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Sample records for molecular basis forobligate

  1. The genome of Methylobacillus flagellatus, the molecular basis forobligate methylotrophy, and the polyphyletic origin ofmethylotrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Lapidus, Alla; Han, Cliff; Goodwin,Lynne; Saunders, Liz; Brettin, Tom; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Lucas,Susan; Richardson, Paul M.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2007-01-08

    Along with methane, methanol and methylated amines representimportant biogenic atmospheric constituents, thus not only methanotrophs,but also non-methanotrophic methylotrophs play a significant role inglobal carbon cycling. The complete genome of a model obligate methanoland methylamine utilizer, Methylobacillus flagellatus (strain KT) wassequenced. The genome is represented by a single circular chromosome ofapproximately 3 Mb pairs, potentially encoding a total of 2,766 proteins.Based on genome analysis as well as the results from previous genetic andmutational analyses, methylotrophy is enabled by methanol- andmethylamine dehydrogenases, the tetrahydromethanopterin-linkedformaldehyde oxidation pathway, the assimilatory and dissimilatorybranches of the ribulose monophosphate cycle, and by formatedehydrogenases. Some of the methylotrophy genes are present in more thanone (identical or non-identical) copy. The obligate dependence on singlecarbon compounds appears to be due to the incomplete tricarboxylic acidcycle, as no genes potentially encoding alpha ketoglutarate, malate orsuccinate dehydrogenases are identifiable. The genome of M. flagellatuswas compared, in terms of methylotrophy functions, to the previouslysequenced genomes of three methylotrophs: Methylobacterium extorquens(Alphaproteobacterium, 7 Mbp), Methylibium petroleophilum(Betaproteobacterium, 4 Mbp), and Methylococcus capsulatus(Gammaproteobacterium, 3.3 Mbp). Strikingly, metabolically and/orphylogenetically, methylotrophy functions in M. flagellatus were moresimilar to the ones in M. capsulatus and M. extorquens than to the onesin the more closely related M. petroleophilum, providing the firstgenomic evidence for the polyphyletic origin of methylotrophy inBetaproteobacteria.

  2. Molecular basis of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Ferguson, Laura; Harris, R Adron

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication causes cellular changes in the brain that last for hours, while chronic alcohol use induces widespread neuroadaptations in the nervous system that can last a lifetime. Chronic alcohol use and the progression into dependence involve the remodeling of synapses caused by changes in gene expression produced by alcohol. The progression of alcohol use, abuse, and dependence can be divided into stages, which include intoxication, withdrawal, and craving. Each stage is associated with specific changes in gene expression, cellular function, brain circuits, and ultimately behavior. What are the molecular mechanisms underlying the transition from recreational use (acute) to dependence (chronic)? What cellular adaptations result in drug memory retention, leading to the persistence of addictive behaviors, even after prolonged drug abstinence? Research into the neurobiology of alcoholism aims to answer these questions. This chapter will describe the molecular adaptations caused by alcohol use and dependence, and will outline key neurochemical participants in alcoholism at the molecular level, which are also potential targets for therapy. PMID:25307570

  3. Molecular basis of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, G; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1998-02-01

    Vaccines represent the most cost-effective means to prevent infectious diseases. Most of the vaccines which are currently available were developed long before the era of molecular biology and biotechnology. They were obtained following empirical approaches leading to the inactivation or to the attenuation of microorganisms, without any knowledge neither of the mechanisms of pathogenesis of the disease they were expected to protect from, nor of the immune responses elicited by the infectious agents or by the vaccine itself. The past two decades have seen an impressive progress in the field of immunology and molecular biology, which have allowed a better understanding of the interactions occurring between microbes and their hosts. This basic knowledge has represented an impetus towards the generation of better vaccines and the development of new vaccines. In this monograph we briefly summarize some of the most important biotechnological approaches that are currently followed in the development of new vaccines, and provide details on an approach to vaccine development: the genetic detoxification of bacterial toxins. Such an approach has been particularly successful in the rational design of a new vaccine against pertussis, which has been shown to be extremely efficacious and safe. It has been applied to the construction of powerful mucosal adjuvants, for administration of vaccines at mucosal surfaces. PMID:9789264

  4. A Molecular Basis of Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the molecular basis of cancer, focusing on genetics of the disease. Indicates that human cancers are initiated by oncogenes (altered versions of normal genes) and that in one case the critical alteration is a single point mutation that changes one amino acid in the protein encoded by the gene. (JN)

  5. The Molecular Basis of Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Allan C.

    1985-01-01

    Discovery that mutations accumulate at steady rates over time in the genes of all lineages of plants and animals has led to new insights into evolution at the molecular and organismal levels. Discusses molecular evolution, examining deoxyribonuclei acid (DNA) sequences, morphological distances, and codon rate of change. (DH)

  6. The Molecular Basis of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Walter J.

    1985-01-01

    Basic architecture of embryo development appears to be under homeobox control (a short stretch of DNA). Outlines research on this genetic segment in fruit flies which led to identification of this control on the embryo's spatial organization. Indicates that molecular mechanisms underlying development may be much more universal than previously…

  7. Molecular Basis of Symbiotic Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Xavier; Staehelin, Christian; Broughton, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotes often form symbioses with microorganisms. Among these, associations between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen input into various ecological niches. Plants of many different families have evolved the capacity to develop root or stem nodules with diverse genera of soil bacteria. Of these, symbioses between legumes and rhizobia (Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Rhizobium) are the most important from an agricultural perspective. Nitrogen-fixing nodules arise when symbiotic rhizobia penetrate their hosts in a strictly controlled and coordinated manner. Molecular codes are exchanged between the symbionts in the rhizosphere to select compatible rhizobia from pathogens. Entry into the plant is restricted to bacteria that have the “keys” to a succession of legume “doors”. Some symbionts intimately associate with many different partners (and are thus promiscuous), while others are more selective and have a narrow host range. For historical reasons, narrow host range has been more intensively investigated than promiscuity. In our view, this has given a false impression of specificity in legume-Rhizobium associations. Rather, we suggest that restricted host ranges are limited to specific niches and represent specialization of widespread and more ancestral promiscuous symbioses. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms governing symbiotic promiscuity in rhizobia and show that it is controlled by a number of molecular keys. PMID:10704479

  8. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  9. Molecular basis for color vision.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, T

    1994-05-01

    Amino acid sequences of four kinds of chicken cone pigments and two kinds of nocturnal gecko visual pigment were determined. Calculations of amino acid identities indicate that gecko pigments should be cone pigments. A phylogenetic tree of visual pigments constructed demonstrated that cone pigments evolved earlier than rod pigments (rhodopsins), indicating that daylight vision including color vision appeared earlier than twilight vision. The divergence of cone pigments to rhodopsins would be caused by replacing basic amino acid residues to acidic ones according to net charge calculations. A comparison between chicken rhodopsin and cone pigments (chicken green and red) displayed that the cone pigments are faster in regeneration from 11-cis retinal and opsin, faster in formation of meta II-intermediate and shorter in lifetime of meta II-intermediate than rhodopsin. These facts would partly explain the rapid dark adaptation, the rapid light response and the low photosensitivity of cones compared with rods. In comparison with di- and tri-chromatic color visions, chicken tetra-chromatic vision was discussed on the basis of both absorption spectra of cone pigments and filtering effect of oil droplets. PMID:8011932

  10. The Molecular Basis of Memory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We propose a tripartite biochemical mechanism for memory. Three physiologic components are involved, namely, the neuron (individual and circuit), the surrounding neural extracellular matrix, and the various trace metals distributed within the matrix. The binding of a metal cation affects a corresponding nanostructure (shrinking, twisting, expansion) and dielectric sensibility of the chelating node (address) within the matrix lattice, sensed by the neuron. The neural extracellular matrix serves as an electro-elastic lattice, wherein neurons manipulate multiple trace metals (n > 10) to encode, store, and decode coginive information. The proposed mechanism explains brains low energy requirements and high rates of storage capacity described in multiples of Avogadro number (NA = 6 × 1023). Supportive evidence correlates memory loss to trace metal toxicity or deficiency, or breakdown in the delivery/transport of metals to the matrix, or its degradation. Inherited diseases revolving around dysfunctional trace metal metabolism and memory dysfunction, include Alzheimer's disease (Al, Zn, Fe), Wilson’s disease (Cu), thalassemia (Fe), and autism (metallothionein). The tripartite mechanism points to the electro-elastic interactions of neurons with trace metals distributed within the neural extracellular matrix, as the molecular underpinning of “synaptic plasticity” affecting short-term memory, long-term memory, and forgetting. PMID:23050060

  11. The molecular basis of positional information.

    PubMed

    Summerbell, D; Smith, J C; Maden, M

    1991-01-01

    Embryologists have dreamed of their own particular philosophers stone for 100 years. During that time they have repeatedly demonstrated the likely existence of signalling molecules or morphogens that control the pattern of development in the embryo. Now at last seems possible that some of these morphogens may have been identified. We review current evidence for the molecular basis of positional information. PMID:1768796

  12. The molecular basis of peanut allergy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures, and discusses how modif...

  13. The molecular basis of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Geoffrey A; Maleki, Soheila J; Pedersen, Lars C

    2014-05-01

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures and discusses how modifications both enzymatic and non-enzymatic affect digestion, innate immune recognition, and IgE interactions. The allergen structures help explain cross-reactivity among allergens from different sources, which is useful in improving patient diagnostics. Surprisingly, it was recently noted that similar short peptide sequences among unrelated peanut allergens could also be a source of cross-reactivity. The molecular features of peanut allergens continue to inform predictions and provide new research directions in the study of allergic disease. PMID:24633613

  14. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  15. The molecular basis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are caused by dermal injuries such as trauma and burns to the deep dermis, which are red, raised, itchy and painful. They can cause cosmetic disfigurement or contractures if craniofacial areas or mobile region of the skin are affected. Abnormal wound healing with more extracellular matrix deposition than degradation will result in HTS formation. This review will introduce the physiology of wound healing, dermal HTS formation, treatment and difference with keloids in the skin, and it also review the current advance of molecular basis of HTS including the involvement of cytokines, growth factors, and macrophages via chemokine pathway, to bring insights for future prevention and treatment of HTS. PMID:27574672

  16. The molecular basis of myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    KITAMURA, Toshio; INOUE, Daichi; OKOCHI-WATANABE, Naoko; KATO, Naoko; KOMENO, Yukiko; LU, Yang; ENOMOTO, Yutaka; DOKI, Noriko; UCHIDA, Tomoyuki; KAGIYAMA, Yuki; TOGAMI, Katsuhiro; KAWABATA, Kimihito C.; NAGASE, Reina; HORIKAWA, Sayuri; HAYASHI, Yasutaka; SAIKA, Makoto; FUKUYAMA, Tomofusa; IZAWA, Kumi; OKI, Toshihiko; NAKAHARA, Fumio; KITAURA, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies consist of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). The latter two diseases have preleukemic features and frequently evolve to AML. As with solid tumors, multiple mutations are required for leukemogenesis. A decade ago, these gene alterations were subdivided into two categories: class I mutations stimulating cell growth or inhibiting apoptosis; and class II mutations that hamper differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In mouse models, class I mutations such as the Bcr-Abl fusion kinase induce MPN by themselves and some class II mutations such as Runx1 mutations induce MDS. Combinations of class I and class II mutations induce AML in a variety of mouse models. Thus, it was postulated that hematopoietic cells whose differentiation is blocked by class II mutations would autonomously proliferate with class I mutations leading to the development of leukemia. Recent progress in high-speed sequencing has enabled efficient identification of novel mutations in a variety of molecules including epigenetic factors, splicing factors, signaling molecules and proteins in the cohesin complex; most of these are not categorized as either class I or class II mutations. The functional consequences of these mutations are now being extensively investigated. In this article, we will review the molecular basis of hematological malignancies, focusing on mouse models and the interfaces between these models and clinical findings, and revisit the classical class I/II hypothesis. PMID:25504228

  17. The molecular basis of allorecognition in ascidians.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shlomo, Rachel

    2008-11-01

    The process of allorecognition consists of an ability to discriminate self from non-self. This discrimination is used either to identify non-self cells and reject them ("non-self histocompatibility") or to identify self cells and reject them (as in the avoidance of self-fertilization by hermaphrodites ("self incompatibility"). The molecular basis governing these two distinct systems has been studied recently in hermaphroditic ascidian urochordates. Harada et al. postulated two highly polymorphic self-incompatibility loci, Themis (A and B), that are transcribed from both strands, forward to yield sperm (s-) trans-membrane antigen, and reverse to yield the egg vitelline coat (v-) receptor. De Tomaso et al. characterized a candidate histocompatibility locus, encoding a highly variable immunoglobulin. Nyholm et al. isolated its candidate allorecognition receptor, fester. Only a minute similarity was found in the structure of the genes involved. It appears that ascidian harbor two very separate types of labeling and recognition genetic systems: one for self and the other for non-self. PMID:18937348

  18. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  19. Molecular basis of fracture in polystyrene films

    SciTech Connect

    Sambasivam, M.; Klein, A.; Thomas, T.N.; Mohammadi, N.; Sperling, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the fracture of polystyrene films, a custom built dental burr grinding instrument was used. Films were made from latexes, compression molded polystyrene, and by photopolymerization. Latexes were prepared by direct miniemulsification of polystyrene using sodium lauryl sulfate as surfactant and cetyl and stearyl alcohols as co-surfactants. Grinding of various films was carried out at room temperature. GPC was used to determine the molecular weight before and after grinding. From the molecular weight reduction, the number of chain scissions per unit volume was determined. The energy required for the grinding process was also measured. The results are consistent with a model of exciting 300{+-}150 bonds (per chain fracture) to the breaking point. The most probable deformation mode, consuming maximum energy is envisaged as the scissor-like opening of the 109{degrees} -C-C-C bond angle.

  20. Molecular basis of angiosperm tree architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The shoot architecture of trees greatly impacts orchard and forest management methods. Amassing greater knowledge of the molecular genetics behind tree form can benefit these industries as well as contribute to basic knowledge of plant developmental biology. This review covers basic components of ...

  1. Molecular basis of viral and microbial pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, R.; Goebel, W.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Correlation Between Viroid Structure and Pathogenicty; Antigenicity of the Influenza Haemagglutinia Membrane Glycoprotein; Viral Glycoproteins as Determinants of Pathogenicity; Virus Genes Involved in Host Range and Pathogenicity; Molecular Heterogenetiy of Pathogenic Herpus Viruses; Recombination of Foreign (Viral) DNA with Host Genome: Studies in Vivo and in a Cell-Free system; Disorders of Cellular Neuro-Functions by Persistent Viral Infection; Pathogenic Aspects of Measles Virus-Persistent Infections in Man; Analysis of the Dual Lineage Specificity of E26 Avian Leukemia Virus; Mx Gene Control of Influenza Virus Susceptibility; Shiga and Shika-Like Toxins: A Family of Related Cytokinons; and Molecular Mechanisms of Pathogenicity in Shigella Flexneri.

  2. Molecular basis of coiled-coil formation.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Michel O; Jelesarov, Ilian; Matousek, William M; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Missimer, John H; Frank, Sabine; Alexandrescu, Andrei T; Kammerer, Richard A

    2007-04-24

    Coiled coils have attracted considerable interest as design templates in a wide range of applications. Successful coiled-coil design strategies therefore require a detailed understanding of coiled-coil folding. One common feature shared by coiled coils is the presence of a short autonomous helical folding unit, termed "trigger sequence," that is indispensable for folding. Detailed knowledge of trigger sequences at the molecular level is thus key to a general understanding of coiled-coil formation. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we identify and characterize here the molecular determinants that specify the helical conformation of the monomeric early folding intermediate of the GCN4 coiled coil. We demonstrate that a network of hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize the trigger-sequence helix. This network is rearranged in the final dimeric coiled-coil structure, and its destabilization significantly slows down GCN4 leucine zipper folding. Our findings provide a general explanation for the molecular mechanism of coiled-coil formation. PMID:17438295

  3. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  4. The VDAC channel: Molecular basis for selectivity.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Marco

    2016-10-01

    The voltage dependent anion-selective channel, VDAC, is the major permeability pathway by which molecules and ion cross the mitochondrial outer membrane. This pathway has evolved to optimize the flow of these substances and to control this flow by a gating process that is influenced by a variety of factors including transmembrane voltage. The permeation pathway formed through the membrane by VDAC is complex. Small ion flow is primarily influenced by the charged surface of the inner walls of the channel. Channel closure changes this landscape resulting in a change from a channel that favors anions to one that favors cations. Molecular ions interact more intimately with the inner walls of the channel and are selected by their 3-dimensional structure, not merely by their size and charge. Molecular ions typically found in cells are greatly favored over those that are not. For these larger structures the channel may form a low-energy translocation path that complements the structure of the permeant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26826035

  5. Molecular basis for amyloid-[beta] polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Laganowsky, Arthur; Landau, Meytal; Zhao, Minglei; Soriaga, Angela B.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Flot, David; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberga, David

    2011-10-19

    Amyloid-beta (A{beta}) aggregates are the main constituent of senile plaques, the histological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. A{beta} molecules form {beta}-sheet containing structures that assemble into a variety of polymorphic oligomers, protofibers, and fibers that exhibit a range of lifetimes and cellular toxicities. This polymorphic nature of A{beta} has frustrated its biophysical characterization, its structural determination, and our understanding of its pathological mechanism. To elucidate A{beta} polymorphism in atomic detail, we determined eight new microcrystal structures of fiber-forming segments of A{beta}. These structures, all of short, self-complementing pairs of {beta}-sheets termed steric zippers, reveal a variety of modes of self-association of A{beta}. Combining these atomic structures with previous NMR studies allows us to propose several fiber models, offering molecular models for some of the repertoire of polydisperse structures accessible to A{beta}. These structures and molecular models contribute fundamental information for understanding A{beta} polymorphic nature and pathogenesis.

  6. Molecular basis of an inherited epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lossin, Christoph; Wang, Dao W; Rhodes, Thomas H; Vanoye, Carlos G; George, Alfred L

    2002-06-13

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition that reflects neuronal hyperexcitability arising from largely unknown cellular and molecular mechanisms. In generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, an autosomal dominant epilepsy syndrome, mutations in three genes coding for voltage-gated sodium channel alpha or beta1 subunits (SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN1B) and one GABA receptor subunit gene (GABRG2) have been identified. Here, we characterize the functional effects of three mutations in the human neuronal sodium channel alpha subunit SCN1A by heterologous expression with its known accessory subunits, beta1 and beta2, in cultured mammalian cells. SCN1A mutations alter channel inactivation, resulting in persistent inward sodium current. This gain-of-function abnormality will likely enhance excitability of neuronal membranes by causing prolonged membrane depolarization, a plausible underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for this inherited human epilepsy. PMID:12086636

  7. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957337

  8. The molecular basis of antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Germain, R N; Sant, A J; Braunstein, N S; Ronchese, F

    1988-01-01

    We have used a multifactorial approach to investigate the relationship between the structure of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded cell surface molecules (Ia) and the recognition of Ia-bound peptide antigens by clonally distributed alpha beta heterodimeric T cell receptors (TCR). Four distinct parameters of Ia structure-function--1) control of Ia assembly and transport to the surface membrane; 2) serological reactivity with panels of monoclonal antibodies; 3) ability to present peptide antigens to T cells for functional activation; and 4) differential peptide binding independent of the TCR--have been measured. This has allowed assignment of allelically polymorphic subregions or individual residues to locations in a model class II molecular structure and attribution to these subregions and residues of specific functions such as control of alpha beta chain interaction and protein folding, antigenic peptide binding, or TCR binding. The results of these analyses have provided an internally consistent picture of the class II molecule that fits well with a hypothetical model for Ia derived by analogy from the recently solved HLA class I crystal structure. They have also given us the first clear definition of specific peptide binding residues within the general peptide binding region of Ia and have revealed an unexpected asymmetry in the structure-function relationships of the putative alpha and beta chain helical regions. Overall, the results of these studies indicate the critical importance of multi-parameter analysis in creating useful molecular models using non-chemical techniques. They also suggest that hypotheses about TCR-Ia interaction may have to take into account a significant asymmetry in the function of the two major polymorphic regions of histocompatibility molecules. PMID:3269359

  9. Molecular basis of the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Karamanolis, Georgios; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Karatzias, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder characterized by abdominal pain, discomfort and bloating. The pathophysiology of IBS is poorly understood, but the presence of psychosocial basis is now known. There is an increasing number of publications supporting the role of genetics in IBS. Most of the variations are found in genes associated with the brain-gut axis, revealing the strong correlation of brain-gut axis and IBS. miRNAs, which play critical roles in physiological processes, are not well studied in IBS. However, so far there is found an involvement of alterations in miRNA expression or sequence, in IBS symptoms. IBS phenotype is affected by epigenetic alteration and environment. Changes in DNA and histone methylation are observed in patients who suffered childhood trauma or abuse, resulting in altered gene expression, such as the glucocorticoid receptor gene. Finally, diet is another factor associated with IBS, which may contribute to symptom onset. Certain foods may affect on bacterial metabolism and epigenetic modifications, predisposing to IBS. PMID:24574707

  10. Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  11. The molecular basis of bone mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, M P; Yovos, J G

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton has the ability to perfectly adapt to external forces of the operating environment, by altering its morphology and metabolism in order to meet different needs. This unique adaptive capacity of the skeleton creates an interesting range of biological questions concerning the perception of mechanical or other kinds of signals, the type of receptor, and the molecular pathways involved in this adaptation. Studies of the characteristics of the cellular engineering provide a host of new information that confers to osteocytes the role of the protagonist in the perception and regulation of mechanical effects on the skeleton. The identity of mechanoreceptors is manifold and concerns ion channels, integrins, cell membrane, the cytoskeleton, and other systems. A similar multiplicity characterizes the intracellular signaling. This review describes recent data concerning the outward force reception systems and intracellular transduction pathways of information transfer leading to the continuous adaptation of bone tissue. Increased appreciation of the importance of the mechanical environment in regulating and determining the effectiveness of structural adjustment of the skeleton defines new horizons for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to diseases associated with bone loss. PMID:27609037

  12. Molecular and cellular basis of bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Osteoclast research has an exciting history and a challenging future. More than 3 decades ago, it became evident that bone-resorbing osteoclasts are of hematopoietic origin and are ultimately linked to the "basic multicellular unit," where they team up with the other cell types, including bone-forming osteoblasts. Since 2 decades, we have learned about the signaling pathways controlling genes relevant for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. It took another decade until the hypothesized "osteoclast differentiation" factor was discovered and was translated into an approved pharmacologic strategy. Here, the focus is on another molecular target, cathepsin K, a cysteine protease being released by the osteoclast into the resorption compartment. Genetic deletion and pharmacological blocking of cathepsin K reduces bone resorption but with ongoing bone formation. This observation not only holds great promise to become a new pharmacologic strategy, but it also provides new insights into the coordinated work of cells in the "basic multicellular unit" and thus, bridges the history and future of osteoclast research. This article is a short primer on osteoclast biology for readers of the special issue on odanacatib, a cathepsin K inhibitor. PMID:25223736

  13. An updated molecular basis for mussel immunity.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; Venier, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Non-self recognition with the consequent tolerance or immune reaction is a crucial process to succeed as living organisms. At the same time the interactions between host species and their microbiome, including potential pathogens and parasites, significantly contribute to animal life diversity. Marine filter-feeding bivalves, mussels in particular, can survive also in heavily anthropized coastal waters despite being constantly surrounded by microorganisms. Based on the first outline of the Mytilus galloprovincialis immunome dated 2011, the continuously growing transcript data and the recent release of a draft mussel genome, we explored the available sequence data and scientific literature to reinforce our knowledge on the main gene-encoded elements of the mussel immune responses, from the pathogen recognition to its clearance. We carefully investigated molecules specialized in the sensing and targeting of potential aggressors, expected to show greater molecular diversification, and outlined, whenever relevant, the interconnected cascades of the intracellular signal transduction. Aiming to explore the diversity of extracellular, membrane-bound and intracellular pattern recognition receptors in mussel, we updated a highly complex immune system, comprising molecules which are described here in detail for the first time (e.g. NOD-like receptors) or which had only been partially characterized in bivalves (e.g. RIG-like receptors). Overall, our comparative sequence analysis supported the identification of over 70 novel full-length immunity-related transcripts in M. galloprovincialis. Nevertheless, the multiplicity of gene functions relevant to immunity, the involvement of part of them in other vital processes, and also the lack of a refined mussel genome make this work still not-exhaustive and support the development of more specific studies. PMID:25700785

  14. Molecular basis for hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H

    probability of entering a non-inactivating mode was very low and independent of potassium. On the other hand, for the abnormal channel the probability of entering an inactive mode rises up to 5-fold with hyperkalemic. Four mutations have recently been detected in individuals with cold-sensitive paramyotenia congenital. Two of the cause amino acid substitutions within the III-IV intracytoplasmic loop. It is striking that one substitutes a valine for a glycine. An analysis of the molecular biology of each mutation should illuminate not only the disease phenotype but also biophysical properties of specific sub-regions of this muscle sodium channel. PMID:11980067

  15. Property-optimized Gaussian basis sets for molecular response calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Furche, Filipp

    2010-10-01

    With recent advances in electronic structure methods, first-principles calculations of electronic response properties, such as linear and nonlinear polarizabilities, have become possible for molecules with more than 100 atoms. Basis set incompleteness is typically the main source of error in such calculations since traditional diffuse augmented basis sets are too costly to use or suffer from near linear dependence. To address this problem, we construct the first comprehensive set of property-optimized augmented basis sets for elements H-Rn except lanthanides. The new basis sets build on the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets of split-valence to quadruple-zeta valence quality and add a small number of moderately diffuse basis functions. The exponents are determined variationally by maximization of atomic Hartree-Fock polarizabilities using analytical derivative methods. The performance of the resulting basis sets is assessed using a set of 313 molecular static Hartree-Fock polarizabilities. The mean absolute basis set errors are 3.6%, 1.1%, and 0.3% for property-optimized basis sets of split-valence, triple-zeta, and quadruple-zeta valence quality, respectively. Density functional and second-order Møller-Plesset polarizabilities show similar basis set convergence. We demonstrate the efficiency of our basis sets by computing static polarizabilities of icosahedral fullerenes up to C720 using hybrid density functional theory.

