Each pixel represents an area capable of individual control of its reflective response. A structure for modulating the resonant reflective response of at least one pixel is provided. The structure for modulating can include at least one electro-optic layer in optical contact with the SWS. The RCSLM is scalable in both pixel size and wavelength. A method for forming a RCSLM includes the steps of selecting a waveguide material and forming a SWS in the waveguide material, the SWS formed from at least one SWL, the SWL having a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels.

  13. Advanced infrared laser modulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, P. K.; Wagner, R.; Gilden, M.

    1984-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to develop an electrooptic waveguide modulator for generating continuous tunable sideband power from an infrared CO2 laser. Parameters included were the waveguide configurations, microstrip dimensions device impedance, and effective dielectric constants. An optimum infrared laser modulator was established and was fabricated. This modulator represents the state-of-the-art integrated optical device, which has a three-dimensional topology to accommodate three lambda/4 step transformers for microwave impedance matching at both the input and output terminals. A flat frequency response of the device over 20 HGz or = 3 dB) was achieved. Maximum single sideband to carrier power greater than 1.2% for 20 W microwave input power at optical carrier wavelength of 10.6 microns was obtained.

  14. Near-infrared reflectance modulation with electrochromic crystalline WO sub 3 films deposited on ambient temperature glass substrates by an oxygen ion-assisted technique

    SciTech Connect

    Arntz, F.O.; Goldner, R.B.; Morel, B.; Hass, T.E.; Wong, K.K. )

    1990-03-15

    Electrochromic, crystalline WO{sub 3} films have been deposited on glass substrates at ambient temperature by an oxygen-ion-assisted technique using oxygen ion energies {ge}300 eV and oxygen ion to vapor molecule (WO{sub 3}) ratios, {gamma}{ge}2.5. After lithiation, the resulting Li{sub {ital x}}WO{sub 3} films exhibited {gt}50% reflectivity in the near infrared, and the reflectivity dispersion was fit by a Drude free-electron model, yielding the Drude parameters: plasma energy, {ital E}{sub {ital p}}=3.3 eV; and the loss (damping) parameter, {ital E}{sub {Gamma}}=1.0 eV. (The bound electron permittivity, {epsilon}{sub {ital b}}, was fixed at 4.0.) These values are comparable to those obtained with WO{sub 3} films rf sputter deposited onto substrates at temperatures {gt}420 {degree}C. During the ion-assisted deposition the substrate temperature reached approximately 90 {degree}C, caused primarily by radiation from the WO{sub 3} evaporant source. This indicates that economical low-temperature substrates, such as plastics, could be used. These results suggest that practical electrochromic smart windows for energy-efficient buildings might be produced using ion-assisted deposition techniques.

  15. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  16. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  17. Identification coding schemes for modulated reflectance systems

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don M.; Briles, Scott D.; Neagley, Daniel L.; Platts, David; Clark, David D.

    2006-08-22

    An identifying coding apparatus employing modulated reflectance technology involving a base station emitting a RF signal, with a tag, located remotely from the base station, and containing at least one antenna and predetermined other passive circuit components, receiving the RF signal and reflecting back to the base station a modulated signal indicative of characteristics related to the tag.

  18. Photovoltaic module with light reflecting backskin

    DOEpatents

    Gonsiorawski, Ronald C.

    2007-07-03

    A photovoltaic module comprises electrically interconnected and mutually spaced photovoltaic cells that are encapsulated by a light-transmitting encapsulant between a light-transparent front cover and a back cover, with the back cover sheet being an ionomer/nylon alloy embossed with V-shaped grooves running in at least two directions and coated with a light reflecting medium so as to provide light-reflecting facets that are aligned with the spaces between adjacent cells and oriented so as to reflect light falling in those spaces back toward said transparent front cover for further internal reflection onto the solar cells, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to the photovoltaic cells, thereby increasing the current output of the module. The internal reflector improves power output by as much as 67%.

  19. Mid-infrared GaInSb quantum well laser structures: a comparison of their characterisation using photoluminescence, photo-modulated reflectance, and FTIR-based surface photovoltage spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Natasha E.; Andreev, A.; Nash, G. R.; Ashley, T.; Hosea, T. J. C.

    2010-08-01

    We study four compressively strained GaInSb/AlGaInSb type I multi quantum-well (QW) laser structures grown on GaAs, with increasingly strained QWs, aimed at emitting at ~4μm. This wavelength region is highly important for applications such a free space communication, biomedical imaging and trace gas sensing. The structures are analysed using photoluminescence, photo-modulated reflectance and, at room temperature, using our novel, recently developed Fourier transform infrared surface photo-voltage spectroscopy technique (FTIR-SPS). Neither photoluminescence nor photo-modulated reflectance managed to give any characterisation information at room temperature or such detailed information even at low temperatures. However, FTIR-SPS clearly yielded a full set of transitions for all four samples including not only the barrier bandgap, but also the QW ground state transition, from which the device operating wavelengths can be inferred, and up to five excited state QW transitions. The full set of measured transition energies are then compared closely with those predicted by an 8-band k.p model which takes account of the band anisotropy and strain. There is generally a good agreement between the QW transitions predicted by the model and those measured experimentally, but there is also a strong indication that the current literature values for the AlGaInSb bandgap seem to be in considerable error for the present alloy compositions. The FTIR-SPS technique gives information of great importance when designing future devices to emit in this wavelength region.

  20. Adding diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy capability to extended x-ray-absorption fine structure in a new cell to study solid catalysts in combination with a modulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarello, Gian Luca; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Marchionni, Valentina; Quaroni, Luca; Ferri, Davide

    2014-07-15

    We describe a novel cell used to combine in situ transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in a single experiment. The novelty of the cell design compared to current examples is that both radiations are passed through an X-ray and IR transparent window in direct contact with the sample. This innovative geometry also offers a wide surface for IR collection. In order to avoid interference from the crystalline IR transparent materials (e.g., CaF{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2}, diamond) a 500 μm carbon filled hole is laser drilled in the center of a CaF{sub 2} window. The cell is designed to represent a plug flow reactor, has reduced dead volume in order to allow for fast exchange of gases and is therefore suitable for experiments under fast transients, e.g., according to the concentration modulation approach. High quality time-resolved XAS and DRIFTS data of a 2 wt.% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst are obtained in concentration modulation experiments where CO (or H{sub 2}) pulses are alternated to O{sub 2} pulses at 150 °C. We show that additional information can be obtained on the Pt redox dynamic under working conditions thanks to the improved sensitivity given by the modulation approach followed by Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD) analysis. It is anticipated that the design of the novel cell is likely suitable for a number of other in situ spectroscopic and diffraction methods.

  1. Infrared-Proximity-Sensor Modules For Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parton, William; Wegerif, Daniel; Rosinski, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Collision-avoidance system for articulated robot manipulators uses infrared proximity sensors grouped together in array of sensor modules. Sensor modules, called "sensorCells," distributed processing board-level products for acquiring data from proximity-sensors strategically mounted on robot manipulators. Each sensorCell self-contained and consists of multiple sensing elements, discrete electronics, microcontroller and communications components. Modules connected to central control computer by redundant serial digital communication subsystem including both serial and a multi-drop bus. Detects objects made of various materials at distance of up to 50 cm. For some materials, such as thermal protection system tiles, detection range reduced to approximately 20 cm.

  2. Temperature-dependent modulated reflectance of InAs/InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots-in-a-well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzinskas, R. Čechavičius, B.; Rimkus, A.; Pozingytė, E.; Kavaliauskas, J.; Valušis, G.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-14

    We present a photoreflectance (PR) study of multi-layer InAs quantum dot (QD) photodetector structures, incorporating InGaAs overgrown layers and positioned asymmetrically within GaAs/AlAs quantum wells (QWs). The influence of the back-surface reflections on the QD PR spectra is explained and a temperature-dependent photomodulation mechanism is discussed. The optical interband transitions originating from the QD/QW ground- and excited-states are revealed and their temperature behaviour in the range of 3–300 K is established. In particular, we estimated the activation energy (∼320 meV) of exciton thermal escape from QD to QW bound-states at high temperatures. Furthermore, from the obtained Varshni parameters, a strain-driven partial decomposition of the InGaAs cap layer is determined.

  3. Infrared-Bolometer Arrays with Reflective Backshorts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Abrahams, John; Allen, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated circuits that incorporate square arrays of superconducting-transition- edge bolometers with optically reflective backshorts are being developed for use in image sensors in the spectral range from far infrared to millimeter wavelengths. To maximize the optical efficiency (and, thus, sensitivity) of such a sensor at a specific wavelength, resonant optical structures are created by placing the backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometer plane. The bolometer and backshort arrays are fabricated separately, then integrated to form a single unit denoted a backshort-under-grid (BUG) bolometer array. In a subsequent fabrication step, the BUG bolometer array is connected, by use of single-sided indium bump bonding, to a readout device that comprises mostly a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer circuit. The resulting sensor unit comprising the BUG bolometer array and the readout device is operated at a temperature below 1 K. The concept of increasing optical efficiency by use of backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometers is not new. Instead, the novelty of the present development lies mainly in several features of the design of the BUG bolometer array and the fabrication sequence used to implement the design. Prior to joining with the backshort array, the bolometer array comprises, more specifically, a square grid of free-standing molybdenum/gold superconducting-transition-edge bolometer elements on a 1.4- m-thick top layer of silicon that is part of a silicon support frame made from a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The backshort array is fabricated separately as a frame structure that includes support beams and contains a correspond - ing grid of optically reflective patches on a single-crystal silicon substrate. The process used to fabricate the bolometer array includes standard patterning and etching steps that result in the formation of deep notches in the silicon support frame. These notches are designed to

  4. A conformation and orientation model of the carboxylic group of fatty acids dependent on chain length in a Langmuir monolayer film studied by polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muro, Maiko; Itoh, Yuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    The conformation of the carboxylic group of fatty acids in a Langmuir (L) monolayer film on water is described in relation to the aggregation property of the hydrocarbon chain. Polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectra (PM-IRRAS) of L films of heptadecanoic acid (C(17)), octadecanoic acid (C(18)), and nonadecanoic acid (C(19)) exhibit systematic spectral changes in both the C-H and C=O stretching vibration regions. Through a stabilization analysis of the L films at a high surface pressure, the C(19) L film has been found outstandingly stable exhibiting no film shrink, while the other two compounds exhibit a large shrink at high surface pressure. By taking into account the uniquely high aggregation property of the hydrocarbon chains of C(19), the three major bands arising from the C=O stretching vibration mode propose three types of molecular conformations about the carboxylic group, which are elucidated by a balance of the hydration of the carboxylic group, the chain length of the hydrocarbon chain, and the surface pressure. PMID:20718412

  5. Potential Modulation on Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Niu, Yu; Viana, A S; Correia, Jorge P; Jin, Gang

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical-total internal reflection ellipsometry (EC-TIRE) has been proposed as a technique to observe the redox reactions on the electrode surface due to its high phase sensitivity to the electrolyte/electrode interface. In this paper, we mainly focus on the influence of the potential modulation on the TIRE response. The analysis suggests that both dielectric constant variation of gold and the electric double layer transformation would modulate the reflection polarization of the surface. For a nonfaradaic process, the signal of TIRE would be proportional to the potential modulation. To testify the analysis, linear sweep voltammetry and open circuit measurement have been performed. The results strongly support the system analysis. PMID:26889871

  6. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bobby E.; Cromwell, Brian K.; Pender, Charles W.; Shepherd, Seth D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements (2-15 microns) that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps retrieved from the LDEF spacecraft. These clamps were used for maintaining the experiments in place and were located at various locations about the spacecraft. Changes in reflectance of the tray clamps at these locations were compared with atomic oxygen fluxes at the same locations. A decrease in absorption band depth was seen for the surfaces exposed to space indicating that there was some surface layer erosion. In all of the surfaces measured, little evidence of contamination was observed and none of the samples showed evidence of the brown nicotine stain that was so prominent in other experiments. Total emissivity values were calculated for both exposed and unexposed tray clamp surfaces. Only small differences, usually less than 1 percent, were observed. The spectral reflectances were measured using a hemi-ellipsoidal mirror reflectometer matched with an interferometer spectrometer. The rapid scanning capability of the interferometer allowed the reflectance measurements to be made in a timely fashion. The ellipsoidal mirror has its two foci separated by 2 inches and located on the major axis. A blackbody source was located at one focus while the tray clamp samples were located at the conjugate focus. The blackbody radiation was modulated and then focused by the ellipsoid onto the tray clamps. Radiation reflected from the tray clamp was sampled by the interferometer by viewing through a hole in the ellipsoid. A gold mirror (reflectance approximately 98 percent) was used as the reference surface.

  7. Reflections From Plasma Would Enhance Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Quantum efficiency of proposed photoemission semiconductor detector of long-wavelength infrared radiation enhanced by multiple passes of radiation. Device has features of back-to-back heterojunction internal-photoemission (HIP) detector, and Fabry-Perot interferometer. Arrays of devices of this type incorporated into integrated-circuit infrared imaging devices.

  8. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  9. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-06-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  10. Space photovoltaic modules based on reflective optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. M.; Larionov, V. R.; Rumyantsev, V. D.; Shvarts, M. Z.

    1995-01-01

    The conceptual design and experimental results for two types of space application concentrator photovoltaic modules, employing reflective optical elements, are presented. The first type is based on the use of compound parabolic concentrators, the second type is based on the use of line-focus parabolic troughs. Lightweight concentrators are formed with nickel foil coated silver with a diamond-like carbon layer protection. Secondary optical elements, including lenses and cones, are introduced for a better matching of concentrators and solar cells. Both types of modules are characterized by concentration ratios in the range 20x to 30x, depending on the chosen range of misorientation angles. The estimated specific parameters of these modules operating with single junction AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells are 240 W/sq m and 3 kg/sq m.

  11. Infrared hollow optical fiber probes for reflectance spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenhui; Kino, Saiko; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-05-10

    Systems for infrared reflectance imaging are built with an FT-IR spectrometer, hollow optical fibers, and a high-speed infrared camera. To obtain reflectance images of biological samples, an optical fiber probe equipped with a light source at the distal end and a hybrid fiber probe composed of fibers for beam radiation and ones for image detection have been developed. By using these systems, reflectance spectral images of lipid painted on biomedical hard tissue, which provides reflectance of around 4%, are successfully acquired. PMID:25967522

  12. Infrared studies of dust grains in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    IR reflection nebulae, regions of dust which are illuminated by nearby embedded sources, were observed in several regions of ongoing star formation. Near IR observation and theoretical modelling of the scattered light form IR reflection nebulae can provide information about the dust grain properties in star forming regions. IR reflection nebulae were modelled as plane parallel slabs assuming isotropically scattering grains. For the grain scattering properties, graphite and silicate grains were used with a power law grain size distribution. Among the free parameters of the model are the stellar luminosity and effective temperature, the optical depth of the nebula, and the extinction by foreground material. The typical results from this model are presented and discussed.

  13. Forensic applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungol, Mary W.; Bartick, Edward G.; Reffner, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy in forensic science are discussed. Internal reflection spectra of single fibers, hairs, paint chips, vehicle rubber bumpers, photocopy toners, carbon copies, writing ink on paper, lipstick on tissue, black electrical tape, and other types of forensic evidence have been obtained. The technique is convenient, non-destructive, and may permit smeared materials to be analyzed in situ.

  14. Infrared reflectance spectra (4-12 micron) of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.

    1991-01-01

    Presented here are infrared reflectance spectra of a typical set of Apollo samples to illustrate spectral character in the mid-infrared (4 to 12 microns) of lunar materials and how the spectra varies among three main forms: soil, breccia, and igneous rocks. Reflectance data, to a close approximation, are the inverse of emission spectra; thus, for a given material the spectral reflectance (R) at any given wavelength is related to emission (E) by 1 - R equals E. Therefore, one can use reflectance spectra of lunar samples to predict how emission spectra of material on the lunar surface will appear to spectrometers on orbiting spacecraft or earthbound telescopes. Spectra were measured in the lab in dry air using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer. Shown here is only the key portion (4 to 12 microns) of each spectrum relating to the principal spectral emission region for sunlit lunar materials and to where the most diagnostic spectral features occur.

  15. Red and near-infrared spectral reflectance of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, H. W.; Munis, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of snow in the range of 0.60 to 2.50 microns wavelengths was studied in a cold laboratory using natural snow and simulated preparations of snow. A white barium sulfate powder was used as the standard for comparison. The high reflectance (usually nearly 100%) of fresh natural snow in visible wavelengths declines rapidly at wavelengths longer than the visible, as the spectral absorption coefficients of ice increase. Aging snow becomes only somewhat less reflective than fresh snow in the visible region and usually retains a reflectance greater than 80%. In the near infrared, aging snow tends to become considerably less reflective than fresh snow.

  16. Atmospheric modulation transfer function in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Buskila, Kobi; Towito, Shay; Shmuel, Elad; Levi, Ran; Kopeika, Natan; Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G; Vollmerhausen, Richard H; Halford, Carl E

    2004-01-10

    In high-resolution ultranarrow field-of-view thermal imagers, image quality over relatively long path lengths is typically limited by atmospheric degradation, especially atmospheric blur. We report our results and analyses of infrared images from two sites, Fort A. P. Hill and Aberdeen Proving Ground. The images are influenced by the various atmospheric phenomena: scattering, absorption, and turbulence. A series of experiments with high-resolution equipment in both the 3-5- and 8-13-microm regions at the two locations indicate that, as in the visible, image quality is limited much more by atmosphere than by the instrumentation for ranges even of the order of only a few kilometers. For paths close to the ground, turbulence is more dominant, whereas for paths involving higher average elevation, aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) is dominant. As wavelength increases, turbulence MTF also increases, thus permitting aerosol MTF to become more dominant. A critical role in aerosol MTF in the thermal infrared is attributed to absorption, which noticeably decreases atmospheric transmission much more than in the visible, thereby reducing high-spatial-frequency aerosol MTF. These measurements indicate that atmospheric MTF should be a basic component in imaging system design and analysis even in the infrared, especially as higher-resolution hardware becomes available. PMID:14735966

  17. Capabilities and Limitations of Infrared Reflectance Microspectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, R. L.; Pieters, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Technological improvements in IR microspectroscopy have made it an increasingly appealing tool for planetary mineralogy. Microspectroscopy presents the prospect of examining small samples nondestructively and acquiring spectra that can be related to remote sensing observations. However, complications are introduced as a target beam size is reduced, and it is critical that limitations are understood. We present the results of a series of well constrained spectroscopic measurements, linking microspectroscopic data to traditionally collected reflectance spectra and petrologic information for the same rock.

  18. Infrared reflectance of high altitude clouds.

    PubMed

    Hovis, W A; Blaine, L R; Forman, M L

    1970-03-01

    The spectral reflectance characteristics of cirrostratus, cirrus clouds, and a jet contrail, in the 0.68-2.4-micro spectral interval, are of interest for remote sensing of cloud types from orbiting satellites. Measurements made with a down-looking spectrometer from a high altitude aircraft show differences between the signatures of naturally formed ice clouds, a fresh jet contrail, and a snow covered surface. PMID:20076243

  19. The near-infrared continuum emission of visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1984-01-01

    In the past, reflection nebulae have provided an astrophysical laboratory well suited for the study of the reflection properties of interstellar dust grains at visual and ultraviolet wavelengths. The present investigation is concerned with observations which were begun with the objective to extend to near-infrared wavelengths the study of grains in reflection. Observations of three classical visual reflection nebulae were conducted in the wavelength range from 1.25 to 2.2 microns, taking into account NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. All three nebulae were found to have similar near-infrared colors, despite widely different colors of their illuminating stars. The brightness level shown by two of the nebulae at 2.2 microns was too high to be easily accounted for on the basis of reflected light. Attention is given to a wide variety of possible emission mechanisms.

  20. Near infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigs, D. E.; Freelin, J. M.; Hieftje, G. M.

    1983-02-01

    Near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.

  1. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion molecular cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y.; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New obervations of Orion Molecular Cloud-2 have been made from 1-100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near infrared sources, IRS1 and IRS4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS1 and IRS4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS1 can be characterized by L less than or equal to 500 Solar luminosities and T approx. 1000 K. The near infrared (1-5) micron albedo of the grains in the IRS1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  2. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion Molecular Cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New observations of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 have been made from 1 to 100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry, and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near-infrared sources, IRS 1 and IRS 4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS 1 and IRS 4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far-infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS 1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS 1 can be characterized by L of 500 solar luminosities or less and T of roughly 1000 K. The near-infrared albedo of the grains in the IRS 1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  3. Infrared spectra of lunar soil analogs. [spectral reflectance of minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronson, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The infrared spectra of analogs of lunar soils were investigated to further the development of methodology for interpretation of remotely measured infrared spectra of the lunar surface. The optical constants of dunite, bytownite, augite, ilmenite, and a mare glass analog were obtained. The infrared emittance spectra of powdered minerals were measured and compared with spectra calculated by the reflectance theory using a catalog of optical constants. The results indicate that the predictions of the theory closely simulate the experimental measurements if the optical constants are properly derived.

  4. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  5. Broadband infrared meanderline reflective quarter-wave plate.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Samuel L; Boreman, Glenn D

    2011-05-23

    We present a novel reflective quarter-wave plate comprised of subwavelength meanderline elements. The device is operational over the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectrum, with significant spectral and angular bandwidths. Power reflection is approximately 70% over the majority of the LWIR. Efficient conversion from a 45° linear polarization state into circular polarization is demonstrated from finite-element electromagnetic simulations and from broadband polarimetric measurements. PMID:21643314

  6. Standard reference material 2036 near-infrared reflection wavelength standard.

    PubMed

    Choquette, Steven J; Duewer, David L; Hanssen, Leonard M; Early, Edward A

    2005-04-01

    Standard Reference Material 2036 (SRM 2036) is a certified transfer standard intended for the verification and calibration of the wavelength/wavenumber scale of near-infrared (NIR) spectrometers operating in diffuse or trans-reflectance mode. SRM 2036 Near-Infrared Wavelength/Wavenumber Reflection Standard is a combination of a rare earth oxide glass of a composition similar to that of SRM 2035 Near-Infrared Transmission Wavelength/Wavenumber Standard and SRM 2065 Ultraviolet-Visible-Near-Infrared Transmission Wavelength/Wavenumber Standard, but is in physical contact with a piece of sintered poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE). The combination of glass contacted with a nearly ideal diffusely reflecting backing provides reflection-absorption bands that range from 15% R to 40% R. SRM 2036 is certified for the 10% band fraction air wavelength centroid location, (10%)B, of seven bands spanning the spectral region from 975 nm to 1946 nm. It is also certified for the vacuum wavenumber (10%)B of the same seven bands in the spectral region from 10 300 cm(-1) to 5130 cm(-1) at 8 cm(-1) resolution. Informational values are provided for the locations of thirteen additional bands from 334 nm to 804 nm. PMID:15901335

  7. Extended near infrared emission from visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Werner, M. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Extended near infrared (2 to 5 microns) emission was observed from three visual reflection nebulae, NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. The emission from each nebula consists of a smooth continuum, which can be described by a greybody with a color temperature of 1000 K, and emission features at 3.3 and 3.4 microns. The continuum emission cannot be explained by free-free emission, reflected light, or field stars, or by thermal emission from grains, with commonly accepted ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, which are in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. A possible explanation is thermal emission from grains with extremely low ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, or from grains with a temperature determined by mechanisms other than equilibrium radiative heating. Another possibility is continuum fluorescence.

