Science.gov

Sample records for modules phase ii

  1. Sintered plug flow modulation of a vapor-liquid phase separator for a helium II vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Chuang, C.; Kamioka, Y.; Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is a system for modulation of a superfluid (helium II) flow in a vapor-liquid phase separator, for use in cryogenic storage tanks in future space missions. The system consists of a semicircular mechanically operated shutter, downstream of the separator plug, rotated at 0.1 rpm to control the operational surface area of the separator. The mass flow rate was varied from 10 to 22 mg/s. Pressure gradients across the plug are also discussed.

  2. The sROD module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Castillo, V.; Ferrer, A.; Fiorini, L.; Hernández, Y.; Higón, E.; Mellado, B.; March, L.; Moreno, P.; Reed, R.; Solans, C.; Valero, A.; Valls, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will also provide digital calibrated information with enhanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD module is designed on a double mid-size AMC format and will operate under an AdvancedTCA framework. The module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing, as well as the implementation of embedded systems. Related to optical connectors, the sROD uses 4 QSFPs to receive and transmit data from the front-end electronics and 1 Avago MiniPOD to send preprocessed data to the first level trigger system. An SFP module maintains the compatibility with the existing hardware. A complete description of the sROD module for the demonstrator including the main functionalities, circuit design and the control software and firmware will be presented.

  3. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  4. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163, (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a singlepiece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment are the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  5. Modulation of phase-II enzyme activities in benzene treated ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Yeshvandra; Rana, S V S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of ovariectomy on phase II enzymes viz. glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) in liver and kidney of female rats treated with benzene. The results showed the significant decrease of the GST and GPX activity in benzene treated rats after ovariectomy. However progesterone supplementation stimulated the activity of GST and GPX in liver and kidney of benzene treated non ovariectomized and ovariectomized rats. Progesterone supplementation to benzene treated ovariectomized rats helps to gain in CAT activity. Our results on DNA damage using single cell gel electrophoresis also confirmed our findings on antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that lack of protective progesterone against benzene toxicity is reflected in alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities. However progesterone therapy to benzene treated ovariectomized rats results in activating the antioxidant defence system. Since female workers are engaged in industrial sector, these results are important from occupational health point of view. Benzene exposure affects their reproductive health. Nevertheless, it could be modulated by suitable hormonal therapy. PMID:21787707

  6. Strategies for the modulation of phase II metabolism in a series of PKCε inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Jeremy J; Coon, Timothy; Busch, Brett B; Asgian, Juliana L; Hudson, Sarah; Termin, Andreas; Flores, Tina B; Tran, Dao; Chiang, Peggy; Sperry, Sam; Gross, Ray; Abt, Jeffrey; Heim, Roger; Lechner, Sandra; Twin, Heather; Studley, John; Brenchley, Guy; Collier, Philip N; Pierard, Francoise; Miller, Andrew; Mak, Chau; Dvornikovs, Vadims; Jimenez, Juan-Miguel; Stamos, Dean

    2014-08-01

    Extensive phase II metabolism of an advanced PKCε inhibitor resulted in sub-optimal pharmacokinetics in rat marked by elevated clearance. Synthesis of the O-glucuronide metabolite as a standard was followed by three distinct strategies to specifically temper phase II metabolic degradation of the parent molecule. In this study, it was determined that the introduction of proximal polarity to the primary alcohol generally curbed O-glucuronidation and improved PK and physical chemical properties while maintaining potency against the target. Utilization of a Jacobsen hydrolytic kinetic resolution to obtain optically enriched final compounds is also discussed. PMID:24939756

  7. Field Validation of the Career Education Curriculum Project Modules. Phase II. K-6 Validation. Final Report. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Earl; Wellman, Frank

    Field validation of the Missouri Career Education Curriculum Project Modules, K-6, was conducted in two phases. In phase 1, three sets of evaluation instruments were produced: K-1, 2-3, and 4-6. In phase 2, the field validation of the K-6 modules was conducted (reported here). (An additional goal of phase 2 was to develop evaluation instruments…

  8. Frequency modulation reveals the phasing of orbital eccentricity during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event II and the Eocene hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurin, Jiří; Meyers, Stephen R.; Galeotti, Simone; Lanci, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Major advances in our understanding of paleoclimate change derive from a precise reconstruction of the periods, amplitudes and phases of the 'Milankovitch cycles' of precession, obliquity and eccentricity. While numerous quantitative approaches exist for the identification of these astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, limitations in radioisotopic dating, and instability of the theoretical astronomical solutions beyond ∼50 Myr ago, can challenge identification of the phase relationships needed to constrain climate response and anchor floating astrochronologies. Here we demonstrate that interference patterns accompanying frequency modulation (FM) of short eccentricity provide a robust basis for identifying the phase of long eccentricity forcing in stratigraphic data. One- and two-dimensional models of sedimentary distortion of the astronomical signal are used to evaluate the veracity of the FM method, and indicate that pristine eccentricity FM can be readily distinguished in paleo-records. Apart from paleoclimatic implications, the FM approach provides a quantitative technique for testing and calibrating theoretical astronomical solutions, and for refining chronologies for the deep past. We present two case studies that use the FM approach to evaluate major carbon-cycle perturbations of the Eocene and Late Cretaceous. Interference patterns in the short-eccentricity band reveal that Eocene hyperthermals ETM2 ('Elmo'), H2, I1 and ETM3 (X; ∼52-54 Myr ago) were associated with maxima in the 405-kyr cycle of orbital eccentricity. The same eccentricity configuration favored regional anoxic episodes in the Mediterranean during the Middle and Late Cenomanian (∼94.5-97 Myr ago). The initial phase of the global Oceanic Anoxic Event II (OAE II; ∼93.9-94.5 Myr ago) coincides with maximum and falling 405-kyr eccentricity, and the recovery phase occurs during minimum and rising 405-kyr eccentricity. On a Myr scale, the event overlaps with a node in eccentricity

  9. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  10. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  11. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level I (18 Week).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in grades 7 and 8, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for twelve units of instruction: (1) orientation; (2) understanding electricity; (3) safety; (4) methods to generate electricity; (5) wiring tools and wire; (6) soldering; (7) magnetism and electromagnetism; (8) circuits, symbols,…

  12. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level I (9 Week).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in grades 7 and 8, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for ten units of instruction (nine-week class): (1) orientation; (2) understanding electricity; (3) safety; (4) methods to generate electricity; (5) wiring tools and wire; (6) soldering; (7) magnetism and electromagnetism; (8)…

  13. Industrial Education. Electricity/Electronics Curriculum Guide, Phase II. Instructional Modules, Level III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo, Robert E.; Soffiotto, Nicholas S.

    Designed for students in the tenth grade, this electricity/electronics curriculum guide contains instructional modules for sixteen units of instruction: (1) orientation, (2) introduction to electricity/electronics, (3) electricity/electronics safety, (4) fundamental skills, (5) direct current circuits, (6) graphical illustrations, (7) circuit…

  14. A Phase II Trial of Arc-Based Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Michael; Best, Lara; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; D'Souza, David; Venkatesan, Varagur; Sexton, Tracy; Ahmad, Belal; Izawa, Jonathan; Rodrigues, George

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and biochemical control of hypofractionated, image-guided (fiducial markers or ultrasound guidance), simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This Phase II prospective clinical trial for T1a-2cNXM0 prostate cancer enrolled 66 patients who received 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Fiducial markers were used for image guidance in 30 patients and daily ultrasound for the remainder. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Acute Phase Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was 34% and 9% for GU vs. 25% and 10% for GI symptoms. One Grade 4 acute GI toxicity occurred in a patient with unrecognized Crohn's disease. Late Grade 2 and 3 toxicity for GU was 14% and 5%, and GI toxicity was 25% and 3%. One late GI Grade 4 toxicity was observed in a patient with significant comorbidities (anticoagulation, vascular disease). Acute GI toxicity {>=}Grade 2 was shown to be a predictor for late toxicity Grade {>=}2 (p < 0.001). The biochemical disease-free survival at 3 years was 95%. Conclusions: Hypofractionated simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy radiotherapy given as 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions demonstrated promising biochemical control rates; however, higher rates of acute Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity and higher late Grade 2 GU and GI toxicity were noted. Ongoing randomized controlled trials should ultimately clarify issues regarding patient selection and the true rate of severe toxicity that can be directly attributed to hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  15. Radiation dose escalation by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tiantian; Chang, Daniel; Chen, Zhijian; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Kun; Guo, Longjia; Zhou, Mingzhen; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Derui; Chen, Chuangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer (EC) underwent standard-dose radical radiotherapy were still disappointing. This phase II study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiation dose escalation using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) combined with chemotherapy in 60 EC patients. Radiotherapy consisted of 66Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction to the gross tumor and 54Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction to subclinical diseases simultaneously. Chemotherapy including cisplatin and 5fluorouracil were administered to all patients during and after radiotherapy. The data showed that the majority of patients (98.3%) completed the whole course of radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. The most common ≥ grade 3 acute toxicities were neutropenia (16.7%), followed by esophagitis (6.7%) and thrombopenia (5.0%). With a median follow-up of 24 months (5-38) for all patients and 30 months (18-38) for those still alive, 11 patients (18.3%) developed ≥ Grade 3 late toxicities and 2 (3.3%) of them died subsequently due to esophageal hemorrhage. The 1- and 2-year local-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 87.6% and 78.6%, 86.0% and 80.5%, 75.6% and 64.4%, 86.7% and 72.7%, respectively. SMART combined with concurrent chemotherapy is feasible in EC patients with tolerable acute toxicities. They showed a trend of significant improvements in local-regional control and overall survival. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the late toxicities. PMID:26992206

  16. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Zhang, Xin Xin; Feng, Lin Chun; Chen, Jing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Hai Xia; Xu, Shou Ping; Xie, Chuan Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods Between August 2011 and September 2013, 132 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled for a prospective phase II study. The prescription doses delivered to the gross tumor volume (pGTVnx) and positive lymph nodes (pGTVnd), the high risk planning target volume (PTV1), and the low risk planning target volume (PTV2), were 67.5 Gy (2.25 Gy/F), 60 Gy (2.0 Gy/F), and 54 Gy (1.8 Gy/F), in 30 fractions, respectively. Acute toxicities were evaluated according to the established RTOG/EORTC criteria. This group of patients was compared with the 190 patients in the retrospective P70 study, who were treated between September 2004 and August 2009 with helical tomotherapy, with a dose of 70-74 Gy/33F/6.5W delivered to pGTVnx and pGTVnd. Results The median follow-up was 23.7 (12–38) months. Acute radiation related side-effects were mainly problems graded as 1 or 2. Only a small number of patients suffered from grade 4 leucopenia (4.5%) or thrombocytopenia (2.3%). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS), local-nodal relapse-free survival (LNRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.7%, 95.5%, 92.2%, 92.7% and 93.2%, at 2 years, respectively, with no significant difference compared with the P70 study. Conclusions Smart delivered via the helical tomotherapy technique appears to be associated with an acceptable acute toxicity profile and favorable short-term outcomes for patients with NPC. Long-term toxicities and patient outcomes are under investigation. PMID:27247555

  17. Alternative glues for the production of ATLAS silicon strip modules for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, L.; Bloch, I.; Edwards, S.; Friedrich, C.; Gregor, I.-M.; Jones, T.; Lacker, H.; Pyatt, S.; Rehnisch, L.; Sperlich, D.; Wilson, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) includes the replacement of the current Inner Detector with an all-silicon tracker consisting of pixel and strip detectors. The current Phase-II detector layout requires the construction of 20,000 strip detector modules consisting of sensor, circuit boards and readout chips, which are connected mechanically using adhesives. The adhesive used initially between readout chips and circuit board is a silver epoxy glue as was used in the current ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT). However, this glue has several disadvantages, which motivated the search for an alternative. This paper presents a study of six ultra-violet (UV) cure glues and a glue pad for possible use in the assembly of silicon strip detector modules for the ATLAS upgrade. Trials were carried out to determine the ease of use, thermal conduction and shear strength. Samples were thermally cycled, radiation hardness and corrosion resistance were also determined. These investigations led to the exclusion of three UV cure glues as well as the glue pad. Three UV cure glues were found to be possible better alternatives than silver loaded glue. Results from electrical tests of first prototype modules constructed using these glues are presented.

  18. A detector module with highly efficient surface-alpha event rejection operated in CRESST-II Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Erb, A.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Ferreiro, N.; Gorla, P.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Loebell, J.; Münster, A.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Reindl, F.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Scholl, S.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; von Sivers, M.; Stanger, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Tanzke, A.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2015-08-01

    The cryogenic dark matter experiment CRESST-II aims at the direct detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO crystals. We present a new, highly improved, detector design installed in the current run of CRESST-II Phase 2 with an efficient active rejection of surface-alpha backgrounds. Using CaWO sticks instead of metal clamps to hold the target crystal, a detector housing with fully-scintillating inner surface could be realized. The presented detector (TUM40) provides an excellent threshold of keV and a resolution of keV (at 2.60 keV). With significantly reduced background levels, TUM40 sets stringent limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3 GeV/c. In this paper, we discuss the novel detector design and the surface-alpha event rejection in detail.

  19. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  20. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  1. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Bleicher, Richard J.; Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu; Swaby, Ramona F.; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Goldstein, Lori J.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  2. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  3. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  4. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook . E-mail: lsw@amc.seoul.kr; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  5. Long Term Effect of Curcumin in Restoration of Tumour Suppressor p53 and Phase-II Antioxidant Enzymes via Activation of Nrf2 Signalling and Modulation of Inflammation in Prevention of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Das, Laxmidhar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of carcinogenesis may be a consequence of attenuation of oxidative stress via activation of antioxidant defence system, restoration and stabilization of tumour suppressor proteins along with modulation of inflammatory mediators. Previously we have delineated significant role of curcumin during its long term effect in regulation of glycolytic pathway and angiogenesis, which in turn results in prevention of cancer via modulation of stress activated genes. Present study was designed to investigate long term effect of curcumin in regulation of Nrf2 mediated phase-II antioxidant enzymes, tumour suppressor p53 and inflammation under oxidative tumour microenvironment in liver of T-cell lymphoma bearing mice. Inhibition of Nrf2 signalling observed during lymphoma progression, resulted in down regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes, p53 as well as activation of inflammatory signals. Curcumin potentiated significant increase in Nrf2 activation. It restored activity of phase-II antioxidant enzymes like GST, GR, NQO1, and tumour suppressor p53 level. In addition, curcumin modulated inflammation via upregulation of TGF-β and reciprocal regulation of iNOS and COX2. The study suggests that during long term effect, curcumin leads to prevention of cancer by inducing phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling, restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and modulation of inflammatory mediators like iNOS and COX2 in liver of lymphoma bearing mice. PMID:25860911

  6. Compact nanomechanical plasmonic phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B. S.; Haftel, M. I.; Czaplewski, D. A.; Lopez, D.; Blumberg, G.; Aksyuk, V. A.

    2015-03-30

    Highly confined optical energy in plasmonic devices is advancing miniaturization in photonics. However, for mode sizes approaching ≈10 nm, the energy increasingly shifts into the metal, raising losses and hindering active phase modulation. Here, we propose a nanoelectromechanical phase-modulation principle exploiting the extraordinarily strong dependence of the phase velocity of metal–insulator–metal gap plasmons on dynamically variable gap size. We experimentally demonstrate a 23-μm-long non-resonant modulator having a 1.5π rad range, with 1.7 dB excess loss at 780 nm. Analysis shows that by simultaneously decreasing the gap, length and width, an ultracompact-footprint π rad phase modulator can be realized. This is achieved without incurring the extra loss expected for plasmons confined in a decreasing gap, because the increasing phase-modulation strength from a narrowing gap offsets rising propagation losses. Such small, high-density electrically controllable components may find applications in optical switch fabrics and reconfigurable plasmonic optics.

  7. Innovative Approaches to Low Cost Module Manufacturing of String Ribbon Si PV Modules: Phase II, Annual Technical Progress Report, 1 April 2003--31 May 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hanoka, J. I.

    2004-10-01

    This subcontract resulted in a number of important advances for Evergreen Solar Inc. Foremost amongst these is the production implementation of dual ribbon growth from a single crucible (Gemini) using the String Ribbon continuous ribbon technology. This project has resulted in the flattest ribbon and the highest yields and machine uptime ever seen at Evergreen Solar. This then has resulted in significantly lowered consumables costs and lower overall direct manufacturing costs. In addition, methods to control the as-grown surface of Gemini ribbon have permitted the usage of the so-called no-etch process that allows for direct transfer of as-grown ribbon to diffusion without any intermediate etching step. In-line diagnostics for Gemini were further developed--these included more accurate methods for measuring and controlling melt depth and more accurate means to measure and control ribbon thickness. Earlier in the project, the focus was on monolithic module development. With the Gemini advances described above, monolithic module work was brought to a close during this second year of the overall three year project. A significant advance in this technology was the development of a conductive adhesive in combination with Evergreen's proprietary backskin and encapsulant. 25-W size experimental monolithic modules have been tested and found to be able to withstand up to 1400 thermal cycles.

  8. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  9. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  10. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vuky, Jacqueline; Badiozamani, Kasra; Song Guobin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  11. Wideband phase-locked angular modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.

    1989-01-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) angular modulator scheme has been proposed which has the characteristics of wideband modulation frequency response. The modulator design is independent of the PLL closed-loop transfer function H(s), thereby allowing independent optimization of the loop's parameters as well as the modulator's parameters. A phase modulator implementing the proposed scheme was built to phase modulate a low-noise phase-locked signal source at the output frequency of 2290 MHz. The measurement results validated the analysis by demonstrating that the resulting baseband modulation bandwidth exceeded that of the phase-locked loop by over an order of magnitude. However, it is expected to be able to achieve much wider response still.

  12. Multilevel phase and amplitude modulation method for holographic memories with programmable phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Toru

    2014-09-01

    The utilization of spatial quadrature amplitude modulation (SQAM) signals with amplitude and phase modulation is a simple method used to improve storage capacity in a holographic data storage system. We propose a multilevel phase and amplitude modulation method for holographic memories with a programmable phase modulator (PPM). In this method, holographic page data is recorded by a two-step exposure process for different phase-modulated data. There is no need to adjust the positions of spatial light modulators (SLM) with high accuracy because we use only one spatial modulator. We estimate the quality of 16 SQAM signals produced by our technique.

  13. Type II Bi1 - xWxO1.5 + 1.5x: a (3 + 3)-dimensional commensurate modulation that stabilizes the fast-ion conducting delta phase of bismuth oxide.

    PubMed

    Wind, Julia; Auckett, Josie E; Withers, Ray L; Piltz, Ross O; Maljuk, Andrey; Ling, Chris D

    2015-12-01

    The Type II phase in the Bi1 - xWxO1.5 + 1.5x system is shown to have a (3 + 3)-dimensional modulated δ-Bi2O3-related structure, in which the modulation vector ℇ `locks in' to a commensurate value of 1/3. The structure was refined in a 3 × 3 × 3 supercell against single-crystal Laue neutron diffraction data. Ab initio calculations were used to test and optimize the local structure of the oxygen sublattice around a single mixed Bi/W site. The underlying crystal chemistry was shown to be essentially the same as for the recently refined (3 + 3)-dimensional modulated structure of Type II Bi1 - xNbxO1.5 + x (Ling et al., 2013), based on a transition from fluorite-type to pyrochlore-type via the appearance of W4O18 `tetrahedra of octahedra' and chains of corner-sharing WO6 octahedra along 〈110〉F directions. The full range of occupancies on this mixed Bi/W site give a hypothetical solid-solution range bounded by Bi23W4O46.5 (x = 0.148) and Bi22W5O48 (x = 0.185), consistent with previous reports and with our own synthetic and analytical results. PMID:26634724

  14. Phase II metabolism of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Schrenk, D; Orzechowski, A; Schwarz, L R; Snyder, R; Burchell, B; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Bock, K W

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic metabolism of benzene is thought to be a prerequisite for its bony marrow toxicity. However, the complete pattern of benzene metabolites formed in the liver and their role in bone marrow toxicity are not fully understood. Therefore, benzene metabolism was studied in isolated rodent hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes released benzene-1,2-dihydrodiol, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CT), phenol (PH), trans-trans-muconic acid, and a number of phase II metabolites such as PH sulfate and PH glucuronide. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) markedly increased PH glucuronide formation while PH sulfate formation was decreased. Likewise, V79 cells transfected with the 3-MC-inducible rat UGT1.6 cDNA showed a considerable rate of PH and HQ glucuronidation. In addition to inducing glucuronidation of phenols, 3-MC treatment (reported to protect rats from the myelotoxicity of benzene) resulted in a decrease of hepatic CYP2E1. In contrast, pretreatment of rats with the CYP2E1-inducer isopropanol strongly enhanced benzene metabolism and the formation of phenolic metabolites. Mouse hepatocytes formed much higher amounts of HQ than rat hepatocytes and considerable amounts of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB) sulfate and HQ sulfate. In conclusion, the protective effect of 3-MC in rats is probably due to a shift from the labile PH sulfate to the more stable PH glucuronide, and to a decrease in hepatic CYP2E1. The higher susceptibility of mice toward benzene may be related to the high rate of formation of the myelotoxic metabolite HQ and the semistable phase II metabolites HQ sulfate and THB sulfate. Images Figure 4. PMID:9118891

  15. Digital optical phase control in ridge-waveguide phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors report a new digital optical phase modulation concept based on depletion-edge-translation p-n junction GaAs/AlGaAs ridge-waveguide modulators. Digital modulation is achieved by integrating in series several discrete waveguide modulators with lengths related by successive factors of two. To illustrate the concept, the authors fabricated and demonstrated a three-bit digital phase modulator with 45[degree] resolution. This structure represents the first photonic integrated circuit that performs direct digital-electronic to analog-optical conversion.

  16. Geology of the Phase II System

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A. William

    1980-11-19

    This is a report on the analysis of EE-2 cuttings and thin sections, geologic characterization of the Phase II system, comparison with Phase 1, and geologic speculations and recommendations concerning Phase II. The EE-2 litholog has been included in the pocket.

  17. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  18. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  19. A Phase II Study of Modulated-Capecitabine and Docetaxel in Chemonaive Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Bertino, Erin M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Fernandez, Soledad; Diasio, Robert B.; Karim, Nagla A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This phase II single-arm trial of docetaxel and capecitabine in previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was designed to evaluate response rate of this regimen based on promising efficacy data from phase II testing in pre-treated NSCLC patients. The trial also evaluated the correlation between peripheral blood dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expression and efficacy/toxicity. Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC (metastatic, including malignant pleural effusion) without prior chemotherapy were enrolled. Baseline DPD screening was performed; patients with baseline DPD level < 0.07 nmol/min/mg protein were considered ineligible for the study. Treatment included a 28-day cycle of docetaxel 36 mg/m2 days 1, 8, 15 and capecitabine 1250 mg/m2/day in divided doses on days 5–18. Overall response rate (RR) was the primary endpoint with a target RR of 50%. Correlative studies included evaluation of DPD activity levels in peripheral blood and correlation with clinical responses. Results Twenty-eight patients received 86 cycles of treatment (median 3 cycles) and were evaluable for response. The RR was 18% (5 patients); RR did not meet the pre-specified efficacy endpoint and the trial was stopped. 14 patients had stable disease (SD - 50%) and 4 pts had SD > 12 weeks. Median time to progression was 3.3 months (95% CI 1.5 – 4.6 months). Median overall survival was 10.5 months (95% CI: 3.2 – 15 months). Main toxicities included fatigue, stomatitis and leukopenia. DPD levels ranged from 0.06 to 0.26 nmol/min/mg. The majority of responders (4/5) had DPD levels ≤ 0.1 nmol/min/mg. Most of the responders (4/5) experienced grade 3 toxicities including leukopenia, dehydration, fatigue, and diarrhea. None of the patients (0/4) with higher DPD levels (>0.2 nmol/min/mg) had a response. Conclusion The response rate for the regimen did not demonstrate sufficient activity and further study of this regimen in this setting is not indicated

  20. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  1. Randomized phase II trial of selenomethionine as a modulator of efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Michael; Singh, Anurag K; Tills, Michael; Dibaj, Shiva; Groman, Adrienne; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rustum, Youcef; Jameson, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether selenomethionine (SLM) reduces mucositis incidence in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) undergoing concurrent chemoradiation (CRT). METHODS: In this multi-institutional, randomized, double-blind phase II trial, patients with Stage III or IV HNSCC received SLM 3600 μg/m2 or placebo twice daily for 7 d prior to CRT, once daily during CRT, and daily for 3 wk following CRT. CRT consisted of 70 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction with cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 22, and 43. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were randomized, 10 received SLM, and there were no differences in baseline factors. There was no difference in mucositis or patient-reported side effects between groups. There was no difference in overall or relapse-free survival at 12 mo. CONCLUSION: Addition of SLM to CRT for HNSCC was well-tolerated but did not lower the incidence of severe mucositis or improve quality of life or survival outcomes. PMID:26468453

  2. Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) juice modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced hepatic but not mammary gland phase I and II enzymes in female rats.

    PubMed

    Szaefer, Hanna; Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Adamska, Teresa; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2011-03-01

    Chokeberry is a rich source of procyanidins known to have several types of biological activity including anticarcinogenic potential in experimental models. In this study we examined the effect of chokeberry juice on the hepatic and mammary gland carcinogen metabolizing enzyme expression altered by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with chokeberry juice (8 ml/kg b.w.) for 28 consecutive days. DMBA was administered i.p. on the 27th and the 28th days. Pretreatment with chokeberry juice reduced the activity of CYP1A1 and increased that of CYP2B involved in metabolic activation/detoxication of DMBA in rat liver, as well as expression and activity of phase II enzymes. Chokeberry juice had no effect on these parameters in the mammary gland and DMBA induced DNA damage in rat blood cells. These results together with our earlier observations indicate that metabolic alterations induced by chokeberry feeding are tissue specific and depend on the class of carcinogen. PMID:21787703

  3. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  4. Upgrades for GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisel, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of 76Ge. It is a process that violates lepton number conservation and is predicted to occur in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. GERDA is located underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. An array of bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge is operated in a cryostat with 64 m3 of liquid argon supplemented by a 3 m thick shield of water. The experiment aims at exploring the 0 νββ decay up to a half life of 2 .1026 yr in two phases: Phase I of the experiment has been concluded last year. No signal is observed and the so far best limit is derived for the half life of the 0 νββ decay of 76Ge, T1/20ν <= 2 . 1 .1025 yr (90% C.L.), after an exposure of 21 . 6 kg .yr. The result refutes an earlier claim of discovery with high probability. The background index of 1 .10-2 cts/(keV .kg .yr) is lower by about one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. At present the experiment is being upgraded to Phase II. The aim is to collect an exposure of 100kg .yr and further reduce the background by another order of magnitude to a level of <=10-3 cts/(keV .kg .yr). The detector mass will be increased by ~20 kg of new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors from enriched 76Ge, which exhibit superior pulse shape discrimination and hence background rejection power. Low mass detector holders, cold front-end electronics, contacting and cabling schemes are redesigned for ultra low mass and radiopurity. In addition, a retractable liquid argon veto will be installed to efficiently suppress background events that induce scintillation in the liquid argon. A hybrid solution of photomultiplier tubes and silicon photomultipliers coupled to scintillating fibres was chosen. This talk gives an account of the results and these challenging modifications to meet our design goals. The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA

  5. Convolutional coding combined with continuous phase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzi, S. V.; Wilson, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    Background theory and specific coding designs for combined coding/modulation schemes utilizing convolutional codes and continuous-phase modulation (CPM) are presented. In this paper the case of r = 1/2 coding onto a 4-ary CPM is emphasized, with short-constraint length codes presented for continuous-phase FSK, double-raised-cosine, and triple-raised-cosine modulation. Coding buys several decibels of coding gain over the Gaussian channel, with an attendant increase of bandwidth. Performance comparisons in the power-bandwidth tradeoff with other approaches are made.

  6. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  7. Electro-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 megabits per sec. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 nano-sec. and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, the resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Mode matching into the bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  8. Amplitude and phase modulation with waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, S.C.; Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.; Penko, F.A.

    1996-12-17

    We have developed amplitude and phase modulation systems for glass lasers using integrated electro-optic modulators and solid state high- speed electronics. The present and future generation of lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion require laser beams with complex temporal and phase shaping to compensate for laser gain saturation, mitigate parametric processes such as transverse stimulated Brillouin scattering in optics, and to provide specialized drive to the fusion targets. These functions can be performed using bulk optoelectronic modulators, however using high-speed electronics to drive low voltage integrated optical modulators has many practical advantages. In particular, we utilize microwave GaAs transistors to perform precision, 250 ps resolution temporal shaping. Optical bandwidth is generated using a microwave oscillator at 3 GHz amplified by a solid state amplifier. This drives an integrated electrooptic modulator to achieve laser bandwidths exceeding 30 GHz.

  9. Phase Modulation of Photonic Band Gap Signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Mengqin; Mahesar, Abdul Rasheed; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2016-01-01

    We first investigate the probe transmission signal (PTS) and the four wave mixing band gap signal (FWM BGS) modulated simultaneously by the relative phase and the nonlinear phase shift in the photonic band gap (PBG) structure. The switch between the absorption enhancement of PTS and the transmission enhancement of PTS with the help of changing the relative phase and the nonlinear phase shift is obtained in inverted Y-type four level atomic system experimentally and theoretically. The corresponding switch in PTS can be used to realize all optical switches. On other hand, the relative phase and the nonlinear phase shift also play the vital role to modulate the intensity of FWM BGS reflected from the PBG structure. And it can be potentially used to realize the optical amplifier. PMID:27323849

  10. Phase Modulation of Photonic Band Gap Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Mengqin; Mahesar, Abdul Rasheed; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2016-01-01

    We first investigate the probe transmission signal (PTS) and the four wave mixing band gap signal (FWM BGS) modulated simultaneously by the relative phase and the nonlinear phase shift in the photonic band gap (PBG) structure. The switch between the absorption enhancement of PTS and the transmission enhancement of PTS with the help of changing the relative phase and the nonlinear phase shift is obtained in inverted Y-type four level atomic system experimentally and theoretically. The corresponding switch in PTS can be used to realize all optical switches. On other hand, the relative phase and the nonlinear phase shift also play the vital role to modulate the intensity of FWM BGS reflected from the PBG structure. And it can be potentially used to realize the optical amplifier. PMID:27323849

  11. LSPRAY-II: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    LSPRAY-II is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-II, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  12. Electric-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 Mbps. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 ns and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. Experimentally, the resonant cavity can be maintained on resonance with respect to the input laser signal by monitoring the fluctuation of output intensity as the cavity is switched. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of additional dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Furthermore, mode matching into a bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. On the other hand, unlike waveguide modulators which are essentially traveling wave devices, the resonant cavity modulator requires that the cavity be maintained in resonance with respect to the incoming laser signal. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  13. Phase-Change Heat-Storage Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, James C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat-storage module accommodates momentary heating or cooling overload in pumped-liquid heat-transfer system. Large heat-storage capacity of module provided by heat of fusion of material that freezes at or near temperature desired to maintain object to be heated or cooled. Module involves relatively small penalties in weight, cost, and size and more than compensates by enabling design of rest of system to handle only average load. Latent heat of fusion of phase-change material provides large heat-storage capacity in small volume.

  14. Linearity optimization in a class of analog phase modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the ultimate modulating linearity attainable with a phase modulation technique based on the linear addition of quadrature phase carrier signals which have been multiplied by precisely defined nonlinear transformations of the modulating signal. Optimum gain coefficients are derived and plotted to permit implementation of analog phase modulators capable of exceptionally good linearity of phase deviations as large as 5 radians.

  15. Chromaticity tracking using a phase modulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    In the classical chromaticity measurement technique, chromaticity is measured by measuring the change in betatron tune as the RF frequency is varied. This paper will describe a novel way of measuring chromaticity: we will phase modulate the RF with a known sine wave and then phase demodulate the betatron frequency. The result is a line in Fourier space which corresponds to the frequency of our sine wave modulation. The peak of this sine wave is proportional to chromaticity. For this technique to work, a tune tracker PLL system is required because it supplies the betatron carrier frequency. This method has been tested in the Tevatron and we will show the results here.

  16. Simulating Complex Modulated Phases Through Spin Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinger, Jonathan V.; Lopatina, Lena M.; Geng, Jun; Selinger, Robin L. B.

    2009-03-01

    We extend the computational approach for studying striped phases on curved surfaces, presented in the previous talk, to two new problems involving complex modulated phases. First, we simulate a smectic liquid crystal on an arbitrary mesh by mapping the director field onto a vector spin and the density wave onto an Ising spin. We can thereby determine how the smectic phase responds to any geometrical constraints, including hybrid boundary conditions, patterned substrates, and disordered substrates. This method may provide a useful tool for designing ferroelectric liquid crystal cells. Second, we explore a model of vector spins on a flat two-dimensional (2D) lattice with long-range antiferromagnetic interactions. This model generates modulated phases with surprisingly complex structures, including 1D stripes and 2D periodic cells, which are independent of the underlying lattice. We speculate on the physical significance of these structures.

  17. Anatomy and Physiology. Module No. IV. Health Occupations Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Nancy; And Others

    This package of 31 modules on anatomy and physiology is one of six such packages containing a total of 46 modules that comprise Health Occupations Education II, the second course of a two-year course of study. Each module may contain some or all of the following components: introduction, directions, objectives, a list of learning activities,…

  18. Phase II trial of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiation therapy combined with temozolomide and bevacizumab for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ney, Douglas E; Carlson, Julie A; Damek, Denise M; Gaspar, Laurie E; Kavanagh, Brian D; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K; Waziri, Allen E; Lillehei, Kevin O; Reddy, Krishna; Chen, Changhu

    2015-03-01

    Bevacizumab blocks the effects of VEGF and may allow for more aggressive radiotherapy schedules. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide and bevacizumab in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were treated with hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor with a 1 cm margin (PTV1) to 60 Gy and to the T2 abnormality with a 1 cm margin (PTV2) to 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks. Concurrent temozolomide (75 mg/m(2) daily) and bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) was administered followed by adjuvant temozolomide (200 mg/m(2)) on a standard 5/28 day cycle and bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 6 months. Thirty newly diagnosed patients were treated on study. Median PTV1 volume was 131.1 cm(3) and the median PTV2 volume was 342.6 cm(3). Six-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 90 %, with median follow-up of 15.9 months. The median PFS was 14.3 months, with a median overall survival (OS) of 16.3 months. Grade 4 hematologic toxicity included neutropenia (10 %) and thrombocytopenia (17 %). Grades 3/4 non-hematologic toxicity included fatigue (13 %), wound dehiscence (7 %) and stroke, pulmonary embolism and nausea each in 1 patient. Presumed radiation necrosis with clinical decline was seen in 50 % of patients, two with autopsy documentation. The study was closed early to accrual due to this finding. This study demonstrated 90 % 6-month PFS and OS comparable to historic data in patients receiving standard treatment. Bevacizumab did not prevent radiation necrosis associated with this hypofractionated radiation regimen and large PTV volumes may have contributed to high rates of presumed radiation necrosis. PMID:25524817

  19. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin-Film CIGS-Based Modules; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report, July 1999 - August 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, T.G.; Wiedeman, S.

    2001-03-12

    Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) has expanded dramatically in the last five years, but commercial use remains limited by performance, cost, and reliability. Of all the thin-film systems, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has demonstrated the greatest potential for achieving high performance at a low cost. The highest-quality CIGS has been formed by multi-source co-evaporation, a technique pioneered in this country by researchers at NREL. Multi-source co-evaporation is also potentially the fastest and most cost-effective method of CIGS absorber deposition. Global Solar Energy (GSE) has adapted multi-source co-evaporation of CIGS to large-area, roll-to-roll processing on flexible substrates, enabling several manufacturing and product capability advantages. Roll-to-roll processing enables a low-cost, automated continuous manufacturing process. Flexible substrates enable product application in unique, as well as traditional, areas. The primary objectives of the GSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are to reduce cost and expand the production rate of thin-film CIGS-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. Specific goals of the three-year contract are: - Monolithic Integration - Increase integration speed by developing high-speed, all-laser scribing processes that are more than 100% faster than the baseline process and offer clean, selective scribing; increase capacity and substantially reduce module area losses by insulating materials with high accuracy into laser scribes. - Absorber Deposition - Increase absorber-layer deposition rate by 75% in the large-area, continuous GSE process, increasing throughput and reducing labor and capital costs. Integrate a parallel detector spectroscopic ellipsometer (PDSE) with mathematical algorithms for in-situ control of the CIGS absorber, enabling runs of over 300 meters

  20. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Winter, Kathryn; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gaur, Rakesh; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Berk, Lawrence; Gaffney, David

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  1. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  2. Phase II Trial of Hyperfractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin for Stage III and IVa Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, Patrick D.; Papagikos, Michael; Hamann, Sue; Neal, Charles; Meyerson, Martin; Hayes, Neil; Ungaro, Peter; Kotz, Kenneth; Couch, Marion; Pollock, Hoke; Tepper, Joel

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel chemoradiation regimen designed to maximize locoregional control (LRC) and minimize toxicity for patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Patients received hyperfractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIMRT) in 1.25-Gy fractions b.i.d. to 70 Gy to high-risk planning target volume (PTV). Intermediate and low-risk PTVs received 60 Gy and 50 Gy, at 1.07, and 0.89 Gy per fraction, respectively. Concurrent cisplatin 33 mg/m{sup 2}/week was started Week 1. Patients completed the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument pretreatment (PRE), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Overall survival (OS), progression-free (PFS), LRC, and toxicities were assessed. Results: Of 39 patients, 30 (77%) were alive without disease at median follow-up of 37.5 months. Actuarial 3-year OS, PFS, and LRC were 80%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. No failures occurred in the electively irradiated neck and there were no isolated neck failures. Head and neck QOL was significantly worse in 18 of 35 patients (51%): mean 7.8 PRE vs. 3.9 EOT. By month 1, H and N QOL returned near baseline (mean 6.2, SD = 1.7). The most common acute Grade 3+ toxicities were mucositis (38%), fatigue (28%), dysphagia (28%), and leukopenia (26%). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated IMRT with low-dose weekly cisplatin resulted in good LRC with acceptable toxicity and QOL. Lack of elective nodal failures despite very low dose per fraction has led to an attempt to further minimize toxicity by reducing elective nodal doses in our subsequent protocol.

  3. Counselor Competencies for Regional Delivery Systems. Final Report--Phase II. July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstrand, Richard K.

    The narrative portion of this report summarizes the highlights of Phase II of a project to identify competencies needed by regional delivery system personnel in delivering career guidance. It identifies the six informational modules that were prepared during Phases I and II. Appendixes contain the six modules for guidance counselors/coordinators…

  4. BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

  5. SLUDGE BATCH 6 PHASE II FLOWSHEET SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Best, D.

    2010-03-30

    Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were used to demonstrate that a fairly wide window of acid stoichiometry was available for processing SB6 Phase II flowsheet simulant (Tank 40 simulant) while still meeting the dual goals of acceptable nitrate destruction and controlled hydrogen generation. Phase II was an intermediate flowsheet study for the projected composition of Tank 40 after transfer of SB6/Tank 51 sludge to the heel of SB5. The composition was based on August 2009 projections. A window of about 50% in total acid was found between acceptable nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation.

  6. Phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Chen, Zhengyu; Xu, Zhiguo; Gao, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    Microwave photonic links (MPLs) can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial and waveguide solutions due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth, superior stability and immunity to external interference. It has been considered in various applications such as: the transmission of radio frequency (RF) signal over optical carriers, video television transmission, radar and communication systems. Stability of phase of the microwave photonic links is a critical issue in several realistic applications. The delay line technique for phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links is measured for the first time. Using this approach, the input signal noise and power supply noise can be effectively cancelled, and it does not require phase locking. The phase noise of a microwave photonic links with a 10 GHz sinusoidal signal is experimentally demonstrated.

  7. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  8. Jail to Job Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erie City School District, PA.