  16. Optimization of selected molecular orbitals in group basis sets.

    PubMed

    Ferenczy, György G; Adams, William H

    2009-04-01

    We derive a local basis equation which may be used to determine the orbitals of a group of electrons in a system when the orbitals of that group are represented by a group basis set, i.e., not the basis set one would normally use but a subset suited to a specific electronic group. The group orbitals determined by the local basis equation minimize the energy of a system when a group basis set is used and the orbitals of other groups are frozen. In contrast, under the constraint of a group basis set, the group orbitals satisfying the Huzinaga equation do not minimize the energy. In a test of the local basis equation on HCl, the group basis set included only 12 of the 21 functions in a basis set one might ordinarily use, but the calculated active orbital energies were within 0.001 hartree of the values obtained by solving the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) equation using all 21 basis functions. The total energy found was just 0.003 hartree higher than the HFR value. The errors with the group basis set approximation to the Huzinaga equation were larger by over two orders of magnitude. Similar results were obtained for PCl(3) with the group basis approximation. Retaining more basis functions allows an even higher accuracy as shown by the perfect reproduction of the HFR energy of HCl with 16 out of 21 basis functions in the valence basis set. When the core basis set was also truncated then no additional error was introduced in the calculations performed for HCl with various basis sets. The same calculations with fixed core orbitals taken from isolated heavy atoms added a small error of about 10(-4) hartree. This offers a practical way to calculate wave functions with predetermined fixed core and reduced base valence orbitals at reduced computational costs. The local basis equation can also be used to combine the above approximations with the assignment of local basis sets to groups of localized valence molecular orbitals and to derive a priori localized orbitals. An

  17. Social parasitism and the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Cini, Alessandro; Patalano, Solenn; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Busby, George B J; Cervo, Rita; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Contrasting phenotypes arise from similar genomes through a combination of losses, gains, co-option and modifications of inherited genomic material. Understanding the molecular basis of this phenotypic diversity is a fundamental challenge in modern evolutionary biology. Comparisons of the genes and their expression patterns underlying traits in closely related species offer an unrivaled opportunity to evaluate the extent to which genomic material is reorganized to produce novel traits. Advances in molecular methods now allow us to dissect the molecular machinery underlying phenotypic diversity in almost any organism, from single-celled entities to the most complex vertebrates. Here we discuss how comparisons of social parasites and their free-living hosts may provide unique insights into the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution. Social parasites evolve from a eusocial ancestor and are specialized to exploit the socially acquired resources of their closely-related eusocial host. Molecular comparisons of such species pairs can reveal how genomic material is re-organized in the loss of ancestral traits (i.e., of free-living traits in the parasites) and the gain of new ones (i.e., specialist traits required for a parasitic lifestyle). We define hypotheses on the molecular basis of phenotypes in the evolution of social parasitism and discuss their wider application in our understanding of the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity within the theoretical framework of phenotypic plasticity and shifting reaction norms. Currently there are no data available to test these hypotheses, and so we also provide some proof of concept data using the paper wasp social parasite/host system (Polistes sulcifer-Polistes dominula). This conceptual framework and first empirical data provide a spring-board for directing future genomic analyses on exploiting social parasites as a route to understanding the evolution of phenotypic specialization. PMID:25741361

  18. Social parasitism and the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cini, Alessandro; Patalano, Solenn; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Busby, George B. J.; Cervo, Rita; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Contrasting phenotypes arise from similar genomes through a combination of losses, gains, co-option and modifications of inherited genomic material. Understanding the molecular basis of this phenotypic diversity is a fundamental challenge in modern evolutionary biology. Comparisons of the genes and their expression patterns underlying traits in closely related species offer an unrivaled opportunity to evaluate the extent to which genomic material is reorganized to produce novel traits. Advances in molecular methods now allow us to dissect the molecular machinery underlying phenotypic diversity in almost any organism, from single-celled entities to the most complex vertebrates. Here we discuss how comparisons of social parasites and their free-living hosts may provide unique insights into the molecular basis of phenotypic evolution. Social parasites evolve from a eusocial ancestor and are specialized to exploit the socially acquired resources of their closely-related eusocial host. Molecular comparisons of such species pairs can reveal how genomic material is re-organized in the loss of ancestral traits (i.e., of free-living traits in the parasites) and the gain of new ones (i.e., specialist traits required for a parasitic lifestyle). We define hypotheses on the molecular basis of phenotypes in the evolution of social parasitism and discuss their wider application in our understanding of the molecular basis of phenotypic diversity within the theoretical framework of phenotypic plasticity and shifting reaction norms. Currently there are no data available to test these hypotheses, and so we also provide some proof of concept data using the paper wasp social parasite/host system (Polistes sulcifer—Polistes dominula). This conceptual framework and first empirical data provide a spring-board for directing future genomic analyses on exploiting social parasites as a route to understanding the evolution of phenotypic specialization. PMID:25741361

  19. Independent molecular basis of convergent highland adaptation in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in ...

  20. Unwinding the Molecular Basis of Interval and Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    Agostino, Patricia V.; Golombek, Diego A.; Meck, Warren H.

    2011-01-01

    Neural timing mechanisms range from the millisecond to diurnal, and possibly annual, frequencies. Two of the main processes under study are the interval timer (seconds-to-minute range) and the circadian clock. The molecular basis of these two mechanisms is the subject of intense research, as well as their possible relationship. This article summarizes data from studies investigating a possible interaction between interval and circadian timing and reviews the molecular basis of both mechanisms, including the discussion of the contribution from studies of genetically modified animal models. While there is currently no common neurochemical substrate for timing mechanisms in the brain, circadian modulation of interval timing suggests an interaction of different frequencies in cerebral temporal processes. PMID:22022309

  1. Molecular basis of host specificity in human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria display various levels of host specificity or tropism. While many bacteria can infect a wide range of hosts, certain bacteria have strict host selectivity for humans as obligate human pathogens. Understanding the genetic and molecular basis of host specificity in pathogenic bacteria is important for understanding pathogenic mechanisms, developing better animal models and designing new strategies and therapeutics for the control of microbial diseases. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial host specificity are much less understood than those of viral pathogens, in part due to the complexity of the molecular composition and cellular structure of bacterial cells. However, important progress has been made in identifying and characterizing molecular determinants of bacterial host specificity in the last two decades. It is now clear that the host specificity of bacterial pathogens is determined by multiple molecular interactions between the pathogens and their hosts. Furthermore, certain basic principles regarding the host specificity of bacterial pathogens have emerged from the existing literature. This review focuses on selected human pathogenic bacteria and our current understanding of their host specificity. PMID:26038515

  2. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  3. Oral Manifestations and Molecular Basis of Oral Genodermatoses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, A.S.; Chaudhary, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Genodermatoses refers to group of inherited monogenic disorders with skin manifestations. Many of these disorders are rare and also have oral manifestations, called oral genodermatoses. This article provides a focused review of molecular basis of important genodermatoses that affects the oral cavity and also have prominent associated dermatologic features. In several conditions discussed here, the oral findings are distinct and may provide the first clue of an underlying genetic diagnosis. The article also emphasises on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and the treatment oral genodermatoses. PMID:27437377

  4. Recent advances in the molecular basis of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Rosa; Neumann, Manuela; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome with heterogeneous molecular basis. Until recently, our knowledge was limited to a minority of cases associated with abnormalities of the tau protein or gene (MAPT). However, in 2006, mutations in progranulin (GRN) were discovered as another important cause of familial FTD. That same year, TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as the pathological protein in the most common subtypes of FTD and ALS. Since then, significant efforts have been made to understand the normal functions and regulation of GRN and TDP-43 and their roles in neurodegeneration. More recently, other DNA/RNA binding proteins (FUS, EWS and TAF15) were identified as pathological proteins in most of the remaining cases of FTD. And just six months ago, abnormal expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 was found to be the most common genetic cause of both FTD and ALS. With this remarkable progress, it appears that all the common FTD-causing genes have now been discovered and the major pathological proteins identified. This review highlights recent advances in the molecular aspects of FTD, which will provide the basis for improved patient care through the future development of more targeted diagnostic tests and therapies. PMID:22732773

  5. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  6. The molecular basis of bacterial-insect symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    Insects provide experimentally tractable and cost-effective model systems to investigate the molecular basis of animal-bacterial interactions. Recent research is revealing the central role of the insect innate immune system, especially anti-microbial peptides and reactive oxygen species, in regulating the abundance and composition of the microbiota in various insects, including Drosophila and the mosquitoes Aedes and Anopheles. Interactions between the immune system and microbiota are, however, bidirectional with evidence that members of the resident microbiota can promote immune function, conferring resistance to pathogens and parasites by both activation of immune effectors and production of toxins. Antagonistic and mutualistic interactions among bacteria have also been implicated as determinants of the microbiota composition, including exclusion of pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Some bacteria are crucial for insect nutrition, through provisioning of specific nutrients (e.g. B vitamins, essential amino acids) and modulation of the insect nutritional sensing and signaling pathways (e.g. insulin signaling) that regulate nutrient allocation, especially to lipid and other energy reserves. A key challenge for future research is to identify the molecular interaction between specific bacterial effectors and animal receptors, and to determine how these interactions translate into microbiota-dependent signaling, metabolism and immune function in the host. PMID:24735869

  7. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide a brief

  8. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Michael J.; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na+/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials. PMID:27305972

  9. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, John P.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K. N.; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C.; Çoku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M.; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as ‘benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy’ is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNAGlu mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNAGlu may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis. PMID:19720722

  10. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na(+)/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials. PMID:27305972

  11. Molecular basis for DNA strand displacement by NHEJ repair polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Carlberg, Tom; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2016-01-01

    The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all domains of life. Archaea and bacteria utilize a conserved set of multifunctional proteins in a pathway termed Archaeo-Prokaryotic (AP) NHEJ that facilitates DSB repair. Archaeal NHEJ polymerases (Pol) are capable of strand displacement synthesis, whilst filling DNA gaps or partially annealed DNA ends, which can give rise to unligatable intermediates. However, an associated NHEJ phosphoesterase (PE) resects these products to ensure that efficient ligation occurs. Here, we describe the crystal structures of these archaeal (Methanocella paludicola) NHEJ nuclease and polymerase enzymes, demonstrating their strict structural conservation with their bacterial NHEJ counterparts. Structural analysis, in conjunction with biochemical studies, has uncovered the molecular basis for DNA strand displacement synthesis in AP-NHEJ, revealing the mechanisms that enable Pol and PE to displace annealed bases to facilitate their respective roles in DSB repair. PMID:26405198

  12. Molecular basis for DNA strand displacement by NHEJ repair polymerases.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Carlberg, Tom; Doherty, Aidan J

    2016-03-18

    The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all domains of life. Archaea and bacteria utilize a conserved set of multifunctional proteins in a pathway termed Archaeo-Prokaryotic (AP) NHEJ that facilitates DSB repair. Archaeal NHEJ polymerases (Pol) are capable of strand displacement synthesis, whilst filling DNA gaps or partially annealed DNA ends, which can give rise to unligatable intermediates. However, an associated NHEJ phosphoesterase (PE) resects these products to ensure that efficient ligation occurs. Here, we describe the crystal structures of these archaeal (Methanocella paludicola) NHEJ nuclease and polymerase enzymes, demonstrating their strict structural conservation with their bacterial NHEJ counterparts. Structural analysis, in conjunction with biochemical studies, has uncovered the molecular basis for DNA strand displacement synthesis in AP-NHEJ, revealing the mechanisms that enable Pol and PE to displace annealed bases to facilitate their respective roles in DSB repair. PMID:26405198

  13. Molecular diagnostics in tuberculosis: basis and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Balasingham, Seetha V; Davidsen, Tonje; Szpinda, Irena; Frye, Stephan A; Tønjum, Tone

    2009-01-01

    The processing of clinical specimens in the mycobacterial diagnostic laboratory has undergone remarkable improvements during the last decade. While microscopy and culture are still the major backbone for laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis on a worldwide basis, new methods including molecular diagnostic tests have evolved over the last two decades. The majority of molecular tests have been focused on (i) detection of nucleic acids, both DNA and RNA, that are specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, by amplification techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and (ii) detection of mutations in the genes that are associated with resistance to antituberculosis drugs by sequencing or nucleic acid hybridization. Recent developments in direct and rapid detection of mycobacteria, with emphasis on M. tuberculosis species identification by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis or oligohybridization and strain typing, as well as detection of drug susceptibility patterns, all contribute to these advances. Generally, the balance between genome instability and genome maintenance as the basis for evolutionary development, strain diversification and resistance development is important, because it cradles the resulting M. tuberculosis phenotype. At the same time, semi-automated culture systems have contributed greatly to the increased sensitivity and reduced turnaround time in the mycobacterial analysis of clinical specimens. Collectively, these advances are particularly important for establishing the diagnosis of tuberculosis in children. More basic and operational research to appraise the impact and cost effectiveness of new diagnostic technologies must, however, be carried out. Furthermore, the design and quality of clinical trials evaluating new diagnostics must be improved to allow clinical and laboratory services that would provide rapid response to test results. Thus, important work remains before the new diagnostic tools can be meaningfully integrated into national

  14. Molecular Basis of Asbestos-Induced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. The modes of action underlying asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma appear to differ depending on the fiber type, lung clearance, and genetics. After reviewing the key pathologic changes following asbestos exposure, we examine recently identified pathogenic pathways, with a focus on oxidative stress. Alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis, which is an important early event in asbestosis, is mediated by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways and may be modulated by the endoplasmic reticulum. We review mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-damage and -repair mechanisms, focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, as well as cross talk between reactive oxygen species production, mtDNA damage, p53, OGG1, and mitochondrial aconitase. These new insights into the molecular basis of asbestos-induced lung diseases may foster the development of novel therapeutic targets for managing degenerative diseases (e.g., asbestosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), tumors, and aging, for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23347351

  15. Molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity in Tryptophan Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Luciana; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Marti, Marcelo A.; Estrin, Dario A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO) and Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) are the only two heme-proteins that catalyze the oxidation reaction of tryptophan (Trp) to N-formylkynurenine (NFK). While human IDO (hIDO) is able to oxidize both L and D-Trp, human TDO (hTDO) displays a major specificity towards L-Trp. In this work we aim to interrogate the molecular basis for the substrate stereoselectivity of hTDO. Our previous molecular dynamics simulation studies of Xanthomonas campestris TDO (xcTDO) showed that an H-bond between T254 (T342 in hTDO) and the ammonium group of the substrate is present in the L-Trp-bound enzyme, but not in the D-Trp bound enzyme. The fact that this is the only notable structural alteration induced by the change in the stereo structure of the substrate prompted us to produce and characterize the T342A mutant of hTDO to evaluate the structural role of T342 in controlling the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme. The experimental results indicate that the mutation only slightly perturbs the global structural properties of the enzyme, but it totally abolishes the substrate stereoselectivity. Molecular Dynamics simulations of xcTDO show that T254 controls the substrate stereoselectivity of the enzyme by (i) modulating the H-bonding interaction between the NH3+ group and epoxide oxygen of the ferryl/indole 2,3-epoxide intermediate of the enzyme, and (ii) regulating the dynamics of two active site loops, loop250–260 and loop117–130, critical for substrate-binding. PMID:22082147

  16. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-02-19

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There aremore » serious philosophical objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo affine motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, quantum chemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model. When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high strain. Here we provide

  17. A new paradigm for the molecular basis of rubber elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2015-07-01

    The molecular basis for rubber elasticity is arguably the oldest and one of the most important questions in the field of polymer physics. The theoretical investigation of rubber elasticity began in earnest almost a century ago with the development of analytic thermodynamic models, based on simple, highly-symmetric configurations of so-called Gaussian chains, i.e. polymer chains that obey Markov statistics. Numerous theories have been proposed over the past 90 years based on the ansatz that the elastic force for individual network chains arises from the entropy change associated with the distribution of end-to-end distances of a free polymer chain. There are serious conceptual objections to this assumption and others, such as the assumption that all network nodes undergo a simple volume-preserving linear motion and that all of the network chains have the same length. Recently, a new paradigm for elasticity in rubber networks has been proposed that is based on mechanisms that originate at the molecular level. Using conventional statistical mechanics analyses, Quantum Chemistry, and Molecular Dynamics simulations, the fundamental entropic and enthalpic chain extension forces for polyisoprene (natural rubber) have been determined, along with estimates for the basic force constants. Concurrently, the complex morphology of natural rubber networks (the joint probability density distributions that relate the chain end-to-end distance to its contour length) has also been captured in a numerical model (EPnet). When molecular chain forces are merged with the network structure in this model, it is possible to study the mechanical response to tensile and compressive strains of a representative volume element of a polymer network. As strain is imposed on a network, pathways of connected taut chains, that completely span the network along strain axis, emerge. Although these chains represent only a few percent of the total, they account for nearly all of the elastic stress at high

  18. BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

    The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 500 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

  19. Molecular Basis of Obesity: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, Hélène; Meyre, David

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a global health problem that is gradually affecting each continent of the world. Obesity is a heterogeneous disorder, and the biological causes of obesity are complex. The rapid increase in obesity prevalence during the past few decades is due to major societal changes (sedentary lifestyle, over-nutrition) but who becomes obese at the individual level is determined to a great extent by genetic susceptibility. In this review, we evidence that obesity is a strongly heritable disorder, and provide an update on the molecular basis of obesity. To date, nine loci have been involved in Mendelian forms of obesity and 58 loci contribute to polygenic obesity, and rare and common structural variants have been reliably associated with obesity. Most of the obesity genes remain to be discovered, but promising technologies, methodologies and the use of “deep phenotyping” lead to optimism to chip away at the ‘missing heritability’ of obesity in the near future. In the longer term, the genetic dissection of obesity will help to characterize disease mechanisms, provide new targets for drug design, and lead to an early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of obesity. PMID:22043164

  20. Molecular basis of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    IJlst, L; Mandel, H; Oostheim, W; Ruiter, J P; Gutman, A; Wanders, R J

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation is important for energy production, which is stressed by the different defects found in this pathway. Most of the enzyme deficiencies causing these defects are well characterized at both the protein and genomic levels. One exception is carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) deficiency, of which until now no mutations have been reported although the defect is enzymatically well characterized. CPT I is the key enzyme in the carnitine-dependent transport across the mitochondrial inner membrane and its deficiency results in a decreased rate of fatty acid beta-oxidation. Here we report the first delineation of the molecular basis of hepatic CPT I deficiency in a new case. cDNA analysis revealed that this patient was homozygous for a missense mutation (D454G). The effect of the identified mutation was investigated by heterologous expression in yeast. The expressed mutant CPT IA displayed only 2% of the activity of the expressed wild-type CPT IA, indicating that the D454G mutation is the disease-causing mutation. Furthermore, in patient's fibroblasts the CPT IA protein was markedly reduced on immunoblot, suggesting that the mutation renders the protein unstable. PMID:9691089

  1. The molecular basis of CO2 reception in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jae Young; Dahanukar, Anupama; Weiss, Linnea A.; Carlson, John R.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 elicits a response from many insects, including mosquito vectors of diseases such as malaria and yellow fever, but the molecular basis of CO2 detection is unknown in insects or other higher eukaryotes. Here we show that Gr21a and Gr63a, members of a large family of Drosophila seven-transmembrane-domain chemoreceptor genes, are coexpressed in chemosensory neurons of both the larva and the adult. The two genes confer CO2 response when coexpressed in an in vivo expression system, the “empty neuron system.” The response is highly specific for CO2 and dependent on CO2 concentration. The response shows an equivalent dependence on the dose of Gr21a and Gr63a. None of 39 other chemosensory receptors confers a comparable response to CO2. The identification of these receptors may now allow the identification of agents that block or activate them. Such agents could affect the responses of insect pests to the humans they seek. PMID:17360684

  2. Microbial biotransformation of DON: molecular basis for reduced toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierron, Alix; Mimoun, Sabria; Murate, Leticia S.; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Bracarense, Ana-Paula F. L.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; He, Jian Wei; Zhou, Ting; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria are able to de-epoxidize or epimerize deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, to deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (deepoxy-DON or DOM-1) or 3-epi-deoxynivalenol (3-epi-DON), respectively. Using different approaches, the intestinal toxicity of 3 molecules was compared and the molecular basis for the reduced toxicity investigated. In human intestinal epithelial cells, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON were not cytotoxic, did not change the oxygen consumption or impair the barrier function. In intestinal explants, exposure for 4 hours to 10 μM DON induced intestinal lesions not seen in explants treated with deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON. A pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis was performed on intestinal explants. 747 probes, representing 323 genes, were differentially expressed, between DON-treated and control explants. By contrast, no differentially expressed genes were observed between control, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON treated explants. Both DON and its biotransformation products were able to fit into the pockets of the A-site of the ribosome peptidyl transferase center. DON forms three hydrogen bonds with the A site and activates MAPKinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases). By contrast deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON only form two hydrogen bonds and do not activate MAPKinases. Our data demonstrate that bacterial de-epoxidation or epimerization of DON altered their interaction with the ribosome, leading to an absence of MAPKinase activation and a reduced toxicity.

  3. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties. PMID:18459791

  4. [Molecular basis of stress-evoked psychiatric disturbances].

    PubMed

    Beszczyńska, Beata

    2007-01-01

    Stress, defined as coping with environmental challenges, involves the activation of the neuronal and neurohormonal systems. Central monoaminergic (noradrenergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic) neural networks, limbic structures, the sympathoadrenal system, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the immune system are considered the most important stress pathways. Their activation determines stress reactivity and pathological consequences on exposure to situations of distress. Both trauma and long-term stress can cause alterations in the activities of neuroanatomical structures and neural networks within the central nervous system. These neurohormonal changes are associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a disturbance thought to be one of the most serious psychiatric illnesses. PTSD may develop in individuals after exposure to a traumatic event (war, violence, accident) and is manifested by various symptoms, such as re-experiencing, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, impaired memory of the event, sleep disorders, nightmares, panic attacks, and depression. In this review the neurohormonal changes associated with experiencing stress are presented to highlight the molecular and hormonal basis of PTSD. PMID:18033206

  5. Molecular basis of complement C3 deficiency in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, H S; Burger, R; Dodds, A; Colten, H R

    1990-01-01

    In experiments to ascertain the biochemical basis of a genetically determined deficiency of the third component of complement (C3) in guinea pigs, we found that C3-deficient liver and peritoneal macrophages contain C3 messenger RNA of normal size (approximately 5 kb) and amounts, that this mRNA programs synthesis of pro-C3 in oocytes primed with liver RNA and in primary macrophage cultures. In each instance, heterodimeric native C3 protein was secreted with normal kinetics but the C3 protein product of the deficient cells failed to undergo autolytic cleavage and was unusually susceptible to proteolysis. These data and a selective failure of C3 in plasma of deficient animals to incorporate [14C]methylamine suggested either a mutation in primary structure of the C3 protein or a selective defect in co- or postsynthetic processing affecting the thiolester bridge, a structure important for C3 function. A mutation in the primary structure of C3 was ruled out by comparison of direct sequence analysis of C3 cDNA generated from two C3 deficient and two C3 sufficient guinea pig liver libraries. Three base pair differences, none resulting in derived amino acid sequence differences were identified. Finally, restriction fragment length polymorphisms were identified in the C3 gene that are independent of the deficiency phenotype. This marker of the C3 gene permits testing of these hypotheses using molecular biological and classical genetic methods. Images PMID:1973176

  6. [Hereditary stomatocytoses--diagnostic problems and their molecular basis].

    PubMed

    Bogusławska, Dzamila M; Machnicka, Beata; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2010-08-01

    Hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) is a group of haemolytic anaemias in which the common symptom is an increased permeability of the red cell membrane for monovalent cations. HSt is diagnosed really seldom and the difficulties in diagnosing are connected to the fact that the clinical presentation of individual subtypes of HSt is very diverse. Many cases are characterised by unique phenotypes. Nevertheless, the number of diagnosed HSt cases is increasing each year. The aim of this review was the presentation of current information and an attempt to systematize it, what might be helpful in clinical diagnostic of the new cases of this anaemia. The most frequent mistake is to classify a case of HSt as the most common haemolytic anaemia--hereditary spherocytosis (HS), in which to improve patient condition a splenectomy is often recommended. Most cases of HSt no positive response to splenectomy and often thromboembolic complications are observed. It is interesting that commonly present in blood film stomatocytes and in many cases absent or severely reduced stomatin in HSt red cell membrane are not correlated with nucleotide sequence changes of the gene encoding stomatin. Many diagnosed cases are related to mutations in SLC4A1 and RHAG genes. Extensive research carried out on HSt in the entire world will certainly permit to know the molecular basis of the disease, the diversify of its subtypes and to estimate the real incidence of HSt. PMID:20842826

  7. Molecular Basis for Lytic Bacteriophage Resistance in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Duerkop, Breck A.; Huo, Wenwen; Bhardwaj, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human intestine harbors diverse communities of bacteria and bacteriophages. Given the specificity of phages for their bacterial hosts, there is growing interest in using phage therapies to combat the rising incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. A significant barrier to such therapies is the rapid development of phage-resistant bacteria, highlighting the need to understand how bacteria acquire phage resistance in vivo. Here we identify novel lytic phages in municipal raw sewage that kill Enterococcus faecalis, a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that resides in the human intestine. We show that phage infection of E. faecalis requires a predicted integral membrane protein that we have named PIPEF (for phage infection protein from E. faecalis). We find that PIPEF is conserved in E. faecalis and harbors a 160-amino-acid hypervariable region that determines phage tropism for distinct enterococcal strains. Finally, we use a gnotobiotic mouse model of in vivo phage predation to show that the sewage phages temporarily reduce E. faecalis colonization of the intestine but that E. faecalis acquires phage resistance through mutations in PIPEF. Our findings define the molecular basis for an evolutionary arms race between E. faecalis and the lytic phages that prey on them. They also suggest approaches for engineering E. faecalis phages that have altered host specificity and that can subvert phage resistance in the host bacteria. PMID:27578757

  8. Molecular Basis of the Apparent Near Ideality of Urea Solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Rosgen, Jorg; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-11-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Activity coefficients of urea solutions are calculated to explore the mechanism of its solution properties, which form the basis for its well-known use as a strong protein denaturant. We perform free energy simulations of urea solutions in different urea concentrations using two urea models (OPLS and KBFF models) to calculate and decompose the activity coefficients. For the case of urea, we clarify the concept of the ideal solution in different concentration scales and standard states and its effect on our subsequent analysis. The analytical form of activity coefficients depends on the concentration units and standard states. For both models studied, urea displays a weak concentration dependence for excess chemical potential. However, for the OPLS force-field model, this results from contributions that are independent of concentration to the van der Waals and electrostatic components whereas for the KBFF model those components are nontrivial but oppose each other. The strong ideality of urea solutions in some concentration scales (incidentally implying a lack of water perturbation) is discussed in terms of recent data and ideas on the mechanism of urea denaturation of proteins.