  8. Extended near-infrared emission from visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Werner, M. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    Extended near infrared (2 to 5 microns) emission was observed from three visual reflection nebulae, NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. The emission from each nebula consists of a smooth continuum, which can be described by a greybody with a color temperature of 1000 K, and emission features at 3.3 and 3.4 microns. The continuum emission cannot be explained by free-free emission, reflected light, or field stars, or by thermal emission from grains, with commonly accepted ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, which are in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. A possible explanation is thermal emission from grains with extremely low ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, or from grains with a temperature determined by mechanisms other than equilibrium radiative heating. Another possibility is continuum fluorescence. Previously announced in STAR N83-25629

  9. Infrared reflection and attenuated total reflection spectra in the Bi2Se3 topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, N. N.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Kucherenko, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    Infrared reflection and attenuated total reflection spectra are measured in the (111)Si/Bi2Se3 topological insulator film. The characteristic parameters of plasmons and phonons in the near-surface layers close to the Si-film interface are obtained from the dispersion analysis of the reflection spectra. It is found that the charge carrier density near the interface far exceeds that in the bulk. The dispersion laws for surface polaritons and waveguide modes are determined.

  10. Improved Spatial Resolution For Reflection Mode Infrared Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C.; May, T. E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-08-13

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the numerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using a microscope coupled to a synchrotron source.

  11. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light. PMID:11538693

  12. Remote sensing of vegetation water content using shortwave infrared reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Yilmaz, M. Tugrul

    2007-09-01

    Vegetation water content is an important biophysical parameter for estimation of soil moisture from microwave radiometers. One of the objectives of the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04) and 2005 (SMEX05) were to develop and test algorithms for a vegetation water content data product using shortwave infrared reflectances. SMEX04 studied native vegetation in Arizona, USA, and Sonora, Mexico, while SMEX05 studied corn and soybean in Iowa, USA. The normalized difference infrared index (NDII) is defined as (R 850 - R 1650)/(R 800 + R 1650), where R 850 is the reflectance in the near infrared and R1650 is the reflectance in the shortwave infrared. Simulations using the Scattering by Arbitrarily Inclined Leaves (SAIL) model indicated that NDII is sensitive to surface moisture content. From Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper and other imagery, NDII is linear with respect to foliar water content with R2 = 0.81. The regression standard error of the y estimate is 0.094 mm, which is equivalent to about a leaf area index of 0.5 m2 m -2. Based on modeling the dynamic water flow through plants, the requirement for detection of water stress is about 0.01 mm, so detection of water stress may not be possible. However, this standard error is accurate for input into the tau-omega model for soil moisture. Therefore, NDII may be a robust backup algorithm for MODIS as a standard data product.

  13. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  14. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of aircraft coatings with infrared diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Hans G.; Wilson, Kody A.; Gross, Kevin C.; Hawks, Michael R.; Zens, Timothy W. C.

    2015-05-01

    Aircraft coatings degrade over time, but aging can be difficult to detect before failure and delamination. We present a method to evaluate aircraft coatings in situ using infrared diffuse reflectance spectra. This method can detect and classify coating degradation much earlier than visual inspection. The method has been tested on two different types of coatings that were artificially aged in an autoclave. Spectra were measured using a hand-held diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). One set of 72 samples can be classified as either aged or unaged with 100% accuracy. A second sample set contained samples that had been artificially aged for 0, 24, 48 or 96 hours. Several classification methods are compared, with accuracy better than 98% possible.

  16. Spectral infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements for LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, B. K.; Shepherd, S. D.; Pender, C. W.; Wood, B. E.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared hemispherical reflectance measurements that were made on 58 chromic acid anodized tray clamps from LDEF are described. The measurements were made using a hemiellipsoidal mirror reflectometer with interferometer for wavelengths between 2-15 microns. The tray clamps investigated were from locations about the entire spacecraft and provided the opportunity for comparing the effects of atomic oxygen at each location. Results indicate there was essentially no dependence on atomic oxygen fluence for the surfaces studied, but there did appear to be a slight dependence on solar radiation exposure. The reflectances of the front sides of the tray clamps consistently were slightly higher than for the protected rear tray clamp surfaces.

  17. Terahertz and mid-infrared reflectance of epitaxial graphene.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cristiane N; Joucken, Frédéric; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Louette, Pierre; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising material for infrared (IR) photodetectors and plasmonics. In this context, wafer scale epitaxial graphene on SiC is of great interest in a variety of applications in optics and nanoelectronics. Here we present IR reflectance spectroscopy of graphene grown epitaxially on the C-face of 6H-SiC over a broad optical range, from terahertz (THz) to mid-infrared (MIR). Contrary to the transmittance, reflectance measurements are not hampered by the transmission window of the substrate, and in particular by the SiC Reststrahlen band in the MIR. This allows us to present IR reflectance data exhibiting a continuous evolution from the regime of intraband to interband charge carrier transitions. A consistent and simultaneous analysis of the contributions from both transitions to the optical response yields precise information on the carrier dynamics and the number of layers. The properties of the graphene layers derived from IR reflection spectroscopy are corroborated by other techniques (micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, transport measurements). Moreover, we also present MIR microscopy mapping, showing that spatially-resolved information can be gathered, giving indications on the sample homogeneity. Our work paves the way for a still scarcely explored field of epitaxial graphene-based THz and MIR optical devices. PMID:27102827

  18. Terahertz and mid-infrared reflectance of epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Cristiane N.; Joucken, Frédéric; de Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Louette, Pierre; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising material for infrared (IR) photodetectors and plasmonics. In this context, wafer scale epitaxial graphene on SiC is of great interest in a variety of applications in optics and nanoelectronics. Here we present IR reflectance spectroscopy of graphene grown epitaxially on the C-face of 6H-SiC over a broad optical range, from terahertz (THz) to mid-infrared (MIR). Contrary to the transmittance, reflectance measurements are not hampered by the transmission window of the substrate, and in particular by the SiC Reststrahlen band in the MIR. This allows us to present IR reflectance data exhibiting a continuous evolution from the regime of intraband to interband charge carrier transitions. A consistent and simultaneous analysis of the contributions from both transitions to the optical response yields precise information on the carrier dynamics and the number of layers. The properties of the graphene layers derived from IR reflection spectroscopy are corroborated by other techniques (micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, transport measurements). Moreover, we also present MIR microscopy mapping, showing that spatially-resolved information can be gathered, giving indications on the sample homogeneity. Our work paves the way for a still scarcely explored field of epitaxial graphene-based THz and MIR optical devices.

  19. Terahertz and mid-infrared reflectance of epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Cristiane N.; Joucken, Frédéric; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Louette, Pierre; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising material for infrared (IR) photodetectors and plasmonics. In this context, wafer scale epitaxial graphene on SiC is of great interest in a variety of applications in optics and nanoelectronics. Here we present IR reflectance spectroscopy of graphene grown epitaxially on the C-face of 6H-SiC over a broad optical range, from terahertz (THz) to mid-infrared (MIR). Contrary to the transmittance, reflectance measurements are not hampered by the transmission window of the substrate, and in particular by the SiC Reststrahlen band in the MIR. This allows us to present IR reflectance data exhibiting a continuous evolution from the regime of intraband to interband charge carrier transitions. A consistent and simultaneous analysis of the contributions from both transitions to the optical response yields precise information on the carrier dynamics and the number of layers. The properties of the graphene layers derived from IR reflection spectroscopy are corroborated by other techniques (micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, transport measurements). Moreover, we also present MIR microscopy mapping, showing that spatially-resolved information can be gathered, giving indications on the sample homogeneity. Our work paves the way for a still scarcely explored field of epitaxial graphene-based THz and MIR optical devices. PMID:27102827

  20. Crystal orientation dependence of polarized infrared reflectance response of hexagonal sapphire crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. C.; Ng, S. S.; Abu Hassan, H.; Hassan, Z.; Dumelow, T.

    2014-11-01

    Polarized infrared (IR) reflectance responses of c-, a- and r-plane sapphire crystals were investigated. The sapphire crystals with differently oriented surfaces exhibited different reststrahlen features. Except for c-plane sapphire, the polarized IR reflectance responses were sensitive to the orientation of the samples. The spectral features for a- and r-plane sapphire crystals were modulated by just rotating the samples about their surface normal. To analyze the observations, a theoretical model for the polarized IR reflectivity that considers the effects of crystal orientation of a hexagonal crystal system was employed. Overall, the theoretical predictions were in good agreement with experimental data. The crystal orientation information deduced from the polarized IR reflectance spectra is consistent with that acquired from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  1. Far-infrared reflectance spectra of optical black coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    Far-infrared specular reflectance spectra of six optically black coatings near normal incidence are presented. The spectra were obtained using nine bandpass transmission filters in the wavelength range between 12 and 300 microns. Data on the construction, thickness, and rms surface roughness of the coatings are also presented. The chemical composition of two coatings can be distinguished from that of the others by a strong absorption feature between 20 and 40 microns which is attributed to amorphous silicate material. Inverse relationships between these spectra and coating roughness and thickness are noted and lead to development of a reflecting-layer model for the measured reflectance. The model is applied to the spectra of several coatings whose construction falls within its constraints.

  2. Improved Spatial Resolution for Reflection Mode Infrared Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; May, T.E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-10-09

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the umerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using two different microscopes apable of diffraction-limited resolution: the first microscope is coupled to a synchrotron source and utilizes a single point detector, whereas the second microscope has a standard blackbody source and uses a focal planetarray (FPA) detector.

  3. Visible and near infrared reflectances measured from laboratory ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Barkey, Brian; Liou, K N

    2008-05-01

    We present laboratory results of the 0.68 microm visible (VIS) and 1.617 microm near infrared (NIR) reflectances typically used for inferring optical depth and ice crystal size from satellite radiometers, from ice clouds generated in a temperature controlled column cloud chamber. Two types of ice crystals were produced in this experiment: small columns and dendrites with mean maximum dimensions of about 17 and 35 microm. Within experimental uncertainty, the measured reflectances from ice clouds at both wavelengths agree reasonably well with the theoretical results computed from the plane-parallel adding-doubling method for radiative transfer using the measured ice particle morphology. We demonstrate that laboratory scattering and reflectance data for thin ice clouds with optical depths less than 0.4 can be used for validation of the thin cirrus optical depth and ice crystal size that have been routinely retrieved from the satellite VIS-NIR two channel pair. PMID:18449323

  4. Optimally designed narrowband guided-mode resonance reflectance filters for mid-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jui-Nung; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Bhargava, Rohit; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    An alternative to the well-established Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, termed discrete frequency infrared (DFIR) spectrometry, has recently been proposed. This approach uses narrowband mid-infrared reflectance filters based on guided-mode resonance (GMR) in waveguide gratings, but filters designed and fabricated have not attained the spectral selectivity (≤ 32 cm−1) commonly employed for measurements of condensed matter using FT-IR spectroscopy. With the incorporation of dispersion and optical absorption of materials, we present here optimal design of double-layer surface-relief silicon nitride-based GMR filters in the mid-IR for various narrow bandwidths below 32 cm−1. Both shift of the filter resonance wavelengths arising from the dispersion effect and reduction of peak reflection efficiency and electric field enhancement due to the absorption effect show that the optical characteristics of materials must be taken into consideration rigorously for accurate design of narrowband GMR filters. By incorporating considerations for background reflections, the optimally designed GMR filters can have bandwidth narrower than the designed filter by the antireflection equivalence method based on the same index modulation magnitude, without sacrificing low sideband reflections near resonance. The reported work will enable use of GMR filters-based instrumentation for common measurements of condensed matter, including tissues and polymer samples. PMID:22109445

  5. Feasibility of far-infrared radiation modulators using high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.M.

    1996-12-31

    The potential of using high-{Tc} superconductors as intensity modulators for far-infrared radiation is investigated in this work. Reflectance and transmittance for several design structures are computed using the published optical constants of the superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and substrate materials. Notable differences in the reflectance and transmittance between the superconducting state and the normal state are illustrated. The best results are obtained based on the reflectance of thin films (10 nm--50 nm thick) on thin substrates (less than 100 {micro}m thick) and for radiation incident on the substrate. This study demonstrates that high-{Tc} superconductive thin films can be used to build far-infrared radiation modulators. Future experimental study is recommended in order to materialize this promising thermooptical device.

  6. Raman and infrared reflection spectroscopy in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, S.; Shirotani, I.

    1985-03-01

    The symmetry and energies of all optically active phonon modes in black phosphorous are determined by polarized Raman scattering and infrared reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The obtained energies are; 365 and 470 cm -1 for A g modes, 197 for B lg, 442 for B 2g, 223 and 440 for B 3g, 136 (TO) and 138 (LO) for B lu, and 468 (TO) and 470 (LO) for B 2u, respectively. The small TO-LO splitting is related to the charge transfer between phosphorus atoms induced by the atomic displacement.

  7. Design and realization of a contact-less interaction system based on infrared reflection photoelectric detection array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Lei, Bing; Feng, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Due to the good performance of high sensitivity, quick response and low cost, infrared reflection detection technology is widely used in various fields. In this work, we present a novel contact-less interaction system which is based on infrared reflection detection technology. The system is mainly composed of a Micro Controller Unit (MCU), upper computer and photoelectric detection module. The MCU is utilized to control the photoelectric detection module and to make sure that the sensing unit is lighted one by one in a given order. When the interactive object appears upon the infrared reflection photoelectric detection array, its position information will be ensured and sent to the upper computer through MCU. In this system, every sensing unit is lighted for 1ms, and the detection array includes 8×8 units. It means that the photoelectric detection array will scan 15.6 times per-second. The experimental research results indicate that the factors affecting the detection range including the working current of transmitting diode, modulation frequency, and the reflectivity of the interactive object. When the working current is 10mA, and the modulation frequency is 80 KHz, the system has a detection range of 20 cm. Moreover, efficient modulation and demodulation of optical signal is quite necessary to remove the influence of surrounding light.

  8. Far-infrared emissivity measurements of reflective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J.; Lange, A. E.; Bock, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    An instrument developed to measure the emissivity of reflective surfaces by comparing the thermal emission of a test sample to that of a reference surface is reported. The instrument can accurately measure the emissivity of mirrors made from lightweight thermally insulating materials such as glass and metallized carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Far infrared measurements at a wavelength of 165 micrometers are reported. The instrument has an absolute accuracy of Delta epsilon = 9 x 10(exp -4) and can reproducibly measure an emissivity of as small as 2 x 10(exp -4) between flat reflective surfaces. The instrument was used to measure mirror samples for balloon-borne and spaceborne experiments. An emissivity of (6.05 +/- 1.24) x 10(exp -3) was measured for gold evaporated on glass, and (6.75 +/- 1.17) x 10(exp -3) for aluminum evaporated on glass.

  9. Photo-induced reflectivity in the mid and far infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Haar, P.; Harrington, K.J.; Schwettman, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    Interest in switching FEL beams has motivated studies of photo-induced reflectivity in the mid and far infrared. We are particularly interested in Ge{sup 4}, GaAs, and Si{sup 5}, materials that can be pumped with a visible or near-IR conventional laser and which together cover the wavelengths from 3-100{mu}m. We have made quantitative measurements to determine the induced reflectivity, carrier lifetime, and transient absorption of these materials at several wavelengths across this range using a variety of pump laser wavelengths and pulse lengths. These measurements allow us to determine the feasibility of single pulse selection and cavity dumping with our FELs at high repetition rates.

  10. Infrared Observations of Temperature Modulations on the Hudson River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, S.; Anderson, S. P.; Zappa, C. J.; Smith, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The thermal boundary layer at the surface of a river is constantly disrupted and renewed by physical processes associated with convection, turbulence, wind stress, heat flux, and other environmental factors. These disruptions cause temperature modulations in the surface layer which can be measured with an infrared (IR) sensor. Over the course of two ten-day periods in August and November of 2010, we imaged the Hudson River from atop a nearby cliff using a large-format, mid-wave IR sensor. Time series imagery was collected for 5 to 10 minute periods, every 30 minutes for the entirety of each experiment. In the field of view, several in situ instruments were mounted to a steel piling driven into the river bed. Above and below the water surface, an array of instruments were installed to measure heat flux, wind speed, air and water temperature, current velocity, humidity, radiance, and conductivity. In this analysis, we investigate the relationship between the temperature modulations present in the IR imagery, which are associated with coherent features advecting with the mean flow, and the environmental parameters measured from our in situ instruments. The IR imagery from these experiments show a diverse range of temperature modulation patterns, on scales of 20cm to several tens of meters, often masked by the presence of surface waves. At low grazing angles, the IR images of the water surface are comprised of a combination of emitted radiance from temperature modulations on the surface and reflected radiance from the sky above. To separate out the emitted signal from the reflected signal, we employ a Fourier space filtering technique to exclude the variance in the imagery due to the surface waves. We find the remaining emitted signal to be correlated with wind speed and the air-water temperature difference, and weakly or uncorrelated with stratification and mean current speed. We report on both the signal processing technique used to extract the emitted signal from

  11. Narrowband Mid-infrared reflectance filters using guided mode resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Anil K.; Schulmerich, Matthew; Ip, Jason; Yen, Gary; Cunningham, Brian T.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to develop mid-infrared (IR) spectrometers for applications in which the absorbance of only a few vibrational mode (optical) frequencies needs to be recorded; unfortunately, there are limited alternatives for the same. The key requirement is the development of a means to access discretely a small set of spectral positions from the wideband thermal sources commonly used for spectroscopy. We present here the theory, design and practical realization of a new class of filters in the mid-infrared (IR) spectral regions based on using guided mode resonances (GMR) for narrowband optical reflection. A simple, periodic surface-relief configuration is chosen to enable both a spectral response and facile fabrication. A theoretical model based on rigorous coupled wave analysis is developed, incorporating anomalous dispersion of filter materials in the mid-IR spectral region. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, a set of four filters for a spectral region around the C-H stretching mode (2600–3000 cm−1) are fabricated and responses compared to theory. The reflectance spectra were well-predicted by the developed theory and results were found to be sensitive to the angle of incidence and dispersion characteristics of the material. In summary, the work reported here forms the basis for a rational design of filters that can prove useful for IR absorption spectroscopy. PMID:20527738

  12. Reflections on Designing a Biology/Humanities Interdisciplinary Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, David; Battey, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses the reflections of a recent workshop on biology and the humanities subject areas to consider the potential for designing a first year interdisciplinary module that brings together teachers and learners in the Biosciences with their counterparts in English and History. It considers three building blocks of module design: aims and…

  13. Inter-reflection Compensation of Immersive Projection Display by Spatio-Temporal Screen Reflectance Modulation.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shoichi; Iwai, Daisuke; Sato, Kosuke

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel inter-reflection compensation technique for immersive projection displays wherein we spatially modulate the reflectance pattern on the screen to improve the compensation performance of conventional methods. As the luminance of light reflected on a projection surface is mathematically represented as the multiplication of the illuminance of incident light and the surface reflectance, we can reduce undesirable intensity elevation because of inter-reflections by decreasing surface reflectance. Based on this principle, we improve conventional inter-reflection compensation techniques by applying reflectance pattern modulation. We realize spatial reflectance modulation of a projection screen by painting it with a photochromic compound, which changes its color (i.e., the reflectance of the screen) when ultraviolet (UV) light is applied and by controlling UV irradiation with a UV LED array placed behind the screen. The main contribution of this paper is a computational model to optimize a reflectance pattern for the accurate reproduction of a target appearance by decreasing the intensity elevation caused by inter-reflection while maintaining the maximum intensity of the target appearance. Through simulation and physical experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed model and confirm its advantage over conventional methods. PMID:26780805

  14. Infrared focal plane detector modules for space applications at AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Dominique; Hanna, Stefan; Thöt, Richard; Gassmann, Kai-Uwe; Haiml, Markus; Weber, Andreas; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Ziegler, Johann; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Fick, W.

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of this paper, AIM presents the actual status of some of its currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments for space applications covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) to the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) and very-long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP will be elaborated. Additionally dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC will be addressed.

  15. Modulation method for infrared communication based on a MEMS Planck infrared source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hongjing; Ma, Li; Sun, Guofeng; Jia, Jun

    2012-12-01

    Infrared communication in the near ground free space has both military and civilian potential. To meet the requirements of infrared communication based on a micro-electro-mechanical system Planck infrared source/radiator, we propose a modulation method with large code information content, strong confidentiality, and a high recognition rate. With the characteristics of mid-infrared light, a long-range and anti-EMI wireless communication system is available. The information code is loaded on the carrier signal generated by the infrared source with specific frequency. Taking a 3×3 array system for an instance in our work, the design principle and implementation procedure of encoding and modulation is discussed. The total information content of the optical dynamic code is 1.5 kbytes. The communication system could transmit data in the bound rate of 900 bit/s with a photoelectric code recognition rate of 96.4% and an effective information content of 190 bytes.

  16. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  17. Modulation transfer function for infrared reflectarrays.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pedrero, Jose Antonio; Ginn, James; Alda, Javier; Boreman, Glenn

    2011-09-20

    The quality of the image produced by optical reflectarrays as a function of the F/#, polarization, and wavelength is analyzed in this paper. The results are expressed as monochromatic and polychromatic modulation transfer functions. They show that large aperture multilevel reflectarrays perform quite close to the diffraction-limited case. The chromatic aberrations make these elements highly wavelength-selective. PMID:21947056

  18. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Analysis of silage composition by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, James B., III; Blosser, Timothy H.; Colenbrander, V. F.

    1991-02-01

    Two studies were performed to investigate the feasibility of using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) with undried silages. In the first study silages were analyzed for major components (e. g. dry matter crude protein and other forms of nitrogen fiber and in vitro digestible dry matter) and short chain fatty acids (SCFA). NIRS was found to operate satisfactorily except for some forms of nitrogen and SCFA. In study two various methods of grinding spectral regions and sample presentation were examined. Undried Wiley ground samples in a rectangular cell gave the best overall results for non-dry ice undried grinds with wavelengths between 1100 and 2498 nm. Silages scanned after drying however produced the best results. Intact samples did not perform as well as ground samples and wavelengths below 1100 nm were of little use. 2 .

  20. Aerosol collection and analysis using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Wong, Diane M.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Williams, Barry R.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Manning, Christopher J.

    2004-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is routinely employed for the identification of organic molecules and, more recently, for the classification of biological materials. We have developed a sample collection method that facilitates infrared analysis of airborne particulates using a diffuse reflectance (DR) technique. Efforts are underway to extend the method to include simultaneous analysis of vapor phase organics by using adsorbent substrates compatible with the DR technique. This series of laboratory results provides proof-of-principle for both the sample collection and data collection processes. Signal processing of the DR spectra is shown to provide rapid qualitative identification of representative aerosol materials, including particulate matter commonly found in the environment. We compare the results for such materials as bacterial spores, pollens and molds, clays and dusts, smoke and soot. Background correction analysis is shown to be useful for differentiation and identification of these constituents. Issues relating to complex mixtures of environmental samples under highly variable conditions are considered. Instrumentation development and materials research are now underway with the aim of constructing a compact sampling system for near real-time monitoring of aerosol and organic pollutants. A miniature, tilt-compensated Fourier transform spectrometer will provide spectroscopic interrogation. A series of advanced digital signal processing methods are also under development to enhance the sensor package. The approach will be useful for industrial applications, chemical and biological agent detection, and environmental monitoring for chemical vapors, hazardous air pollutants, and allergens.

  1. Detection of cracks on tomatoes using hyperspectral near-infrared reflectance imaging system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of hyperspectral near-infrared (NIR) reflectance imaging techniques for detection of cuticle cracks on tomatoes. A hyperspectral near-infrared reflectance imaging system in the region of 1000-1700 nm was used to obtain hyperspectral reflectance ima...

  2. Improved optical resonance in mid-infrared GaAs-based modulating retro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikpe, Stanley; Triplett, Gregory

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we studied a mid-infrared modulating retro-reflector (MRR) design that is GaAs-based because of the flexibility to monolithically incorporate reflective optics along with quantum well modulator region. Using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy, we produced MRR devices, where the GaAs quantum well(s) in the modulator region contained AlxGa1-xAs barriers to tune the wavelength selectivity beyond three microns. The width of the quantum well was also adjusted in order to achieve free electron absorption within the confined energy subbands and modified by way of the quantum confined Stark effect. When the applied electric field varies in polarity, intensity, or frequency, the fabricated MRRs behave as an optional shutter--absorbing or transmitting the incident mid-infrared energy depending on the applied field. Our work shows that the ability for the modulating region to effectively act as a shutter for mid-infrared radiation depends on the number of cascading quantum wells, though increasing the number of wells directly increases the overall thickness of the modulating region and adversely affects the reflected power of the mid-infrared modulated beam. The shutter operation was achieved by applying an alternating square bias across the QWM region, and the speed at which the quantum wells switch from absorbing to non-absorbing was dependent on the physical size of the device. Increasing the physical size increases the associated device capacitance. The maximum achievable contrast ratio for these devices is calculated to be 1.6:1 for applied voltages between 12V and 25V.