    Through the Jail to Job Phase II project, the Erie Adult Learning Center provided inmates of the Erie County Prison with employability skills, decision making, problem solving, survival skills, and anger management education. Forty soon-to-be-released inmates participated in 37 hours of class. Prison staff, in concert with the instructor, selected…

  9. LSM II: Library Skills Module for English 132.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    The information and exercises provided in this learning module are designed to help English Composition II students at Yavapai College to acquire advanced library skills. The module contains three lessons. Lesson I, "Dictionaries, Various and Sundry Encyclopedias, and Handbooks," uses examples and exercises from fields such as foreign languages,…

  10. Time domain spectral phase encoding/DPSK data modulation using single phase modulator for OCDMA application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Gao, Zhensen; Kataoka, Nobuyuki; Wada, Naoya

    2010-05-10

    A novel scheme using single phase modulator for simultaneous time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) signal generation and DPSK data modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Array- Waveguide-Grating and Variable-Bandwidth-Spectrum-Shaper based devices can be used for decoding the signal directly in spectral domain. The effects of fiber dispersion, light pulse width and timing error on the coding performance have been investigated by simulation and verified in experiment. In the experiment, SPE signal with 8-chip, 20GHz/chip optical code patterns has been generated and modulated with 2.5 Gbps DPSK data using single modulator. Transmission of the 2.5 Gbps data over 34km fiber with BER<10(-9) has been demonstrated successfully. The proposed scheme has simple configuration and improved flexibility that can significantly improve the data confidentiality for optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) and secure optical communication applications. PMID:20588838

  11. A prototype automatic phase compensation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, John D.

    1992-01-01

    The growing demands for high gain and accurate satellite communication systems will necessitate the utilization of large reflector systems. One area of concern of reflector based satellite communication is large scale surface deformations due to thermal effects. These distortions, when present, can degrade the performance of the reflector system appreciable. This performance degradation is manifested by a decrease in peak gain, and increase in sidelobe level, and pointing errors. It is essential to compensate for these distortion effects and to maintain the required system performance in the operating space environment. For this reason the development of a technique to offset the degradation effects is highly desirable. Currently, most research is direct at developing better material for the reflector. These materials have a lower coefficient of linear expansion thereby reducing the surface errors. Alternatively, one can minimize the distortion effects of these large scale errors by adaptive phased array compensation. Adaptive phased array techniques have been studied extensively at NASA and elsewhere. Presented in this paper is a prototype automatic phase compensation module designed and built at NASA Lewis Research Center which is the first stage of development for an adaptive array compensation module.

  12. {sup 129}I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M W; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-30

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios of the samples varied from 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}14}. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the {sup 129}I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in {sup 129}I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I {sup 129}I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the {sup 129}I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating {sup 129}I AMS facilities and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  13. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  14. Multilayer Dielectric Transmissive Optical Phase Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew Scott; Fork, Richard Lynn

    2004-01-01

    A multilayer dielectric device has been fabricated as a prototype of a low-loss, low-distortion, transmissive optical phase modulator that would provide as much as a full cycle of phase change for all frequency components of a transmitted optical pulse over a frequency band as wide as 6.3 THz. Arrays of devices like this one could be an alternative to the arrays of mechanically actuated phase-control optics (adaptive optics) that have heretofore been used to correct for wave-front distortions in highly precise optical systems. Potential applications for these high-speed wave-front-control arrays of devices include agile beam steering, optical communications, optical metrology, optical tracking and targeting, directional optical ranging, and interferometric astronomy. The device concept is based on the same principle as that of band-pass interference filters made of multiple dielectric layers with fractional-wavelength thicknesses, except that here there is an additional focus on obtaining the desired spectral phase profile in addition to the device s spectral transmission profile. The device includes a GaAs substrate, on which there is deposited a stack of GaAs layers alternating with AlAs layers, amounting to a total of 91 layers. The design thicknesses of the layers range from 10 nm to greater than 1 micrometer. The number of layers and the thickness of each layer were chosen in a computational optimization process in which the wavelength dependences of the indices of refraction of GaAs and AlAs were taken into account as the design was iterated to maximize the transmission and minimize the group-velocity dispersion for a wavelength band wide enough to include all significant spectral components of the pulsed optical signal to be phase modulated.

  15. NRG ONCOLOGY/RTOG 0921: A PHASE II STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY (IMRT) WITH CONCURRENT CISPLATIN AND BEVACIZUMAB FOLLOWED BY CARBOPLATIN AND PACLITAXEL FOR PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Moughan, Jennifer; Miller, Brigitte E.; Xiao, Ying; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Bosch, Walter; Matulonis, Ursula; Horowitz, Neil; Mannel, Robert S.; Souhami, Luis; Erickson, Beth; Winter, Kathryn; Small, William; Gaffney, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess acute and late adverse events (AEs), overall survival (OS), pelvic failure (PF), regional failure, distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS) in a prospective phase II clinical trial of bevacizumab (Bev) and pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial-cancer patients. Materials/Methods Patients had a hysterectomy, lymph node removal, and ≥1 of the following high-risk factors: grade 3 carcinoma with >50% myometrial invasion; grade 2 or 3 disease with any cervical stromal invasion; or known extrauterine extension confined to the pelvis. Treatment included pelvic IMRT and concurrent cisplatin on days 1 and 29 of radiation and Bev (5 mg/kg on days 1, 15 and 29 of radiation) followed by adjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel for 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was grade ≥3 AEs in the first 90 days. Results Thirty-four patients were accrued from November 2009 through December 2011, 30 of whom were eligible and received study treatment. Seven out of 30 patients (23.3%, 90% CI: 10.6%-36.0%) had grade ≥3 treatment-related non-hematologic toxicities within 90 days; an additional 6 patients had grade ≥3 toxicities between 90 and 365 days after treatment. Two-year OS was 96.7% and DFS was 79.1%. No patient developed a within-field PF and no patients with stage I-IIIA disease relapsed after a median follow-up of 26 months. Conclusion Postoperative Bev added to chemotherapy and pelvic IMRT is well tolerated and results in high overall survival rates at 2 years for patients with high-risk endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25847373

  16. Gravity dual of spatially modulated phase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shin; Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2010-02-15

    We show that the five-dimensional Maxwell theory with the Chern-Simons term is tachyonic in the presence of a constant electric field. When coupled to gravity, a sufficiently large Chern-Simons coupling causes instability of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes in anti-de Sitter space. The instability happens only at nonvanishing momenta, suggesting a spatially modulated phase in the holographically dual quantum field theory in (3+1) dimensions, with spontaneous current generation in a helical configuration. The three-charge extremal black hole in the type IIB superstring theory on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} barely satisfies the stability condition.

  17. Holographic endpoint of spatially modulated phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2010-12-15

    In a previous paper [S. Nakamura, H. Ooguri, and C. S. Park, Phys. Rev. D 81, 044018 (2010)], we showed that the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole in the five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space coupled to the Maxwell theory with the Chern-Simons term is unstable when the Chern-Simons coupling is sufficiently large. In the dual conformal field theory, the instability suggests a spatially modulated phase transition. In this paper, we construct and analyze nonlinear solutions which describe the endpoint of this phase transition. In the limit where the Chern-Simons coupling is large, we find that the phase transition is of the second order with the mean field critical exponent. However, the dispersion relation with the Van Hove singularity enhances quantum corrections in the bulk, and we argue that this changes the order of the phase transition from the second to the first. We compute linear response functions in the nonlinear solution and find an infinite off-diagonal DC conductivity in the new phase.

  18. Cleome rutidosperma and Euphorbia thymifolia Suppress Inflammatory Response via Upregulation of Phase II Enzymes and Modulation of NF-κB and JNK Activation in LPS-Stimulated BV2 Microglia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Wu, Pei-Shan; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Cleome rutidosperma DC. and Euphorbia thymifolia L. are herbal medicines used in traditional Indian and Chinese medicine to treat various illnesses. Reports document that they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities; nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms involved in their anti-inflammatory actions have not yet been elucidated. The anti-neuroinflammatory activities and underlying mechanisms of ethanol extracts of Cleome rutidosperma (CR) and Euphorbia thymifolia (ET) were studied using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cell line BV2. The morphology changes and production of pro-inflammatory mediators were assayed. Gene expression of inflammatory genes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interleukin (IL)-1β, and CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, as well as phase II enzymes such as heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1), were further investigated using reverse transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-Q-PCR) and Western blotting. The effects of CR and ET on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were examined using Western blotting and specific inhibitors. CR and ET suppressed BV2 activation, down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) overproduction without affecting cell viability. They reduced LPS-mediated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 production, attenuated IL-1β and CCL2 expression, but upregulated HO-1, GCLM and NQO1 expression. They also inhibited p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and modulated Jun-N terminal kinase (JNK) activation in BV2 cells. SP600125, the JNK inhibitor, significantly augmented the anti-IL-6 activity of ET. NF-κB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, enhanced the anti-IL-6 effects of both CR and ET. Znpp, a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, attenuated the anti-NO effects of CR and ET. Our results show that CR and ET exhibit anti

  19. Angiotensin II modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Iwata, Shusuke; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Horio, Nao; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2013-04-10

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying gustatory detection of dietary sodium is important for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Here, we show that Angiotensin II (AngII), a major mediator of body fluid and sodium homeostasis, modulates salty and sweet taste sensitivities, and that this modulation critically influences ingestive behaviors in mice. Gustatory nerve recording demonstrated that AngII suppressed amiloride-sensitive taste responses to NaCl. Surprisingly, AngII also enhanced nerve responses to sweeteners, but had no effect on responses to KCl, sour, bitter, or umami tastants. These effects of AngII on nerve responses were blocked by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) antagonist CV11974. In behavioral tests, CV11974 treatment reduced the stimulated high licking rate to NaCl and sweeteners in water-restricted mice with elevated plasma AngII levels. In taste cells AT1 proteins were coexpressed with αENaC (epithelial sodium channel α-subunit, an amiloride-sensitive salt taste receptor) or T1r3 (a sweet taste receptor component). These results suggest that the taste organ is a peripheral target of AngII. The specific reduction of amiloride-sensitive salt taste sensitivity by AngII may contribute to increased sodium intake. Furthermore, AngII may contribute to increased energy intake by enhancing sweet responses. The linkage between salty and sweet preferences via AngII signaling may optimize sodium and calorie intakes. PMID:23575826

  20. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  1. Trellis-coded multidimensional phase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrobon, Steven S.; Deng, Robert H.; Lafanechere, Alain; Ungerboeck, Gottfried; Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A 2L-dimensional multiple phase-shift keyed (MPSK) (L x MPSK) signal set is obtained by forming the Cartesian product of L two-dimensional MPSK signal sets. A systematic approach to partitioning L x MPSK signal sets that is based on block coding is used. An encoder system approach is developed. It incorporates the design of a differential precoder, a systematic convolutional encoder, and a signal set mapper. Trellis-coded L x 4PSK, L x 8PSK, and L x 16PSK modulation schemes are found for L = 1-4 and a variety of code rates and decoder complexities, many of which are fully transparent to discrete phase rotations of the signal set. The new codes achieve asymptotic coding gains up to 5.85 dB.

  2. [Experiences with ambulatory cardiologic phase II rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Schönstedt, S; Beckmann, S; Disselhoff, W; Rüssmann, B

    1999-04-01

    The phase II cardiac rehabilitation in Germany differs markedly from other European countries and the USA. Most of the patients enter a 3-week full residential program. In contrast we developed an outpatient phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Since 1979 we treated more than 8,500 patients with different indications (i.e. after myocardial infarction, coronary bypass surgery, valve replacement and reconstruction). Patients with a daily commuting time over 60 minutes are not suitable for outpatient rehabilitation. Our model corresponds to the German intrahospital rehabilitation. The rehabilitation is carried out in 3 weeks offering approximately 66 hours of therapy. Groups of 8 patients with a similar level of physical capacity stay together during the rehabilitation. A comprehensive program with exercise training, physical therapy, psychological support, education in life style changes and risk factor modification has been developed. The compliance of the patients as well as the acceptance by the family are excellent. Long-lasting reduction in LDL cholesterol levels and increments in work-load capacities have been demonstrated. A high percentage of patients returned to work. Cost analysis demonstrates a reduction up to 40% in comparison to the full residential program. Therefore the outpatient phase II cardiac rehabilitation is a good alternative especially in urban areas. PMID:10372303

  3. Unified Technical Concepts. Application Modules Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    Unified Technical Concepts (UTC) is a modular system for teaching applied physics in two-year postsecondary technician programs. This UTC laboratory textbook, the second of two volumes, consists of 45 learning modules dealing with basic concepts of physics. Addressed in the individual chapters of the guide are the following topics: force…

  4. Improving Alzheimer's disease phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry D; Carrillo, Maria C; Ryan, J Michael; Gold, Michael; Gallagher, Kim; Grundman, Michael; Berman, Robert M; Ashwood, Timothy; Siemers, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many drugs have been studied as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease, but only four have demonstrated sufficient efficacy to be approved as treatments, of which three are in the same class. This lack of success has raised questions both in the pharmaceutical industry and academia about the future of Alzheimer's disease therapy. The high cost and low success rate of drug development across many disease areas can be attributed, in large part, to late-stage clinical failures (Schachter and Ramoni, Nat Rev Drug Discov 2007;6:107-8). Thus, identifying in phase II, or preferably phase I, drugs that are likely to fail would have a dramatic impact on the costs associated with developing new drugs. With this in mind, the Alzheimer's Association convened a Research Roundtable on June 23 and 24, 2011, in Washington, DC, bringing together scientists from academia, industry, and government regulatory agencies to discuss strategies for improving the probability of phase II trial results predicting success when considering the go/no-go decision-making process leading to the initiation of phase III. PMID:23164548

  5. Bricklaying. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cholewinski, Scott

    These 23 Student Training Modules on bricklaying comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 567.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  6. Plastering. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamblen, Ron

    These 20 Student Training Modules on plastering comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 569.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  7. Painting. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kracht, Shannon

    These 21 Student Training Modules on painting comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 561.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  8. Tilesetting. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ausland, Greg

    These 24 Student Training Modules on tilesetting comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 563.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  9. Plumbing. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brath, Ed

    These 26 Student Training Modules on plumbing comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 577.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  10. Drywall. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Doug

    These 18 Student Training Modules on drywall comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 573.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  11. fiber optic interferometer fringe projector using sinusoidal phase-modulating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changrong; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Fukai; Duan, Xiaojie; Bo, En; Feng, Fan

    2013-10-01

    A novel fiber-optic interferometer fringe projector with the sinusoidal phase-modulating method is presented. The system utilizes the integrating bucket method to detect the desired phase or the displacement and a CMOS image sensor to detect four frames obtained by integration of the time-varying intensity in an interference image during the four quarters of the modulation period. Since this technique with the method modulating the injection current of the piezoelectric transducer (PZT), measurement accuracy is not affected by an intensity modulation that usually appears in the current modulation. The system also utilizes the Fresnel reflection signal to adjust the phase-modulation coefficient z to eliminate the disturbance of initial phase ψ0 . The experimental results for surface profiles of a convex hull show that the sinusoidal phase modulating interferometer proposed here confirms its applicability to practical application.

  12. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10-2 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set to 2.1.1025 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 1026 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from 214Bi and 208Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  13. Phase I-II study of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: a report of feasibility and early toxicity results in the first 50 treatments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To report results in terms of feasibility and early toxicity of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) as adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery. Methods Between September 2010 and May 2011, 50 consecutive patients presenting early-stage breast cancer were submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy with SIB-VMAT approach using RapidArc in our Institution (Istituto Clinico Humanitas ICH). Three out of 50 patients were irradiated bilaterally (53 tumours in 50 patients). All patients were enrolled in a phase I-II trial approved by the ICH ethical committee. All 50 patients enrolled in the study underwent VMAT-SIB technique to irradiate the whole breast with concomitant boost irradiation of the tumor bed. Doses to whole breast and surgical bed were 40.5 Gy and 48 Gy respectively, delivered in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Skin toxicities were recorded during and after treatment according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria with a median follow-up of 12 months (range 8–16). Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results The median age of the population was 68 years (range 36–88). According to AJCC staging system, 38 breast lesions were classified as pT1, and 15 as pT2; 49 cases were assessed as N0 and 4 as N1. The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 20/50 patients, Grade 1 in 32/50, Grade 2 in 0 and Grade 3 in 1/50 (one of the 3 cases of bilateral breast irradiation). No Grade 4 toxicities were observed. All Grade 1 toxicities had resolved within 3 weeks. No significant differences in cosmetic scores on baseline assessment vs. 3 months and 6 months after the treatment were observed: all patients were scored as excellent/good (50/50) compared with baseline; no fair/poor judgment was recorded. No other toxicities or local failures were recorded during follow-up. Conclusions The 3-week course of

  14. Inductive Adder Kicker Modulator for DARHT-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Edward

    An all solid-state kicker modulator for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT-2) has been designed and tested. This kicker modulator uses multiple solid-state modules stacked in an inductive-adder configuration where the energy is switched into each section of the adder by a parallel array of MOSFETs. The modulator features very fast rise and fall times, pulse width agility and a high pulse-repetition rate in burst mode. The modulator can drive a 50* cable with voltages up to 20 kV and can be easily configured for either positive or negative polarity. The presentation will include test data collected from both the ETA II accelerator kicker and resistive dummy loads.

  15. Experimental demonstration of microring quadrature phase-shift keying modulators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po; Xie, Chongjin; Chen, Long; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Chen, Young-kai

    2012-04-01

    Advanced optical modulation formats are a key technology to increase the capacity of optical communication networks. Mach-Zehnder modulators are typically used to generate various modulation formats. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) modulation using compact microring modulators. Generation of 20 Gb/s QPSK signals is demonstrated with 30 μm radius silicon ring modulators with drive voltages of ~6 V. These compact QPSK modulators may be used in miniature optical transponders for high-capacity optical data links. PMID:22466187

  16. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  17. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yiming Sun

    2001-09-19

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

  18. Robust quantum data locking from phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Wilde, Mark M.; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-08-01

    Quantum data locking is a uniquely quantum phenomenon that allows a relatively short key of constant size to (un)lock an arbitrarily long message encoded in a quantum state, in such a way that an eavesdropper who measures the state but does not know the key has essentially no information about the message. The application of quantum data locking in cryptography would allow one to overcome the limitations of the one-time pad encryption, which requires the key to have the same length as the message. However, it is known that the strength of quantum data locking is also its Achilles heel, as the leakage of a few bits of the key or the message may in principle allow the eavesdropper to unlock a disproportionate amount of information. In this paper we show that there exist quantum data locking schemes that can be made robust against information leakage by increasing the length of the key by a proportionate amount. This implies that a constant size key can still lock an arbitrarily long message as long as a fraction of it remains secret to the eavesdropper. Moreover, we greatly simplify the structure of the protocol by proving that phase modulation suffices to generate strong locking schemes, paving the way to optical experimental realizations. Also, we show that successful data locking protocols can be constructed using random code words, which very well could be helpful in discovering random codes for data locking over noisy quantum channels.

  19. Hybrid multinary modulation using a phase modulating spatial light modulator and a low-pass spatial filter.

    PubMed

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Erdei, Gábor; Sarkadi, Tamás; Ujhelyi, Ferenc; Reményi, Judit; Koppa, Pál; Lorincz, Emoke

    2007-08-15

    We propose a method for performing binary intensity and continuous phase modulation of beams with a spatial light modulator (SLM) and a low-pass spatial filtering 4-f system. With our method it is possible to avoid the use of phase masks in holographic data storage systems or to enhance the phase encoding of the SLM by making it capable of binary amplitude modulation. The data storage capabilities and the limitations of the method are studied. PMID:17700777

  20. Phase-modulating lasers toward on-chip integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaka, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Kazuyoshi; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Takiguchi, Yu; Nomoto, Yoshiro

    2016-07-01

    Controlling laser-beam patterns is indispensable in modern technology, where lasers are typically combined with phase-modulating elements such as diffractive optical elements or spatial light modulators. However, the combination of separate elements is not only a challenge for on-chip miniaturisation but also hinders their integration permitting the switchable control of individual modules. Here, we demonstrate the operation of phase-modulating lasers that emit arbitrarily configurable beam patterns without requiring any optical elements or scanning devices. We introduce a phase-modulating resonator in a semiconductor laser, which allows the concurrent realisation of lasing and phase modulation. The fabricated devices are on-chip-sized, making them suitable for integration. We believe this work will provide a breakthrough in various laser applications such as switchable illumination patterns for bio-medical applications, structured illuminations, and even real three-dimensional or highly realistic displays, which cannot be realised with simple combinations of conventional devices or elements.

  1. Phase-modulating lasers toward on-chip integration

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Kazuyoshi; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Takiguchi, Yu; Nomoto, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Controlling laser-beam patterns is indispensable in modern technology, where lasers are typically combined with phase-modulating elements such as diffractive optical elements or spatial light modulators. However, the combination of separate elements is not only a challenge for on-chip miniaturisation but also hinders their integration permitting the switchable control of individual modules. Here, we demonstrate the operation of phase-modulating lasers that emit arbitrarily configurable beam patterns without requiring any optical elements or scanning devices. We introduce a phase-modulating resonator in a semiconductor laser, which allows the concurrent realisation of lasing and phase modulation. The fabricated devices are on-chip-sized, making them suitable for integration. We believe this work will provide a breakthrough in various laser applications such as switchable illumination patterns for bio-medical applications, structured illuminations, and even real three-dimensional or highly realistic displays, which cannot be realised with simple combinations of conventional devices or elements. PMID:27456666

  2. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneš, P.; Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalik, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Šimkovic, F.; Štekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.

    2007-10-01

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.→g.s.) in 106Cd as 2.0×1020 years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  3. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, P.; Cermak, P.; Stekl, I.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Kovalik, A.; Simkovic, F.

    2007-10-12

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of {sup 106}Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.{yields}g.s.) in {sup 106}Cd as 2.0x10{sup 20} years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  4. 40 CFR 73.10 - Initial allocations for phase I and phase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Initial allocations for phase I and phase II. 73.10 Section 73.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Allocations § 73.10 Initial allocations for phase I and phase II. (a) Phase...

  5. Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with phase modulation to combat sequential attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hiroki; Oka, Toru; Inoue, Kyo

    2011-11-15

    Phase-modulated differential-phase-shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) is presented for combating sequential attacks that most severely restrict the DPS-QKD system distance. Slow phase modulation imposed onto the DPS signal obstructs the optimum unambiguous state discrimination measurement conducted in the sequential attack and improves the QKD distance as a result. The condition with which the phase modulation does not degrade the DPS-QKD system performance is also described.

  6. Improved beam smoothing with SSD using generalized phase modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The smoothing of the spatial illumination of an inertial confinement fusion target is examined by its spatial frequency content. It is found that the smoothing by spectral dispersion method, although efficient for glass lasers, can yield poor smoothing at low spatial frequency. The dependence of the smoothed spatial spectrum on the characteristics of phase modulation and dispersion is examined for both sinusoidal and more general phase modulation. It is shown that smoothing with non-sinusoidal phase modulation can result in spatial spectra which are substantially identical to that obtained with the induced spatial incoherence or similar method where random phase plates are present in both methods and identical beam divergence is assumed.

  7. An effective phase modulation in the collinear holographic storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiao; Ke, Jun; Wu, An'an; Xiao, Xue; Tan, Xiaodi

    2014-02-01

    Almost all current collinear holographic storage systems record and reproduce the amplitude information but ignore the phase information. To utilize phase information as the useful data is a significant study. Instead of amplitude modulation, using phase encoding and decoding to get phase information is one way to raise storage density. By adding phase encoding to the amplitude encoding, we realized the phase modulation. To reduce the computation load we simplified multilayer phase-scale model to binary 0 and π phase model. By controlling the proportion of 0 and π phase, different phase modulation models can be represented. In the simulation, we use the angular spectrum theory to build the system mathematical model. We got an effective range of the phase modulation called degree of freedom curve of phase encoding, which can promise both low bit-error-rate (BER) and high code rate. Using this curve, we can make phase encoding more efficiently. Once the dynamic response range of the materiel, the gray levels of phase encoding, and the demanded BER determined, we can calculate the degree of freedom curve to prepare for the followed phase encoding.

  8. MesoNAM Verification Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2011-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron Launch Weather Officers use the 12-km resolution North American Mesoscale model (MesoNAM) forecasts to support launch weather operations. In Phase I, the performance of the model at KSC/CCAFS was measured objectively by conducting a detailed statistical analysis of model output compared to observed values. The objective analysis compared the MesoNAM forecast winds, temperature, and dew point to the observed values from the sensors in the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network. In Phase II, the AMU modified the current tool by adding an additional 15 months of model output to the database and recalculating the verification statistics. The bias, standard deviation of bias, Root Mean Square Error, and Hypothesis test for bias were calculated to verify the performance of the model. The results indicated that the accuracy decreased as the forecast progressed, there was a diurnal signal in temperature with a cool bias during the late night and a warm bias during the afternoon, and there was a diurnal signal in dewpoint temperature with a low bias during the afternoon and a high bias during the late night.

  9. Cytomegalovirus vaccine: phase II clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Steininger, C

    2014-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most significant viral pathogens during pregnancy and in immunocompromised patients. Antiviral prophylactic strategies are limited by toxicities, drug-drug interactions and development of antiviral resistance. A safe and protective vaccine against CMV is highly desirable in view of the potential positive impact on CMV-associated morbidity and mortality as well as healthcare costs. Unfortunately, this demand could not be met in the past four decades although development of a CMV vaccine has been ranked at the highest priority by the US Institute of Medicine. Multiple different vaccine candidates have been developed and evaluated in phase I clinical trials and few succeeded to phase II trials. Nevertheless, two different vaccines showed recently promising results in trials that studied healthy adults and immunocompromised solid-organ and bone-marrow transplant recipients, respectively. The gB/MF59 vaccine exhibited a vaccine efficacy of 50% in healthy, postpartum females. In transplant patients, gB/MF59 and the DNA vaccine TransVax both limited the periods of viraemia and consequently the need for antiviral treatment. The success of these trials is encouraging and will probably give new impetus to the development of an effective CMV vaccine. Sterilizing immunity may not be attainable in the near future and may not be necessary for a CMV vaccine to have a significant impact on health care as discussed in the present review. PMID:24283990

  10. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  11. The SIMPLE Phase II dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Marques, R.; Simple Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Phase II of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) searched for astroparticle dark matter using superheated liquid C2ClF5 droplet detectors. Each droplet generally requires an energy deposition with linear energy transfer (LET) ≳150 keV/μm for a liquid-to-gas phase transition, providing an intrinsic rejection against minimum ionizing particles of order 10-10, and reducing the backgrounds to primarily α and neutron-induced recoil events. The droplet phase transition generates a millimetric-sized gas bubble that is recorded by acoustic means. We describe the SIMPLE detectors, their acoustic instrumentation, and the characterizations, signal analysis and data selection, which yield a particle-induced, "true nucleation" event detection efficiency of better than 97% at a 95% C.L. The recoil-α event discrimination, determined using detectors first irradiated with neutrons and then doped with alpha emitters, provides a recoil identification of better than 99%; it differs from those of COUPP and PICASSO primarily as a result of their different liquids with lower critical LETs. The science measurements, comprising two shielded arrays of fifteen detectors each and a total exposure of 27.77 kgd, are detailed. Removal of the 1.94 kgd Stage 1 installation period data, which had previously been mistakenly included in the data, reduces the science exposure from 20.18 to 18.24 kgd and provides new contour minima of σp=4.3×10-3 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-dependent sector of astroparticle dark matter-proton interactions and σN=3.6×10-6 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-independent sector. These results are examined with respect to the fluorine spin and halo parameters used in the previous data analysis.

  12. Highly birefringent crystal for Raman transitions with phase modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Nieves; Abediyeh, Vahide; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Jeronimo-Moreno, Yasser; Gomez, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    We present a system to excite Raman transitions with minimum phase noise. The system uses a phase modulator to generate the phase locked beams required for the transition. We use a long calcite crystal to filter out one of the sidebands, avoiding the cancellation that appears at high detunings for phase modulation. The measured phase noise is limited by the quality of the microwave synthesizer. We use the calcite crystal a second time to produce a co-propagating Raman pair with perpendicular polarizations to drive velocity insensitive Raman transitions. Support from CONACYT and Fundacion Marcos Moshinsky.

  13. Phase modulation induced by cooperative effects in electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischhaker, Robert; Evers, Joerg; Dey, Tarak N.

    2010-07-15

    We analyze the influence of dipole-dipole interactions in an electromagnetically induced transparency set up for a density at the onset of cooperative effects. To this end, we include mean-field models for the influence of local-field corrections and radiation trapping into our calculation. We show both analytically and numerically that the polarization contribution to the local field strongly modulates the phase of a weak pulse. We give an intuitive explanation for this local-field-induced phase modulation and demonstrate that it distinctively differs from the nonlinear self-phase-modulation that a strong pulse experiences in a Kerr medium.

  14. Experimental verification of electro-refractive phase modulation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Neumaier, Daniel; Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Matheisen, Christopher; Lena Giesecke, Anna; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kurz, Heinrich

    2015-06-01

    Graphene has been considered as a promising material for opto-electronic devices, because of its tunable and wideband optical properties. In this work, we demonstrate electro-refractive phase modulation in graphene at wavelengths from 1530 to 1570 nm. By integrating a gated graphene layer in a silicon-waveguide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the key parameters of a phase modulator like change in effective refractive index, insertion loss and absorption change are extracted. These experimentally obtained values are well reproduced by simulations and design guidelines are provided to make graphene devices competitive to contemporary silicon based phase modulators for on-chip applications.

  15. Experimental verification of electro-refractive phase modulation in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Neumaier, Daniel; Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Matheisen, Christopher; Lena Giesecke, Anna; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kurz, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has been considered as a promising material for opto-electronic devices, because of its tunable and wideband optical properties. In this work, we demonstrate electro-refractive phase modulation in graphene at wavelengths from 1530 to 1570 nm. By integrating a gated graphene layer in a silicon-waveguide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the key parameters of a phase modulator like change in effective refractive index, insertion loss and absorption change are extracted. These experimentally obtained values are well reproduced by simulations and design guidelines are provided to make graphene devices competitive to contemporary silicon based phase modulators for on-chip applications. PMID:26061415

  16. Minimizing inter-channel cross-phase modulation with optical phase conjugation in asymmetric fibre links.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Graham D; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2016-09-01

    Using analytic and numerical modelling of fibre transmission systems that employ optical phase conjugation (OPC), we show inter-channel cross-phase modulation depends on the integrated square error between nonlinear profiles before and after OPC and that arranging amplifiers and tuning power levels is crucial to minimizing noise. We derive modulation transparent formulas for phase noise and optimal power settings. Examples are shown for 16 and 64 quadrature amplitude modulation. PMID:27607633

  17. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  18. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  19. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phase II repowering extensions. 72.44 Section 72.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering extensions. (a) Applicability. (1)...

  20. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  1. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  2. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  3. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  4. Method and apparatus for receiving and tracking phase modulated signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, S.; Lenett, S. D.; Kobayashi, H. S.; Pawlowski, J. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and technique are described for receiving and tracking analog or digital phase modulated signals from 0 deg to 360 deg phase shift. In order to track a signal with many phases, a detector discerns the phase modulation of the incoming signal and a phase shifter generates a negative phase shift opposite in angle to the detected phase angle. This produces a converted series sideband component barrier signal. The residual carrier signal and the converted series sideband component carrier are added together to produce a tracking carrier signal. The tracking carrier signal is multiplied with the output from a voltage controlled oscillator in the tracking loop to obtain an error signal which drives the voltage controlled oscillator and tracks the incoming signal frequency. The technique is less susceptible to carrier interference which may degrade tracking and tracking may be performed at lower signal to noise ratios and for lower input signal power levels.

  5. Design Of A New In Situ Spectroscopic Phase Modulated Ellipsometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevillon, Bernard; Parey, J. Y.; Stchakovsky, M.; Benferhat, Ramdane; Josserand, Yves; Schlayen, B.

    1990-02-01

    A new spectroscopic phase modulated ellipsometer (SPME) is presented. As compared to other ellipsometric techniques like rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE), the phase modulation uses a high frequency modulation (50 kHz) provided by a photoelastic modulator. Then SPME allows at least two orders of magnitude faster real-time mesurements than RAE. Thus, SPME is particularly suitable for in situ real-time applications. New insights on phase modulated ellipsometry are given. In particular, it is shown that an optical model, taking into account the presence of higher harmonics in the modulation, leads to an improvement of the precision measurement. Therefore, it can be inferred that both RAE and SPME provide comparable high precision measurements. Moreover SPME can be combined with numerical data processing systems. A new Fourier analysis of the signal, based on the use of a high precision analog digital converter and a fast digital processor, is presented. The adaptation of the SPME to a deposition chamber is illustrated. In particular, the use of optical fibers in both optical arms allows an increase of the compactness of the ellipsometer. Four detectors can be used simultaneously providing the spectroscopic capability for real-time applications. On-line connexions between the data acquisition system and external analog signals and triggers can also be used. Thus phase modulated ellipsometry appears a powerful technique for in situ control processing applications.

  6. Condensin II initiates sister chromatid resolution during S phase

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Takao; Yamashita, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Condensins I and II are multisubunit complexes that play essential yet distinct functions in chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis. Unlike condensin I, condensin II localizes to the nucleus during interphase, but it remains poorly understood what functions condensin II might have before mitotic entry. Here, we report that condensin II changes its chromatin-binding property during S phase. Remarkably, advanced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assays enabled us to visualize condensin II forming “sister axes” in replicated regions of chromosomes in S phase cells. Depletion of condensin II compromised PCC-driven sister chromatid resolution during S phase. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization assays revealed that condensin II, but not condensin I, promotes disjoining duplicated chromosomal loci during S phase. Application of mild replicative stress partially impaired this process and further exacerbated phenotypes arising from condensin II depletion. Our results suggest that condensin II initiates structural reorganization of duplicated chromosomes during S phase to prepare for their proper condensation and segregation in mitosis. PMID:23401001

  7. Considerations of digital phase modulation for narrowband satellite mobile communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grythe, Knut

    1990-01-01

    The Inmarsat-M system for mobile satellite communication is specified as a frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system, applying Offset Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) for transmitting 8 kbit/sec in 10 kHz user channel bandwidth. We consider Digital Phase Modulation (DPM) as an alternative modulation format for INMARSAT-M. DPM is similar to Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) except that DPM has a finite memory in the premodular filter with a continuous varying modulation index. It is shown that DPM with 64 states in the VA obtains a lower bit error rate (BER). Results for a 5 kHz system, with the same 8 kbit/sec transmitted bitstream, is also presented.

  8. Angiotensin II and angiotensin II receptor blocker modulate the arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tai, Ching-Tai; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Cheng-I; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (AIIRBs) have been shown to prevent atrial fibrillation. The pulmonary veins (PVs) are the most important focus for the generation of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether angiotensin II or AIIRB may change the arrhythmogenic activity of the PVs. Conventional microelectrodes and whole-cell patch clamps were used to investigate the action potentials (APs) and ionic currents in isolated rabbit PV tissue and single cardiomyocytes before and after administering angiotensin II or losartan (AIIRB). In the tissue preparations, angiotensin II induced delayed after-depolarizations (1, 10, and 100 nM) and accelerated the automatic rhythm (10 and 100 nM). Angiotensin II (100 nM) prolonged the AP duration and increased the contractile force (10 and 100 nM). Losartan (1 and 10 μM) inhibited the automatic rhythm. Losartan (10 μM) prolonged the AP duration and reduced the contractile force (1 and 10 μM). Angiotensin II reduced the transient outward potassium current (Ito) but increased the L-type calcium, delayed rectifier potassium (IK), transient inward (Iti), pacemaker, and Na+–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) currents in the PV cardiomyocytes. Losartan decreased the Ito, IK, Iti, and NCX currents. In conclusion, angiotensin II and AIIRB modulate the PV electrical activity, which may play a role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. PMID:16273119

  9. Effect of input phase modulation to a phase-sensitive optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Anderson, Brian E; Horrom, Travis; Jones, Kevin M; Lett, Paul D

    2016-08-22

    Many optical applications depend on amplitude modulating optical beams using devices such as acousto-optical modulators (AOMs) or optical choppers. Methods to add amplitude modulation (AM) often inadvertently impart phase modulation (PM) onto the light as well. While this PM is of no consequence to many phase-insensitive applications, phase-sensitive processes can be affected. Here we study the effects of input phase and amplitude modulation on the output of a quantum-noise limited phase-sensitive optical amplifier (PSA) realized in hot 85Rb vapor. We investigate the dependence of PM on AOM alignment and demonstrate a novel approach to quantifying PM by using the PSA as a diagnostic tool. We then use this method to measure the alignment-dependent PM of an optical chopper which arises due to diffraction effects as the chopper blade passes through the optical beam. PMID:27557263

  10. Continuous-wave phase-matched molecular optical modulator

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Izaki, Hirotomo; Tsuchiya, Takao; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-01-01

    In optical modulation, the highest available modulation rate is basically limited to the GHz frequency range at best. This is because optical modulation is often performed using electro-optic or acousto-optic effects that require application of an external signal to solid-state nonlinear optical materials. Here we describe optical modulation of continuous-wave radiation at frequencies exceeding 10 THz based on ultrafast variation of molecule polarizability arising from coherent molecular motion. The optical modulation efficiency is extensively enhanced by fulfilling phase-matching conditions with the help of dispersion control of the optical cavity, generating sidebands with a highest ratio of 7.3 × 10−3. These results will pave the way for development of versatile optical modulation-based techniques in a wide range of research fields in optical sciences, such as mode-locked lasers operating in the THz range. PMID:26887500

  11. BADD phase II: DDS information management architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Thomas P.; DeCleene, Brian T.; Speckert, Glen; Voorhees, Harry L.

    1997-06-01

    The DARPA Battlefield Awareness and Data Dissemination (BADD) Phase II Program will provide the next generation multimedia information management architecture to support the warfighter. One goal of this architecture is proactive dissemination of information to the warfighter through strategies such as multicast and 'smart push and pull' designed to minimize latency and make maximum use of available communications bandwidth. Another goal is to support integration of information from widely distributed legacy repositories. This will enable the next generation of battlefield awareness applications to form a common operational view of the battlefield to aid joint service and/or multi-national peacekeeping forces. This paper discusses the approach we are taking to realize such an architecture for BADD. Our architecture and its implementation, known as the Distributed Dissemination Serivces (DDS) are based on two key concepts: a global database schema and an intelligent, proactive caching scheme. A global schema provides a common logical view of the information space in which the warfighter operates. This schema (or subsets of it) is shared by all warfighters through a distributed object database providing local access to all relevant metadata. This approach provides both scalability to a large number of warfighters, and it supports tethered as well as autonomous operations. By utilizing DDS information integration services that provide transparent access to legacy databases, related information from multiple 'stovepipe' systems are now available to battlefield awareness applications. The second key concept embedded in our architecture is an intelligent, hierarchical caching system supported by proactive dissemination management services which push both lightweight and heavyweight data such as imagery and video to warfighters based on their information profiles. The goal of this approach is to transparently and proactively stage data which is likely to be requested by

  12. Low voltage blue phase liquid crystal for spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fenglin; Lee, Yun-Han; Luo, Zhenyue; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrated a low-voltage polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal (BPLC) for phase-only modulation with a liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS). A new device configuration was developed, which allows the incident laser beam to traverse the BPLC layer four times before exiting the LCoS. As a result, the 2π phase change voltage is reduced to below 24 V in the visible region. The response time remains relatively fast (∼3  ms). The proposed device configuration enables widespread applications of BPLC spatial light modulators. PMID:26512528

  13. A New OEO Design Using Optical Phase Modulation and Modulation Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Yu, Nan

    2006-01-01

    We present the design for a phase-modulated Opto-Electronic Oscillator (OEO) that incorporates asymmetric Mach- Zehnder (AMZ) interferometers as phase demodulators together with PM modulation suppression. The new design promises to obtain in the electro-optical domain the low-noise advantages previously achieved in RF and microwave oscillators by the use of carrier suppression but which have been achieved only to a limited extent in OEO's.

  14. Epitaxially grown vertical junction phase shifters for improved modulation efficiency in silicon depletion-type modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif Azadeh, S.; Romero-García, S.; Merget, F.; Moscoso-Mártir, A.; von den Driesch, Nils; Buca, D.; Witzens, J.