  9. Emerging Models for the Molecular Basis of Mammalian Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian timekeeping arises from a transcription-based feedback loop driven by a set of dedicated clock proteins. At its core, the heterodimeric transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 activates expression of Period, Cryptochrome, and Rev-Erb genes, which feed back to repress transcription and create oscillations in gene expression that confer circadian timing cues to cellular processes. The formation of different clock protein complexes throughout this transcriptional cycle helps to establish the intrinsic ∼24 h periodicity of the clock; however, current models of circadian timekeeping lack the explanatory power to fully describe this process. Recent studies confirm the presence of at least three distinct regulatory complexes: a transcriptionally active state comprising the CLOCK:BMAL1 heterodimer with its coactivator CBP/p300, an early repressive state containing PER:CRY complexes, and a late repressive state marked by a poised but inactive, DNA-bound CLOCK:BMAL1:CRY1 complex. In this review, we analyze high-resolution structures of core circadian transcriptional regulators and integrate biochemical data to suggest how remodeling of clock protein complexes may be achieved throughout the 24 h cycle. Defining these detailed mechanisms will provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of circadian timing and help to establish new platforms for the discovery of therapeutics to manipulate the clock. PMID:25303119

  10. Microbial biotransformation of DON: molecular basis for reduced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Alix; Mimoun, Sabria; Murate, Leticia S.; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Bracarense, Ana-Paula F. L.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; He, Jian Wei; Zhou, Ting; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are able to de-epoxidize or epimerize deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, to deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (deepoxy-DON or DOM-1) or 3-epi-deoxynivalenol (3-epi-DON), respectively. Using different approaches, the intestinal toxicity of 3 molecules was compared and the molecular basis for the reduced toxicity investigated. In human intestinal epithelial cells, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON were not cytotoxic, did not change the oxygen consumption or impair the barrier function. In intestinal explants, exposure for 4 hours to 10 μM DON induced intestinal lesions not seen in explants treated with deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON. A pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis was performed on intestinal explants. 747 probes, representing 323 genes, were differentially expressed, between DON-treated and control explants. By contrast, no differentially expressed genes were observed between control, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON treated explants. Both DON and its biotransformation products were able to fit into the pockets of the A-site of the ribosome peptidyl transferase center. DON forms three hydrogen bonds with the A site and activates MAPKinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases). By contrast deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON only form two hydrogen bonds and do not activate MAPKinases. Our data demonstrate that bacterial de-epoxidation or epimerization of DON altered their interaction with the ribosome, leading to an absence of MAPKinase activation and a reduced toxicity. PMID:27381510

  11. Microbial biotransformation of DON: molecular basis for reduced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pierron, Alix; Mimoun, Sabria; Murate, Leticia S; Loiseau, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Bracarense, Ana-Paula F L; Schatzmayr, Gerd; He, Jian Wei; Zhou, Ting; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are able to de-epoxidize or epimerize deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, to deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (deepoxy-DON or DOM-1) or 3-epi-deoxynivalenol (3-epi-DON), respectively. Using different approaches, the intestinal toxicity of 3 molecules was compared and the molecular basis for the reduced toxicity investigated. In human intestinal epithelial cells, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON were not cytotoxic, did not change the oxygen consumption or impair the barrier function. In intestinal explants, exposure for 4 hours to 10 μM DON induced intestinal lesions not seen in explants treated with deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON. A pan-genomic transcriptomic analysis was performed on intestinal explants. 747 probes, representing 323 genes, were differentially expressed, between DON-treated and control explants. By contrast, no differentially expressed genes were observed between control, deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON treated explants. Both DON and its biotransformation products were able to fit into the pockets of the A-site of the ribosome peptidyl transferase center. DON forms three hydrogen bonds with the A site and activates MAPKinases (mitogen-activated protein kinases). By contrast deepoxy-DON and 3-epi-DON only form two hydrogen bonds and do not activate MAPKinases. Our data demonstrate that bacterial de-epoxidation or epimerization of DON altered their interaction with the ribosome, leading to an absence of MAPKinase activation and a reduced toxicity. PMID:27381510

  12. Molecular Photoionization Calculations Using the Complex Basis Function Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chin-Hui

    The complex basis function method (CBF) using both real and complex basis functions has been applied to the calculation of photoionization cross sections. The CBF method requires less computational resources than rigorous full-scattering methods and is effective for the evaluation of shape-resonance features. Neither the number of electrons in the system nor the molecular geometry is restricted. Moreover, the cross section obtained by the CBF method satisfies a variational principle and provides a practical diagnostic tool for the calculation of cross sections. The photoionization cross sections of H _sp{2}{+}, H _2, N_2, CO _2, and SF_6 have been computed using the CBF method. The computed partial cross sections for linear molecules agreed fairly well with other theoretical and experimental values. Particularly encouraging is the nearly perfect agreement of the CBF results with the results by rigorous full-scattering methods in the regions of sharp resonance features such as the K-shell ionization of N_2 and the 4sigma_{rm g} --> ksigma_ {rm u} transition of CO _2. The effect of averaging over all vibrational modes on the ionization cross sections for the 4 sigma_{rm g} orbital in CO_2 has also been studied for the first time. The resonance peak in the totally vibrationally averaged cross sections was reduced by 20%, but still represents a feature which has not yet been detected experimentally. The photoionization of SF_6 valence shells, 1t_{1rm g} , 5t_{1rm u}, 1t_{2rm u}, 3e _{rm g}, 1t_ {2rm g}, 4t_{1 rm u}, and 5a_{1 rm g}, has also been studied for the continuum symmetries a_{1rm g }, t_{1rm u} , e_{rm g}, and t_{2rm g}. The CBF results of SF_6 are numerically stable and essentially approach the static-exchange limit. These static-exchange partial cross sections, however, do not compare well with the experimental measurements. The discrepancy may be attributed to the physical approximations made in the theoretical model and to the quality of the ground -state

  13. Molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, A; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of the molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury and their contribution in pathogenesis. First of all, we reviewed the anatomy of spinal cord vessels. The pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries revealed two types of pathogenic mechanisms. The primary event, the mechanic trauma, results in a disruption of neural and vascular structures into the spinal cord. It is followed by secondary pathogenesis that leads to the progression of the initial lesion. We reviewed vascular responses following spinal cord injury, focusing on both primary and secondary events. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a direct consequence of trauma; it has a typical pattern of distribution into the contused spinal cord, inside the gray matter and, it is radially extended into the white matter. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is restricted to the dorsal columns, into adjacent rostral and caudal spinal segments. Distribution of chronic lesions overlaps the pattern of the early intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We described the mechanisms of action, role, induction and distribution of the heme oxygenase isoenzymes 1 and 2. Posttraumatic inflammatory response contributes to secondary pathogenesis. We analyzed the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the moment of appearance after the injury, the decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. The disruption of the blood–spinal cord barrier is biphasic. It exposes the spinal cord to inflammatory cells and to toxic effects of other molecules. Endothelin 1 mediates oxidative stress into the spinal cord through the modulation of spinal cord blood flow. The role of matrix metalloproteinases in blood–spinal cord barrier disruption, inflammation, and angiogenesis are reviewed. PMID:20945816

  14. Myostatin/activin pathway antagonism: molecular basis and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Han, H Q; Zhou, Xiaolan; Mitch, William E; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2013-10-01

    Muscle wasting is associated with a wide range of catabolic diseases. This debilitating loss of muscle mass and functional capacity reduces the quality of life and increases the risks of morbidity and mortality. Major progress has been made in understanding the biochemical mechanisms and signaling pathways regulating muscle protein balance under normal conditions and the enhanced protein loss in atrophying muscles. It is now clear that activation of myostatin/activin signaling is critical in triggering the accelerated muscle catabolism that causes muscle loss in multiple disease states. Binding of myostatin and activin to the ActRIIB receptor complex on muscle cell membrane leads to activation of Smad2/3-mediated transcription, which in turn stimulates FoxO-dependent transcription and enhanced muscle protein breakdown via ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy. In addition, Smad activation inhibits muscle protein synthesis by suppressing Akt signaling. Pharmacological blockade of the myostatin/activin-ActRIIB pathway has been shown to prevent or reverse the loss of muscle mass and strength in various disease models including cancer cachexia and renal failure. Moreover, it can markedly prolong the lifespan of animals with cancer-associated muscle loss. Furthermore, inhibiting myostatin/activin actions also improves insulin sensitivity, reduces excessive adiposity, attenuates systemic inflammation, and accelerates bone fracture healing in disease models. Based on these exciting advances, the potential therapeutic benefits of myostatin/activin antagonism are now being tested in multiple clinical settings. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23721881

  15. Wrinkled Peas and White-Eyed Fruit Flies: The Molecular Basis of Two Classical Genetic Traits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoile, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on bridging the gap between classical and molecular genetics for two traits: wrinkled seeds in garden peas and white eye color in fruit flies. Discusses the molecular details of the underlying basis of these traits. Contains 15 references. (JRH)

  16. Emerging insights into the molecular and cellular basis of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Gavin P.; Rinne, Mikael L.; Wykosky, Jill; Genovese, Giannicola; Quayle, Steven N.; Dunn, Ian F.; Agarwalla, Pankaj K.; Chheda, Milan G.; Campos, Benito; Wang, Alan; Brennan, Cameron; Ligon, Keith L.; Furnari, Frank; Cavenee, Webster K.; Depinho, Ronald A.; Chin, Lynda; Hahn, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma is both the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor. Extensive multiplatform genomic characterization has provided a higher-resolution picture of the molecular alterations underlying this disease. These studies provide the emerging view that “glioblastoma” represents several histologically similar yet molecularly heterogeneous diseases, which influences taxonomic classification systems, prognosis, and therapeutic decisions. PMID:22508724

  17. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  18. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 A), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 A. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions. PMID:20550422

  19. Cardiac Hypertrophy: An Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Basis.

    PubMed

    Samak, Mostafa; Fatullayev, Javid; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Schmack, Bastian; Farag, Mina; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Dohmen, Pascal M; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wahlers, Thorsten; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy is an ominous escalation of hemodynamically stressful conditions such as hypertension and valve disease. The pathophysiology of hypertrophy is complex and multifactorial, as it touches on several cellular and molecular systems. Understanding the molecular background of cardiac hypertrophy is essential in order to protect the myocardium from pathological remodeling, or slow down the destined progression to heart failure and cardiomyopathy. In this review we highlight the most important molecular aspects of cardiac hypertrophic growth in light of the currently available published research data. PMID:27450399

  20. Cellular and molecular basis of decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Yapici, Nilay; Zimmer, Manuel; Domingos, Ana I

    2014-01-01

    People think they are in control of their own decisions: what to eat or drink, whom to marry or pick a fight with, where to live, what to buy. Behavioural economists and neurophysiologists have long studied decision-making behaviours. However, these behaviours have only recently been studied through the light of molecular genetics. Here, we review recent research in mice, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, that analyses the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying decision-making. These studies interrogate decision-making about food, sexual behaviour, aggression or foraging strategies, and add molecular and cell biology understanding onto the consilience of brain and decision. PMID:25239948

  1. Cardiac Hypertrophy: An Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Samak, Mostafa; Fatullayev, Javid; Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Schmack, Bastian; Farag, Mina; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Wahlers, Thorsten; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy is an ominous escalation of hemodynamically stressful conditions such as hypertension and valve disease. The pathophysiology of hypertrophy is complex and multifactorial, as it touches on several cellular and molecular systems. Understanding the molecular background of cardiac hypertrophy is essential in order to protect the myocardium from pathological remodeling, or slow down the destined progression to heart failure. In this review we highlight the most important molecular aspects of cardiac hypertrophic growth in light of the currently available published research data. PMID:27450399

  2. The molecular basis of cognitive deficits in pervasive developmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Aditi; Klann, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Persons with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) exhibit a range of cognitive deficits that hamper their quality of life, including difficulties involving communication, sociability, and perspective-taking. In recent years, a variety of studies in mice that model genetic syndromes with a high risk of PDD have provided insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms associated with these disorders. What is less appreciated is how the molecular anomalies affect neuronal and circuit function to give rise to the cognitive deficits associated with PDD. In this review, we describe genetic mutations that cause PDD and discuss how they alter fundamental social and cognitive processes. We then describe efforts to correct cognitive impairments associated with these disorders and identify areas of further inquiry in the search for molecular targets for therapeutics for PDD. PMID:22904374

  3. Molecular basis for the thermostability of Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to protect village chickens against Newcastle disease, due to their decreased dependence on cold chain for transport and storage. However, the genetic basis underlying the NDV thermostability is poorly understood. In this stud...

  4. Treasure of the Past VIII: Molecular Basis of Flame Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by inorganic chemical additives in fire retardancy and flame inhibition is considered. Particular attention is given to the molecular level aspects of commercially important systems containing compounds of antimony, halogens, and phosphorus. The flame inhibiting function of metal containing additives is also discussed. PMID:27500045

  5. A reduced basis method for molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent-Finley, Rachel Elisabeth

    In this dissertation, we develop a method for molecular simulation based on principal component analysis (PCA) of a molecular dynamics trajectory and least squares approximation of a potential energy function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a computational tool used to study molecular systems as they evolve through time. With respect to protein dynamics, local motions, such as bond stretching, occur within femtoseconds, while rigid body and large-scale motions, occur within a range of nanoseconds to seconds. To capture motion at all levels, time steps on the order of a femtosecond are employed when solving the equations of motion and simulations must continue long enough to capture the desired large-scale motion. To date, simulations of solvated proteins on the order of nanoseconds have been reported. It is typically the case that simulations of a few nanoseconds do not provide adequate information for the study of large-scale motions. Thus, the development of techniques that allow longer simulation times can advance the study of protein function and dynamics. In this dissertation we use principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the dominant characteristics of an MD trajectory and to represent the coordinates with respect to these characteristics. We augment PCA with an updating scheme based on a reduced representation of a molecule and consider equations of motion with respect to the reduced representation. We apply our method to butane and BPTI and compare the results to standard MD simulations of these molecules. Our results indicate that the molecular activity with respect to our simulation method is analogous to that observed in the standard MD simulation with simulations on the order of picoseconds.

  6. Molecular Basis of Functional Myocardial Potassium Channel Diversity.

    PubMed

    Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2016-06-01

    Multiple types of voltage-gated K(+) and non-voltage-gated K(+) currents have been distinguished in mammalian cardiac myocytes based on differences in time-dependent and voltage-dependent properties and pharmacologic sensitivities. Many of the genes encoding voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) and non-voltage-gated K(+) (Kir and K2P) channel pore-forming and accessory subunits are expressed in the heart, and a variety of approaches have been, and continue to be, used to define the molecular determinants of native cardiac K(+) channels and to explore the molecular mechanisms controlling the diversity, regulation, and remodeling of these channels in the normal and diseased myocardium. PMID:27261820

  7. Energetic basis for the molecular-scale organization of bone.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jinhui; Battle, Keith C; Pan, Haihua; Salter, E Alan; Chien, Yung-Ching; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; De Yoreo, James J

    2015-01-13

    The remarkable properties of bone derive from a highly organized arrangement of coaligned nanometer-scale apatite platelets within a fibrillar collagen matrix. The origin of this arrangement is poorly understood and the crystal structures of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and the nonmineralized collagen fibrils alone do not provide an explanation. Moreover, little is known about collagen-apatite interaction energies, which should strongly influence both the molecular-scale organization and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. We investigated collagen-mineral interactions by combining dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) measurements of binding energies with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of binding and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations of collagen adsorption on single crystals of calcium phosphate for four mineral phases of potential importance in bone formation. In all cases, we observe a strong preferential orientation of collagen binding, but comparison between the observed orientations and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses of native tissues shows that only calcium-deficient apatite (CDAP) provides an interface with collagen that is consistent with both. MD simulations predict preferred collagen orientations that agree with observations, and results from both MD and DFS reveal large values for the binding energy due to multiple binding sites. These findings reconcile apparent contradictions inherent in a hydroxyapatite or carbonated apatite (CAP) model of bone mineral and provide an energetic rationale for the molecular-scale organization of bone. PMID:25540415

  8. Molecular basis of telomere syndrome caused by CTC1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liuh-Yow; Majerská, Jana; Lingner, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in CTC1 lead to the telomere syndromes Coats Plus and dyskeratosis congenita (DC), but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. CTC1 forms with STN1 and TEN1 a trimeric complex termed CST, which binds ssDNA, promotes telomere DNA synthesis, and inhibits telomerase-mediated telomere elongation. Here we identify CTC1 disease mutations that disrupt CST complex formation, the physical interaction with DNA polymerase α-primase (polα-primase), telomeric ssDNA binding in vitro, accumulation in the nucleus, and/or telomere association in vivo. While having diverse molecular defects, CTC1 mutations commonly lead to the accumulation of internal single-stranded gaps of telomeric DNA, suggesting telomere DNA replication defects as a primary cause of the disease. Strikingly, mutations in CTC1 may also unleash telomerase repression and telomere length control. Hence, the telomere defect initiated by CTC1 mutations is distinct from the telomerase insufficiencies seen in classical forms of telomere syndromes, which cause short telomeres due to reduced maintenance of distal telomeric ends by telomerase. Our analysis provides molecular evidence that CST collaborates with DNA polα-primase to promote faithful telomere DNA replication. PMID:24115768

  9. Energetic basis for the molecular-scale organization of bone

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jinhui; Battle, Keith C.; Pan, Haihua; Salter, E. Alan; Chien, Yung-Ching; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; De Yoreo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable properties of bone derive from a highly organized arrangement of coaligned nanometer-scale apatite platelets within a fibrillar collagen matrix. The origin of this arrangement is poorly understood and the crystal structures of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and the nonmineralized collagen fibrils alone do not provide an explanation. Moreover, little is known about collagen–apatite interaction energies, which should strongly influence both the molecular-scale organization and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. We investigated collagen–mineral interactions by combining dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) measurements of binding energies with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of binding and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations of collagen adsorption on single crystals of calcium phosphate for four mineral phases of potential importance in bone formation. In all cases, we observe a strong preferential orientation of collagen binding, but comparison between the observed orientations and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses of native tissues shows that only calcium-deficient apatite (CDAP) provides an interface with collagen that is consistent with both. MD simulations predict preferred collagen orientations that agree with observations, and results from both MD and DFS reveal large values for the binding energy due to multiple binding sites. These findings reconcile apparent contradictions inherent in a hydroxyapatite or carbonated apatite (CAP) model of bone mineral and provide an energetic rationale for the molecular-scale organization of bone. PMID:25540415

  10. Molecular Basis of Klotho: From Gene to Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuechi

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Klotho (KL) gene, which was originally identified as a putative aging-suppressor gene, has generated tremendous interest and has advanced understanding of the aging process. In mice, the overexpression of the KL gene extends the life span, whereas mutations to the KL gene shorten the life span. The human KL gene encodes the α-Klotho protein, which is a multifunctional protein that regulates the metabolism of phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D. α-Klotho also may function as a hormone, although the α-Klotho receptor(s) has not been found. Point mutations of the KL gene in humans are associated with hypertension and kidney disease, which suggests that α-Klotho may be essential to the maintenance of normal renal function. Three α-Klotho protein types with potentially different functions have been identified: a full-length transmembrane α-Klotho, a truncated soluble α-Klotho, and a secreted α-Klotho. Recent evidence suggests that α-Klotho suppresses the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways, inhibits oxidative stress, and regulates phosphatase and calcium absorption. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, biochemical, and physiological properties of the KL gene. Specifically, this review focuses on the structure of the KL gene and the factors that regulate KL gene transcription, the key sites in the regulation of α-Klotho enzyme activity, the α-Klotho signaling pathways, and the molecular mechanisms that underlie α-Klotho function. This current understanding of the molecular biology of the α-Klotho protein may offer new insights into its function and role in aging. PMID:25695404

  11. The molecular basis of ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The simple gas ethylene profoundly influences plants at nearly every stage of growth and development. In the past ten years, the use of a genetic approach, based on the triple response phenotype, has been a powerful tool for investigating the molecular events that underlie these effects. Several fundamental elements of the pathway have been described: a receptor with homology to bacterial two-component histidine kinases (ETR1), elements of a MAP kinase cascade (CTR1) and a putative transcription factor (EIN3). Taken together, these elements can be assembled into a simple, linear model for ethylene signalling that accounts for most of the well-characterized ethylene mediated responses.

  12. Differential colorectal carcinogenesis: Molecular basis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Morán, Alberto; Ortega, Paloma; de Juan, Carmen; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Frías, Cristina; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Torres, Antonio José; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Iniesta, Pilar; Benito, Manuel

    2010-03-15

    Colorectal cancer (CCR) is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries. It poses a major public health problem and there is renewed interest in understanding the basic principles of the molecular biology of colorectal cancer. It has been established that sporadic CCRs can arise from at least two different carcinogenic pathways. The traditional pathway, also called the suppressor or chromosomal instability pathway, follows the Fearon and Vogelstein model and shows mutation in classical oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, such as K-ras, adenomatous polyposis coli, deleted in colorectal cancer, or p53. Alterations in the Wnt pathway are also very common in this type of tumour. The second main colorectal carcinogenesis pathway is the mutator pathway. This pathway is present in nearly 15% of all cases of sporadic colorectal cancer. It is characterized by the presence of mutations in the microsatellite sequences caused by a defect in the DNA mismatch repair genes, mostly in hMLH1 or hMSH2. These two pathways have clear molecular differences, which will be reviewed in this article, but they also present distinct histopathological features. More strikingly, their clinical behaviours are completely different, having the "mutator" tumours a better outcome than the "suppressor" tumours. PMID:21160823

  13. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  14. Structural basis for molecular recognition at serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jinming; Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Chenghai; Bai, Fang; Yang, Huaiyu; Yang, Linlin; Jiang, Hualiang; Roth, Bryan L; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C; Xu, H Eric

    2013-05-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) regulates a wide spectrum of human physiology through the 5-HT receptor family. We report the crystal structures of the human 5-HT1B G protein-coupled receptor bound to the agonist antimigraine medications ergotamine and dihydroergotamine. The structures reveal similar binding modes for these ligands, which occupy the orthosteric pocket and an extended binding pocket close to the extracellular loops. The orthosteric pocket is formed by residues conserved in the 5-HT receptor family, clarifying the family-wide agonist activity of 5-HT. Compared with the structure of the 5-HT2B receptor, the 5-HT1B receptor displays a 3 angstrom outward shift at the extracellular end of helix V, resulting in a more open extended pocket that explains subtype selectivity. Together with docking and mutagenesis studies, these structures provide a comprehensive structural basis for understanding receptor-ligand interactions and designing subtype-selective serotonergic drugs. PMID:23519210

  15. Molecular basis of human CD36 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the class B scavenger receptor family. The CD36 gene is located on chromosome 7 q11.2 and is encoded by 15 exons. Defective CD36 is a likely candidate gene for impaired fatty acid metabolism, glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, Alzheimer disease, and modification of the clinical course of malaria. Contradictory data concerning the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate that further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis may be important for the prevention and treatment of this disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of CD36 gene structure, splicing, and mutations and the molecular, metabolic, and clinical consequences of these phenomena. PMID:17673938

  16. Molecular Basis of Human CD36 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the class B scavenger receptor family. The CD36 gene is located on chromosome 7 q11.2 and is encoded by 15 exons. Defective CD36 is a likely candidate gene for impaired fatty acid metabolism, glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, Alzheimer disease, and modification of the clinical course of malaria. Contradictory data concerning the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate that further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis may be important for the prevention and treatment of this disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of CD36 gene structure, splicing, and mutations and the molecular, metabolic, and clinical consequences of these phenomena. PMID:17673938

  17. [Physiological regulation of hematopoietic stem cell and its molecular basis].

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Hao, Sha; Cheng, Hui; Cheng, Tao

    2016-08-25

    As a classical type of tissue stem cells, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is the earliest discovered and has been widely applied in the clinic as a great successful example for stem cell therapy. Thus, HSC research represents a leading field in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, apoptosis and trafficking constitute major characteristics of functional HSCs. These characteristics also signify different dynamic states of HSC through physiological interactions with the microenvironment cues in vivo. This review covers our current knowledge on the physiological regulation of HSC and its underlying molecular mechanisms. It is our hope that this review will not only help our colleagues to understand how HSC is physiologically regulated but also serve as a good reference for the studies on stem cell and regenerative medicine in general. PMID:27546503

  18. Molecular basis of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: an update.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, Wieslaw H; Koczorowski, Ryszard

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in understanding the molecular events underlying hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) caused by mutations of the genes encoding proteins of the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-related signaling pathway have been presented. These proteins are involved in signal transduction from ectoderm to mesenchyme during development of the fetus and are indispensable for the differentiation of ectoderm-derived structures such as eccrine sweat glands, teeth, hair, skin, and/or nails. Novel data were reviewed and discussed on the structure and functions of the components of TNFα-related signaling pathway, the consequences of mutations of the genes encoding these proteins, and the prospect for further investigations, which might elucidate the origin of HED. PMID:26294279

  19. Molecular Basis for Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellerqvist, Carl G.; Sundell, Hakan; Gettins, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen affecting newborns. We have investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the respiratory distress induced in sheep after intravenous injection of a toxin produced by this organism. The pathophysiological response is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, followed by granulocytopenia and increased pulmonary vascular permeability to protein. 31P NMR studies of GBS toxin and model components before and after reductive alkaline hydrolysis demonstrated that phosphodiester residues are an integral part of the GBS toxin. Reductive alkaline treatment cleaves phosphate esters from secondary and primary alcohols and renders GBS toxin nontoxic in the sheep model and inactive as a mediator of elastase release in vitro from isolated human granulocytes. We propose that the interaction of cellular receptors with mannosyl phosphodiester groups plays an essential role in the pathophysiological response to GBS toxin.

  20. Molecular basis for amyloid fibril formation and stability

    PubMed Central

    Makin, O. Sumner; Atkins, Edward; Sikorski, Pawel; Johansson, Jan; Serpell, Louise C.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular structure of the amyloid fibril has remained elusive because of the difficulty of growing well diffracting crystals. By using a sequence-designed polypeptide, we have produced crystals of an amyloid fiber. These crystals diffract to high resolution (1 Å) by electron and x-ray diffraction, enabling us to determine a detailed structure for amyloid. The structure reveals that the polypeptides form fibrous crystals composed of antiparallel β-sheets in a cross-β arrangement, characteristic of all amyloid fibers, and allows us to determine the side-chain packing within an amyloid fiber. The antiparallel β-sheets are zipped together by means of π-bonding between adjacent phenylalanine rings and salt-bridges between charge pairs (glutamic acid–lysine), thus controlling and stabilizing the structure. These interactions are likely to be important in the formation and stability of other amyloid fibrils. PMID:15630094

  1. Molecular and genetic basis of X-linked immunodeficiency disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, J.M. )

    1994-03-01

    Within a short time interval the specific gene defects causing three X-linked human immunodeficiencies, agammaglobulinemia (XLA), hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM), and severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), have been identified. These represent the first human disease phenotypes associated with each of three gene families already recognized to be important in lymphocyte development and signaling: XLA is caused by mutations of a B cell-specific intracellular tyrosine kinase; HIGM, by mutations in the TNF-related CD40 ligand, through which T cells deliver helper signals by direct contact with B cell CD40; and XSCID, by mutations in the [gamma] chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Each patient mutation analyzed to date has been unique, representing both a challenge for genetic diagnosis and management and an important resource for dissecting molecular domains and understanding the physiologic function of the gene products.