  3. Modulated optical reflectance method for analysis of magnetoelectric nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, V.; Penchev, S.; Nedkov, I.; Kutzarova, T.; Naboko, V.

    2010-04-01

    A recently developed technique of modulated optical reflectance and its applicability to structural and defectoscopic analysis with high spatial resolution of the ferromagnetic LSMO materials is reported. The variation of the optical reflectance is measured within the active area in the laser focus on the surface of the thin film subjected to photothermal modulation. The measurement described is indicative of the magnetoelectric properties of the sample films and is found to be proportional to the thermal variations of the conductance and free carrier density.

  4. Near-infrared distributed feedback solgel lasers by intensity modulation and polarization modulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Dong, Hongxing; Fan, Jintai; Li, Rihong; Zhang, Long; Wong, King Y

    2011-11-20

    Near-infrared distributed feedback (DFB) laser actions of Oxazine 725 dye in zirconia thin films and in silica bulks were investigated. Intensity modulation and polarization modulation were used to generate the DFB lasing. Wideband tuning of the output wavelength was achieved by varying the period of the modulation generated by a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. Tuning ranges were 716-778 nm and 724-813 nm for the thin film lasers and the bulk lasers, respectively. The laser output showed different polarization characteristics and threshold energy variation when the feedback mechanism was changed from intensity modulation to polarization modulation. PMID:22108883

  5. Plasmonic nanostructured metal-oxide-semiconductor reflection modulators.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Anthony; Chen, Chengkun; Hassan, Sa'ad; Lisicka-Skrzek, Ewa; Tait, R Niall; Berini, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    We propose a plasmonic surface that produces an electrically controlled reflectance as a high-speed intensity modulator. The device is conceived as a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor on silicon with its metal structured as a thin patch bearing a contiguous nanoscale grating. The metal structure serves multiple functions as a driving electrode and as a grating coupler for perpendicularly incident p-polarized light to surface plasmons supported by the patch. Modulation is produced by charging and discharging the capacitor and exploiting the carrier refraction effect in silicon along with the high sensitivity of strongly confined surface plasmons to index perturbations. The area of the modulator is set by the area of the incident beam, leading to a very compact device for a strongly focused beam (∼2.5 μm in diameter). Theoretically, the modulator can operate over a broad electrical bandwidth (tens of gigahertz) with a modulation depth of 3 to 6%, a loss of 3 to 4 dB, and an optical bandwidth of about 50 nm. About 1000 modulators can be integrated over a 50 mm(2) area producing an aggregate electro-optic modulation rate in excess of 1 Tb/s. We demonstrate experimentally modulators operating at telecommunications wavelengths, fabricated as nanostructured Au/HfO2/p-Si capacitors. The modulators break conceptually from waveguide-based devices and belong to the same class of devices as surface photodetectors and vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers. PMID:25730698

  6. Mapping polarons in polymer FETs by charge modulation microscopy in the mid-infrared

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Xin Yu; Yin, Jun; Wang, Zilong; Caironi, Mario; Soci, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    We implemented spatial mapping of charge carrier density in the channel of a conventional polymer Field-Effect Transistor (FET) by mid-infrared Charge Modulation Spectroscopy (CMS). CMS spectra are recorded with a high sensitivity confocal Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) microscope by probing electroinduced Infra-Red Active Vibrational (IRAV) modes and low-energy polaron bands in the spectral region 680–4000 cm−1. Thanks to the high specificity and strong oscillator strength of these modes, charge-induced reflectance measurements allow quantitative estimation of charge carrier densities within the FET channel, without the need for amplitude or phase modulation. This is illustrated by identifying the contribution of intrinsic and electrostatically induced polarons to conduction, and by mapping the polaron spatial distribution in a P3HT (Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)) FET channel under different drain-source bias conditions. This work demonstrates the potential of mid-infrared charge modulation microscopy to characterize carrier injection and transport in semiconducting polymer materials. PMID:24406635

  7. Mapping polarons in polymer FETs by charge modulation microscopy in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Yin, Jun; Wang, Zilong; Caironi, Mario; Soci, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    We implemented spatial mapping of charge carrier density in the channel of a conventional polymer Field-Effect Transistor (FET) by mid-infrared Charge Modulation Spectroscopy (CMS). CMS spectra are recorded with a high sensitivity confocal Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) microscope by probing electroinduced Infra-Red Active Vibrational (IRAV) modes and low-energy polaron bands in the spectral region 680-4000 cm-1. Thanks to the high specificity and strong oscillator strength of these modes, charge-induced reflectance measurements allow quantitative estimation of charge carrier densities within the FET channel, without the need for amplitude or phase modulation. This is illustrated by identifying the contribution of intrinsic and electrostatically induced polarons to conduction, and by mapping the polaron spatial distribution in a P3HT (Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)) FET channel under different drain-source bias conditions. This work demonstrates the potential of mid-infrared charge modulation microscopy to characterize carrier injection and transport in semiconducting polymer materials.

  8. Mid- Versus Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for On-Site Determination of Soil Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has demonstrated that the determination of soil C diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is often more accurate and produces more robust calibrations than near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) when analyzing ground, dry soils. DRIFTS is also not ...

  9. Near- and Mid-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for the Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several decades near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to determine the composition of a variety of agricultural products. More recently, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) has similarly been shown to be able to determine the co...

  10. Electronic modulation of infrared radiation in graphene plasmonic resonators.

    PubMed

    Brar, Victor W; Sherrott, Michelle C; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Seyoon; Kim, Laura; Choi, Mansoo; Sweatlock, Luke A; Atwater, Harry A

    2015-01-01

    All matter at finite temperatures emits electromagnetic radiation due to the thermally induced motion of particles and quasiparticles. Dynamic control of this radiation could enable the design of novel infrared sources; however, the spectral characteristics of the radiated power are dictated by the electromagnetic energy density and emissivity, which are ordinarily fixed properties of the material and temperature. Here we experimentally demonstrate tunable electronic control of blackbody emission from graphene plasmonic resonators on a silicon nitride substrate. It is shown that the graphene resonators produce antenna-coupled blackbody radiation, which manifests as narrow spectral emission peaks in the mid-infrared. By continuously varying the nanoresonator carrier density, the frequency and intensity of these spectral features can be modulated via an electrostatic gate. This work opens the door for future devices that may control blackbody radiation at timescales beyond the limits of conventional thermo-optic modulation. PMID:25948173

  11. Laboratory Infrared Optical Constants and Reflectance Spectra of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Karly M.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Speck, A. K.

    2006-12-01

    The observed SiC features in astronomical IR spectra of carbon stars (C-stars) correlate with thin-film IR absorption spectra of β-SiC, the polytype most commonly found as presolar grains in meteorites. Comparison between spectra of astronomical sources and laboratory compounds alone is also not sufficient to assess the relative contributions of different minerals to a given observed spectrum: radiative transfer modeling must be performed (cf. Thompson et al. 2006, ApJ, 652, in press). For C-star spectra, radiative transfer modeling is impeded by the lack of trustworthy SiC optical constants for both β and α polytypes. To address the need for improved dust composition parameters, we measured midand far-infrared room temperature reflectance spectra for several polytypes and orientations (E perpendicular to c, E parallel to c) of commercially manufactured SiC: semiconductor grade purity 3C (β-)SiC, several colors of 6H (α-SiC), and synthetic moissanite (α-SiC). The extremely high reflectivity was connected with discrepancies existing among previous absorption laboratory spectra from thin films, crystallites, and powders. We extracted the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (m(λ) = n(λ) + ik(λ)) from these data using classical dispersion analyses [Spitzer et al. 1962] and supplied these results to 1-D radiative transfer models (DUSTY; Ivezic & Elitzur 1995; Nenkova et al. 2000) to determine how the emerging spectrum should change in response to our n(λ) and k(λ) and other dust shell parameters (effective stellar temperature, inner dust shell temperature, optical depth). The results of this work have direct application to carbon-rich AGB stellar outflows, novae, supernovae, and potentially proto-planetary nebulae and may further our understanding of the contribution of SiC to carbon star spectra and the lack of SiC features in the ISM. Work supported by NASA APRA04-000-0041, NSF-AST 0607418, and performed under contract to NASA.

  12. Determination of plant silicon content with near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Smis, Adriaan; Ancin Murguzur, Francisco Javier; Struyf, Eric; Soininen, Eeva M.; Herranz Jusdado, Juan G.; Meire, Patrick; Bråthen, Kari Anne

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most common elements in the earth bedrock, and its continental cycle is strongly biologically controlled. Yet, research on the biogeochemical cycle of Si in ecosystems is hampered by the time and cost associated with the currently used chemical analysis methods. Here, we assessed the suitability of Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring Si content in plant tissues. NIR spectra depend on the characteristics of the present bonds between H and N, C and O, which can be calibrated against concentrations of various compounds. Because Si in plants always occurs as hydrated condensates of orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), linked to organic biomolecules, we hypothesized that NIRS is suitable for measuring Si content in plants across a range of plant species. We based our testing on 442 samples of 29 plant species belonging to a range of growth forms. We calibrated the NIRS method against a well-established plant Si analysis method by using partial least-squares regression. Si concentrations ranged from detection limit (0.24 ppmSi) to 7.8% Si on dry weight and were well predicted by NIRS. The model fit with validation data was good across all plant species (n = 141, R2 = 0.90, RMSEP = 0.24), but improved when only graminoids were modeled (n = 66, R2 = 0.95, RMSEP = 0.10). A species specific model for the grass Deschampsia cespitosa showed even slightly better results than the model for all graminoids (n = 16, R2 = 0.93, RMSEP = 0.015). We show for the first time that NIRS is applicable for determining plant Si concentration across a range of plant species and growth forms, and represents a time- and cost-effective alternative to the chemical Si analysis methods. As NIRS can be applied concurrently to a range of plant organic constituents, it opens up unprecedented research possibilities for studying interrelations between Si and other plant compounds in vegetation, and for addressing the role of Si in ecosystems across a range of Si

  13. Reversible modulated mid-infrared absorption of Ag/TiO{sub 2} by photoinduced interfacial charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S. C. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn; Li, L.; Pan, S. S.; Luo, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. X.; Li, G. H. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn

    2014-10-06

    An enhanced mid-infrared absorption in Ag nanoparticles-decorated TiO{sub 2} microflowers was reported. It was found that the mid-infrared absorption of the Ag/TiO{sub 2} complex depends strongly on the content and size of Ag nanoparticles, the higher the Ag nanoparticles content, the stronger the infrared absorption. The average reflectivity in the entire mid-infrared region of the microflowers drops from 57.6% to 10.5% after Ag nanoparticles decoration. Reversible modulated mid-infrared absorption properties were found in the Ag/TiO{sub 2} complexes upon alternative illumination of visible and UV light due to the photoinduced interfacial electron transfer between TiO{sub 2} semiconductor and Ag nanoparticles.

  14. Femtosecond measurements of near-infrared pulse induced mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Hong; Liu, Sheng; Lalanne, Elaine; Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Xiaojun; Johnson, Anthony M.

    2014-05-26

    We temporally resolved the ultrafast mid-infrared transmission modulation of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using a near-infrared pump/mid-infrared probe technique at room temperature. Two different femtosecond wavelength pumps were used with photon energy above and below the quantum well (QW) bandgap. The shorter wavelength pump modulates the mid-infrared probe transmission through interband transition assisted mechanisms, resulting in a high transmission modulation depth and several nanoseconds recovery lifetime. In contrast, pumping with a photon energy below the QW bandgap induces a smaller transmission modulation depth but much faster (several picoseconds) recovery lifetime, attributed to intersubband transition assisted mechanisms. The latter ultrafast modulation (>60 GHz) could provide a potential way to realize fast QCL based free space optical communication.

  15. Modulation transfer function of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Hill, C. J.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.; Höglund, L.; Luong, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this presentation we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of 1024x1024 pixels mid-wavelength and long-wavelength quantum well infrared photodetector, and 320x256 pixels long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). Long wavelength Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) based on InAs/GaSb superlattice material is hybridized to recently designed and fabricated 320x256 pixel format ROIC. The n-type CBIRD was characterized in terms of performance and thermal stability. The experimentally measured NEΔT of the 8.8μm cutoff n-CBIRD FPA was 18.6 mK with 300 K background and f/2 cold stop at 78K FPA operating temperature. The horizontal and vertical MTFs of this pixel fully delineated CBIRD FPA at Nyquist frequency are 49% and 52%, respectively.

  16. Tree Canopy Characterization for EO-1 Reflective and Thermal Infrared Validation Studies: Rochester, New York

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.; Smith, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The tree canopy characterization presented herein provided ground and tree canopy data for different types of tree canopies in support of EO-1 reflective and thermal infrared validation studies. These characterization efforts during August and September of 2001 included stem and trunk location surveys, tree structure geometry measurements, meteorology, and leaf area index (LAI) measurements. Measurements were also collected on thermal and reflective spectral properties of leaves, tree bark, leaf litter, soil, and grass. The data presented in this report were used to generate synthetic reflective and thermal infrared scenes and images that were used for the EO-1 Validation Program. The data also were used to evaluate whether the EO-1 ALI reflective channels can be combined with the Landsat-7 ETM+ thermal infrared channel to estimate canopy temperature, and also test the effects of separating the thermal and reflective measurements in time resulting from satellite formation flying.

  17. Characterization and Application of a Grazing Angle Objective for Quantitative Infrared Reflection Microspectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.

    1995-01-01

    A grazing angle objective on an infrared microspectrometer is studied for quantitative spectroscopy by considering the angular dependence of the incident intensity within the objective's angular aperture. The assumption that there is no angular dependence is tested by comparing the experimental reflectance of Si and KBr surfaces with the reflectance calculated by integrating the Fresnel reflection coefficient over the angular aperture under this assumption. Good agreement was found, indicating that the specular reflectance of surfaces can straight-forwardly be quantitatively integrated over the angular aperture without considering non-uniform incident intensity. This quantitative approach is applied to the thickness determination of dipcoated Krytox on gold. The infrared optical constants of both materials are known, allowing the integration to be carried out. The thickness obtained is in fair agreement with the value determined by ellipsometry in the visible. Therefore, this paper illustrates a method for more quantitative use of a grazing angle objective for infrared reflectance microspectroscopy.

  18. Accurate diffuse reflection measurements in the infrared spectral range.

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Erb, W

    1987-11-01

    A sphere arrangement for directional-hemispherical reflectance measurements in the 1-15-microm wavelength range is tested for its accuracy. Comparative measurements with the fundamental PTB sphere reflectometer in the overlapping spectral range between 1.0 and 1.1 microm indicate no systematic measurement uncertainties of the new device. The uncertainty of the reflectance measured by it is therefrom deduced to be +/-0.01 for the 1-5.6-microm wavelength range. PMID:20523415

  19. Social exclusion modulates pre-reflective interpersonal body representation.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Ettore; Blomberg, Olle; Mandrigin, Alisa; Costantini, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Perception of affordance is enhanced not only when that object is located in one's own peripersonal space, as compared to when it is located within extrapersonal space, but also when the object is located in another person's peripersonal space [as measured by a spatial alignment effect (SAE)]. It has been suggested that this reflects the existence of an interpersonal body representation (IBR) that allows us to represent the perceptual states and action possibilities of others. Here, we address the question of whether IBR can be modulated by higher level/reflective social cognition, such as judgments about one's own social status. Participants responded with either the right or the left hand as soon as a go signal appeared. The go signal screen contained a task-irrelevant stimulus consisting of a 3D scene in which a mug with a left- or right-facing handle was positioned on a table. The mug was positioned either inside or outside the reaching space of the participants. In a third of the trials, the mug was positioned within the reaching space of an avatar seated at the table. Prior to this task we induced an experience of social ostracism in half of the participants by means of a standardized social exclusion condition. The results were that the SAE that normally occurs when the mug is in the avatar's reaching space is extinguished by the induced social exclusion. This indicates that judgments about one's own social status modulate the effect of IBR. PMID:23307152

  20. Comments on a peak of AlxGa1-xN observed by infrared reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, G.; Engelbrecht, J. A. A.; Lee, M. E.; Wagener, M. C.; Henry, A.

    2016-05-01

    AlxGa1-xN epilayers, grown on c-plane oriented sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), were evaluated using FTIR infrared reflectance spectroscopy. A peak at ∼850 cm-1 in the reflectance spectra, not reported before, was observed. Possible origins for this peak are considered and discussed.

  1. NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMISSION AND REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY FOR DETERMINATION OF DIETARY FIBER IN BARLEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley. The Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and the NIR Systems 6500 monochromator were used to obtain transmission and reflectance spectra, respectiv...

  2. Optical diffuse reflectance accessory for measurements of skin tissue by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, R.; Heise, H. M.

    1995-02-01

    An optimized accessory for measuring the diffuse reflectance spectra of human skin tissue in the near-infrared spectral range is presented. The device includes an on-axis ellipsoidal collecting mirror with efficient illumination optics for small sampling areas of bulky body specimens. The optical design is supported by the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the reflectance characteristics of skin tissue. Because the results evolved from efforts to measure blood glucose noninvasively, the main emphasis is placed on the long-wavelength near-infrared range where sufficient penetration depth for radiation into tissue is still available. The accessory is applied for in vivo diffuse reflectance measurements.

  3. Polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional Gaussian sea surfaces with surface reflections.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe

    2011-08-10

    Surface reflection is an important phenomenon that must be taken into account when studying sea surface infrared emissivity, especially at large observation angles. This paper models analytically the polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional sea surfaces with shadowing effect and one surface reflection, by assuming a Gaussian surface slope distribution. A Monte Carlo ray-tracing method is employed as a reference. It is shown that the present model agrees well with the reference method. The emissivity calculated by the present model is then compared with measurements. The comparisons show that agreements are greatly improved by taking one surface reflection into account. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of sea surface infrared emissivity with two and three reflections are also determined. Their contributions are shown to be negligible. PMID:21833139

  4. The spatial distribution of infrared radiation from visible reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luan, Ling; Werner, Michael W.; Dwek, Eli; Sellgren, Kris

    1989-01-01

    The emission at IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands of reflection nebulae is far in excess of that expected from the longer wavelength equilibrium thermal emission. The excess emission in the IRAS 12 micron band is a general phenomenon, seen in various components of interstellar medium such as IR cirrus clouds, H II regions, atomic and molecular clouds, and also normal spiral galaxies. This excess emission has been attributed to UV excited fluorescence in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules or to the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small grains. Results are presented of studies of IRAS data on reflection nebulae selected from the van den Bergh reflection nebulae sample. Detailed scans of flux ratio and color temperature across the nebulae were obtained in order to study the spatial distribution of IR emission. A model was used to predict the spatial distribution of IR emission from dust grains illuminated by a B type star. The model was also used to explore the excitation of the IRAS 12 micron band emission as a function of stellar temperature. The model predictions are in good agreement with the analysis of reflection nebulae, illuminated by stars with stellar temperature ranging from 21,000 down to 3,000 K.

  5. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    A model has been developed for reflection nebulae around luminous IR sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The shape of the IR spectrum is shown to be the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of the model results with IR observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse ISM, or consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains. By adding water-ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, the 3.08 micron ice-band feature observed in the spectra of several IR reflection nebulae has been modeled. It is shown that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains.

  6. Measurement of the modulation transfer function of infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzannes, Alexis P.; Mooney, Jonathan M.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of starting PtSi infrared cameras is characterized based on estimating their spatial frequency response. Applying a modified knife-edge technique, we arrive at an estimate of the edge spread function (ESF), which is used to obtain a profile through the center of the 2-D modulation transfer function (MTF). Using this technique, the complete system MTF in the horizontal and vertical direction is measured for various imaging systems. The influence of charge transfer efficiency (CTE) on the knife-edge measurement and resulting MTF is also modeled and discussed. An estimate of the CTE can actually be obtained from the shape of the ESF in the horizontal direction. In addition, we demonstrate that this technique can be used as a filed measurement. By applying the technique at long range, the MTF of the atmosphere can be measured.

  7. Measurement of leaf relative water content by infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.; Rock, Barrett N.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    From basic considerations and Beer's law, a leaf water content index incorporating reflectances of wavelengths from 0.76 to 0.90 microns and from 1.55 to 1.75 microns was developed that relates leaf reflectance to leaf relative water content. For the leaf succulent, Agave deserti, the leaf water content index was not significantly different from the relative water content for either individual leaves or an entire plant. Also, the relative water contents of intact plants of Encelia farinosa and Hilaria rigida in the field were estimated by the leaf water content index; variations in the proportion of living to dead leaf area could cause large errors in the estimate of relative water content. Thus, the leaf water content index may be able to estimate average relative water content of canopies when TM4 and TM5 are measured at a known relative water content and fraction of dead leaf material.

  8. Electro-optic modulator for infrared laser using gallium arsenide crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. E.

    1968-01-01

    Gallium arsenide electro-optic modulator used for infrared lasers has a mica quarter-wave plate and two calcite polarizers to amplitude or phase modulate an infrared laser light source in the wavelength range from 1 to 3 microns. The large single crystal has uniformly high resistivities, is strain free, and comparable in quality to good optical glass.

  9. Spectrally Selective Photocapacitance Modulation in Plasmonic Nanochannels for Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ya-Lun; Huang, Li-Chung; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2016-05-11

    The optical response of subwavelength plasmonic structures can be used to monitor minute changes in their physical, chemical, and biological environments with high performance for sensing. The optical response in the far field is governed by the near-field properties of plasmon resonances. Sharp, tunable resonances can be obtained by controlling the shape of the structure and by using resonant cavities. However, microintegration of plasmonic structures on chips is difficult because of the readout in the far field. As such, structures that form an electrical microcircuit and directly monitor the near-field variation would be more desirable. Here, we report on an electronically readable photocapacitor based on a plasmonic nanochannel structure with high spectral resolution and a large modulation capability. The structure consists of metallic U-cavities and semiconductor channels, which are used to focus and confine light at the semiconductor-metal interfaces. At these interfaces, light is efficiently converted into photocarriers that change the electrical impedance of the structure. The capacitance modulation of the structure in response to light produces a light-to-dark contrast ratio larger than 10(3). A reflectance spectrum with a bandwidth of 16 nm and a 6% modulation depth is detected using a reactance variation of 3 kΩ with the same bandwidth. This photocapacitor design offers a practical means of monitoring changes induced by the near field and thus could be deployed in pixel arrays of image sensors for miniaturized spectroscopic applications. PMID:27120263

  10. Infrared reflectivity spectra of GaS 1-xSe x mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, V.; Neumann, H.; Sobotta, H.; Lévy, F.

    1980-04-01

    Infrared reflectivity spectra of GaS 1- xSe x mixed crystals are measured for E ‖ c in the wavenumber range from 180 to 4000 cm -1. Two-mode behaviour is found for the infrared active optical modes. The composition dependence of the mode frequencies can be described by the MREI model if a nonlinear change of the force constants with composition is assumed.

  11. Determination of styrene-butadiene rubber composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. S.; Kiselev, S. A.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Budeeva, A. V.; Mashukov, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    A rapid method for determining the composition of styrene-butadiene rubber using attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was proposed. PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and infrared transmission spectroscopy were used as absolute techniques for determining the compositions of calibration samples. It was shown that the method was applicable to a wide range of styrene-butadiene rubbers, did not require additional sample preparation, and was easily reproducible.