    2015-05-01

    High-speed silicon modulators based on the plasma effect in reverse-biased p(i)n junction phase shifters have been extensively investigated. The main challenge for such modulators is to maximize their modulation efficiency without compromising high-speed performance and insertion losses. Here, we propose a highly efficient silicon modulator based on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer in which the doping profile of a vertical pin junction is precisely controlled by means of in-situ doping during silicon epitaxial growth. The precise level of control afforded by this fabrication procedure allows separately optimizing doping concentrations in the immediate vicinity of the junction and in surrounding electrical transport layers at the nanometric scale, enabling high performance levels. Free carrier absorption losses are minimized by implementing high carrier densities only in the waveguide regions where they benefit the most, i.e., in the immediate vicinity of the junction. Since these devices rely entirely on single crystal silicon, performance degradation caused by poor transport and high optical losses in poly- or amorphous silicon (as utilized in similar vertical phase shifter geometries such as semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor capacitive phase shifters) is avoided. Furthermore, unlike conventional plasma effect silicon phase shifters, the bandwidth of the proposed phase shifters is largely independent of the applied reverse voltage and the phase shift versus applied voltage is linearized, making them more suitable for complex modulation formats. The efficiency of the single ended phase shifters is expected to reach a VπL of 0.56 V•cm and absorption losses of α=4.5 dB/mm, a good performance metric for depletion-type modulators. Lumped element Mach-Zehnder Modulators as well as travelling-wave modulators with phase matching based on meandered waveguides have been designed and their RF characteristics simulated and optimized with Ansoft HFSS. First experiments

  15. Full electroresistance modulation in a mixed-phase metallic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zhiqi; Li, L.; Gai, Zheng; Clarkson, J. D.; Hsu, S. L.; Wong, Anthony T.; Fan, L. S.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Ward, Thomas Zac; et al

    2016-03-03

    We report a giant, ~22%, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV/cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh/BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Furthermore, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systemsmore » with phase instability therein.« less

  16. Full Electroresistance Modulation in a Mixed-Phase Metallic Alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Li, L; Gai, Z; Clarkson, J D; Hsu, S L; Wong, A T; Fan, L S; Lin, M-W; Rouleau, C M; Ward, T Z; Lee, H N; Sefat, A S; Christen, H M; Ramesh, R

    2016-03-01

    We report a giant, ∼22%, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2  kV/cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh/BaTiO_{3} heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Moreover, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systems with phase instability therein. PMID:26991197

  17. Full Electroresistance Modulation in a Mixed-Phase Metallic Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Li, L.; Gai, Z.; Clarkson, J. D.; Hsu, S. L.; Wong, A. T.; Fan, L. S.; Lin, M.-W.; Rouleau, C. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lee, H. N.; Sefat, A. S.; Christen, H. M.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report a giant, ˜22 %, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV /cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh /BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Moreover, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systems with phase instability therein.

  18. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  19. Zero-static-power phase-change optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohsen; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2016-03-15

    This Letter presents an innovative design of an electro-optical modulator using germanium telluride (GeTe) phase change material with an integrated nano-heater. The refractive index and the electrical conductivity of GeTe significantly change as the GeTe goes though the crystallographic phase change. Amorphization and crystallization of GeTe is achieved using the Joule heating method by passing current through an array of metal gratings, where GeTe fills the slits between the metal lines. These metal slits also increase the contrast between the amorphous (on) and crystalline (off) phases of the modulator by having extraordinary transmission and reflection response based on interactions of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with the incoming light. The modulator is designed for 1550 nm wavelength, where GeTe is transparent in the amorphous phase and provides high optical on/off contrast. The metal-insulator-metal (MIM) is designed in such a way to only support SPP excitation when GeTe is crystalline and slit resonance when it is amorphous to increase the modulation index. The modulator is stable in both phases with higher than 12 dB change in transmission with zero static power consumption at room temperature. PMID:26977663

  20. Liquid crystal spatial light modulator with very large phase modulation operating in high harmonic orders.

    PubMed

    Calero, Venancio; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Albero, Jorge; Sánchez-López, María M; Moreno, Ignacio

    2013-11-15

    Unusually large phase modulation in a commercial liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) is reported. Such a situation is obtained by illuminating with visible light a device designed to operate in the infrared range. The phase modulation range reaches 6π radians in the red region of the visible spectrum and 10π radians in the blue region. Excellent diffraction efficiency in high harmonic orders is demonstrated despite a concomitant and non-negligible Fabry-Perot interference effect. This type of SLM opens the possibility to implement diffractive elements with reduced chromatic dispersion or chromatic control. PMID:24322100

  1. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography using continuous polarization modulation with arbitrary phase modulation amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  2. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin; Liu, Lianqing E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang; Li, Guangyong E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu

    2014-08-04

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  3. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  4. Characterization of polarization-independent phase modulation method for practical plug and play quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Osung; Lee, Min-Soo; Woo, Min Ki; Park, Byung Kwon; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Yong-Su; Han, Sang-Wook; Moon, Sung

    2015-12-01

    We characterized a polarization-independent phase modulation method, called double phase modulation, for a practical plug and play quantum key distribution (QKD) system. Following investigation of theoretical backgrounds, we applied the method to the practical QKD system and characterized the performance through comparing single phase modulation (SPM) and double phase modulation. Consequently, we obtained repeatable and accurate phase modulation confirmed by high visibility single photon interference even for input signals with arbitrary polarization. Further, the results show that only 80% of the bias voltage required in the case of single phase modulation is needed to obtain the target amount of phase modulation.

  5. Adaptive optics fundus camera using a liquid crystal phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Naoki; Bessho, Kenichiro; Kitaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Naoyuki; Fujikado, Takashi; Mihashi, Toshifumi

    2008-05-01

    We have developed an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera to obtain high resolution retinal images of eyes. We use a liquid crystal phase modulator to compensate the aberrations of the eye for better resolution and better contrast in the images. The liquid crystal phase modulator has a wider dynamic range to compensate aberrations than most mechanical deformable mirrors and its linear phase generation makes it easy to follow eye movements. The wavefront aberration was measured in real time with a sampling rate of 10 Hz and the closed loop system was operated at around 2 Hz. We developed software tools to align consecutively obtained images. From our experiments with three eyes, the aberrations of normal eyes were reduced to less than 0.1 μm (RMS) in less than three seconds by the liquid crystal phase modulator. We confirmed that this method was adequate for measuring eyes with large aberrations including keratoconic eyes. Finally, using the liquid crystal phase modulator, high resolution images of retinas could be obtained.

  6. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  7. System design of programmable 4f phase modulation techniques for rapid intensity shaping: a conceptual comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Matthias; Heber, Jörg; Janschek, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The present study analyses three beam shaping approaches with respect to a light-efficient generation of i) patterns and ii) multiple spots by means of a generic optical 4f-setup. 4f approaches share the property that due to the one-to-one relationship between output intensity and input phase, the need for time-consuming, iterative calculation can be avoided. The resulting low computational complexity offers a particular advantage compared to the widely used holographic principles and makes them potential candidates for real-time applications. The increasing availability of high-speed phase modulators, e.g. on the basis of MEMS, calls for an evaluation of the performances of these concepts. Our second interest is the applicability of 4f methods to high-power applications. We discuss the variants of 4f intensity shaping by phase modulation from a system-level point of view which requires the consideration of application relevant boundary conditions. The discussion includes i) the micro mirror based phase manipulation combined with amplitude masking in the Fourier plane, ii) the Generalized Phase Contrast, and iii) matched phase-only correlation filtering combined with GPC. The conceptual comparison relies on comparative figures of merit for energy efficiency, pattern homogeneity, pattern image quality, maximum output intensity and flexibility with respect to the displayable pattern. Numerical simulations illustrate our findings.

  8. Phase-modulated beams technique for thin photorefractive films characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmenkov, Yu. O.; Kir'yanov, A. V.; Starodumov, A. N.; Kozhevnikov, N. M.; Lemmetyinen, H.

    2000-04-01

    The phase-modulated beams technique is developed for nonlinear thin photorefractive films characterization. In the Raman-Nath diffraction approximation, the formulas are deduced, allowing us to measure the amplitude of phase grating recorded in a film and its nonlinear refractive index n2. The method is applied for studying Langmuir-Blodgett multilayer thin (˜0.6 μm) films of Bacteriorhodopsin at wavelength 633 nm.

  9. Comparison of phase modulation schemes for coherently combined fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian; Flores, Angel; Holten, Roger; Dajani, Iyad

    2015-10-19

    Optical linewidth broadening through both white noise (WNS) and pseudo-random binary sequence (PBRS) phase modulation are effective techniques for suppressing stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in high- power fiber amplifiers. However, detailed studies comparing both coherent beam combining and SBS suppression of these phase modulation schemes have not been reported. In this study, a passive fiber cutback experiment is performed comparing the SBS threshold enhancement factor of a PRBS and WNS broadened seed as a function of linewidth and fiber length. Particularly, assuming an optimal PRBS pattern is chosen, pseudo-random modulation provides superior SBS suppression than WNS for a given fiber length and signal linewidth. Furthermore, two WNS and PRBS modulated 150 W fiber lasers are coherently combined to measure and compare the combining efficiency, beam quality, and coherence as a function of optical path length difference. Notably, the discrete spectral density of PRBS modulation provides a re-coherence effect where the lasers periodically come back into phase. Overall, this may reduce path length matching complexity in coherently combined fiber laser systems. PMID:26480366

  10. Modulated phase matching and high-order harmonic enhancement mediated by the carrier-envelope phase

    SciTech Connect

    Faccio, Daniele; Serrat, Carles; Cela, Jose M.; Farres, Albert; Di Trapani, Paolo; Biegert, Jens

    2010-01-15

    The process of high-order harmonic generation in gases is numerically investigated in the presence of a few-cycle pulsed-Bessel-beam pump, featuring a periodic modulation in the peak intensity due to large carrier-envelope-phase mismatch. A two-decade enhancement in the conversion efficiency is observed and interpreted as the consequence of a mechanism known as a nonlinearly induced modulation in the phase mismatch.

  11. Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative, Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Mary Jo; Johnson, Ryan; Kornreich, Toby; Klym, Mark; Leland, Karen

    In 1996, drawing from religious, educational, social services, media, neighborhoods, nonprofits, and health-providing sectors of the community, the Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative (PVPI) was conceived. During Phase One of the initiative, the following seven points regarding prevention and prevention design strategies were assembled: (1)…

  12. Phase-controlled superconducting heat-flux quantum modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giazotto, F.; Martínez-Pérez, M. J.

    2012-09-01

    We theoretically put forward the concept of a phase-controlled superconducting heat-flux quantum modulator. Its operation relies on phase-dependent heat current predicted to occur in temperature-biased Josephson tunnel junctions. The device behavior is investigated as a function of temperature bias across the junctions, bath temperature, and junctions asymmetry as well. In a realistic Al-based setup the structure could provide temperature modulation amplitudes up to ˜50 mK with flux-to-temperature transfer coefficients exceeding ˜125 mK/Φ0 below 1 K, and temperature modulation frequency of the order of a few MHz. The proposed structure appears as a promising building-block for the implementation of caloritronic devices operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  13. Liquid metal blanket module testing and design for ITER/TIBER II

    SciTech Connect

    Mattas, R.F.; Cha, Y.; Finn, P.A.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.; Stevens, H.; Turner, L.

    1988-05-01

    A major goal for ITER is the testing of nuclear components to demonstrate the integrated performance of the most attractive concepts that can lead to a commercial fusion reactor. As part of the ITER/TIBER II study, the test program and design of test models were examined for a number of blanket concepts. The work at Argonne National Laboratory focused on self-cooled liquid metal blankets. A test program for liquid metal blankets was developed based upon the ITER/TIBER II operating schedule and the specific data needs to resolve the key issues for liquid metals. Testing can begin early in reactor operation with liquid metal MHD tests to confirm predictive capability. Combined heat transfer/MHD tests can be performed during initial plasma operation. After acceptable heat transfer performance is verified, tests to determine the integrated high temperature performance in a neutron environment can begin. During the high availability phase operation, long term performance and reliability tests will be performed. It is envisioned that a companion test program will be conducted outside ITER to determine behavior under severe accident conditions and upper performance limits. A detailed design of a liquid metal test module and auxiliary equipment was also developed. The module followed the design of the TPSS blanket. Detailed analysis of the heat transfer and tritium systems were performed, and the overall layout of the systems was determined. In general, the blanket module appears to be capable of addressing most of the testing needs. 8 refs., 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Adiabatic quantum computing with phase modulated laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of quantum logical gates for multilevel systems is demonstrated through decoherence control under the quantum adiabatic method using simple phase modulated laser pulses. We make use of selective population inversion and Hamiltonian evolution with time to achieve such goals robustly instead of the standard unitary transformation language. PMID:17195865

  15. Photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer for lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Hori, Akio; Kamada, Takeshi

    2001-05-01

    We propose a phase-modulation fluorometer that is applicable to a very weak fluorescence intensity level. In order to counter the single-photon event situation, we have introduced a combination of a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC) and a pulse height analyzer (PHA) to the phase- modulation fluorometer, the combination of which is usually used in the single-photon correlation method to measure fluorescence decay waveforms by pulsed excitation. In the proposed fluorometer, a sinusoidal response waveform that is shifted in phase over the reference one is obtained statistically as a histogram in the PHA memory and then the fluorescence lifetime can be calculated by the same procedure as the conventional analog phase-modulation method. The excitation light source used was a current- modulated ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED), whose center wavelength was 370 nm and its spectral bandwidth was 10 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes of 17.6 ns and 5.7 ns obtained for 10 ppb quinine sulfate in 0.1 N H2SO4 and for 10 ppb rhodamine 6G in ethanol, respectively, agreed well with those reported in the literature.

  16. Charge modulation as fingerprints of phase-string triggered interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zheng; Tian, Chushun; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Weng, Zheng-Yu; Zaanen, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Charge order appears to be an ubiquitous phenomenon in doped Mott insulators, which is currently under intense experimental and theoretical investigations particularly in the high Tc cuprates. This phenomenon is conventionally understood in terms of Hartree-Fock-type mean-field theory. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for charge modulation which is rooted in the many-particle quantum physics arising in the strong coupling limit. Specifically, we consider the problem of a single hole in a bipartite t -J ladder. As a remnant of the fermion signs, the hopping hole picks up subtle phases pending the fluctuating spins, the so-called phase-string effect. We demonstrate the presence of charge modulations in the density matrix renormalization group solutions which disappear when the phase strings are switched off. This form of charge modulation can be understood analytically in a path-integral language with a mean-field-like approximation adopted, showing that the phase strings give rise to constructive interferences leading to self-localization. When the latter occurs, left- and right-moving propagating modes emerge inside the localization volume and their interference is responsible for the real space charge modulation.

  17. ADMX Phase II : Relocation and Millikelvin Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Heilman, Jesse; Tracy, Kyle

    2010-08-30

    Low mass axions are an attractive candidate for making up dark matter. While there are several models for how the Axion couples with other matter, were they to be the majority of the local galactic dark matter halo, they would have a number density on the order of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) is a microwave cavity experiment searching for axion Dark Matter via the axion's electromagnetic coupling. While the original ADMX did not see evidence of axions, the experiment is planned to go through two phases of upgrades to expand its sensitivity and provide a definitive search for axion dark matter. The first phase established the use of a SQUID amplifier which can reduce the amplifier noise temperature to the 100 mK range. In the second phase we will first move the experiment from LLNL to CENPA at the University of Washington. Once the experiment has been moved successfully we will install a dilution refrigerator to cool the cavity to the 100 mK range thus increasing the sensititivity to the level required to scan the remainder of the allowed model space.

  18. Longitudinal tracking with phase and amplitude modulated rf

    SciTech Connect

    Caussyn, D.D.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1993-06-01

    Synchrotron motion was induced by phase shifting the rf of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) cooler-synchrotron. The resulting coherent-bunch motion was tracked in longitudinal phase space for as many as 700,000 turns, or for over 350 synchrotron oscillations. Results of recent experimental studies of longitudinal motion in which the rf phase and amplitude were harmonically modulated are also presented. Comparisons of experimental data with numerical simulations, assuming independent particle motion, are made. Observed multiparticle effects are also discussed.

  19. Propagation of phase modulation signals in time-varying plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Li, Xiaoping; Wang, Di; Liu, Yanming; He, Pan

    2016-05-01

    The effects of time-varying plasma to the propagation of phase modulation signals are investigated in this paper. Through theoretical analysis, the mechanism of the interaction between the time-varying plasma and the phase modulation signal is given. A time-varying plasma generator which could produce arbitrary time-varying plasma is built by adjusting the discharge power. A comparison of results from experiment and simulation prove that the time-varying plasma could cause the special rotation of QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying) constellation, and the mechanism of constellation point's rotation is analyzed. Additionally, the experimental results of the QPSK signals' EVM (Error Vector Magnitude) after time-varying and time-invariant plasma with different ωp/ω are given. This research could be used to improve the TT&C (Tracking Telemeter and Command) system of re-entry vehicles.

  20. Spatial optical phase-modulating metadevice with subwavelength pixelation.

    PubMed

    Cencillo-Abad, Pablo; Plum, Eric; Rogers, Edward T F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic control over optical wavefronts enables focusing, diffraction and redirection of light on demand, however, sub-wavelength resolution is required to avoid unwanted diffracted beams that are present in commercial spatial light modulators. Here we propose a realistic metadevice that dynamically controls the optical phase of reflected beams with sub-wavelength pixelation in one dimension. Based on reconfigurable metamaterials and nanomembrane technology, it consists of individually moveable metallic nanowire actuators that control the phase of reflected light by modulating the optical path length. We demonstrate that the metadevice can provide on-demand optical wavefront shaping functionalities of diffraction gratings, beam splitters, phase-gradient metasurfaces, cylindrical mirrors and mirror arrays - with variable focal distance and numerical aperture - without unwanted diffraction. PMID:27505842

  1. Absolute negative mobility induced by potential phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandogbessi, Bruno S.; Kenfack, Anatole

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the transport properties of a particle subjected to a deterministic inertial rocking system, under a constant bias, for which the phase of the symmetric spatial potential used is time modulated. We show that this modulated phase, assisted by a periodic driving force, can lead to the occurrence of the so-called absolute negative mobility (ANM), the phenomenon in which the particle surprisingly moves against the bias. Furthermore, we discover that ANM predominantly originates from chaotic-periodic transitions. While a detailed mechanism of ANM remains unclear, we show that one can manipulate the control parameters, i.e., the amplitude and the frequency of the phase, in order to enforce the motion of the particle in a given direction. Finally, for this experimentally realizable system, we devise a two-parameter current plot which may be a good guide for controlling ANM.

  2. Optical vector network analyzer based on amplitude-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Kasimova, Dilyara I.; Zastela, Mikhail Y.; Gavrilov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Igor A.; Purtov, Vadim A.

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the principles of optical vector network analyzer (OVNA) design for fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) characterization based on amplitude-phase modulation of optical carrier that allow us to improve the measurement accuracy of amplitude and phase parameters of the elements under test. Unlike existing OVNA based on a single-sideband and unbalanced double sideband amplitude modulation, the ratio of the two side components of the probing radiation is used for analysis of amplitude and phase parameters of the tested elements, and the radiation of the optical carrier is suppressed, or the latter is used as a local oscillator. The suggested OVNA is designed for the narrow band-stop elements (π-phaseshift FBG) and wide band-pass elements (linear chirped FBG) research.

  3. Phase matching of high order harmonic generation using dynamic phase modulation caused by a non-collinear modulation pulse

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Oren; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Mumane, Margaret M.

    2010-02-16

    Phase matching high harmonic generation (HHG) uses a single, long duration non-collinear modulating pulse intersecting the driving pulse. A femtosecond driving pulse is focused into an HHG medium (such as a noble gas) to cause high-harmonic generation (HHG), for example in the X-ray region of the spectrum, via electrons separating from and recombining with gas atoms. A non-collinear pulse intersects the driving pulse within the gas, and modulates the field seen by the electrons while separated from their atoms. The modulating pulse is low power and long duration, and its frequency and amplitude is chosen to improve HHG phase matching by increasing the areas of constructive interference between the driving pulse and the HHG, relative to the areas of destructive interference.

  4. Configuration management: Phase II implementation guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Configuration management (CM) is essential to maintaining an acceptable level of risk to the public, workers, environment, or mission success. It is a set of activities and techniques used to maintain consistency among physical and functional configuration, applicable requirements, and key documents. This document provides guidance for continuing the implementation of CM in a phased and graded manner. It describes a cost-effective approach to documented consistency with requirements, with early emphasis on items most important to safety and environmental protection. It is intended to help responsible line managers and configuration management staff personnel in meeting the Energy Systems configuration management policy standard.

  5. Intraocular pressure efficacy of glaucoma medications versus placebo in phase II compared to later phase trials.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, R Allan; Nelson, Lindsay A; Stewart, Jeanette A; Stewart, William C

    2013-02-01

    This review aimed to compare the predictive value between the untreated reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) from baseline or placebo measured in early phase clinical trials to phase III and IV results for glaucoma medicines. Published, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel, single-masked or double-masked clinical trials with at least one phase II, III and IV study available were reviewed. This study included 50 articles evaluating 9 medicines from 59 active arms and 18 placebo arms. For all studies the phase II IOP reduction from placebo showed less decrease compared to the decrease from baseline (p<0.04). For all medicines, reductions from morning baseline in phase II did not predict better than the decrease from placebo for phase III (p=0.15) or IV (p=0.08) reductions in IOP. In contrast, diurnal IOP reduction from baseline in phase II predicted decreases better than placebo in phase III (p=0.007) and IV (p=0.02). Generally, for prostaglandins, β blockers and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors for the morning trough and diurnal curve there was no difference in pressure reduction from baseline for phase II compared to phase III or IV (p≥0.23). In contrast, where comparisons were available for the decrease in pressure from placebo there were differences for phase II compared to phase III and phase IV (p≤0.02). This study suggests that in early phase glaucoma trials, using the reduction from untreated baseline in general better approximates the results of later regulatory and post-commercialisation trials than the decrease from placebo. PMID:23060621

  6. Phase Modulation in Rydberg Dressed Multi-Wave Mixing processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zheng, Huaibin; Yao, Xin; Tian, Yaling; Che, Junling; Wang, Xiuxiu; Zhu, Dayu; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    We study the enhancement and suppression of different multi-waving mixing (MWM) processes in a Rydberg-EIT rubidium vapor system both theoretically and experimentally. The nonlinear dispersion property of hot rubidium atoms is modulated by the Rydberg-Rydberg interaction, which can result in a nonlinear phase shift of the relative phase between dark and bright states. Such Rydberg-induced nonlinear phase shift can be quantitatively estimated by the lineshape asymmetry in the enhancedand suppressed MWM processes, which can also demonstrate the cooperative atom-light interaction caused by Rydberg blockaded regime. Current study on phase shift is applicable to phase-sensitive detection and the study of strong Rydberg-Rydberg interaction. PMID:26053438

  7. Phase Modulation in Rydberg Dressed Multi-Wave Mixing processes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zheng, Huaibin; Yao, Xin; Tian, Yaling; Che, Junling; Wang, Xiuxiu; Zhu, Dayu; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    We study the enhancement and suppression of different multi-waving mixing (MWM) processes in a Rydberg-EIT rubidium vapor system both theoretically and experimentally. The nonlinear dispersion property of hot rubidium atoms is modulated by the Rydberg-Rydberg interaction, which can result in a nonlinear phase shift of the relative phase between dark and bright states. Such Rydberg-induced nonlinear phase shift can be quantitatively estimated by the lineshape asymmetry in the enhancedand suppressed MWM processes, which can also demonstrate the cooperative atom-light interaction caused by Rydberg blockaded regime. Current study on phase shift is applicable to phase-sensitive detection and the study of strong Rydberg-Rydberg interaction. PMID:26053438

  8. Theory of Self-Phase Modulation and Spectral Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. R.; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    Self-phase modulation refers to the phenomenon in which a laser beam propagating in a medium interacts with the medium and imposes a phase modulation on itself. It is one of those very fascinating effects discovered in the early days of nonlinear optics (Bloembergen and Lallemand, 1966; Brewer, 1967; Cheung et al., 1968; Lallemand, 1966; Jones and Stoicheff, 1964; Shimizu, 1967; Stoicheff, 1963). The physical origin of the phenomenon lies in the fact that the strong field of a laser beam is capable of inducing an appreciable intensity-dependent refractive index change in the medium. The medium then reacts back and inflicts a phase change on the incoming wave, resulting in self-phase modulation (SPM). Since a laser beam has a finite cross section, and hence a transverse intensity profile, SPM on the beam should have a transverse spatial dependence, equivalent to a distortion of the wave front. Consequently, the beam will appear to have self-diffracted. Such a self-diffraction action, resulting from SPM in space, is responsible for the well-known nonlinear optical phenomena of self-focusing and self-defocusing (Marburger, 1975; Shen, 1975). It can give rise to a multiple ring structure in the diffracted beam if the SPM is sufficiently strong (Durbin et al., 1981; Santamato and Shen, 1984). In the case of a pulsed laser input, the temporal variation of the laser intensity leads to an SPM in time. Since the time derivative of the phase of a wave is simply the angular frequency of the wave, SPM also appears as a frequency modulation. Thus, the output beam appears with a self-induced spectral broadening (Cheung et al., 1968; Gustafson et al., 1969; Shimizu, 1967).

  9. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, two objectives (e.g., list the types of joints and movements, and give examples), and two learning…

  10. Health Occupations Module. Communication in Health Occupations--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on communication in health occupations is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic and one learning experience. The learning experience contains six activities (e.g., read…

  11. Self-phase-modulation of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leon, Israel; Sipe, J. E.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach for calculating the nonlinear propagation of surface plasmon polaritons in one-dimensional planar waveguides consisting of a metal slab or a semi-infinite metal bounded by linear dielectrics, starting with an assumed third-order nonlinearity that characterizes the nonlinear response of the metal. With this approach we model the self-phase-modulation of surface plasmon polaritons. Expressions relating the complex nonlinear parameter of these surface waves with the third-order nonlinear susceptibility of the metal are provided. We present and discuss results pertaining to the self-phase-modulation of the symmetric and antisymmetric surface plasmon polaritons supported by a thin gold slab in vacuum and of the surface plasmon polariton supported by the single gold-vacuum interface.

  12. Concentration fluctuations and phase transitions in coupled modulated bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Yuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2012-08-01

    We consider the formation of finite-size domains in lipid bilayers consisting of saturated and hybrid lipids. First, we describe a monolayer model that includes a coupling between a compositional scalar field and a two-dimensional vectorial order parameter. Such a coupling yields an effective two-dimensional microemulsion free energy for the lipid monolayer, and its characteristic length of compositional modulations can be considered as the origin of finite-size domains in biological membranes. Next, we consider a coupled bilayer composed of two modulated monolayers and discuss the static and dynamic properties of concentration fluctuations above the transition temperature. We also investigate the micro-phase separation below the transition temperature and compare the micro-phase separated structures with statics and dynamics of concentration fluctuations above the transition.

  13. Large conditional single-photon cross-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kristin; Hosseini, Mahdi; Duan, Yiheng; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    Deterministic optical quantum logic requires a nonlinear quantum process that alters the phase of a quantum optical state by π through interaction with only one photon. Here, we demonstrate a large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal field, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. This approach avoids fundamental limitations associated with multimode effects for traveling optical photons. We measure a conditional cross-phase shift of up to π / 3 between the retrieved signal and control photons, and confirm deterministic entanglement between the signal and control modes by extracting a positive concurrence. With a moderate improvement in cavity finesse, our system can reach a coherent phase shift of p at low loss, enabling deterministic and universal photonic quantum logic. Preprint: arXiv:1512.02166 [quant-ph

  14. Phase ambiguity resolution for offset QPSK modulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A demodulator for Offset Quaternary Phase Shift Keyed (OQPSK) signals modulated with two words resolves eight possible combinations of phase ambiguity which may produce data error by first processing received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data in an integrated carrier loop/symbol synchronizer using a digital Costas loop with matched filters for correcting four of eight possible phase lock errors, and then the remaining four using a phase ambiguity resolver which detects the words to not only reverse the received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data channels, but to also invert (complement) the I(sub R) and/or Q(sub R) data, or to at least complement the I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data for systems using nontransparent codes that do not have rotation direction ambiguity.

  15. Large conditional single-photon cross-phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kristin M; Hosseini, Mahdi; Duan, Yiheng; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-08-30

    Deterministic optical quantum logic requires a nonlinear quantum process that alters the phase of a quantum optical state by π through interaction with only one photon. Here, we demonstrate a large conditional cross-phase modulation between a signal field, stored inside an atomic quantum memory, and a control photon that traverses a high-finesse optical cavity containing the atomic memory. This approach avoids fundamental limitations associated with multimode effects for traveling optical photons. We measure a conditional cross-phase shift of [Formula: see text] (and up to [Formula: see text] by postselection on photons that remain in the system longer than average) between the retrieved signal and control photons, and confirm deterministic entanglement between the signal and control modes by extracting a positive concurrence. By upgrading to a state-of-the-art cavity, our system can reach a coherent phase shift of π at low loss, enabling deterministic and universal photonic quantum logic. PMID:27519798

  16. Spatial phase modulation from permanent memory in doped glass.

    PubMed

    Myint, Thandar; Alfano, R R

    2010-04-15

    Diffraction rings are observed from photoinduced permanent memory of doped glass. The permanent memory is created by the high-intensity picosecond laser beam. A 1 mm spot size of laser beam creates spatially variable refractive index memory, which appears as a void located inside the glass. When a probe laser beam passes through the memory region, the diffraction rings arisen from spatial phase modulation of the transverse phase of the input beam are created. Agreement between the observed and calculated beam pattern using Kirchhoff's diffraction integral is satisfactory. PMID:20410991

  17. Formation of nonequilibrium modulated phases under local energy input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linjun; Pleimling, Michel

    2012-05-01

    We study numerically an inhomogeneous Ising lattice gas with short-range interactions where different sectors are in contact with thermal baths at different temperatures. Inside the different sectors particles jump to empty sites following the familiar Kawasaki dynamics. In addition, particles can freely hop from one sector to the other. This crossing between the sectors breaks detailed balance and yields a local energy influx that drives the system to a nonequilibrium steady state. When the low-temperature sector is cooled below the equilibrium critical temperature, a complicated nonequilibrium phase diagram emerges, dominated by unusual modulated nonequilibrium stationary states. These steady states result from the interplay of phase separation and convection.

  18. Continuous fiber ceramic composites. Phase II - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, James

    1997-10-31

    This report documents Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) Phase 11 effort on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) program. This project is supported by the DOE cooperative agreement DE-FCO2-92CE40998. Such DOE support does not constitute an endorsement of the views expressed in this report. ARC'S CFCC Phase II effort began during October 1993 and was suspended in March of 1997 when, for business considerations, ARC closed the Amercom operation. This report covers progress from Phase II program inception through Amercom closure. ARC'S Phase II effort built upon the results of the Phase I Applications Assessment and Process Engineering developments to produce CFCC test components for end-user evaluation. Initially, the Phase 11 effort planned to develop and produce three CFCC components: CFCC compression rings for stationary diesel engines, CFCC hot gas fans for industrial furnace applications, and CFCC hot gas filters for current and advanced coal fired power cycles. As the program progressed, the development effort for the diesel engine piston rings was suspended. This decision was based on technical issues, cost factors and reduced program funding; the status of CFCC diesel engine piston ring development will be discussed in detail in section 2.2.1.

  19. Stacked Optical Precursors from Amplitude and Phase Modulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. F.; Feng, L.; Loy, M. M. T.; Wong, G. K. L.; Du, Shengwang; Jeong, Heejeong

    2010-06-04

    We report the generation of stacked optical precursors from a laser beam whose amplitude or phase is modulated by sequenced on-off step waveforms. Making use of the constructive interference between the precursors produced from different steps, as well as the main field, we generate optical transient pulses having peak powers of eight times the input power with electromagnetically induced transparency in laser-cooled atoms.

  20. Lo/Ld phase coexistence modulation induced by GM1.

    PubMed

    Puff, Nicolas; Watanabe, Chiho; Seigneuret, Michel; Angelova, Miglena I; Staneva, Galya

    2014-08-01

    Lipid rafts are assumed to undergo biologically important size-modulations from nanorafts to microrafts. Due to the complexity of cellular membranes, model systems become important tools, especially for the investigation of the factors affecting "raft-like" Lo domain size and the search for Lo nanodomains as precursors in Lo microdomain formation. Because lipid compositional change is the primary mechanism by which a cell can alter membrane phase behavior, we studied the effect of the ganglioside GM1 concentration on the Lo/Ld lateral phase separation in PC/SM/Chol/GM1 bilayers. GM1 above 1mol % abolishes the formation of the micrometer-scale Lo domains observed in GUVs. However, the apparently homogeneous phase observed in optical microscopy corresponds in fact, within a certain temperature range, to a Lo/Ld lateral phase separation taking place below the optical resolution. This nanoscale phase separation is revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy, including C12NBD-PC self-quenching and Laurdan GP measurements, and is supported by Gaussian spectral decomposition analysis. The temperature of formation of nanoscale Lo phase domains over an Ld phase is determined, and is shifted to higher values when the GM1 content increases. A "morphological" phase diagram could be made, and it displays three regions corresponding respectively to Lo/Ld micrometric phase separation, Lo/Ld nanometric phase separation, and a homogeneous Ld phase. We therefore show that a lipid only-based mechanism is able to control the existence and the sizes of phase-separated membrane domains. GM1 could act on the line tension, "arresting" domain growth and thereby stabilizing Lo nanodomains. PMID:24835016

  1. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phase II test rule. 790.52 Section 790.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES GOVERNING TESTING CONSENT AGREEMENTS AND TEST RULES Implementation, Enforcement, and Modification of Test Rules §...

  2. Peer Review in the National Science Foundation: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jonathan R.; Cole, Stephen

    A two part study was conducted to determine if the peer review system of proposals to the National Science Foundation (NSF) operates fairly and if changes are warranted. Part I (reported in ED 167376) extensively described the peer review process and indicated that it is indeed equitable. Phase II, summarized, investigated the issue further by…

  3. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phase II test rule. 790.52 Section 790.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES GOVERNING TESTING CONSENT AGREEMENTS AND TEST RULES Implementation, Enforcement, and Modification of Test Rules §...

  4. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... protocol section of the study plan, as defined by § 790.50(c)(1)(v) of this chapter, as the test standard... Modification of Test Rules § 790.52 Phase II test rule. (a) If EPA determines that the proposed study plan... Federal Register requesting comments on the ability of the proposed study plan to ensure that data...

  5. Chandra X-ray spectroscopy of focused wind in the Cygnus X-1 system. II. The non-dip spectrum in the low/hard state - modulations with orbital phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miškovičová, Ivica; Hell, Natalie; Hanke, Manfred; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Grinberg, Victoria; Duro, Refiz; Madej, Oliwia K.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Rodriguez, Jérôme; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John A.; Lee, Julia C.; Brown, Gregory V.; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-05-01

    Accretion onto the black hole in the system HDE 226868/Cygnus X-1 is powered by the strong line-driven stellar wind of the O-type donor star. We study the X-ray properties of the stellar wind in the hard state of Cyg X-1, as determined using data from the Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings. Large density and temperature inhomogeneities are present in the wind, with a fraction of the wind consisting of clumps of matter with higher density and lower temperature embedded in a photoionized gas. Absorption dips observed in the light curve are believed to be caused by these clumps. This work concentrates on the non-dip spectra as a function of orbital phase. The spectra show lines of H-like and He-like ions of S, Si, Na, Mg, Al, and highly ionized Fe (Fe xvii-Fe xxiv). We measure velocity shifts, column densities, and thermal broadening of the line series. The excellent quality of these five observations allows us to investigate the orbital phase-dependence of these parameters. We show that the absorber is located close to the black hole. Doppler shifted lines point at a complex wind structure in this region, while emission lines seen in some observations are from a denser medium than the absorber. The observed line profiles are phase-dependent. Their shapes vary from pure, symmetric absorption at the superior conjunction to P Cygni profiles at the inferior conjunction of the black hole.

  6. A Kinetic Approach to Bose-Einstein Condensates: Self-Phase Modulation and Bogoliubov Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, J.T.; Bingham, R.; Shukla, P.K.

    2005-11-01

    A kinetic approach to Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) is proposed based on the Wigner-Moyal equation (WME). In the semiclassical limit, the WME reduces to the particle-number conservation equation. Two examples of applications are (i) a self-phase modulation of a BE condensate beam, where we show that part of the beam is decelerated and eventually stops as a result of the gradient of the effective self-potential, and (ii) the derivation of a kinetic dispersion relation for sound waves in BECs, including collisionless Landau damping.

  7. Phase-Array Approach to Optical Whispering Gallery Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    This technology leverages the well-defined orbital number of a whispering gallery modulator (WGM) to expand the range of applications for such resonators. This property rigidly connects the phase variation of the field in this mode with the azimuthal angle between the coupling locations. A WGM with orbital momentum L has exactly L instant nodes around the circumference of the WGM resonator supporting such a mode. Therefore, in two locations separated by the arc alpha, the phase difference of such a field will be equal to phi= alpha L. Coupling the field out of such locations, and into a balanced interferometer, once can observe a complete constructive or distractive interference (or have any situation in between) depending on the angle alpha. Similarly, a mode L + delta L will pick up the phase phi + alpha delta L. In all applications of a WGM resonator as a modulator, the orbital numbers for the carrier and sidebands are different, and their differences delta L are known (usually, but not necessarily, delta L = 1). Therefore, the choice of the angle alpha, and of the interferometer arms difference, allows one to control the relative phase between different modes and to perform the conversion, separation, and filtering tasks necessary.

  8. A phase-modulated laser system of ultra-low phase noise for compact atom interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Se; Kim, Jaewan; Lee, Sang-Bum; Park, Sang Eon; Kwon, Taek Yong

    2015-07-01

    A compact and robust laser system is essential for mobile atom interferometers. Phase modulation can provide the two necessary phase-coherent frequencies without sophisticated phase-locking between two different lasers. However, the additional laser frequencies generated can perturb the atom interferometer. In this article, we report on a novel method to produce a single high-power laser beam composed of two phase-coherent sidebands without the perturbing carrier mode. Light from a diode laser is phase-modulated by using a fiber-coupled electro-optic modulator driven at 3.4 GHz and passes through a Fabry-Perot cavity with a 6.8 GHz free spectral range. The cavity filters the carrier mode to leave the two first-order sidebands for the two-photon Raman transition between the two hyperfine ground states of 87Rb. The laser beam is then fed to a single tapered amplifier, and the two sidebands are both amplified without mode competition. The phase noise is lower than that of a state-of-the-art optically phase-locked external-cavity diode laser (-135 dBrad2/Hz at 10 kHz) at frequencies above 10 Hz. This technique can be used in all-fiber-based laser systems for future mobile atom interferometers.

  9. 78 FR 30951 - SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... INFORMATION: Section 4(a)(3)(iii) of the SBIR Policy Directive (77 FR 46806) and the STTR Policy Directive (77 FR 46855) require each agency to establish an SBA-approved Phase I-Phase II Transition Rate benchmark... benchmarks can take effect. As a result, on October 16, 2012, at 77 FR 63410, SBA published the...

  10. 77 FR 63410 - SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... 4(a)(3)(iii) of the SBIR Policy Directive, which was published on August 6, 2012, at 77 FR 46806 and the STTR Policy Directive, which was published the same day at 77 FR 46855, requires each agency to... ADMINISTRATION SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...

  11. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R.; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  12. Spin-orbit optical cross-phase-modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Brasselet, Etienne

    2010-12-15

    We show experimentally that optical phase singularities (PSs) can be written and erased, locally and in a controllable manner, into a light beam using the giant Kerr optical nonlinearities of liquid crystals. The method relies on the nonlinear optical spin-orbit coupling experienced by a collimated probe beam when a collinear focused pump beam imprints a radial birefringent pattern into a nematic film. In addition, experimental data are quantitatively described, accounting for the elastic anisotropy of the material and its nonlocal spatial response to the pump light field. Since we show that the optical intensity of a light beam (the 'pump') controls the phase of another beam (the 'probe') in a singular fashion (i.e., with the generation of a screw PS) via their interaction in a nonlinear medium that involves spin-orbit coupling, we dubbed such a nonlinear optical process as spin-orbit optical cross-phase-modulation.