  2. Molecular genetic basis of pod corn (Tunicate maize)

    PubMed Central

    Wingen, Luzie U.; Münster, Thomas; Faigl, Wolfram; Deleu, Wim; Sommer, Hans; Saedler, Heinz; Theißen, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Pod corn is a classic morphological mutant of maize in which the mature kernels of the cob are covered by glumes, in contrast to generally grown maize varieties in which kernels are naked. Pod corn, known since pre-Columbian times, is the result of a dominant gain-of-function mutation at the Tunicate (Tu) locus. Some classic articles of 20th century maize genetics reported that the mutant Tu locus is complex, but molecular details remained elusive. Here, we show that pod corn is caused by a cis-regulatory mutation and duplication of the ZMM19 MADS-box gene. Although the WT locus contains a single-copy gene that is expressed in vegetative organs only, mutation and duplication of ZMM19 in Tu lead to ectopic expression of the gene in the inflorescences, thus conferring vegetative traits to reproductive organs. PMID:22517751

  3. Molecular basis of barriers for interspecies transmissibility of mammalian prions.

    PubMed

    Vanik, David L; Surewicz, Krystyna A; Surewicz, Witold K

    2004-04-01

    Spongiform encephalopathies are believed to be transmitted by a unique mechanism involving self-propagating conformational conversion of prion protein into a misfolded form. Here we demonstrate that fundamental aspects of mammalian prion propagation, including the species barrier and strain diversity, can be reproduced in vitro in a seeded fibrillization of the recombinant prion protein variant Y145Stop. Our data show that species-specific substitution of a single amino acid in a critical region completely changes the seeding specificity of prion protein fibrils. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sequence-based barriers that prevent cross-seeding between proteins from different species can be bypassed, and new barriers established, by a template-induced adaptation process that leads to the emergence of new strains of prion fibrils. Although the seeding barriers observed in this study do not fully match those seen in animals, the present findings provide fundamental insight into mechanistic principles of these barriers at a molecular level. PMID:15068810

  4. Molecular basis of glyphosate resistance: Different approaches through protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Siehl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl-glycine) is the most-used herbicide in the world: glyphosate-based formulations exhibit broad-spectrum herbicidal activity with minimal human and environmental toxicity. The extraordinary success of this simple small molecule is mainly due to the high specificity of glyphosate towards the plant enzyme enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in the shikimate pathway leading to biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. Starting in 1996, transgenic glyphosate-resistant plants were introduced thus allowing the application of the herbicide to the crop (post-emergence) to remove emerged weeds without crop damage. This review focuses on the evolution of mechanisms of resistance to glyphosate as obtained through natural diversity, the gene shuffling approach to molecular evolution, and a rational, structure-based approach to protein engineering. In addition, we offer rationale for the means by which the modifications made have had their intended effect. PMID:21668647

  5. Molecular basis for group B beta-hemolytic streptococcal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hellerqvist, C G; Sundell, H; Gettins, P

    1987-01-01

    Group B beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen affecting newborns. We have investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the respiratory distress induced in sheep after intravenous injection of a toxin produced by this organism. The pathophysiological response is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, followed by granulocytopenia and increased pulmonary vascular permeability to protein. 31P NMR studies of GBS toxin and model components before and after reductive alkaline hydrolysis demonstrated that phosphodiester residues are an integral part of the GBS toxin. Reductive alkaline treatment cleaves phosphate esters from secondary and primary alcohols and renders GBS toxin nontoxic in the sheep model and inactive as a mediator of elastase release in vitro from isolated human granulocytes. We propose that the interaction of cellular receptors with mannosyl phosphodiester groups plays an essential role in the pathophysiological response to GBS toxin. PMID:3540959

  6. The Molecular Basis for Kinesin Functional Specificity During Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Welburn, Julie P I

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule-based motor proteins play key roles during mitosis to assemble the bipolar spindle, define the cell division axis, and align and segregate the chromosomes. The majority of mitotic motors are members of the kinesin superfamily. Despite sharing a conserved catalytic core, each kinesin has distinct functions and localization, and is uniquely regulated in time and space. These distinct behaviors and functional specificity are generated by variations in the enzymatic domain as well as the non-conserved regions outside of the kinesin motor domain and the stalk. These flanking regions can directly modulate the properties of the kinesin motor through dimerization or self-interactions, and can associate with extrinsic factors, such as microtubule or DNA binding proteins, to provide additional functional properties. This review discusses the recently identified molecular mechanisms that explain how the control and functional specification of mitotic kinesins is achieved. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24039047

  7. Molecular basis for the thermostability of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guoyuan; Hu, Xiao; Zhao, Kang; Wang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Tengfei; Yang, Jinlong; Luo, Qingping; Zhang, Rongrong; Pan, Zishu; Shao, Huabin; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to protect village chickens against Newcastle disease, due to their decreased dependence on cold chain for transport and storage. However, the genetic basis underlying the NDV thermostability is poorly understood. In this study, we generated chimeric viruses by exchanging viral genes between the thermostable TS09-C strain and thermolabile LaSota strain using reverse genetics technology. Evaluations of these chimeric NDVs demonstrated that the thermostability of NDV was dependent on the origin of HN protein. Chimeras bearing the HN protein derived from thermostable virus exhibited a thermostable phenotype, and vice versa. Both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities of viruses bearing the TS09-C HN protein were more thermostable than those containing LaSota HN protein. Furthermore, the newly developed thermostable virus rLS-T-HN, encoding the TS09-C HN protein in LaSota backbone, induced significantly higher antibody response than the TS09-C virus, and conferred complete protection against virulent NDV challenge. Taken together, the data suggest that the HN protein of NDV is a crucial determinant of thermostability, and the HN gene from a thermostable NDV could be engineered into a thermolabile NDV vaccine strain for developing novel thermostable NDV vaccine. PMID:26935738

  8. Molecular basis for the thermostability of Newcastle disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Guoyuan; Hu, Xiao; Zhao, Kang; Wang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Tengfei; Yang, Jinlong; Luo, Qingping; Zhang, Rongrong; Pan, Zishu; Shao, Huabin; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to protect village chickens against Newcastle disease, due to their decreased dependence on cold chain for transport and storage. However, the genetic basis underlying the NDV thermostability is poorly understood. In this study, we generated chimeric viruses by exchanging viral genes between the thermostable TS09-C strain and thermolabile LaSota strain using reverse genetics technology. Evaluations of these chimeric NDVs demonstrated that the thermostability of NDV was dependent on the origin of HN protein. Chimeras bearing the HN protein derived from thermostable virus exhibited a thermostable phenotype, and vice versa. Both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities of viruses bearing the TS09-C HN protein were more thermostable than those containing LaSota HN protein. Furthermore, the newly developed thermostable virus rLS-T-HN, encoding the TS09-C HN protein in LaSota backbone, induced significantly higher antibody response than the TS09-C virus, and conferred complete protection against virulent NDV challenge. Taken together, the data suggest that the HN protein of NDV is a crucial determinant of thermostability, and the HN gene from a thermostable NDV could be engineered into a thermolabile NDV vaccine strain for developing novel thermostable NDV vaccine. PMID:26935738

  9. Toxocara canis: Molecular basis of immune recognition and evasion

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxocara canis has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in the tissues of diverse vertebrate species, as well as to develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive canid host. Human disease is caused by larval stages invading musculature, brain and the eye, and immune mechanisms appear to be ineffective at eliminating the infection. Survival of T. canis larvae can be attributed to two molecular strategies evolved by the parasite. Firstly, it releases quantities of ‘excretory–secretory’ products which include lectins, mucins and enzymes that interact with and modulate host immunity. For example, one lectin (CTL-1) is very similar to mammalian lectins, required for tissue inflammation, suggesting that T. canis may interfere with leucocyte extravasation into infected sites. The second strategy is the elaboration of a specialised mucin-rich surface coat; this is loosely attached to the parasite epicuticle in a fashion that permits rapid escape when host antibodies and cells adhere, resulting in an inflammatory reaction around a newly vacated focus. The mucins have been characterised as bearing multiple glycan side-chains, consisting of a blood-group-like trisaccharide with one or two O-methylation modifications. Both the lectins and these trisaccharides are targeted by host antibodies, with anti-lectin antibodies showing particular diagnostic promise. Antibodies to the mono-methylated trisaccharide appear to be T. canis-specific, as this epitope is not found in the closely related Toxocara cati, but all other antigenic determinants are very similar between the two species. This distinction may be important in designing new and more accurate diagnostic tests. Further tools to control toxocariasis could also arise from understanding the molecular cues and steps involved in larval development. In vitro-cultivated larvae express high levels of four mRNAs that are translationally silenced, as the proteins they encode are not detectable in

  10. A Demonstration of the Molecular Basis of Sickle-Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration that permits the separation of different hemoglobin molecules within two to three hours. Introduces students to the powerful technique of gel electrophoresis and illustrates the molecular basis of sickle-cell anemia. (JRH)

  11. Understanding Darjeeling tea flavour on a molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Bornali; Borchetia, Sangeeta; Bhorali, Priyadarshini; Agarwal, Niraj; Bhuyan, L P; Rahman, A; Sakata, K; Mizutani, M; Shimizu, B; Gurusubramaniam, G; Ravindranath, R; Kalita, M C; Hazarika, M; Das, Sudripta

    2012-04-01

    Darjeeling teas are the highest grown teas in the world and preferred for its flavour, aroma and quality. Apart from the genetic makeup of the plant, earlier reports suggest that insect infestation, particularly jassids and thrips triggers the aroma and flavour formation in Darjeeling tea. The present work encompasses the identification of the genes/transcriptomes responsible for the typical flavour of Darjeeling tea, besides understanding the role of jassids and thrips in particular, in producing the best cup character and quality. The quantitative real time PCR analysis was based on a suppression subtractive hybridisation forward library of B157 (tea clone infested with thrips), providing us transcripts related to aroma and flavour formation. We observed the expression of genes like leucine zipper, ntd, nced, geraniol synthase, raffinose synthase, trehalose synthase, amylase, farnesyl transferase, catalase, methyl transferase, linalool synthase, peroxidases, elicitor responsive proteins, linamarase, nerolidol linalool synthase 2, 12-oxophytodienoate reductase, glucosidase, MYB transcription factor, and alcohol dehydrogenase, highly regulated due to insect infestation, manufacturing stresses and mechanical injury. The first report on gene expression dynamics in thrips infested Darjeeling tea leaves can be extrapolated with increase in volatiles which is responsible for enhancing the quality of Darjeeling tea, specially the flavour and aroma of the infusion. We hope to model these responses in order to understand the molecular changes that occur during Darjeeling tea flavour formation. PMID:22328090

  12. Molecular Basis of Bacterial Outer Membrane Permeability Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria characteristically are surrounded by an additional membrane layer, the outer membrane. Although outer membrane components often play important roles in the interaction of symbiotic or pathogenic bacteria with their host organisms, the major role of this membrane must usually be to serve as a permeability barrier to prevent the entry of noxious compounds and at the same time to allow the influx of nutrient molecules. This review summarizes the development in the field since our previous review (H. Nikaido and M. Vaara, Microbiol. Rev. 49:1-32, 1985) was published. With the discovery of protein channels, structural knowledge enables us to understand in molecular detail how porins, specific channels, TonB-linked receptors, and other proteins function. We are now beginning to see how the export of large proteins occurs across the outer membrane. With our knowledge of the lipopolysaccharide-phospholipid asymmetric bilayer of the outer membrane, we are finally beginning to understand how this bilayer can retard the entry of lipophilic compounds, owing to our increasing knowledge about the chemistry of lipopolysaccharide from diverse organisms and the way in which lipopolysaccharide structure is modified by environmental conditions. PMID:14665678

  13. The Molecular Basis of Folate Salvage in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Sora, J. Enrique; Ochong, Edwin; Beveridge, Susan; Johnson, David; Nzila, Alexis; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Stocks, Paul A.; O'Neill, Paul M.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Bray, Patrick G.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahydrofolates are essential cofactors for DNA synthesis and methionine metabolism. Malaria parasites are capable both of synthesizing tetrahydrofolates and precursors de novo and of salvaging them from the environment. The biosynthetic route has been studied in some detail over decades, whereas the molecular mechanisms that underpin the salvage pathway lag behind. Here we identify two functional folate transporters (named PfFT1 and PfFT2) and delineate unexpected substrate preferences of the folate salvage pathway in Plasmodium falciparum. Both proteins are localized in the plasma membrane and internal membranes of the parasite intra-erythrocytic stages. Transport substrates include folic acid, folinic acid, the folate precursor p-amino benzoic acid (pABA), and the human folate catabolite pABAGn. Intriguingly, the major circulating plasma folate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, was a poor substrate for transport via PfFT2 and was not transported by PfFT1. Transport of all folates studied was inhibited by probenecid and methotrexate. Growth rescue in Escherichia coli and antifolate antagonism experiments in P. falciparum indicate that functional salvage of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate is detectable but trivial. In fact pABA was the only effective salvage substrate at normal physiological levels. Because pABA is neither synthesized nor required by the human host, pABA metabolism may offer opportunities for chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:21998306

  14. Emerging molecular basis of hematogenous metastasis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Chen, Yan; Wang, Liang-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is commonly observed in gastric cancer (GC), but hematogenous metastasis is more likely responsible for the cancer-related mortality. Since Stephen Paget first introduced the “seed and soil hypothesis” a century ago, growing evidence recognizes that numerous essential secreted factors and signaling pathway effectors participate in the pre-metastatic niche formation and distant organ metastasis. The cross-talk between GC cells and surrounding microenvironment may consist of a series of interrelated steps, including epithelial mesenchymal transition, intravasation into blood vessels, circulating tumor cell translocation, and secondary organ metastasis. Secreted factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinases and cancer-derived extracellular vesicles, especially exosomes, are essential in formation of premetastatic niche. Circulating tumor cells and microRNAs represent as ‘‘metastatic intermediates’’ between primary tumors and sites of dissemination. Many biomarkers have been identified as novel metastatic markers and prognostic effectors. In addition, molecular therapy has been designed to target biomarkers such as growth factors (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, VEGF) and chemokines, although they have not clearly proven to be effective in inhibiting GC metastasis in clinical trials. In this review, we will systematically discuss the emerging molecules and their microenvironment in hematogenous metastasis of GC, which may help us to find new therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26937132

  15. Molecular basis for CD40 signaling mediated by TRAF3

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Chao-Zhou; Welsh, Kate; Leo, Eugen; Chiou, Chu-kuan; Wu, Hao; Reed, John C.; Ely, Kathryn R.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) are single transmembrane-spanning glycoproteins that bind cytokines and trigger multiple signal transduction pathways. Many of these TNFRs rely on interactions with TRAF proteins that bind to the intracellular domain of the receptors. CD40 is a member of the TNFR family that binds to several different TRAF proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of a 20-residue fragment from the cytoplasmic domain of CD40 in complex with the TRAF domain of TRAF3. The CD40 fragment binds as a hairpin loop across the surface of the TRAF domain. Residues shown by mutagenesis and deletion analysis to be critical for TRAF3 binding are involved either in direct contact with TRAF3 or in intramolecular interactions that stabilize the hairpin. Comparison of the interactions of CD40 with TRAF3 vs. TRAF2 suggests that CD40 may assume different conformations when bound to different TRAF family members. This molecular adaptation may influence binding affinity and specific cellular triggers. PMID:10984535

  16. Molecular basis of alpha-thalassemia in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Mesbah-Amroun, Hamida; Rouabhi, Fatiha; Ducrocq, Rolande; Elion, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    An epidemiological molecular study was carried out to evaluate the spectrum and allelic frequency of alpha-thalassemia (alpha-thal) defects in Algeria. A series of 153 randomly selected blood donors was screened for 10 alpha-thal alleles described in the Mediterranean area. In addition, six unrelated cases with hematological and biochemical data suggestive of Hb H disease were investigated. Our data revealed an allele frequency of 4.6%. The presence of alpha(0)-thal determinants (-alpha(20.5) and --MED I) was observed both in Hb H patients and in the randomly collected samples. Overall, the -alpha(3.7) deletion was the most prevalent allele (2.9%), followed by the alpha(Nco I)alpha (HBA2:c.1A>G) allele (0.6%) and by the alpha(Hph I)alpha (HBA2:c.95 + 2_95 + 6delTGAGG), -alpha(20.5), --(MED I) alleles (0.3% each). The -alpha(4.2) deletion was observed in only one Hb H patient. These results outline the heterogeneity of the alpha-thal alleles in Algeria which reflects the anthropological history of the country. Because of their frequency, alpha-thal alleles are probably frequent modulators of prevalent beta-globin gene-related hemoglobinopathies in Algeria. PMID:18473243

  17. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K+ channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K+ channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), KCNH2 (Kv11.1), KCNH5 (Kv10.2), KCNT1 (KCa4.1), KCNT2 (KCa4.2), and KCNK5 (K2P5.1). We will give an overview of K+ channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K+ channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K+ channels may be of importance. PMID:23962792

  18. The biophysical and molecular basis of TRPV1 proton gating

    PubMed Central

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Cao, Lishuang; Papakosta, Marianthi; Stevens, Edward B; Phillips, Stephen; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential family of non-selective cation channels is a polymodal nociceptor. Noxious thermal stimuli, protons, and the alkaloid irritant capsaicin open the channel. The mechanisms of heat and capsaicin activation have been linked to voltage-dependent gating in TRPV1. However, until now it was unclear whether proton activation or potentiation or both are linked to a similar voltage-dependent mechanism and which molecular determinants underlie the proton gating. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we show that protons activate and potentiate TRPV1 by shifting the voltage dependence of the activation curves towards more physiological membrane potentials. We further identified a key residue within the pore region of TRPV1, F660, to be critical for voltage-dependent proton activation and potentiation. We conclude that proton activation and potentiation of TRPV1 are both voltage dependent and that amino acid 660 is essential for proton-mediated gating of TRPV1. PMID:21285946

  19. Molecular basis of chill resistance adaptations in poikilothermic animals.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Scott A L; Manso, Bruno; Cossins, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Chill and freeze represent very different components of low temperature stress. Whilst the principal mechanisms of tissue damage and of acquired protection from freeze-induced effects are reasonably well established, those for chill damage and protection are not. Non-freeze cold exposure (i.e. chill) can lead to serious disruption to normal life processes, including disruption to energy metabolism, loss of membrane perm-selectivity and collapse of ion gradients, as well as loss of neuromuscular coordination. If the primary lesions are not relieved then the progressive functional debilitation can lead to death. Thus, identifying the underpinning molecular lesions can point to the means of building resistance to subsequent chill exposures. Researchers have focused on four specific lesions: (i) failure of neuromuscular coordination, (ii) perturbation of bio-membrane structure and adaptations due to altered lipid composition, (iii) protein unfolding, which might be mitigated by the induced expression of compatible osmolytes acting as 'chemical chaperones', (iv) or the induced expression of protein chaperones along with the suppression of general protein synthesis. Progress in all these potential mechanisms has been ongoing but not substantial, due in part to an over-reliance on straightforward correlative approaches. Also, few studies have intervened by adoption of single gene ablation, which provides much more direct and compelling evidence for the role of specific genes, and thus processes, in adaptive phenotypes. Another difficulty is the existence of multiple mechanisms, which often act together, thus resulting in compensatory responses to gene manipulations, which may potentially mask disruptive effects on the chill tolerance phenotype. Consequently, there is little direct evidence of the underpinning regulatory mechanisms leading to induced resistance to chill injury. Here, we review recent advances mainly in lower vertebrates and in arthropods, but increasingly

  20. The molecular basis of galactosemia - Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-09-10

    Galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism, was first described in the 1900s by von Ruess. The subsequent 100years has seen considerable progress in understanding the underlying genetics and biochemistry of this condition. Initial studies concentrated on increasing the understanding of the clinical manifestations of the disease. However, Leloir's discovery of the pathway of galactose catabolism in the 1940s and 1950s enabled other scientists, notably Kalckar, to link the disease to a specific enzymatic step in the pathway. Kalckar's work established that defects in galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) were responsible for the majority of cases of galactosemia. However, over the next three decades it became clear that there were two other forms of galactosemia: type II resulting from deficiencies in galactokinase (GALK1) and type III where the affected enzyme is UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). From the 1970s, molecular biology approaches were applied to galactosemia. The chromosomal locations and DNA sequences of the three genes were determined. These studies enabled modern biochemical studies. Structures of the proteins have been determined and biochemical studies have shown that enzymatic impairment often results from misfolding and consequent protein instability. Cellular and model organism studies have demonstrated that reduced GALT or GALE activity results in increased oxidative stress. Thus, after a century of progress, it is possible to conceive of improved therapies including drugs to manipulate the pathway to reduce potentially toxic intermediates, antioxidants to reduce the oxidative stress of cells or use of "pharmacological chaperones" to stabilise the affected proteins. PMID:26143117

  1. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  2. The molecular basis of chloride transport in shark rectal gland.

    PubMed

    Riordan, J R; Forbush, B; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-11-01

    Transepithelial Cl- secretion in vertebrates is accomplished by a secondary active transport process brought about by the coordinated activity of apical and basolateral transport proteins. The principal basolateral components are the Na+/K(+)-ATPase pump, the Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter (symporter) and a K+ channel. The rate-limiting apical component is a cyclic-AMP-stimulated Cl- channel. As postulated nearly two decades ago, the net Cl- movement from the blood to the lumen involves entry into the epithelial cells with Na+ and K+, followed by active Na+ extrusion via the pump and passive K+ exit via a channel. Intracellular [Cl-] is raised above electrochemical equilibrium and exits into the lumen when the apical Cl- channel opens. Cl- secretion is accompanied by a passive paracellular flow of Na+. The tubules of the rectal glands of elasmobranchs are highly specialized for secreting concentrated NaCl by this mechanism and hence have served as an excellent experimental model in which to characterize the individual steps by electrophysiological and ion flux measurements. The recent molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the apical Cl- channel and basolateral cotransporter have enabled more detailed analyses of the mechanisms and their regulation. Not surprisingly, since hormones acting through kinases control secretion, both the Cl- channel, which is the shark counterpart of the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator), and the cotransporter are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The primary stimulation of secretion by hormones employing cyclic AMP as second messenger activates CFTR via the direct action of protein kinase A (PKA), which phosphorylates multiple sites on the R domain. In contrast, phosphorylation of the cotransporter by as yet unidentified kinases is apparently secondary to the decrease in intracellular chloride concentration caused by anion exit through CFTR. PMID:7529818

  3. Traumatic brain injury: a review of characteristics, molecular basis and management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Cui, Daming; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a critical cause of hospitalization, disability, and death worldwide. The global increase in the incidence of TBI poses a significant socioeconomic burden. Guidelines for the management of acute TBI mostly pertain to emergency treatment. Comprehensive gene expression analysis is currently available for several animal models of TBI, along with enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms activated during injury and subsequent recovery. The current review focuses on the characteristics, molecular basis and management of TBI. PMID:27100477

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor and glioblastoma multiforme: molecular basis for a new approach.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Sereno, María; González-Barón, Manuel; Perona, Rosario

    2008-02-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumours. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the cornerstone of actual treatment. In spite of large therapeutic efforts, overall survival is still poor. New molecular data allow a new molecular classification for high-grade gliomas and open a therapeutic window for targeted therapy. Molecular diagnostic tools may provide a basis for receptor-based therapies and enough information to personalise future treatments. In this regard, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target that will play a critical role in the management of glioma patients. This review summarises basic and preclinical data that support future use of therapies against EGFR. PMID:18258505

  5. Molecular Biomechanics: The Molecular Basis of How Forces Regulate Cellular Function

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Gang; Kamm, Roger D.; Thomas, Wendy; Hwang, Wonmuk; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Zhu, Cheng; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have led to the emergence of molecular biomechanics as an essential element of modern biology. These efforts focus on theoretical and experimental studies of the mechanics of proteins and nucleic acids, and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress transmission, mechanosensing and mechanotransduction in living cells. In particular, single-molecule biomechanics studies of proteins and DNA, and mechanochemical coupling in biomolecular motors have demonstrated the critical importance of molecular mechanics as a new frontier in bioengineering and life sciences. To stimulate a more systematic study of the basic issues in molecular biomechanics, and attract a broader range of researchers to enter this emerging field, here we discuss its significance and relevance, describe the important issues to be addressed and the most critical questions to be answered, summarize both experimental and theoretical/computational challenges, and identify some short-term and long-term goals for the field. The needs to train young researchers in molecular biomechanics with a broader knowledge base, and to bridge and integrate molecular, subcellular and cellular level studies of biomechanics are articulated. PMID:20700472

  6. Drugs meeting the molecular basis of diabetic kidney disease: bridging from molecular mechanism to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Oberbauer, Rainer; Perco, Paul; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Mayer, Gert; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a complex, multifactorial disease and is associated with a high risk of renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Clinical practice guidelines for diabetes recommend essentially identical treatments for all patients without taking into account how the individual responds to the instituted therapy. Yet, individuals vary widely in how they respond to medications and therefore optimal therapy differs between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of variability in drug response will help tailor optimal therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to drug pharmacokinetics have been used to explore mechanisms of response variability in DKD, but with limited success. The complex interaction between genetic make-up and environmental factors on the abundance of proteins and metabolites renders pharmacogenomics alone insufficient to fully capture response variability. A complementary approach is to attribute drug response variability to individual variability in underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of disease. The interplay of different processes (e.g. inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress) appears to drive disease progression, but the individual contribution of each process varies. Drugs at the other hand address specific targets and thereby interfere in certain disease-associated processes. At this level, biomarkers may help to gain insight into which specific pathophysiological processes are involved in an individual followed by a rational assessment whether a specific drug's mode of action indeed targets the relevant process at hand. This article describes the conceptual background and data-driven workflow developed by the SysKid consortium aimed at improving characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying DKD at the interference of the molecular impact of individual drugs in order to tailor optimal therapy to individual patients. PMID:26209732

  7. Intermolecular transfer integrals for organic molecular materials: can basis set convergence be achieved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingsong; Kertesz, Miklos

    2004-05-01

    Intermolecular transfer integrals, and associated band-structures of organic molecular materials can be calculated through a dimer approach. Extensive numerical studies are performed on an ethylene π-dimer to investigate the basis sets dependence of transfer integrals. Convergence of calculated transfer integrals is achieved with respect to both Gaussian and plane-wave basis sets, provided the same level of theory is used. Effects of diffuse and polarization Gaussian functions on transfer integrals are identified. Comparison of experimental and theoretical values of transfer integrals of the TTF-TCNQ charge transfer salt is also presented.