  12. Investigation of Latent Traces Using Infrared Reflectance Hyperspectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Till; Wenzel, Susanne; Roscher, Ribana; Stachniss, Cyrill

    2016-06-01

    The detection of traces is a main task of forensics. Hyperspectral imaging is a potential method from which we expect to capture more fluorescence effects than with common forensic light sources. This paper shows that the use of hyperspectral imaging is suited for the analysis of latent traces and extends the classical concept to the conservation of the crime scene for retrospective laboratory analysis. We examine specimen of blood, semen and saliva traces in several dilution steps, prepared on cardboard substrate. As our key result we successfully make latent traces visible up to dilution factor of 1:8000. We can attribute most of the detectability to interference of electromagnetic light with the water content of the traces in the shortwave infrared region of the spectrum. In a classification task we use several dimensionality reduction methods (PCA and LDA) in combination with a Maximum Likelihood classifier, assuming normally distributed data. Further, we use Random Forest as a competitive approach. The classifiers retrieve the exact positions of labelled trace preparation up to highest dilution and determine posterior probabilities. By modelling the classification task with a Markov Random Field we are able to integrate prior information about the spatial relation of neighboured pixel labels.

  13. Surface temperature correction for active infrared reflectance measurements of natural materials.

    PubMed

    Snyder, W C; Wan, Z

    1996-05-01

    Land surface temperature algorithms for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer satellite instrument will require the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of natural surfaces in the thermal infrared. We designed the spectral infrared bidirectional reflectance and emissivity instrument to provide such measurements by the use of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. A problem we encountered is the unavoidable surface heating caused by the source irradiance. For our system, the effects of the heating can cause a 30% error in the measured BRDF The error caused by heating is corrected by temporally curve fitting the radiance signal. This curve-fitting technique isolates the radiance caused by reflected irradiance. With this correction, other factors dominate the BRDF error. It is now ~5% and can be improved further. The method is illustrated with measurements of soil BRDF. PMID:21085353

  14. Mid-infrared wavelength- and frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a pump-modulated singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, I. D.; Groß, P.; Lee, C. J.; Adhimoolam, B.; Boller, K.-J.

    2006-12-01

    We describe the implementation of the wavelength- and frequency-modulation spectroscopy techniques using a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a fiber-amplified diode laser. Frequency modulation of the diode laser was transferred to the OPO’s mid-infrared idler output, avoiding the need for external modulation devices. This approach thus provides a means of implementing these important techniques with powerful, widely tunable, mid-infrared sources while retaining the simple, flexible modulation properties of diode lasers.

  15. Isoconversion effective activation energy profiles by variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel R; White, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Thermal process characterization based on calculating effective activation energies from variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (VT-DRIFTS) measurements is demonstrated. Experimental factors that affect the accuracies of activation energy values are outlined. Infrared radiation scattering efficiency, thermal conductivity, and inertness towards chemical reactions are factors that should be considered when selecting an appropriate diluent for preparing samples. The Kubelka-Munk representation is superior to apparent absorbance when baseline variations in spectra measured at different temperatures can be minimized. Variable-temperature infrared spectral features, such as integrated absorption band area, can be used to compute isoconversion effective activation energies, provided that measured quantities are proportional to species concentrations. PMID:18230216

  16. Catheter based mid-infrared reflectance and reflectance generated absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2013-10-29

    A method of characterizing conditions in a tissue, by (a) providing a catheter that has a light source that emits light in selected wavenumbers within the range of mid-IR spectrum; (b) directing the light from the catheter to an area of tissue at a location inside a blood vessel of a subject; (c) collecting light reflected from the location and generating a reflectance spectra; and (d) comparing the reflectance spectra to a reference spectra of normal tissue, whereby a location having an increased number of absorbance peaks at said selected wavenumbers indicates a tissue inside the blood vessel containing a physiological marker for atherosclerosis.

  17. [Application of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to the detection and identification of transgenic corn].

    PubMed

    Rui, Yu-kui; Luo, Yun-bo; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhang, Lu-da

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of the GMO, more and more GMO food has been pouring into the market. Much attention has been paid to GMO labeling under the controversy of GMO safety. Transgenic corns and their parents were scanned by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy range of 12000-4000 cm(-1); the resolution was 4 cm(-1); scanning was carried out for 64 times; BP algorithm was applied for data processing. The GMO food was easily resolved. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is unpolluted and inexpensive compared with PCR and ELISA, so it is a very promising detection method for GMO food. PMID:16395887

  18. Differences in visible and near-infrared light reflectance between orange fruit and leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Berumen, A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective was to find the best time during the season (April 26, 1972 to January 8, 1973) to distinguish orange fruit from leaves by spectrophotometrically determining at 10-day intervals when the difference in visible (550- and 650-nm wavelengths) and near-infrared (850-nm wavelength) light reflectance between fruit and nearby leaves was largest. December 5 to January 8 was the best time to distinguish fruit from leaves. During this period the fruit's color was rapidly changing from green to yellow, and the difference in visible light reflectance between fruit and leaves was largest. The difference in near-infrared reflectance between leaves and fruit remained essentially constant during ripening when the difference in visible light reflectance between leaves and fruit was largest.

  19. Near Infrared 45°/0° Reflectance Factor of Pressed Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Powder

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Maria E.; Barnes, P. Yvonne

    1999-01-01

    Pressed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) powder is commonly used as a reflectance standard for bidirectional and hemispherical geometries. The wavelength dependence of the reflectance factor of PTFE is presented for the near-infrared spectral region (800 nm to 1600 nm) for the 45°/0° geometry, as well as in the visible spectral region (380 nm to 800 nm) for comparison with previously published results.

  20. A Multi-Wavelength Thermal Infrared and Reflectance Scene Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, J. R., Jr.; Smith, J. A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several theoretical calculations are presented and our approach discussed for simulating overall composite scene thermal infrared exitance and canopy bidirectional reflectance of a forest canopy. Calculations are performed for selected wavelength bands of the DOE Multispectral Thermal Imagery and comparisons with atmospherically corrected MTI imagery are underway. NASA EO-1 Hyperion observations also are available and the favorable comparison of our reflective model results with these data are reported elsewhere.

  1. PRINCIPAL COMPONENT REGRESSION OF NEAR-INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTRA FOR BEEF TENDERNESS PREDICTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tenderness is the most important factor affecting consumer perception of eating quality of meat. In this paper, the development of the principal component regression (PCR) models to relate near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra of raw meat to Warner-Bratzler (WB) shear force measurement of cooked m...

  2. Near-infrared transmission and reflectance spectroscopy for the measurement of dietary fiber in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars. A Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and an NIR Systems 6500 spectrometer were used to obtain transmission and ref...

  3. Near infrared reflectance-based tools for predicting soil chemical properties of Oklahoma grazinglands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has potential to provide timely, and lower cost estimates of soil properties than current laboratory techniques. This study defined the capacity of NIRS to predict soil organic matter (SOM), total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in native prairie (n=3) and c...

  4. Low-resolution mid-infrared reflection analysis for discernment of contaminants in seed cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminants often decrease cotton quality, which subsequently decrease cotton profitability. In this research, a low-resolution mid-infrared reflection instrument was designed and constructed by using only four different wavelengths to accomplish good separation of cotton samples from 14 contaminan...

  5. TETRACHLORODIBENZODIOXIN ISOMER DIFFERENTIATION BY MICRO DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY AT THE LOW NANOGRAM LEVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infrared diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded for the 22 tetrachlorodibenzodioxin isomers (TCDDs). By use of micro-DRIFT techniques and signal averaging, identifiable spectra for each of the isomers were achieved at low nanogram levels. Spectral features in the 1200/cm to 16...

  6. Durable silver mirror with ultra-violet thru far infra-red reflection

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.

    2010-11-23

    A durable highly reflective silver mirror characterized by high reflectance in a broad spectral range of about 300 nm in the UV to the far infrared (.about.10000 nm), as well as exceptional environmental durability. A high absorptivity metal underlayer is used which prevents the formation of a galvanic cell with a silver layer while increasing the reflectance of the silver layer. Environmentally durable overcoat layers are provided to enhance mechanical and chemical durability and protect the silver layer from corrosion and tarnishing, for use in a wide variety of surroundings or climates, including harsh or extreme environments.

  7. Modeling thermal infrared (2-14 micrometer) reflectance spectra of frost and snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Andrew E.

    1994-01-01

    Existing theories of radiative transfer in close-packed media assume that each particle scatters independently of its neighbors. For opaque particles, such as are common in the thermal infrared, this assumption is not valid, and these radiative transfer theories will not be accurate. A new method is proposed, called 'diffraction subtraction', which modifies the scattering cross section of close-packed large, opaque spheres to account for the effect of close packing on the diffraction cross section of a scattering particle. This method predicts the thermal infrared reflectance of coarse (greater than 50 micrometers radius), disaggregated granular snow. However, such coarse snow is typically old and metamorphosed, with adjacent grains welded together. The reflectance of such a welded block can be described as partly Fresnel in nature and cannot be predicted using Mie inputs to radiative transfer theory. Owing to the high absorption coefficient of ice in the thermal infrared, a rough surface reflectance model can be used to calculate reflectance from such a block. For very small (less than 50 micrometers), disaggregated particles, it is incorrect in principle to treat diffraction independently of reflection and refraction, and the theory fails. However, for particles larger than 50 micrometers, independent scattering is a valid assumption, and standard radiative transfer theory works.

  8. [The research progress in determining lignocellulosic content by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; An, Dong; Xia, Tian; Huang, Yan-Hua; Li, Hong-Chao; Zhang, Yun-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology, as a new analytic method, can be used to determine the content of lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose which is faster, effective, easier to operate, and more accurate than the traditional wet chemical methods. Nowadays it has been widely used in measuring the composition of lignocelluloses in woody plant and herbaceous plant. The domestic and foreign research progress in determining the lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose content in woody plant ( wood and bamboo used as papermaking raw materials and wood served as potential biomass energy) and herbaceous plant (forage grass and energy grass) by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology is comprehensively summarized and the advances in method studies of measuring the composition of lignocelluloses by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology are summed up in three aspects, sample preparation, spectral data pretreatment and wavelength selection methods, and chemometric analysis respectively. Four outlooks are proposed combining the development statues of wood, forage grass and energy grass industry. First of all, the authors need to establish more feasible and applicable models for a variety of uses which can be used for more species from different areas, periods and anatomical parts. Secondly, comprehensive near infrared reflectance spectroscopy data base of grass products quality index needs to be improved to realize on-line quality and process control in grassproducts industry, which can guarantee the quality of the grass product. Thirdly, the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy quality index model of energy plant need to be built which can not only contribute to breed screening, but also improve the development of biomass industry. Besides, modeling approaches are required to be explored and perfected any further. Finally, the authors need to try our best to boost the advancement in the determination method of lignin, cellulose and hemi

  9. Enhanced spatial near-infrared modulation of graphene-loaded perfect absorbers using plasmonic nanoslits.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo; Lin, Timothy; Zhou, Jianyang; Ye, Longfang; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-12-14

    Modulating spatial near-infrared light for ultra-compact electro-optic devices is a critical issue in optical communication and imaging applications. To date, spatial near-infrared modulators based on graphene have been reported, but they showed limited modulation effects due to the relatively weak light-graphene interaction. In combination with graphene and metallic nanoslits, we design a kind of ultrathin near-infrared perfect absorber with enhanced spatial modulation effects and independence on a wide range of incident angles. The modulated spectral shift of central wavelength is up to 258.2 nm in the near-infrared range, which is more promising in applications than state-of-the-art devices. The modulation enhancement is attributed to the plasmonic nanoslit mode, in which the optical electric field is highly concentrated in the deep subwavelength scale and the light-graphene interaction is significantly strengthened. The physical insight is deeply revealed by a combination of equivalent circuit and electromagnetic field analysis. The design principles are not only crucial for spatial near-infrared modulators, but also provide a key guide for developing active near-infrared patch nanoantennas based on graphene. PMID:26699022

  10. Electro-optic study of PZT ferroelectric ceramics using modulation of reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazkov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optic coefficients of variations in the refractive index of PZT and PLZT ceramic materials induced by ac electric field are estimated using modulation of reflected light. The electro-optic coefficients of PLZT ceramics measured with the aid of conventional birefringence using the phase shift of transmitted radiation and the proposed method of birefringence using the modulation of reflected light are compared.

  11. Effects of Sample Preparation on the Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.

    2015-05-22

    While reflectance spectroscopy is a useful tool in identifying molecular compounds, laboratory measurement of solid (particularly powder) samples often is confounded by sample preparation methods. For example, both the packing density and surface roughness can have an effect on the quantitative reflectance spectra of powdered samples. Recent efforts in our group have focused on developing standard methods for measuring reflectance spectra that accounts for sample preparation, as well as other factors such as particle size and provenance. In this work, the effect of preparation method on sample reflectivity was investigated by measuring the directional-hemispherical spectra of samples that were hand-packed as well as pressed into pellets using an integrating sphere attached to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results show that the methods used to prepare the sample have a substantial effect on the measured reflectance spectra, as do other factors such as particle size.

  12. Potential of remote visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance measurements for mapping thermal maturity variations

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, L.C.; Pawlewicz, M.J.; Jones, O.D. )

    1989-09-01

    The visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral reflectance of rocks containing organic matter is related to thermal maturity because thermal alteration liberates hydrogen and forms highly absorbing carbon-rich polycondensed structures. To evaluate the usefulness of remote spectral reflectance measurements for mapping thermal maturity differences, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images of the Eureka, Nevada, area were processed to produce a digital classification image maps that shows maturity in well-exposed, sparsely vegetated areas consisting of Chainman Shale. The relationship between spectral reflectance in TM bands and band ratios and maturity was confirmed through analysis of laboratory VNIR spectral reflectance and mean vitrinite reflectance (R{sub m}) measurements of 20 samples.

  13. Study of jamming of the frequency modulation infrared seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Fang; Guo, Jin; Shao, Jun-feng; Wang, Ting-feng

    2013-09-01

    The threat of the IR guidance missile is a direct consequence of extensive proliferation of the airborne IR countermeasure. The aim of a countermeasure system is to inject false information into a sensor system to create confusion. Many optical seekers have a single detector that is used to sense the position of its victim in its field of view. A seeker has a spinning reticle in the focal plane of the optical system that collects energy from the thermal scene and focuses it on to the detector. In this paper, the principle of the conical-scan FM reticle is analyzed. Then the effect that different amplitude or frequency modulated mid-infrared laser pulse acts on the reticle system is simulated. When the ratio of jamming energy to target radiation (repression) gradually increases, the azimuth error and the misalignment angle error become larger. The results show that simply increasing the intensity of the jamming light achieves little, but it increases the received signal strength of the FM reticle system ,so that the target will be more easily exposed. A slow variation of amplitude will warp the azimuth information received by the seeker, but the target can't be completely out of the missile tracking. If the repression and the jamming frequency change at the same time, the jamming effects can be more obvious. When the jamming signal's angular frequency is twice as large as the carrier frequency of the reticle system, the seeker will can't receive an accurate signal and the jamming can be achieved. The jamming mechanism of the conical-scan FM IR seeker is described and it is helpful to the airborne IR countermeasure system.

  14. The visible and near infrared module of EChO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, A.; Bellucci, G.; Gambicorti, L.; Focardi, M.; Oliva, E.; Farina, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Santoli, F.; Pace, E.; Piccioni, G.; Filacchione, G.; Pancrazzi, M.; Tozzi, A.; Micela, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) is one of the modules of EChO, the Exoplanets Characterization Observatory proposed to ESA for an M-class mission. EChO is aimed to observe planets while transiting by their suns. Then the instrument had to be designed to assure a high efficiency over the whole spectral range. In fact, it has to be able to observe stars with an apparent magnitude Mv = 9-12 and to see contrasts of the order of 10-4-10-5 necessary to reveal the characteristics of the atmospheres of the exoplanets under investigation. VNIR is a spectrometer in a cross-dispersed configuration, covering the 0.4-2.5 μm spectral range with a resolving power of about 330 and a field of view of 2 arcsec. It is functionally split into two channels respectively working in the 0.4-1.0 μm and 1.0-2.5 μm spectral ranges. Such a solution is imposed by the fact the light at short wavelengths has to be shared with the EChO Fine Guiding System (FGS) devoted to the pointing of the stars under observation. The spectrometer makes use of a HgCdTe detector of 512 by 512 pixels, 18 μm pitch and working at a temperature of 45 K as the entire VNIR optical bench. The instrument has been interfaced to the telescope optics by two optical fibers, one per channel, to assure an easier coupling and an easier colocation of the instrument inside the EChO optical bench.

  15. Evaluation of thermal stability of indinavir sulphate using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parul; Premkumar, L; Mehrotra, Ranjana; Kandpal, H C; Bakhshi, A K

    2008-06-01

    Indinavir sulphate is a potent and specific protease inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is used for the treatment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). At elevated temperature the drug which otherwise remains crystalline undergoes a phase transition to an amorphous phase to form degradation products. In the present study, thermal stability of indinavir sulphate is evaluated using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of the drug before and after the exposure to thermal radiation at different temperatures were acquired in the diffuse reflectance mode using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were used as complimentary techniques to adequately implement and assist the interpretation of the infrared spectroscopy results. The DRIFT spectra reveal that the drug remains stable up to 100 degrees C, degrades slightly at 125 degrees C and undergoes complete degradation at about 150 degrees C to produce degradation products. The degradation products can easily be characterized using the infrared spectra. PMID:18280078

  16. Infrared reflectance measurements of the insulator-metal transition in solid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Hemley, R. J.; Hanfland, M.

    1990-01-01

    Reflectance measurements on solid hydrogen to 177 GPa (1.77 Mbar) have been performed from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths (0.5 to 3 eV). Above 150 GPa characteristic free-electron behavior in the infrared region is observed to increase sharply with increasing pressure. Analysis of volume dependence of the plasma frequency obtained from Drude-model fits to the spectra indicates that the pressure of the insulator-metal transition is 149 (+ or - 10) GPa at 295 K. The measurements are consistent with metallization by closure of an indirect gap in the molecular solid.

  17. Structural design considerations for a line-focus reflective module using inexpensive composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, L. M.

    1982-08-01

    The structural design aspects of a parabolic trough reflective module is addressed. The reflective module is a lightweight, low flexural rigidity design that is rotated about the focal line. The modules and support frame are designed to rotate with a cable drive system in a cross row manner. Analysis indicates that the structural and optical aspects of the reflector frame concept are adequate, with dramatic savings in weight and costs for the structure.

  18. [Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and its application in the determination for the quality of animal feed and products].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Meng, Qing-Xiang; Ren, Li-Ping; Yang, Jian-Song

    2010-06-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been the most rapidly developing and noticeable spectrographic analytical technique in recent years. The determining principle and progresses of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy are presented briefly. It mainly includes the progresses in pre-processing technique and analyzing model of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Two pre-processing techniques, including differential coefficient-dealt with technique, the signal-smoothing technique, and four analyzing models of near-infrared spectroscopy, including the multiplied lined regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS), and artificial nerve network (ANN). The application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to the first time. The investigation of reviewed papers shows that the near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy is widely applied in feed analysis and animal products analysis because of its rapidness, non-destruction and non-pollution. The near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has been used to determine the feed common ingredient, such as dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, crude fat and so on, micro-components including amino acid, vitamin, and noxious components, and to determine the physical and chemical properties of animal products which including egg, mutton, beef and pork. Details of the analytical characteristics of feed and animal products described in the reviewed papers are given. New trends and limits to the application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy in these fields are also discussed. PMID:20707134

  19. Surface roughness and gloss study of prints: application of specular reflection at near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silfsten, P.; Dutta, R.; Pääkkönen, P.; Tåg, C.-M.; Gane, P. A. C.; Peiponen, K.-E.

    2012-12-01

    Absolute reflectance data were measured with a spectrophotometer in the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral range. The specular reflectance data in the NIR were used for the assessment of the surface roughness of magenta, yellow, cyan and black prints on paper. In addition, surface roughness data obtained from the prints with a mechanical diamond stylus, an optical profiling system and the spectrophotometer are compared with each other. The surface roughness obtained with the aid of the spectrophotometer data suggests a smoother surface than when measured with the diamond stylus and the optical profiling system. The gloss of the prints can be obtained from the absolute specular reflectance spectra in the spectral region of visible light. It is shown that specular reflection data at a fixed wavelength in the NIR are useful also in the interpretation of gloss in the visible spectral range, but using an unconventional grazing angle of incidence.

  20. Cryo-Transmittance and -Reflectance of Filters and Beamsplitters for the SIRTF Infrared Array Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Kenneth P.; Quijada, Manuel A.a

    2000-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) uses two dichroic beamsplitters, four bandpass filters, and four detector arrays to acquire images in four channels at wavelengths between 3 and 10 micron. Accurate knowledge of the pass bands is necessary because, in order to meet the science objectives, IRAC is required to do 2% relative photometry in each band relative to the other bands. We report the in-band and out-of-band polarized transmittance and reflectance of these optical elements measured near the instrument operating temperature of 1.4 K. Details of the experimental apparatus, which include a continuous flow liquid helium optical cryostat and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer are discussed.

  1. [Application of Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy in analysis of pulp and paper industry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Cao, Chun-yu; Feng, Wen-ying; Xu, Ming; Su, Zhen-hua; Liu, Xiao-meng; Lü, Wei-jun

    2011-03-01

    As one of the most powerful tools to investigate the compositions of raw materials and the property of pulp and paper, infrared spectroscopy has played an important role in pulp and paper industry. However, the traditional transmission infrared spectroscopy has not met the requirements of the producing processes because of its disadvantages of time consuming and sample destruction. New technique would be needed to be found. Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is an advanced spectroscopic tool for nondestructive evaluation and could rapidly, accurately estimate the production properties of each process in pulp and paper industry. The present review describes the application of ATR-FTIR in analysis of pulp and paper industry. The analysis processes will include: pulping, papermaking, environmental protecting, special processing and paper identifying. PMID:21595211

  2. Attenuated total reflectance powder cell for infrared analysis of hygroscopic samples.

    PubMed

    Lekgoathi, M D S; le Roux, J P

    2011-11-01

    An attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sample cell has been designed, manufactured and subsequently used for the mid-infrared analysis of hygroscopic samples. This sample cell was installed as a simple drop-in replacement for the cell supplied with our commercially available Harrick Mvp-Pro FTIR-ATR accessory. Calcium chloride, a well-known desiccant that has a propensity to absorb water into its crystal lattice, was selected as non-infrared active substrate to accentuate the efficacy of the cell in preserving the anhydrous state of the sample by straightforward monitoring of the water bands. In contrast, mid-infrared spectra are presented that qualitatively demonstrate the rapid rate at which atmospheric moisture is incorporated into the anhydrous sample when analyzed using the conventional ATR cell assembly. PMID:21835688

  3. Attenuated total reflectance powder cell for infrared analysis of hygroscopic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekgoathi, M. D. S.; le Roux, J. P.

    2011-11-01

    An attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sample cell has been designed, manufactured and subsequently used for the mid-infrared analysis of hygroscopic samples. This sample cell was installed as a simple drop-in replacement for the cell supplied with our commercially available Harrick Mvp-Pro FTIR-ATR accessory. Calcium chloride, a well-known desiccant that has a propensity to absorb water into its crystal lattice, was selected as non-infrared active substrate to accentuate the efficacy of the cell in preserving the anhydrous state of the sample by straightforward monitoring of the water bands. In contrast, mid-infrared spectra are presented that qualitatively demonstrate the rapid rate at which atmospheric moisture is incorporated into the anhydrous sample when analyzed using the conventional ATR cell assembly.

  4. [Rapid determination of fatty acids in soybean oils by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Feng-ping; Liu, Yao-min; Wu, Zong-wen; Suo, You-rui

    2012-08-01

    In the present research, a novel method was established for determination of five fatty acids in soybean oil by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy. The optimum conditions of mathematics model of five components (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3) were studied, including the sample set selection, chemical value analysis, the detection methods and condition. Chemical value was analyzed by gas chromatography. One hundred fifty eight samples were selected, 138 for modeling set, 10 for testing set and 10 for unknown sample set. All samples were placed in sample pools and scanned by transmission reflection-near infrared spectrum after sonicleaning for 10 minute. The 1100-2500 nm spectral region was analyzed. The acquisition interval was 2 nm. Modified partial least square method was chosen for calibration mode creating. Result demonstrated that the 1-VR of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.8839, 0.5830, 0.9001, 0.9776 and 0.9596, respectively. And the SECV of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.42, 0.29, 0.83, 0.46 and 0.21, respectively. The standard error of the calibration (SECV) of five fatty acids between the reference value of testing sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.891, 0.790, 0.900, 0.976 and 0.942, respectively. It was proved that the near infrared spectrum predictive value was linear with chemical value and the mathematical model established for fatty acids of soybean oil was feasible. For validation, 10 unknown samples were selected for analysis by near infrared spectrum. The result demonstrated that the relative standard deviation between predict value and chemical value was less than 5.50%. That was to say that transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy had a good veracity in analysis of fatty acids of soybean oil

  5. [Tri-Level Infrared Spectroscopic Identification of Hot Melting Reflective Road Marking Paint].