  13. Phased-array optical whispering gallery mode modulation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator device and method capable of filtering sidebands of optical modulators are provided. The method includes providing an optical resonator adapted to support whispering gallery modes and forming a first field and a second field from a first location and a second location, respectively, at the circumference of the optical resonator and being separated by an arc angle, .alpha.. The method includes adjusting relative phase between the first field and the second field in accordance to a differential phase, .beta., and combining the first and the second fields into an output. Particular selection of the arc angle, .alpha., and the differential phase, .beta., can determine the function of the output.

  14. Linear phase encoding for holographic data storage with a single phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-04-01

    A linear phase encoding is presented for realizing a compact and simple holographic data storage system with a single spatial light modulator (SLM). This encoding method makes it possible to modulate a complex amplitude distribution with a single phase-only SLM in a holographic storage system. In addition, an undesired light due to the imperfection of an SLM can be removed by spatial frequency filtering with a Nyquist aperture. The linear phase encoding is introduced to coaxial holographic data storage. The generation of a signal beam using linear phase encoding is experimentally verified in an interferometer. In a coaxial holographic data storage system, single data recording, shift selectivity, and shift multiplexed recording are experimentally demonstrated. PMID:27139658

  15. Optical phase conjugation for time-domain undoing of dispersive self-phase-modulation effects.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R A; Suydam, B R; Yevick, D

    1983-12-01

    We show that the temporal distortion and spectral broadening of a pulse generated by the combined effects of group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation is removed by reflection of a cw-pumped, broadband, unityreflecting Kerr-like optical phase conjugator followed by retraversal of the nonlinear medium. We also examinenumerically the effects of finite linear loss in the material, of nonunity conjugate reflectivity, and of finite conjugator thickness. PMID:19718200

  16. Phase-modulated spin-motional decoupling with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmunds, Claire; Milne, Alistair; Mavadia, Sandeep; Green, Todd; Biercuk, Michael

    We present a technique to minimize residual spin-motional entanglement after a phonon-mediated entangling gate in trapped 171Yb+ ion qubits. Phonon-mediated gates, such as the Mølmer-Sørensen gate, engineer spin-spin entanglement by coupling the qubits to their collective modes of motion. Consequently, a major experimental limitation is residual motional entanglement at the conclusion of the gate, resulting in a degradation of the final spin state purity. Our work utilizes phase-modulated pulse sequences to decouple the qubits from multiple motional modes simultaneously at a variable gate time. In addition, we extend this technique to the suppression of time-dependent noise using concatenated gate sequences, which allows for the recovery of a higher purity spin state. Using a single, experimentally controllable modulation parameter we are able to achieve more optimal quantum control in these gate sequences.

  17. Linearized electrooptic microwave downconversion using phase modulation and optical filtering.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Vincent R; Haas, Bryan M; Murphy, T E

    2011-01-17

    We propose and demonstrate an electrooptic technique for relaying microwave signals over an optical fiber and downconverting the microwave signal to an intermediate frequency at the receiver. The system uses electrooptic phase modulation in the transmitter to impose the microwave signal on an optical carrier followed by re-modulation with a microwave local oscillator at the receiver. We demonstrate that by subsequently suppressing the optical carrier using a notch filter, the resulting optical signal can be directly detected to obtain a downconverted microwave signal.We further show that by simply controlling the amplitude of the microwave local oscillator, the system can be linearized to third-order, yielding an improvement in the dynamic range. PMID:21263628

  18. Parallel phase modulation scheme for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Hartman, M T; Quetschke, V; Tanner, D B; Reitze, D H; Mueller, G

    2014-11-17

    Advanced LIGO (aLIGO) requires multiple frequency sidebands to disentangle all of the main interferometer's length signals. This paper presents the results of a risk reduction experiment to produce two sets of frequency sidebands in parallel, avoiding mixed 'sidebands on sidebands'. Two phase modulation frequencies are applied to separate Electro-Optic Modulators (EOMs), with one EOM in each of the two arms of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In this system the Mach-Zehnder's arm lengths are stabilized to reduce relative intensity noise in the recombined carrier beam by feeding a corrective control signal back to the Rubidium Titanyl Phosphate (RTP) EOM crystals to drive the optical path length difference to zero. This setup's use of the RTP crystals as length actuators provides enough bandwidth in the feedback to meet arm length stability requirements for aLIGO. PMID:25402074

  19. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

  20. Construction of a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hironobu; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2005-12-01

    We have constructed a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer (FT-PMF) by which a fluorescence decay waveform can be obtained. In the FT-PMF, the modulation frequency of the excitation light source is swept continuously from a direct current (dc) to a high frequency f max with a time duration T. The resultant fluorescence signal waveform is Fourier-transformed to obtain its amplitude and phase spectra. The ratio of the amplitude spectrum and the difference of the phase spectrum over those of the reference spectra that are obtained from a non-fluorescent material are calculated, respectively, and the pair of both spectral data is inverse-Fourier-transformed again to obtain the fluorescence decay waveform. The light source used was an ultraviolet light emitting- diode (UV LED) whose typical operating condition was f max = 100 MHz and T = 10 μs. To demonstrate the performance of the FT-PMF, we carried out (1) measurement of a fluorescent decay waveform of YAG materials packed in a white LED, and (2) determination of fluorescence lifetime of 10 ppm quinine sulfate in 0.1N H IISO 4.

  1. Construction of a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Shibata, Hironobu; Araki, Tsutomu

    2005-11-01

    We have constructed a Fourier-transform phase-modulation fluorometer (FT-PMF) by which a fluorescence decay waveform can be obtained. In the FT-PMF, the modulation frequency of the excitation light source is swept continuously from a direct current (dc) to a high frequency fmax with a time duration T. The resultant fluorescence signal waveform is Fourier transformed to obtain its amplitude and phase spectra. The ratio of the amplitude spectrum and the difference of the phase spectrum over those of the reference spectra from an excitation waveform are calculated, respectively, and the pair of both spectral data is inverse-Fourier-transformed again to obtain the fluorescence decay waveform. The light source used was an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED) whose operating condition was fmax = 50-120 MHz and T = 10 µs. To demonstrate the performance of the FT-PMF, we carried out (1) the measurement of a fluorescent decay waveform of YAG materials enclosed in a white LED and (2) determinations of fluorescence lifetimes of 10 ppm quinine sulfate in 0.1 N H2SO4 and 10 ppm rhodamine 6G in ethanol.

  2. Optical beamforming networks employing phase modulation and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Bingkun

    2011-06-01

    We propose a novel dispersion-based optical beamforming network scheme employing phase modulation and direct detection. Optical phase modulators have the advantages of simple-structure, low loss and absence of bias. Dispersion-induced phase-to-intensity conversion is utilized to facilitate direct detection. A structure of wideband dispersive device (WDD) cascaded with periodic dispersive device (PDD) is introduced to enhance the system flexibility, so that the delay adjustability and RF response can be properly designed respectively by choosing appropriate dispersions of the WDD and PDD. A concept-proof system with a wideband chirped fiber grating (CFG) as the WDD and two multiband CFGs (MCFG1 and MCFG2) as the PDD separately is built to demonstrate the basic idea. The delay tuning range is 0-1.8 ns with increment of 164.2 ps. The passband center is 30 GHz for MCFG1 and 20 GHz for MCFG2, and the fractional bandwidth is 51.8%. The shot-noise-limited spurious-free dynamic range is also analyzed and measured to be 105.7 dB ṡ Hz2/3 when the average photocurrent is 2.7 mA.

  3. Effects of randomizing phase on the discrimination between amplitude-modulated and quasi-frequency-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Hisaaki; Borucki, Ewa; Berg, Bruce G

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the bandwidth of phase sensitivity. Subjects discriminated amplitude-modulated tones (AM), and quasi-frequency-modulated tones (QFM) in a two-interval, forced-choice task. An adaptive threshold procedure was used to estimate the modulation depth needed to discriminate the stimuli as a function of carrier and modulation frequency. Non-monotonicities in threshold-bandwidth functions were often observed at higher modulation frequencies. The results are discussed in terms of two potential cues: (1) waveform envelope, (2) cubic distortion products. In order to degrade the information obtained from auditory distortions, the phase for the carrier frequency was randomly sampled from a uniform distribution, which diminished the non-monotonicities with minimal effect at lower modulation frequencies. Model simulations demonstrated that phase randomization degrades distortion product cues with only a modest effect on temporal cues. Final results show that maximum bandwidths for phase sensitivity (BW(max)) were not proportional to carrier frequencies. PMID:22609773

  4. Distinct type I and type II toxin-antitoxin modules control Salmonella lifestyle inside eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Moreno-Córdoba, Inmaculada; Figueroa, Virginia; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules contribute to the generation of non-growing cells in response to stress. These modules abound in bacterial pathogens although the bases for this profusion remain largely unknown. Using the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model, here we show that a selected group of TA modules impact bacterial fitness inside eukaryotic cells. We characterized in this pathogen twenty-seven TA modules, including type I and type II TA modules encoding antisense RNA and proteinaceous antitoxins, respectively. Proteomic and gene expression analyses revealed that the pathogen produces numerous toxins of TA modules inside eukaryotic cells. Among these, the toxins HokST, LdrAST, and TisBST, encoded by type I TA modules and T4ST and VapC2ST, encoded by type II TA modules, promote bacterial survival inside fibroblasts. In contrast, only VapC2ST shows that positive effect in bacterial fitness when the pathogen infects epithelial cells. These results illustrate how S. Typhimurium uses distinct type I and type II TA modules to regulate its intracellular lifestyle in varied host cell types. This function specialization might explain why the number of TA modules increased in intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:25792384

  5. Modulating patterns of two-phase flow with electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingsheng; Hakimi, Bejan; Volny, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Anand, Robbyn K.; Turecek, Frantisek; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of electro-hydrodynamic actuation to control the transition between three major flow patterns of an aqueous-oil Newtonian flow in a microchannel: droplets, beads-on-a-string (BOAS), and multi-stream laminar flow. We observed interesting transitional flow patterns between droplets and BOAS as the electric field was modulated. The ability to control flow patterns of a two-phase fluid in a microchannel adds to the microfluidic tool box and improves our understanding of this interesting fluid behavior. PMID:25379091

  6. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid–liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of “extranucleolar droplets” (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  7. RNA transcription modulates phase transition-driven nuclear body assembly.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-09-22

    Nuclear bodies are RNA and protein-rich, membraneless organelles that play important roles in gene regulation. The largest and most well-known nuclear body is the nucleolus, an organelle whose primary function in ribosome biogenesis makes it key for cell growth and size homeostasis. The nucleolus and other nuclear bodies behave like liquid-phase droplets and appear to condense from the nucleoplasm by concentration-dependent phase separation. However, nucleoli actively consume chemical energy, and it is unclear how such nonequilibrium activity might impact classical liquid-liquid phase separation. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro experiments with theory and simulation to characterize the assembly and disassembly dynamics of nucleoli in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. In addition to classical nucleoli that assemble at the transcriptionally active nucleolar organizing regions, we observe dozens of "extranucleolar droplets" (ENDs) that condense in the nucleoplasm in a transcription-independent manner. We show that growth of nucleoli and ENDs is consistent with a first-order phase transition in which late-stage coarsening dynamics are mediated by Brownian coalescence and, to a lesser degree, Ostwald ripening. By manipulating C. elegans cell size, we change nucleolar component concentration and confirm several key model predictions. Our results show that rRNA transcription and other nonequilibrium biological activity can modulate the effective thermodynamic parameters governing nucleolar and END assembly, but do not appear to fundamentally alter the passive phase separation mechanism. PMID:26351690

  8. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  9. Experiment TGV II—results of Phases I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalík, A.; Mamedov, F.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Sandukovski, V. G.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Šimkovic, F.; Stekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Zinatulina, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    Currently, the TGV collaboration is investigating the two-neutrino double electron capture (2vEC/EC) of 106Cd at the Modane underground laboratory. The study is performed with low-background multi-HPGe detector TGV II, which has been constructed for measurements of the rare processes. The half-life limits of T1/2>2.6×1020 years (for Phase I, 8687 hours) and T1/2>3.6×1020 years (for Phase II, 9003 hours) were obtained for the ground state to ground state 2vEC/EC of 106Cd. The results already allow to rule out some of the previous nuclear structure calculations.

  10. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  11. Study of phase I NOx control: Lessons learned for phase II NOx control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.

    1996-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is concerned with lowering the levels of acid rain in the USA. One of the contributions to acid rain is nitric oxides referred to as NO{sub x}. Title IV seeks NO{sub x} reductions from two groupings of utility steam generators. The first group, known as Phase I, was to have their reductions made by January 1, 1996. The purpose of this paper is to look back at Phase I to see what one can learn for use in Phase II compliance planning. Phase II units are scheduled to be in compliance by January 1, 2000. As such, this paper looks to answer four questions about Phase I units.

  12. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  13. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively.

  14. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  15. Observation of nonreciprocal transmission in binary phase-shift keying modulation using traveling-wave Mach-Zehnder modulators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po; Gui, Chengcheng

    2016-06-15

    In coherent optical transmission, traveling-wave Mach-Zehnder modulators are commonly used to generate various advanced formats where the modulators are biased at the minimum transmission point. Here, we report that an optical isolation effect with lower backward transmission occurs under this condition. This concept is successfully demonstrated to achieve ∼7  dB isolation over a 90-nm wavelength span under binary phase-shift keying modulation using a commercial lithium niobate modulator. PMID:27304273

  16. Method of phase space beam dilution utilizing bounded chaos generated by rf phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Alfonse N.; Lee, S. Y.; Ng, K. Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper explores the physics of chaos in a localized phase-space region produced by rf phase modulation applied to a double rf system. The study can be exploited to produce rapid particle bunch broadening exhibiting longitudinal particle distribution uniformity. Hamiltonian models and particle-tracking simulations are introduced to understand the mechanism and applicability of controlled particle diffusion. When phase modulation is applied to the double rf system, regions of localized chaos are produced through the disruption and overlapping of parametric resonant islands and configured to be bounded by well-behaved invariant tori to prevent particle loss. The condition of chaoticity and the degree of particle dilution can be controlled by the rf parameters. The method has applications in alleviating adverse space-charge effects in high-intensity beams, particle bunch distribution uniformization, and industrial radiation-effects experiments.

  17. Enhancement of the phase-modulation range by using cascaded injection-locked semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwan; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2016-03-01

    The phase modulation of an injection-locked semiconductor laser can be controlled by tuning the injection-locking parameters. However, the phase-modulation range is limited to 180°, which significantly hinders its widespread application. In this study, we investigated the phase-modulation characteristics of a single stage of an injection-locked laser configuration by considering a slave laser's bias control as a tuning parameter. Herein, we propose cascaded injection-locked laser configurations to enhance the phase-modulation range and theoretically demonstrate that the achievable phase-modulation range can be increased. The output of the slave laser is used as the input of the next slave laser to produce an accumulated phase modulation. The results show that a phase modulation of 360° can be achieved using the cascaded configurations; moreover, the number of cascaded configurations required to achieve this range is determined for specific laser parameters.

  18. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  19. Shock and Recovery of Polytetrafluoroethylene Above and Below the Phase II to Phase III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gray, George T.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2006-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a semi-crystalline polymer exhibiting complicated pressure and temperature dependent phases. High strain rate applications in aerospace, defense, and automotive industries have lead to interest in the shock response of PTFE and resulting changes in the polymer structure. Experimental studies on pressure-induced phase transitions using shock-loading techniques and the resulting changes in crystalline structure are presented. Gas launcher experiments were performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C momentum trapped assemblies with impact pressures from 0.4 to 0.85 GPa to investigate the material response above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. [LAUR-05-5945

  20. A novel phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Gao, Yingjie; Yang, Chun

    2016-07-01

    Microwave photonic links can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth and immunity to external interference. In this paper, a novel phase noise measurement system is built, since the input signal and the power supply noise can be effectively cancelled by a two-arm configuration without the phase locking. Using this approach, the phase noise performance of the 10-GHz phase modulation photonic link has been measured for the first time, evaluated the values of -124 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -132 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset is obtained. Theoretical analysis on the phase noise measurement system calibration is also discussed.

  1. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  2. Combined Analysis of Phase I and Phase II Data to Enhance the Power of Pharmacogenetic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J; Chenel, M; Comets, E

    2016-01-01

    We show through a simulation study how the joint analysis of data from phase I and phase II studies enhances the power of pharmacogenetic tests in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. PK profiles were simulated under different designs along with 176 genetic markers. The null scenarios assumed no genetic effect, while under the alternative scenarios, drug clearance was associated with six genetic markers randomly sampled in each simulated dataset. We compared penalized regression Lasso and stepwise procedures to detect the associations between empirical Bayes estimates of clearance, estimated by nonlinear mixed effects models, and genetic variants. Combining data from phase I and phase II studies, even if sparse, increases the power to identify the associations between genetics and PK due to the larger sample size. Design optimization brings a further improvement, and we highlight a direct relationship between η‐shrinkage and loss of genetic signal. PMID:27069775

  3. Combined Analysis of Phase I and Phase II Data to Enhance the Power of Pharmacogenetic Tests.

    PubMed

    Tessier, A; Bertrand, J; Chenel, M; Comets, E

    2016-03-01

    We show through a simulation study how the joint analysis of data from phase I and phase II studies enhances the power of pharmacogenetic tests in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. PK profiles were simulated under different designs along with 176 genetic markers. The null scenarios assumed no genetic effect, while under the alternative scenarios, drug clearance was associated with six genetic markers randomly sampled in each simulated dataset. We compared penalized regression Lasso and stepwise procedures to detect the associations between empirical Bayes estimates of clearance, estimated by nonlinear mixed effects models, and genetic variants. Combining data from phase I and phase II studies, even if sparse, increases the power to identify the associations between genetics and PK due to the larger sample size. Design optimization brings a further improvement, and we highlight a direct relationship between η-shrinkage and loss of genetic signal. PMID:27069775

  4. A Linear hybrid kicker modulator for ETA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, R.; Davis, B.; Yen, B.

    1997-06-29

    A new type of pulse modulator is being developed at Livermore that will rapidly split a high current electron beam into two halves, enabling each half to proceed along separate pathways. Each modulator will be capable of applying a {+-}10kV, 200A pulse onto a transmission line electrode structure with a rise time less than 10 ns, a pulse repetition frequency greater than 1 MHz, and a maximum pulse duration of 400 ns. The electrode structure, located inside the beam-transport pipe, generates an electromagnetic field that acts on part of the original beam to ``kick`` it in another direction. The true merit of this high-speed modulator will be its flexibility in pulse duration and shape. The electrodynamics involved in altering the beam`s trajectory require the modulator to generate a time-varying pulse that is precisely tailored in amplitude. Consequently, the modulator is driven by an arbitrary waveform generator and must act more as a linear amplifier than as a simple switch. The requirements of high peak power and wide analog bandwidth (about 50 MHz) will be addressed by merging a solid-state driver with an output stage of high-power vacuum tubes. Modulator development and performance data will be presented as will the issues of beam-induced voltage and transit-time isolation that are considered when driving a beam load.

  5. Preliminary Exploratory Study of Different Phase II Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.W.; Bertarelli, A.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Roesler, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Smith, J.C.; Lari, L.; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-11-02

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system is installed and commissioned in different phases, following the natural evolution of the LHC performance. To improve cleaning efficiency towards the end of the low beta squeeze at 7TeV, and in stable physics conditions, it is foreseen to complement the 30 highly robust Phase I secondary collimators with low impedance Phase II collimators. At this stage, their design is not yet finalized. Possible options include metallic collimators, graphite jaws with a movable metallic foil, or collimators with metallic rotating jaws. As part of the evaluation of the different designs, the FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used for calculating energy deposition and studying material damage and activation. This report outlines the simulation approach and defines the critical quantities involved.

  6. Cement Finishing. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nama, Joe

    These 20 Student Training Modules on cement finishing comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 575.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of…

  7. Parts Counter. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, James A.

    These 23 Student Training Modules on parts counter comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 571.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  8. Floor Covering. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. Student Training Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamblen, Ron

    These 21 Student Training Modules on floor covering comprise one of nine sets of self-paced learning modules developed for Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 2 Training. (A companion instructor's guide is available separately as CE 031 565.) The modules are designed to impart trade knowledge and skills to the student. Each module contains some or all of the…

  9. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal issuance of Phase II permits. 72.74 Section 72.74 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will...

  10. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State issuance of Phase II permits. 72.73 Section 72.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits. (a) State Permit Issuance. (1) A...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II...

  15. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II...

  16. Final Design And Manufacturing of the PEP II High Energy Ring Arc Bellows Module

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Nadine R.; Kulikov, Artem; Corlett, John; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    A novel RF shield bellows module developed at SLAC has been successfully manufactured and installed in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER). Tests indicate that the module meets its performance and operational requirements. The primary function of the bellows module is to allow for thermal expansion of the chambers and for lateral, longitudinal and angular offsets due to tolerances and alignment, while providing RF continuity between adjoining chambers. An update on the Arc bellows module for the PEP-II High Energy Ring is presented. Final design, manufacturing issues, material and coating selection, and tribological and RF testing are discussed. Performance and operational requirements are also reviewed. The RF shield design has been proven during assembly to allow for large manufacturing tolerances without reducing the mechanical spring force below required values. In addition, the RF shield maintains electrical contact even with large misalignments across the module.

  17. Modulation of Rubisco Activity during the Diurnal Phases of the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Maxwell; Borland; Haslam; Helliker; Roberts; Griffiths

    1999-11-01

    The regulation of Rubisco activity was investigated under high, constant photosynthetic photon flux density during the diurnal phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr. During phase I, a significant period of nocturnal, C(4)-mediated CO(2) fixation was observed, with the generated malic acid being decarboxylated the following day (phase III). Two periods of daytime atmospheric CO(2) fixation occurred at the beginning (phase II, C(4)-C(3) carboxylation) and end (phase IV, C(3)-C(4) carboxylation) of the day. During the 1st h of the photoperiod, when phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was still active, the highest rates of atmospheric CO(2) uptake were observed, coincident with the lowest rates of electron transport and minimal Rubisco activity. Over the next 1 to 2 h of phase II, carbamylation increased rapidly during an initial period of decarboxylation. Maximal carbamylation (70%-80%) was reached 2 h into phase III and was maintained under conditions of elevated CO(2) resulting from malic acid decarboxylation. Initial and total Rubisco activity increased throughout phase III, with maximal activity achieved 9 h into the photoperiod at the beginning of phase IV, as atmospheric CO(2) uptake recommenced. We suggest that the increased enzyme activity supports assimilation under CO(2)-limited conditions at the start of phase IV. The data indicate that Rubisco activity is modulated in-line with intracellular CO(2) supply during the daytime phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism. PMID:10557233

  18. Spectral changes induced by a phase modulator acting as a time lens

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, B. W.; Donaldson, W. R.; Agrawal, G. P.

    2015-07-06

    We show both numerically and experimentally that a phase modulator, acting as a time lens in the Fourier-lens configuration, can induce spectral broadening, narrowing, or shifts, depending on the phase of the modulator cycle. These spectral effects depend on the maximum phase shift that can be imposed by the modulator. In our numerical simulations, pulse spectrum could be compressed by a factor of 8 for a 30 rad phase shift. Experimentally, spectral shifts over a 1.35 nm range and spectral narrowing and broadening by a factor of 2 were demonstrated using a lithium niobate phase modulator with a maximum phase shift of 16 rad at a 10 GHz modulation frequency. All spectral changes were accomplished without employing optical nonlinear effects such as self- or cross-phase modulation.

  19. Arbitrary manipulation of spatial amplitude and phase using phase-only spatial light modulators

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Long; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Spatial structure of a light beam is an important degree of freedom to be extensively explored. By designing simple configurations with phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs), we show the ability to arbitrarily manipulate the spatial full field information (i.e. amplitude and phase) of a light beam. Using this approach to facilitating arbitrary and independent control of spatial amplitude and phase, one can flexibly generate different special kinds of light beams for different specific applications. Multiple collinear orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, and Bessel beams, having both spatial amplitude and phase distributions, are successfully generated in the experiments. Some arbitrary beams with odd-shaped intensity are also generated in the experiments. PMID:25501584

  20. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John Michael; Ostovic, Vlado

    1999-11-02

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to a another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  1. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.; Ostovic, V.

    1999-11-02

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  2. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  3. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  4. Regulation of Hepatic Phase II Metabolism in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xia; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Thomas, Paul E.; Slitt, Angela L.; King, Roberta S.

    2013-01-01

    Phase II enzymes, including Ugts, Sults, and Gsts, are critical for the disposition and detoxification of endo- and xenobiotics. In this study, the mRNA and protein expression of major phase II enzymes, as well as key regulatory transcription factors, were quantified in livers of time-matched pregnant and virgin control C57BL/6 mice on gestation days (GD) 7, 11, 14, 17, and postnatal days (PND) 1, 15, and 30. Compared with virgin controls, the mRNA expression of Ugt1a1, 1a6, 1a9, 2a3, 2b1, 2b34, and 2b35 decreased 40 to 80% in pregnant dams. Protein expression of Ugt1a6 also decreased and corresponded with reduced in vitro glucuronidation of bisphenol A in S9 fractions from livers of pregnant mice. Similar to Ugts levels, Gsta1 and a4 mRNAs were reduced in pregnant dams in mid to late gestation; however no change in protein expression was observed. Conversely, Sult1a1, 2a1/2, and 3a1 mRNAs increased 100 to 500% at various time points in pregnant and lactating mice and corresponded with enhanced in vitro sulfation of acetaminophen in liver S9 fractions. Coinciding with maximal decreases in Ugts as well as increases in Sults, the expression of transcription factors CAR, PPARα, and PXR and their target genes were downregulated, whereas ERα mRNA was upregulated. Collectively, these data demonstrate altered regulation of hepatic phase II metabolism in mice during pregnancy and suggest that CAR, PPARα, PXR, and ERα signaling pathways may be candidate signaling pathways responsible for these changes. PMID:23055538

  5. Broadband spatial self-phase modulation of black phosphorous.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingdi; Yu, Xuefeng; Han, Weijia; Lv, Bosai; Li, Xiaohong; Xiao, Si; Gao, Yongli; He, Jun

    2016-04-15

    Spatial self-phase modulation (SSPM) experiments on two-dimensional (2D) black phosphorus (BP) nanoflake suspensions are performed with focused femtosecond pulsed lasers at 350-1160 nm. In the broadband region, the slope of the SSPM ring number versus laser intensity varies from 0.99 to 0.34, which is larger than 0.25 in MoS2. We deduce the portion of the fluid globe (ξ) to be 0.0067, which is a constant independent of laser intensity, when the laser intensity is above 10 W/cm2. The nonlinear refractive index of BP is measured to be ∼10(-5) cm2 W(-1), and the third-order nonlinear susceptibility is χ(3)∼10(-8) esu at multiple wavelengths. PMID:27082324

  6. Measurement of organic/polymer material by phase modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yong; Teboul, Eric; Kramer, Alan R.

    2004-06-01

    Due to they can be tailored to provide a wide range of physical properties and their easiness of processing and fabrication, polymeric materials have found widespread use in the manufacture of microwave, electronics, photonics and bio-tech systems. This paper presents the basic principle of phase modulation spectroscopic ellipsometer (PMSE) and its advantages over other ellipsometry in measuring polymer film. Used for thin film measurements ultra-thin dielectric, meal film and organic film, the PMSE technique is now used over a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid infrared. Film thickness ranging from Angstrom up to 50um can be measured by PMSE. Applications of PMSE on measurement and characterization of polymer/organic material are given in the paper.

  7. Rotational modulation of hydrogen Lyman alpha flux from 44ii Bootis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilhu, O.; Neff, J. E.; Rahunen, T.

    1988-01-01

    Observations with IUE that cover the entire 6.4 hr orbital cycle of the late-type contact binary 44i Bootis are presented. Intrinsic stellar hydrogen Lyman alpha emission flux was determined from low-resolution IUE spectra, compensating for geocoronal emission and for interstellar absorption. The variation of the stellar Lyman alpha emission flux correlates well with the variation of the C II and C IV emission fluxes, and shows orbital modulation in phase with the visual light curve. The ratio of Lyman alpha to CII flux (15 to 20) is similar to that observed in solar active regions. Hydrogen Lyman alpha emission is thus one of the most important cooling channels in the outer atmosphere of 44i Boo. A high-resolution spectrum of the Lyman alpha line was obtained between orbital phases 0.0 and 0.6. The integrated flux in the observed high-resolution Lyman alpha profile is consistent with the fluxes determined using low-resolution spectra, and the composite profile indicates that both components of this binary have equally active chromospheres and transition regions. The uncertainty in the interstellar hydrogen column density cannot mimic the observed variation in the integrated Lyman alpha flux, because the stellar line is very much broader than the interstellar absorption.

  8. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    SciTech Connect

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  9. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Carsten B.; Picasso Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  10. Phase II study of lonidamine in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pronzato, P.; Amoroso, D.; Bertelli, G.; Conte, P. F.; Cusimano, M. P.; Ciottoli, G. B.; Gulisano, M.; Lionetto, R.; Rosso, R.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with previously treated metastatic breast cancer were entered in a phase II study with oral lonidamine. Twenty-eight patients are evaluable for toxicity and 25 for response. A partial remission was obtained in four patients (16%) and disease stability in 11 (44%): 10 patients progressed (40%). Toxicity was acceptable, consisting mainly of myalgias (39% of patients) and asthenia (21.4%). No myelotoxicity was observed. The drug is active in previously treated metastatic breast cancer and, because of its peculiar pattern of action and toxicity, deserves to be evaluated in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:2930690

  11. Amorphous silicon research: Phase II. Annual technical progress report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research performed during Phase II of a three-phase, three-year program under NREL Subcontract No. ZAN-4-13318-02. The research program is intended to expand, enhance and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for the development of high-performance, two-terminal multijunction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) alloy modules. It is now well recognized that a multifunction, multibandgap approach has the potential of achieving the highest stable efficiency in a-Si:H alloy solar cells. In this approach, the bandgap of the materials of the component cell is varied in order to capture a wide spectrum of the solar photons. Significant progress has been made in the development of materials and cell design in the last few years, and a stable module efficiency of 10.2% has been demonstrated over one-square-foot area using a triple-junction approach in which the bottom two component cells use hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy. In order to meet the Department of Energy goal of achievement of 12% stable module efficiency, it is necessary to make further improvements in each of the component cells. This has been the thrust of the current program.

  12. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a 14.1kgd measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30kgd Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |ap|<0.32 for MW=50GeV/c2 on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3×10-5pb at MW=45GeV/c2 is obtained.

  13. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Girard, T. A.; Fernandes, A. C.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-19

    We report results of a 14.1 kg d measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30 kg d Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |a{sub p}|<0.32 for M{sub W}=50 GeV/c{sup 2} on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3x10{sup -5} pb at M{sub W}=45 GeV/c{sup 2} is obtained.

  14. Dynamics of phase slips in systems with time-periodic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Punit; Knobloch, Edgar; Beaume, Cédric

    2015-12-01

    The Adler equation with time-periodic frequency modulation is studied. A series of resonances between the period of the frequency modulation and the time scale for the generation of a phase slip is identified. The resulting parameter space structure is determined using a combination of numerical continuation, time simulations, and asymptotic methods. Regions with an integer number of phase slips per period are separated by regions with noninteger numbers of phase slips and include canard trajectories that drift along unstable equilibria. Both high- and low-frequency modulation is considered. An adiabatic description of the low-frequency modulation regime is found to be accurate over a large range of modulation periods.

  15. [Phase I-II study of recombinant interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Ogawa, M; Usui, N; Inagaki, J; Horikoshi, N; Inoue, K; Nakada, H; Tada, A; Yamazaki, H; Mukaiyama, T

    1985-06-01

    A phase I-II study of human recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma) was conducted in patients with various advanced cancer refractory to standard chemotherapies. In the phase I study, seven patients received 14 courses of escalating doses ranging from 2 X 10(6)U/m2 to 64 X 10(6)U/m2 by 1-hour intravenous infusion for 5 consecutive days. The toxicities were high fever with chills, anorexia, occasional nausea and vomiting, elevation of serum GOT, and dose-related leukopenia and neurotoxic symptoms such as heavy fatigue with somnolence or lethargy, both of which were reversible. The pharmacokinetics showed that the peak levels of serum rIFN-gamma activity were dose-related but decreased rapidly to below measurable levels within 6 hours after infusion in patients receiving less than 12 X 10(6)U/m2. Considering these data, the dosage of rIFN-gamma 6 X 10(6) U/m2 by daily intramuscular injection for more than 4 weeks was selected for the early phase II study. There was no partial response out of 11 evaluable patients but a stable condition was observed in 2 cases of renal cell carcinoma and one case each of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. All toxicities seen were similar to those observed in the phase I study, but no tachyphylaxis developed with continued dosage. The antitumor effect of rIFN-gamma remains to be evaluated in a further study employing higher doses. PMID:2988459

  16. Career Education. Administrators and Counselors Implementation Model. Module II. Orientation Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Part of a 13-volume series designed to be used as a group inservice or a self-learning system to train school administrators and counselors for their role in career education, this module follows Module 1 and contains a more detailed examination of the various career education models from selected States with particular attention given to the…

  17. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  18. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  19. High consistency forming process for papermaking. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kranz, W.T.; Judd, M.; Rotherham, J.

    1980-09-01

    The demonstration program for saving energy that can be obtained by forming paper and paperboard products at initial high fiber concentration is discussed. Under Phase II, a limited number of design modifications were made to the low speed high consistency headbox. These resulted in improved sheet formation for samples used in subsequent press studies. Comparisons of sheet physical and drainage properties were made between low and high consistency sheets. Equipment for these tests was designed and fabricated during Phase II, including a laboratory scale dynamic roll nip press with single felt. The high consistency sheet had significantly higher permeability and compressive modulus than the low consistency sheet. In simulated three nip press studies the high consistency sheet demonstrated a 1.5 to 2.5% higher solids content than the low consistency sheet under the same operating parameters. The effect of variables such as machine speed, sheet basis weight, nip loading and entering sheet consistency were investigated. Rules for scaling between laboratory and full size press nips have been established. The energy saving potential for the paper industry through the use of high consistency forming was estimated as 6 to 7% of current total consumption.

  20. Analog optical phase modulator based on chiral smectic and polymer cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockley, Jay E.; Sharp, Gary D.; Serati, Steven A.; Johnson, Kristina M.

    1995-12-01

    A high-speed analog optical phase modulator based on chiral smectic and cholesteric liquid crystals is discussed. The chiral smectic liquid-crystal device functions as a variable-orientation half-wave retarder, whereas the polymer cholesteric liquid-crystal film acts as a polarization-preserving mirror. We use circular Jones calculus to describe optical phase modulation, using a half-wave retarder of variable orientation acting on circularly polarized light. The phase induced by this modulator is achromatic. Analog phase modulation of nearly 360deg is demonstrated with a device switching time of 200 mu s at 25degC .

  1. ISAC SC-LINAC PHASE-II HELIUM REFRIGERATOR COMMISSIONING AND FIRST OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-09

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  2. Isac Sc-Linac Phase-II Helium Refrigerator Commissioning and First Operational Experience at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-01

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  3. Dopaminergic modulation of phase reversal in desert locusts.

    PubMed

    Alessi, Ahmad M; O'Connor, Vincent; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Newland, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity allows animals to modify their behavior, physiology, and morphology to adapt to environmental change. The global pest, the desert locust, shows two extreme phenotypes; a solitarious phase that is relatively harmless and a gregarious phase that forms swarms and causes extensive agricultural and economic damage. In the field, environmental conditions can drive isolated animals into crowded populations and previous studies have identified the biogenic amine serotonin as a key determinant of this transition. Here we take an integrated approach to investigate the neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral correlates defined by a laboratory based paradigm that mimics facets of swarm break down as gregarious locusts become isolated. Following isolation there was an increased propensity of locusts to avoid conspecifics, and show a reduced locomotion. Changes in choice behavior occurred within 1 h of isolation although isolation-related changes progressed with increased isolation time. Isolation was accompanied by changes in the levels of the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin within the CNS within 1 h. Dopamine levels were higher in isolated animals and we focused on the role played by this transmitter in synaptic changes that may underpin solitarization. Dopamine reduced synaptic efficacy at a key central synapse between campaniform sensilla (CS) and a fast extensor tibiae motor neuron that is involved in limb movement. We also show that dopamine injection into the haemocoel was sufficient to induce solitarious-like behavior in otherwise gregarious locusts. Further, injection of a dopamine antagonist, fluphenazine, into isolated locusts induced gregarious-like behavior. This highlights that dopaminergic modulation plays an important role in the plasticity underpinning phase transition and sets a context to deepen the understanding of the complementary role that distinct neuromodulators play in polyphenism in locusts. PMID:25426037

  4. Dopaminergic modulation of phase reversal in desert locusts

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Ahmad M.; O'Connor, Vincent; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Newland, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity allows animals to modify their behavior, physiology, and morphology to adapt to environmental change. The global pest, the desert locust, shows two extreme phenotypes; a solitarious phase that is relatively harmless and a gregarious phase that forms swarms and causes extensive agricultural and economic damage. In the field, environmental conditions can drive isolated animals into crowded populations and previous studies have identified the biogenic amine serotonin as a key determinant of this transition. Here we take an integrated approach to investigate the neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral correlates defined by a laboratory based paradigm that mimics facets of swarm break down as gregarious locusts become isolated. Following isolation there was an increased propensity of locusts to avoid conspecifics, and show a reduced locomotion. Changes in choice behavior occurred within 1 h of isolation although isolation-related changes progressed with increased isolation time. Isolation was accompanied by changes in the levels of the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin within the CNS within 1 h. Dopamine levels were higher in isolated animals and we focused on the role played by this transmitter in synaptic changes that may underpin solitarization. Dopamine reduced synaptic efficacy at a key central synapse between campaniform sensilla (CS) and a fast extensor tibiae motor neuron that is involved in limb movement. We also show that dopamine injection into the haemocoel was sufficient to induce solitarious-like behavior in otherwise gregarious locusts. Further, injection of a dopamine antagonist, fluphenazine, into isolated locusts induced gregarious-like behavior. This highlights that dopaminergic modulation plays an important role in the plasticity underpinning phase transition and sets a context to deepen the understanding of the complementary role that distinct neuromodulators play in polyphenism in locusts. PMID:25426037

  5. Wavefront watermarking of technical and biological samples using digital random phase modulation and phase retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpio, Justine Patricia L.; Almoro, Percival F.

    2014-10-01

    A technique for digital watermarking of smooth object wavefronts using digital random phase modulation and multiple-plane iterative phase retrieval is demonstrated experimentally. A complex-valued watermark is first encrypted using two random phase masks of known distributions before being superposed onto a set of host wavefront intensity patterns. Encryption scaling factor and depth of randomization of the masks are optimized such that the amplitude and phase watermarks are decrypted successfully and are not distorting the host wavefront. Given that the watermarked intensity patterns and the numerous decryption keys are available (i.e. distances between recording planes, light source wavelength, pixel size, random phase masks and their distances to the planes are all known), increasing the number of watermarked patterns used results in enhanced quality of decrypted watermarks. The main advantage of wavefront watermarking via the phase retrieval approach compared to the holographic approach is the avoidance of reference wave-induced aberration. Watermarking of wavefronts from lenses and unstained human cheek cells demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique.