  8. Understanding the Molecular Basis of Heterogeneity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Manian, Kannan V; Aalam, Syed Mohammed Musheer; Bharathan, Sumitha P; Srivastava, Alok; Velayudhan, Shaji R

    2015-12-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has considerable latency and generates epigenetically distinct partially and fully reprogrammed clones. To understand the molecular basis of reprogramming and to distinguish the partially reprogrammed iPSC clones (pre-iPSCs), we analyzed several of these clones for their molecular signatures. Using a combination of markers that are expressed at different stages of reprogramming, we found that the partially reprogrammed stable clones have significant morphological and molecular heterogeneity in their response to transition to the fully pluripotent state. The pre-iPSCs had significant levels of OCT4 expression but exhibited variable levels of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. These novel molecular signatures that we identified would help in using these cells to understand the molecular mechanisms in the late of stages of reprogramming. Although morphologically similar mouse iPSC clones showed significant heterogeneity, the human iPSC clones isolated initially on the basis of morphology were highly homogeneous with respect to the levels of pluripotency. PMID:26562626

  9. The molecular basis of the memory T cell response: differential gene expression and its epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Nan-ping; Araki, Yasuto; Subedi, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    How the immune system remembers a previous encounter with a pathogen and responds more efficiently to a subsequent encounter has been one of the central enigmas for immunologists for over a century. The identification of pathogen-specific memory lymphocytes that arise after an infection provided a cellular basis for immunological memory. But the molecular mechanisms of immunological memory remain only partially understood. The emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes have a key role in controlling the distinct transcriptional profiles of memory lymphocytes and thus in shaping their function. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress that has been made in assessing the differential gene expression and chromatin modifications in memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and we present our current understanding of the molecular basis of memory T cell function. PMID:22421787

  10. Dysregulation of transition metal ion homeostasis is the molecular basis for cadmium toxicity in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Stephanie L.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Luo, Zhenyao; Couñago, Rafael M.; Morey, Jacqueline R.; Maher, Megan J.; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Kobe, Bostjan; O’Mara, Megan L.; Paton, James C.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a transition metal ion that is highly toxic in biological systems. Although relatively rare in the Earth’s crust, anthropogenic release of cadmium since industrialization has increased biogeochemical cycling and the abundance of the ion in the biosphere. Despite this, the molecular basis of its toxicity remains unclear. Here we combine metal-accumulation assays, high-resolution structural data and biochemical analyses to show that cadmium toxicity, in Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs via perturbation of first row transition metal ion homeostasis. We show that cadmium uptake reduces the millimolar cellular accumulation of manganese and zinc, and thereby increases sensitivity to oxidative stress. Despite this, high cellular concentrations of cadmium (~17 mM) are tolerated, with negligible impact on growth or sensitivity to oxidative stress, when manganese and glutathione are abundant. Collectively, this work provides insight into the molecular basis of cadmium toxicity in prokaryotes, and the connection between cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:25731976

  11. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-01

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors. PMID:11853675

  12. Molecular basis of transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Da, Lintai; Plouffe, Steven W.; Chong, Jenny; Kool, Eric; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high transcriptional fidelity is essential for life. Some DNA lesions lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis. In particular, we will focus on the three key checkpoint steps of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity: insertion (specific nucleotide selection and incorporation), extension (differentiation of RNA transcript extension of a matched over mismatched 3'-RNA terminus), and proofreading (preferential removal of misincorporated nucleotides from the 3'-RNA end). We will also discuss some novel insights into the molecular basis and chemical perspectives of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity through structural, computational, and chemical biology approaches. PMID:24767259

  13. Connecting the eye to the brain: the molecular basis of ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Oster, S F; Sretavan, D W

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, a great deal has been learnt about the molecular basis through which specific neural pathways in the visual system are established during embryonic development. This review provides a framework for understanding the principles of retinal ganglion cell axon guidance, and introduces some of the families of axon guidance molecules involved. In addition, the potential relevance of retinal axon guidance to human visual developmental disorders, and to retinal axon regeneration, is discussed. PMID:12714414

  14. Molecular Pathways: Molecular Basis for Sensitivity and Resistance to JAK Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sara C.; Levine, Ross L.

    2014-01-01

    Janus kinases (JAK) are the mediators of a variety of cytokine signals via their cognate receptors that result in activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Alterations in JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 signaling contribute to different disease states, and dysregulated JAK-STAT signaling is associated with hematological malignancies, autoimmune disorders and immune-deficient conditions. Genetic alterations of JAK2 occur in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and occur in a subset of patients with acute leukemias. JAK-mediated signaling critically relies on STAT transcription factors, and on activation of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling axes. Hyperactive JAK at the apex of these potent oncogenic signaling pathways therefore represents an important target for small molecule kinase inhibitors in different disease states. The JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib and the JAK3 inhibitor tofacitinib were recently approved for the treatment of myelofibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively and additional ATP-competitive JAK inhibitors are in clinical development. Although these agents show clinical activity, the ability of these JAK inhibitors to induce clinical/molecular remissions in hematological malignancies appears limited and resistance upon chronic drug exposure is seen. Alternative modes of targeting JAK2 such as allosteric kinase inhibition or HSP-90 inhibition are under evaluation as is the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors. Combination therapy approaches integrating inhibition of STAT, PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways with JAK kinase inhibitors might be critical to overcome malignancies characterized by dysregulated JAK signaling. PMID:24583800

  15. Gaussian basis sets for use in correlated molecular calculations. IV. Calculation of static electrical response properties

    SciTech Connect

    Woon, D.E.; Dunning, T.H. Jr. )

    1994-02-15

    An accurate description of the electrical properties of atoms and molecules is critical for quantitative predictions of the nonlinear properties of molecules and of long-range atomic and molecular interactions between both neutral and charged species. We report a systematic study of the basis sets required to obtain accurate correlated values for the static dipole ([alpha][sub 1]), quadrupole ([alpha][sub 2]), and octopole ([alpha][sub 3]) polarizabilities and the hyperpolarizability ([gamma]) of the rare gas atoms He, Ne, and Ar. Several methods of correlation treatment were examined, including various orders of Moller--Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, MP3, MP4), coupled-cluster theory with and without perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD, CCSD(T)], and singles and doubles configuration interaction (CISD). All of the basis sets considered here were constructed by adding even-tempered sets of diffuse functions to the correlation consistent basis sets of Dunning and co-workers. With multiply-augmented sets we find that the electrical properties of the rare gas atoms converge smoothly to values that are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data and/or previously computed results. As a further test of the basis sets presented here, the dipole polarizabilities of the F[sup [minus

  16. Heritability and molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity: A genome-wide ssociation study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Isen, Joshua D.; Malone, Stephen M.; Miller, Michael B.; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular genetic basis of electrodermal activity (EDA) was analyzed using 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large population-representative sample of twins and parents (N = 4,424) in relation to various EDA indices. Biometric analyses suggested that approximately 50% or more of variance in all EDA indices was heritable. The combined effect of all SNPs together accounted for a significant amount of variance in each index, affirming their polygenic basis and heritability. However, none of the SNPs were genome-wide significant for any EDA index. Previously reported SNP associations with disorders such as substance dependence or schizophrenia, which have been linked to EDA abnormalities, were not significant; nor were associations between EDA and genes in specific neurotransmitter systems. These results suggest that EDA is influenced by multiple genes rather than by polymorphisms with large effects. PMID:25387706

  17. Polyatomic molecular Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations with Gaussian basis sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical methods have been used successfully in atomic Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) calculations for many years. Some DHF calculations using numerical methods have been done on diatomic molecules, but while these serve a useful purpose for calibration, the computational effort in extending this approach to polyatomic molecules is prohibitive. An alternative more in line with traditional quantum chemistry is to use an analytical basis set expansion of the wave function. This approach fell into disrepute in the early 1980's due to problems with variational collapse and intruder states, but has recently been put on firm theoretical foundations. In particular, the problems of variational collapse are well understood, and prescriptions for avoiding the most serious failures have been developed. Consequently, it is now possible to develop reliable molecular programs using basis set methods. This paper describes such a program and reports results of test calculations to demonstrate the convergence and stability of the method.

  18. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  19. Molecular Basis of Ligand Dissociation from the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Pan, Albert C; Dror, Ron O; Mocking, Tamara; Liu, Rongfang; Heitman, Laura H; Shaw, David E; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-01

    How drugs dissociate from their targets is largely unknown. We investigated the molecular basis of this process in the adenosine A2Areceptor (A2AR), a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Through kinetic radioligand binding experiments, we characterized mutant receptors selected based on molecular dynamic simulations of the antagonist ZM241385 dissociating from the A2AR. We discovered mutations that dramatically altered the ligand's dissociation rate despite only marginally influencing its binding affinity, demonstrating that even receptor features with little contribution to affinity may prove critical to the dissociation process. Our results also suggest that ZM241385 follows a multistep dissociation pathway, consecutively interacting with distinct receptor regions, a mechanism that may also be common to many other GPCRs. PMID:26873858

  20. Many-body calculations of molecular electric polarizabilities in asymptotically complete basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monten, Ruben; Hajgató, Balázs; Deleuze, Michael S.

    2011-10-01

    The static dipole polarizabilities of Ne, CO, N2, F2, HF, H2O, HCN, and C2H2 (acetylene) have been determined close to the Full-CI limit along with an asymptotically complete basis set (CBS), according to the principles of a Focal Point Analysis. For this purpose the results of Finite Field calculations up to the level of Coupled Cluster theory including Single, Double, Triple, Quadruple and perturbative Pentuple excitations [CCSDTQ(P)] were used, in conjunction with suited extrapolations of energies obtained using augmented and doubly-augmented Dunning's correlation consistent polarized valence basis sets of improving quality. The polarizability characteristics of C2H4 (ethylene) and C2H6 (ethane) have been determined on the same grounds at the CCSDTQ level in the CBS limit. Comparison is made with results obtained using lower levels in electronic correlation, or taking into account the relaxation of the molecular structure due to an adiabatic polarization process. Vibrational corrections to electronic polarizabilities have been empirically estimated according to Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamical simulations employing Density Functional Theory. Confrontation with experiment ultimately indicates relative accuracies of the order of 1 to 2%.

  1. Molecular basis for antagonistic activity of anifrolumab, an anti-interferon-α receptor 1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Oganesyan, Vaheh; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2015-01-01

    Anifrolumab (anifrolumab) is an antagonist human monoclonal antibody that targets interferon α receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Anifrolumab has been developed to treat autoimmune diseases and is currently in clinical trials. To decipher the molecular basis of its mechanism of action, we engaged in multiple epitope mapping approaches to determine how it interacts with IFNAR1 and antagonizes the receptor. We identified the epitope of anifrolumab using enzymatic fragmentation, phage-peptide library panning and mutagenesis approaches. Our studies revealed that anifrolumab recognizes the SD3 subdomain of IFNAR1 with the critical residue R(279). Further, we solved the crystal structure of anifrolumab Fab to a resolution of 2.3 Å. Guided by our epitope mapping studies, we then used in silico protein docking of the anifrolumab Fab crystal structure to IFNAR1 and characterized the corresponding mode of binding. We find that anifrolumab sterically inhibits the binding of IFN ligands to IFNAR1, thus blocking the formation of the ternary IFN/IFNAR1/IFNAR2 signaling complex. This report provides the molecular basis for the mechanism of action of anifrolumab and may provide insights toward designing antibody therapies against IFNAR1. PMID:25606664

  2. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations of molecular systems with a Gaussian basis.

    PubMed

    Al-Saidi, W A; Zhang, Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2006-06-14

    We extend the recently introduced phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach to any single-particle basis and apply it to molecular systems with Gaussian basis sets. QMC methods in general scale favorably with the system size as a low power. A QMC approach with auxiliary fields, in principle, allows an exact solution of the Schrodinger equation in the chosen basis. However, the well-known sign/phase problem causes the statistical noise to increase exponentially. The phaseless method controls this problem by constraining the paths in the auxiliary-field path integrals with an approximate phase condition that depends on a trial wave function. In the present calculations, the trial wave function is a single Slater determinant from a Hartree-Fock calculation. The calculated all-electron total energies show typical systematic errors of no more than a few millihartrees compared to exact results. At equilibrium geometries in the molecules we studied, this accuracy is roughly comparable to that of coupled cluster with single and double excitations and with noniterative triples [CCSD(T)]. For stretched bonds in H(2)O, our method exhibits a better overall accuracy and a more uniform behavior than CCSD(T). PMID:16784257

  3. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations of molecular systems with a Gaussian basis

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saidi, W.A.; Zhang Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2006-06-14

    We extend the recently introduced phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach to any single-particle basis and apply it to molecular systems with Gaussian basis sets. QMC methods in general scale favorably with the system size as a low power. A QMC approach with auxiliary fields, in principle, allows an exact solution of the Schroedinger equation in the chosen basis. However, the well-known sign/phase problem causes the statistical noise to increase exponentially. The phaseless method controls this problem by constraining the paths in the auxiliary-field path integrals with an approximate phase condition that depends on a trial wave function. In the present calculations, the trial wave function is a single Slater determinant from a Hartree-Fock calculation. The calculated all-electron total energies show typical systematic errors of no more than a few millihartrees compared to exact results. At equilibrium geometries in the molecules we studied, this accuracy is roughly comparable to that of coupled cluster with single and double excitations and with noniterative triples [CCSD(T)]. For stretched bonds in H{sub 2}O, our method exhibits a better overall accuracy and a more uniform behavior than CCSD(T)

  4. The Molecular Basis for Dual Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH)/Cyclooxygenase (COX) Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Giulia; Favia, Angelo D; Convertino, Marino; De Vivo, Marco

    2016-06-20

    The design of multitarget-directed ligands is a promising strategy for discovering innovative drugs. Here, we report a mechanistic study that clarifies key aspects of the dual inhibition of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes by a new multitarget-directed ligand named ARN2508 (2-[3-fluoro-4-[3-(hexylcarbamoyloxy)phenyl]phenyl]propanoic acid). This potent dual inhibitor combines, in a single scaffold, the pharmacophoric elements often needed to block FAAH and COX, that is, a carbamate moiety and the 2-arylpropionic acid functionality, respectively. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ARN2508 uses a noncovalent mechanism of inhibition to block COXs, while inhibiting FAAH via the acetylation of the catalytic Ser241, in line with previous experimental evidence for covalent FAAH inhibition. This study proposes the molecular basis for the dual FAAH/COX inhibition by this novel hybrid scaffold, stimulating further experimental studies and offering new insights for the rational design of novel anti-inflammatory agents that simultaneously act on FAAH and COX. PMID:26593700

  5. Discovering transnosological molecular basis of human brain diseases using biclustering analysis of integrated gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been reported that several brain diseases can be treated as transnosological manner implicating possible common molecular basis under those diseases. However, molecular level commonality among those brain diseases has been largely unexplored. Gene expression analyses of human brain have been used to find genes associated with brain diseases but most of those studies were restricted either to an individual disease or to a couple of diseases. In addition, identifying significant genes in such brain diseases mostly failed when it used typical methods depending on differentially expressed genes. Results In this study, we used a correlation-based biclustering approach to find coexpressed gene sets in five neurodegenerative diseases and three psychiatric disorders. By using biclustering analysis, we could efficiently and fairly identified various gene sets expressed specifically in both single and multiple brain diseases. We could find 4,307 gene sets correlatively expressed in multiple brain diseases and 3,409 gene sets exclusively specified in individual brain diseases. The function enrichment analysis of those gene sets showed many new possible functional bases as well as neurological processes that are common or specific for those eight diseases. Conclusions This study introduces possible common molecular bases for several brain diseases, which open the opportunity to clarify the transnosological perspective assumed in brain diseases. It also showed the advantages of correlation-based biclustering analysis and accompanying function enrichment analysis for gene expression data in this type of investigation. PMID:26043779

  6. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program

  7. Molecular basis for oncohistone H3 recognition by SETD2 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Xiangdong; Lu, Chao; Li, Guo-Min; Allis, C David; Li, Haitao

    2016-07-15

    High-frequency point mutations of genes encoding histones have been identified recently as novel drivers in a number of tumors. Specifically, the H3K36M/I mutations were shown to be oncogenic in chondroblastomas and undifferentiated sarcomas by inhibiting H3K36 methyltransferases, including SETD2. Here we report the crystal structures of the SETD2 catalytic domain bound to H3K36M or H3K36I peptides with SAH (S-adenosylhomocysteine). In the complex structure, the catalytic domain adopts an open conformation, with the K36M/I peptide snuggly positioned in a newly formed substrate channel. Our structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis underying oncohistone recognition by and inhibition of SETD2. PMID:27474439

  8. Molecular basis of agonist binding to the type A cholecystokinin receptor.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence J; Lybrand, Terry P

    2002-12-01

    The receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK) peptides are guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors in the rhodopsin/beta-adrenergic receptor family. The molecular basis of natural ligand binding to the type A CCK receptor has been studied using ligand structure-activity series, receptor mutagenesis, and photoaffinity labeling studies. These have focused attention on the extracellular loop and tail domains, with the most direct insights coming from intrinsic photoaffinity labeling studies. A model of the binding of CCK to this receptor is consistent with all these studies. This model places the carboxyl terminus of CCK adjacent to the amino-terminal tail outside of transmembrane segment 1, the mid-region of the peptide adjacent to the third extracellular loop outside of transmembrane segment 7, and includes a charge-charge interaction between peptide residue tyrosine-sulfate 27 and the arginine residue in the second extracellular loop of the receptor in position 197. PMID:12688369

  9. The influence of the molecular basis of resistance on insecticide discovery

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of invention and development of new insecticides and the impact of current research in resistance mechanisms on that process. The topic is introduced in the context of (i) the critical need to develop new insect-control agents to ensure a continued supply of high-quality food and fibre; (ii) how resistance development will continue to influence the potential to ensure the supply of these essentials; and (iii) why new insect-control technology is welcomed by growers. The main section of the paper describes a generic agrochemical invention process and discusses the impact that an understanding of the molecular basis of resistance will have on the various stages of this process, using specific examples to illustrate these points. By focusing on insecticide invention, this paper provides a context in which other information more specific to insecticide resistance from this issue can be understood.

  10. Molecular basis of natural variation and environmental control of trichome patterning.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2014-01-01

    Trichomes are differentiated epidermal cells on above ground organs of nearly all land plants. They play important protective roles as structural defenses upon biotic attacks such as herbivory, oviposition and fungal infections, and against abiotic stressors such as drought, heat, freezing, excess of light, and UV radiation. The pattern and density of trichomes is highly variable within natural population suggesting tradeoffs between traits positively affecting fitness such as resistance and the costs of trichome production. The spatial distribution of trichomes is regulated through a combination of endogenous developmental programs and external signals. This review summarizes the current understanding on the molecular basis of the natural variation and the role of phytohormones and environmental stimuli on trichome patterning. PMID:25071803

  11. Molecular basis of functional diversity of voltage-gated potassium channels in mammalian brain.

    PubMed Central

    Stühmer, W; Ruppersberg, J P; Schröter, K H; Sakmann, B; Stocker, M; Giese, K P; Perschke, A; Baumann, A; Pongs, O

    1989-01-01

    Cloning and sequencing of cDNAs isolated from a rat cortex cDNA library reveals that a gene family encodes several highly homologous K+ channel forming (RCK) proteins. Functional characterization of the channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes following microinjection of in vitro transcribed RCK-specific RNAs shows that each of the RCK proteins forms K+ channels that differ greatly in both their functional and pharmacological properties. This suggests that the molecular basis for the diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels in mammalian brain is based, at least partly, on the expression of several RCK proteins by a family of genes and their assembly to homooligomeric K+ channels with different functional properties. Images PMID:2555158

  12. Cellular and molecular basis of RV hypertrophy in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Iacobazzi, D; Suleiman, M-S; Ghorbel, M; George, SJ; Caputo, M; Tulloh, RM

    2016-01-01

    RV hypertrophy (RVH) is one of the triggers of RV failure in congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, improving our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of this pathology will help in developing strategic therapeutic interventions to enhance patient benefit in the future. This review describes the potential mechanisms that underlie the transition from RVH to RV failure. In particular, it addresses structural and functional remodelling that encompass contractile dysfunction, metabolic changes, shifts in gene expression and extracellular matrix remodelling. Both ischaemic stress and reactive oxygen species production are implicated in triggering these changes and will be discussed. Finally, RV remodelling in response to various CHDs as well as the potential role of biomarkers will be addressed. PMID:26516182

  13. ["Gating-Spring" model and molecular basis of mechanotransduction in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The sense of mechanical stimuli (e.g. force or deformation) in the environment underlies several important physiological processes, for example the perception of sound, touch, pain and acceleration. The key step in mechanosensation is to convert the extracellular mechanical stimuli into cellular electrical or chemical signals. This process is termed as mechanotransduction. Based on mechanical and electrophysiological measurements, "Gating-Spring" theory was proposed as a general model to describe the cell biological mechanism of mechanotransduction. However, despite efforts made in several model organisms, the molecular basis of the "Gating-Spring" model remains elusive. In recent years, several key progresses have been made using the mechanoreceptors of Drosophila melanogaster as the models. This article introduces the "Gating-Spring" theory and reviews the recent research progresses on the fly mechanotransduction. PMID:26915326

  14. Molecular basis of cellular localization of poly C binding protein 1 in neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Andrea M.; Flock, Kelly E.; Loh, Horace H.; Ko, Jane L. . E-mail: kojane@shu.edu

    2006-11-03

    Poly C binding protein 1 (PCBP) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of neuronal mu-opioid receptor gene. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of PCBP cellular/nuclear localization in neuronal cells using EGFP fusion protein. PCBP, containing three KH domains and a variable domain, distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus with a preferential nuclear expression. Domain-deletional analyses suggested the requirement of variable and KH3 domains for strong PCBP nuclear expression. Within the nucleus, a low nucleolar PCBP expression was observed, and PCBP variable domain contributed to this restricted nucleolar expression. Furthermore, the punctate nuclear pattern of PCBP was correlated to its single-stranded (ss) DNA binding ability, with both requiring cooperativity of at least three sequential domains. Collectively, certain PCBP domains thus govern its nuclear distribution and transcriptional regulatory activity in the nucleus of neurons, whereas the low nucleolar expression implicates the disengagement of PCBP in the ribosomal RNA synthesis.

  15. Genomic analysis to define molecular basis of aggressiveness in a mouse model of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chalivendra, Varun; Kanchi, Krishna Latha; Onken, Michael D.; Winkler, Ashley E.; Mardis, Elaine; Uppaluri, Ravindra

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis underlying aggressive behavior in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), our laboratory developed a carcinogen-induced mouse oral cancer (MOC) cell line model that encompasses the growth and metastasis spectrum of its human counterpart. We performed next-generation sequencing (NGS) and gene expression microarray profiles to explore the genomic and transcriptional backgrounds of the differential MOC line phenotypes, as well as, the cross-species relevance of the model. Here we describe the comparative analysis of NGS (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample?LinkName=bioproject_biosample_all&from_uid=247825) and expression microarray (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE50041) data from the MOC lines and corresponding human data, as described in our recent publication [1]. PMID:25729643

  16. The molecular basis of partial penetrance of splicing mutations in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rave-Harel, N; Kerem, E; Nissim-Rafinia, M; Madjar, I; Goshen, R; Augarten, A; Rahat, A; Hurwitz, A; Darvasi, A; Kerem, B

    1997-01-01

    The splicing variant, 5T allele, in intron 8 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was shown to be associated with partial penetrance of the clinical expression. This splicing variant leads to two possible transcripts: one normal and the other aberrantly spliced that lacks exon 9. The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular basis of the partial penetrance in individuals carrying the 5T allele. We analyzed the level of the correctly spliced RNA transcribed from the 5T allele in nasal and epididymal epithelium and correlated it with disease expression. Semiquantitative nondifferential reverse-transcriptase-PCR showed a considerable variability (6%-37%) in the total level of correctly spliced RNA transcribed from the 5T allele in nasal epithelium from 11 patients. A significant nonlinear correlation (r = .82, P = .002) between the level of the normal CFTR transcripts and the severity of lung disease was shown. No individuals with normal lung function and minimal or no lung disease (FEV1 >80% predicted) had <25% of normal transcripts, and individuals with <15% of normal transcripts did not have FEV1 >80%. The level of normal transcripts in epididymal epithelial cells from four infertile males with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens was low (6%-24%). In infertile males with normal lung function the level of correctly spliced transcripts in the nasal epithelium was higher than the level in the epididymal epithelium. These results indicate that there is variability in the efficiency of the splicing mechanism, among different individuals and between different organs of the same individual. This variability provides the molecular basis of the partial penetrance of cystic fibrosis disease in patients carrying the 5T allele. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8981951

  17. Molecular Origin of Color Variation in Firefly (Beetle) Bioluminescence: A Chemical Basis for Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Firefly shows bioluminescence by "luciferin-luciferase" (L-L) reaction using luciferin, luciferase, ATP and O2. The chemical photon generation by an enzymatic reaction is widely utilized for analytical methods including biological imaging in the life science fields. To expand photondetecting analyses with firefly bioluminescence, it is important for users to understand the chemical basis of the L-L reaction. In particular, the emission color variation of the L-L reaction is one of the distinguishing characteristics for multicolor luciferase assay and in vivo imaging. From the viewpoint of fundamental chemistry, this review explains the recent progress in the studies on the molecular mechanism of emission color variation after showing the outline of the reaction mechanism of the whole L-L reaction. On the basis of the mechanism, the progresses in organic synthesis of luciferin analogs modulating their emission colors are also presented to support further developments of red/near infrared in vivo biological imaging utility of firefly bioluminescence. PMID:27072710

  18. Molecular basis of the dopaminergic system in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Sadamoto, Hisayo; Aonuma, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    In insects, dopamine modulates various aspects of behavior such as learning and memory, arousal and locomotion, and is also a precursor of melanin. To elucidate the molecular basis of the dopaminergic system in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer, we identified genes involved in dopamine biosynthesis, signal transduction, and dopamine re-uptake in the cricket. Complementary DNA of two isoforms of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which convert tyrosine into L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, was isolated from the cricket brain cDNA library. In addition, four dopamine receptor genes (Dop1, Dop2, Dop3, and DopEcR) and a high-affinity dopamine transporter gene were identified. The two TH isoforms contained isoform-specific regions in the regulatory ACT domain and showed differential expression patterns in different tissues. In addition, the dopamine receptor genes had a receptor subtype-specific distribution: the Dop1, Dop2, and DopEcR genes were broadly expressed in various tissues at differential expression levels, and the Dop3 gene was restrictedly expressed in neuronal tissues and the testicles. Our findings provide a fundamental basis for understanding the dopaminergic regulation of diverse physiological processes in the cricket. PMID:23539475

  19. Molecular Basis of Differential B-Pentamer Stability of Shiga Toxins 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Conrady, Deborah G.; Flagler, Michael J.; Friedmann, David R.; Vander Wielen, Bradley D.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Weiss, Alison A.; Herr, Andrew B.