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Ma, Fang; Sun, Su-qin

    2015-12-01

    In order to detect the road marking paint from the trace evidence in traffic accident scene, and to differentiate their brands, we use Tri-level infrared spectroscopic identification, which employs the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), the second derivative infrared spectroscopy(SD-IR), two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy(2D-IR) to identify three different domestic brands of hot melting reflective road marking paints and their raw materials in formula we Selected. The experimental results show that three labels coatings in ATR and FTIR spectrograms are very similar in shape, only have different absorption peak wave numbers, they have wide and strong absorption peaks near 1435 cm⁻¹, and strong absorption peak near 879, 2955, 2919, 2870 cm⁻¹. After enlarging the partial areas of spectrograms and comparing them with each kind of raw material of formula spectrograms, we can distinguish them. In the region 700-970 and 1370-1 660 cm⁻¹ the spectrograms mainly reflect the different relative content of heavy calcium carbonate of three brands of the paints, and that of polyethylene wax (PE wax), ethylene vinyl acetate resin (EVA), dioctyl phthalate (DOP) in the region 2800-2960 cm⁻¹. The SD-IR not only verify the result of the FTIR analysis, but also further expand the microcosmic differences and reflect the different relative content of quartz sand in the 512-799 cm-1 region. Within the scope of the 1351 to 1525 cm⁻¹, 2D-IR have more significant differences in positions and numbers of automatically peaks. Therefore, the Tri-level infrared spectroscopic identification is a fast and effective method to distinguish the hot melting road marking paints with a gradually improvement in apparent resolution. PMID:26964206

  6. Infrared reflectance and photoemission spectroscopy studies across the phase transition boundary in thin film vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Zawilski, Kevin; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2008-01-01

    Optical properties and valence band density of states near the Fermi level of high-quality VO2 thin films have been investigated by mid-infrared reflectometry and hard-UV (h = 150 eV) photoemission spectroscopy. An exceptionally large change in reflectance from 2 to 94% is found upon the thermally driven metal insulator transition (MIT). The infrared dispersion spectra of the reflectance across the MIT are presented and evidence for the percolative nature of the MIT is pointed out. The discrepancy between the MIT temperatures defined from the electrical and optical properties is found and its origin is discussed. The manifestation of the MIT is observed in the photoemission spectra of the V 3d levels. The analysis of the changes of the V 3d density of states is done and the top valence band shift upon the MIT is measured to be 0.6 eV.

  7. Prepreg cure monitoring using diffuse reflectance-FTIR. [Fourier Transform Infrared Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    An in situ diffuse reflectance-Fourier transform infrared technique was developed to determine infrared spectra of graphite fiber prepregs as they were being cured. A bismaleimide, an epoxy, and addition polyimide matrix resin prepregs were studied. An experimental polyimide adhesive was also examined. Samples were positioned on a small heater at the focal point of diffuse reflectance optics and programmed at 15 F/min while FTIR spectra were being scanned, averaged, and stored. An analysis of the resulting spectra provided basic insights into changes in matrix resin molecular structure which accompanied reactions such as imidization and crosslinking. An endo-exothermal isomerization involving reactive end-caps was confirmed for the addition polyimide prepregs. The results of this study contribute to a fundamental understanding of the processing of composites and adhesives. Such understanding will promote the development of more efficient cure cycles.

  8. Near-infrared reflectance spectra-applications to problems in asteroid-meteorite relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, Lucy A.; Chamberlin, Alan; Vilas, Faith

    1991-01-01

    Near-infrared spectral reflectance data were collected at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Mauna Kea Observatories in 1985 and 1986 for the purpose of searching the region near the 3:1 Kirkwood gap for asteroids with the spectral signatures of ordinary chondrite parent bodies. Twelve reflectance spectra are observed. The presence of ordinary chondrite parent bodies among this specific set of observed asteroids is not obvious, though the sample is biased towards the larger asteroids in the region due to limitations imposed by detector sensitivity. The data set, which was acquired with the same instrumentation used for the 52-color asteroid survey (Bell et al., 1987), also presents some additional findings. The range of spectral characteristics that exist among asteroids of the same taxonomic type is noted. Conclusions based on the findings are discussed.

  9. Modeling the attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum of apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufort, Julie; Ségalen, Loïc; Gervais, Christel; Brouder, Christian; Balan, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectra were measured on a synthetic and a natural fluorapatite sample. A modeling approach based on the computation of the Fresnel reflection coefficient between the ATR crystal and the powder sample was used to analyze the line shape of the spectra. The dielectric properties of the samples were related to those of pure fluorapatite using an effective medium approach, based on Maxwell-Garnett and Bruggeman models. The Bruggeman effective medium model leads to a very good agreement with the experimental data recorded on the synthetic fluorapatite sample. The poorer agreement observed on the natural sample suggests a more significant heterogeneity of the sample at a characteristic length scale larger than the mid-infrared characteristic wavelength, i.e., about 10 micrometers. The results demonstrate the prominent role of macroscopic electrostatic effects over fine details of the microscopic structure in determining the line shape of strong ATR bands.

  10. Optical constants of silver and copper indium ternary sulfides from infrared reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanly, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared reflection spectra are obtained in the frequency range of 50-2000 cm-1 for AgIn5S8 and CuIn5S8 single crystals grown by Bridgman method. All four infrared-active modes are detected, which are in full agreement with the prediction of group-theoretical analysis. Spectral dependence of optical parameters; real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function, the function of energy losses, refractive index, absorption index and absorption coefficient were calculated from reflectivity experiments. The frequencies of transverse and longitudinal optical modes and oscillator strengths were also determined. The bands detected in IR spectra of studied crystals were assigned to various vibration types (valence and valence-deformation) on the basis of the symmetrized displacements of atoms obtained employing the Melvin projection operators.

  11. Large-Area Reflective Infrared Filters for Millimeter/Sub-mm Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Grayson, J. A.; Thompson, K. L.; Kuo, C.-L.; Brooks, G.; Pothoven, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ground-based millimeter and sub-millimeter telescopes are attempting to image the sky with ever-larger cryogenically-cooled bolometer arrays, but face challenges in mitigating the infrared loading accompanying large apertures. Absorptive infrared filters supported by mechanical coolers scale insufficiently with aperture size. Reflective metal-mesh filters placed behind the telescope window provide a scalable solution in principle, but have been limited by photolithography constraints to diameters under 300 mm. We present laser etching as an alternate technique to photolithography for fabrication of large-area reflective filters, and show results from lab tests of 500-mm-diameter filters. Filters with up to 700-mm diameter can be fabricated using laser etching with existing capability.

  12. Aircraft observations of Venus' near-infrared reflection spectrum - Implications for cloud composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Summers, A. L.; Van Camp, W.; Baldwin, B. J.; Augason, G. C.; Caroff, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison of aircraft-based measurement data on Venus' near-infrared (1.2- to 4.1-micron) reflection spectrum with computer generated spectra of a number of cloud candidates shows a 75-% or more concentrated water solution of sulfuric acid to give the only acceptable match to the profile of Venus' strong 3-micron absorption feature. However, the measurement data obtained also show a modest decline in reflectivity from 2.3-micron to 1.2-micron wavelength, which is inconsistent with the flat spectrum of sulfuric acid in this spectral region. It is hypothesized that this decline is due to impurities in the sulfuric acid droplets.

  13. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy and thermographic investigations of the Shroud of Turin.

    PubMed

    Accetta, J S; Baumgart, J S

    1980-06-15

    In this paper we present the results of the IR investigations of the controversial Turin Shroud. Reflectance spectroscopy in the 3-5- and 8-14-microm bands was attempted in situ using commercial equipment with moderate success. Spectral comparisons are made between laboratory reflectance data and selected Shroud features. Infrared thermographic imaging was accomplished with an enhanced contrast technique using external illumination. Due to the spectral similarities of most features observed, we show that the results are inconclusive. The IR imagery yielded results that are consistent with expectations with no anomalies observed. PMID:20221156

  14. Measuring near infrared spectral reflectance changes from water stressed conifer stands with AIS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, George; Running, Steven W.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-2 (AIS-2) data was acquired over two paired conifer stands for the purpose of detecting differences in spectral reflectance between stressed and natural canopies. Water stress was induced in a stand of Norway spruce and white pine by severing the sapwood near the ground. Water stress during the AIS flights was evaluated through shoot water potential and relative water content measurements. Preliminary analysis with raw AIS-2 data using SPAM indicates that there were small, inconsistent differences in absolute spectral reflectance in the near infrared 0.97 to 1.3 micron between the stressed and natural canopies.

  15. Selecting the Right Tool: Comparison of the Analytical Performance of Infrared Attenuated Total Reflection Accessories.

    PubMed

    Schädle, Thomas; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-01

    The analytical performance of four commercially available infrared attenuated total reflection (IR-ATR) accessories with various ATR waveguide materials has been analyzed and evaluated using acetate, CO2, and CO3 (2-) solutions. Calibration functions have been established to determine and compare analytically relevant parameters such as sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and efficiency. The obtained parameters were further analyzed to support conclusions on the differences in performance of the individual IR-ATR accessories. PMID:27091901

  16. Influence of Si doping on the infrared reflectance characteristics of GaN grown on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. T.; Feng, Z. C.; Chua, S. J.; Li, M. F.; Akutsu, N.; Matsumoto, K.

    1999-11-01

    Si-doped GaN films grown on sapphire are investigated by infrared reflectance. A damping behavior of the interference fringes is observed, and interpreted to be due to the presence of an interface layer between the film and the substrate. A theoretical calculation using a two-layer model to take into account the interface layer resulted in this damping in agreement with the experiment. The damping behavior and an improvement of interface properties by Si incorporation are demonstrated.

  17. Broadband infrared electro-optic modulator having a buried microstrip network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheo, Peter K. (Inventor); Gilden, Meyer (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A microwave infrared modulator having a novel three dimensional structure is presented. The modulator includes a waveguide and metal base with a dielectric wafer buried therebetween. The buried wafer allows for conventional microstrip structures to be employed with larger microstrip electrode dimensions than would otherwise be possible.

  18. High reflected cubic cavity as long path absorption cell for infrared gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    One direct and efficient method to improve the sensitivity of infrared gas sensors is to increase the optical path length of gas cells according to Beer-Lambert Law. In this paper, cubic shaped cavities with high reflected inner coating as novel long path absorption cells for infrared gas sensing were developed. The effective optical path length (EOPL) for a single cubic cavity and tandem cubic cavities were investigated based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measuring oxygen P11 line at 763 nm. The law of EOPL of a diffuse cubic cavity in relation with the reflectivity of the coating, the port fraction and side length of the cavity was obtained. Experimental results manifested an increase of EOPL for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of port fraction of the connecting aperture f', and the EOPL equaled to the sum of that of two single cubic cavities at f'<0.01. The EOPL spectra at infrared wavelength range for different inner coatings including high diffuse coatings and high reflected metallic thin film coatings were deduced.

  19. Comparison of Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy with Grating-Based Near-Infrared for the Determination of Fatty Acids in Forages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared (FTMIR) and near infrared spectroscopy (FTNIR) were compared to scanning monochromator-grating-based near infrared spectroscopy (SMNIR), for their ability to quantify fatty acids (FA) in forages. Thirteen different forage cultivars belonging to 11 d...

  20. Infrared beam-steering using acoustically modulated surface plasmons over a graphene monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.-Y.; Farhat, M.; Askarpour, A. N.; Tymchenko, M.; Alù, A.

    2014-09-01

    We model and design a graphene-based infrared beamformer based on the concept of leaky-wave (fast traveling wave) antennas. The excitation of infrared surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) over a ‘one-atom-thick’ graphene monolayer is typically associated with intrinsically ‘slow light’. By modulating the graphene with elastic vibrations based on flexural waves, a dynamic diffraction grating can be formed on the graphene surface, converting propagating SPPs into fast surface waves, able to radiate directive infrared beams into the background medium. This scheme allows fast on-off switching of infrared emission and dynamic tuning of its radiation pattern, beam angle and frequency of operation, by simply varying the acoustic frequency that controls the effective grating period. We envision that this graphene beamformer may be integrated into reconfigurable transmitter/receiver modules, switches and detectors for THz and infrared wireless communication, sensing, imaging and actuation systems.

  1. The use of visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra for estimating organic matter thermal maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, L.C.; Poole, F.G.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1995-10-01

    Measurements of visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of 41 samples of mudstone, silt-stone, and carbonate rocks representing two major depositional settings in Nevada were compared to vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) and hydrogen index (HI) measurements to determine the relation between spectral reflectance and organic matter (OM) maturity. The samples range in age from Devonian to Paleogene and have highly variable total organic carbon (TOC) contents, recycled OM contents, and kerogen compositions. Visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of the samples changes systematically as OM maturity increases from submature to supermature (R{sub o} range of 0.28 to 4.32); therefore, spectral reflectance generally can be used to estimate the thermal maturity of the contained OM. The sum of several ratios (compound ratio) used to express spectral changes in the visible and near-infrared wavelength region is high for most submature samples, decreases rapidly with increasing R{sub o} into the mature range, and then decreases less rapidly through the remaining mature range and the supermature range. A similar trend is displayed in the plot of HI vs. compound ratio. Some spectra are affected by iron absorption features and the presence of recycled OM. Iron absorption generally causes the compound ratio values to be anomalously high relative to the OM maturity, whereas recycled OM results in unusually low ratio values. Spectra affected by recycled OM were identified by using a pair of ratios that expresses the difference in spectral shape between these spectra and spectra of supermature samples, which they resemble. Samples containing recycled kerogen are much more numerous from the Mississippian prodelta basin of the Antler foreland basin than from the Antler orogene; this difference indicates derivation of much of the kerogen from the orogene.

  2. Health Monitoring of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Mid-Infrared Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Spuckler, C. M.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Street, K. W.

    2002-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) reflectance is shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring the integrity of 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Because of the translucent nature of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs, particularly at MIR wavelengths (3 to 5 microns), measured reflectance does not only originate from the TBC surface, but contains strong contributions from internal scattering within the coating as well as reflectance from the underlying TBC/substrate interface. Therefore, changes in MIR reflectance measurements can be used to monitor the progression of TBC delamination. In particular, MIR reflectance is shown to reproducibly track the progression of TBC delamination produced by repeated thermal cycling (to 1163 C) of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs on Rene N5 superalloy substrates. To understand the changes in MIR reflectance with the progression of a delamination crack network, a four-flux scattering model is used to predict the increase in MIR reflectance produced by the introduction of these cracks.

  3. Health Monitoring of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Mid-Infrared Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Spuckler, C. M.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Street, K. W.

    2002-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) reflectance is shown to be a powerful tool for monitoring the integrity of 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Because of the translucent nature of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs at MIR wavelengths (3 to 5 pm), measured reflectance does not only originate from the TBC surface, but contains strong contributions from internal scattering within the coating as well as reflectance from the underlying TBC/substrate interface. Therefore, changes in MIR reflectance measurements can be used to monitor the progression of TBC delamination. In particular, MIR reflectance is shown to reproducibly track the progression of TBC delamination produced by repeated thermal cycling (to 1163 C) of plasma-sprayed 8YSZ TBCs on Rene N5 superalloy substrates. To understand the changes in MIR reflectance with the progression of a delamination crack network, a four-flux scattering model is used to predict the increase in MIR reflectance produced by the introduction of these cracks.

  4. Design, fabrication, and measured performance of anti-reflecting surface textures in infrared transmitting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Douglas S.; MacLeod, Bruce D.

    2005-05-01

    Rugged infrared transmitting materials have a high refractive index, which leads to large reflection losses. Multi-layer thin-film coatings designed for anti-reflection (AR), exhibit good performance, but have limited bandwidths, narrow acceptance angles, polarization effects, high costs, and short lifetimes in harsh environments. Many aerospace and military applications requiring high optical transmission, durability, survivability, and radiation resistance, are inadequately addressed by thin-film coating technology. Surface relief microstructures have been shown to be an effective alternative to thin-film AR coatings in many infrared and visible-band applications. These microstructures, etched directly into the window surface and commonly referred to as "Motheye" textures, impart an optical function that minimizes surface reflections without compromising the inherent durability of the window material. Reflection losses are reduced to a minimum for broad-band light incident over a wide angular range. For narrow-band applications such as laser communications, a simpler type of AR surface structure called a sub-wavelength, or "SWS" surface, is used. In general, both the Motheye and SWS surface textures will exhibit the same characteristics as the bulk material with respect to durability, thermal issues, and radiation resistance. The problems associated with thin-film coating adhesion and stress, are thus eliminated by design. Optical performance data for AR structures fabricated in fused silica, sapphire, Clear ZnS, ZnSe, cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), silicon, and germanium, will be presented.

  5. Detection of Cracks on Tomatoes Using a Hyperspectral Near-Infrared Reflectance Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.; Jeong, Danhee; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Chao, Kuanglin; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of hyperspectral near-infrared (NIR) reflectance imaging techniques for detecting cuticle cracks on tomatoes. A hyperspectral NIR reflectance imaging system that analyzed the spectral region of 1000–1700 nm was used to obtain hyperspectral reflectance images of 224 tomatoes: 112 with and 112 without cracks along the stem-scar region. The hyperspectral images were subjected to partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to classify and detect cracks on the tomatoes. Two morphological features, roundness (R) and minimum-maximum distance (D), were calculated from the PLS-DA images to quantify the shape of the stem scar. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and a support vector machine (SVM) were then used to classify R and D. The results revealed 94.6% and 96.4% accuracy for classifications made using LDA and SVM, respectively, for tomatoes with and without crack defects. These data suggest that the hyperspectral near-infrared reflectance imaging system, in addition to traditional NIR spectroscopy-based methods, could potentially be used to detect crack defects on tomatoes and perform quality assessments. PMID:25310472

  6. Quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance infrared, near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Erxleben, Andrea; Ryder, Alan G; McArdle, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    The simultaneous quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs (forms I, III and V) in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR), near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is reported. To reduce the effect of systematic variations, four different data pre-processing methods; multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variate (SNV), first and second derivatives, were applied and their performance was evaluated using their prediction errors. It was possible to derive a reliable calibration model for the three polymorphic forms, in powder ternary mixtures, using a partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with SNV pre-processing, which predicted the concentration of polymorphs I, III and V. Root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for ATR-IR spectra were 5.0%, 5.1% and 4.5% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively, while NIR spectra had a RMSEP of 2.0%, 2.9%, and 2.8% and Raman spectra had a RMSEP of 3.5%, 4.1%, and 3.6% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively. NIR spectroscopy exhibits the smallest analytical error, higher accuracy and robustness. When these advantages are combined with the greater convenience of NIR's "in glass bottle" sampling method both ATR-IR and Raman methods appear less attractive. PMID:20605386

  7. Cryogenic Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Organic Ices and Their Relevance to the Surface Composition of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchin, John; Clark, R. N.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2006-09-01

    In order to properly interpret reflectance spectra of Titan's surface, laboratory spectra of candidate materials for comparative analysis is needed. Although the common cosmochemical species (H2O, CO2, CO, NH3, and CH4) are well represented in the spectroscopic literature, comparatively little reflectance work has been done on organics at cryotemperatures at visible to near infrared wavelengths. Measurement of reflectance is required for characterizing weak features not seen in transmittance. Such features may be important in remote sensing of planetary surfaces. The USGS Spectroscopy Laboratory uses Nicolet FT-IR and ASD field spectrometers in combination with cryogenic chambers to acquire reflectance spectra of organic ices at approximately 80-90 ºK in a wavelength range of 0.35 to 15.5 microns. This region encompasses the fundamental absorptions and many overtones and combinations of major organic molecules including those with hydrogen-carbon, carbon-carbon (single, double and triple bonds), carbon-oxygen, oxygen-hydrogen, carbon-nitrogen, and nitrogen-hydrogen bonds. Because most organic compounds belong to families with similar structure and composition, individual species identification within a narrow wavelength range may be ambiguous. Only by measuring spectral reflectance of the pure laboratory ices from the visible through the near and mid-infrared can absorption bands unique to each be observed, cataloged and compared to planetary reflectance data. We present here spectra of organic ices belonging to eight families, the alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, nitriles, amines, and cyanides. Many of these compounds are predicted to coat the surface of Titan and indeed, a number of atmospheric windows, particularly at 5 microns, have allowed their identification with VIMS (Clark et al., DPS 2006, this volume). The spectral properties of these materials have applications to other solar system surfaces and remote sensing of terrestrial

  8. Assessment of diffuse transmission and reflection modes in near-infrared quantification, part 2: DIFFuse reflection information depth.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhanned; Probst, Leila; Betz, Gabriele

    2011-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy offers tremendous advantages for pharmaceutical manufacturing as a fast and nondestructive method of quantitative and qualitative analysis. Content uniformity (end-product analytics) and process analytics are two important applications of the method. Diffuse reflection (DR) information depth (vertical sampling span) assessment is of equal importance in content prediction applications and to understand the effect of inhomogeneities in the sample. Three experiments were conducted: (a) 0.5 to 10.0 mm incremental thickness MCC tablets with constant porosity, (b) MCC/phenylbutazone (PBZ) double-layered (DL) tablets (PBZ layer 0%-100% in 0.5 mm steps), and (c) Comparison of placebo and 30% caffeine tablet cores with incremental film coating (film thickness of 0-0.35 mm). Incremental thickness and cluster analysis of DL tablets showed that DR information depth was <0.5 mm, whereas the data fitting from incremental coating showed that signal drop reached 50% at 0.05 to 0.07 mm, depending on the wavenumber and 90% signal drop (10% information content) can be seen between 0.20 and 0.25 mm without extrapolation. These results mean that DR mode for pharmaceutical tablets obtains spectral information from the very surface, and radiation is barely reflected back from beyond thin-film coatings, making it less useful than diffuse transmission mode for core content analysis, especially for thick-coated, multilayer, multicore, or highly inhomogeneous tablets. PMID:20862671

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Mid-infrared Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I; Spuckler, Charles M.; Nesbitt, James A.; Martin, Richard E.

    2005-01-01

    The application of mid-infrared reflectance (MIR) imaging to monitor damage in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been extended from a previously demonstrated area-averaged spectroscopic analysis tool to become a practical imaging tool that provides the spatial resolution needed to quickly identify localized regions of TBC damage by visual inspection, Illumination optics and image collection procedures were developed to produce illumination-normalized flatfield reflectance images after subtraction of the background thermal emission. MIR reflectance images were collected with a bandpass filter centered at a wavelength of 4 microns, which provided the optimum balance between good sensitivity to buried cracks and coating erosion, but with a desirable sensitivity to TBC sintering and absorption from ambient gases. Examples are presented of the application of MIR reflectance imaging to monitor damage progression in plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) TBCs subjected to either furnace cycling or alumina particle jet erosion. These results show that MIR reflectance imaging can reliably track the progression of buried delamination cracks produced by thermal cycling and can also be used to determine when any local section of the TBC has eroded beyond an acceptable limit. Modeling of the effects of buried cracks and erosion on reflectance will be presented to show the dependence of damage sensitivity to TBC thickness.