  6. Ring resonator-based on-chip modulation transformer for high-performance phase-modulated microwave photonic links.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Taddei, Caterina; Hoekman, Marcel; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René; van Dijk, Paulus; Roeloffzen, Chris

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel wideband on-chip photonic modulation transformer for phase-modulated microwave photonic links. The proposed device is able to transform phase-modulated optical signals into intensity-modulated versions (or vice versa) with nearly zero conversion of laser phase noise to intensity noise. It is constructed using waveguide-based ring resonators, which features simple architecture, stable operation, and easy reconfigurability. Beyond the stand-alone functionality, the proposed device can also be integrated with other functional building blocks of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) to create on-chip complex microwave photonic signal processors. As an application example, a PIC consisting of two such modulation transformers and a notch filter has been designed and realized in TriPleX(TM) waveguide technology. The realized device uses a 2 × 2 splitting circuit and 3 ring resonators with a free spectral range of 25 GHz, which are all equipped with continuous tuning elements. The device can perform phase-to-intensity modulation transform and carrier suppression simultaneously, which enables high-performance phase-modulated microwave photonics links (PM-MPLs). Associated with the bias-free and low-complexity advantages of the phase modulators, a single-fiber-span PM-MPL with a RF bandwidth of 12 GHz (3 dB-suppression band 6 to 18 GHz) has been demonstrated comprising the proposed PIC, where the achieved spurious-free dynamic range performance is comparable to that of Class-AB MPLs using low-biased Mach-Zehnder modulators. PMID:24216825

  7. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  8. Experimental observation of excess noise in a detuned phase-modulation harmonic mode-locking laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Shiquan; Bao Xiaoyi

    2006-09-15

    The intracavity phase-modulated laser can work in two distinct stages: 1) phase mode-locking when the applied modulation frequency is equal to the cavity's fundamental frequency or one of its harmonics, and 2) the FM laser oscillation at a moderate detuned modulation frequency. In this paper, we experimentally studied the noise buildup process in the transition from FM laser oscillation to phase mode-locking in a phase-modulated laser. We found that the relaxation oscillation frequency varies with the modulation frequency detuning and the relaxation oscillation will occur twice in the transition region. Between these two relaxation oscillations, the supermode noise can be significantly enhanced, which is evidence of excess noise in laser systems. All of these results can be explained by the theory of Floquet modes in a phase-modulated laser cavity.

  9. Performance evaluation of partial response continuous phase modulation: Discriminator detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachtman, Eyal

    1989-09-01

    The principles of continuous phase modulation (CPM) are reviewed and signalling schemes based on it are discussed. The discriminator detector is widely used to detect CPM signals on band limited channels; it is a non-coherent detector which is widely used in mobile communication applications in which fading makes coherent detection difficult; it is suitable for frequency hopping systems. The detector's inferior response to that of a coherent detector can be compensated by suitable design. The performance is compared of various receivers which use the discriminator detector, using an especially written computer simulation. Receiver schemes considered included: Full response signal with integrate and dump filter; Integrate and dump filter with differential symbol detection; zero forcing linear equalization with symbol detection; Decision feedback equalization (DFE); Maximum likelihood sequence estimation; and Tomlinson filter configuration. The Tomlinson filter configuration, which has not previously been used in a CPM communication system, was compared with the other systems with respect to performance and complexity. For all CPM and detection schemes there are optimum values of h, the modulation index and there is no benefit in increasing the value of h and, therefore the bandwidth, beyond this value. Results are presented for various signal schemes, which indicate that detectability performance can be improved and bandwidth reduced by using a partial response CPM. There is a tradeoff between detectability performance and bandwidth, as a function of the baseband pulse duration. It was found that quaternary signal schemes gave better detectability performance than binary schemes, for the same bit-rates. The simulation results indicated that the Tomlinson-DFE configuration was effective for the partial response M-ary CPM channel with discriminator detection; spectral efficiency was not seriously degraded by precoding using the Tomlinson filter, and there was no

  10. Lipolytic and metabolic response to glucagon in fasting king penguins: phase II vs. phase III.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Thil, Marie-Anne; Groscolas, Rene

    2003-02-01

    This study aims to determine how glucagon intervenes in the regulation of fuel metabolism, especially lipolysis, at two stages of a spontaneous long-term fast characterized by marked differences in lipid and protein availability and/or utilization (phases II and III). Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo in a subantarctic bird (king penguin) before, during, and after a 2-h glucagon infusion. In the two fasting phases, glucagon infusion at a rate of 0.025 microg. kg(-1). min(-1) induced a three- to fourfold increase in the plasma concentration and in the rate of appearance (Ra) of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids, the percentage of primary reesterification remaining unchanged. Infusion of glucagon also resulted in a progressive elevation of the plasma concentration of glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate and in a twofold higher insulinemia. These changes were not significantly different between the two phases. The plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols and uric acid were unaffected by glucagon infusion, except for a 40% increase in plasma uric acid in phase II birds. Altogether, these results indicate that glucagon in a long-term fasting bird is highly lipolytic, hyperglycemic, ketogenic, and insulinogenic, these effects, however, being similar in phases II and III. The maintenance of the sensitivity of adipose tissue lipolysis to glucagon could suggest that the major role of the increase in basal glucagonemia observed in phase III is to stimulate gluconeogenesis rather than fatty acid delivery. PMID:12388477

  11. Shock and Recovery of Polytetrafluoroethylene Above and Below the Phase II To Phase III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2005-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is semi-crystalline in nature with its linear chains forming complicated temperature and pressure dependent phases. Due to its desirable mechanical properties applications of PTFE include structures designed for dynamic largescale plasticity excursions. Experimental studies on pressure-induced phase transitions using shock-loading techniques and the resulting changes in crystalline structure are presented. Disks of pedigreed PTFE 7C have been shock loaded in momentum trapped assemblies using a 80 mm gas launcher. Challenges in momentum trapping and soft recovery arising from the low yield stress of PTFE (9 MPa at room temperature) are discussed. Experiments were performed with impact pressures from 0.4 to 0.85 GPa to investigate the material response above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Changes in crystalline structure of the recovered materials were quantified using dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC) and density.

  12. Conversion of a transverse density modulation into a longitudinal phase space modulation using an emittance exchange technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.

    2010-03-01

    We report on an experiment to produce a train of sub-picosecond microbunches using a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange technique. The generation of a modulation on the longitudinal phase space is done by converting an initial horizontal modulation produced using a multislits mask. The preliminary experimental data clearly demonstrate the conversion process. To date only the final energy modulation has been measured. However numerical simulations, in qualitative agreement with the measurements, indicate that the conversion process should also introduce a temporal modulation.

  13. Imaging the Lipid-Phase-Dependent Pore Formation of Equinatoxin II in Droplet Interface Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rojko, N.; Cronin, B.; Danial, J.S.H.; Baker, M.A.B.; Anderluh, G.; Wallace, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Using phase-separated droplet interface bilayers, we observe membrane binding and pore formation of a eukaryotic cytolysin, Equinatoxin II (EqtII). EqtII activity is known to depend on the presence of sphingomyelin in the target membrane and is enhanced by lipid phase separation. By imaging the ionic flux through individual pores in vitro, we observe that EqtII pores form predominantly within the liquid-disordered phase. We observe preferential binding of labeled EqtII at liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered domain boundaries before it accumulates in the liquid-disordered phase. PMID:24739162

  14. Photonic ultrawideband impulse radio generation and modulation over a fiber link using a phase modulator and a delay interferometer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Sun, Junqiang

    2012-08-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and flexible photonic scheme for generation and modulation of ultrawideband (UWB) using a phase modulator and a fiber delay interferometer (DI)-based multichannel frequency discrimination. By introducing a Gaussian signal to the phase modulator, the UWB polarity-switchable doublet pulses can be achieved by combining the pair of UWB monocycle pulses with inverted polarities at the DI outputs under proper time delay. Furthermore, the pulse shape modulation, pulse position modulation, and on-off keying can be performed by coding the electrical data patterns and adjusting the time delay between the two monocycle pulses. Only a laser source introduced in the architecture guarantees the excellent dispersion tolerance over 75 km optical fiber link for UWB pulse sequence, which has potential application in future high-speed UWB impulse radio over optical fiber access networks. PMID:23381294

  15. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  16. Optimal synthesis of double-phase computer generated holograms using a phase-only spatial light modulator with grating filter.

    PubMed

    Song, Hoon; Sung, Geeyoung; Choi, Sujin; Won, Kanghee; Lee, Hong-Seok; Kim, Hwi

    2012-12-31

    We propose an optical system for synthesizing double-phase complex computer-generated holograms using a phase-only spatial light modulator and a phase grating filter. Two separated areas of the phase-only spatial light modulator are optically superposed by 4-f configuration with an optimally designed grating filter to synthesize arbitrary complex optical field distributions. The tolerances related to misalignment factors are analyzed, and the optimal synthesis method of double-phase computer-generated holograms is described. PMID:23388811

  17. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

    2012-09-28

    quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  18. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography measurements with different phase modulation amplitude when using continuous polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  19. Three-dimensional shape measurement with sinusoidal phase-modulating fiber-optic interferometer fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changrong; Duan, Fajie; Fu, Xiao; Huang, Tingting

    2016-05-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement system using a fiber-optic interferometer fringe projector is presented and demonstrated. The system utilizes sinusoidal phase shifting interferometry to detect the desired phase which is improved by introducing constant scaling factors from linear phase shift interferometry algorithm, and the relationship between the modulation voltage and the phase modulation coefficient is analyzed; the system also utilizes the reflection signal to realize measurement of the disturbance and feed back to the modulated signal. Practical experiments validate the feasibility of this method. The phase accuracy is nearly 37.6 mrad and the measurement error is about 10 nm.

  20. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  1. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  2. Phase-noise limitations on single-photon cross-phase modulation with differing group velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Justin; Chudzicki, Christopher; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2014-12-01

    A framework is established for evaluating cphase gates that use single-photon cross-phase modulation (XPM) originating from the Kerr nonlinearity. Prior work [J. H. Shapiro, Phys. Rev. A 73, 062305 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.062305], which assumed that the control and target pulses propagated at the same group velocity, showed that the causality-induced phase noise required by a noninstantaneous XPM response function precluded the possibility of high-fidelity π -radian conditional phase shifts. The framework presented herein incorporates the more realistic case of group-velocity disparity between the control and target pulses, as employed in existing XPM-based fiber-optical switches. Nevertheless, the causality-induced phase noise identified by Shapiro [J. H. Shapiro, Phys. Rev. A 73, 062305 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevA.73.062305] still rules out high-fidelity π -radian conditional phase shifts. This is shown to be so for both a reasonable theoretical model for the XPM response function and for the experimentally measured XPM response function of silica-core fiber.

  3. Quantitative spectroscopy of photospheric-phase type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, L.; Hillier, D. J.

    2005-07-01

    We present first results on the quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the photospheric-phase of type II supernovae (SN). The analyses are based on the model atmosphere code, CMFGEN, of Hillier & Miller (1998) which solves the radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations in expanding outflows under the constraint of radiative equilibrium. A key asset of CMFGEN is its thorough treatment of line-blanketing due to metal species. From its applicability to hot star environments, the main modifications to the source code were to allow a linear velocity law, a power-law density distribution, an adaptive grid to handle the steep H recombination/ionization front occurring in some SN models, and a routine to compute the gray temperature structure in the presence of large velocities. In this first paper we demonstrate the ability of CMFGEN to reproduce, with a high level of accuracy, the UV and optical observations of a sample of well observed type II SN, i.e. SN1987A and SN1999em, at representative stages of their photospheric evolution. Two principal stages of SN are modeled that where hydrogen is fully ionized, and that in which H is only partially ionized. For models with an effective temperature below ~8000 K, hydrogen recombines and gives rise to a steep ionization front. The effect of varying the location of the outer grid radius on the spectral energy distribution (SED) is investigated. We find that going to 5-6 times the optically-thick base radius is optimal, since above that, the model becomes prohibitively large, while below this, significant differences appear because of the reduced line-blanketing (which persists even far above the photosphere) and the truncation of line-formation regions. To constrain the metallicity and the reddening of SN, the UV spectral region of early-time spectra is essential. We find that the density of the photosphere and effect of line blanketing decline as the spatial scale of the SN increases. The density distribution is

  4. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  5. Phase modulators for refractive corrections of human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, Rejean; Marchese, Linda E.; Hou, Lijan

    2004-10-01

    Using optical modeling, it is shown that it is possible to construct a pixilated spatial light modulator, SLM, to provide a dynamic correction for the loss of accommodation in most adults over the age of 55. The optical correction for this loss, known as presbyopia, is modeled by placing a pixilated SLM with a spherical optical path difference profile at the apex of the front surface of the eye. It is shown that an 8x8 mm2 SLM divided into 127x127 pixels and capable of 20 waves of phase retardation (OPD depth) at 550nm provides up to 2D of accommodation for pupils of 6mm in diameter while providing optical quality equivalent to the natural state of the eye. The required OPD depth may be reduce to 15 waves if the correction is required over a smaller 5mm pupil. It is also shown that the poor image quality resulting from small array sizes (9x9 or 21x21 pixels) is due to the complex diffraction and interference effects resulting from the structure of the array and the circular pupil.

  6. Corticospinal Modulations during Bimanual Movement with Different Relative Phases

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yoshifumi; Jono, Yasutomo; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate corticospinal modulation of bimanual (BM) movement with different relative phases (RPs). The participants rhythmically abducted and adducted the right index finger (unimanual (UM) movement) or both index fingers (BM movement) with a cyclic duration of 1 s. The RP of BM movement, defined as the time difference between one hand movement and the other hand movement, was 0°, 90°, or 180°. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the right flexor dorsal interosseous muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were obtained during UM or BM movement. Corticospinal excitability in the first dorsal interosseous muscle during BM movement with 90° RP was higher than that during UM movement or BM movement with 0° or 180° RP. The correlation between muscle activity level and corticospinal excitability during BM movement with 90° RP was smaller than that during UM movement or BM movement with 0° or 180° RP. The higher corticospinal excitability during BM movement with 90° RP may be caused by the greater effort expended to execute a difficult task, the involvement of interhemispheric interaction, a motor binding process, or task acquisition. The lower dependency of corticospinal excitability on the muscle activity level during BM movement with 90° RP may reflect the minor corticospinal contribution to BM movement with an RP that is not in the attractor state. PMID:27014026

  7. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  8. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector - phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase II (TPOP-II) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and DT mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and DT extrusions; integrate, test and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter {approximately} 7-8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory requiring secondary and room containment systems. In initial tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to thirteen pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of order 1.0-1.1 km/s using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. The pellets are typically 7.4 mm in diameter and up to 11 mm in length and are the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 11% density perturbation to ITER. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first wall tritium inventories by a process called isotopic fueling where tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge.

  9. Lunar Quest in Second Life, Lunar Exploration Island, Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F. M.; Day, B. H.; Mitchell, B.; Hsu, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Linden Lab’s Second Life is a virtual 3D metaverse created by users. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars move through Second Life by walking, flying, or teleporting. Users form communities or groups of mutual interest such as music, computer graphics, and education. These groups communicate via e-mail, voice, and text within Second Life. Information on downloading the Second Life browser and joining can be found on the Second Life website: www.secondlife.com. This poster details Phase II in the development of Lunar Exploration Island (LEI) located in Second Life. Phase I LEI highlighted NASA’s LRO/LCROSS mission. Avatars enter LEI via teleportation arriving at a hall of flight housing interactive exhibits on the LRO/ LCROSS missions including full size models of the two spacecraft and launch vehicle. Storyboards with information about the missions interpret the exhibits while links to external websites provide further information on the mission, both spacecraft’s instrument suites, and related EPO. Other lunar related activities such as My Moon and NLSI EPO programs. A special exhibit was designed for International Observe the Moon Night activities with links to websites for further information. The sim includes several sites for meetings, a conference stage to host talks, and a screen for viewing NASATV coverage of mission and other televised events. In Phase II exhibits are updated to reflect on-going lunar exploration highlights, discoveries, and future missions. A new section of LEI has been developed to showcase NASA’s Lunar Quest program. A new exhibit hall with Lunar Quest information has been designed and is being populated with Lunar Quest information, spacecraft models (LADEE is in place) and kiosks. A two stage interactive demonstration illustrates lunar phases with static and 3-D stations. As NASA’s Lunar Quest program matures further

  10. Phase Diagrams and Electronic Structure of II-VI Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gironcoli, Stefano

    1998-03-01

    Among II-VI wide-gap semiconductor solid solutions, Zn_xMg_1-xS_ySe_1-y alloy is the most studied for its potential applications in the blue-green light-emitter technology. In spite of this enormous technological interest little is known about its fundamental thermodynamical and structural properties. In this work the structural and thermodynamical properties of the Zn_xMg_1-xS_ySe_1-y solid solutions are determined by a combination of the computational alchemy (S. de Gironcoli, P. Giannozzi, and S. Baroni, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66), 2116 (1991); N. Marzari, S. de Gironcoli, and S. Baroni, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 4001 (1994). and the cluster expansion (S.-H. Wei, L. G. Ferreira, and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. B 41), 8240 (1990). methods with Monte Carlo simulations. We determine the phase diagram of the alloy and show that the system is completely mixible at the tipical growth temperatures and phase separates at lower temperatures into two or three phases. The homogeneous phase is characterized by a large amount of short-range order occurring among first-nearest neighbors. Electronic-structure calculations, performed extending the special quasi-random structures approach (A. Zunger, S.-H. Wei, L. G. Ferreira, and J. E. Bernard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65), 353 (1990). to the quaternary alloy case, indicate that the energy gap of the alloy is rather sensitive to this short-range order.

  11. Simulation of Phase Modulation for Longitudinal Emittance Blow-Up in J-PARC MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ezura, Eizi; Hara, Keigo; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Nomura, Masahiro; Ohmori, Chihiro; Schnase, Alexander; Shimada, Taihei; Takagi, Akira; Takata, Koji; Tamura, Fumihiko; Toda, Makoto; Yoshii, Masahito

    The J-PARC MR provides a coasting proton beam for nuclear physics experiments by slow extraction. The longitudinal emittance should be enlarged until the MR flat top to mitigate the microwave instability. We have investigated a phase modulation method by using a High Frequency Cavity (HFC) to increase the emittance. We have performed extensive simulation studies to find the appropriate parameters of the phase modulation. We found that the effective HFC frequency has a linear dependence with the modulation frequency where the emittance is smoothly enlarged. Furthermore, we confirmed that the required HFC voltage is inverse proportional to the square root of the duration time of the phase modulation.

  12. Thermal imaging QC for silicon strip staves of the ATLAS phase II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergel Infante, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    A new silicon strip detector is part of the phase II upgrade of the ATLAS inner tracker. Light-material carbon fiber honeycomb sandwich staves serve as mechanical support for the strip sensors and readout modules and to move the dissipated heat out of the detector. A cooling pipe inside the stave is embedded in heat-conducting foam that thermally connects the pipe with the readout modules. The staves are required to pass a set of quality control (QC) tests before they are populated with readout modules. One test uses a non-invasive inspection method of infrared (IR) thermal imaging of the heat path while the stave is cooled to around -40°C at ambient room temperature. Imperfections in the manufacturing, such as the delamination of the stave facing from the foam, will exhibit a different temperature profile compared to a flawless stave. We report on the current status of the thermal imaging QC measurements including a characterization of various contributions to the uncertainties in the temperature reading of the IR camera such as pedestal variations, common-mode noise, vignetting, and statistical fluctuations across the field of view.

  13. Coherent combining of fiber-laser-pumped frequency converters using all fiber electro-optic modulator for active phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, P.; Durécu, A.; Canat, G.; Le Gouët, J.; Goular, D.; Lombard, L.

    2015-03-01

    Coherent beam combining (CBC) by active phase control could be useful for power scaling fiber-laser-pumped optical frequency converters like OPOs. However, a phase modulator operating at the frequency-converted wavelength is needed, which is non standard component. Fortunately, nonlinear conversion processes rely on a phase-matching condition correlating, not only the wave vectors of the coupled waves, but also their phases. This paper demonstrates that, using this phase correlation for indirect control of the phase, coherent combining of optical frequency converters is feasible using standard all-fibered electro-optic modulators. For the sake of demonstration, this new technique is experimentally applied twice for continuous wave second-harmonic-generator (SHG) combination: i) combining 2 SHG of 1.55-μm erbium-doped fiber amplifiers in PPLN crystals generating 775-nm beams; ii) combining 2 SHG of 1.064-μm ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers in LBO crystals generating 532-nm beams. Excellent CBC efficiency is achieved on the harmonic waves in both these experiments, with λ/20 and λ/30 residual phase error respectively. In the second experiment, I/Q phase detection is added on fundamental and harmonic waves to measure their phase variations simultaneously. These measurements confirm the theoretical expectations and formulae of correlation between the phases of the fundamental and harmonic waves. Unexpectedly, in both experiments, when harmonic waves are phase-locked, a residual phase difference remains between the fundamen tal waves. Measurements of the spectrum of these residual phase differences locate them above 50 Hz, revealing that they most probably originate in fast-varying optical path differences induced by turbulence and acoustic-waves on the experimental breadboard.

  14. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Commercialization Plan. A succinct commercialization plan must be included in each SBIR Phase II proposal moving... of a product or service for which an SBIR award is made; (ii) Revenue from the sale of new...

  15. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video…

  16. Affordable GaAs Tx/Rx modules for phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, P. A.; Tench, M. D. R.; Green, C. R.; Lane, A. A.; Gregory, L. I.

    Recent work performed to identify the sensitivity of various elements of the transmit/receive module in phased array radars is discussed. The choice of a module configuration based on the results of a cost sensitivity analysis with a target of 250 pounds sterling for a two-watt module with a four-bit phase control is addressed. Some areas requiring further development to achieve this cost target are considered.

  17. Nerve-mediated antidiuresis and antinatriuresis after air-jet stress is modulated by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Veelken, R; Hilgers, K F; Stetter, A; Siebert, H G; Schmieder, R E; Mann, J F

    1996-11-01

    A putative interaction between angiotensin II (Ang II) and the sympathetic nervous system within the kidney has been reported. We tested the hypothesis in conscious rats that endogenous Ang II modulates the renal effects of a stress-induced increase in sympathetic nerve activity. We recorded mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity, renal hemodynamics, urine volume, and urinary sodium content in conscious rats. We used the Ang II type 1 receptor blocker ZD 7155 to inhibit the effects of endogenous Ang II. Ten minutes of air-jet stress increased renal sympathetic nerve activity by 98 +/- 4% (n = 6) without changing systemic hemodynamics. Air-jet stress reduced urine volume (from 31 +/- 3 to 8 +/- 4 microL/min per gram kidney weight, P < .05, n = 12) and sodium excretion (from 4.3 +/- 0.9 to 1.2 +/- 0.3 mumol/min per gram kidney weight, P < .05, n = 12). After renal denervation, air-jet stress had no effect on either parameter. Six micrograms of the Ang II type 1 receptor inhibitor ZD 7155 blunted the decrease in urine volume and sodium excretion in response to air-jet stress, although the increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity during air-jet stress and the pressor response to exogenous Ang II were not affected. Glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow were also not affected. Higher doses of 30 and 60 micrograms ZD 7155 inhibited the pressor response to exogenous Ang II and abolished the changes in urine volume and sodium excretion in response to air-jet stress. None of the ZD 7155 doses affected urinary sodium excretion permanently. Hence, the Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist ZD 7155 impaired or abolished the renal nerve-mediated antinatriuresis and anitidiuresis in response to air-jet stress. We conclude that endogenous Ang II modulates the renal effects of centrally mediated changes of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats. PMID:8901830

  18. Analysis of SBIR phase I and phase II review results at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Vener, K J; Calkins, B M

    1991-09-01

    A cohort of phase I and phase II summary statements for the SBIR grant applications was evaluated to determine the strengths and weaknesses in approved and disapproved applications. An analysis of outcome variables (disapproval or unfunded status) was examined with respect to exposure variables (strengths or shortcomings). Logistic regression models were developed for comparisons to measure the predictive value of shortcomings and strengths to the outcomes. Disapproved phase I results were compared with an earlier 1985 study. Although the magnitude of the frequencies of shortcomings was greater in the present study, the relative rankings within shortcoming class were more alike than different. Also, the frequencies of shortcomings were, with one exception, not significantly different in the two studies. Differences in the summary statement review may have accounted for some differences observed between the 1985 data and results of the present study. Comparisons of Approved/Disapproved and Approved-Unfunded/Funded yielded the following observations. For phase I applicants, a lack of a clearly stated, testable hypothesis, a poorly qualified or described investigative team, and inadequate methodological approaches contributed significantly (in that order) to a rating of disapproval. A critical flaw for phase II proposals was failure to accomplish objectives of the phase I study. Methodological issues also dominate the distinctions in both comparison groups. A clear result of the data presented here and that published previously is that SBIR applicants need continuing assistance to improve the chances of their success. These results should serve as a guide to assist NIH staff as they provide information to prospective applicants focusing on key elements of the application. A continuing review of the SBIR program would be helpful to evaluate the quality of the submitted science. PMID:1916087

  19. Easier Phase IIs: Recent Improvements to the Gemini User Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bryan; Nuñez, A.

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 and 2012 Gemini Observatory undertook a significant project to improve the software tools used by investigators to propose for and prepare observations. The main goal was to make the definition of observation details (the Phase II process) easier and faster. The main initiatives included rewriting the observing proposal tool (Phase I Tool) and making several major improvements to the Observing Tool, including automatic settings for arc and flat exposures, automatic guide star selection for all instruments and wavefront sensors, and more complete initial template observations with capabilities for simultaneous editing of many observations. This poster explains these major changes as well as outlines future development plans. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  20. Overview of SBIR Phase II Work on Hollow Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-Lightweight materials are enabling for producing space based optical components and support structures. Heretofore, innovative designs using existing materials has been the approach to produce lighter-weight optical systems. Graphite fiber reinforced composites, because of their light weight, have been a material of frequent choice to produce space based optical components. Hollow graphite fibers would be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, would save weight in optical components. The Phase I SBIR program demonstrated it is possible to produce hollow carbon fibers that have strengths up to 4.2 GPa which are equivalent to commercial fibers, and composites made from the hollow fibers had substantially equivalent composite strengths as commercial fiber composites at a 46% weight savings. The Phase II SBIR program will optimize processing and properties of the hollow carbon fiber and scale-up processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA. Information presented here includes an overview of the strength of some preliminary hollow fibers, photographs of those fibers, and a short discussion of future plans.

  1. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP):  Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models;  Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36

  2. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase II Power, Energy Storage, and Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research and development needs for Agency programs. This report highlights 21 of the innovative SBIR Phase II projects from 2007 from 2012 that focus on one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Power, Energy Storage, and Conversion. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as multijunction solar cells, roll-out solar arrays, photovoltaic concentrator blanket assemblies, wide bandgap power semiconductor modules, and indium-gallium nitride high temperature photovoltaic cells. Each article describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides as an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  3. Compact acousto-optic modulator operatingin the purely Raman - Nath diffraction regime as a phase modulator in FM spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N; Epikhin, V M

    2010-08-03

    We report fabrication of a new acousto-optic modulator (AOM-RN) operating purely in the Raman - Nath diffraction regime. This device can be used as an external phase modulator in frequency-modulation (FM) optical heterodyne spectroscopy for fast and broadband frequency control of diode lasers. The AOM-RN design is significantly simplified, and its dimensions are minimised due to a decrease (by almost an order of magnitude in comparison with the existing AOMs) in the acousto-optic interaction length and the absence of impedance matching circuit. The FM spectroscopy based on AOM-RN makes it possible to analyse both absorption and dispersion properties of optical resonances under study; this possibility is shown by the example of saturated-absorption resonances in cesium vapour. The possibility of detecting coherent population trapping resonances using FM spectroscopy with AOM-RN as an external phase modulator is experimentally demonstrated.

  4. Characterization and Modulation of the Immunosuppressive Phase of Sepsis▿

    PubMed Central

    Muenzer, Jared T.; Davis, Christopher G.; Chang, Kathy; Schmidt, Robert E.; Dunne, W. Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Studies of patients and animal models have revealed that changes in the immune response during sepsis play a decisive role in the outcome. Using a clinically relevant two-hit model of sepsis, i.e., cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) followed by the induction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, we characterized the host immune response. Second, AS101 [ammonium trichloro(dioxoethylene-o,o′)tellurate], a compound that blocks interleukin 10 (IL-10), a key mediator of immunosuppression in sepsis, was tested for its ability to reverse immunoparalysis and improve survival. Mice subjected to pneumonia following CLP had different survival rates depending upon the timing of the secondary injury. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa at 4 days post-CLP had ∼40% survival, whereas animals challenged at 7 days had 85% survival. This improvement in survival was associated with decreased lymphocyte apoptosis, restoration of innate cell populations, increased proinflammatory cytokines, and restoration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production by stimulated splenocytes. These animals also showed significantly less P. aeruginosa growth from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Importantly, AS101 improved survival after secondary injury 4 days following CLP. This increased survival was associated with many of the same findings observed in the 7-day group, i.e., restoration of IFN-γ production, increased proinflammatory cytokines, and decreased bacterial growth. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that immunosuppression following initial septic insult increases susceptibility to secondary infection. However, by 7 days post-CLP, the host's immune system has recovered sufficiently to mount an effective immune response. Modulation of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis may aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:20100863

  5. Characterization and modulation of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Muenzer, Jared T; Davis, Christopher G; Chang, Kathy; Schmidt, Robert E; Dunne, W Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2010-04-01

    Sepsis continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Studies of patients and animal models have revealed that changes in the immune response during sepsis play a decisive role in the outcome. Using a clinically relevant two-hit model of sepsis, i.e., cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) followed by the induction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, we characterized the host immune response. Second, AS101 [ammonium trichloro(dioxoethylene-o,o')tellurate], a compound that blocks interleukin 10 (IL-10), a key mediator of immunosuppression in sepsis, was tested for its ability to reverse immunoparalysis and improve survival. Mice subjected to pneumonia following CLP had different survival rates depending upon the timing of the secondary injury. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa at 4 days post-CLP had approximately 40% survival, whereas animals challenged at 7 days had 85% survival. This improvement in survival was associated with decreased lymphocyte apoptosis, restoration of innate cell populations, increased proinflammatory cytokines, and restoration of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production by stimulated splenocytes. These animals also showed significantly less P. aeruginosa growth from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Importantly, AS101 improved survival after secondary injury 4 days following CLP. This increased survival was associated with many of the same findings observed in the 7-day group, i.e., restoration of IFN-gamma production, increased proinflammatory cytokines, and decreased bacterial growth. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that immunosuppression following initial septic insult increases susceptibility to secondary infection. However, by 7 days post-CLP, the host's immune system has recovered sufficiently to mount an effective immune response. Modulation of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis may aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:20100863

  6. Chromaticity tracking with a phase modulation/demodulation technique in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Tevatron chromaticity tracker (CT) has been successfully commissioned and is now operational. The basic idea behind the CT is that when the phase of the Tevatron RF is slowly modulated, the beam momentum is also modulated. This momentum modulation is coupled transversely via chromaticity to manifest as a phase modulation on the betatron tune. And so by phase demodulating the betatron tune, the chromaticity can be recovered. However, for the phase demodulation to be successful, it is critical that the betatron tune be a coherent signal that can be easily picked up by a phase detector. This is easily done because the Tevatron has a phase locked loop based tune tracker which coherently excites the beam at the betatron tune.

  7. Emerging Roles of Nrf2 and Phase II Antioxidant Enzymes in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; An, Chengrui; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase II metabolic enzymes are a battery of critical proteins that detoxify xenobiotics by increasing their hydrophilicity and enhancing their disposal. These enzymes have long been studied for their preventative and protective effects against mutagens and carcinogens and for their regulation via the Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1) / Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2) / ARE (antioxidant response elements) pathway. Recently, a series of studies have reported the altered expression of phase II genes in postmortem tissue of patients with various neurological diseases. These observations hint at a role for phase II enzymes in the evolution of such conditions. Furthermore, promising findings reveal that overexpression of phase II genes, either by genetic or chemical approaches, confers neuroprotection in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, there is a need to summarize the current literature on phase II genes in the central nervous system (CNS). This should help guide future studies on phase II genes as therapeutic targets in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduce the concept of phase I, II and III enzymes, with a special focus on phase II enzymes. We then discuss their expression regulation, their inducers and executors. Following this background, we expand our discussion to the neuroprotective effects of phase II enzymes and the potential application of Nrf2 inducers to the treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:23025925

  8. Phase I and Phase II Objective Response Rates are Correlated in Pediatric Cancer Trials: An Argument for Better Clinical Trial Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jonathan C; Huang, Peng; Cohen, Kenneth J

    2016-07-01

    Although many phase I trials report tumor response, formal analysis of efficacy is deferred to phase II. We reviewed paired phase I and II pediatric oncology trials to ascertain the relationship between phase I and II objective response rate (OR%). Single-agent phase I trials were paired with corresponding phase II trials (comparable study drug, dosing schedule, and population). Phase I trials without efficacy data or a matching phase II trial were excluded. OR% was tabulated for all trials, and phase II authors' subjective conclusions regarding efficacy were documented; 35 pairs of trials were analyzed. The correlation between phase I and II OR% was 0.93. Between phase II studies with a "positive" conclusion versus a "negative" one, there was a statistically significant difference in mean phase I OR% (32.0% vs. 4.5%, P<0.001). Thirteen phase II studies were undertaken despite phase I OR% of 0%; only 1 had a "positive" conclusion, and none exceeded OR% of 15%. OR% are highly correlated between phase I and II pediatric oncology trials. Although not a formal measure of drug efficacy, phase I OR% may provide an estimate of phase II response, inform phase II study design, and should be given greater consideration. PMID:27164535

  9. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-2, Operation of Ultrasonic Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This second in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) II describes specific ultrasonic test techniques and calibration principles. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  11. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  12. Modulation of oxygen production in Archaean oceans by episodes of Fe(II) toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Mloszewska, Aleksandra M.; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Schoenberg, Ronny; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen accumulated in the surface waters of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere several hundred million years before the Great Oxidation Event between 2.4 and 2.3 billion years ago. Before the Great Oxidation Event, periods of enhanced submarine volcanism associated with mantle plume events supplied Fe(II) to sea water. These periods generally coincide with the disappearance of indicators of the presence of molecular oxygen in Archaean sedimentary records. The presence of Fe(II) in the water column can lead to oxidative stress in some organisms as a result of reactions between Fe(II) and oxygen that produce reactive oxygen species. Here we test the hypothesis that the upwelling of Fe(II)-rich, anoxic water into the photic zone during the late Archaean subjected oxygenic phototrophic bacteria to Fe(II) toxicity. In laboratory experiments, we found that supplying Fe(II) to the anoxic growth medium housing a common species of planktonic cyanobacteria decreased both the efficiency of oxygenic photosynthesis and their growth rates. We suggest that this occurs because of increasing intracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species. We use geochemical modelling to show that Fe(II) toxicity in conditions found in the late Archaean photic zone could have substantially inhibited water column oxygen production, thus decreasing fluxes of oxygen to the atmosphere. We therefore propose that the timing of atmospheric oxygenation was controlled by the timing of submarine, plume-type volcanism, with Fe(II) toxicity as the modulating factor.

  13. Emerging technologies and approaches to minimize discharges into Lake Michigan Phase 2, Module 3 report.

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M. C.; Gillenwater, P.; Urgun Demirtas, M.

    2011-05-11

    Purdue University Calumet (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) have conducted an independent study to identify deployable technologies that could help the BP Whiting Refinery, and other petroleum refineries, meet future wastewater discharge limits. This study has been funded by BP. Each organization tested a subset of the target technologies and retains sole responsibility for its respective test design and implementation, quality assurance and control, test results obtained from each of the technologies, and corresponding conclusions and recommendations. This project was divided in two phases and modules. This report summarizes the work conducted by Argonne in Phase II Module 3 (Bench Scale Testing). Other Modules are discussed elsewhere (Emerging Technologies and Approaches to Minimize Discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase 2, Modules 1-3 Report, April 2011, prepared for BP Americas by the Argonne - Purdue Task Force). The goal of this project was to identify and assess available and emerging wastewater treatment technologies for removing mercury and vanadium from the Whiting Refinery wastewater and to conduct bench-scale tests to provide comparable, transparent, and uniform results across the broad range of technologies tested. After the bench-scale testing phase, a previously developed decision matrix was refined and applied by Argonne to process and review test data to estimate and compare the preliminary performance, engineering configuration, preliminary cost, energy usage, and waste generation of technologies that were shown to be able to remove Hg and/or V to below the target limit at the bench scale. The data were used as the basis to identify the best candidates for further testing at the bench or pilot scale on a slip stream of effluent to lake (ETL) or clarifier effluent (CE) at the Whiting Refinery to determine whether future limits could be met and to generate other pertinent data for scale-up and sustainability evaluation. As a result of

  14. Modulation-format-independent blind phase search algorithm for coherent optical square M-QAM systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Kangping; Gao, Yuliang; Lu, Chao; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Long, Keping

    2014-10-01

    Modulation format independence is one of the key challenges in digital signal processing (DSP) techniques for future elastic optical transmissions. We proposed a modulation-format-independent blind phase search (MFI-BPS) algorithm for square M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) systems, in which modulation format recognition (MFR) and carrier phase estimation (CPE), are included and implemented both in a feed-forward manner. Comprehensive simulation and the experimental studies on 224 Gbit/s polarization multiplexing 16-QAM (PM-16QAM) systems demonstrate the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed MFI-BPS algorithm. PMID:25321980

  15. Automated procedures for the assembly of the CMS Phase 1 upgrade pixel modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Alex; CMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Phase 1 upgrade of the pixel tracker for the CMS experiment requires the assembly of approximately 1000 modules consisting of pixel sensors bump bonded to readout chips. The precision assembly of modules in this volume is made possible using several robotic processes for dispensing epoxy,positioning of sensor components, automatic wire-bonding and robotic deposition of elastomer for wire bond encapsulation. We will describe the these processes in detail, along with the measurements that quanitfy the quality of assembled modules, and describe the subsequent steps in which the sensor modules are used in the construction of the Phase 1 pixel tracker. With support from USCMS.

  16. Clean Air Act Title IV: Lessons learned from Phase I; getting ready for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required significant reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants in the US. This paper examines some of the key technical lessons learned in Phase I following retrofit of low NO{sub x} systems, FGD systems, and continuous emissions monitors. Some of the key problems encountered have been waterwall wastage as a result of low NO{sub x} burner retrofits; high LOI (carbon) ash as a result of low NO{sub x} operation; high O&M costs associated with CEMs; and the heat rate discrepancy which has arisen between CEMs and conventional heat rate calculations. As Phase II approaches, EPRI and the electric utility industry are investigating improvements in FGD systems (e.g., clear liquor scrubbing), advances in NO{sub x} control technologies, more robust CEM systems, and tools to help in the technology decision-making process.

  17. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  18. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  19. Frequency modulated self-oscillation and phase inertia in a synchronized nanowire mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barois, T.; Perisanu, S.; Vincent, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Ayari, A.

    2014-08-01

    Synchronization has been reported for a wide range of self-oscillating systems. However, even though it has been predicted theoretically for several decades, the experimental realization of phase self-oscillation, sometimes called phase trapping, in the high driving regime has been studied only recently. We explored in detail the phase dynamics in a synchronized field emission SiC nanoelectromechanical system with intrinsic feedback. A richer variety of phase behavior has been unambiguously identified, implying phase modulation and inertia. This synchronization regime is expected to have implications for the comprehension of the dynamics of interacting self-oscillating networks and for the generation of frequency modulated signals at the nanoscale.

  20. Performance results of a 300-degree linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/-2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  1. Multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation based on polarization modulation and balanced detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Xu, Weiyuan; Wei, Zhengwu; Pan, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Photonic multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation is proposed and demonstrated based on polarization modulation and balanced detection. Consisting of only a polarization modulator (PolM) driven by an electrical coding data, a polarization beam splitter (PBS) and a balanced photodetector (BPD), the proposed microwave phase coder has no requirement on the wavelength, intensity modulation format, or modulation index of the input optical microwave signal, and allows phase coding of arbitrary-format RF signals, which enables multi-frequency phase coding with compact structure, simple operation, and high flexibility. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed, achieving simultaneous phase coding of 15 and 30 GHz, or 10 and 20 GHz RF signals with a coding rate of 5  Gb/s. PMID:26696170

  2. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

  3. Background rejection of n+ surface events in GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Björn

    2016-05-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta (0vββ) decay in 76Ge using an array of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors immersed in liquid argon (LAr). Phase II of the experiment uses 30 new broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors with superior pulse shape discrimination capabilities compared to the previously used semi-coaxial detector design. By far the largest background component for BEGe detectors in GERDA are n+-surface events from 42K β decays which are intrinsic in LAr. The β particles with up to 3.5 MeV can traverse the 0.5 to 0.9 mm thick electrode and deposit energy within the region of interest for the 0vββ decay. However, those events have particular pulse shape features allowing for a strong discrimination. The understanding and simulation of this background, showing a reduction by up to a factor 145 with pulse shape discrimination alone, is presented in this work.