    2012-06-27

    Escherichia coli strain O157:H7 is a major cause of food poisoning that can result in severe diarrhea and, in some cases, renal failure. The pathogenesis of E. coli O157:H7 is in large part due to the production of Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB{sub 5} toxin that consists of a ribosomal RNA-cleaving A-subunit surrounded by a pentamer of receptor-binding B subunits. There are two major isoforms, Stx1 and Stx2, which differ dramatically in potency despite having 57% sequence identity. Animal studies and epidemiological studies show Stx2 is associated with more severe disease. Although the molecular basis of this difference is unknown, data suggest it is associated with the B-subunit. Mass spectrometry studies have suggested differential B-pentamer stability between Stx1 and Stx2. We have examined the relative stability of the B-pentamers in solution. Analytical ultracentrifugation using purified B-subunits demonstrates that Stx2B, the more deadly isoform, shows decreased pentamer stability compared to Stx1B (EC{sub 50} = 2.3 {micro}M vs. EC{sub 50} = 0.043 {micro}M for Stx1B). X-ray crystal structures of Stx1B and Stx2B identified a glutamine in Stx2 (versus leucine in Stx1) within the otherwise strongly hydrophobic interface between B-subunits. Interchanging these residues switches the stability phenotype of the B-pentamers of Stx1 and Stx2, as demonstrated by analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism. These studies demonstrate a profound difference in stability of the B-pentamers in Stx1 and Stx2, illustrate the mechanistic basis for this differential stability, and provide novel reagents to test the basis for differential pathogenicity of these toxins.

  20. Molecular basis of human transcobalamin II deficiency in an affected family

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Seetharam, S.; Seetharam, B.

    1994-09-01

    Transcobalamin II (TC II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease leading to cobalamin (Cbl, Vitamin B{sub 12}) deficiency. Patients with this disorder fail to absorb and transport Cbl across cellular membranes and develop Cbl deficiency, symptoms of which include failure to thrive, megaloblastic anemia, impaired immunodefence and neurological disorders. The molecular basis for this disease is not known. By means of Southern blotting and sequence analysis of TC II, cDNA amplified from fibroblasts of an affected child and his parents, we have identified two mutant TC II alleles. The maternally derived allele had a gross deletion, while the paternally derived allele had a 4-nucleotide ({sup 1023}TCTG) deletion which caused a reading frame shift and generation of a premature termination codon, 146 nucleotides downstream from the deletion. Both these deletions caused markedly reduced levels of TC II mRNA and protein. In addition, these two deletions were unique to this family and were not detected in four other unrelated TC II deficient patients who also exhibited the same (TC II protein/mRNA deficiency) phenotypes. Based on this study we suggest, (1) that the molecular defect in the most common form of human TC II deficiency (lack of immunoprecipitable plasma TC II) is heterogeneous and (2) these mutations cause TC II mRNA and protein deficiency leading to defective plasma transport of Cbl and the development of Cbl deficiency.

  1. "Zwitterionic Proton Sponge" Hydrogen Bonding Investigations on the Basis of Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J

    2015-06-22

    1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)-4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene has been investigated on the basis of static DFT computations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed in the gas phase and in the solid state. The studied "zwitterionic proton sponge" possesses two, short intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O-H···O and N-H···N) classified as Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds (LBHBs); therefore, the system studied is strongly anharmonic. In addition, the compound exists as a "zwitterion" in solution and in the solid state, thus the intramolecular hydrogen bonds belong to the class of charge-assisted interactions. The applied quantum-chemical methods enabled investigations of metric and spectroscopic parameters of the molecule. The time-evolution investigations of the H-bonding showed a strong delocalization of the bridge protons and their high mobility, reflected in the low barriers on the free energy surfaces. Frequent proton transfer phenomena were noticed. The power spectra of atomic velocity were computed to analyze the vibrational features associated with O-H and N-H stretching. A broad absorption was indicated for both hydrogen bridges. For the first time, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics results are reported for the compound, and they indicate a broad, shallow but not barrierless, potential well for each of the bridge protons. PMID:25965324

  2. Molecular basis for bacterial peptidoglycan recognition by LysM domains

    PubMed Central

    Mesnage, Stéphane; Dellarole, Mariano; Baxter, Nicola J.; Rouget, Jean-Baptiste; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Wang, Ning; Fujimoto, Yukari; Hounslow, Andrea M.; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Fukase, Koichi; Foster, Simon J.; Williamson, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate recognition is essential for growth, cell adhesion and signalling in all living organisms. A highly conserved carbohydrate binding module, LysM, is found in proteins from viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants and mammals. LysM modules recognize polysaccharides containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues including peptidoglycan, an essential component of the bacterial cell wall. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning LysM–peptidoglycan interactions remains unclear. Here we describe the molecular basis for peptidoglycan recognition by a multimodular LysM domain from AtlA, an autolysin involved in cell division in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. We explore the contribution of individual modules to the binding, identify the peptidoglycan motif recognized, determine the structures of free and bound modules and reveal the residues involved in binding. Our results suggest that peptide stems modulate LysM binding to peptidoglycan. Using these results, we reveal how the LysM module recognizes the GlcNAc-X-GlcNAc motif present in polysaccharides across kingdoms. PMID:24978025

  3. Molecular basis of the autosomal recessive forms of chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Curnutte, J T

    1992-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited group of disorders in which phagocytic leukocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and macrophages) fail to undergo a respiratory burst when stimulated. The products of the respiratory burst, which include superoxide and hypochlorous acid, play a critical role in killing pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and parasites. As a result of the failure to activate the respiratory burst in their phagocytes, most CGD patients suffer from severe recurrent infections. While all CGD patients share this severe defect, there is substantial heterogeneity in the molecular mechanisms responsible. The enzyme that catalyzes the respiratory burst, NADPH oxidase, has been extensively characterized and found to consist of at least four subunits: gp91-phox and p22-phox (the two subunits of a low potential cytochrome b that is the terminal electron carrier of the oxidase) as well as p47-phox and p67-phox (two cytosolic oxidase components). CGD is caused by a defect in any one of these four components, thus explaining the previously confusing genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. In approximately thirty reported cases, the underlying mutations involving these oxidase components have been identified. The current understanding of the molecular basis of CGD is reviewed in the context of a recently completed Phase III clinical trial establishing the efficacy of recombinant human interferon gamma in the treatment of CGD. PMID:1554499

  4. The molecular basis of emerin–emerin and emerin–BAF interactions

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Jason M.; Simon, Dan N.; Jenkins-Houk, Clifton R.; Westerbeck, Jason W.; Grønning-Wang, Line M.; Carlson, Cathrine R.; Wilson, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Emerin is a conserved membrane component of nuclear lamina structure. Here, we report an advance in understanding the molecular basis of emerin function: intermolecular emerin–emerin association. There were two modes: one mediated by association of residues 170–220 in one emerin molecule to residues 170–220 in another, and the second involving residues 170–220 and 1–132. Deletion analysis showed residues 187–220 contain a positive element essential for intermolecular association in cells. By contrast, deletion of residues 168–186 inactivated a proposed negative element, required to limit or control association. Association of GFP–emerin with nuclear BAF in cells required the LEM domain (residues 1–47) and the positive element. Emerin peptide arrays revealed direct binding of residues 170–220 to residues 206–225 (the proposed positive element), residues 147–174 (particularly P153MYGRDSAYQSITHYRP169) and the LEM domain. Emerin residues 1–132 and 159–220 were each sufficient to bind lamin A or B1 tails in vitro, identifying two independent regions of molecular contact with lamins. These results, and predicted emerin intrinsic disorder, support the hypothesis that there are multiple ‘backbone’ and LEM-domain configurations in a proposed intermolecular emerin network at the nuclear envelope. PMID:25052089

  5. Molecular basis for the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of thymine-7-hydroxylase in fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2015-11-16

    TET proteins play a vital role in active DNA demethylation in mammals and thus have important functions in many essential cellular processes. The chemistry for the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC, 5fC and 5caC catalysed by TET proteins is similar to that of T to 5hmU, 5fU and 5caU catalysed by thymine-7-hydroxylase (T7H) in the nucleotide anabolism in fungi. Here, we report the crystal structures and biochemical properties of Neurospora crassa T7H. T7H can bind the substrates only in the presence of cosubstrate, and binding of different substrates does not induce notable conformational changes. T7H exhibits comparable binding affinity for T and 5hmU, but 3-fold lower affinity for 5fU. Residues Phe292, Tyr217 and Arg190 play critical roles in substrate binding and catalysis, and the interactions of the C5 modification group of substrates with the cosubstrate and enzyme contribute to the slightly varied binding affinity and activity towards different substrates. After the catalysis, the products are released and new cosubstrate and substrate are reloaded to conduct the next oxidation reaction. Our data reveal the molecular basis for substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of T7H and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis of TET proteins. PMID:26429971

  6. Molecular basis for the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of thymine-7-hydroxylase in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    TET proteins play a vital role in active DNA demethylation in mammals and thus have important functions in many essential cellular processes. The chemistry for the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC, 5fC and 5caC catalysed by TET proteins is similar to that of T to 5hmU, 5fU and 5caU catalysed by thymine-7-hydroxylase (T7H) in the nucleotide anabolism in fungi. Here, we report the crystal structures and biochemical properties of Neurospora crassa T7H. T7H can bind the substrates only in the presence of cosubstrate, and binding of different substrates does not induce notable conformational changes. T7H exhibits comparable binding affinity for T and 5hmU, but 3-fold lower affinity for 5fU. Residues Phe292, Tyr217 and Arg190 play critical roles in substrate binding and catalysis, and the interactions of the C5 modification group of substrates with the cosubstrate and enzyme contribute to the slightly varied binding affinity and activity towards different substrates. After the catalysis, the products are released and new cosubstrate and substrate are reloaded to conduct the next oxidation reaction. Our data reveal the molecular basis for substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of T7H and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis of TET proteins. PMID:26429971

  7. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-01

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  8. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S K; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  9. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  10. Molecular Basis for the Dissociation Dynamics of Protein A-Immunoglobulin G1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Huang, Bo; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) is the most popular affinity ligand for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). However, the molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of SpA-IgG1 complex is unclear. Herein, coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the Martini force field were used to study the dissociation dynamics of the complex. The CG-MD simulations were first verified by the agreement in the structural and interactional properties of SpA and human IgG1 (hIgG1) in the association process between the CG-MD and all-atom MD at different NaCl concentrations. Then, the CG-MD simulation studies focused on the molecular insight into the dissociation dynamics of SpA-hIgG1 complex at pH 3.0. It is found that there are four steps in the dissociation process of the complex. First, there is a slight conformational adjustment of helix II in SpA. This is followed by the phenomena that the electrostatic interactions provided by the three hot spots (Glu143, Arg146 and Lys154) of helix II of SpA break up, leading to the dissociation of helix II from the binding site of hIgG1. Subsequently, breakup of the hydrophobic interactions between helix I (Phe132, Tyr133 and His137) in SpA and hIgG1 occurs, resulting in the disengagement of helix I from its binding site of hIgG1. Finally, the non-specific interactions between SpA and hIgG1 decrease slowly till disappearance, leading to the complete dissociation of the SpA-hIgG1 complex. This work has revealed that CG-MD coupled with the Martini force field is an effective method for studying the dissociation dynamics of protein-protein complex. PMID:23776704

  11. Molecular genetic basis of antimicrobial agent resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: 1998 update.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Musser, J M

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of resistance to antituberculous agents has advanced rapidly since we reviewed this topic 3 years ago. Virtually all isolates resistant to rifampin and related rifamycins have a mutation that alters the sequence of a 27-amino-acid region of the beta subunit of ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase. Resistance to isoniazid (INH) is more complex. Many resistant organisms have mutations in the katG gene encoding catalase-peroxidase that result in altered enzyme structure. These structural changes apparently result in decreased conversion of INH to a biologically active form. Some INH-resistant organisms also have mutations in the inhA locus or a recently characterized gene (kasA) encoding a beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase. Streptomycin resistance is due mainly to mutations in the 16S rRNA gene or the rpsL gene encoding ribosomal protein S12. Resistance to pyrazinamide in the great majority of organisms is caused by mutations in the gene (pncA) encoding pyrazinamidase that result in diminished enzyme activity. Ethambutol resistance in approximately 60% of organisms is due to amino acid replacements at position 306 of an arabinosyltransferase encoded by the embB gene. Amino acid changes in the A subunit of deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase cause fluoroquinolone resistance in most organisms. Kanamycin resistance is due to nucleotide substitutions in the rrs gene encoding 16S rRNA. Multidrug resistant strains arise by sequential accumulation of resistance mutations for individual drugs. Limited evidence exists indicating that some drug resistant strains with mutations that severely alter catalase-peroxidase activity are less virulent in animal models. A diverse array of strategies is available to assist in rapid detection of drug resistance-associated gene mutations. Although remarkable advances have been made, much remains to be learned about the molecular genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is

  12. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy; Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  13. Molecular Basis of Glycosaminoglycan Heparin Binding to the Chemokine CXCL1 Dimer*

    PubMed Central

    Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Joseph, Prem Raj B.; Sawant, Kirti V.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-bound and soluble chemokine gradients in the vasculature and extracellular matrix mediate neutrophil recruitment to the site of microbial infection and sterile injury in the host tissue. However, the molecular principles by which chemokine-GAG interactions orchestrate these gradients are poorly understood. This, in part, can be directly attributed to the complex interrelationship between the chemokine monomer-dimer equilibrium and binding geometry and affinities that are also intimately linked to GAG length. To address some of this missing knowledge, we have characterized the structural basis of heparin binding to the murine CXCL1 dimer. CXCL1 is a neutrophil-activating chemokine and exists as both monomers and dimers (Kd = 36 μm). To avoid interference from monomer-GAG interactions, we designed a trapped dimer (dCXCL1) by introducing a disulfide bridge across the dimer interface. We characterized the binding of GAG heparin octasaccharide to dCXCL1 using solution NMR spectroscopy. Our studies show that octasaccharide binds orthogonally to the interhelical axis and spans the dimer interface and that heparin binding enhances the structural integrity of the C-terminal helical residues and stability of the dimer. We generated a quadruple mutant (H20A/K22A/K62A/K66A) on the basis of the binding data and observed that this mutant failed to bind heparin octasaccharide, validating our structural model. We propose that the stability enhancement of dimers upon GAG binding regulates in vivo neutrophil trafficking by increasing the lifetime of “active” chemokines, and that this structural knowledge could be exploited for designing inhibitors that disrupt chemokine-GAG interactions and neutrophil homing to the target tissue. PMID:23864653

  14. The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Taste Coding in the Legs of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Frederick; Dahanukar, Anupama; Weiss, Linnea A.; Kwon, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    To understand the principles of taste coding, it is necessary to understand the functional organization of the taste organs. Although the labellum of the Drosophila melanogaster head has been described in detail, the tarsal segments of the legs, which collectively contain more taste sensilla than the labellum, have received much less attention. We performed a systematic anatomical, physiological, and molecular analysis of the tarsal sensilla of Drosophila. We construct an anatomical map of all five tarsal segments of each female leg. The taste sensilla of the female foreleg are systematically tested with a panel of 40 diverse compounds, yielding a response matrix of ∼500 sensillum–tastant combinations. Six types of sensilla are characterized. One type was tuned remarkably broadly: it responded to 19 of 27 bitter compounds tested, as well as sugars; another type responded to neither. The midleg is similar but distinct from the foreleg. The response specificities of the tarsal sensilla differ from those of the labellum, as do n-dimensional taste spaces constructed for each organ, enhancing the capacity of the fly to encode and respond to gustatory information. We examined the expression patterns of all 68 gustatory receptors (Grs). A total of 28 Gr–GAL4 drivers are expressed in the legs. We constructed a receptor-to-sensillum map of the legs and a receptor-to-neuron map. Fourteen Gr–GAL4 drivers are expressed uniquely in the bitter-sensing neuron of the sensillum that is tuned exceptionally broadly. Integration of the molecular and physiological maps provides insight into the underlying basis of taste coding. PMID:24849350

  15. Molecular Basis for the Interaction Between AP4 β4 and its Accessory Protein, Tepsin.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Meredith N; Davies, Alexandra K; Voehler, Markus; Kendall, Amy K; Borner, Georg H H; Chazin, Walter J; Robinson, Margaret S; Jackson, Lauren P

    2016-04-01

    The adaptor protein 4 (AP4) complex (ϵ/β4/μ4/σ4 subunits) forms a non-clathrin coat on vesicles departing the trans-Golgi network. AP4 biology remains poorly understood, in stark contrast to the wealth of molecular data available for the related clathrin adaptors AP1 and AP2. AP4 is important for human health because mutations in any AP4 subunit cause severe neurological problems, including intellectual disability and progressive spastic para- or tetraplegias. We have used a range of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches to determine the molecular basis for how the AP4 β4 C-terminal appendage domain interacts with tepsin, the only known AP4 accessory protein. We show that tepsin harbors a hydrophobic sequence, LFxG[M/L]x[L/V], in its unstructured C-terminus, which binds directly and specifically to the C-terminal β4 appendage domain. Using nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift mapping, we define the binding site on the β4 appendage by identifying residues on the surface whose signals are perturbed upon titration with tepsin. Point mutations in either the tepsin LFxG[M/L]x[L/V] sequence or in its cognate binding site on β4 abolish in vitro binding. In cells, the same point mutations greatly reduce the amount of tepsin that interacts with AP4. However, they do not abolish the binding between tepsin and AP4 completely, suggesting the existence of additional interaction sites between AP4 and tepsin. These data provide one of the first detailed mechanistic glimpses at AP4 coat assembly and should provide an entry point for probing the role of AP4-coated vesicles in cell biology, and especially in neuronal function. PMID:26756312

  16. Uncovering the differential molecular basis of adaptive diversity in three Echinochloa leaf transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Nah, Gyoungju; Im, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Won; Park, Hae-Rim; Yook, Min-Jung; Yang, Tae-Jin; Fischer, Albert J; Kim, Do-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Echinochloa is a major weed that grows almost everywhere in farmed land. This high prevalence results from its high adaptability to various water conditions, including upland and paddy fields, and its ability to grow in a wide range of climates, ranging from tropical to temperate regions. Three Echinochloa crus-galli accessions (EC-SNU1, EC-SNU2, and EC-SNU3) collected in Korea have shown diversity in their responses to flooding, with EC-SNU1 exhibiting the greatest growth among three accessions. In the search for molecular components underlying adaptive diversity among the three Echinochloa crus-galli accessions, we performed de novo assembly of leaf transcriptomes and investigated the pattern of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Although the overall composition of the three leaf transcriptomes was well-conserved, the gene expression patterns of particular gene ontology (GO) categories were notably different among the three accessions. Under non-submergence growing conditions, five protein categories (serine/threonine kinase, leucine-rich repeat kinase, signaling-related, glycoprotein, and glycosidase) were significantly (FDR, q < 0.05) enriched in up-regulated DEGs from EC-SNU1. These up-regulated DEGs include major components of signal transduction pathways, such as receptor-like kinase (RLK) and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) genes, as well as previously known abiotic stress-responsive genes. Our results therefore suggest that diversified gene expression regulation of upstream signaling components conferred the molecular basis of adaptive diversity in Echinochloa crus-galli. PMID:26266806

  17. Uncovering the Differential Molecular Basis of Adaptive Diversity in Three Echinochloa Leaf Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Nah, Gyoungju; Im, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Won; Park, Hae-Rim; Yook, Min-Jung; Yang, Tae-Jin; Fischer, Albert J.; Kim, Do-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Echinochloa is a major weed that grows almost everywhere in farmed land. This high prevalence results from its high adaptability to various water conditions, including upland and paddy fields, and its ability to grow in a wide range of climates, ranging from tropical to temperate regions. Three Echinochloa crus-galli accessions (EC-SNU1, EC-SNU2, and EC-SNU3) collected in Korea have shown diversity in their responses to flooding, with EC-SNU1 exhibiting the greatest growth among three accessions. In the search for molecular components underlying adaptive diversity among the three Echinochloa crus-galli accessions, we performed de novo assembly of leaf transcriptomes and investigated the pattern of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Although the overall composition of the three leaf transcriptomes was well-conserved, the gene expression patterns of particular gene ontology (GO) categories were notably different among the three accessions. Under non-submergence growing conditions, five protein categories (serine/threonine kinase, leucine-rich repeat kinase, signaling-related, glycoprotein, and glycosidase) were significantly (FDR, q < 0.05) enriched in up-regulated DEGs from EC-SNU1. These up-regulated DEGs include major components of signal transduction pathways, such as receptor-like kinase (RLK) and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) genes, as well as previously known abiotic stress-responsive genes. Our results therefore suggest that diversified gene expression regulation of upstream signaling components conferred the molecular basis of adaptive diversity in Echinochloa crus-galli. PMID:26266806

  18. The Burmese python genome reveals the molecular basis for extreme adaptation in snakes

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, Todd A.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Hall, Kathryn T.; Card, Daren C.; Schield, Drew R.; Fujita, Matthew K.; Ruggiero, Robert P.; Degner, Jack F.; Daza, Juan M.; Gu, Wanjun; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Shaney, Kyle J.; Castoe, Jill M.; Fox, Samuel E.; Poole, Alex W.; Polanco, Daniel; Dobry, Jason; Vandewege, Michael W.; Li, Qing; Schott, Ryan K.; Kapusta, Aurélie; Minx, Patrick; Feschotte, Cédric; Uetz, Peter; Ray, David A.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Bogden, Robert; Smith, Eric N.; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Vonk, Freek J.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Richardson, Michael K.; Mackessy, Stephen P.; Bronikowski, Anne M.; Yandell, Mark; Warren, Wesley C.; Secor, Stephen M.; Pollock, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Snakes possess many extreme morphological and physiological adaptations. Identification of the molecular basis of these traits can provide novel understanding for vertebrate biology and medicine. Here, we study snake biology using the genome sequence of the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), a model of extreme physiological and metabolic adaptation. We compare the python and king cobra genomes along with genomic samples from other snakes and perform transcriptome analysis to gain insights into the extreme phenotypes of the python. We discovered rapid and massive transcriptional responses in multiple organ systems that occur on feeding and coordinate major changes in organ size and function. Intriguingly, the homologs of these genes in humans are associated with metabolism, development, and pathology. We also found that many snake metabolic genes have undergone positive selection, which together with the rapid evolution of mitochondrial proteins, provides evidence for extensive adaptive redesign of snake metabolic pathways. Additional evidence for molecular adaptation and gene family expansions and contractions is associated with major physiological and phenotypic adaptations in snakes; genes involved are related to cell cycle, development, lungs, eyes, heart, intestine, and skeletal structure, including GRB2-associated binding protein 1, SSH, WNT16, and bone morphogenetic protein 7. Finally, changes in repetitive DNA content, guanine-cytosine isochore structure, and nucleotide substitution rates indicate major shifts in the structure and evolution of snake genomes compared with other amniotes. Phenotypic and physiological novelty in snakes seems to be driven by system-wide coordination of protein adaptation, gene expression, and changes in the structure of the genome. PMID:24297902

  19. The Burmese python genome reveals the molecular basis for extreme adaptation in snakes.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Hall, Kathryn T; Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Fujita, Matthew K; Ruggiero, Robert P; Degner, Jack F; Daza, Juan M; Gu, Wanjun; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Shaney, Kyle J; Castoe, Jill M; Fox, Samuel E; Poole, Alex W; Polanco, Daniel; Dobry, Jason; Vandewege, Michael W; Li, Qing; Schott, Ryan K; Kapusta, Aurélie; Minx, Patrick; Feschotte, Cédric; Uetz, Peter; Ray, David A; Hoffmann, Federico G; Bogden, Robert; Smith, Eric N; Chang, Belinda S W; Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Richardson, Michael K; Mackessy, Stephen P; Bronikowski, Anne M; Bronikowsi, Anne M; Yandell, Mark; Warren, Wesley C; Secor, Stephen M; Pollock, David D

    2013-12-17

    Snakes possess many extreme morphological and physiological adaptations. Identification of the molecular basis of these traits can provide novel understanding for vertebrate biology and medicine. Here, we study snake biology using the genome sequence of the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), a model of extreme physiological and metabolic adaptation. We compare the python and king cobra genomes along with genomic samples from other snakes and perform transcriptome analysis to gain insights into the extreme phenotypes of the python. We discovered rapid and massive transcriptional responses in multiple organ systems that occur on feeding and coordinate major changes in organ size and function. Intriguingly, the homologs of these genes in humans are associated with metabolism, development, and pathology. We also found that many snake metabolic genes have undergone positive selection, which together with the rapid evolution of mitochondrial proteins, provides evidence for extensive adaptive redesign of snake metabolic pathways. Additional evidence for molecular adaptation and gene family expansions and contractions is associated with major physiological and phenotypic adaptations in snakes; genes involved are related to cell cycle, development, lungs, eyes, heart, intestine, and skeletal structure, including GRB2-associated binding protein 1, SSH, WNT16, and bone morphogenetic protein 7. Finally, changes in repetitive DNA content, guanine-cytosine isochore structure, and nucleotide substitution rates indicate major shifts in the structure and evolution of snake genomes compared with other amniotes. Phenotypic and physiological novelty in snakes seems to be driven by system-wide coordination of protein adaptation, gene expression, and changes in the structure of the genome. PMID:24297902

  20. Multiple-site replacement analogs of glucagon. A molecular basis for antagonist design.

    PubMed

    Unson, C G; Wu, C R; Fitzpatrick, K J; Merrifield, R B

    1994-04-29

    Extensive structure activity analysis has allowed us to identify specific residues in the glucagon sequence that are responsible for either receptor recognition or signal transduction. For instance, we have demonstrated that aspartic acid 9 and histidine 1 are essential for activation, and that an ionic interaction between the negative carboxylate and the protonated imidazole may contribute to the activation reaction at the molecular level. In the absence of the carboxylic group at position 9, aspartic 21 or aspartic 15 might furnish distal electrostatic effects to maintain partial agonism. Further investigation established that each of the 4 serine residues in the hormone play distinct roles. Serine 8 provides an important determinant of binding. Whereas neither serines 2, 11, nor 16 are required for receptor recognition. We have shown that serine 16 is essential for signal transduction and thus have identified it to be the third residue in glucagon to participate in a putative catalytic triad together with aspartic 9 and histidine 1, in the transduction of the glucagon response. In this work, we utilized insights into the functional significance of particular residues in the peptide appropriated from our structure-function assignments, as the basis of a molecular approach for the design of active-site directed antagonists of glucagon. The importance as well as the accuracy of our findings are confirmed by the synthesis of a series of improved glucagon antagonists based on replacements at positions 1, 9, 11, 16, and 21. The inhibition index, (I/A)50, of our best antagonist des-His1-[Nle9-Ala11-Ala16]glucagon amide, has been improved 10-fold over the previous best glucagon inhibitor. PMID:8175663

  1. Molecular basis for H blood group deficiency in Bombay (Oh) and para-Bombay individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, R J; Ernst, L K; Larsen, R D; Bryant, J G; Robinson, J S; Lowe, J B