  10. Modulation of Retrieval Processing Reflects Accuracy of Emotional Source Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Adam P. R.; Henson, Richard N. A.; Rugg, Michael D.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2005-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that encoding and consolidation of memory are modulated by emotion, but the retrieval of emotional memories is not well characterized. Here we manipulated the emotional context with which affectively neutral stimuli were associated during encoding, allowing us to examine neural activity associated with retrieval of…

  11. High temperature far-infrared dynamics of orthorhombic NdMnO3: emissivity and reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Massa, Néstor E; del Campo, Leire; Meneses, Domingos De Sousa; Echegut, Patrick; Martínez-Lope, María Jesús; Alonso, José Antonio

    2013-06-12

    We report on near normal far- and mid-infrared emission and reflectivity of NdMnO3 perovskite from room temperature to sample decomposition above 1800 K. At 300 K the number of infrared active phonons is in close agreement with the 25 calculated for the orthorhombic D(2h)(16)-Pbnm (Z = 4) space group. Their number gradually decreases as we approach the temperature of orbital disorder at ~1023 K where the orthorhombic O' lower temperature cooperative phase coexists with the cubic orthorhombic O. At above ~1200 K, the three infrared active phonons coincide with that expected for cubic Pm-3m (Z = 1) in the high temperature insulating regime. Heating samples in dry air triggers double exchange conductivity by Mn(3+) and Mn(4+) ions and a small polaron mid-infrared band. Fits to the optical conductivity single out the octahedral antisymmetric and symmetric vibrational modes as the main phonons in the electron-phonon interactions at 875 K. For 1745 K, it is enough to consider the symmetric stretching internal mode. An overdamped defect induced Drude component is clearly outlined at the highest temperatures. We conclude that rare earth manganite eg electrons are prone to spin, charge, orbital, and lattice couplings in an intrinsic orbital distorted perovskite lattice, favoring embryonic low energy collective excitations. PMID:23676242

  12. The cuticle modulates ultraviolet reflectance of avian eggshells.

    PubMed

    Fecheyr-Lippens, Daphne C; Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Hanley, Daniel; Verdes, Aida; Holford, Mande; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Grim, Tomas; Hauber, Mark E; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Avian eggshells are variedly coloured, yet only two pigments, biliverdin and protoporphyrin IX, are known to contribute to the dramatic diversity of their colours. By contrast, the contributions of structural or other chemical components of the eggshell are poorly understood. For example, unpigmented eggshells, which appear white to the human eye, vary in their ultraviolet (UV) reflectance, which may be detectable by birds. We investigated the proximate mechanisms for the variation in UV-reflectance of unpigmented bird eggshells using spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, chemical analyses, and experimental manipulations. We specifically tested how UV-reflectance is affected by the eggshell cuticle, the outermost layer of most avian eggshells. The chemical dissolution of the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, increased UV-reflectance for only eggshells that contained a cuticle. Our findings demonstrate that the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, absorb UV-light, probably because they contain higher levels of organic components and other chemicals, such as calcium phosphates, compared to the predominantly calcite-based eggshell matrix. These data highlight the need to examine factors other than the known pigments in studies of avian eggshell colour. PMID:25964661

  13. The cuticle modulates ultraviolet reflectance of avian eggshells

    PubMed Central

    Fecheyr-Lippens, Daphne C.; Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Hanley, Daniel; Verdes, Aida; Holford, Mande; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I. N.; Grim, Tomas; Hauber, Mark E.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian eggshells are variedly coloured, yet only two pigments, biliverdin and protoporphyrin IX, are known to contribute to the dramatic diversity of their colours. By contrast, the contributions of structural or other chemical components of the eggshell are poorly understood. For example, unpigmented eggshells, which appear white to the human eye, vary in their ultraviolet (UV) reflectance, which may be detectable by birds. We investigated the proximate mechanisms for the variation in UV-reflectance of unpigmented bird eggshells using spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, chemical analyses, and experimental manipulations. We specifically tested how UV-reflectance is affected by the eggshell cuticle, the outermost layer of most avian eggshells. The chemical dissolution of the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, increased UV-reflectance for only eggshells that contained a cuticle. Our findings demonstrate that the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, absorb UV-light, probably because they contain higher levels of organic components and other chemicals, such as calcium phosphates, compared to the predominantly calcite-based eggshell matrix. These data highlight the need to examine factors other than the known pigments in studies of avian eggshell colour. PMID:25964661

  14. Study of Spectral Modifications in Acidified Ignitable Liquids by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martín-Alberca, Carlos; Ojeda, Fernando Ernesto Ortega; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the spectral characteristics of two types of acidified gasoline and acidified diesel fuel are discussed. Neat and acidified ignitable liquids (ILs) infrared absorption spectra obtained by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were compared in order to identify the modifications produced by the reaction of the ILs with sulfuric acid. Several bands crucial for gasoline identification were modified, and new bands appeared over the reaction time. In the case of acidified diesel fuel, no significant modifications were observed. Additionally, the neat and acidified ILs spectra were used to perform a principal components analysis in order to confirm objectively the results. The complete discrimination among samples was successfully achieved, including the complete differentiation among gasoline types. Taking into account the results obtained in this work, it is possible to propose spectral fingerprints for the identification of non-burned acidified ILs in forensic investigations related with arson or the use of improvised incendiary devices (IIDs). PMID:26810182

  15. Infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy: an innovative strategy for analyzing mineral components in energy relevant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Delle Piane, Claudio; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  16. Mars - Near-infrared spectral reflectance of surface regions and compositional implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, T. B.; Clark, R. N.; Singer, R. B.

    1982-04-01

    Both morphological and compositional information are needed to define and characterize surface geologic units on Mars. A description is presented of new, near-infrared spectra (0.65 to 2.50 micrometers) for 11 regions on the Martian surface observed in 1978. The high photometric quality of these data combined with increased near-infrared spectral coverage provide new information about the spectral behavior and, therefore, the composition and physical nature of Martian surface materials. The spectral reflectances were obtained with the aid of a 2.2-m telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. A cooled (to 77 K) circular variable filter spectrometer with an InSb detector was used to measure alternatively Mars and the standard star Beta Geminorum. Attention is given to general spectral characteristics, the dark region composition, spectral evidence for water, and the 2.3 micrometer absorption.

  17. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  18. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  19. Applications of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.C.; Noel, D.; Hechler, J.J.

    1988-12-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to obtain infrared spectra directly from the surface of composite materials, with little or no sample preparation. It is thus of interest as a nondestructive method for industrial inspection. In many cases, the IR spectra provide detailed information concerning the chemical composition and molecular structure of the material. The technique works particularly well for carbon-fiber composites. This paper describes the principles involved, some factors which influence the quality of the spectra, and a number of examples of applications. These include the characterization of epoxy matrices (composition, curing, degradation), the detection of surface contamination, and the determination of the degree of crystallinity in poly(phenylene sulfide)-based composites. 24 references.

  20. Transcutaneous analyte measuring method (TAMM): a reflective, noninvasive, near-infrared blood chemistry analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Ruchti, Timothy L.

    1995-04-01

    TAMM for Transcutaneous Analyte Measuring Method is a near infrared spectroscopic technique for the noninvasive measurement of human blood chemistry. A near infrared indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) photodiode array spectrometer has been developed and tested on over 1,000 patients as a part of an SBIR program sponsored by the Naval Medical Research and Development Command. Nine (9) blood analytes have been measured and evaluated during pre-clinical testing: sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, bicarbonate, BUN, glucose, hematocrit and hemoglobin. A reflective rather than a transmissive invasive approach to measurement has been taken to avoid variations resulting from skin color and sensor positioning. The current status of the instrumentation, neural network pattern recognition algorithms and test results will be discussed.

  1. Far-infrared reflectivity and Raman spectra of Ba5Nb4O15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Néstor E.; Pagola, Silvina; Carbonio, Raúl

    1996-04-01

    We report low-temperature, far-infrared reflectivity, and Raman-scattering measurements for layered Ba5Nb4O15. We find that this material is characterized by a strong anharmonic lattice where the symmetric stretching vibration of the empty octahedra, a singular feature of this layer compound, splits into two narrow Raman-active bands. We assign them to the same phonon in a slightly different environment, and suggest a small local departure of the reported centrosymmetric D33d-P3m1 space group. We think that the infrared and mainly the Raman band profiles indicate that the lattice of Ba5Nb4O15 is close to collapsing into a lower symmetry structure.

  2. Determination of in vivo skin moisture level by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saknite, Inga; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has a potential for noninvasive determination of skin moisture level due to high water absorption. In this study, diffuse reflectance spectra of in vivo skin were acquired in the spectral range of 900 nm to 1700 nm by using near-infrared spectrometer, optical fiber and halogen bulb light source. Absorption changes after applying skin moisturizers were analyzed over time at different body sites. Results show difference in absorption when comparing dry and normal skin. Comparison of absorption changes over time after applying moisturizer at different body sites is analyzed and discussed. Some patterns of how skin reacts to different skin moisturizers are shown, although no clear pattern can be seen due to signal noise.

  3. Self-assembled flower-like antimony trioxide microstructures with high infrared reflectance performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Shengsong; Yang, Xiaokun; Shao, Qian; Liu, Qingyun; Wang, Tiejun; Wang, Lingyun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2013-04-15

    A simple hydrothermal process was adopted to self-assembly prepare high infrared reflective antimony trioxide with three-dimensional flower-like microstructures. The morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) respectively. It is also found that experimental parameters, such as NaOH concentration, surfactant concentration and volume ratio of ethanol–water played crucial roles in controlling the morphologies of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures. A possible growth mechanism of flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructure was proposed based on the experimental data. UV–vis–NIR spectra verified that the near infrared reflectivity of the obtained flower-like microstructures could averagely achieve as 92% with maximum reflectivity of 98%, obviously higher than that of other different morphologies of antimony trioxide microstructures. It is expected that the flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures have some applications in optical materials and heat insulation coatings. - Graphical abstract: Flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures that composed of nanosheets with thickness of ca. 100 nm exhibit high reflectivity under UV–vis–NIR spectra. Highlights: ► Uniform flower-like microstructures were synthesized via simple hydrothermal reaction. ► The flower-like Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} microstructures exhibited higher reflectivity than other morphologies under the UV–vis–NIR light. ► Influencing parameters on the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} morphologies have been discussed in detail. ► Possible mechanism leading to flower-like microstructures was proposed.

  4. Measuring Snow Grain Size with the Near-Infrared Emitting Reflectance Dome (NERD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. M.; Flanner, M.

    2014-12-01

    Because of its high visible albedo, snow plays a large role in Earth's surface energy balance. This role is a subject of intense study, but due to the wide range of snow albedo, variations in the characteristics of snow grains can introduce radiative feedbacks in a snow pack. Snow grain size, for example, is one property which directly affects a snow pack's absorption spectrum. Previous studies model and observe this spectrum, but potential feedbacks induced by these variations are largely unknown. Here, we implement a simple and inexpensive technique to measure snow grain size in an instrument we call the Near-infrared Emitting Reflectance Dome (NERD). A small black styrene dome (~17cm diameter), fitted with two narrowband light-emitting diodes (LEDs) centered around 1300nm and 1550nm and three near-infrared reverse-biased photodiodes, is placed over the snow surface enabling a multi-spectral measurement of the hemispheric directional reflectance factor (HDRF). We illuminate the snow at each wavelength, measure directional reflectance, and infer grain size from the difference in HDRFs measured on the same snow crystals at fixed viewing angles. We validate measurements from the NERD using two different reflectance standards, materials designed to be near perfect Lambertian reflectors, having known, constant reflectances (~99% and ~55%) across a wide range of wavelengths. Using a 3D Monte Carlo model simulating photon pathways through a pack of spherical snow grains, we calculate the difference in HDRFs at 1300nm and 1550nm to predict the calibration curve for a wide range of grain sizes. This theoretically derived curve gives a relationship between effective radius and the difference in HDRFs and allows us to approximate grain sizes using the NERD in just a few seconds. Further calibration requires knowledge of truth values attainable using a previously validated instrument or measurements from an inter-comparison workshop.

  5. Specular reflectance of optical-black coatings in the far infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Far-infrared specular reflectance spectra of seven optically black coatings near normal incidence are presented. Seven photometric spectra were obtained using eleven bandpass transmission filters in the wavelength range between 12 and 500 microns, and three interferometric spectra were obtained for corroboration. Data on the construction, thickness, and rms surface roughness of the coatings are also presented. The chemical composition of three coatings can be distinguished from that of the others by a strong absorption feature between 20 and 40 microns, which can be largely attributed to amorphous silicate material. At 100 microns, the most and least reflective coatings differ by nearly 3 orders of magnitude. Inverse relationships observed between the spectra and the roughness and thickness of the coatings led to development of a reflecting-layer model for the measured reflectance. The model successfully describes the spectra at wavelengths outside the silicate absorption, and optical constants are deduced from a nonlinear least squares fit to the data. Parametric errors are estimated by chi-square analysis, and sensitivity tests are performed to determine which parameters control reflectance in different spectral regions.

  6. Preliminary Method for Direct Quantification of Colistin Methanesulfonate by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Niece, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin use has increased in response to the advent of infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. It is administered parenterally as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS). Various formulations of CMS and labeling conventions can lead to confusion about colistin dosing, and questions remain about the pharmacokinetics of CMS. Since CMS does not have strong UV absorbance, current methods employ a laborious process of chemical conversion to colistin followed by precolumn derivatization to detect formed colistin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Here, we report a method for direct quantification of colistin methanesulfonate by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR). PMID:26124160

  7. Soil moisture estimation using reflected solar and emitted thermal infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Cihlar, J.; Estes, J. E.; Heilman, J. L.; Kahle, A.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Millard, J.; Price, J. C.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Classical methods of measuring soil moisture such as gravimetric sampling and the use of neutron moisture probes are useful for cases where a point measurement is sufficient to approximate the water content of a small surrounding area. However, there is an increasing need for rapid and repetitive estimations of soil moisture over large areas. Remote sensing techniques potentially have the capability of meeting this need. The use of reflected-solar and emitted thermal-infrared radiation, measured remotely, to estimate soil moisture is examined.

  8. Infrared reflectance spectra (2.2-15 microns) of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Salisbury, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory results show that (1) the Christiansen frequency (CF) feature in mid-infrared reflectance spectra of powders can be used to accurately distinguish plagioclase composition, and (2) the wavelength position of the CF is not affected by vitrification of the plagioclase. Although the CF position does not distinguish glass from crystalline forms of plagioclase, other features (combination-tone, overtone, restrahlen bands) in the mid-IR spectra of plagioclase can be used for that purpose. These results have important implications for application of thermal emission spectroscopy to mapping the surface composition of regolith-covered planetary bodies like the moon, Mars, and asteroids.

  9. Multivariate determination of hematocrit in whole blood by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrewa, S.; Paarmann, Ch.; Goemann, W.; Heise, H. M.

    1998-06-01

    A spectral analysis of whole blood was undertaken in the mid-infrared spectral range by using the attenuated total reflection technique. The reference hematocrit values of 109 blood samples were measured after centrifugation with a range between 30% and 50%. Multivariate calibration with the partial least-squares (PLS) algorithm was performed using baseline corrected absorbance spectra between 1600 and 1200 cm-1. The relative prediction error achieved was 2.7% based on average hematocrit values. The performance is comparable to that using centrifugation or conductivity measurements. The spectral effects from protein adsorption onto the ATR-crystal, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation have been investigated.

  10. Atomic Scale Flatness of Chemically Cleaned Silicon Surfaces Studied by Infrared Attenuated-Total-Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawara, Kenichi; Yasaka, Tatsuhiro; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Hirose, Masataka

    1992-07-01

    Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces obtained by aqueous HF or pH-modified (pH{=}5.3) buffered-HF (BHF) treatments have been characterized by a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) technique. The BHF treatment provides better surface flatness than the HF treatment. Pure water rinse is effective for improving the Si(111) surface flatness, while this is not the case for Si(100) because the pure water acts as an alkaline etchant and promotes the formation of (111) microfacets or microdefects on the (100) surface.

  11. Imaging the Material Properties of Bone Specimens Using Reflection-Based Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Acerbo A. S.; Carr, G.L.; Judex, S.; Miller, L.M.

    2012-03-13

    Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) is a widely used method for mapping the material properties of bone and other mineralized tissues, including mineralization, crystallinity, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking. This technique is traditionally performed in a transmission-based geometry, which requires the preparation of plastic-embedded thin sections, limiting its functionality. Here, we theoretically and empirically demonstrate the development of reflection-based FTIRM as an alternative to the widely adopted transmission-based FTIRM, which reduces specimen preparation time and broadens the range of specimens that can be imaged. In this study, mature mouse femurs were plastic-embedded and longitudinal sections were cut at a thickness of 4 {micro}m for transmission-based FTIRM measurements. The remaining bone blocks were polished for specular reflectance-based FTIRM measurements on regions immediately adjacent to the transmission sections. Kramers-Kronig analysis of the reflectance data yielded the dielectric response from which the absorption coefficients were directly determined. The reflectance-derived absorbance was validated empirically using the transmission spectra from the thin sections. The spectral assignments for mineralization, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking were indistinguishable in transmission and reflection geometries, while the stoichiometric/nonstoichiometric apatite crystallinity parameter shifted from 1032/1021 cm{sup -1} in transmission-based to 1035/1025 cm{sup -1} in reflection-based data. This theoretical demonstration and empirical validation of reflection-based FTIRM eliminates the need for thin sections of bone and more readily facilitates direct correlations with other methods such as nanoindentation and quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBSE) from the same specimen. It provides a unique framework for correlating bone's material and mechanical properties.

  12. Imaging the Material Properties of Bone Specimens using Reflection-Based Infrared Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Acerbo, Alvin S.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Judex, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier Transform InfraRed Microspectroscopy (FTIRM) is a widely used method for mapping the material properties of bone and other mineralized tissues, including mineralization, crystallinity, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking. This technique is traditionally performed in a transmission-based geometry, which requires the preparation of plastic-embedded thin sections, limiting its functionality. Here, we theoretically and empirically demonstrate the development of reflection-based FTIRM as an alternative to the widely adopted transmission-based FTIRM, which reduces specimen preparation time and broadens the range of specimens that can be imaged. In this study, mature mouse femurs were plastic-embedded and longitudinal sections were cut at a thickness of 4 μm for transmission-based FTIRM measurements. The remaining bone blocks were polished for specular reflectance-based FTIRM measurements on regions immediately adjacent to the transmission sections. Kramers-Kronig analysis of the reflectance data yielded the dielectric response from which the absorption coefficients were directly determined. The reflectance-derived absorbance was validated empirically using the transmission spectra from the thin sections. The spectral assignments for mineralization, carbonate substitution, and collagen cross-linking were indistinguishable in transmission and reflection geometries, while the stoichiometric/non-stoichiometric apatite crystallinity parameter shifted from 1032 / 1021 cm−1 in transmission-based to 1035 / 1025 cm−1 in reflection-based data. This theoretical demonstration and empirical validation of reflection-based FTIRM eliminates the need for thin sections of bone and more readily facilitates direct correlations with other methods such nanoindentation and quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBSE) from the same specimen. It provides a unique framework for correlating bone’s material and mechanical properties. PMID:22455306

  13. Non-resonant optical modulation of quantum cascade laser and its application potential in infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Tian, Chao; Chen, Gang; Martini, Rainer

    2014-02-01

    Based on the nature of ultra-fast carrier life time in semiconductor quantum well, optical modulation of quantum cascade laser offers an unique way to control intersubband transition through interband transition. This method circumvents the problem of parasitic effects associated with electrical modulation, resulting in a high modulation bandwidth. In addition it allows for fast wavelength modulation on standard type quantum cascade lasers by directly injecting charge carriers to laser active region with near-infrared optical excitation. Here, we demonstrate the first infrared spectroscopic measurement conducted with this all-optical modulation approach. Using wavelength modulation spectroscopy, a 1st order derivative spectrum of methanol vapor gas is observed. Optically based wavelength modulation up to 200 MHz is purely induced by pumping the front facet of quantum cascade laser with an intensity-modulated 1550 nm DFB laser. Compared with conventional direct absorption approach, the noise equivalent sensitivity is improved by a factor of 10 by adding optical modulation in a non-optimized system.

  14. Dynamics and control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Junshan; Gong, Shengping; Ma, Pengbin; Li, Junfeng

    2015-10-01

    Electrochromic devices have been used for the attitude control of a spinning solar sail in a deep space mission by modulating the reflectivity of the sail membrane. As a flexible spinning solar sail has no rigid structure to support its membrane, the distributed load due to solar radiation will lead to the deformation of the sail membrane, and the control torque generated by reflectivity modulation can introduce oscillatory motion to the membrane. By contrast, the deformation and oscillatory motion of the sail membrane have an impact on the performance of the reflectivity control. This paper investigates the dynamics and control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation. The static deformation of a spinning sail membrane subjected to solar radiation pressure in an equilibrium state is analyzed. The von Karman theory is used to obtain the displacements and the stress distribution in the equilibrium states. A simplified analytical first-order mode is chosen to model the membrane oscillation. The coupled membrane oscillation-attitude-orbit dynamics are considered for a GeoSail formation flying mission. The relative attitude and orbit control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation are numerically tested. The simulations indicate that the membrane deformation and oscillation have a lower impact on the control of the reflectivity modulated sails than the increase of the spinning rate.

  15. Electron tunneling infrared sensor module with integrated control circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyadzhyan-Sevak, Vardkes V. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    In an integrated electron tunneling sensor, an automatic tunneling control circuit varies a high voltage bias applied to the sensor deflection electrode in response to changes in sensor output to maintain the proper gap between the sensor tip and membrane. The control circuit ensures stable tunneling activity in the presence of large signals and other disturbances to the sensor. Output signals from the module may be derived from the amplified sensor output. The integrated sensor module is particularly well adapted for use in blood glucose measurement and monitoring system.

  16. Sediment mineralogy based on visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrard, R.D.; Vanden Berg, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIS) can be used to measure reflectance spectra (wavelength 350-2500 nm) for sediment cores and samples. A local ground-truth calibration of spectral features to mineral percentages is calculated by measuring reflectance spectra for a suite of samples of known mineralogy. This approach has been tested on powders, core plugs and split cores, and we conclude that it works well on all three, unless pore water is present. Initial VNIS studies have concentrated on determination of relative proportions of carbonate, opal, smectite and illite in equatorial Pacific sediments. Shipboard VNIS-based determination of these four components was demonstrated on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 199. ?? The Geological Society of London 2006.

  17. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite solar-shield material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbs, J. E.; Nofziger, M. J.; Bartell, F. O.; Wolfe, W. L.; Brooks, L. D.

    1982-09-01

    The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) telescope has an outer shield on it which is used to reduce the amount of thermal radiation that enters the telescope. The shield forms the first part of the baffle structure which reduces the photon incidence on the focal plane. It was, therefore, necessary to model this structure for scattering, and a required input for such modeling is the scattering characteristic of this surface. Attention is given to the measurement of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), the reflected radiance divided by the incident irradiance at 10.6 micrometers, 118 micrometers, and at several angles of incidence. Visual observation of the gold sample shows that there are striations which line up in a single direction. The data were, therefore, taken with the sample oriented in each of two directions.

  18. Pluto-Charon: Infrared Reflectance from 3.6 to 8.0 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Stansberry, John A.; VanCleve, Jeffrey E.

    2004-01-01

    We have measured the spectral reflectance of the Pluto-Charon pair at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micrometers with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) (G. G. Fazzio et al. Ap.J.Supp. 154, 10-17, 2004) on the Spitzer Space Telescope (STS), at eight different longitudes that cover a full rotation of the planet. STS does not have sufficient resolution to separate the light from the planet and the satellite. The image of the Pluto-Charon pair is clearly visible at each of the four wavelengths. We will discuss the spectral reflectance in terms of models that include the known components of Pluto and Charon s surfaces, and evidence for diurnal variations.

  19. Investigation of ferromagnetic properties of LSMO nanolayers by laser modulated reflectance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, V.; Alipieva, E.; Penchev, S.; Nedkov, I.; Kutzarova, T.