  4. Combined Forward Calorimetry Option for Phase II CMS Endcap Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, EM and HAD compartments are thought to be separate and are often optimized individually. However, it is possible to optimize a robust and economical combined calorimeter system for myriad physics objectives. By employing event-by-event compensation afforded by the dual-readout technique, we have shown that excellent jet performance can be attained with a longitudinally un-segmented calorimeter that is calibrated only with electrons. In addition, the linear hadronic energy scale renders complex off-line correction schemes unnecessary. The proposed replacement of the CMS EE and HE calorimeters with a single Combined Forward Calorimeter (CFC) shows excellent jet performance complemented by good EM object detection. In this paper, we give brief snapshots on basic design criteria, timing characteristics of Cherenkov and scintillation pulses, trigger generation criteria and performance under high radiation fields. Although CMS has recently chosen different technologies for its endcap calorimetry in Phase II, the concepts developed here are likely to remain valuable for some time to come.

  5. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  6. [Phase II trial of peplomycin in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sampi, K; Kumai, R; Hattori, M; Kaneko, Y; Sakurai, M

    1985-05-01

    Seventeen patients with malignant lymphoma were entered into a phase II study of peplomycin (PEP) to determine the efficacy of the drug. There were 8 males and 9 females with a median age of 64 yrs (range 3-74 yrs) and a median PS 3 (range 2-4). Three of these were children. At first PEP was given intermittently and intramuscularly (8 cases) at a dose of 10 mg every one (3 cases) or two (5 cases) weeks, and then intravenously by 22-hr continuous infusion (9 cases) at a dose of 5 mg per day for 5 days. Mean cumulative dose was 78 mg. Objective responses were obtained in 6 patient (35%). CR lasting 4 weeks was obtained in one patient with diffuse mixed-type lymphoma. Five patients, one with diffuse medium-sized cell type and 3 with diffuse large cell type, had PR, lasting 6, 7, 7, 9, and 50+ weeks, respectively. Pulmonary fibrosis was found in two patients on autopsy and interstitial pneumonia in two patients clinically. Temporary high fever occurred in 7 patients, stomatitis in 3 patients and anorexia in 3 patients. PMID:2581513

  7. Modulated magnetic phase of structurally heterogeneous easy-plane weak ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhuraev, D. R.; Niyazov, L. N.; Sokolov, B. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The modulated magnetic phase of a structurally heterogeneous easy-plane weak ferromagnet is considered in terms of the thermodynamic Landau theory of phase transitions. The temperature and field dependences of the main magnetic order modulation parameters are determined. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data obtained for the orientational phase transition into a modulated magnetic state that occurs in hematite and iron borate crystals doped with diamagnetic ions to create structural heterogeneity. The proposed theoretical model is shown to describe the entire set of experimental results consistently with some exceptions.

  8. Understanding pharmacology in humans: Phase I and Phase II (data generation).

    PubMed

    Merlo Pich, Emilio

    2011-10-01

    The discovery of novel drugs is a complex and highly regulated process organized around a critical moment, that is, when the novel compound is tested in humans. This process encompasses a series of clinical studies, identified as Phase I and Phase II, whose composite outcome should deliver the data needed for an informed decision about progressing or not the compound in full development (Phase III). Over the last 10 years the global delivery of novel treatments from the pharmaceutical industry has plunged to the level of the '70ies in spite of a 10-fold larger investment, the differential mostly due to failures in Phase III. There is the need to improve the decision making at the early clinical stage by using innovation and the high-profile achievements of basic science generated in academic and biomedical labs. A specific attention should be paid to applied biotechnologies, in particular nanotechnology and biomedical devices not only for drug deliver but also for biomarker detection. This path, also supported by regulatory agencies, is calling for an important change of perspective about how drug discovery is made, which we believe should start from the full implementation of the paradigm of Translational Medicine. PMID:21783419

  9. Optical phase conjugation in phase-modulated transmission systems: experimental comparison of different nonlinearity-compensation methods.

    PubMed

    Minzioni, Paolo; Pusino, Vincenzo; Cristiani, Ilaria; Marazzi, Lucia; Martinelli, Mario; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, M M; Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2010-08-16

    We experimentally compare the effectiveness of three different optical-phase-conjugation-based nonlinearity-compensation strategies on a transmission system employing phase-modulated signals, and hence affected by the Gordon-Mollenauer effect. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain significant nonlinearity compensation, but that no improvement is obtained using configurations specifically aimed at the compensation of the nonlinear phase noise. PMID:20721200

  10. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  11. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.8 Section 76.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers. (a) General...

  12. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  13. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  14. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  15. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  16. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  17. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  18. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  19. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  20. A steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system: Phase II. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, A.; Shenhar, J.; Lum, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the phase II work on the Position Location Device (POLO) for penetrometers. Phase II was carried out to generate an integrated design of a full-scale steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system. Steering provides for the controlled and directional use of the penetrometer, while vibratory thrusting can provide greater penetration ability.

  1. 47 CFR 54.310 - Connect America Fund for Price Cap Territories-Phase II

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Connect America Fund for Price Cap Territories... Connect America Fund for Price Cap Territories—Phase II (a) Geographic areas eligible for support. Connect America Phase II support may be made available for census blocks or other areas identified as eligible...

  2. MECHANISM AND KINETICS OF THE FORMATION OF NOX AND OTHER COMBUSTION POLLUTANTS. PHASE II. MODIFIED COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives Phase II results of a combined experimental/theoretical study to define the mechanisms and kinetics of the formation of NOx and other combustion pollutants. Two experimental devices were used in Phase II. A special flat-flame burner with a controlled-temperature ...

  3. 47 CFR 54.309 - Connect America Fund Phase II Public Interest Obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Connect America Fund Phase II Public Interest Obligations. 54.309 Section 54.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for High Cost Areas § 54.309 Connect America Fund Phase II...

  4. Investing in Our Nation's Youth. National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign: Phase II (Final Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    This publication presents the findings from an evaluation of Phase II of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign. The number one goal of the campaign was to educate youth to reject illegal drugs. This report evaluates Phase II and focuses on the effect of paid television advertising on awareness of anti-drug messages among youth, teens, and…

  5. Phase II trial of cyclophosphamide, leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil 24-hour infusion and tamoxifen in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Eckel, F; Lersch, C; Lippl, F; Assmann, G; Schulte-Frohlinde, E

    2000-09-01

    Leucovorin modulates the cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the treatment of cancer. 24-hour infusion of 5-FU has been shown to enhance antitumor activity in colorectal cancer compared to bolus infusion. According to experimental data cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen may enhance the effectiveness of leucovorin and 5-FU. A phase II trial was initiated to evaluate the effect of a combination of low-dose cyclophosphamide (C), leucovorin (L), 5-FU (F) and tamoxifen (T) (CLFT) in advanced pancreatic cancer. Fifty patients were treated monthly with 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide and weekly with 500 mg/m2 leucovorin followed by a 24-hour infusion of 2000 mg/m2 5-FU and tamoxifen 20 mg bid. Three patients had a partial response (6%), two a minor response (4%) and 32 (64%) no change of disease. The median survival time was 8.5 months for all patients, the median time to progression of disease was 4.6 months and the 1-year survival rate was 28%. CLFT was fairly well tolerated. These data suggest that biochemical modulation of 24-hour infusional 5-FU with leucovorin together with cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen has some positive effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:11144522

  6. A low-loss linear analog phase modulator for 8415 MHz transponder application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N.

    1989-01-01

    A breadboard single-section low-loss analog phase modulator with good thermal stability for a spacecraft transponder application has been analyzed, fabricated, and evaluated. A linear phase shift of 70 degrees with a linearity tolerance of plus or minus 7 percent was measured for this modulator from 8257 to 8634 MHz over the temperature range -20 C to 75 C. The measured insertion loss and the static delay variation with temperature were within 2 plus or minus 0.3 dB and 0.16 ps/C, respectively. Four sections will be cascaded to provide the X-band (8415 MHz) phase modulator. The generic modulator design can also be utilized at 7950 to 8075 MHz followed by X4 multiplication to provide modulation of a Ka-band downlink signal.

  7. Dynamics of phase slips in systems with time-periodic modulation.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Punit; Knobloch, Edgar; Beaume, Cédric

    2015-12-01

    The Adler equation with time-periodic frequency modulation is studied. A series of resonances between the period of the frequency modulation and the time scale for the generation of a phase slip is identified. The resulting parameter space structure is determined using a combination of numerical continuation, time simulations, and asymptotic methods. Regions with an integer number of phase slips per period are separated by regions with noninteger numbers of phase slips and include canard trajectories that drift along unstable equilibria. Both high- and low-frequency modulation is considered. An adiabatic description of the low-frequency modulation regime is found to be accurate over a large range of modulation periods. PMID:26764781

  8. Electrical power inverter having a phase modulated, twin-inverter, high frequency link and an energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Pitel, I.J.

    1987-02-03

    The present invention provides an electrical power inverter method and apparatus, which includes a high frequency link, for converting DC power into AC power. Generally stated, the apparatus includes a first high frequency module which produces an AC voltage at a first output frequency, and a second high frequency inverter module which produces an AC voltage at a second output frequency that is substantially the same as the first output frequency. The second AC voltage is out of phase with the first AC voltage by a selected angular phase displacement. A mixer mixes the first and second output voltages to produce a high frequency carrier which has a selected base frequency impressed on the sidebands thereof. A rectifier rectifies the carrier, and a filter filters the rectified carrier. An output inverter inverts the filtered carrier to produce an AC line voltage at the selected base frequency. A phase modulator adjusts the relative angular phase displacement between the outputs of the first and second high frequency modules to control the base frequency and magnitude of the AC line voltage. 19 figs.

  9. Electrical power inverter having a phase modulated, twin-inverter, high frequency link and an energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Pitel, Ira J.

    1987-02-03

    The present invention provides an electrical power inverter method and apparatus, which includes a high frequency link, for converting DC power into AC power. Generally stated, the apparatus includes a first high frequency module which produces an AC voltage at a first output frequency, and a second high frequency inverter module which produces an AC voltage at a second output frequency that is substantially the same as the first output frequency. The second AC voltage is out of phase with the first AC voltage by a selected angular phase displacement. A mixer mixes the first and second output voltages to produce a high frequency carrier which has a selected base frequency impressed on the sidebands thereof. A rectifier rectifies the carrier, and a filter filters the rectified carrier. An output inverter inverts the filtered carrier to produce an AC line voltage at the selected base frequency. A phase modulator adjusts the relative angular phase displacement between the outputs of the first and second high frequency modules to control the base frequency and magnitude of the AC line voltage.

  10. Effect of frequency-modulation coherence for inharmonic stimuli: frequency-modulation phase discrimination and identification of artificial double vowels.

    PubMed

    Lyzenga, Johannes; Moore, Brian C J

    2005-03-01

    The ability to compare patterns of frequency modulation (FM) in separate frequency regions was explored. In experiment 1, listeners had to distinguish whether the FM applied to two nonharmonically related sinusoidal carriers was in phase or out of phase. The FM rate was the same for each carrier. The starting phase of the modulation was randomized for each stimulus in a three alternative, forced-choice (3AFC) trial. Subjects were sensitive to relative FM phase for modulation rates of 2 and 4 Hz, but not for higher rates. In experiment 2, vowel identification was compared for artificial single and double vowels. The vowels were constructed from complex tones with components spaced at 2-ERB(N) (equivalent rectangular bandwidth) intervals, by increasing the levels of three components by 15 dB, to create three "formants." In the double vowels, the components of the two vowels were interleaved, to give 1-ERB(N) spacing. The three "formant" components were frequency modulated at 2, 4, or 8 Hz, with either the same or different rates for the two vowels. The identification of double vowels was not improved by a difference in FM rate across vowels, suggesting that differences in FM rate do not support perceptual segregation of inharmonic stimuli. PMID:15807020

  11. Spectral and temporal properties of optical signals with multiple sinusoidal phase modulations.

    PubMed

    Dorrer, C

    2014-02-10

    Optical signals generated by multiple sinusoidal temporal phase modulations (multi-FMs) applied to a monochromatic field are studied from the viewpoint of their optical spectrum and temporal modulations arising from spectral impairments. Statistical analysis based on the central limit theorem shows that the signals' optical spectrum converges to a normal distribution as the number of modulations increases, allowing one to predict the frequency range containing a given fraction of the total energy with the associated cumulative density function. The conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation is analyzed and simulated for arbitrary multi-FM signals. These developments are of theoretical and practical importance for high-energy laser systems, where optical pulses are phase modulated in the front end to smooth out the on-target beam profile and prevent potentially catastrophic damage to optical components. PMID:24663283

  12. Pseudo-random binary sequence phase modulation for narrow linewidth, kilowatt, monolithic fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Flores, Angel; Robin, Craig; Lanari, Ann; Dajani, Iyad

    2014-07-28

    We report on pseudo random binary sequence (PRBS) phase modulation for narrow-linewidth, kilowatt-class, monolithic (all-fiber) amplifiers. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) threshold enhancement factors for different patterns of PRBS modulated fiber amplifiers were experimentally analyzed and agreed well with the theoretical predictions. We also examined seeding of the SBS process by phase modulated signals when the effective linewidth is on the same order as the Brillouin shift frequency. Here ~30% variations in SBS power thresholds were observed from small tunings of the modulation frequency. In addition, a 3 GHz PRBS modulated, 1.17 kW fiber amplifier was demonstrated. Near diffraction-limited beam quality was achieved (M2 = 1.2) with an optical pump efficiency of 83%. Overall, the improved SBS suppression and narrow linewidth achieved through PRBS modulation can have a significant impact on the beam combining of kilowatt class fiber lasers. PMID:25089393

  13. The Implications of Encoder/Modulator/ Phased Array Designs for Future Broadband LEO Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderaar, Mark; Jensen, Chris A.; Terry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the effects of modulation and channel coding on the design of wide angle scan, broadband, phased army antennas. In the paper we perform several trade studies. First, we investigate the amplifier back-off requirement as a function of variability of modulation envelope. Specifically, we contrast constant and non-constant envelope modulations, as well as single and multiple carrier schemes. Additionally, we address the issues an(f concerns of using pulse shaping filters with the above modulation types. Second, we quantify the effects of beam steering on the quality of data, recovery using selected modulation techniques. In particular, we show that the frequency response of the array introduces intersymbol interference for broadband signals and that the mode of operation for the beam steering controller may introduce additional burst or random errors. Finally, we show that the encoder/modulator design must be performed in conjunction with the phased array antenna design.

  14. Phase-Modulated Hierarchical Surface Structures by Interfering Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2006-01-01

    A high-energy laser interference direct modulation technique is proposed to develop surfaces for energy-efficient performance based on microstructure and physical parameter control. By producing the surface features or particles at the nano to micron scale in an orderly and/or parallel manner with a lateral long-range order, the surfaces can be configured for highly improved surface response for a host of properties, including wear and friction. Laser interference direct modulation can lead to an optimized composite of metallurgical (localized alloyed or composite regions) and topographic textures. The technique is rapid prototyping, low cost and one-step method that can be well-integrated into existing production lines without the need for any special atmosphere. It is usable for complex geometries of the components and the surface can be modulated for nano-micro scale features on large areas. The present paper describes the principle behind the laser interference technique configured for surface modulation and provides the definitions of surface structures (features) evolved. Some examples of laser-based surface modulation of materials systems are presented.

  15. Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine and Tanespimycin (17AAG) in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: A Mayo Clinic Phase II Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Katrina S.; Kim, George P.; Foster, Nathan R.; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Erlichman, Charles; McWilliams, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that stabilizes many oncogenic proteins. HSP90 inhibitors may sensitize tumors to cytotoxic agents by causing client protein degradation. Gemcitabine, which has modest activity in pancreas cancer, activates Chk1, a client protein of HSP90. This phase II trial was designed to determine whether 17AAG could enhance the clinical activity of gemcitabine through degradation of Chk1 in patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer. Methods A multicenter, prospective study combining gemcitabine and 17AAG enrolled patients with stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma, adequate liver and kidney function, ECOG performance status 0-2, and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The primary goal was to achieve a 60% overall survival at six months. Sixty-six patients were planned for accrual, with an interim analysis after 25 patients enrolled. Results: After a futility analysis to achieve the endpoint, accrual was halted with 21 patients enrolled. No complete or partial responses were seen. 40% of patients were alive at 6 months. Median overall survival was 5.4 months. Tolerability was moderate, with 65% of patients having ≥ grade 3 adverse events (AE), and 15% having grade 4 events. Conclusions The lack of clinical activity suggests that targeting Chk1 by inhibiting HSP90 is not important in pancreatic cancer sensitivity to gemcitabine alone. Further studies of HSP90 targeted agents with gemcitabine alone are not warranted. PMID:25952464

  16. Fast nanoscale heat-flux modulation with phase-change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zwol, P. J.; Joulain, K.; Ben Abdallah, P.; Greffet, J. J.; Chevrier, J.

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a concept for electrically controlled heat-flux modulation. A flux contrast larger than 10 dB is expected with switching time on the order of tens of nanoseconds. Heat-flux modulation is based on the interplay between radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale and phase-change materials. Such large contrasts are not obtainable in solids, or in far field. As such, this opens up new horizons for temperature modulation and actuation at the nanoscale.

  17. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  18. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  19. Cross-phase modulational instability in an elliptical birefringent fiber with higher order nonlinearity and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Kuriakose, V. C.

    2002-04-01

    We obtain conditions for the occurrence of cross-phase modulational instability in the normal dispersion regime for the coupled higher order nonlinear Schrödinger equation with higher order dispersion and nonlinear terms.

  20. Observation of relativistic cross-phase modulation in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Rever, M; Zhang, P; Theobald, W; Umstadter, D

    2006-10-01

    A nonlinear optical phenomenon, relativistic cross-phase modulation, is reported. A relativistically intense light beam (I = 1.3 x 10(18) W cm(-2), lambda = 1.05 microm) is experimentally observed to cause phase modulation of a lower intensity, copropagating light beam in a plasma. The latter beam is generated when the former undergoes the stimulated Raman forward scattering instability. The bandwidth of the Raman satellite is found to be broadened from 3.8-100 nm when the pump laser power is increased from 0.45-2.4 TW. A signature of relativistic cross-phase modulation, namely, asymmetric spectral broadening of the Raman signal, is observed at a pump power of 2.4 TW. The experimental cross-phase modulated spectra compared well with theoretical calculations. Applications to generation of high-power single-cycle pulses are also discussed. PMID:17155181

  1. Computer-generated phase-modulated full parallax holographic stereograms without conjugate images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chuang; Yan, Xingpeng; Jiang, Xiaoyu

    2014-10-01

    A pure phase-modulated computer-generated hologram (CGH) method is presented to generate a full parallax holographic stereogram. The holographic stereogram plane is divided into several two-dimensional holographic elements (hogels). The spectra of the hogels are rendered from multiview full parallax images of three-dimensional (3-D) objects. The phase-modulated hogel is calculated by iterative Fourier transform algorithms to improve diffraction efficiency and eliminate conjugate images. A gray calibration technique is introduced to generate the accurate intensity modulation of pure phase hogels. The holographic stereogram that we proposed is reconstructed by an optical system based on a phase only spatial light modulator. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can successfully reconstruct parallax images of 3-D objects.

  2. Unlimited-bandwidth distributed optical phase modulators and detectors: Design and fabrication issues

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Armendariz, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    Practical and theoretical limits on the bandwidth of distributed optical phase modulators and traveling-wave photodetectors are given. For the case of perfect velocity matching, RF transmission losses are the main performance-limiting factor. However, some high-performance modulators require highly-capacitive transmission lines making proper slow-wave operation difficult to achieve.

  3. Phase modulation for reduced vibration sensitivity in laser-cooled clocks in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W.; Dick, G.; Jefferts, S.; Walls, F.

    2001-01-01

    The standard interrogation technique in atomic beam clocks is square-wave frequency modulation (SWFM), which suffers a first order sensitivity to vibrations as changes in the transit time of the atoms translates to perceived frequency errors. Square-wave phase modulation (SWPM) interrogation eliminates sensitivity to this noise.

  4. Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.K.

    1987-09-01

    The major justification for examining ultrafiltration was to lower the viscosity of the Kraft Black Liquor by recovering it as an ultrafiltration permeate from which the highest MW lignin had been removed. The liquor could then be concentrated to a higher percentage solids before firing into the recovery boiler. Consequent energy savings for the 1000 ton/day pulp mill would be 2.05 x 10 Btu/y for each percentage increase in TDS (total dissolved solids) to the recovery boiler. This Phase II report gives data on viscosity with percentage solids of KBL permeates. Another favorable effect of ultrafiltration on the permeate properties is disproportionate removal of multivalent ions including the major scaling ion CaS . If this high-viscosity high-Ca retentate could be treated to lower its viscosity and to release the Ca in a non-scaling form, this would enhance the possibility that ultrafiltration might be useful in a mill situation. Included in this report are data on the results of treating the retentate fraction. Other justifications for this program included further information in KBL properties: lignin MW in the KBL at high pH; elemental and sugar analyses; and differential properties of lignins in the retentate and the permeate fractions. A preliminary economic analysis of ultrafiltration is contained in this report. These analyses indicate that with flux rates now attainable, ultrafiltration would not be economically justified at this time if the only justification is to lower KBL viscosity. For certain situations where high Ca liquors present a scaling problem, especially in an evaporator-limited mill, the economics are more favorable. There are also unsolved problems relating to the use of the high viscosity retentate.

  5. A phase II study of axitinib in advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, J R; Cives, M; Hwang, J; Weber, T; Nickerson, M; Atreya, C E; Venook, A; Kelley, R K; Valone, T; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Bergsland, E K

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascular neoplasms overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Axitinib is a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, currently approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. We performed an open-label, two-stage design, phase II trial of axitinib 5 mg twice daily in patients with progressive unresectable/metastatic low-to-intermediate grade carcinoid tumors. The primary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and 12-month PFS rate. The secondary end points included time to treatment failure (TTF), overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), biochemical response rate and safety. A total of 30 patients were enrolled and assessable for toxicity; 22 patients were assessable for response. After a median follow-up of 29 months, we observed a median PFS of 26.7 months (95% CI, 11.4–35.1), with a 12-month PFS rate of 74.5% (±10.2). The median OS was 45.3 months (95% CI, 24.4–45.3), and the median TTF was 9.6 months (95% CI, 5.5–12). The best radiographic response was partial response (PR) in 1/30 (3%) and stable disease (SD) in 21/30 patients (70%); 8/30 patients (27%) were unevaluable due to early withdrawal due to toxicity. Hypertension was the most common toxicity that developed in 27 patients (90%). Grade 3/4 hypertension was recorded in 19 patients (63%), leading to treatment discontinuation in six patients (20%). Although axitinib appears to have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth in patients with advanced, progressive carcinoid tumors, the high rate of grade 3/4 hypertension may represent a potential impediment to its use in unselected patients. PMID:27080472

  6. Research and Applications Modules (RAM), phase B study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The research and applications modules (RAM) system is discussed. The RAM is a family of payload carrier modules that can be delivered to and retrieved from earth orbit by the space shuttle. The RAM's capability for implementing a wide range of manned and man-tended missions is described. The rams have evolved into three types; (1) pressurized RAMs, (2) unpressurized RAMs, and (3) pressurizable free-flying RAMs. A reference experiment plan for use as a baseline in the derivation and planning of the RAM project is reported. The plan describes the number and frequency of shuttle flights dedicated to RAM missions and the RAM payloads for the identified flights.

  7. Topical glucocorticosteroids modulate the expression of CRABP I and II in human skin differently.

    PubMed

    Piletta, P; Jaconi, S; Siegenthaler, G; Didierjean, L; Saurat, J H

    1994-02-01

    Epidermal cells express two retinotic acid-binding proteins (CRABP I and II). Because CRABP II protein is strongly induced by topical retinoic acid, the respective roles of the two proteins in the pharmacological activity and toxicity of topical retinoids deserve particular attention. Since topical steroids diminish the irritation induced by retinoic acid (RA), whereas retinoic acid may counteract the atrophogenic effects of steroids, the possible interplay of both compounds in the expression of CRABP I and II appeared worth studying. We have analyzed the effects of topical application of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) on the retinoic acid-induced altered expression of CRABP I and II in normal human skin, at the protein and mRNA levels. We found that CRABP II protein and mRNA were strongly increased upon retinoic acid application: this induction was significantly inhibited by concomitant application of triamcinolone acetonide; a more potent steroid, difluocortolone valerate, was also found to diminish normal endogenous expression of CRABP II. In contrast, CRABP I protein was decreased by topical retinoic acid, and the down modulating effect of retinoic acid was counteracted by triamcinolone acetonide. PMID:8061932

  8. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  9. Extracting the differential phase in dual atom interferometers by modulating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhong, Jia-Qi; Chen, Xi; Li, Run-Bing; Li, Da-Wei; Zhu, Lei; Song, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    We present a new scheme for measuring the differential phase in dual atom interferometers. The magnetic field is modulated in one interferometer, and the differential phase can be extracted without measuring the amplitude of the magnetic field by combining the ellipse and linear fitting methods. The gravity gradient measurements are discussed based on dual atom interferometers. Numerical simulation shows that the systematic error of the differential phase measurement is largely decreased when the duration of the magnetic field is symmetrically modulated. This combined fitting scheme has a high accuracy for measuring an arbitrary differential phase in dual atom interferometers.

  10. Topological Quantum Phase Transitions in a Majorana Chain with Spatial Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takumi; Totsuka, Keisuke

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the quantum phase transitions and the stability of Majorana zero modes in a generalized Kitaev model in one dimension when the chemical potential is periodically modulating in space. By using the exact diagonalization method for open boundary condition, we investigate the ground-state phases in terms of the non-local properties such as the entanglement spectrum (ES) and the string correlation functions. When we vary the phase of the modulation, the number of the Majorana zero modes changes, which manifests itself in the degeneracy of the lowest level of the ES. Next, we study the quantum phase transitions driven by the change in the amplitude of the modulation. In particular, for certain values of the wave number and the phase of the modulation, we observe a quantum phase transition from one topological phase into another where the string correlation function oscillates in space. We also show a case where the degeneracy of the ES does not change even for large enough amplitude of the modulation. Finally, we characterize the phases of the system with periodic boundary condition by the topological invariant, which reflects the number of the zero-energy excitations.

  11. Photoassociation dynamics driven by second- and third-order phase-modulated laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Chen, Mao-Du; Hu, Xue-Jin; Li, Jing-Lun; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2016-05-01

    We investigate theoretically the photoassociation dynamics of ultracold 85Rb atoms driven by second- and third-order phase-modulated laser fields. The interplay between the second-order and third-order terms of the phase-modulated pulse has an obvious influence on photoassociation dynamics. The different combinations of the second-order and third-order phase coefficients lead to different pulse shapes. Most of the molecular population in the excited electronic state driven only by the third-order phase pulses can be distributed in a single vibrational level. The second-order term of the phase-modulated pulse can change the instantaneous frequency, and therefore the final population is distributed on several resonant vibrational levels, instead of concentrating on a single level. Although the second- and third-order phase-modulated pulse covers more resonant vibrational levels, the total population on the resonant vibrational levels is much smaller than that controlled only by the third-order phase pulse. In particular, the third-order term of the phase-modulated pulse can weaken the ‘multiple interaction’ to some degree.

  12. Phase-field modeling of submonolayer growth with the modulated nucleation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. L.; Xing, H.; Chen, C. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Jin, K. X.

    2015-10-01

    In this letter, we perform the phase-field simulations to investigate nucleation regime of submonolayer growth via a quantified nucleation term. Results show that the nucleation related kinetic coefficients have changed the density of islands and critical sizes to modulate the nucleation regime. The scaling behavior of the island density can be agreed with the classical theory only when effects of modulations have been quantified. We expect to produce the quantitative descriptions of nucleation for submonolayer growth in phase-field models.

  13. Self-phase modulation of femtosecond pulses in hollow photonic-crystal fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Bugar, I; Chorvat, D J; Beloglazov, V I; Skibina, N B; Shcherbakov, Andrei V; Chorvat, D; Mel'nikov, L A

    2004-01-31

    Self-phase modulation of femtosecond laser pulses in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres is experimentally studied. Photonic-crystal fibres allowing single-mode waveguide regimes of nonlinear-optical interactions to be implemented with maximum transmission for 800-nm femtosecond pulses are designed and fabricated. A radical enhancement of self-phase modulation is demonstrated for submicrojoule femtosecond pulses of Ti:sapphire-laser radiation propagating through hollow photonic-crystal fibres. (optical fibres)

  14. Spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and phase-only spatial light modulator for constructing arbitrary complex fields.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Atsushi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Masanori; Tomita, Akihisa

    2014-02-24

    We propose a spatial cross modulation method using a random diffuser and a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM), by which arbitrary complex-amplitude fields can be generated with higher spatial resolution and diffraction efficiency than off-axis and double-phase computer-generated holograms. Our method encodes the original complex object as a phase-only diffusion image by scattering the complex object using a random diffuser. In addition, all incoming light to the SLM is consumed for a single diffraction order, making a diffraction efficiency of more than 90% possible. This method can be applied for holographic data storage, three-dimensional displays, and other such applications. PMID:24663718

  15. Phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator is introduced. A close-loop phase retrieval method based on Eigen functions of Laplacian is proposed, and its accuracy and efficiency are analyzed through numerical experiments of atmospheric phase retrieval. The results show that the close-loop phase retrieval method has a high accuracy. Moreover, it is stable regardless of modal cross coupling.

  16. Correlation with a spatial light modulator having phase and amplitude cross coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    In correlation filtering a spatial light modulators is traditionally modeled as affecting only the phase or only the amplitude of light. Usually, however, a single operating parameter affects both phase and amplitude. An integral constraint is developed that is a necessary condition for optimizing a correlation filter having single parameter coupling between phase and amplitude. The phase-only filter is shown to be a special case.

  17. MMIC linear-phase and digital modulators for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Ali, Fazal

    1991-01-01

    The design concepts, analyses, and development of GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) linear-phase and digital modulators for the next generation of space-borne communications systems are summarized. The design approach uses a compact lumped element quadrature hybrid and Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFET)-varactors to provide low loss and well-controlled phase performance for deep space transponder (DST) applications. The measured results of the MESFET-diode show a capacitance range of 2:1 under reverse bias, and a Q of 38 at 10 GHz. Three cascaded sections of hybrid-coupled reflection phase shifters were modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band (8415 +/- 50 MHz) DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation. The modulator will accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry and ranging data, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 8 +/- 0.5 dB. The MMIC digital modulator is designed to provide greater than 10 Mb/s of bi-phase modulation at X-band.

  18. Large space telescope, phase A. Volume 5: Support systems module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of the support systems module for the Large Space Telescope are discussed. The following systems and described: (1) thermal control, (2) electrical, (3) communication and data landing, (4) attitude control system, and (5) structural features. Analyses of maintainability and reliability considerations are included.

  19. A surface-plasmon resonance phase modulation bio-reaction detection system with (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Hung; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Hsu, I.-Hung; Tseng, Eddie; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2007-12-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a very important metrology in biology detection. Phase modulation is one of the SPR detection technologies and the sample changes can be recognized from the phase variation. It is able to detect very tiny bio sample variation due to its high sensitivity. In this study, the optical system design based on a paraboloidal lens-based surface plasmon resonance instrument will be used to control the SPR critical angle. The charge coupled device camera (CCD camera) will be used to record the images of the bio-reaction and (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm will be adopted to retrieve the phase fringes of the whole spot from the intensity maps. The combination of the angle control SPR system and the (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm will expand the whole spot detection ability from the intensity to phase modulation because the intensity maps are going to be recorded for the (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm calculation. The difference between (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm and Five-Step Algorithm1 is that (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm only needs one image map at one time during the bio reaction and Five-Step Algorithm requires five image maps. Therefore, (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm will reduce the process of experiment and the requirement of the memory. The different concentration alcohols were measured by the optical system to verify the (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm applied in SPR phase modulation measurement and to prove the idea is workable and successful.

  20. A new balanced modulation code for a phase-image-based holographic data storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Renu; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2005-08-01

    We propose a new balanced modulation code for coding data pages for phase-image-based holographic data storage systems. The new code addresses the coding subtleties associated with phase-based systems while performing a content-based search in a holographic database. The new code, which is a balanced modulation code, is a modification of the existing 8:12 modulation code, and removes the false hits that occur in phase-based content-addressable systems due to phase-pixel subtractions. We demonstrate the better performance of the new code using simulations and experiments in terms of discrimination ratio while content addressing through a holographic memory. The new code is compared with the conventional coding scheme to analyse the false hits due to subtraction of phase pixels.

  1. Yakima Fish Passage : Phase II : Fish Screen Construction.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    2003-03-01

    Accomplishments in 2001--2002 were spotty and limited due primarily to right-of-way problems at several sites and unanticipated changes in scope at some sites. Changes in BPA funding procedures have also impacted our ability to accomplish previously scheduled work. The following is a brief summary of work accomplished and scheduled at the remaining Phase II sites. (1) Selah-Moxee Fish Screen--Construction at this site was started in October 2001 and was completed in March 2002. We have settled the contractor claims and have closed out the construction contract. The O&M Agreement with the irrigation district was also completed in 2002. Work remains to complete the Designer's Operating Criteria. (2) Scott Fish Screen--Considerable effort was spent in 2001 and 2002 to try to resolve right-of-way issues at this site. However, these problems proved to be insurmountable, and this site has been dropped from the Phase n Program. The only thing remaining on Scott (as far as the Phase n program is concerned) is to prepare a brief wrap-up report to send to all interested parties to summarize what has been done and to explain the status of the diversion from a fish passage standpoint. (3) Packwood Fish Screen--Designs and specifications for the civil works were completed for this screen in 2002. The screen, screen cleaner, and other metal work have already been fabricated by WDFW Screen Shop. Award of a construction contract was scheduled for September 2002. The BP A lands staff has experienced significant delays in obtaining an easement from the state of Washington for a piece of the John Wayne Trail right-of-way currently occupied by the existing screen. As a result, the construction contract has been rescheduled for award in the fall of 2003. We are ready to proceed with construction if BP A can obtain the necessary easements by May 2003. (4) Fogarty Fish Screen--We opened bids on this site in August, 2002. There was only one responsive bidder and the bid was nearly double

  2. Structural mechanisms of the Ih–II and II → Ic transitions between the crystalline phases of aqueous ice

    SciTech Connect

    Zheligovskaya, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    Structural mechanisms are proposed for experimentally observed phase transitions between crystalline modifications of aqueous ice, Ih and II, as well as II and Ic. It is known that the Ih–II transition occurs with the conservation of large structural units (hexagonal channels) common for these ices. It is shown that the Ih → II transition may occur with the conservation of 5/6 of all hydrogen bonds in crystal, including all hydrogen bonds in the retained channels (3/4 of the total number of bonds in crystal) and 1/3 of the bonds between these channels (1/12 of the total number). The transformation of other hydrogen bonds between the retained channels leads to the occurrence of proton order in ice II. A structural mechanism is proposed to explain the transformation of single crystals of ice Ih either into single crystals of ice II or into crystalline twins of ice II with c axes rotated by 180° with respect to each other, which is often observed at the Ih → II transition. It is established that up to 7/12 of all hydrogen bonds are retained at the irreversible cooperative II → Ic transition.

  3. Designing a series of decision-theoretic phase II trials in a small population.

    PubMed

    Hee, Siew Wan; Stallard, Nigel

    2012-12-30

    This paper introduces a decision-theoretic design for a series of phase II trials. Instead of designing phase II trials individually, we proposed a development plan that consists of a series of phase II trials and one phase III trial such that the long-term expected utility on the whole is optimized. The phase II trials are conducted sequentially, and patients are recruited sequentially to each phase II trial. At each interim stage, a decision is made to continue recruiting patients to the current trial, to stop and recommend the treatment proceeds to a phase III trial, to stop and initiate a new phase II trial or to stop and cease the development plan. The methodology uses a hybrid approach in which it is assumed that the data from the final phase III trial will be analysed using a classical frequentist hypothesis test. The expected power of this test based on some specified prior distribution for the effect of the experimental treatment is then used in a utility function, which is used to obtain the optimal design for the whole series of trials. PMID:22927289

  4. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters. PMID:27178907

  5. Photonic generation of arbitrarily phase-modulated microwave signals based on a single DDMZM.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Wen Ting; Sun, Wen Hui; Wang, Li Xian; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a compact and cost-effective photonic approach to generate arbitrarily phase-modulated microwave signals using a conventional dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DDMZM). One arm (arm1) of the DDMZM is driven by a sinusoidal microwave signal whose power is optimized to suppress the optical carrier, while the other arm (arm2) of the DDMZM is driven by a coding signal. In this way, the phase-modulated optical carrier from the arm2 and the sidebands from the arm1 are combined together at the output of the DDMZM. Binary phase-coded microwave pulses which are free from the baseband frequency components can be generated when the coding signal is a three-level signal. In this case, the precise π phase shift of the microwave signal is independent of the amplitude of the coding signal. Moreover, arbitrarily phase-modulated microwave signals can be generated when an optical bandpass filter is attached after the DDMZM to achieve optical single-sideband modulation. The proposed approach is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. The binary phase-coded microwave pulses, quaternary phase-coded microwave signal, and linearly frequency-chirped microwave signal are experimentally generated. The simulated and the experimental results agree very well with each other. PMID:24718119

  6. Emerging technologies and approaches to minimize discharges into Lake Michigan, phase 2 module 4 report.

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M.C.; Gillenwater, P.; Urgun-Demirtas, M.; Nnanna, G.; Yu, J.; Jannotta, I,

    2012-04-19

    The Great Lakes Initiative (GLI) established the new water quality-based discharge criteria for mercury (Hg), thereby increasing the need for many municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants in the region to lower the mercury in their effluents. Information on deployable technologies to satisfy these requirements for industrial and municipal dischargers in the Great lakes region is scarce. Therefore, BP funded Purdue University Calumet and Argonne to identify deployable Hg removal technologies to meet the GLI discharge criterion at its Whiting Refinery in Indiana. The joint PUC/Argonne project was divided into 2 phases. Results from Phase I and Phase II Modules 1-3 have been previously reported. This report summarizes the work done in Phase 3 Module 4, which consisted of the pilot scale testing of Hg removal technologies previously selected in Module 3. The pilot testing was an Argonne/PUC jointly directed project that was hosted at and funded by the BP refinery in Whiting, IN. As two organizations were involved in data analysis and interpretation, this report combines two independent sets of evaluations of the testing that was done, prepared respectively by Argonne and Purdue. Each organization retains sole responsibility for its respective analysis conclusions and recommendations. Based on Module 3 bench testing with pre-Effluent To Lake (pre-ETL) and clarifier effluent (CE) samples from the Whiting refinery, three different technologies were chosen for pilot testing: (1) Ultrafiltration (using GE ZeeWeed(reg sign) Technology, 0.04 {mu}m pore size and made up of PVDF) for particulate mercury removal; (2) Adsorption using Mersorb(reg sign) LW, a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon, for dissolved mercury removal if present and (3) The Blue PRO(reg sign) reactive filtration process for both particulate and dissolved (if present) mercury removal. The ultrafiltration and the Blue PRO(reg sign) reactive filtration pilot studies were done simultaneously at the

  7. Phase-amplitude crosstalk in intensity modulated near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, K.; Wickramasinghe, Y.

    2000-05-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instruments that rely on phase sensitive detection suffer from what is called "phase-amplitude crosstalk," i.e., the phase measured is dependent on the average light intensity entering the detector. Changes in detector rise time with input light intensity is the accepted explanation of this phenomenon. It is concluded here that an additional simple mechanism can cause phase-amplitude errors, particularly if the ratio of the ac component of the detected signal to the dc component is low. It is shown that the form of the phase distortion encountered during the development of a new phase sensitive NIR instrument can be modeled by assuming the presence of a synchronous interfering signal, due to rf coupling, at the detector output. This modeling allows a required margin between the detected signal of interest, i.e., the signal from the tissue and the interfering signal to be set in order to achieve a measured phase accuracy necessary to derive sufficiently accurate clinical parameters.