    1994-01-01

    The penultimate step in the biosynthesis of the human ABO blood group oligosaccharide antigens is catalyzed by alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase(s) (GDP-L-fucose: beta-D-galactoside 2-alpha-L-fucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.69), whose expression is determined by the H and Secretor (SE) blood group loci (also known as FUT1 and FUT2, respectively). These enzymes construct Fuc alpha 1-->2Gal beta-linkages, known as H determinants, which are essential precursors to the A and B antigens. Erythrocytes from individuals with the rare Bombay and para-Bombay blood group phenotypes are deficient in H determinants, and thus A and B determinants, as a consequence of apparent homozygosity for null alleles at the H locus. We report a molecular analysis of a human alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase gene, thought to correspond to the H blood group locus, in a Bombay pedigree and a para-Bombay pedigree. We find inactivating point mutations in the coding regions of both alleles of this gene in each H-deficient individual. These results define the molecular basis for H blood group antigen deficiency in Bombay and para-Bombay phenotypes, provide compelling evidence that this gene represents the human H blood group locus, and strongly support a hypothesis that the H and SE loci represent distinct alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase genes. Candidate sequences for the human SE locus are identified by low-stringency Southern blot hybridization analyses, using a probe derived from the H alpha-(1,2)-fucosyltransferase gene. Images PMID:7912436

  2. Functional diversification of a protease inhibitor gene in the genus Drosophila and its molecular basis.

    PubMed

    Börner, Stefan; Ragg, Hermann

    2008-05-31

    The mutually exclusive use of alternative reactive site loop (RSL) cassettes due to alternative splicing of serpin (serine protease inhibitor) gene transcripts is a widespread strategy to create target-selective protease inhibitors in the animal kingdom. Since molecular basis and evolution of serpin RSL cassette exon amplification and diversification are unexplored, the exon-intron organization of the serpin gene spn4 from 12 species of the genus Drosophila was studied. The analysis of the gene structures shows that both number and target enzyme specificities of Spn4 RSL cassettes are highly variable in fruit flies and includes inhibitor variants with novel antiproteolytic activities in some species, indicating that RSL diversity is the result of adaptive evolution. Comparative genomics suggests that interallelic gene conversion and/or recombination events contribute to RSL cassette exon amplification. Due to an intron that is located at the most suitable position within the RSL region, multiple inhibitors can be formed in an economic manner that are both efficient and target-selective, allowing fruit flies to control an astonishing variety of proteases with different cleavage chemistry and evolutionary ancestry. PMID:18395367

  3. The neuronal and molecular basis of quinine-dependent bitter taste signaling in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A.; Mazija, Lorena; Wüst, Alexander; Thum, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    The sensation of bitter substances can alert an animal that a specific type of food is harmful and should not be consumed. However, not all bitter compounds are equally toxic and some may even be beneficial in certain contexts. Thus, taste systems in general may have a broader range of functions than just in alerting the animal. In this study we investigate bitter sensing and processing in Drosophila larvae using quinine, a substance perceived by humans as bitter. We show that behavioral choice, feeding, survival, and associative olfactory learning are all directly affected by quinine. On the cellular level, we show that 12 gustatory sensory receptor neurons that express both GR66a and GR33a are required for quinine-dependent choice and feeding behavior. Interestingly, these neurons are not necessary for quinine-dependent survival or associative learning. On the molecular receptor gene level, the GR33a receptor, but not GR66a, is required for quinine-dependent choice behavior. A screen for gustatory sensory receptor neurons that trigger quinine-dependent choice behavior revealed that a single GR97a receptor gene expressing neuron located in the peripheral terminal sense organ is partially necessary and sufficient. For the first time, we show that the elementary chemosensory system of the Drosophila larva can serve as a simple model to understand the neuronal basis of taste information processing on the single cell level with respect to different behavioral outputs. PMID:24478653

  4. Molecular basis of floral petaloidy: insights from androecia of Canna indica

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qian; Liu, Huanfang; Almeida, Ana M. R.; Kuang, Yanfeng; Zou, Pu; Liao, Jingping

    2014-01-01

    Floral organs that take on the characteristics of petals can occur in all whorls of the monocot order Zingiberales. In Canna indica, the most ornamental or ‘petaloid’ parts of the flowers are of androecial origin and are considered staminodes. However, the precise nature of these petaloid organs is yet to be determined. In order to gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of androecial identity, a molecular investigation of B- and C-class genes was carried out. Two MADS-box genes GLOBOSA (GLO) and AGAMOUS (AG) were isolated from young inflorescences of C. indica by 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (3′-RACE PCR). Sequence characterization and phylogenetic analyses show that CiGLO and CiAG belong to the B- and C-class MADS-box gene family, respectively. CiAG is expressed in petaloid staminodes, the labellum, the fertile stamen and carpels. CiGLO is expressed in petals, petaloid staminodes, the labellum, the fertile stamen and carpels. Expression patterns in mature tissues of CiGLO and CiAG suggest that petaloid staminodes and the labellum are of androecial identity, in agreement with their position within the flower and with described Arabidopsis thaliana expression patterns. Although B- and C-class genes are important components of androecial determination, their expression patterns are not sufficient to explain the distinct morphology observed in staminodes and the fertile stamen in C. indica. PMID:24876297

  5. Molecular basis for the recognition of methylated adenines in RNA by the eukaryotic YTH domain

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shukun; Tong, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of the N6 position of selected internal adenines (m6A) in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs is widespread in eukaryotes, and the YTH domain in a collection of proteins recognizes this modification. We report the crystal structure of the splicing factor YT521-B homology (YTH) domain of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MRB1 in complex with a heptaribonucleotide with an m6A residue in the center. The m6A modification is recognized by an aromatic cage, being sandwiched between a Trp and Tyr residue and with the methyl group pointed toward another Trp residue. Mutations of YTH domain residues in the RNA binding site can abolish the formation of the complex, confirming the structural observations. These residues are conserved in the human YTH proteins that also bind m6A RNA, suggesting a conserved mode of recognition. Overall, our structural and biochemical studies have defined the molecular basis for how the YTH domain functions as a reader of methylated adenines. PMID:25201973

  6. Molecular basis for the recognition of methylated adenines in RNA by the eukaryotic YTH domain.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shukun; Tong, Liang

    2014-09-23

    Methylation of the N6 position of selected internal adenines (m(6)A) in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs is widespread in eukaryotes, and the YTH domain in a collection of proteins recognizes this modification. We report the crystal structure of the splicing factor YT521-B homology (YTH) domain of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MRB1 in complex with a heptaribonucleotide with an m(6)A residue in the center. The m(6)A modification is recognized by an aromatic cage, being sandwiched between a Trp and Tyr residue and with the methyl group pointed toward another Trp residue. Mutations of YTH domain residues in the RNA binding site can abolish the formation of the complex, confirming the structural observations. These residues are conserved in the human YTH proteins that also bind m(6)A RNA, suggesting a conserved mode of recognition. Overall, our structural and biochemical studies have defined the molecular basis for how the YTH domain functions as a reader of methylated adenines. PMID:25201973

  7. The Genetic and Molecular Basis of O-Antigenic Diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Tuanyok, Apichai; Stone, Joshua K.; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Georgia, Shalamar; Warrington, Stephanie; Mullins, Travis; Allender, Christopher J.; Wagner, David M.; Chantratita, Narisara; Peacock, Sharon J.; Currie, Bart J.; Keim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the most important virulence and antigenic components of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis. LPS diversity in B. pseudomallei has been described as typical, atypical or rough, based upon banding patterns on SDS-PAGE. Here, we studied the genetic and molecular basis of these phenotypic differences. Bioinformatics was used to determine the diversity of genes known or predicted to be involved in biosynthesis of the O-antigenic moiety of LPS in B. pseudomallei and its near-relative species. Multiplex-PCR assays were developed to target diversity of the O-antigen biosynthesis gene patterns or LPS genotypes in B. pseudomallei populations. We found that the typical LPS genotype (LPS genotype A) was highly prevalent in strains from Thailand and other countries in Southeast Asia, whereas the atypical LPS genotype (LPS genotype B) was most often detected in Australian strains (∼13.8%). In addition, we report a novel LPS ladder pattern, a derivative of the atypical LPS phenotype, associated with an uncommon O-antigen biosynthesis gene cluster that is found in only a small B. pseudomallei sub-population. This new LPS group was designated as genotype B2. We also report natural mutations in the O-antigen biosynthesis genes that potentially cause the rough LPS phenotype. We postulate that the diversity of LPS may correlate with differential immunopathogenicity and virulence among B. pseudomallei strains. PMID:22235357

  8. Molecular basis and expression of the LWa/LWb blood group polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hermand, P; Gane, P; Mattei, M G; Sistonen, P; Cartron, J P; Bailly, P

    1995-08-15

    The Landsteiner-Wiener (LW) blood group antigens reside on a 42-kD erythrocyte membrane glycoprotein that has recently been cloned. Here, we found that the molecular basis for the LWa/LWb polymorphism is determined by a single base pair mutation (A308G) that correlates with a Pvu II restriction site and results in a Gln70Arg amino acid substitution. COS-7 cells transfected with LWa or LWb cDNAs reacted with human anti-LWa and anti-LWb sera, respectively, as well as with a murine monoclonal anti-LWab antibody, as shown by flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, a 42-kD protein was immunoprecipitated from the transfected cells with the monoclonal anti-LWab antibody. These findings indicate that LWa and LWb are alleles of the LW blood group locus as defined also by a monoclonal anti-LWab of nonhuman origin. In addition, the LW locus has been assigned to chromosome 19p13.3 by in situ hybridization. Study by Southern blot analysis indicated also that the LW locus is composed of a single gene that was not grossly rearranged in rare LW(a-b-) and Rhnull individuals deficient for LW antigens. In addition, Pvu II restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis indicated that these variants were all homozygous for a phenotypically silent LWa allele. PMID:7632968

  9. Molecular Basis for Cyclooxygenase Inhibition by the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, Kelsey C.; Walters, Matthew J.; Musee, Joel; Harp, Joel M.; Kiefer, James R.; Oates, John A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-11-15

    Naproxen ((S)-6-methoxy-{alpha}-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid) is a powerful non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is extensively used as a prescription and over-the-counter medication. Naproxen exhibits gastrointestinal toxicity, but its cardiovascular toxicity may be reduced compared with other drugs in its class. Despite the fact that naproxen has been marketed for many years, the molecular basis of its interaction with cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes is unknown. We performed a detailed study of naproxen-COX-2 interactions using site-directed mutagenesis, structure-activity analysis, and x-ray crystallography. The results indicate that each of the pendant groups of the naphthyl scaffold are essential for COX inhibition, and only minimal substitutions are tolerated. Mutation of Trp-387 to Phe significantly reduced inhibition by naproxen, a result that appears unique to this inhibitor. Substitution of S or CH2 for the O atom of the p-methoxy group yielded analogs that were not affected by the W387F substitution and that exhibited increased COX-2 selectivity relative to naproxen. Crystallization and x-ray analysis yielded structures of COX-2 complexed to naproxen and its methylthio analog at 1.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The combination of mutagenesis, structure analysis, and x-ray crystallography provided comprehensive information on the unique interactions responsible for naproxen binding to COX-2.

  10. Meshless reconstruction method for fluorescence molecular tomography based on compactly supported radial basis function.

    PubMed

    An, Yu; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Guanglei; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Jiang, Shixin; Shang, Wenting; Du, Yang; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising tool in the study of cancer, drug discovery, and disease diagnosis, enabling noninvasive and quantitative imaging of the biodistribution of fluorophores in deep tissues via image reconstruction techniques. Conventional reconstruction methods based on the finite-element method (FEM) have achieved acceptable stability and efficiency. However, some inherent shortcomings in FEM meshes, such as time consumption in mesh generation and a large discretization error, limit further biomedical application. In this paper, we propose a meshless method for reconstruction of FMT (MM-FMT) using compactly supported radial basis functions (CSRBFs). With CSRBFs, the image domain can be accurately expressed by continuous CSRBFs, avoiding the discretization error to a certain degree. After direct collocation with CSRBFs, the conventional optimization techniques, including Tikhonov, L1-norm iteration shrinkage (L1-IS), and sparsity adaptive matching pursuit, were adopted to solve the meshless reconstruction. To evaluate the performance of the proposed MM-FMT, we performed numerical heterogeneous mouse experiments and in vivo bead-implanted mouse experiments. The results suggest that the proposed MM-FMT method can reduce the position error of the reconstruction result to smaller than 0.4 mm for the double-source case, which is a significant improvement for FMT. PMID:26451513

  11. Molecular basis of the attenuated phenotype of human APOBEC3B DNA mutator enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Caval, Vincent; Bouzidi, Mohamed S.; Suspène, Rodolphe; Laude, Hélène; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Bashamboo, Anu; Krey, Thomas; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The human APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B genes (A3A and A3B) encode DNA mutator enzymes that deaminate cytidine and 5-methylcytidine residues in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). They are important sources of mutations in many cancer genomes which show a preponderance of CG->TA transitions. Although both enzymes can hypermutate chromosomal DNA in an experimental setting, only A3A can induce double strand DNA breaks, even though the catalytic domains of A3B and A3A differ by only 9% at the protein level. Accordingly we sought the molecular basis underlying A3B attenuation through the generation of A3A-A3B chimeras and mutants. It transpires that the N-terminal domain facilitates A3B activity while a handful of substitutions in the catalytic C-terminal domain impacting ssDNA binding serve to attenuate A3B compared to A3A. Interestingly, functional attenuation is also observed for the rhesus monkey rhA3B enzyme compared to rhA3A indicating that this genotoxic dichotomy has been selected for and maintained for some 38 million years. Expression of all human ssDNA cytidine deaminase genes is absent in mature sperm indicating they contribute to somatic mutation and cancer but not human diversity. PMID:26384561

  12. Structure of a Chaperone-Usher Pilus Reveals the Molecular Basis of Rod Uncoiling

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Redzej, Adam; Dodson, Karen; Ukleja, Marta; Frenz, Brandon; Rodrigues, Catarina; Hultgren, Scott J.; DiMaio, Frank; Egelman, Edward H.; Waksman, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Types 1 and P pili are prototypical bacterial cell-surface appendages playing essential roles in mediating adhesion of bacteria to the urinary tract. These pili, assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway, are polymers of pilus subunits assembling into two parts: a thin, short tip fibrillum at the top, mounted on a long pilus rod. The rod adopts a helical quaternary structure and is thought to play essential roles: its formation may drive pilus extrusion by preventing backsliding of the nascent growing pilus within the secretion pore; the rod also has striking spring-like properties, being able to uncoil and recoil depending on the intensity of shear forces generated by urine flow. Here, we present an atomic model of the P pilus generated from a 3.8 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction. This structure provides the molecular basis for the rod’s remarkable mechanical properties and illuminates its role in pilus secretion. PMID:26724865

  13. Sphingolipid signalling: molecular basis and role in TNF-alpha-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Gouazé, Valérie; Tardy, Claudine; Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry

    2002-12-01

    Various lipidic molecules serve as second messengers for transducing signals from the cell surface to the cell interior and trigger specific cellular responses. Sphingolipids represent a complex group of lipids that have recently emerged as new transducers in eukaryotic cells. Several sphingolipid molecules are able to modulate cell growth, differentiation and death. This review summarises current knowledge of the signalling functions of sphingolipids, especially in the regulation of tumour necrosis factor [alpha] (TNF-[alpha])-mediated cytotoxic effects. TNF-[alpha] is a multifaceted cytokine that controls a wide range of immune responses in mammals, including induction of programmed cell death (also called apoptosis). On the basis of recent observations, a working model is proposed for the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of sphingolipid generation following TNF-[alpha] receptor 1 activation. The implications of these findings for the development of future pharmacological strategies to prevent the cytotoxic TNF-[alpha] response and subsequent cellular dysfunctions (as seen in various human diseases) are discussed. PMID:14987386

  14. Alterations of Dermal Connective Tissue Collagen in Diabetes: Molecular Basis of Aged-Appearing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Angela J.; Robichaud, Patrick; Balimunkwe, Rebecca Mutesi; Fisher, Gary J.; Hammerberg, Craig; Yan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the collagen, the major structural protein in skin, contribute significantly to human skin connective tissue aging. As aged-appearing skin is more common in diabetes, here we investigated the molecular basis of aged-appearing skin in diabetes. Among all known human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), diabetic skin shows elevated levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled real-time PCR indicated that elevated MMPs in diabetic skin were primarily expressed in the dermis. Furthermore, diabetic skin shows increased lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression and higher cross-linked collagens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) further indicated that collagen fibrils were fragmented/disorganized, and key mechanical properties of traction force and tensile strength were increased in diabetic skin, compared to intact/well-organized collagen fibrils in non-diabetic skin. In in vitro tissue culture system, multiple MMPs including MMP-1 and MM-2 were induced by high glucose (25 mM) exposure to isolated primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for collagen homeostasis in skin. The elevation of MMPs and LOX over the years is thought to result in the accumulation of fragmented and cross-linked collagen, and thus impairs dermal collagen structural integrity and mechanical properties in diabetes. Our data partially explain why old-looking skin is more common in diabetic patients. PMID:27104752

  15. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with “emotive” neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the “neutrix.” Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding (“flavoring”) cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  16. The molecular basis for ANE syndrome revealed by the large ribosomal subunit processome interactome

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Kathleen L; Teramoto, Takamasa; Zhang, Jun; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Baserga, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    ANE syndrome is a ribosomopathy caused by a mutation in an RNA recognition motif of RBM28, a nucleolar protein conserved to yeast (Nop4). While patients with ANE syndrome have fewer mature ribosomes, it is unclear how this mutation disrupts ribosome assembly. Here we use yeast as a model system and show that the mutation confers growth and pre-rRNA processing defects. Recently, we found that Nop4 is a hub protein in the nucleolar large subunit (LSU) processome interactome. Here we demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation disrupts Nop4’s hub function by abrogating several of Nop4’s protein-protein interactions. Circular dichroism and NMR demonstrate that the ANE syndrome mutation in RRM3 of human RBM28 disrupts domain folding. We conclude that the ANE syndrome mutation generates defective protein folding which abrogates protein-protein interactions and causes faulty pre-LSU rRNA processing, thus revealing one aspect of the molecular basis of this human disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16381.001 PMID:27077951

  17. Molecular basis for specific recognition of bacterial ligands by NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Kofoed, Eric M; Daugherty, Matthew D; Malik, Harmit S; Vance, Russell E

    2014-04-10

    NLR (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]- and leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing) proteins mediate innate immune sensing of pathogens in mammals and plants. How NLRs detect their cognate stimuli remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed ligand recognition by NLR apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) inflammasomes. Mice express multiple highly related NAIP paralogs that recognize distinct bacterial proteins. We analyzed a panel of 43 chimeric NAIPs, allowing us to map the NAIP domain responsible for specific ligand detection. Surprisingly, ligand specificity was mediated not by the LRR domain, but by an internal region encompassing several NBD-associated α-helical domains. Interestingly, we find that the ligand specificity domain has evolved under positive selection in both rodents and primates. We further show that ligand binding is required for the subsequent co-oligomerization of NAIPs with the downstream signaling adaptor NLR family, CARD-containing 4 (NLRC4). These data provide a molecular basis for how NLRs detect ligands and assemble into inflammasomes. PMID:24657167

  18. Leukemia-Associated Mutations in Nucleophosmin Alter Recognition by CRM1: Molecular Basis of Aberrant Transport

    PubMed Central

    Arregi, Igor; Falces, Jorge; Olazabal-Herrero, Anne; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Taneva, Stefka G.; Rodríguez, José A.; Urbaneja, María A.; Bañuelos, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, normally enriched in nucleoli, that performs several activities related to cell growth. NPM mutations are characteristic of a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where mutant NPM seems to play an oncogenic role. AML-associated NPM mutants exhibit altered subcellular traffic, being aberrantly located in the cytoplasm of leukoblasts. Exacerbated export of AML variants of NPM is mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1, and due, in part, to a mutationally acquired novel nuclear export signal (NES). To gain insight on the molecular basis of NPM transport in physiological and pathological conditions, we have evaluated the export efficiency of NPM in cells, and present new data indicating that, in normal conditions, wild type NPM is weakly exported by CRM1. On the other hand, we have found that AML-associated NPM mutants efficiently form complexes with CRM1HA (a mutant CRM1 with higher affinity for NESs), and we have quantitatively analyzed CRM1HA interaction with the NES motifs of these mutants, using fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We have observed that the affinity of CRM1HA for these NESs is similar, which may help to explain the transport properties of the mutants. We also describe NPM recognition by the import machinery. Our combined cellular and biophysical studies shed further light on the determinants of NPM traffic, and how it is dramatically altered by AML-related mutations. PMID:26091065

  19. Molecular Basis of Spectral Diversity in Near-Infrared Phytochrome-Based Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Daria M; Baloban, Mikhail; Pletnev, Sergei; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Xiao, Hui; Dauter, Zbigniew; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2015-11-19

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are the probes of choice for deep-tissue imaging. Detection of several processes requires spectrally distinct NIR FPs. We developed an NIR FP, BphP1-FP, which has the most blue-shifted spectra and the highest fluorescence quantum yield among BphP-derived FPs. We found that these properties result from the binding of the biliverdin chromophore to a cysteine residue in the GAF domain, unlike natural BphPs and other BphP-based FPs. To elucidate the molecular basis of the spectral shift, we applied biochemical, structural and mass spectrometry analyses and revealed the formation of unique chromophore species. Mutagenesis of NIR FPs of different origins indicated that the mechanism of the spectral shift is general and can be used to design multicolor NIR FPs from other BphPs. We applied pairs of spectrally distinct point cysteine mutants to multicolor cell labeling and demonstrated that they perform well in model deep-tissue imaging. PMID:26590639

  20. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} There exists a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. {yields} This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. {yields} A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C {yields} A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  1. Molecular Basis of Factor H R1210C Association with Ocular and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Recalde, Sergio; Tortajada, Agustin; Subias, Marta; Anter, Jaouad; Blasco, Miquel; Maranta, Ramona; Coco, Rosa; Pinto, Sheila; Noris, Marina; García-Layana, Alfredo; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2016-05-01

    The complement factor H (FH) mutation R1210C, which was described in association with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), also confers high risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and associates with C3 glomerulopathy (C3G). To reveal the molecular basis of these associations and to provide insight into what determines the disease phenotype in FH-R1210C carriers, we identified FH-R1210C carriers in our aHUS, C3G, and AMD cohorts. Disease status, determined in patients and relatives, revealed an absence of AMD phenotypes in the aHUS cohort and, vice versa, a lack of renal disease in the AMD cohort. These findings were consistent with differences in the R1210C-independent overall risk for aHUS and AMD between mutation carriers developing one pathology or the other. R1210C is an unusual mutation that generates covalent complexes between FH and HSA. Using purified FH proteins and surface plasmon resonance analyses, we demonstrated that formation of these FH-HSA complexes impairs accessibility to all FH functional domains. These data suggest that R1210C is a unique C-terminal FH mutation that behaves as a partial FH deficiency, predisposing individuals to diverse pathologies with distinct underlying pathogenic mechanisms; the final disease outcome is then determined by R1210C-independent genetic risk factors. PMID:26376859

  2. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with "emotive" neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the "neutrix." Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding ("flavoring") cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  3. Deciphering the molecular basis of ammonium uptake and transport in maritime pine.

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodríguez, Vanessa; Assaf-Casals, Iman; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Fan, Xiaorong; Avila, Concepción; Miller, Anthony; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    Ammonium is the predominant form of inorganic nitrogen in the soil of coniferous forests. Despite the ecological and economic importance of conifers, the molecular basis of ammonium uptake and transport in this group of gymnosperms is largely unknown. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of members of the AMT gene family in Pinus pinaster: PpAMT1.1, PpAMT1.2 and PpAMT1.3 (subfamily 1) and PpAMT2.1 and PpAMT2.3 (subfamily 2). Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that in conifers, all members of the AMT1 subfamily evolved from a common ancestor that is evolutionarily related to the ancient PpAMT1.2 gene. Individual AMT genes are developmentally and nutritionally regulated, and their transcripts are specifically distributed in different organs. PpAMT1.3 was predominantly expressed in the roots, particularly during N starvation and mycorrhizal interaction, whereas PpAMT2.3 was preferentially expressed in lateral roots. Immunolocalization studies of roots with varied nitrogen availability revealed that PpAMT1 and PpAMT2 proteins play complementary roles in the uptake of external ammonium. Heterologous expression in yeast and Xenopus oocytes revealed that the AMT genes encode functional transporters with different kinetics and with different capacities for ammonium transport. Our results provide new insights on how nitrogen is acquired and transported in conifers. PMID:26662862

  4. Molecular basis of cyclin-CDK-CKI regulation by reversible binding of an inositol pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sam; Huang, Kexin; Quiocho, Florante A; O’Shea, Erin K

    2008-01-01

    When Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are starved of inorganic phosphate, the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin–cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) is inactivated by the Pho81 CDK inhibitor (CKI). The regulation of Pho80-Pho85 is distinct from previously characterized mechanisms of CDK regulation: the Pho81 CKI is constitutively associated with Pho80-Pho85, and a small-molecule ligand, inositol heptakisphosphate (IP7), is required for kinase inactivation. We investigated the molecular basis of the IP7- and Pho81-dependent Pho80-Pho85 inactivation using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, enzyme kinetics and fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that IP7 interacts noncovalently with Pho80-Pho85-Pho81 and induces additional interactions between Pho81 and Pho80-Pho85 that prevent substrates from accessing the kinase active site. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to Pho81, we define regions of Pho81 responsible for constitutive Pho80-Pho85 binding and IP7-regulated interaction and inhibition. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms of cyclin-CDK regulation and of the biochemical mechanisms of IP7 action. PMID:18059263

  5. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  6. Molecular Basis Determining Inhibition/Activation of Nociceptive Receptor TRPA1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Banzawa, Nagako; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Kashio, Makiko; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a Ca2+-permeable, nonselective cation channel mainly expressed in a subset of nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 functions as a cellular sensor detecting mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimuli. Because TRPA1 is considered to be a key player in nociception and inflammatory pain, TRPA1 antagonists have been developed as analgesic agents. Recently, by utilizing species differences, we identified the molecular basis of the antagonistic action of A967079, one of the most potent mammalian TRPA1 antagonists. Here, we show a unique effect of A967079 on TRPA1 from diverse vertebrate species, i.e. it acts as an agonist but not as an antagonist for chicken and frog TRPA1s. By characterizing chimeric channels of human and chicken TRPA1s, as well as point mutants, we found that a single specific amino acid residue located within the putative fifth transmembrane domain was involved in not only the stimulatory but also the inhibitory actions of A967079. AP18, structurally related to A967079, exerted similar pharmacological properties to A967079. Our findings and previous reports on species differences in the sensitivity to TRPA1 antagonists supply useful information in the search for novel analgesic medicines targeting TRPA1. PMID:25271161

  7. Genomic Analysis Reveals the Molecular Basis for Capsule Loss in the Group B Streptococcus Population

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B. Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl trasferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  8. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  9. Meshless reconstruction method for fluorescence molecular tomography based on compactly supported radial basis function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yu; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Guanglei; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Jiang, Shixin; Shang, Wenting; Du, Yang; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising tool in the study of cancer, drug discovery, and disease diagnosis, enabling noninvasive and quantitative imaging of the biodistribution of fluorophores in deep tissues via image reconstruction techniques. Conventional reconstruction methods based on the finite-element method (FEM) have achieved acceptable stability and efficiency. However, some inherent shortcomings in FEM meshes, such as time consumption in mesh generation and a large discretization error, limit further biomedical application. In this paper, we propose a meshless method for reconstruction of FMT (MM-FMT) using compactly supported radial basis functions (CSRBFs). With CSRBFs, the image domain can be accurately expressed by continuous CSRBFs, avoiding the discretization error to a certain degree. After direct collocation with CSRBFs, the conventional optimization techniques, including Tikhonov, L1-norm iteration shrinkage (L1-IS), and sparsity adaptive matching pursuit, were adopted to solve the meshless reconstruction. To evaluate the performance of the proposed MM-FMT, we performed numerical heterogeneous mouse experiments and in vivo bead-implanted mouse experiments. The results suggest that the proposed MM-FMT method can reduce the position error of the reconstruction result to smaller than 0.4 mm for the double-source case, which is a significant improvement for FMT.