    2010-10-01

    Modulated optical reflectance (MOR) technique is employed for defectoscopy and structural analysis of La2/3Sr1/3MnO3(LSMO) ferromagnetic nanolayers. The optical reflectance is affected by the change of free charge carrier density due to periodic photothermal modulation described by Drude effect. A dual wavelength setup of a pulsed heating laser and a probe CW laser, whereas the laser focal spots are precisely aligned on the scanned sample surface, provides electrical signal proportional to the variation of optical reflectance at each measurement point. The probe beam is modulated selectively by reflection without interference by the substrate properties or external fields. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that MOR signal is proportional to the thermal derivative of magnetoresistance. The described contactless measurement may find important application in investigation of a range of new magnetoelectric devices.

  20. Cloud Thermodynamic-Phase Determination From Near-Infrared Spectra of Reflected Sunlight.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knap, Wouter H.; Stammes, Piet; Koelemeijer, Robert B. A.

    2002-01-01

    A simple method for the determination of the thermodynamic phase of clouds over ocean from near-infrared spectra of reflected sunlight is presented. The method is based on thresholding the parameter S1.67 (in percent), which is defined as the ratio of the difference between the spectral reflectivities at 1.70 and 1.64 μm to the reflectivity at 1.64 μm. Radiative transfer calculations for different cloudy atmospheres over ocean are presented to show that S1.67 0 for water clouds and S1.67 > 0 for ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. It is shown that S1.67 is sensitive to the presence of ice particles in clouds, and depends primarily on ice-cloud optical thickness and crystal size. The method is relatively independent of viewing and solar geometry because it is based on spectral absorption properties rather than scattering properties of clouds.The method is thoroughly analyzed using near-infrared reflectivity spectra made by the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over a well-defined cloud system of stratocumulus and cirrus situated over the Pacific Ocean. The location of water and ice clouds, derived from pilot information and from visual interpretation of the 0.87-μm (atmospheric window) and 1.38-μm (water vapor absorption band) images, is well reproduced by thresholding S1.67 according to the following scheme: S1.67 2%, water cloud; 2% < S1.67 < 10%, optically thin ice cloud; and S1.67 10%, optically thick ice cloud.On the basis of radiative transfer calculations it is shown that the method may lead to misclassifications in cases where optically thin clouds are present over snow. It is suggested that this also applies to minerals, rocks, and (dry) soils. On the other hand, it is shown that there is no fundamental difference between S1.67 cloud-phase determination over ocean and green vegetation. It is therefore expected that the method is suitable for application to measurements made over large parts of the globe by spaceborne

  1. Surface Compositional Units on Mercury from Spectral Reflectance at Ultraviolet to Near-infrared Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Domingue, D. L.; McClintock, W. E.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Helbert, J.; Head, J. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been acquiring reflectance spectra of Mercury's surface for over 16 months. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS has accumulated a global data set of more than 2 million spectra over the wavelength range 300-1450 nm. We have derived a set of VIRS spectral units (VSUs) from the following spectral parameters: visible brightness (R575: reflectance at 575 nm); visible/near-infrared reflectance ratio (VISr: reflectance at 415 nm to that at 750 nm); and ultraviolet reflectance ratio (UVr: reflectance at 310 nm to that at 390 nm). Five broad, slightly overlapping VSUs may be distinguished from these parameters. "Average VSU" areas have spectral parameters close to mean global values. "Dark blue VSU" areas have spectra with low R575 and high UVr. "Red VSU" areas have spectra with low UVr and higher VISr and R575 than average. "Intermediate VSU" areas have spectra with higher VISr than VSU red, generally higher R575, and a wide range of UVr. "Bright VSU" areas have high R575 and VISr and intermediate UVr. Several units defined by morphological or multispectral criteria correspond to specific VSUs, including low-reflectance material (dark blue VSU), pyroclastic deposits (red VSU), and hollows (intermediate VSU), but these VSUs generally include other types of areas as well. VSU definitions are complementary to those obtained by unsupervised clustering analysis. The global distribution of VIRS spectral units provides new information on Mercury's geological evolution. Much of Mercury's northern volcanic plains show spectral properties ranging from those of average VSU to those of red VSU, as does a large region in the southern hemisphere centered near 50°S, 245°E. Dark blue VSU material is widely distributed, with concentrations south of the northern plains, around the Rembrandt and

  2. Infrared and Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements from the TIROS 2 Meteorological Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandeen, W. R.; Hanel, R. A.; Licht, John; Stampfl, R. A.; Stroud, W. G.

    1961-01-01

    TIROS II contains instrumentation for measuring infrared and reflected solar radiation from the earth and its atmosphere. A medium resolution scanning radiometer and a low resolution non-scanning radiometer are employed. The satellite's spin provides the scan line of the medium resolution radiometer which is then advanced by the orbital motion. The spatial resolution is about 40 miles square when the earth directly beneath the satellite is viewed. The five channels employ bolometer detectors and filters to limit the spectral responses to five bands: 6 to 6.5 microns, 8 to 12 microns, 0.2 to 6 microns, 8 to 30 microns, and 0.55 to 0.75 microns. These five bands study, respectively: radiation in the water vapor absorption band; day and nighttime cloud cover; albedo; thermal radiation; and visual maps for comparison with satellite vidicon pictures. The low resolution non-scanning radiometer measures the earth's black-body temperature and albedo. Its field when viewing directly below is a circle of 450 miles diameter, covering part of each frame from the wide-field television camera. This radiometer consists of two thermistors, each in the apex of a reflective cone which provides optical gain. One thermistor is black and responds to both thermal and reflected solar radiation. The second responds to thermal but reflects solar radiation. The design, calibration, performance, and data reduction for both systems are discussed herein.

  3. Combination of infrared thermography and reflectance spectroscopy for precise classification of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianru; Guan, Yue; Liu, Caihua; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Hair follicles enjoy continual cycle of anagen, catagen and telogen all life. They not only provide a unique opportunity to study the physiological mechanism of organ regeneration, but also benefit to guide the treatment of organ repair in regenerative medicine. Usually, the histological examination as a gold standard has been applied to determine the stage of hair follicle cycle, but noninvasive classification of hair cycle in vivo remains unsolved. In this study, the thermal infrared imager was applied to measure the temperature change of mouse dorsal skin with hair follicle cycle, and the change of diffuse reflectance was monitored by the optical fiber spectrometer. Histological examination was used to verify the hair follicle stages. The results indicated that the skin temperature increased at the beginning of anagen. After having stayed a high value for several days, the temperature began to decrease. At the same time, the skin diffuse reflectance decreased until the end of this period. Then the temperature increased gradually after slightly decreased when the hair follicle entered into catagen stage, and the diffuse reflectance increased at this time. In telogen, both the temperature and the diffuse reflectance went back to a steady state all the time. Sub-stages of hair follicle cycle could be distinguished based on the joint curves. This study provided a new method to noninvasively recognize the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for the basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  4. Brain tumour differentiation: rapid stratified serum diagnostics via attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hands, James R; Clemens, Graeme; Stables, Ryan; Ashton, Katherine; Brodbelt, Andrew; Davis, Charles; Dawson, Timothy P; Jenkinson, Michael D; Lea, Robert W; Walker, Carol; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity is essential to exploit advances in new treatments to lead significant reductions in mortality and morbidity. Current cancer diagnostic tests observing tissue architecture and specific protein expression for specific cancers suffer from inter-observer variability, poor detection rates and occur when the patient is symptomatic. A new method for the detection of cancer using 1 μl of human serum, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and pattern recognition algorithms is reported using a 433 patient dataset (3897 spectra). To the best of our knowledge, we present the largest study on serum mid-infrared spectroscopy for cancer research. We achieve optimum sensitivities and specificities using a Radial Basis Function Support Vector Machine of between 80.0 and 100 % for all strata and identify the major spectral features, hence biochemical components, responsible for the discrimination within each stratum. We assess feature fed-SVM analysis for our cancer versus non-cancer model and achieve 91.5 and 83.0 % sensitivity and specificity respectively. We demonstrate the use of infrared light to provide a spectral signature from human serum to detect, for the first time, cancer versus non-cancer, metastatic cancer versus organ confined, brain cancer severity and the organ of origin of metastatic disease from the same sample enabling stratified diagnostics depending upon the clinical question asked. PMID:26874961

  5. Infrared Studies of the Reflective Properties of Solar Cells and the HS376 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frith, James; Reyes, Jacqueline; Cowardin, Heather; Anz-Meador, Phillip; Buckalew, Brent; Lederer, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, a selection of HS-376 buses were observed photometrically with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) to explore relationships between time-on-orbit and Near Infrared (NIR) color. These buses were chosen because of their relatively simple shape, for the abundance of similar observable targets, and their surface material being primarily covered by solar cells. While the HS-376 spacecraft were all very similar in design, differences in the specific solar cells used in the construction of each model proved to be an unconstrained variable that could affect the observed reflective properties. In 2016, samples of the solar cells used on various models of HS-376 spacecraft were obtained from Boeing and were analyzed in the Optical Measurements Center at the Johnson Space Center using a visible-near infrared field spectrometer. The laboratory-based spectra are convolved to match the photometric bands previously obtained using UKIRT and compared with the on-orbit photometry. The results and future work are discussed here.

  6. Attenuated total internal reflectance infrared microspectroscopy as a detection technique for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brian M; Danielson, Neil D; Sommer, André J

    2004-07-01

    A novel detector for capillary electrophoresis (CE) using single-bounce attenuated total internal reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy is presented. The terminus of the CE capillary is placed approximately 1 microm from the internal reflectance crystal at the focus of an ATR infrared microscope. Using pressure driven flow injection, concentration and volume detection limits have been determined for 25- and 10-microm-i.d. silica capillaries. Upon injection of 820 pL of succinylcholine chloride in a 10-microm capillary, a concentration detection limit of approximately 0.5 parts per thousand (ppt), or 410 pg, is found. The injection volume detection limit using a 108 ppt solution is 2.0 pL (216 pg). Sample separations using a programmed series of pressure, voltage, and again pressure on 25-, 50-, and 75-microm-i.d. capillaries are shown. CE separations of citrate and nitrate, as well as succinylcholine chloride with sodium salicylate using acetone as a neutral marker, are demonstrated. Several advantages of this CE-FT-IR technique include: (1) minimization of postcolumn broadening as a result of a small detector volume; (2) the ability to signal average spectra of the same aliquot, thereby improving the signal-to-noise in a stopped-flow environment; and (3) simplicity of design. PMID:15228361

  7. Reflective and photoacoustic infrared spectroscopic techniques in assessment of binding media in paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łojewski, Tomasz; Bagniuk, Jacek; Kołodziej, Andrzej; Łojewska, Joanna

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes a method to estimate the lipid content in binding media in paintings that can be used at any laboratory equipped with an infrared spectrometer. The lipid content estimator, termed greasiness index (GI), is defined as a ratio of lipid ν(C=O) and protein amide I bands at 1743 and 1635 cm-1, respectively. Three Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) sampling techniques were evaluated for GI determination: reflective attenuated total reflection—ATR, specular reflection microscopy— μSR and photoacoustic—PAS. A set of model painting samples containing three tempera binding media (casein, egg, egg + oil), seven pigments and one varnish type were used in the study. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the resulting data. A good reproducibility of GI was obtained by ATR and PAS but not with μSR. The discriminative power of the technique is higher for unvarnished samples, but, generally, the GI estimator can be used for the categorisation of binding media in large populations of painting samples analysed with the same FTIR technique (sampling technique, detection, etc.).

  8. Study and Development of near-Infrared Reflective and Absorptive Materials for Energy Saving Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yu Xing

    Near-Infrared (NIR) materials find applications in the field of energy saving. Both NIR reflective and absorptive materials can be used as energy saving materials with different working principles. The reflective materials can reflect the NIR light preventing it from being transmitted. Silver thin films are the best option as reflective films based on its reflectivity and cost. On the other hand, NIR absorptive materials can effectively convert the absorbed NIR light from sunlight to heat or electric energy. The first part of this research explored methods of preparing silver thin films that could be processed at low cost. The second part involved the design, synthesis and characterization of nickel coordination polymers as NIR absorptive materials. In part 1, different solution based methods of preparing silver thin films were studied. A silver nanoparticles solution was used to make thin film by a spray-pyrolysis process. Another method involved the surface activation with a fluoro-compound or silver nanoparticles followed by electroless silver plating on different substrates. Both methods could be processed at low cost. The obtained silver films showed NIR reflection of 50˜90% with transmission of 15-28% in the visible region. In part 2, two Nickel coordination polymers were explored. Tetraamino compounds were used as bridging ligands to increase the scope of electronic delocalization and metal-ligand orbital overlap which would reduce the energy gap to the NIR region. As a result, both polymers showed broad NIR absorption with maximum of 835 and 880 nm, respectively. In addition, the polymer showed NIR halochromism. This ground study pointed out both Ni coordination polymers as NIR absorptive materials with NIR halochromism.

  9. Classification of the waxy condition of durum wheat by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy using wavelets and a genetic algorithm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been applied to the problem of differentiating four genotypes of durum wheat: ‘waxy’, wx-A1 null, wx-B1 null and wild type. The test data consisted of 95 NIR reflectance spectra of wheat samples obtained from a USDA-ARS wheat breeding program. A two...

  10. Instrument Reflections and Scene Amplitude Modulation in a Polychromatic Microwave Quadrature Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, Greg

    2003-01-01

    A polychromatic microwave quadrature interferometer has been characterized using several laboratory plasmas. Reflections between the transmitter and the receiver have been observed, and the effects of including reflection terms in the data reduction equation have been examined. An error analysis which includes the reflections, modulation of the scene beam amplitude by the plasma, and simultaneous measurements at two frequencies has been applied to the empirical database, and the results are summarized. For reflection amplitudes around 1096, the reflection terms were found to reduce the calculated error bars for electron density measurements by about a factor of 2. The impact of amplitude modulation is also quantified. In the complete analysis, the mean error bar for high- density measurements is 7.596, and the mean phase shift error for low-density measurements is 1.2". .

  11. Improved near-infrared ocean reflectance correction algorithm for satellite ocean color data processing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lide; Wang, Menghua

    2014-09-01

    A new approach for the near-infrared (NIR) ocean reflectance correction in atmospheric correction for satellite ocean color data processing in coastal and inland waters is proposed, which combines the advantages of the three existing NIR ocean reflectance correction algorithms, i.e., Bailey et al. (2010) [Opt. Express18, 7521 (2010)Appl. Opt.39, 897 (2000)Opt. Express20, 741 (2012)], and is named BMW. The normalized water-leaving radiance spectra nLw(λ) obtained from this new NIR-based atmospheric correction approach are evaluated against those obtained from the shortwave infrared (SWIR)-based atmospheric correction algorithm, as well as those from some existing NIR atmospheric correction algorithms based on several case studies. The scenes selected for case studies are obtained from two different satellite ocean color sensors, i.e., the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the satellite Aqua and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP), with an emphasis on several turbid water regions in the world. The new approach has shown to produce nLw(λ) spectra most consistent with the SWIR results among all NIR algorithms. Furthermore, validations against the in situ measurements also show that in less turbid water regions the new approach produces reasonable and similar results comparable to the current operational algorithm. In addition, by combining the new NIR atmospheric correction with the SWIR-based approach, the new NIR-SWIR atmospheric correction can produce further improved ocean color products. The new NIR atmospheric correction can be implemented in a global operational satellite ocean color data processing system. PMID:25321543

  12. Testing Models of Low-Excitation Photodissociation Regions with Far-Infrared Observations of Reflection Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young Owl, Rolaine C.; Meixner, Margaret M.; Fong, David; Haas, Michael R.; Rudolph, Alexander L.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents Kuiper Airborne Observatory observations of the photodissociation regions (PDRs) in nine reflection nebulae. These observations include the far-infrared atomic fine-structure lines of [O I] 63 and 145 μm, [C II] 158 μm, and [Si II] 35 μm and the adjacent far-infrared continuum to these lines. Our analysis of these far-infrared observations provides estimates of the physical conditions in each reflection nebula. In our sample of reflection nebulae, the stellar effective temperatures are 10,000-30,000 K, the gas densities are 4×102-2×104 cm-3, the gas temperatures are 200-690 K, and the incident far-ultraviolet intensities are 300-8100 times the ambient interstellar radiation field strength (1.2×10-4 ergs cm-2 s-1 sr-1). Our observations are compared with current theory for low-excitation PDRs. The [C II] 158 μm to [O I] 63 μm line ratio decreases with increasing incident far-ultraviolet intensity. This trend is due in part to a positive correlation of gas density with incident far-ultraviolet intensity. We show that this correlation arises from a balance of pressure between the H II region and the surrounding PDR. The [O I] 145 to 63 μm line ratio is higher (greater than 0.1) than predicted and is insensitive to variations in incident far-ultraviolet intensity and gas density. The stellar temperature has little effect on the heating efficiency that primarily had the value 3×10-3, within a factor of 2. This result agrees with a model that modifies the photoelectric heating theory to account for color temperature effects and predicts that the heating efficiencies would vary by less than a factor of 3 with the color temperature of the illuminating field. In addition to the single-pointing observations, an [O I] 63 μm scan was done across the molecular ridge of one of our sample reflection nebulae, NGC 1977. The result appears to support previous suggestions that the ionization front of this well-studied PDR is not purely edge-on.

  13. Assessment of Drowsiness Based on Ocular Parameters Detected by Infrared Reflectance Oculography

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Clare; Chang, Anne-Marie; Sullivan, Jason P.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Numerous ocular parameters have been proposed as reliable physiological markers of drowsiness. A device that measures many of these parameters and then combines them into a single metric (the Johns Drowsiness Scale [JDS]) is being used commercially to assess drowsiness in professional drivers. Here, we examine how these parameters reflect changes in drowsiness, and how they relate to objective and subjective indices of the drowsy state in a controlled laboratory setting. Design: A within subject prospective study. Participants: 29 healthy adults (18 males; mean age 23.3 ± 4.6 years; range 18-34 years) Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Over the course of a 30-h extended wake vigil under constant routine (CR) conditions, participants were monitored using infrared reflectance oculography (Optalert) and completed bi-hourly neurobehavioral tests, including the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT). Ocular-defined increases in drowsiness were evident with extended time awake and during the biological night for all ocular parameters; JDS being the most sensitive marker of drowsiness induced by sleep regulatory processes (p < 0.0001). In addition, the associations between JDS in the preceding 10-min period and subsequent PVT lapses and KSS were stronger (AUC 0.74/0.80, respectively) than any other ocular metric, such that PVT lapses, mean response time (RT), and KSS increased in a dose-response manner as a function of prior JDS score (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Ocular parameters captured by infrared reflectance oculography detected fluctuations in drowsiness due to time awake and during the biological night. The JDS outcome was the strongest predictor of drowsiness among those tested, and showed a clear association to objective and subjective measures of drowsiness. Our findings indicate this real-time objective drowsiness monitoring system is an effective tool for monitoring changes in alertness and

  14. Bio-inspired, subwavelength surface structures to control reflectivity, transmission, and scattering in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora Gonzalez, Federico

    Controlling the reflection of visible and infrared (IR) light at interfaces is extremely important to increase the power efficiency and performance of optics, electro-optical and (thermo)photovoltaic systems. The eye of the moth has evolved subwavelength protuberances that increase light transmission into the eye tissue and prevent reflection. The subwavelength protuberances effectively grade the refractive index from that of air (n=1) to that of the tissue (n=1.4), making the interface gradual, suppressing reflection. In theory, the moth-eye (ME) structures can be implemented with any material platform to achieve an antireflectance effect by scaling the pitch and size of protuberances for the wavelength range of interest. In this work, a bio-inspired, scalable and substrate-independent surface modification protocol was developed to realize broadband antireflective structures based on the moth-eye principle. Quasi-ordered ME arrays were fabricated in IR relevant materials using a colloidal lithography method to achieve highly efficient, omni-directional transmission of mid and far infrared (IR) radiation. The effect of structure height and aspect ratio on transmittance and scattering is explored, with discussion on experimental techniques and effective medium theory (EMT). The highest aspect ratio structures (AR = 9.4) achieved peak single-side transmittance of 98%, with >85% transmission for lambda = 7--30 microns. A detailed photon balance constructed by transmission, forward scattering, specular reflection and diffuse reflection measurements to quantify optical losses due to near-field effects will be discussed. In addition, angle-dependent transmission measurements showed that moth-eye structures provide superior antireflective properties compared to unstructured interfaces over a wide angular range (0--60° incidence). Finally, subwavelength ME structures are incorporated on a Si substrate to enhance the absorption of near infrared (NIR) light in PtSi films to

  15. Nondestructive inspection of organic films on sandblasted metals using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Cox, R.L.; Barber, T.E.; Neu, J.T.

    1996-07-08

    Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy is a very useful tool for the determination of surface contamination and characterization of films in manufacturing applications. Spectral data from the surfaces of a host of practical materials may be obtained with sufficient insensitivity to characterize relatively thick films, such as paint, and the potential exists to detect very thin films, such as trace oil contamination on metals. The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/InfraRed (SIMIR) has been developed as a nondestructive inspection tool to exploit this potential in practical situations. This SIMIR is a complete and ruggidized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with a very efficient and robust barrel ellipse diffuse reflectance optical collection system and operating software system. The SIMIR weighs less than 8 Kg, occupies less than 14 L volume, and may be manipulated into any orientation during operation. The surface to be inspected is placed at the focal point of the SIMIR by manipulating the SIMIR or the surface. The SIMIR may or may not contact the surface being inspected. For flat or convex items, there are no size limits to items being inspected. For concave surfaces, the SIMIR geometry limits the surface to those having a radius of curvature greater than 0.2 m. For highly reflective metal surfaces, the SIMIR has a noise level approaching 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} absorbance units, which is sufficient for detecting nanometer thick organic film residues on metals. The use of this nondestructive inspection tool is demonstrated by the spatial mapping of organic stains on sand blasted metals in which organic stains such as silicone oils, mineral oils, and triglycerides are identified both qualitatively and quantitatively over the surface of the metal specimen.

  16. Temperature dependence of far-infrared difference reflectivity of YBa2Cu3O7-y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, H.; Bauer, G.; Vogl, G.; Strasser, G.; Gornik, E.

    1989-04-01

    Far-infrared difference reflectivity spectra (50-450 cm-1) below, across and above the transition temperature on polycrystalline single-phase YBa2Cu3O7-y samples were measured. The data are compared with model fits using the explicit temperature dependence of the Mattis-Bardeen conductivity, an effective-medium approach and temperature-dependent phonon oscillator parameters and alternatively a plasma model. For the plasma model we alternatively use a generalized Drude-like expression with a frequency-dependent damping after Thomas et al. [Phys. Rev. B 36, 846 (1987)] or the original model with Orenstein et al. [Phys. Rev. B 36, 729 (1987)] and Sherwin, Richards, and Zettl [Phys. Rev. B 37, 1587 (1988)] with a Drude contribution plus a mid-infrared oscillator, but with constant carrier relaxation rates. The models explain the difference reflectivity data (precision <0.2%) with a fitting accuracy of 1-2 % (Mattis-Bardeen model) or 2-3 % (plasma model) over the full temperature range. In order to investigate their applicability, reflectivity, and conductivity data of a highly oriented YBa2Cu3O7-y sample, as recently published by Bonn et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2249 (1987)], were also fitted with both models. Because of the frequency dependence of the free-carrier damping rates, it was important to fulfill the Kramers-Kronig relations between the real and the imaginary part of the dynamic conductivity in the calculations. For both models the characteristic dependences of the conductivity on frequency and temperature are given. Whereas, naturally, the Mattis-Bardeen model yields a gaplike depression of the conductivity for frequencies below an assumed gap, the plasma model results in somewhat smoother dependences of Re(σ(ω)) and Im(σ(ω)) in the frequency region of interest.