  8. On linear structure and phase rotation invariant properties of block M-PSK modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, Tadao; Takata, Toyoo; Fujiwara, Toru; Lin, Shu

    1991-01-01

    Two important structural properties of block M(=2')-ary PSK modulation codes, linear structure and phase symmetry, are investigated. An M-ary modulation code is first represented as a code with symbols from the integer group S(MPSK) = (0,1,2,...M-1) under modulo-M addition. Then the linear structure of block MPSK modulation codes over S(M-PSK) with respect to modulo-M vector addition is defined, and conditions are derived under which a block MPSK modulation code is linear. Once the linear structure is developed, the phase symmetry of block M-PSK modulation codes is studied. In particular, a necessary and sufficient condition for a block MPSK modulation code that is linear as a binary code to be invariant under 2 h 180 deg/M phase rotation (for h = 1 to l) is derived. Finally, a list of short 8PSK and 16PSK modulation codes is given, together with their linear structure and the smallest phase rotation for which a code is invariant.

  9. Transformable optical dipole trap using a phase-modulated standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Jae Jin; Cho, D.

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate a new type of a cavity-enhanced optical trap whose standing-wave potential well can be transformed by using phase modulation. When the modulation frequency is matched to the free spectral range of the cavity, the potential well can be changed continuously from a corrugated form of a standing wave to a flattened form of a traveling wave depending on the modulation index. With the phase modulation, more atoms are trapped due to the increase in the trap volume, and there is a pronounced increase by a factor of 1.9 when an optimal modulation is applied. From the increase in number of trapped atoms we also infer that the temperature associated with longitudinal motion is strongly affected by the transformation of the potential well. This technique can be used to study collective behavior of trapped atoms and to manipulate atomic distribution for quantum information processing.

  10. Neural Networks For Demodulation Of Phase-Modulated Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altes, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Hopfield neural networks proposed for demodulating quadrature phase-shift-keyed (QPSK) signals carrying digital information. Networks solve nonlinear integral equations prior demodulation circuits cannot solve. Consists of set of N operational amplifiers connected in parallel, with weighted feedback from output terminal of each amplifier to input terminals of other amplifiers. Used to solve signal processing problems. Implemented as analog very-large-scale integrated circuit that achieves rapid convergence. Alternatively, implemented as digital simulation of such circuit. Also used to improve phase estimation performance over that of phase-locked loop.

  11. Phase-sensitive frequency conversion of quadrature modulated signals.

    PubMed

    Webb, R P; Power, M; Manning, R J

    2013-05-20

    Two mechanisms that can make frequency conversion based on nonlinear mixing dependent on the phase of the input signal are identified. A novel phase-to-polarization converter that converts the orthogonal phase components of an input signal to two orthogonally polarized outputs is proposed. The operation of this scheme and a previously reported scheme at an increased symbol rate are simulated with semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) as the nonlinear devices. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of SOAs for nonlinear mixing over a wide range of wavelengths and difference frequencies and confirm the accuracy of the numerical model. PMID:23736490

  12. Transparent building-integrated PV modules. Phase 1: Comprehensive report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-28

    This Comprehensive Report encompasses the activities that have been undertaken by Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with Energy Photovoltaics, Incorporated (EPV), to develop a flexible patterning system for thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules for building applications. There are two basic methods for increasing transparency/light transmission by means of patterning the PV film: widening existing scribe lines, or scribing a second series of lines perpendicular to the first. These methods can yield essentially any degree of light transmission, but both result in visible patterns of light and dark on the panel surface. A third proposed method is to burn a grid of dots through the films, independent of the normal cell scribing. This method has the potential to produce a light-transmitting panel with no visible pattern. Ornamental patterns at larger scales can be created using combinations of these techniques. Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with EPV are currently developing a complementary process for the large-scale lamination of thin-film PVs, which enables building integrated (BIPV) modules to be produced in sizes up to 48 in. x 96 in. Flexible laser patterning will be used for three main purposes, all intended to broaden the appeal of the product to the building sector: To create semitransparent thin-film modules for skylights, and in some applications, for vision glazing.; to create patterns for ornamental effects. This application is similar to fritted glass, which is used for shading, visual screening, graphics, and other purposes; and to allow BIPV modules to be fabricated in various sizes and shapes with maximum control over electrical characteristics.

  13. All-optical logic gates based on cross phase modulation effect in a phase-shifted grating.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiliang; Song, Junfeng; Chen, Xin; Bi, Meihua; Hu, Miao; Li, Shuqin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we perform a theoretical study of the all-optical logic gates based on the techniques of cross phase modulation (XPM) in a phase-shifted grating. Here the pumps are used to control the switching of a weak continuous wave (cw). In order to understand the transferring process of the information from the pump light to the cw light, we first study the switching characteristic of the device. Then, by changing the combination between two pumps, in a fiber grating with zero phase shift we have realized NOT, AND, and NAND gates, and in a phase-shifted grating with the phase shift π, the other various logic operations can be realized such as NAND gates and OR gates; when selecting Δφ=3/2π, we can realize XOR gates and XNOR gates. Thus the change of the phase shift of the phase-shifted grating will yield various logic gates. PMID:27607262

  14. Metabolism of methandrostenolone in the horse: a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric investigation of phase I and phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A R; Ridley, D D; Suann, C J

    2001-12-01

    The phase I and phase II metabolism of the anabolic steroid methandrostenolone was investigated following oral administration to a standardbred gelding. In the phase I study, metabolites were isolated from the urine by solid-phase extraction, deconjugated by acid catalysed methanolysis and converted to their O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl derivatives. GC-MS analysis indicated the major metabolic processes to be sequential reduction of the A-ring and hydroxylation at C6 and C16. In the phase II study, unconjugated, beta-glucuronidated and sulfated metabolites were fractionated and deconjugated using a combination of liquid-liquid extraction, enzyme hydrolysis, solid-phase extraction and acid catalysed methanolysis. Derivatization followed by GC-MS analysis revealed extensive conjugation to both glucuronic and sulfuric acids, with only a small proportion of metabolites occurring in unconjugated form. PMID:11817312

  15. Investigations of SBS and laser gain competition in high-power phase modulated fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Angel; Dajani, Iyad; Hult, Dane; Robin, Craig

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results of SBS suppression in high power, monolithic, Yb-doped fiber amplifiers via phase modulated laser gain competition. To narrow the linewidth, two-tone laser gain competition between broad (1036 nm) and narrow linewidth (1064 nm) laser signals is investigated in conjunction with phase modulation and yields pump limited output powers of 600 W. Here integration of both two-tone and pseudo random bit sequence (PRBS) phase modulation concepts, generated SBS enhancement factors of greater than 17x at a modulation frequency of 500 MHz, without reaching the SBS threshold. Significantly, the results represent a near order of magnitude reduction in linewidth over current high-power, monolithic, Yb-doped fiber amplifiers.

  16. Low V(π) Silicon photonics modulators with highly linear epitaxially grown phase shifters.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Saeed Sharif; Merget, Florian; Romero-García, Sebastian; Moscoso-Mártir, Alvaro; von den Driesch, Nils; Müller, Juliana; Mantl, Siegfried; Buca, Dan; Witzens, Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of Silicon Mach-Zehnder carrier depletion modulators relying on epitaxially grown vertical junction diodes. Unprecedented spatial control over doping profiles resulting from combining local ion implantation with epitaxial overgrowth enables highly linear phase shifters with high modulation efficiency and comparatively low insertion losses. A high average phase shifter efficiency of VπL = 0.74 V⋅cm is reached between 0 V and 2 V reverse bias, while maintaining optical losses at 4.2 dB/mm and the intrinsic RC cutoff frequency at 48 GHz (both at 1 V reverse bias). The fabrication process, the sensitivity to fabrication tolerances, the phase shifter performance and examples of lumped element and travelling wave modulators are modeled in detail. Device linearity is shown to be sufficient to support complex modulation formats such as 16-QAM. PMID:26368451

  17. Frequency-coded quantum key distribution using amplitude-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Gabdulkhakov, Il'daris M.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Zagrieva, Aida R.; Sarvarova, Lutsia M.

    2016-03-01

    Design principals of universal microwave photonics system for quantum key distribution with frequency coding are concerned. Its concept is based on the possibility of creating the multi-functional units to implement the most commonly used technologies of frequency coding: amplitude, phase and combined amplitude-phase modulation and re-modulation of optical carrier. The characteristics of advanced systems based on classical approaches and prospects of their development using a combination of amplitude modulation and phase commutation are discussed. These are the valuations how to build advanced systems with frequency coding quantum key distribution, including at their symmetric and asymmetric constructions, using of the mechanisms of the photon polarization states passive detection, based on the filters for wavelength division multiplexing of modulated optical carrier side components.

  18. Modulating Photoluminescence of Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide by Metal-Insulator Phase Transition in Active Substrates.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jiwei; Wang, Xi; Fu, Deyi; Ko, Changhyun; Chen, Yabin; Sun, Yufei; Lee, Sangwook; Wang, Kevin X; Dong, Kaichen; Sun, Yinghui; Tongay, Sefaattin; Jiao, Liying; Yao, Jie; Liu, Kai; Wu, Junqiao

    2016-08-01

    The atomic thickness and flatness allow properties of 2D semiconductors to be modulated with influence from the substrate. Reversible modulation of these properties requires an "active," reconfigurable substrate, i.e., a substrate with switchable functionalities that interacts strongly with the 2D overlayer. In this work, the photoluminescence (PL) of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) is modulated by interfacing it with a phase transition material, vanadium dioxide (VO2 ). The MoS2 PL intensity is enhanced by a factor of up to three when the underlying VO2 undergoes the thermally driven phase transition from the insulating to metallic phase. A nonvolatile, reversible way to rewrite the PL pattern is also demonstrated. The enhancement effect is attributed to constructive optical interference when the VO2 turns metallic. This modulation method requires no chemical or mechanical processes, potentially finding applications in new switches and sensors. PMID:27335137

  19. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  20. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  1. Phase-ambiguity resolution for QPSK modulation systems. Part 2: A method to resolve offset QPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    1989-01-01

    Part 2 presents a new method to resolve the phase-ambiguity for Offset QPSK modulation systems. When an Offset Quaternary Phase-Shift-Keyed (OQPSK) communications link is utilized, the phase ambiguity of the reference carrier must be resolved. At the transmitter, two different unique words are separately modulated onto the quadrature carriers. At the receiver, the recovered carrier may have one of four possible phases, 0, 90, 180, or 270 degrees, referenced to the nominally correct phase. The IF portion of the channel may cause a phase-sense reversal, i.e., a reversal in the direction of phase rotation for a specified bit pattern. Hence, eight possible phase relationships (the so-called eight ambiguous phase conditions) between input and output of the demodulator must be resolved. Using the In-phase (I)/Quadrature (Q) channel reversal correcting property of an OQPSK Costas loop with integrated symbol synchronization, four ambiguous phase conditions are eliminated. Thus, only four possible ambiguous phase conditions remain. The errors caused by the remaining ambiguous phase conditions can be corrected by monitoring and detecting the polarity of the two unique words. The correction of the unique word polarities results in the complete phase-ambiguity resolution for the OQPSK system.

  2. Method of Phase and Amplitude Modulation/Demodulation Using Datapages with Embedded Phase-Shift for Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunsen, Masatoshi; Umetsu, Shuhei; Takabayashi, Masanori; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    A technique for the phase and amplitude detection of object beams with multivalued phase and amplitude modulation is proposed for holographic storage systems. Generally, the spatial distribution of the complex amplitude of the object beam can be precisely detected by phase-shifting interferometric measurements in which the phase of the reference wave for interferometry is temporally or spatially changed in the datapage retrieval process. On the other hand, our technique allows fast, accurate, and feasible phase and amplitude demodulations by preliminary embedding phase shift into the phase signal of the datapage during recording. This technique will significantly improve the data transfer rate and vibration tolerance of the holographic storage system because the complex amplitudes of the object beam carrying datapages can be detected by single-shot image capturing. The optical system for datapage replay will also be simplified because there is no need to use any phase-shifting device during data retrieval. The single-shot detection of the phase-modulated datapage is experimentally demonstrated.

  3. Influence of the cubic spectral phase of high-power laser pulses on their self-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, V. N.; Kochetkov, A. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.; Mironov, S. Yu; Shaykin, A. A.; Khazanov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral broadening of high-power transform-limited laser pulses under self-phase modulation in a medium with cubic nonlinearity is widely used to reduce pulse duration and to increase its power. It is shown that the cubic spectral phase of the initial pulse leads to a qualitatively different broadening of its spectrum: the spectrum has narrow peaks and broadening decreases. However, the use of chirped mirrors allows such pulses to be as effectively compressed as transform-limited pulses.

  4. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-1, Fundamentals of Ultrasonic Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Bruce

    This first in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II introduces the student/trainee to the basic behavior of ultrasound, describes ultrasonic test equipment, and outlines the principal methods of ultrasonic testing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  5. Rotational modulation and flares on the RS Canum Venaticorum binary II Pegasi in July/September 1990: Spots and flares on II Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Mathioudakis, M.; Murphy, H. M.; Avgoloupis, S.; Mavridis, L. N.; Seiradakis, J. H.

    1993-11-01

    During ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the RS CVn star II Peg in September 1990 a long duration (greater than or = 3 hrs.) flare was observed. During the early stage of the event, a feature at 1354 A was present, however, within the spectral resolution of the data it is not possible to identify this line. A contribution from the hot coronal ion Fe XXI is suspected. From line diagnostic ratios, the electron pressure at flare peak was estimated to be 1017/cu cm K, decreasing to 1016/cu cm K towards the end of the flare. One other flare was observed with IUE, and three optical flares (unfortunately none of these were observed simultaneously). The chromospheric and transition region losses from the larger of the two IUE flares was approx. 3 x 1031 erg/s at flare maximum, with total chromospheric/transition region radiative losses over the duration of the event being approx. 1.5 x 1035 erg. Continuum radiative losses over the wavelength region 1150A to 1950A were approximately 3% of the above figure. At flare maximum, the N V 1240 A line showed an enhancement factor of approx. 3 over the preflare value compared to 9 for the C IV 1550 A line. We interpret this difference as due to an underabundance of nitrogen during the flare, possibly related to photoionization of lower chromospheric material by soft X-ray photons sometime prior to the flare. No evidence of rotational modulation was present in any of the transition region lines, although the chromospheric lines did show a phase variation. However, these lines (H-alpha, Ca II K and Mg II h&k) were not consistent with one another although it is clear that the H-alpha equivalent width showed variations faster than the star's rotation period, being perhaps related to the decay/activation of individual active regions.

  6. A wideband photonic microwave phase shifter using polarization-dependent intensity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyu; Sun, Wenhui; Wang, Wenting; Tong, Youwan; Zheng, Jianyu; Yuan, Haiqing; Wang, Xin; Bai, Jinhua; Yu, Lijuan; Liu, Jianguo; Zhu, Ninghua

    2015-12-01

    We present a tunable and wideband microwave photonic phase shifter based on polarization-dependence of the LiNbO3 Mach-Zehender modulator (MZM). In the proposed device, an orthogonal single sideband modulation is implemented by using a MZM and an optical band-pass filter. With the polarizer to synthesize the polarization orthogonal optical carrier and sideband, the phase of the optical microwave signal output from the polarizer can be tuned from 0 to 360° by simply adjusting the polarization direction of the lights whereas the amplitude keeps constant. A full range tunable phase shifting in the frequency range of 10-35 GHz is achieved.

  7. Across-frequency processing of modulation phase differences in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J; Valentine, Susie

    2015-09-01

    Two experiments tested the influence of hearing impairment (HI) on representing across-frequency temporal coherence. In one experiment, HI listeners demonstrated similar abilities to normal-hearing listeners in detecting across-frequency differences in modulation phase. In another, spectral-shape discrimination was detrimentally affected by modulation phase disparities imposed on spectral components. Spectral-shape discrimination by HI listeners was less influenced by the disparities, suggesting that hearing loss alters the representation of envelope phase. Results suggest that multiple approaches may be necessary to determine alterations associated with hearing loss—detection tasks may not be sufficient to elucidate distortions to temporal envelope associated with hearing loss. PMID:26428814

  8. Across-frequency processing of modulation phase differences in hearing-impaired listeners

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Jennifer J.; Valentine, Susie

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments tested the influence of hearing impairment (HI) on representing across-frequency temporal coherence. In one experiment, HI listeners demonstrated similar abilities to normal-hearing listeners in detecting across-frequency differences in modulation phase. In another, spectral-shape discrimination was detrimentally affected by modulation phase disparities imposed on spectral components. Spectral-shape discrimination by HI listeners was less influenced by the disparities, suggesting that hearing loss alters the representation of envelope phase. Results suggest that multiple approaches may be necessary to determine alterations associated with hearing loss—detection tasks may not be sufficient to elucidate distortions to temporal envelope associated with hearing loss. PMID:26428814

  9. Phase-ambiguity resolution for QPSK modulation systems. Part 1: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    1989-01-01

    Part 1 reviews the current phase-ambiguity resolution techniques for QPSK coherent modulation systems. Here, those known and published methods of resolving phase ambiguity for QPSK with and without Forward-Error-Correcting (FEC) are discussed. The necessary background is provided for a complete understanding of the second part where a new technique will be discussed. An appropriate technique to the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) is recommended for consideration in future standards on phase-ambiguity resolution for QPSK coherent modulation systems.

  10. Large resistivity modulation in mixed-phase metallic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeonbae; Liu, Z. Q.; Heron, J. T.; Clarkson, J. D.; Hong, J.; Ko, C.; Biegalski, M. D.; Aschauer, U.; Hsu, S. L.; Nowakowski, M. E.; Wu, J.; Christen, H. M.; Salahuddin, S.; Bokor, J. B.; Spaldin, N. A.; Schlom, D. G.; Ramesh, R.

    2015-01-01

    In numerous systems, giant physical responses have been discovered when two phases coexist; for example, near a phase transition. An intermetallic FeRh system undergoes a first-order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition above room temperature and shows two-phase coexistence near the transition. Here we have investigated the effect of an electric field to FeRh/PMN-PT heterostructures and report 8% change in the electrical resistivity of FeRh films. Such a ‘giant’ electroresistance (GER) response is striking in metallic systems, in which external electric fields are screened, and thus only weakly influence the carrier concentrations and mobilities. We show that our FeRh films comprise coexisting ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases with different resistivities and the origin of the GER effect is the strain-mediated change in their relative proportions. The observed behaviour is reminiscent of colossal magnetoresistance in perovskite manganites and illustrates the role of mixed-phase coexistence in achieving large changes in physical properties with low-energy external perturbation.

  11. Large resistivity modulation in mixed-phase metallic systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonbae; Liu, Z Q; Heron, J T; Clarkson, J D; Hong, J; Ko, C; Biegalski, M D; Aschauer, U; Hsu, S L; Nowakowski, M E; Wu, J; Christen, H M; Salahuddin, S; Bokor, J B; Spaldin, N A; Schlom, D G; Ramesh, R

    2015-01-01

    In numerous systems, giant physical responses have been discovered when two phases coexist; for example, near a phase transition. An intermetallic FeRh system undergoes a first-order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition above room temperature and shows two-phase coexistence near the transition. Here we have investigated the effect of an electric field to FeRh/PMN-PT heterostructures and report 8% change in the electrical resistivity of FeRh films. Such a 'giant' electroresistance (GER) response is striking in metallic systems, in which external electric fields are screened, and thus only weakly influence the carrier concentrations and mobilities. We show that our FeRh films comprise coexisting ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases with different resistivities and the origin of the GER effect is the strain-mediated change in their relative proportions. The observed behaviour is reminiscent of colossal magnetoresistance in perovskite manganites and illustrates the role of mixed-phase coexistence in achieving large changes in physical properties with low-energy external perturbation. PMID:25564764

  12. Pattern manipulation via on-chip phase modulation between orbital angular momentum beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huanlu; Strain, Michael J.; Meriggi, Laura; Sorel, Marc; Chen, Lifeng; Zhu, Jiangbo; Cicek, Kenan; Wang, Jianwei; Thompson, Mark G.; Cai, Xinlun; Yu, Siyuan

    2015-08-03

    An integrated approach to thermal modulation of relative phase between two optical vortices with opposite chirality has been demonstrated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. The device consists of a silicon-integrated optical vortex emitter and a phase controlled 3 dB coupler. The relative phase between two optical vortices can be actively modulated on chip by applying a voltage on the integrated heater. The phase shift is shown to be linearly proportional to applied electrical power, and the rotation angle of the interference pattern is observed to be inversely proportional to topological charge. This scheme can be used in lab-on-chip, communications and sensing applications. It can be intentionally implemented with other modulation elements to achieve more complicated applications.

  13. Impact of High-Frequency Spectral Phase Modulation on the Temporal Profile of Short Optical Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrer, C.; Bromage, J.

    2008-03-18

    The impact of high-frequency spectral phase modulation on the temporal intensity of optical pulses is derived analytically and simulated in two different regimes. The temporal contrast of an optical pulse close to the Fourier-transform limit is degraded by a pedestal related to the power spectral density of the spectral phase modulation. When the optical pulse is highly chirped, its intensity modulation is directly related to the spectral phase variations with a transfer function depending on the second-order dispersion of the chirped pulse. The metrology of the spectral phase of an optical pulse using temporal-intensity measurements performed after chirping the pulse is studied. The effect of spatial averaging is also discussed.

  14. A dynamic plasmonic manipulation technique assisted by phase modulation of an incident optical vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wang, Q; Tan, P S; Lin, J; Yuan, X-C

    2012-09-28

    A novel phase modulation method for dynamic manipulation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with a phase engineered optical vortex (OV) beam illuminating on nanoslits is experimentally demonstrated. Because of the unique helical phase carried by an OV beam, dynamic control of SPP multiple focusing and standing wave generation is realized by changing the OV beam's topological charge constituent with the help of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. Measurement of SPP distributions with near-field scanning optical microscopy showed an excellent agreement with numerical predictions. The proposed phase modulation technique for manipulating SPPs features has seemingly dynamic and reconfigurable advantages, with profound potential for development of SPP coupling, routing, multiplexing and high-resolution imaging devices on plasmonic chips. PMID:22948098

  15. High-performance GaAs/AlGaAs optical phase modulators for microwave photonic integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Armendariz, M.G.; Vawter, G.A.; Carson, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    A high-performance high-speed optical phase modulator for photonic integrated circuit (PIC) use is described. Integration of these optical phase modulators into a real system (compass) is also discussed. The optical phase modulators are based on depletion-edge translation and have experimentally provided optical phase shifts in excess of 60{degrees}/V{center_dot}mm with approximately 4 dB/cm loss while simultaneously demonstrating bandwidths in excess of 10 GHz.

  16. Pharmacological Inhibition of polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII Modulates Tumour Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saraireh, Yousef M. J.; Sutherland, Mark; Springett, Bradley R.; Freiberger, Friedrich; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Errington, Rachel J.; Smith, Paul J.; Fukuda, Minoru; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Patterson, Laurence H.; Shnyder, Steven D.; Falconer, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia), an α-2,8-glycosidically linked polymer of sialic acid, is a developmentally regulated post-translational modification predominantly found on NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule). Whilst high levels are expressed during development, peripheral adult organs do not express polySia-NCAM. However, tumours of neural crest-origin re-express polySia-NCAM: its occurrence correlates with aggressive and invasive disease and poor clinical prognosis in different cancer types, notably including small cell lung cancer (SCLC), pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma. In neuronal development, polySia-NCAM biosynthesis is catalysed by two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV, but it is ST8SiaII that is the prominent enzyme in tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ST8SiaII inhibition by a small molecule on tumour cell migration, utilising cytidine monophosphate (CMP) as a tool compound. Using immunoblotting we showed that CMP reduced ST8iaII-mediated polysialylation of NCAM. Utilizing a novel HPLC-based assay to quantify polysialylation of a fluorescent acceptor (DMB-DP3), we demonstrated that CMP is a competitive inhibitor of ST8SiaII (Ki = 10 µM). Importantly, we have shown that CMP causes a concentration-dependent reduction in tumour cell-surface polySia expression, with an absence of toxicity. When ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells (SH-SY5Y and C6-STX) were evaluated in 2D cell migration assays, ST8SiaII inhibition led to significant reductions in migration, while CMP had no effect on cells not expressing ST8SiaII (DLD-1 and C6-WT). The study demonstrates for the first time that a polysialyltransferase inhibitor can modulate migration in ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells. We conclude that ST8SiaII can be considered a druggable target with the potential for interfering with a critical mechanism in tumour cell dissemination in metastatic cancers. PMID:23951351

  17. Experimental Demonstration of Phase Modulation and Motion Sensing Using Graphene-Integrated Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Dabidian, Nima; Dutta-Gupta, Shourya; Kholmanov, Iskandar; Lai, Kueifu; Lu, Feng; Lee, Jongwon; Jin, Mingzhou; Trendafilov, Simeon; Khanikaev, Alexander; Fallahazad, Babak; Tutuc, Emanuel; Belkin, Mikhail A; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-06-01

    Strong interaction of graphene with light accounts for one of its most remarkable properties: the ability to absorb 2.3% of the incident light's energy within a single atomic layer. Free carrier injection via field-effect gating can dramatically vary the optical properties of graphene, thereby enabling fast graphene-based modulators of the light intensity. However, the very thinness of graphene makes it difficult to modulate the other fundamental property of the light wave: its optical phase. Here we demonstrate that considerable phase control can be achieved by integrating a single-layer graphene (SLG) with a resonant plasmonic metasurface that contains nanoscale gaps. By concentrating the light intensity inside of the nanogaps, the metasurface dramatically increases the coupling of light to the SLG and enables control of the phase of the reflected mid-infrared light by as much as 55° via field-effect gating. We experimentally demonstrate graphene-based phase modulators that maintain the amplitude of the reflected light essentially constant over most of the phase tuning range. Rapid nonmechanical phase modulation enables a new experimental technique, graphene-based laser interferometry, which we use to demonstrate motion detection with nanoscale precision. We also demonstrate that by the judicious choice of a strongly anisotropic metasurface the graphene-controlled phase shift of light can be rendered polarization-dependent. Using the experimentally measured phases for the two orthogonal polarizations, we demonstrate that the polarization state of the reflected light can be by modulated by carrier injection into the SLG. These results pave the way for novel high-speed graphene-based optical devices and sensors such as polarimeters, ellipsometers, and frequency modulators. PMID:27152557

  18. Generation of phase-coded microwave signals using a polarization-modulator-based photonic microwave phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    A scheme for the generation of phase-coded microwave signals using an electrically tunable photonic microwave phase shifter is proposed and demonstrated. The photonic phase shifter is based on a single-sideband polarization modulator (PolM), and the tuning of the phase shifter is implemented by a second PolM. By introducing an RF signal to the first PolM and an electrical coding signal to the second PolM, a phase-coded microwave signal with binary phase codes or polyphase codes is achieved. An experiment is performed. The simple and flexible operation, high coding rate, large frequency range, excellent transmission performance, and high stability of the system is confirmed. PMID:23455292

  19. Developmental decline in modulation of glutamatergic synapses in layer IV of the barrel cortex by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Z; Porter, J T

    2015-04-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) reduce glutamate release from thalamocortical synapses during early postnatal development (P7-11). To further examine the role of group II mGluRs in the modulation of somatosensory circuitry, we determined whether group II mGluRs continue to modulate thalamocortical synapses until adulthood and whether these receptors also modulate intra-cortical synapses in the barrel cortex. To address these issues, we examined the effect of the group II mGluR agonists on thalamocortical excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and intra-barrel EPSCs in slices from animals of different ages (P7-53). We found that the depression of thalamocortical EPSCs by group II mGluRs rapidly declined after the second postnatal week. In contrast, adenosine continued to depress thalamocortical EPSCs via a presynaptic mechanism in young adult mice (P30-50). Activation of group II mGluRs also reduced intra-barrel EPSCs through a postsynaptic mechanism in young mice (P7-11). Similar to the thalamocortical synapses, the group II mGluR modulation of intra-barrel excitatory synapses declined with development. In young adult animals (P30-50), group II mGluR stimulation had little effect on intra-barrel EPSCs but did hyperpolarize the neurons. Together our results demonstrate that group II mGluRs modulate barrel cortex circuitry by presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms depending on the source of the synapse and that this modulation declines with development. PMID:25595969

  20. Developmental decline in modulation of glutamatergic synapses in layer IV of the barrel cortex by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Zaira; Porter, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that group II mGluRs reduce glutamate release from thalamocortical synapses during early postnatal development (P7–11). To further examine the role of group II mGluRs in the modulation of somatosensory circuitry, we determined whether group II mGluRs continue to modulate thalamocortical synapses until adulthood and whether these receptors also modulate intra-cortical synapses in the barrel cortex. To address these issues, we examined the effect of the group II mGluR agonists on thalamocortical EPSCs and intra-barrel EPSCs in slices from animals of different ages (P7–53). We found that the depression of thalamocortical EPSCs by stimulation group II mGluRs rapidly declined after the second postnatal week. In contrast, adenosine continued to depress thalamocortical EPSCs via a presynaptic mechanism in young adult mice (P30–50). Activation group II mGluRs also reduced intra-barrel EPSCs through a postsynaptic mechanism in young mice (P7–11). Similar to the thalamocortical synapses, the group II mGluR modulation of intra-barrel excitatory synapses declined with development. In young adult animals (P30–50), group II mGluR stimulation had little effect on intra-barrel EPSCs but did hyperpolarize the neurons. Together our results demonstrate that group II mGluRs modulate barrel cortex circuitry by presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms depending on the source of the synapse and that this modulation declines with development. PMID:25595969

  1. Spontaneous phase transitions in magnetic films with a modulated structure

    SciTech Connect

    Arzamastseva, G. V.; Evtikhov, M. G.; Lisovskii, F. V. Mansvetova, E. G.

    2011-09-15

    The influence of monoperiodic and biperiodic bias fields on the nucleation of domain structures in quasi-uniaxial magnetic films near the Curie point has been studied experimentally. The main types of observed nonuniform magnetic moment distributions have been established and chains of a devil's staircase phase transitions are shown to be realized when the films are slowly cooled.

  2. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Cannell; Adrian S. Sabau

    2005-09-30

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in

  3. Effects and correction of magneto-optic spatial light modulator phase errors in an optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Hine, Butler P.; Reid, Max B.

    1992-01-01

    The optical phase errors introduced into an optical correlator by the input and filter plane magnetooptic spatial light modulators have been studied. The magnitude of these phase errors is measured and characterized, their effects on the correlation results are evaluated, and a means of correction by a design modification of the binary phase-only optical-filter function is presented. The efficacy of the phase-correction technique is quantified and is found to restore the correlation characteristics to those obtained in the absence of errors, to a high degree. The phase errors of other correlator system elements are also discussed and treated in a similar fashion.

  4. Realization of an all-optical zero to pi cross-phase modulation jump.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Ryan M; Dixon, P Ben; Glasser, Ryan T; Jordan, Andrew N; Howell, John C

    2009-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an all-optical pi cross-phase modulation jump. By performing a preselection, an optically induced unitary transformation, and then a postselection on the polarization degree of freedom, the phase of the output beam acquires either a zero or pi phase shift (with no other possible values). The postselection results in optical loss in the output beam. An input state may be chosen near the resulting phase singularity, yielding a pi phase shift even for weak interaction strengths. The scheme is experimentally demonstrated using a coherently prepared dark state in a warm atomic cesium vapor. PMID:19257193

  5. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  6. Effects of photofrin II and light on cellular adenine nucleotides and their modulation.

    PubMed

    Khanum, F; Jain, V

    1997-04-01

    Effects of photofrin II (PII) and light on the intra cellular nucleotide levels have been investigated using BHK-21 cell line. Results indicate that lower concentrations of photofrin II in dark increases ATP levels in a non linear manner, however, there has been no change in energy charge and levels of other nucleotides. Photoirradiation of PII-treated cells leads to a significant reduction in ATP levels and energy charge along with an increase in ATP breakdown products like ADP and AMP. The phosphorylation potential [ATP]/[ADP][Pi] also reduces upon photoirradiation of PII treated cells. Incubation conditions like pH of the medium and temperature modulate the cellular responses to a great extent. PMID:9315234

  7. Quantitative evaluation of spatial phase light modulator characteristics in Fresnel incoherent correlation holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Tianlong; Wan, Yuhong; Chen, Hao; Jiang, Zhuqing; Wang, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) is one of the methods for recording holograms of 3D samples under incoherent illumination. The FINCH combines the theory of spatial self-coherence and the in-line phase-shift technology together to form a complex hologram. A spatial phase light modulator (SPLM) plays important roles as the dynamic diffraction optical element (DOE) and phase shifter. When the incoherent light generated from each object point of the 3D samples incidents to a SPLM, it can be split into two spatial self-coherent beams with different curvatures. The hologram caused by these two beams can then be captured by an image detector. Three holograms with different phase shift are recorded sequentially for eliminating the zero-order and twin image, and then a complex valued hologram is obtained by superposing the three holograms. In this paper, the modulation characteristics of SPLM and phase shift error in FINCH are investigated. Based on digital holography, phase modulation characteristics of SPLM are measured under coherent and narrow-bandwidth incoherent illumination respectively. Phase shift error due to quasi monochromatic light illumination is then analyzed in FINCH. The effect of phase shift error on the quality of reconstructed image is also investigated. It is demonstrated the FINCH setup has a smaller phase shift error by experiment.

  8. Full-field absolute phase measurements in the heterodyne interferometer with an electro-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Hsieh, H. C.; Wu, W. T.; Su, D. C.

    2009-06-01

    A novel method for full-field absolute phase measurements in the heterodyne interferometer with an electro-optic modulator is proposed in this paper. Instead of the commonly-used half-wave voltage to drive the electro-optic modulator, a saw-tooth voltage signal with the amplitude being lower than its half-wave voltage is used. The interference signals become a group of periodical sinusoidal segments. The initial phase of each sinusoidal segment depends on the phase difference induced by the test sample. In real measurements, each segment is taken by a fast camera and becomes discrete digital points. After a series of operations, the starting point of the sampled sinusoidal segment can be determined accurately. Next, the period of the sampled sinusoidal segments is lengthened and they can be modified to a continuous sinusoidal wave by using a least-square sine fitting algorithm. The initial phase of the continuous sinusoidal wave can also be estimated. Subtracting the characteristic phase of the modulator from the initial phase, the absolute phase measured at the pixel can be obtained without the conventional reference signals. These operations are applied to other pixels, and the full-field absolute phase measurements can be achieved. The phase retardation of a quarter-wave plate is measured to show the validity of this method.

  9. 76 FR 55947 - Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... of the Secretary Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam AGENCY: Bureau of... funded.. DAI, through its Industrial Relations Promotion Project (IRRP), is the only organization that... disputes and sound industrial relations by developing approaches in cooperation with trade...

  10. A Tool for Predicting Regulatory Approval After Phase II Testing of New Oncology Compounds.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, J A; Hermann, J C; Twyman, K; Kondru, R K; Stergiopoulos, S; Getz, K A; Rackoff, W

    2015-11-01

    We developed an algorithm (ANDI) for predicting regulatory marketing approval for new cancer drugs after phase II testing has been conducted, with the objective of providing a tool to improve drug portfolio decision-making. We examined 98 oncology drugs from the top 50 pharmaceutical companies (2006 sales) that first entered clinical development from 1999 to 2007, had been taken to at least phase II development, and had a known final outcome (research abandonment or regulatory marketing approval). Data on safety, efficacy, operational, market, and company characteristics were obtained from public sources. Logistic regression and machine-learning methods were used to provide an unbiased approach to assess overall predictability and to identify the most important individual predictors. We found that a simple four-factor model (activity, number of patients in the pivotal phase II trial, phase II duration, and a prevalence-related measure) had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting regulatory marketing approval. PMID:26239772

  11. FPGA-based phase control of acousto-optic modulator Fourier synthesis system through gradient descent phase-locking algorithm.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Kenneth J; Jones, Andrew M; Gopinath, Juliet T

    2015-06-20

    We present a new application of the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to fast active phase control in a Fourier synthesis system. Pulses (4.9 ns) with an 80 MHz repetition rate are generated by feedback from a single phase-sensitive metric. Phase control is applied via fast current modulation of a tapered amplifier using an SPGD algorithm realized on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The waveforms are maintained by constant active feedback from the FPGA. We also discuss the extension of this technique to many more semiconductor laser emitters in a diode laser array. PMID:26193004

  12. Area modulation grating for sinusoidal structure illumination on phase-measuring profilometry.

    PubMed

    Xian, T; Su, X

    2001-03-10

    Sinusoidal structured illumination is used widely in three-dimensional (3-D) sensing and machine vision. Phase algorithms, for example, in phase-measuring profilometry, are inherently free of errors only with perfect sinusoidal fringe projection. But it is difficult to produce a perfect sinusoidal grating. We propose a new concept, area modulation, to improve the sinusoidality of structured illumination. A binary-coded picture is made up of many micrometer units. An aperture is open in every micrometer unit, and its area is determined by the value of the sinusoidal function. When such a grating is projected onto an object surface, the image of the grating becomes sinusoidal because of the convolution function of an optical system. We have designed and manufactured an area modulation grating for sinusoidal structure illumination using a large-scale integration technique. The area modulation grating has been used in the high-precision phase-measuring profilometry system, and the phase errors caused by the area modulation grating are reduced to 0.1%. The grating guaranteed the entire measuring accuracy to a 1% equivalent wavelength. The experimental results proved that area modulation grating would be of significant help in improving the phase-measurement accuracy of the 3-D sensing system. PMID:18357106

  13. Optically addressed and submillisecond response phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangjie; Duan, Jiazhu; Zhang, Dayong; Luo, Yongquan

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystal based phase only spatial light modulator has attracted many research interests since last decades because of its superior advantage. Until now the liquid crystal spatial light modulator has been applied in many fields, but the response speed of nematic LC limited its further application. In this paper, an optically addressed phase only LC spatial light modulator was proposed based on polymer network liquid crystal. Morphology effect on the light scattering of PNLC was studied, which was mainly consisted of fiber and fiber bundles. The morphology nearly determined the light scattering and electro-optical property. Due to the high threshold voltage, to address the PNLC phase modulator was also concerned. Optical addressing method was proposed, in which BSO crystal was selected to replace one of the glass substrate. The response speed of PNLC was so fast that the reorientation of liquid crystal director will follow the change of effective voltage applied on LC layer, which was related with the voltage signal and especially with electron transport of photo-induced carriers due to diffusion and drift. The on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated. Based on this device, beam steering was also achieved by loading 488nm laser strip on the optical addressed phase only spatial light modulator.

  14. Fuzzy Logic Controlled Solar Module for Driving Three- Phase Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afiqah Zainal, Nurul; Sooi Tat, Chan; Ajisman

    2016-02-01

    Renewable energy produced by solar module gives advantages for generated three- phase induction motor in remote area. But, solar module's ou tput is uncertain and complex. Fuzzy logic controller is one of controllers that can handle non-linear system and maximum power of solar module. Fuzzy logic controller used for Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique to control Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) for switching power electronics circuit. DC-DC boost converter used to boost up photovoltaic voltage to desired output and supply voltage source inverter which controlled by three-phase PWM generated by microcontroller. IGBT switched Voltage source inverter (VSI) produced alternating current (AC) voltage from direct current (DC) source to control speed of three-phase induction motor from boost converter output. Results showed that, the output power of solar module is optimized and controlled by using fuzzy logic controller. Besides that, the three-phase induction motor can be drive and control using VSI switching by the PWM signal generated by the fuzzy logic controller. This concluded that the non-linear system can be controlled and used in driving three-phase induction motor.

  15. Modulation of casein kinase II activity by the polar head group of an insulin-sensitive glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    PubMed

    Alemany, S; Puerta, J; Guadaño, A; Mato, J M

    1990-03-25

    A phospho-oligosaccharide, whose production is stimulated by insulin, modulated the activity of partially purified casein kinase II. Whereas at 2 microM the phospho-oligosaccharide stimulated casein kinase II 1.3-fold, higher concentrations of this molecule were inhibitory. 50% inhibition of the enzyme was obtained at 15 microM phospho-oligosaccharide. This biphasic effect of the phospho-oligosaccharide on casein kinase II activity was observed using as substrate both casein or the specific peptide for casein kinase II, Arg-Arg-Arg-Glu-Glu-Glu-Thr-Glu-Glu-Glu. The effect of the phospho-oligosaccharide on casein kinase II was still observed after gel filtration. Deamination of the phospho-oligosaccharide with nitrous acid abolished both the activation and the inhibition of casein kinase II. The glycophospholipid precursor of the phospho-oligosaccharide did not affect casein kinase II activity. Moreover, modulation of casein kinase II activity was not observed with other compounds structurally related to the phospho-oligosaccharide, when used in the micro-molar range. In conclusion, the present results indicate that the phospho-oligosaccharide that mimics and might mediate some of the actions of insulin modulates casein kinase II activity in vitro. PMID:2138621

  16. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  17. NATIONAL SURFACE WATER SURVEY: EASTERN LAKE SURVEY PHASE II NORTHEASTERN LAKES, DATABASE DICTIONARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this data dictionary is to provide information pertaining to the contents and structure of the Eastern Lakes Survey-Phase II (ELS-II) chemistry database. he data dictionary does not describe the design, protocols, or findings of the study, which are described in He...