  17. Integrated Analysis of Carbonatite using Short Wave Infra-Red and Visible/Near Infra-Red Reflectance Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assiri, A.; Rooney, T. O.; Velbel, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonatites are among the most important hosts for economically important rare-earth element (REE) deposits. An ongoing challenge has been the identification of carbonatites, which may outcrop as small bodies with indistinct field characteristics. Remote sensing techniques may provide a routine and reliable method to identify such deposits. We have used short wave infra-red (SWIR) and visible/near infra-red (VNIR) reflectance characteristics of a well exposed carbonatite located in the north east of the United Arab Emirates to develop techniques to facilitate the distinction of carbonatites from other rock types. This project has focused on the wavelength region from 0.45 to 2.43 μm of SWIR and VNIR subsystems on the imaging instrument onboard ASTER. We hypothesize that based on spectral and spatial data derived from computer segmentation algorithms of the SWIR (7) and VNIR (4, 1) bands we will be able to identify carbonatite rocks. In order to build a technique that can capture the intrinsic associations between carbonatite anomalies, rock class types, and attributes, we assembled the spectral and spatial information derived from computer segmentation algorithms into a single segment image. During our investigation of the spatial data two principal questions arose: 1) How should spatial structures, or "neighborhoods" for each pixel within the image be automatically defined? 2) How should spatial and spectral information be combined in the classification? We addressed these questions by using unsupervised and supervised segmentation algorithm strategies based on pixel values and locations. Pixels that are spatially connected and have similar values were grouped in a single segment (fixed neighborhood pixels) on the basis of the integration of the maximum-likelihood supervised classification technique within a Markov Random Fields framework. We then developed guidelines for combining the spatial information extracted through segmentation with spectral information

  18. A system for simultaneous near-infrared reflectance and transillumination imaging of occlusal carious lesions

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians need technologies to improve the diagnosis of questionable occlusal carious lesions (QOC’s) and determine if decay has penetrated to the underlying dentin. Assessing lesion depth from near-infrared (NIR) images holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel and stain to NIR light at λ=1300–1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. Unfortunately, NIR reflectance measurements alone are limited in utility for approximating occlusal lesion depth >200-μm due to light attenuation from the lesion body. Previous studies sought to combine NIR reflectance and transillumination measurements taken at λ=1300-nm in order to estimate QOC depth and severity. The objective of this study was to quantify the change in lesion contrast and size measured from multispectral NIR reflectance and transillumination images of natural occlusal carious lesions with increasing lesion depth and severity in order to determine the optimal multimodal wavelength combinations for estimating QOC depth. Extracted teeth with varying amounts of natural occlusal decay were measured using a multispectral-multimodal NIR imaging system at prominent wavelengths within the λ=1300–1700-nm spectral region. Image analysis software was used to calculate lesion contrast and area values between sound and carious enamel regions. PMID:27006524

  19. A system for simultaneous near-infrared reflectance and transillumination imaging of occlusal carious lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Clinicians need technologies to improve the diagnosis of questionable occlusal carious lesions (QOC's) and determine if decay has penetrated to the underlying dentin. Assessing lesion depth from near-infrared (NIR) images holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel and stain to NIR light at λ=1300-1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. Unfortunately, NIR reflectance measurements alone are limited in utility for approximating occlusal lesion depth >200-μm due to light attenuation from the lesion body. Previous studies sought to combine NIR reflectance and transillumination measurements taken at λ=1300-nm in order to estimate QOC depth and severity. The objective of this study was to quantify the change in lesion contrast and size measured from multispectral NIR reflectance and transillumination images of natural occlusal carious lesions with increasing lesion depth and severity in order to determine the optimal multimodal wavelength combinations for estimating QOC depth. Extracted teeth with varying amounts of natural occlusal decay were measured using a multispectral-multimodal NIR imaging system at prominent wavelengths within the λ=1300-1700-nm spectral region. Image analysis software was used to calculate lesion contrast and area values between sound and carious enamel regions.

  20. Modulated surface nanostructures for enhanced light trapping and reduced surface reflection of crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Hirai, Yuji; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Usami, Noritaka

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the fabrication of modulated surface nanostructures as a new surface texture design for thin wafer solar cells. Using a combination of conventional alkali etching and colloidal lithography, we fabricated surface textures with micrometer and nanometre scales on a Si substrate. These modulated surface nanostructures exhibit reduced surface reflection in a broad spectral range, compared with conventional micrometer textures. We investigated optical absorption using a rigorous coupled wave analysis simulation, which revealed a significant reduction in surface reflection over a broad spectral range and efficient light trapping (comparable to that of conventional micrometer-scale textures) for the modulated nanostructures. We found that the modulated surface nanostructures have a high potential of improving the performance of thin wafer crystalline Si solar cells.

  1. Method for measuring retardation of infrared wave-plate by modulated-polarized visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Song, Feijun

    2012-11-01

    A new method for precisely measuring the optical phase retardation of wave-plates in the infrared spectral region is presented by using modulated-polarized visible light. An electro-optic modulator is used to accurately determine the zero point by the frequency-doubled signal of the Modulated-polarized light. A Babinet-Soleil compensator is employed to make the phase delay compensation. Based on this method, an instrument is set up to measure the retardations of the infrared wave-plates with visible region laser. Measurement results with high accuracy and sound repetition are obtained by simple calculation. Its measurement precision is less than and repetitive precision is within 0.3%.

  2. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrate and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O and adsorbed H2O. The spectal character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micrometers, 2.2 micrometers, 2.7 micrometers, 3 micrometers, and 6 micrometers are reported here in spetra measured under Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stonger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micrometer feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3- micrometer band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micromter band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural

  3. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials

  4. Phase-amplitude crosstalk in intensity modulated near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, K.; Wickramasinghe, Y.

    2000-05-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instruments that rely on phase sensitive detection suffer from what is called "phase-amplitude crosstalk," i.e., the phase measured is dependent on the average light intensity entering the detector. Changes in detector rise time with input light intensity is the accepted explanation of this phenomenon. It is concluded here that an additional simple mechanism can cause phase-amplitude errors, particularly if the ratio of the ac component of the detected signal to the dc component is low. It is shown that the form of the phase distortion encountered during the development of a new phase sensitive NIR instrument can be modeled by assuming the presence of a synchronous interfering signal, due to rf coupling, at the detector output. This modeling allows a required margin between the detected signal of interest, i.e., the signal from the tissue and the interfering signal to be set in order to achieve a measured phase accuracy necessary to derive sufficiently accurate clinical parameters.

  5. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Boreman, G D; Dogariu, A; Christodoulou, C; Kotter, D

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 μm. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's. PMID:21127627

  6. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, Glenn D.; Dogariu, Aristide; Christodoulou, Christos; Kotter, Dale

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 mu m. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's.

  7. Estimation of blood alcohol concentration by horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kakali; Sharma, Shiba P; Lahiri, Sujit C

    2010-06-01

    Numerous methods like distillation followed by iodometric titrations, gas chromatograph (GC)-flame ionization detector, gas chromatograph-mass spectrophotometer, GC-Headspace, Breath analyzer, and biosensors including alcohol dehydrogenase (enzymatic) have been used to determine blood alcohol concentration (BAC). In the present study, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy had been used to determine BAC in whole blood. The asymmetric stretching frequency of C-C-O group of ethanol in water (1,045 cm(-1)) had been used to calculate BAC using Beer's Law. A seven-point calibration curve of ethanol was drawn in the concentration range 24-790 mg dL(-1). The curve showed good linearity over the concentration range used (r(2)=0.999, standard deviation=0.0023). The method is accurate, reproducible, rapid, simple, and nondestructive in nature. PMID:20541351

  8. Strategies for Detecting Organic Liquids on Soils Using Mid-Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Neal B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2008-06-25

    Stand-off monitoring for chemical spills can provide timely information for clean-up efforts and mid-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy is one approach being investigated. Anomaly and target detection strategies were examined for detection of four different low-volatility organic liquids on two different soil types. Several preprocessing and signal weighting strategies were studied. Anomaly detection for C-H bands was very good using second derivative preprocessing and provided similar performance to target detection approaches such as generalized least squares (GLS) and partial least squares (PLS) with detections at soil loads of approximately 0.6 to 1.5 mg/cm2. Good performance was also found for detection of P=O, O–H and C=O bands but the optimal strategy varied. The simplicity and generality of anomaly detection is attractive, however target detection provides more capability for classification.

  9. Recent Developments in Solid-Phase Extraction for Near and Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huck, Christian W

    2016-01-01

    A review with more than 100 references on the principles and recent developments in the solid-phase extraction (SPE) prior and for in situ near and attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopic analysis is presented. New materials, chromatographic modalities, experimental setups and configurations are described. Their advantages for fast sample preparation for distinct classes of compounds containing different functional groups in order to enhance selectivity and sensitivity are discussed and compared. This is the first review highlighting both the fundamentals of SPE, near and ATR spectroscopy with a view to real sample applicability and routine analysis. Most of real sample analyses examples are found in environmental research, followed by food- and bioanalysis. In this contribution a comprehensive overview of the most potent SPE-NIR and SPE-ATR approaches is summarized and provided. PMID:27187347

  10. Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Lipid-Protein Interaction in Langmuir Films

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  11. Detection of whitening agents in illegal cosmetics using attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Bothy, J L; Desmedt, B; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O

    2014-09-01

    Cosmetic products containing illegal whitening agents are still found on the European market. They represent a considerable risk to public health, since they are often characterised by severe side effects when used chronically. The detection of such products at customs is not always simple, due to misleading packaging and the existence of products containing only legal components. Therefore there is a need for easy to use equipment and techniques to perform an initial screening of samples. The use of attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, combined with chemometrics, was evaluated for that purpose. It was found that the combination of ATR-IR with the simple chemometric technique k-nearest neighbours gave good results. A model was obtained in which a minimum of illegal samples was categorised as legal. The correctly classified illegal samples could be attributed to the illegal components present. PMID:24927403

  12. Pectin functionalised by fatty acids: Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopic characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Calce, Enrica; Tarantilis, Petros A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Chemically modified pectin derivatives obtained by partial esterification of its hydroxyl moieties with fatty acids (FA; oleic, linoleic and palmitic acids), as well as the initial apple peel pectin were comparatively characterised using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Characteristic changes observed in DRIFT spectra in going from pectin to its FA esters are related to the corresponding chemical modifications. Comparing the DRIFT spectra with some reported data on FTIR spectra of the same materials measured in KBr or NaCl matrices has revealed noticeable shifts of several polar functional groups both in pectin and in its FA-esterified products induced by the halide salts. The results obtained have implications for careful structural analyses of biopolymers with hydrophilic functional groups by means of different FTIR spectroscopic methodologies.

  13. Electrically controlled infrared optical transmission and reflection through metallic grating using NEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Fujii, Masamitsu

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced optical properties of metallic subwavelength gratings with very narrow slits have recently been extensively studied in the field of plasmonics. The optical transmission and reflection of such nanostructures, which act as nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) actuators, can be electrically controlled by varying their geometrical parameters, giving them great flexibility for numerous applications in photonics, opto-electronics, and sensing. The previous challenges in controlling the optical properties were overcome by forming a metallic subwavelength grating with an NEMS actuator in mid-air, allowing the grating to be physically moved with the bias voltage. The device can shift the plasmon resonance wavelength with an electrical signal. The resonance wavelength for Wood's anomaly at the infrared region is predicted through simulations to shift by approximately 150 nm. We discuss the effect of polarization on the optical properties and grating mechanism. The reported effect may be used to achieve active spectral tuning and switching in a wide range of applications.

  14. Multiple perturbation two-dimensional correlation analysis of cellulose by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Morita, Shin-Ich; Awa, Kimie; Okada, Mariko; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-05-01

    An extension of the two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis scheme for multi-dimensional perturbation is described. A simple computational form is provided to construct synchronous correlation and disrelation maps for the analysis of microscopic imaging data based on two independent perturbation variables. Sets of time-dependent attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectra of water and cellulose mixtures were collected during the evaporation of water from finely ground cellulose. The system exhibits complex behaviors in response to two independent perturbations, i.e., evaporation time and grinding time. Multiple perturbation 2D analysis reveals a specific difference in the rate of evaporation of water molecules when accompanied by crystallinity changes of cellulose. It identifies subtle differences in the volatility of water, which is related to the crystalline structure of cellulose. PMID:19470205

  15. [Use of visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to identify the cashmere and wool].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Ru; Zhang, Li-Ping; Wang, Jian-Fu; Wu, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Rong

    2013-08-01

    The wool and cashmere samples (n = 130) from different areas of Gansu province were identified by visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (Vis/NIRs). The result shows that principal component-mahalanobis distance pattern can identify the wool and cashmere, and the boundary between two categories was clear; The calibration set samples were used to establish calibration qualitative model using PCR combined with the best pretreatment of the spectra and math, including multivariate scattering correction (MSC), first derivative, eight for the best principal component factor, one for uncertainty factor, this calibration model of the predicted was the best, and the result of the external validation was correct completely. Results from this experiment indicate that Vis/NIRs can be utilized to identify the wool and cashmere. PMID:24159853

  16. Polarized infrared attenuated total reflection study of sapphire crystals with different crystallographic planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. C.; Ng, S. S.; Hassan, H. Abu; Dumelow, T.

    2015-04-01

    Polarized infrared (IR) attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements were performed on c- (polar) and r-plane (semi-polar) sapphire crystals. For c-plane sapphire crystal, spectral features due to the surface phonon polariton (SPhP) modes are only observable in the p-polarized ATR spectrum. Calculation of the SPhP dispersion spectra revealed that the SPhP modes of r-plane sapphire crystal are possible to be observed in both the s- and p-polarized ATR spectra. ATR measurements verified that excitation of the SPhP modes are still easier in the p-polarized ATR spectra. Taking into account the effects of anisotropy and the crystal orientation of hexagonal crystal system, the ATR spectra of r-plane sapphire crystal with arbitrary orientations were simulated. Through a best fit of experimental with simulated spectra, information about the crystal orientation of sapphire crystals was deduced.

  17. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  18. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy of thin films using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with <1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  19. Calibration and prediction of amino acids in stevia leaf powder using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guan; Wang, Ruiguo; Quampah, Alfred Julius; Rong, Zhengqin; Shi, Chunhai; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-28

    The use of stevia as animal feed additive has been researched over the years, but how to rapidly predict its amino acid contents has not been studied yet by using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. In the present study, 301 samples of stevia leaf powder were defined as the calibration set from which calibration models were optimized, and the performance of prediction was evaluated. Compared with other mathematical treatments, the models developed with the "1, 12, 12, 1" treatment, combined with modified partial least-squares regression and standard normal variance with de-trending, had a significant potential in predicting amino acid contents, such as threonine, serine, etc. Six spectral regions were found to possess large spectrum variation and show high contribution to calibration models. From the present study, the calibration models of amino acids in stevia were successfully developed and could be applied to quality control in feed processing, breeding selection and mutant screening. PMID:22066716

  20. Fast determination of total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-cai; Chen, Xing-dan; Lu, Yong-jun; Cao, Zhi-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was used to develop a fast determination method for total ginsenosides in Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) powder. The spectra were analyzed with multiplicative signal correction (MSC) correlation method. The best correlative spectra region with the total ginsenosides content was 1660 nm~1880 nm and 2230nm~2380 nm. The NIR calibration models of ginsenosides were built with multiple linear regression (MLR), principle component regression (PCR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression respectively. The results showed that the calibration model built with PLS combined with MSC and the optimal spectrum region was the best one. The correlation coefficient and the root mean square error of correction validation (RMSEC) of the best calibration model were 0.98 and 0.15% respectively. The optimal spectrum region for calibration was 1204nm~2014nm. The result suggested that using NIR to rapidly determinate the total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder were feasible.

  1. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy: principles and applications to lipid-protein interaction in Langmuir films.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R

    2010-04-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins, and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  2. [Application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy in grass breeding with space flight mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-Bo; Han, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yun-Wei; Guo, Hui-Qin

    2008-02-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a new fast and efficient analysis method. It has been wildly used in many areas such as evaluation of feedstuff, assessment of soil fertilizer and so on. In the present paper, the principle, technique method and merits of NIRS were introduced. The potential application of NIRS in grass breeding with space flight mutagenesis was discussed in areas such as analysis of grass nutrition, estimate of secondary metabolism compounds, forecast of disease and insects resistance, and evaluation of abiotic stress. The conclusion is that application of NIRS in grass breeding with space mutagenesis is significant in both academic and technical areas because it not only improves the efficiency of mutation selection but helps uncover the mechanism of space mutation breeding. PMID:18479009

  3. Depth profile characterization technique for electron density in GaN films by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijoh, Takaaki; Ma, Bei; Morita, Ken; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a noncontact measurement method for carrier density and mobility. In this article, the model determination procedure of layer-type nonuniform electron distribution is investigated, since the spectrum fitting hitherto has been conducted on the basis of a multilayer model defined in advance. A simplified case of a high-electron-density GaN layer embedded in a GaN matrix is mainly studied. The following procedure is found to be applicable. The first step is the determination of the high-density layer position in the vicinity of the surface, in the middle region, or in the vicinity of the interface. This is followed by the specification of the sheet electron density and the layer thickness of the high-density region. It is found that this procedure is also applicable to the characterization of two-dimensional electron gases in the vicinity of AlGaN/GaN heterointerfaces.

  4. [Quantitative analysis of contents in compound fertilizer and application research using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Le; Zhang, Hong; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Bin-Mei; Yu, Li-Xiang; Wang, Qi; Wu, Yue-Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a new approach to fast determining the content of urea, biuret and moisture in compound fertilizer composed of urea, ammonium dihydrogenphosphate and potassium chloride was proposed by using near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. After preprocessing the original spectrum, partial least squares (PLS) models of urea, biuret and moisture were built with the R2 values of 0.9861, 0.9770 and 0.9713 respectively, the root mean square errors of cross validation were 2.59, 0.38, 0.132 respectively. And the prediction correlation factors were 0.9733, 0.9215 and 0.9679 respectively. The authors detected six kinds of compound fertilizer in market for the model verification, the correlation factors were 0.9237, 0.9786 and 0.9874 respectively. The data implied that the new method can be used for situ quality control in the production process of compound fertilizer. PMID:24783536

  5. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging of tissues and live cells.

    PubMed

    Andrew Chan, K L; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-03-29

    FTIR spectroscopic imaging is a label-free, non-destructive and chemically specific technique that can be utilised to study a wide range of biomedical applications such as imaging of biopsy tissues, fixed cells and live cells, including cancer cells. In particular, the use of FTIR imaging in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode has attracted much attention because of the small, but well controlled, depth of penetration and corresponding path length of infrared light into the sample. This has enabled the study of samples containing large amounts of water, as well as achieving an increased spatial resolution provided by the high refractive index of the micro-ATR element. This review is focused on discussing the recent developments in FTIR spectroscopic imaging, particularly in ATR sampling mode, and its applications in the biomedical science field as well as discussing the future opportunities possible as the imaging technology continues to advance. PMID:26488803

  6. Analysis of visible and near infrared spectral reflectance for assessing metals in soil.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Paresh H; Müller, Ingo; Van der Meer, Freek D; de Smeth, Boudewijn

    2015-10-01

    Visible and near infrared reflectance (VNIR; 350-2500 nm) spectroscopy has greatly been used in soils, especially for studying variability in spectrally active soil components (e.g., organic carbon, clays, and Fe/Al oxides) based on their diagnostic spectral features. In recent years, this technique has also been applied to assess soil metallic ions. In this research, the feasibility of VNIR spectroscopy for determination of soil metals was investigated with two soil data sets: (i) artificially metal-spiked and (ii) in situ metal-contaminated soils. Results showed that reflectance spectra of neither metal-spiked soils with Cd, As, and Pb even at their higher concentrations of 20, 900, and 1200 mg kg(-1), respectively, nor in situ metal-contaminated soils (with concentrations of 30 mg Cd, 3019 mg As, and 5725 mg Pb kg(-1) soil) showed any recognized absorption peaks that correspond to soil metal concentrations. We observed variations in reflectance intensity for in situ metal-contaminated soils only, showing higher reflectance across the entire spectrum for strongly and lower for less metal-contaminated soils. A significant correlation was found between surface soil metals' concentrations and continuum removed spectra, while soil metals were also found significantly associated with soil organic matter and total Fe. A partial least square regression with cross-validation approach produced an acceptable prediction of metals (R (2) = 0.58-0.94) for both soil data sets, metal-spiked and in situ metal-contaminated soils. However, high values of root mean square error ruled out practical application of the achieved prediction models. PMID:27614958

  7. Diffuse reflectance near infrared-chemometric methods development and validation of amoxicillin capsule formulations

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahmed Nawaz; Khar, Roop Krishen; Ajayakumar, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to establish near infrared-chemometric methods that could be effectively used for quality profiling through identification and quantification of amoxicillin (AMOX) in formulated capsule which were similar to commercial products. In order to evaluate a large number of market products easily and quickly, these methods were modeled. Materials and Methods: Thermo Scientific Antaris II near infrared analyzer with TQ Analyst Chemometric Software were used for the development and validation of the identification and quantification models. Several AMOX formulations were composed with four excipients microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, croscarmellose sodium and colloidal silicon dioxide. Development includes quadratic mixture formulation design, near infrared spectrum acquisition, spectral pretreatment and outlier detection. According to prescribed guidelines by International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) and European Medicine Agency (EMA) developed methods were validated in terms of specificity, accuracy, precision, linearity, and robustness. Results: On diffuse reflectance mode, an identification model based on discriminant analysis was successfully processed with 76 formulations; and same samples were also used for quantitative analysis using partial least square algorithm with four latent variables and 0.9937 correlation of coefficient followed by 2.17% root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC), 2.38% root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), 2.43% root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV). Conclusion: Proposed model established a good relationship between the spectral information and AMOX identity as well as content. Resulted values show the performance of the proposed models which offers alternate choice for AMOX capsule evaluation, relative to that of well-established high-performance liquid chromatography method. Ultimately three commercial products were successfully evaluated using developed

  8. Characterization of a High Efficiency, Ultrashort Pulse Shaper Incorporating a Reflective 4096-Element Spatial Light Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Planchon, Thomas A.; Amir, Wafa; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate pulse shaping via arbitrary phase modulation with a reflective, 1×4096 element, liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The unique construction of this device provides a very high efficiency when the device is used for phase modulation only in a prism based pulse shaper, namely 85%. We also present a single shot characterization of the SLM in the spatial domain and a single shot characterization of the pulse shaper in the spectral domain. These characterization methods provide a detailed picture of how the SLM modifies the spectral phase of an ultrashort pulse. PMID:19562096

  9. Characterization of a high efficiency, ultrashort pulse shaper incorporating a reflective 4096-element spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Planchon, Thomas A.; Amir, Wafa; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate pulse shaping via arbitrary phase modulation with a reflective, 1 × 4096 element, liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The unique construction of this device provides a very high efficiency when the device is used for phase modulation only in a prism based pulse shaper, namely 85%. We also present a single shot characterization of the SLM in the spatial domain and a single shot characterization of the pulse shaper in the spectral domain. These characterization methods provide a detailed picture of how the SLM modifies the spectral phase of an ultrashort pulse.

  10. Interaction of ester functional groups with aluminum oxide surfaces studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, J; Blajiev, O; Beentjes, P C J; Terryn, H; de Wit, J H W

    2004-07-20

    The bonding of two types of ester group-containing molecules with a set of different oxide layers on aluminum has been investigated using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The different oxide layers were made by giving typical surface treatments to the aluminum substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to find out what type of ester-oxide bond is formed and whether this is influenced by changes in the composition and chemistry of the oxide. The extent by which these bonded ester molecules resisted disbondment in water or substitution by molecules capable of chemisorption was also investigated. The ester groups were found to show hydrogen bonding with hydroxyls on the oxide surfaces through their carbonyl oxygens. For all oxides, the ester groups showed the same nu(C = O) carbonyl stretching vibration after adsorption, indicating very similar bonding occurs. However, the oxides showed differences in the amount of molecules bonded to the oxide surface, and a clear relation was observed with the hydroxyl concentration present on the oxide surface, which was determined from XPS measurements. The two compounds showed differences in the free to bonded nu(C = O) infrared peak shift, indicating differences in bonding strength with the oxide surface between the two types of molecules. The bonding of the ester groups with the oxide surfaces was found to be not stable in the presence of water and also not in the presence of a compound capable of chemisorption with the aluminum oxide surface. PMID:15248718