  18. Final commissioning phase of the AdOpt@TNG module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzoni, Roberto; Baruffolo, Andrea; Farinato, Jacopo; Ghedina, Adriano; Marchetti, Enrico; Esposito, Simone; Fini, Luca; Ranfagni, Piero; Bortoletto, Fabio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Ghigo, Mauro; Crimi, G.

    2000-07-01

    The AdOptTNG module is an adaptive optics facility permanently mounted at the Nasmyth focus of the 4m-class Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). Its integration on the telescope started in late November 1998 and first-light of the speckle and tip-tilt modes took place shortly after. Both modes have been offered to the astronomical community and turned out to provide performances close to the expectations. Double stars with separation below 0.1 arcsec have been resolved by the speckle facility. Improvement of the Strehl ratio of a factor two and enhancement in the FWHM from 0.65 arcsec to 0.35 arcsec have been obtained on relatively faint reference stars. The high-speed low noise CCD, namely an 80 X 80 pixel read from the four corners, has been mounted and aligned with the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A Xinetics mirror with 96 actuators has been calibrated against the wavefront sensor with on-board alignment fibers. This has been done using a modal approach and using Singular Value Decomposition in order to get a reliable interaction matrix. Filtering can be modal too, using a default integrative filter coupled with a limited FIR-fashioned technique. Open loop measurements on the sky provide data to establish open loop transfer functions and realistic estimates of limiting magnitude. High-order wavefront correction loop has been successfully tested on the sky. In this paper we give a description of the overall functionality of the module and of the procedure required to acquire targets to be used as reference in the correction. A brief overview of the very first astronomical results obtained so far on angular size and shape measurements of a few asteroids and sub-arcsec imaging of Planetary Nebulae and Herbig Haro objects is also given.

  19. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  20. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Preconceptual Phase II Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-07-09

    The purpose of the report is to summarize the process used to identify the Short List alternatives that will be evaluated during Phase III and to document the results of the selection process. The Phase III evaluation will result in the determination of the preferred alternative(s) to be used for final disposition of the HLW salt to a permitted waste form.

  1. Public Library Information and Referral Project, Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Thomas; Krauser, Cheri

    This study is the second of a two-phase survey of public library information and referral (I&R) service. In this phase, seven public libraries offering I&R services were studied in depth to provide descriptions of their operations, organizational factors, and the reactions of their users. Organizational factors and operations were studied through…

  2. Large resistivity modulation in mixed-phase metallic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeonbae; Liu, Zhiqi; Heron, John; Clarkson, James; Hong, Jeongmin; Ko, Changhyun; Biegalski, Michael; Aschauer, Ulrich; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Nowakowski, Mark; Wu, Junqiao; Christen, Hans; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Bokor, Jeffrey; Spaldin, Nicola; Schlom, Darrell; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of an electric field to FeRh/PMN-PT heterostructures and report 8% change in the electrical resistivity of FeRh films. Such a ``giant'' electroresistance (GER) response is striking in metallic systems, in which external electric fields are screened and thus only weakly influence the carrier concentrations and mobilities. We show that our FeRh films comprise coexisting ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases with different resistivities, and the origin of the GER effect is the strain-mediated change in their relative proportions. The observed behavior is reminiscent of colossal magnetoresistance in perovskite manganites, and illustrates the role of mixed-phase coexistence in achieving large changes in physical properties with low-energy external perturbation.

  3. Opto-Electronic Oscillator Using Suppressed Phase Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Yu, Nan

    2007-01-01

    A proposed opto-electronic oscillator (OEO) would generate a microwave signal having degrees of frequency stability and spectral purity greater than those achieved in prior OEOs. The design of this system provides for reduction of noise levels (including the level of phase noise in the final output microwave signal) to below some of the fundamental limits of the prior OEOs while retaining the advantages of photonic generation of microwaves.

  4. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    SciTech Connect

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  5. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual HF beams with ELF phase offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The modulation of naturally occuring ionospheric currents with high power radio waves in the high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) band is a well known technique for generation of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) waves. We use the heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to investigate the effect of using dual HF beams with an ELF/VLF phase offset between the modulation waveforms. Experiments with offset HF beams confirm the model of independent ELF/VLF sources. Experiments with co-located HF beams exhibit interaction between the first and second harmonics of the modulated tones when square and sine wave modulation waveforms are employed. Using ELF/VLF phase offsets for co-loacted beams is also shown to be a potential diagnostic for the D-region ionospheric profile.

  6. High-Lift Flight Tunnel - Phase II Report. Phase 2 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofftus, David; Lund, Thomas; Rote, Donald; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High-Lift Flight Tunnel (HiLiFT) concept is a revolutionary approach to aerodynamic ground testing. This concept utilizes magnetic levitation and linear motors to propel an aerodynamic model through a tube containing a quiescent test medium. This medium (nitrogen) is cryogenic and pressurized to achieve full flight Reynolds numbers higher than any existing ground test facility world-wide for the range of 0.05 to 0.50 Mach. The results of the Phase II study provide excellent assurance that the HiLiFT concept will provide a valuable low-speed, high Reynolds number ground test facility. The design studies concluded that the HiLiFT facility is feasible to build and operate and the analytical studies revealed no insurmountable difficulties to realizing a practical high Reynolds number ground test facility. It was determined that a national HiLiFT facility, including development, would cost approximately $400M and could be operational by 2013 if fully funded. Study participants included National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center as the Program Manager and MSE Technology Applications, Inc., (MSE) of Butte, Montana as the prime contractor and study integrator. MSE#s subcontractors included the University of Texas at Arlington for aerodynamic analyses and the Argonne National Laboratory for magnetic levitation and linear motor technology support.

  7. A Low-Noise Delta-Sigma Phase Modulator for Polar Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A low-noise phase modulator, using finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering embedded delta-sigma (ΔΣ) fractional-N phase-locked loop (PLL), is fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS for GSM/EDGE polar transmitters. A simplified digital compensation filter with inverse-FIR and -PLL features is proposed to trade off the transmitter noise and linearity. Experimental results show that the presented architecture performs RF phase modulation well with 20 mW power dissipation from 1.6 V supply and achieves the root-mean-square (rms) and peak phase errors of 4° and 8.5°, respectively. The measured and simulated phase noises of −104 dBc/Hz and −120 dBc/Hz at 400-kHz offset from 1.8-GHz carrier frequency are observed, respectively. PMID:24719578

  8. A low-noise delta-sigma phase modulator for polar transmitters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A low-noise phase modulator, using finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering embedded delta-sigma (ΔΣ) fractional-N phase-locked loop (PLL), is fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS for GSM/EDGE polar transmitters. A simplified digital compensation filter with inverse-FIR and -PLL features is proposed to trade off the transmitter noise and linearity. Experimental results show that the presented architecture performs RF phase modulation well with 20 mW power dissipation from 1.6 V supply and achieves the root-mean-square (rms) and peak phase errors of 4° and 8.5°, respectively. The measured and simulated phase noises of -104 dBc/Hz and -120 dBc/Hz at 400-kHz offset from 1.8-GHz carrier frequency are observed, respectively. PMID:24719578

  9. Minimum-loss vector PWM strategy for three-phase inverters. [Pulse Width Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Trzynadlowski, A.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Legowski, S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    A novel vector Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) method for three-phase voltage-controlled inverters is described. The so-called Minimum-Loss Vector PWM (MLVPWM) strategy is characterized by the minimum amount of switching losses incurred in the inverter switches. Comparative analysis proving superiority of the MLVPWM technique over the existing regular-sampling PWM methods, and results of experimental investigation of a prototype modulator are presented.

  10. Plasmonic phase modulator based on novel loss-overcompensated coupling between nanoresonator and waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Song-Jin; Ho, Gum-Song; Yang, Da-Jie; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Li; Kim, Nam-Chol; Kim, Il-Gwang; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We present that surface plasmon polariton, side-coupled to a gain-assisted nanoresonator where the absorption is overcompensated, exhibits a prominent phase shift up to π maintaining the flat unity transmission across the whole broad spectra. Bandwidth of this plasmonic phase shift can be controlled by adjusting the distance between the plasmonic waveguide and the nanoresonator. For a moderate distance, within bandwidth of 100 GHz, the phase shift and transmission are constantly maintained. The plasmonic phase can be shift-keying-modulated by a pumping signal in the gain-assisted nanoresonator. A needed length in our approach is of nanoscale while already suggested types of plasmonic phase modulator are of micrometer scale in length. The energy consumption per bit, which benefits from the nano size of this device, is ideally low on the order of 10 fJ/bit. The controllable plasmonic phase shift can find applications in nanoscale Mach-Zehnder interferometers and other phase-sensitive devices as well as directly in plasmonic phase shift keying modulators.

  11. Plasmonic phase modulator based on novel loss-overcompensated coupling between nanoresonator and waveguide.

    PubMed

    Im, Song-Jin; Ho, Gum-Song; Yang, Da-Jie; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Li; Kim, Nam-Chol; Kim, Il-Gwang; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We present that surface plasmon polariton, side-coupled to a gain-assisted nanoresonator where the absorption is overcompensated, exhibits a prominent phase shift up to π maintaining the flat unity transmission across the whole broad spectra. Bandwidth of this plasmonic phase shift can be controlled by adjusting the distance between the plasmonic waveguide and the nanoresonator. For a moderate distance, within bandwidth of 100 GHz, the phase shift and transmission are constantly maintained. The plasmonic phase can be shift-keying-modulated by a pumping signal in the gain-assisted nanoresonator. A needed length in our approach is of nanoscale while already suggested types of plasmonic phase modulator are of micrometer scale in length. The energy consumption per bit, which benefits from the nano size of this device, is ideally low on the order of 10 fJ/bit. The controllable plasmonic phase shift can find applications in nanoscale Mach-Zehnder interferometers and other phase-sensitive devices as well as directly in plasmonic phase shift keying modulators. PMID:26733338

  12. Plasmonic phase modulator based on novel loss-overcompensated coupling between nanoresonator and waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Im, Song-Jin; Ho, Gum-Song; Yang, Da-Jie; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Zhou, Li; Kim, Nam-Chol; Kim, Il-Gwang; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We present that surface plasmon polariton, side-coupled to a gain-assisted nanoresonator where the absorption is overcompensated, exhibits a prominent phase shift up to π maintaining the flat unity transmission across the whole broad spectra. Bandwidth of this plasmonic phase shift can be controlled by adjusting the distance between the plasmonic waveguide and the nanoresonator. For a moderate distance, within bandwidth of 100 GHz, the phase shift and transmission are constantly maintained. The plasmonic phase can be shift-keying-modulated by a pumping signal in the gain-assisted nanoresonator. A needed length in our approach is of nanoscale while already suggested types of plasmonic phase modulator are of micrometer scale in length. The energy consumption per bit, which benefits from the nano size of this device, is ideally low on the order of 10 fJ/bit. The controllable plasmonic phase shift can find applications in nanoscale Mach–Zehnder interferometers and other phase-sensitive devices as well as directly in plasmonic phase shift keying modulators. PMID:26733338

  13. Optical signal monitoring in phase modulated optical fiber transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian

    Optical performance monitoring (OPM) is one of the essential functions for future high speed optical networks. Among the parameters to be monitored, chromatic dispersion (CD) is especially important since it has a significant impact on overall system performance. In this thesis effective CD monitoring approaches for phase-shift keying (PSK) based optical transmission systems are investigated. A number of monitoring schemes based on radio frequency (RF) spectrum analysis and delay-tap sampling are proposed and their performance evaluated. A method for dispersion monitoring of differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals based on RF power detection is studied. The RF power spectrum is found to increase with the increase of CD and decrease with polarization mode dispersion (PMD). The spectral power density dependence on CD is studied theoretically and then verified through simulations and experiments. The monitoring sensitivity for nonreturn-to-zero differential phase-shift keying (NRZ-DPSK) and return-to-zero differential phase-shift keying (RZ-DPSK) based systems can reach 80ps/nm/dB and 34ps/nm/dB respectively. The scheme enables the monitoring of differential group delay (DGD) and CD simultaneously. The monitoring sensitivity of CD and DGD can reach 56.7ps/nm/dB and 3.1ps/dB using a bandpass filter. The effects of optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR), DGD, fiber nonlinearity and chirp on the monitoring results are investigated. Two RF pilot tones are employed for CD monitoring of DPSK signals. Specially selected pilot tone frequencies enable good monitoring sensitivity with minimum influence on the received signals. The dynamic range exceeding 35dB and monitoring sensitivity up to 9.5ps/nm/dB are achieved. Asynchronous sampling technique is employed for CD monitoring. A signed CD monitoring method for 10Gb/s NRZ-DPSK and RZ-DPSK systems using asynchronous delay-tap sampling technique is studied. The demodulated signals suffer asymmetric waveform distortion if

  14. Effects of Parkinson's disease on brain-wave phase synchronisation and cross-modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, K.; Schumann, A. Y.; Plotnik, M.; Gans, F.; Penzel, T.; Fietze, I.; Hausdorff, J. M.; Kantelhardt, J. W.

    2010-02-01

    We study the effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) on phase synchronisation and cross-modulation of instantaneous amplitudes and frequencies for brain waves during sleep. Analysing data from 40 full-night EEGs (electro-encephalograms) of ten patients with PD and ten age-matched healthy controls we find that phase synchronisation between the left and right hemisphere of the brain is characteristically reduced in patients with PD. Since there is no such difference in phase synchronisation for EEGs from the same hemisphere, our results suggest the possibility of a relation with problems in coordinated motion of left and right limbs in some patients with PD. Using the novel technique of amplitude and frequency cross-modulation analysis, relating oscillations in different EEG bands and distinguishing both positive and negative modulation, we observe an even more significant decrease in patients for several band combinations.

  15. Crystal-Phase Control by Solution-Solid-Solid Growth of II-VI Quantum Wires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2016-02-10

    A simple and potentially general means of eliminating the planar defects and phase alternations that typically accompany the growth of semiconductor nanowires by catalyzed methods is reported. Nearly phase-pure, defect-free wurtzite II-VI semiconductor quantum wires are grown from solid rather than liquid catalyst nanoparticles. The solid-catalyst nanoparticles are morphologically stable during growth, which minimizes the spontaneous fluctuations in nucleation barriers between zinc blende and wurtzite phases that are responsible for the defect formation and phase alternations. Growth of single-phase (in our cases the wurtzite phase) nanowires is thus favored. PMID:26731426

  16. Universal weighted graph state generation with the cross phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie Ru; Lin, Qing

    2016-05-01

    We introduce an architecture of cascade CZθ operation for conveniently generating universal weighted graph state. The entanglement bonds between dependent or independent single photons can be created efficiently with only one ancilla single photon. The generation is scalable for universal weighted graph states, including arbitrary two-dimensional or three-dimensional weighted graph states. Moreover, the generation is flexible, including that the controlled phase shift θ between each pair of single photons can be different, the traces of the ancilla single photon walking is not fixed, and the prior entangled states are not required.

  17. Iterative phase retrieval algorithms. Part II: Attacking optical encryption systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changliang; Liu, Shi; Sheridan, John T

    2015-05-20

    The modified iterative phase retrieval algorithms developed in Part I [Guo et al., Appl. Opt.54, 4698 (2015)] are applied to perform known plaintext and ciphertext attacks on amplitude encoding and phase encoding Fourier-transform-based double random phase encryption (DRPE) systems. It is shown that the new algorithms can retrieve the two random phase keys (RPKs) perfectly. The performances of the algorithms are tested by using the retrieved RPKs to decrypt a set of different ciphertexts encrypted using the same RPKs. Significantly, it is also shown that the DRPE system is, under certain conditions, vulnerable to ciphertext-only attack, i.e., in some cases an attacker can decrypt DRPE data successfully when only the ciphertext is intercepted. PMID:26192505

  18. Micro-antennas for the phase and amplitude modulation of terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingwen; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Based on the localized surface plasmons (LSPs), a series of C-shaped slits antennas are designed to modulate the phase and amplitude of the cross-polarized transmitted wave in THz waveband. By adjusting the structure parameters of the antenna unit, arbitrary phase and amplitude modulation of the cross-polarized THz wave can be obtained. The C-shaped slit antenna units are designed at two operating frequencies f=0.8 THz and f=1.0 THz using a commercial software package (Lumerical Solutions), which is based on the finite-difference time-domain method. According to the simulated results, principles for modulating the phase and amplitude of THz wave are summarized as follows. Firstly, the operating wavelength depends on the effective length of the antenna and the operating wavelength increases as the effective length increases; Secondly, the phase of the cross-polarized wave can be modulated from 0 to 2π by changing the opening angle of the split; Thirdly, the amplitude transmittance of the cross-polarized wave can be changed from the extinction state to the maximum value by rotating the symmetry axis of the C-shaped slit. These principles can be used to direct the design of the field modulator in any other working frequency.

  19. Quasi-coherent performance of convolutionally-coded continuous phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Nieto, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) schemes are advantageous for low-power radios. The constant envelope transmit signal is more efficient for both linear and non-linear amplifier architectures. A standard, coherent CPM receiver can take advantage of modulation memory and is more complex than a coherent Phase Shift Keyed receiver. But the CPM signal can be demodulated non-coherently and still take advantage of the trellis structure inherent in the modulation. With this complexity reduction, the CPM receiver is comparable in performance to a Phase Shift Keyed radio with the power utilization of a Frequency Shift-Keyed design. In this paper, we discuss two methods for increasing the modulation memory of the CPM signal. In the first method, the distribution of the transmitted symbol across multiple phase pulses is investigated and the bit error rate analyzed. In the next method we address the addition of convolutioncodes. In both cases the effects of the CPM memory to quasi-coherent demodulation is analyzed and discussed. The differences in complexity will be analyzed and the overall performance enhancements of several different modulation schemes will be illustrated. 1

  20. Hybrid intensity-modulation-to-phase-remodulation optical wavelength reuse transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Hung; Tseng, Meng-Chun; Tseng, Cheng-Han

    2015-12-01

    A hybrid intensity-modulation (IM)-to-phase-remodulation optical wavelength reuse transport system is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. Based on the transport system, an optical carrier can be intensity-modulated with an orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) signal and then phase-remodulated with a radio frequency (RF) signal prior to communicating its destination through a span of single mode fiber. The OFDM signal at the receiver end can be directly detected using a photodetector (PD), and the phase-modulated RF signal can be detected by another PD after being converted back to intensity-modulation format by a semiconductor laser. In this study, the working window of the semiconductor laser-composed phase-modulation-format-to-IM-format converter is not fixed. The converter can be flexibly adjusted to align with the wavelength of the employed optical carrier. Experimental results prove that both OFDM and RF signals can be clearly detected with an error-free transmission. Evident interference is not found between both signals at the receiver end.

  1. Ligand field spectroscopy of Cu(II) and Ag(II) complexes in the gas phase: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Ljiljana; Cox, Hazel; Goren, Alan; Aitken, Georgina D C; Stace, Anthony J

    2003-01-01

    Ligand field spectra have been recorded in the gas phase for the two series of complexes containing either Cu(II) or Ag(II) in association with pyridine. Where comparisons are possible, the gas phase spectra match those recorded in the condensed phase; however, for Ag(II) systems the results differ in interpretation. The Ag(II) data are attributed to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer process, and the Cu(II) data (spectral region and extinction coefficient) match the characteristics of a d-d transition. A detailed theoretical analysis of two complexes. [Cu(py)4]2+ and [Ag(py)4]2+ provides evidence of a minimum energy, D4h structure and two less stable D2h and D2d structures within approximately 60 kJ mol(-1). From these structures it is possible to identify a range of optically and vibronically allowed transitions that could contribute to spectra observed in the gas phase. In the case of calculations on [Ag(py)4]2+ there is strong evidence of an electronic transition that would account for the observation of charge transfer in the experiments. Less detailed calculations on [Cu(py)6]2+ and [Ag(py)6]2+ show structural evidence of extensive Jahn Teller distortion. Taken together with incremental binding energies calculated for complexes containing between two and six pyridine molecules, these results show that the level of theory adopted is capable of providing a semi-quantitative understanding of the experimental data. PMID:14527220

  2. Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

    2005-08-03

    This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and

  3. Growth and phase velocity of self-modulated beam-driven plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; Gruener, Florian; Leemans, Wim

    2011-09-20

    A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to the self-modulation instability. This instability is analyzed and the growth rate is calculated, including the phase relation. The phase velocity of the wake is shown to be significantly less than the beam velocity. These results indicate that the energy gain of a plasma accelerator driven by a self-modulated beam will be severely limited by dephasing. In the long-beam, strongly-coupled regime, dephasing is reached in a homogeneous plasma in less than four e-foldings, independent of beam-plasma parameters.

  4. Detrimental effect of self-phase modulation on the performance of Brillouin distributed fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Foaleng, Stella M; Rodríguez-Barrios, Félix; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; González-Herráez, Miguel; Thévenaz, Luc

    2011-01-15

    We show that the spectral broadening of the pump pulse through self-phase modulation in a time-domain distributed Brillouin sensor has a considerably detrimental effect in the measurement, especially in the case of long distances and high-resolution pulses. Using 30 ns pump pulses with peak power of 276 mW, self-phase modulation leads to a doubling of the effective gain linewidth after some 20 km, which is equivalent to a contrast loss of 2dB in the measurement. The impact is higher for shorter pulses (higher resolution). The theoretical modeling is fully confirmed by experimental results. PMID:21263465

  5. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  6. Electronic heterodyne recording and processing of optical holograms using phase modulated reference waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.; Pao, Y.-H.; Claspy, P. C.

    1978-01-01

    The use of a phase-modulated reference wave for the electronic heterodyne recording and processing of a hologram is described. Heterodyne recording is used to eliminate the self-interference terms of a hologram and to create a Leith-Upatnieks hologram with coaxial object and reference waves. Phase modulation is also shown to be the foundation of a multiple-view hologram system. When combined with hologram scale transformations, heterodyne recording is the key to general optical processing. Spatial filtering is treated as an example.

  7. Effects of polarization and phase modulation on the focal spot in 4Pi microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaocong; You, Shangting; Fang, Yue; Wang, Yifan; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2016-07-01

    In 4Pi microscopy, the intensity and polarization distributions of the focal spot directly determine the system resolution, influencing its extended applications. This paper illustrates how the focal spot is affected by the polarization and phase modulation of the incident beams. Various combinations of polarization states and phase modulations are considered and their effects on the focal spot are investigated. The optimal configurations for generating a solid spot and a doughnut-shaped spot are proposed. This paper provides the theoretical basis and reference for extended applications, such as super-resolution confocal microscopy, 4Pi microscopy or 4Pi-STED microscopy.

  8. L-Band Transmit/Receive Module for Phase-Stable Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andricos, Constantine; Edelstein, Wendy; Krimskiy, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been shown to provide very sensitive measurements of surface deformation and displacement on the order of 1 cm. Future systematic measurements of surface deformation will require this capability over very large areas (300 km) from space. To achieve these required accuracies, these spaceborne sensors must exhibit low temporal decorrelation and be temporally stable systems. An L-band (24-cmwavelength) InSAR instrument using an electronically steerable radar antenna is suited to meet these needs. In order to achieve the 1-cm displacement accuracy, the phased array antenna requires phase-stable transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The T/R module operates at L-band (1.24 GHz) and has less than 1- deg absolute phase stability and less than 0.1-dB absolute amplitude stability over temperature. The T/R module is also high power (30 W) and power efficient (60-percent overall efficiency). The design is currently implemented using discrete components and surface mount technology. The basic T/R module architecture is augmented with a calibration loop to compensate for temperature variations, component variations, and path loss variations as a function of beam settings. The calibration circuit consists of an amplitude and phase detector, and other control circuitry, to compare the measured gain and phase to a reference signal and uses this signal to control a precision analog phase shifter and analog attenuator. An architecture was developed to allow for the module to be bidirectional, to operate in both transmit and receive mode. The architecture also includes a power detector used to maintain a transmitter power output constant within 0.1 dB. The use of a simple, stable, low-cost, and high-accuracy gain and phase detector made by Analog Devices (AD8302), combined with a very-high efficiency T/R module, is novel. While a self-calibrating T/R module capability has been sought for years, a practical and cost-effective solution has

  9. Growth and phase velocity of self-modulated beam-driven plasma waves.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Grüner, F J; Leemans, W P

    2011-09-30

    A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to the self-modulation instability. This instability is analyzed and the growth rate is calculated, including the phase relation. The phase velocity of the wake is shown to be significantly less than the beam velocity. These results indicate that the energy gain of a plasma accelerator driven by a self-modulated beam will be severely limited by dephasing. In the long-beam, strongly coupled regime, dephasing is reached in a homogeneous plasma in less than four e foldings, independent of beam-plasma parameters. PMID:22107202

  10. Growth and Phase Velocity of Self-Modulated Beam-Driven Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Gruener, F. J.

    2011-09-30

    A long, relativistic particle beam propagating in an overdense plasma is subject to the self-modulation instability. This instability is analyzed and the growth rate is calculated, including the phase relation. The phase velocity of the wake is shown to be significantly less than the beam velocity. These results indicate that the energy gain of a plasma accelerator driven by a self-modulated beam will be severely limited by dephasing. In the long-beam, strongly coupled regime, dephasing is reached in a homogeneous plasma in less than four e foldings, independent of beam-plasma parameters.

  11. Modulation of Different Phases of Formalin Test by Force Swim Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad; Azhdari-Zarmehri, Hassan; Mosavi, Faeze; Haghdoost-Yazdi, Hashem; Nazeri, Masoud; Shabani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The formalin test is the most accepted chemical test for evaluation of nociception. It requires the injection of an adequate amount of formalin into the surface of the hindpaw. Formalin test consists of phase 1 (0–7 min) and phase 2 (15–60) in which the animal shows painful behaviors. These phases are separated with a quiet phase named interphase, in which the nociceptive responses are decreased or completely disappeared. Methods: The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of swim stress at different heights of water on different phases of the formalin test in male rats. Results: Swim stress decreased nociceptive behaviors in first phase and prolonged interphase or delayed the start of second phase in a water height dependent manner. Swim stress in 25 and 50cm completely abolished the nociceptive behaviors in phase 1. Discussion: The present results showed different pain modulation during different phases of the formalin test and elucidated the impact of swim stress on duration of interphase. Interphase considered as an inactive period, but a recent research has shown that active inhibitory mechanisms are involved in the modulation of pain during this period. Therefore, swim stress may be considered as a useful tool for study of the basic inhibitory mechanisms underlying attenuation of nociceptive behaviors between phase 1 and 2 of the formalin test. PMID:27284395

  12. Nickel (II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; MA Goyette

    2004-06-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nmol kg{sup -1}. The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo-and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  13. Nickel(II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; M.A. Goyette

    2003-03-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nanomolal (nm). The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo- and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  14. Measurement of gas-phase ionic mercury(II) species in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, W.J.; Lindberg, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    One of the important questions in the biogeochemical cycling of mercury is the speciation of mercury in the atmosphere. Although a large fraction of Hg in ambient air is Hg(O), a small fraction is believed to be gas-phase Hg(II). This fraction is highly water-soluble and thus is important to explaining the high concentration of Hg in precipitation. We have developed a novel technique for measuring gas-phase Hg(II), using a high-flow refluxing mist chamber to trap the water-soluble Hg(II) in an aerosol mist. Measured concentrations of gas-phase Hg(II) in ambient air are generally in the range 0.05-0.1 ng/m{sup 3}, or 2-4% of the total gaseous Hg. In this talk, representative data under different atmospheric and geographic conditions will be presented, along with a summary of some of the experimental difficulties and unanswered questions.

  15. Modulation of mixed-phase titania photoluminescence by oxygen adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Pallotti, D.; Orabona, E.; Amoruso, S.; Maddalena, P.; Lettieri, S.

    2014-07-21

    We investigate the effect of oxygen (O{sub 2}) adsorption on photoluminescence properties of mixed-phase titania nanoparticle films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition, aiming to assess preliminary conclusions about the feasibility of opto-chemical sensing based on titania. We evidence that O{sub 2} produces opposite responses in rutile and anatase photoluminescence efficiency, highlighting interesting potentialities for future double-parametric optical sensing based on titania. The results evidence an important role of lattice oxygen atoms, suggesting that the standard Schottky barrier mechanism driving the response toward gas species in most used metal-oxide sensors (e.g., tin dioxide) is not the only active mechanism in titania.

  16. Articulated Instruction Objectives Guide for Typewriting (Module 1.0--Typewriting I) (Module 2.0--Typewriting II). Project Period, March 1981-February 1982 (Pilot Model). Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Barbara; And Others

    Developed during the course of a project designed to provide a continuous, competency-based line of vocational training in business and office education programs at the secondary and postsecondary levels, this package consists of an instructor's guide and learning modules for use in Typewriting I and Typewriting II. Various aspects of implementing…

  17. Articulated Instruction Objectives Guide for Accounting (Module 5.0--Accounting I) (Module 6.0--Accounting II). Project Period, March 1981-February 1982 (Pilot Model). Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Wylda; And Others

    Developed during a project designed to provide a continuous, competency-based line of vocational training in business and office education programs at the secondary and postsecondary levels, this package consists of an instructor's guide and learning modules for use in Accounting I and II. Various aspects of implementing and articulating secondary…

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes-Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. his phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impur...

  19. SH-2F LAMPS Instructional Systems Development: Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Hymes, Jonah P.

    This project was one of four aircrew training development projects in a continuing study of the methodology, effectiveness, and resource requirements of the Instructional Systems Development (ISD) process. This report covers the Phase II activities of a two-phase project for the development of aircrew training for SH-2F anti-submarine warfare…

  20. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  1. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  2. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  3. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  4. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food items…

  5. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... States (including but not limited to fish, shellfish, wildlife, other natural resources, and the public... substantial threat to the public health or welfare of the United States (including, but not limited to...

  6. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... States (including but not limited to fish, shellfish, wildlife, other natural resources, and the public... substantial threat to the public health or welfare of the United States (including, but not limited to...

  7. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... States (including but not limited to fish, shellfish, wildlife, other natural resources, and the public... substantial threat to the public health or welfare of the United States (including, but not limited to...

  8. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Operational Response Phases for Oil Removal § 300.305 Phase II... States (including but not limited to fish, shellfish, wildlife, other natural resources, and the public... substantial threat to the public health or welfare of the United States (including, but not limited to...

  9. Extension and Public Service in the University of Illinois. Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana.

    Phase II of the report on the problem outlined in Phase I deals with specific recommendations for expanding and improving the extension and public service functions of the University of Illinois. To be effective, the university needs a master plan in which the four essential ingredients must be (1) broad, strong and explicit policy commitments by…

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  11. Career Ladders and Core Curriculum in Human Services. Phase II Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soong, Robert K.

    This portion of Phase II of the Social Service Aide Project, a program of exemplary education for the career development of paraprofessionals in social and/or human services, represented an attempt to broaden the career ladders developed during Phase I and to extend the core curriculum above and below the Associate in Arts degree. The scheme of…

  12. Proteomic comparison of phase I and II coxiella burnetii cells reveals potential virulence biomarkers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coxiella burnetii, a category B biological warfare agent, causes several worldwide outbreaks of zoonotic disease each year. In order to identify C. burnetii virulence factors, the virulent phase I and avirulent phase II variants of the Nine Mile RSA strains, were propagated in embryonated hen eggs ...

  13. Phase relations between total solar irradiance and the Mg II index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. J.; Xu, J. C.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2016-01-01

    The Mg II index is usually used to represent the brightening contribution to total solar irradiance (TSI) by solar bright structures, such as faculae and network. In order to understand variations of TSI, phase relations of TSI and the chromospheric Mg II index is investigated on time-scales of one year and longer. The NOAA daily Mg II index at the time interval of November 17, 1978-October 24, 2007 is utilized to carry out correlation analyses respectively with the daily ACRIM and PMOD composites of TSI. The Mg II index is found to lead TSI by about one solar rotation period for time-scales of one year and longer. Correlation of TSI with the Mg II index on the time-scale of one year is sometimes significantly positive, sometimes statistically insignificant, and sometimes even significantly negative. When sunspot darkening is dominant, the correlation between TSI and Mg II is either negative or not significant. When TSI is backward shifted vs the Mg II index by about one rotation period, correlation between them becomes significantly positive in all years. Thus, it is after about one rotation period that a more prominent intensification is inferred to be contributed to TSI than that immediately, by bright constructions, which is represented by the Mg II index. We propose an explanation for the phase relationship of TSI and the Mg II index.

  14. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Heather A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Geraghty, Daniel E; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H; Krebs, Shelly J; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; McElrath, M Juliana; Montefiori, David C; Bailer, Robert T; Koup, Richard A; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H; Thomas, Rasmi

    2015-07-15

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1-specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120-204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial. PMID:26180102

  15. Optimized generation of spatial qudits by using a pure phase spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, J. J. M.; Rebón, L.; Solís-Prosser, M. A.; Neves, L.; Ledesma, S.; Iemmi, C.

    2014-11-01

    We present a method for preparing arbitrary pure states of spatial qudits, namely, D-dimensional (D≥slant 2) quantum systems carrying information in the transverse momentum and position of single photons. For this purpose, a set of D slits with complex transmission are displayed on a spatial light modulator (SLM). In a recent work we have shown a method that requires a single phase-only SLM to control independently the complex coefficients which define the quantum state of dimension D. The amplitude information was codified by introducing phase gratings inside each slit, and the phase value of the complex transmission was added to the phase gratings. After a spatial filtering process, we obtained in the image plane the desired qudit state. Although this method has proven to be a good alternative to compact the previously reported architectures, it presents some features that could be improved. In this paper we present an alternative scheme to codify the required phase values that minimizes the effects of temporal phase fluctuations associated to the SLM where the codification is carried out. In this scheme, the amplitudes are set by appropriate phase gratings addressed at the SLM, while the relative phases are obtained by a lateral displacement of these phase gratings. We show that this method improves the quality of the prepared state and provides very high fidelities of preparation for any state. An additional advantage of this scheme is that a complete 2π modulation is obtained by shifting the grating by one period; hence the encoding is not limited by the phase modulation range achieved by the SLM. Numerical simulations, that take into account the phase fluctuations, show high fidelities for thousands of qubit states covering the whole Bloch sphere surface. Similar analyses are performed for qudits with D = 3 and D = 7.

  16. Modulation of lipid phase behavior by kosmotropic and chaotropic solutes : Experiment and thermodynamic theory.

    PubMed

    Koynova, R; Brankov, J; Tenchov, B

    1997-01-01

    By means of differential scanning calorimetry and from a review of published data we demonstrate in this work that low-molecular weight kosmotropic substances (water-structure makers) of different chemical structure such as disaccharides, proline, and glycerol have identical effects on the phase behavior of several kinds of phospholipids and glycolipids. These substances favor formation of the high-temperature inverted hexagonal phase (H(II)) and the low-temperature lamellar crystalline (L(c)) and gel (L( β )) phases at the expense of the intermediate lamellar liquid-crystalline phase (L( α )). The latter phase may completely disappear from the phase diagram at high enough solute concentration. By contrast, chaotropic substances (water-structure breakers) such as sodium thiocyanate and guanidine hydrochloride expand the existence range of L( α ) at the expense of the adjacent L( β ) and H(II) phases. Moreover, chaotropes are able to induce the appearance of missing intermediate liquid-crystalline phases in lipids displaying direct L( β )→H(II) transitions in pure water. In previous publications we have considered the influence of chaotropic and kosmotropic substances on the lipid phase behavior as a manifestation of their indirect (Hofmeister) interactions with the lipid aggregates. For a quantitative characterization of this effect, here we derive a general thermodynamic equation between lipid phase transition temperature and solute concentration, analogous to the Clapeyron-Clausius equation between transition temperature and pressure. It provides a clear description in physical quantities of the disparate effects of kosmotropic and chaotropic substances on the relative stability of the lipid-water phases. According to this equation, the magnitude of the solute effect is proportional to the hydration difference of the adjacent lipid phases and inversely proportional to the transition latent heat. The sign and magnitude of the transition shifts depend also

  17. Etoposide-induced cell cycle delay and arrest-dependent modulation of DNA topoisomerase II in small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P. J.; Souès, S.; Gottlieb, T.; Falk, S. J.; Watson, J. V.; Osborne, R. J.; Bleehen, N. M.

    1994-01-01

    As an approach to the rational design of combination chemotherapy involving the anti-cancer DNA topoisomerase II poison etoposide (VP-16), we have studied the dynamic changes occurring in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell populations during protracted VP-16 exposure. Cytometric methods were used to analyse changes in target enzyme availability and cell cycle progression in a SCLC cell line, mutant for the tumour-suppressor gene p53 and defective in the ability to arrest at the G1/S phase boundary. At concentrations up to 0.25 microM VP-16, cells became arrested in G2 by 24 h exposure, whereas at concentrations 0.25-2 microM G2 arrest was preceded by a dose-dependent early S-phase delay, confirmed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Recovery potential was determined by stathmokinetic analysis and was studied further in aphidicolin-synchronised cultures released from G1/S and subsequently exposed to VP-16 in early S-phase. Cells not experiencing a VP-16-induced S-phase delay entered G2 delay dependent upon the continued presence of VP-16. These cells could progress to mitosis during a 6-24 h period after drug removal. Cells experiencing an early S-phase delay remained in long-term G2 arrest with greatly reducing ability to enter mitosis up to 24 h after removal of VP-16. Irreversible G2 arrest was delimited by the induction of significant levels of DNA cleavage or fragmentation, not associated with overt apoptosis, in the majority of cells. Western blotting of whole-cell preparations showed increases in topoisomerase II levels (up to 4-fold) attributable to cell cycle redistribution, while nuclei from cells recovering from S-phase delay showed enhanced immunoreactivity with an anti-topoisomerase II alpha antibody. The results imply that traverse of G1/S and early S-phase in the presence of a specific topoisomerase II poison gives rise to progressive low-level trapping of topoisomerase II alpha, enhanced topoisomerase II alpha availability and the subsequent

  18. Heat transfer in the plastic phases I and II of cyclopentane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, V. A.; Sagan, V. V.; Revyakin, V. P.; Karachevtseva, A. V.; Pursky, O. I.

    2014-09-01

    Thermal conductivity of solid cyclopentane C5H10 has been measured at isochoric conditions in the plastic phases I and II for samples of different densities. Isochoric thermal conductivity is nearly constant in phase II and increases with temperature in phase I. Such behaviour is attributed to weakening of the translational orientational coupling which, in turn, leads to a decrease of phonon scattering on rotational excitations. The experimental data are described in terms of a modified Debye model of thermal conductivity with allowance for heat transfer by both low-frequency phonons and diffusive modes.

  19. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1994, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions for the year, and outlines future work. The PVUSA project has five objectives. These are designed to narrow the gap between a large utility industry that is unfamiliar with PV and a small PV industry that is aware of a potentially large utility market but unfamiliar with how to meet its requirements. The objectives are: Evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of promising PV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components side by side at a single location; Assess PV system operation and maintenance in a utility setting; Compare US utilities hands-on experience in designing, procuring, and operating PV systems; and, Document and disseminate knowledge gained from the project.

  20. Quantitative security evaluation of optical encryption using hybrid phase- and amplitude-modulated keys.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Tamás; Koppa, Pál

    2012-02-20

    In the increasing number of system approaches published in the field of optical encryption, the security level of the system is evaluated by qualitative and empirical methods. To quantify the security of the optical system, we propose to use the equivalent of the key length routinely used in algorithmic encryption. We provide a calculation method of the number of independent keys and deduce the binary key length for optical data encryption. We then investigate and optimize the key length of the combined phase- and amplitude-modulated key encryption in the holographic storage environment, which is one of the promising solutions for the security enhancement of single- and double-random phase-encoding encryption and storage systems. We show that a substantial growth of the key length can be achieved by optimized phase and amplitude modulation compared to phase-only encryption. We also provide experimental confirmation of the model results. PMID:22358164