  10. Molecular basis of glucoamylase overproduction by a mutagenised industrial strain of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie; Jeenes; Gou; Archer

    2000-02-01

    We have compared a mutagenized strain of Aspergillus niger (S1), used industrially for glucoamylase production, and a related low glucoamylase-producing strain (S2) with a laboratory strain of A. niger (AB4.1). Our aim was to assess the properties of S1 in relation to the laboratory strain and to account at the molecular level for the basis of its glucoamylase overproduction. Both S1 and S2 have similar multiple copies of the glucoamylase-encoding gene (glaA) but only S1 has enhanced glaA transcript and glucoamylase levels compared to AB4.1 that has a single copy of the glaA gene. Glucoamylase production by S1 and AB4.1 was repressed by xylose and induced by starch but, in S2, remained unaffected by carbon source. S1 also secreted elevated levels of alpha-amylase relative to both S2 and AB4.1 but the production of alpha-glucosidase was low in all three strains. The gene encoding aspergillopepsin (pepA), an abundant secreted aspartyl protease, was present as a single copy in all strains but no aspergillopepsin could be detected by Western blotting in either S1 or S2 culture supernatants. We conclude that A. niger strain improvement by mutagenesis and screening for glucoamylase overproduction has led to glaA gene multiplication and an expression defect in the pepA gene. PMID:10689077

  11. Comparative genome analysis reveals the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuxiang; Tang, Hongzhi; Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter is one of the most prevalent genera of nicotine-degrading bacteria; however, studies of nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter species remain at the plasmid level (plasmid pAO1). Here, we report the bioinformatic analysis of a nicotine-degrading Arthrobacter aurescens M2012083, and show that the moeB and mogA genes that are essential for nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter are absent from plasmid pAO1. Homologues of all the nicotine degradation-related genes of plasmid pAO1 were found to be located on a 68,622-bp DNA segment (nic segment-1) in the M2012083 genome, showing 98.1% nucleotide acid sequence identity to the 69,252-bp nic segment of plasmid pAO1. However, the rest sequence of plasmid pAO1 other than the nic segment shows no significant similarity to the genome sequence of strain M2012083. Taken together, our data suggest that the nicotine degradation-related genes of strain M2012083 are located on the chromosome or a plasmid other than pAO1. Based on the genomic sequence comparison of strain M2012083 and six other Arthrobacter strains, we have identified 17 σ70 transcription factors reported to be involved in stress responses and 109 genes involved in environmental adaptability of strain M2012083. These results reveal the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter species. PMID:25721465

  12. Apicoplast isoprenoid precursor synthesis and the molecular basis of fosmidomycin resistance in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sethu C.; Brooks, Carrie F.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Strurm, Angelika; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Sundriyal, Sandeep; Anglin, Justin L.; Song, Yongcheng; Moreno, Silvia N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexa are important pathogens that include the causative agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Apicomplexan parasites contain a relict chloroplast, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is indispensable and an attractive drug target. The apicoplast is home to a 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DOXP) pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. This pathway is believed to be the most conserved function of the apicoplast, and fosmidomycin, a specific inhibitor of the pathway, is an effective antimalarial. Surprisingly, fosmidomycin has no effect on most other apicomplexans. Using Toxoplasma gondii, we establish that the pathway is essential in parasites that are highly fosmidomycin resistant. We define the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility, experimentally testing various host and parasite contributions in T. gondii and Plasmodium. We demonstrate that in T. gondii the parasite plasma membrane is a critical barrier to drug uptake. In strong support of this hypothesis, we engineer de novo drug-sensitive T. gondii parasites by heterologous expression of a bacterial transporter protein. Mice infected with these transgenic parasites can now be cured from a lethal challenge with fosmidomycin. We propose that the varied extent of metabolite exchange between host and parasite is a crucial determinator of drug susceptibility and a predictor of future resistance. PMID:21690250

  13. Basis of a humeomics science: chemical fractionation and molecular characterization of humic biosuprastructures.

    PubMed

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2011-04-11

    We propose a mild stepwise fractionation of molecular components of a humic acid (HA) suprastructure and their structural identification by advanced analytical methods. This procedure may be the basis of a "Humeomics" approach to characterize natural humic molecules and clarify their relations with ecosystems functions. Sequential fractionation included: (1) organic solvent extraction, (2) transesterification with boron trifluoride in methanol (BF(3)-CH(3)OH), (3) methanolic alkaline hydrolysis (KOH-CH(3)OH), and (4) cleavage of ether and glycosidic bonds with HI. Structural identification of initial and final material, separated organo-soluble and hydrosoluble fractions, and subfractions was conducted by GC-MS, HPSEC-ESI-MS (high-resolution, Orbitrap), and solid- and liquid-state NMR. GC-MS revealed in organosoluble unbound fractions the presence of both saturated and unsaturated, linear and branched, alkanoic, hydroxyalkanoic and alkandioic acids, n-alkanes, and n-alkanols. These components decreased progressively in fractions obtained after weak and strong ester cleavage. Unsubstituted alkanoic acids with variable chain length were ubiquitously detected in all fractions, thereby suggesting their fundamental function in the architecture of humic suprastructures. An important role in differentiating supramolecular associations should also be attributed to substituted alkanoic acids that were detected in variable amounts in different fractions. The content of aromatic acids and steroids was only noticed in the latter fractions. HPSEC-ESI-MS of initial and final solid fractions showed similar compounds, as indicated by GC-MS, whereas the hydrosoluble fraction after transesterification revealed fewer of these compounds but noticeable nitrogen-containing acids. A large amount of "cyclic" acids were identified by MS empirical formula in initial HA, and, to a lesser extent, in the final fractionation residue as well as in the hydrosoluble fraction. The predominant alkyl

  14. Molecular basis of substrate selection by the N-end rule adaptor protein ClpS

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2009-06-19

    The N-end rule is a conserved degradation pathway that relates the stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid. Here, we present crystal structures of ClpS, the bacterial N-end rule adaptor, alone and engaged with peptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine, leucine, and tryptophan. These structures, together with a previous structure of ClpS bound to an N-terminal tyrosine, illustrate the molecular basis of recognition of the complete set of primary N-end rule amino acids. In each case, the alpha-amino group and side chain of the N-terminal residue are the major determinants of recognition. The binding pocket for the N-end residue is preformed in the free adaptor, and only small adjustments are needed to accommodate N-end rule residues having substantially different sizes and shapes. M53A ClpS is known to mediate degradation of an expanded repertoire of substrates, including those with N-terminal valine or isoleucine. A structure of Met53A ClpS engaged with an N-end rule tryptophan reveals an essentially wild-type mechanism of recognition, indicating that the Met(53) side chain directly enforces specificity by clashing with and excluding beta-branched side chains. Finally, experimental and structural data suggest mechanisms that make proteins with N-terminal methionine bind very poorly to ClpS, explaining why these high-abundance proteins are not degraded via the N-end rule pathway in the cell.

  15. Towards understanding the molecular basis of cockroach tergal gland morphogenesis. A transcriptomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ylla, Guillem; Belles, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The tergal gland is a structure exclusive of adult male cockroaches that produces substances attractive to the female and facilitates mating. It is formed de novo in tergites 7 and 8 during the transition from the last nymphal instar to the adult. Thus, the tergal gland can afford a suitable case study to investigate the molecular basis of a morphogenetic process occurring during metamorphosis. Using Blattella germanica as model, we constructed transcriptomes from male tergites 7-8 in non-metamorphosing specimens, and from the same tergites in metamorphosing specimens. We performed a de novo assembly all available transcriptomes to construct a reference transcriptome and we identified transcripts by homology. Finally we mapped all reads into the reference transcriptome in order to perform analysis of differentially expressed genes and a GO-enrichment test. A total of 5622 contigs appeared to be overrepresented in the transcriptome of metamorphosing specimens with respect to those specimens that did not metamorphose. Among these genes, there were six GO-terms with a p-value lower than 0.05 and among them GO: 0003676 ("nucleic acid binding") was especially interesting since it included transcription factors (TFs). Examination of TF-Pfam-motifs revealed that the transcriptome of metamorphosing specimens contains the highest diversity of these motifs, with 29 different types (seven of them exclusively expressed in this stage) compared with that of non-metamorphosing specimens, which contained 24 motif types. Transcriptome comparisons suggest that TFs are important drivers of the process of tergal gland formation during metamorphosis. PMID:26086932

  16. Structure of human procathepsin L reveals the molecular basis of inhibition by the prosegment.

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, R; Grochulski, P; Sivaraman, J; Ménard, R; Mort, J S; Cygler, M

    1996-01-01

    Cathepsin L is a member of the papain superfamily of cysteine proteases and, like many other proteases, it is synthesized as an inactive proenzyme. Its prosegment shows little homology to that of procathepsin B, whose structure, the first for a cysteine protease proenzyme, has been determined recently. We report here the 3-D structure of a mutant of human procathepsin L determined at 2.2 A resolution, describe the mode of binding employed by the prosegment and discuss the molecular basis for other possible roles of the prosegment. The N-terminal part of the prosegment is globular and contains three alpha-helices with a small hydrophobic core built around aromatic side chains. This domain packs against a loop on the enzyme's surface, with the aromatic side chain from the prosegment being located in the center of this loop and providing a large contact area. The C-terminal portion of the prosegment assumes an extended conformation and follows along the substrate binding cleft toward the N-terminus of the mature enzyme. The direction of the prosegment in the substrate binding cleft is opposite to that of substrates. The previously described role of the prosegment in the interactions with membranes is supported by the structure of its N-terminal domain. The fold of the prosegment and the mechanism by which it inhibits the enzymatic activity of procathepsin L is similar to that observed in procathepsin B despite differences in length and sequence, suggesting that this mode of inhibition is common to all enzymes from the papain superfamily. Images PMID:8896443

  17. Molecular basis and drug sensitivity of the delayed rectifier (IKr) in the fish heart.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Minna; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fishes are increasingly used as models for human cardiac diseases, creating a need for a better understanding of the molecular basis of fish cardiac ion currents. To this end we cloned KCNH6 channel of the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) that produces the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr), the main repolarising current of the fish heart. KCNH6 (ccErg2) was the main isoform of the Kv11 potassium channel family with relative transcript levels of 98.9% and 99.6% in crucian carp atrium and ventricle, respectively. KCNH2 (ccErg1), an orthologue to human cardiac Erg (Herg) channel, was only slightly expressed in the crucian carp heart. The native atrial IKr and the cloned ccErg2 were inhibited by similar concentrations of verapamil, terfenadine and KB-R7943 (P>0.05), while the atrial IKr was about an order of magnitude more sensitive to E-4031 than ccErg2 (P<0.05) suggesting that some accessory β-subunits may be involved. Sensitivity of the crucian carp atrial IKr to E-4031, terfenadine and KB-R7943 was similar to what has been reported for the Herg channel. In contrast, the sensitivity of the crucian carp IKr to verapamil was approximately 30 times higher than the previously reported values for the Herg current. In conclusion, the cardiac IKr is produced by non-orthologous gene products in fish (Erg2) and mammalian hearts (Erg1) and some marked differences exist in drug sensitivity between fish and mammalian Erg1/2 which need to be taken into account when using fish heart as a model for human heart. PMID:26215639

  18. Fast Electron Correlation Methods for Molecular Clusters without Basis Set Superposition Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So; Valiev, Marat

    2008-02-19

    Two critical extensions to our fast, accurate, and easy-to-implement binary or ternary interaction method for weakly-interacting molecular clusters [Hirata et al. Mol. Phys. 103, 2255 (2005)] have been proposed, implemented, and applied to water hexamers, hydrogen fluoride chains and rings, and neutral and zwitterionic glycine–water clusters with an excellent result for an initial performance assessment. Our original method included up to two- or three-body Coulomb, exchange, and correlation energies exactly and higher-order Coulomb energies in the dipole–dipole approximation. In this work, the dipole moments are replaced by atom-centered point charges determined so that they reproduce the electrostatic potentials of the cluster subunits as closely as possible and also self-consistently with one another in the cluster environment. They have been shown to lead to dramatic improvement in the description of short-range electrostatic potentials not only of large, charge-separated subunits like zwitterionic glycine but also of small subunits. Furthermore, basis set superposition errors (BSSE) known to plague direct evaluation of weak interactions have been eliminated by com-bining the Valiron–Mayer function counterpoise (VMFC) correction with our binary or ternary interaction method in an economical fashion (quadratic scaling n2 with respect to the number of subunits n when n is small and linear scaling when n is large). A new variant of VMFC has also been proposed in which three-body and all higher-order Coulomb effects on BSSE are estimated approximately. The BSSE-corrected ternary interaction method with atom-centered point charges reproduces the VMFC-corrected results of conventional electron correlation calculations within 0.1 kcal/mol. The proposed method is significantly more accurate and also efficient than conventional correlation methods uncorrected of BSSE.

  19. Molecular basis of two novel mutations found in type I methemoglobinemia.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Felipe R; Phillips, John D; Nussenzveig, Roberto; Lingam, Bindu; Koul, Parvaiz A; Schrier, Stanley L; Prchal, Josef T

    2011-04-15

    Congenital methemoglobinemia due to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase 3 (CYB5R3) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that occurs sporadically worldwide, although endemic clusters of this disorder have been identified in certain ethnic groups. It is present as two distinct phenotypes, type I and type II. Type I methemoglobinemia is characterized by CYB5R3 enzyme deficiency restricted to erythrocytes and is associated with benign cyanosis. The less frequent type II methemoglobinemia is associated with generalized CYB5R3 deficiency affecting all cells and is lethal in early infancy. Here we describe the molecular basis of type I methemoglobinemia due to CYB5R3 deficiency in four patients from three distinct ethnic backgrounds, Asian Indian, Mexican and Greek. The CYB5R3 gene of three probands with type I methemoglobinemia and their relatives were sequenced revealing several putative causative mutations; in one subject multiple mutations were present. Two novel mutations, S54R and F157C, were identified and the previously described A179T, V253M mutations were also identified. All these point mutations mapped to the NADH binding domain and or the FAD binding domain. Each has the potential to sterically hinder cofactor binding causing instability of the CYB5R3 protein. Wild-type CYB5R3, as well as two of these novel mutations, S54R and F157C, was amplified, cloned, and purified recombinant peptide obtained. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of these proteins show that the above mutations lead to decreased thermal stability. PMID:21349748

  20. Molecular Basis of Impaired Glycogen Metabolism during Ischemic Stroke and Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammed Iqbal; Roulston, Carli Lorraine; Stapleton, David Ian

    2014-01-01

    identified that glycogen breakdown is impaired during ischemic stroke, the molecular basis of which includes reduced glycogen debranching enzyme expression level together with reduced glycogen phosphorylase and PKA activity. PMID:24858129

  1. The molecular basis of multiple vector insertion by gene targeting in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P; Baker, M D

    1999-01-01

    Gene targeting using sequence insertion vectors generally results in integration of one copy of the targeting vector generating a tandem duplication of the cognate chromosomal region of homology. However, occasionally the target locus is found to contain >1 copy of the integrated vector. The mechanism by which the latter recombinants arise is not known. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis by which multiple vectors become integrated at the chromosomal immunoglobulin mu locus in a murine hybridoma. To accomplish this, specially designed insertion vectors were constructed that included six diagnostic restriction enzyme markers in the Cmu region of homology to the target chromosomal mu locus. This enabled contributions by the vector-borne and chromosomal Cmu sequences at the recombinant locus to be ascertained. Targeted recombinants were isolated and analyzed to determine the number of vector copies integrated at the chromosomal immunoglobulin mu locus. Targeted recombinants identified as bearing >1 copy of the integrated vector resulted from a Cmu triplication formed by two vector copies in tandem. Examination of the fate of the Cmu region markers suggested that this class of recombinant was generated predominantly, if not exclusively, by two targeted vector integration events, each involving insertion of a single copy of the vector. Both vector insertion events into the chromosomal mu locus were consistent with the double-strand-break repair mechanism of homologous recombination. We interpret our results, taken together, to mean that a proportion of recipient cells is in a predetermined state that is amenable to targeted but not random vector integration. PMID:10049930

  2. Molecular basis of a shattering resistance boosting global dissemination of soybean.

    PubMed

    Funatsuki, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Masaya; Hirose, Aya; Inaba, Hiroki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Kunihiko; Katayama, Takeshi; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Fujino, Kaien

    2014-12-16

    Pod dehiscence (shattering) is essential for the propagation of wild plant species bearing seeds in pods but is a major cause of yield loss in legume and crucifer crops. Although natural genetic variation in pod dehiscence has been, and will be, useful for plant breeding, little is known about the molecular genetic basis of shattering resistance in crops. Therefore, we performed map-based cloning to unveil a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling pod dehiscence in soybean. Fine mapping and complementation testing revealed that the QTL encodes a dirigent-like protein, designated as Pdh1. The gene for the shattering-resistant genotype, pdh1, was defective, having a premature stop codon. The functional gene, Pdh1, was highly expressed in the lignin-rich inner sclerenchyma of pod walls, especially at the stage of initiation in lignin deposition. Comparisons of near-isogenic lines indicated that Pdh1 promotes pod dehiscence by increasing the torsion of dried pod walls, which serves as a driving force for pod dehiscence under low humidity. A survey of soybean germplasm revealed that pdh1 was frequently detected in landraces from semiarid regions and has been extensively used for breeding in North America, the world's leading soybean producer. These findings point to a new mechanism for pod dehiscence involving the dirigent protein family and suggest that pdh1 has played a crucial role in the global expansion of soybean cultivation. Furthermore, the orthologs of pdh1, or genes with the same role, will possibly be useful for crop improvement. PMID:25468966

  3. Dissecting the molecular basis of the contribution of source strength to high fructan accumulation in wheat.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang-Ping; Drenth, Janneke; Glassop, Donna; Kooiker, Maarten; McIntyre, C Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Fructans represent the major component of water soluble carbohydrates (WSCs) in the maturing stem of temperate cereals and are an important temporary carbon reserve for grain filling. To investigate the importance of source carbon availability in fructan accumulation and its molecular basis, we performed comparative analyses of WSC components and the expression profiles of genes involved in major carbohydrate metabolism and photosynthesis in the flag leaves of recombinant inbred lines from wheat cultivars Seri M82 and Babax (SB lines). High sucrose levels in the mature flag leaf (source organ) were found to be positively associated with WSC and fructan concentrations in both the leaf and stem of SB lines in several field trials. Analysis of Affymetrix expression array data revealed that high leaf sucrose lines grown in abiotic-stress-prone environments had high expression levels of a number of genes in the leaf involved in the sucrose synthetic pathway and photosynthesis, such as Calvin cycle genes, antioxidant genes involved in chloroplast H(2)O(2) removal and genes involved in energy dissipation. The expression of the majority of genes involved in fructan and starch synthetic pathways were positively correlated with sucrose levels in the leaves of SB lines. The high level of leaf fructans in high leaf sucrose lines is likely attributed to the elevated expression levels of fructan synthetic enzymes, as the mRNA levels of three fructosyltransferase families were consistently correlated with leaf sucrose levels among SB lines. These data suggest that high source strength is one of the important genetic factors determining high levels of WSC in wheat. PMID:23114999

  4. Molecular basis of a shattering resistance boosting global dissemination of soybean

    PubMed Central

    Funatsuki, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Masaya; Hirose, Aya; Inaba, Hiroki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Kunihiko; Katayama, Takeshi; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Fujino, Kaien

    2014-01-01

    Pod dehiscence (shattering) is essential for the propagation of wild plant species bearing seeds in pods but is a major cause of yield loss in legume and crucifer crops. Although natural genetic variation in pod dehiscence has been, and will be, useful for plant breeding, little is known about the molecular genetic basis of shattering resistance in crops. Therefore, we performed map-based cloning to unveil a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling pod dehiscence in soybean. Fine mapping and complementation testing revealed that the QTL encodes a dirigent-like protein, designated as Pdh1. The gene for the shattering-resistant genotype, pdh1, was defective, having a premature stop codon. The functional gene, Pdh1, was highly expressed in the lignin-rich inner sclerenchyma of pod walls, especially at the stage of initiation in lignin deposition. Comparisons of near-isogenic lines indicated that Pdh1 promotes pod dehiscence by increasing the torsion of dried pod walls, which serves as a driving force for pod dehiscence under low humidity. A survey of soybean germplasm revealed that pdh1 was frequently detected in landraces from semiarid regions and has been extensively used for breeding in North America, the world’s leading soybean producer. These findings point to a new mechanism for pod dehiscence involving the dirigent protein family and suggest that pdh1 has played a crucial role in the global expansion of soybean cultivation. Furthermore, the orthologs of pdh1, or genes with the same role, will possibly be useful for crop improvement. PMID:25468966

  5. Molecular basis of hERG potassium channel blockade by the class Ic antiarrhythmic flecainide

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    The class Ic antiarrhythmic drug flecainide inhibits KCNH2-encoded “hERG” potassium channels at clinically relevant concentrations. The aim of this study was to elucidate the underlying molecular basis of this action. Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37 °C. Wild-type (WT) IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.49 μM and this was not significantly altered by reversing the direction of K+ flux or raising external [K+]. The use of charged and uncharged flecainide analogues showed that the charged form of the drug accesses the channel from the cell interior to produce block. Promotion of WT IhERG inactivation slowed recovery from inhibition, whilst the N588K and S631A attenuated-inactivation mutants exhibited IC50 values 4–5 fold that of WT IhERG. The use of pore-helix/selectivity filter (T623A, S624A V625A) and S6 helix (G648A, Y652A, F656A) mutations showed < 10-fold shifts in IC50 for all but V625A and F656A, which respectively exhibited IC50s 27-fold and 142-fold their WT controls. Docking simulations using a MthK-based homology model suggested an allosteric effect of V625A, since in low energy conformations flecainide lay too low in the pore to interact directly with that residue. On the other hand, the molecule could readily form π–π stacking interactions with aromatic residues and particularly with F656. We conclude that flecainide accesses the hERG channel from the cell interior on channel gating, binding low in the inner cavity, with the S6 F656 residue acting as a principal binding determinant. PMID:26159617

  6. Molecular basis of the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of citramalate synthase from Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zilong; Zha, Manwu; Xu, Hai; Zhao, Guoping; Ding, Jianping

    2008-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans is the causative agent for leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease of global importance. In contrast with most other micro-organisms, L. interrogans employs a pyruvate pathway to synthesize isoleucine and LiCMS (L. interrogans citramalate synthase) catalyses the first reaction of the pathway which converts pyruvate and acetyl-CoA into citramalate, thus making it an attractive target for the development of antibacterial agents. We report here the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of LiCMS and its complexes with substrates, and kinetic and mutagenesis studies of LiCMS, which together reveal the molecular basis of the high substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of LiCMS. The catalytic domain consists of a TIM barrel flanked by an extended C-terminal region. It forms a homodimer in the crystal structure, and the active site is located at the centre of the TIM barrel near the C-terminal ends of the beta-strands and is composed of conserved residues of the beta-strands of one subunit and the C-terminal region of the other. The substrate specificity of LiCMS towards pyruvate against other alpha-oxo acids is dictated primarily by residues Leu(81), Leu(104) and Tyr(144), which form a hydrophobic pocket to accommodate the C(2)-methyl group of pyruvate. The catalysis follows the typical aldol condensation reaction, in which Glu(146) functions as a catalytic base to activate the methyl group of acetyl-CoA to form an enolated acetyl-CoA intermediate and Arg(16) as a general acid to stabilize the intermediate. PMID:18498255

  7. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  8. Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Modeling: An Integration to Teach Drug Structure-Activity Relationship and the Molecular Basis of Drug Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Ivone; Borges, Aurea D. L.; Bernardes, Lilian S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of computational chemistry and the protein data bank (PDB) to understand and predict the chemical and molecular basis involved in the drug-receptor interactions is discussed. A geometrical and chemical overview of the great structural similarity in the substrate and inhibitor is provided.

  9. Molecular Basis of the Waxy Endosperm Starch Phenotype in Broomcorn Millet (Panicum miliaceum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Harriet V.; Denyer, Kay; Packman, Len C.; Jones, Martin K.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Waxy varieties of the tetraploid cereal broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) have endosperm starch granules lacking detectable amylose. This study investigated the basis of this phenotype using molecular and biochemical methods. Iodine staining of starch granules in 72 plants from 38 landrace accessions found 58 nonwaxy and 14 waxy phenotype plants. All waxy types were in plants from Chinese and Korean accessions, a distribution similar to that of the waxy phenotype in other cereals. Granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) protein was present in the endosperm of both nonwaxy and waxy individuals, but waxy types had little or no granule-bound starch synthase activity compared with the wild types. Sequencing of the GBSSI (Waxy) gene showed that this gene is present in two different forms (L and S) in P. miliaceum, which probably represent homeologues derived from two distinct diploid ancestors. Protein products of both these forms are present in starch granules. We identified three polymorphisms in the exon sequence coding for mature GBSSI peptides. A 15-bp deletion has occurred in the S type GBSSI, resulting in the loss of five amino acids from glucosyl transferase domain 1 (GTD1). The second GBSSI type (L) shows two sequence polymorphisms. One is the insertion of an adenine residue that causes a reading frameshift, and the second causes a cysteine–tyrosine amino acid polymorphism. These mutations appear to have occurred in parallel from the ancestral allele, resulting in three GBSSI-L alleles in total. Five of the six possible genotype combinations of the S and L alleles were observed. The deletion in the GBSSI-S gene causes loss of protein activity, and there was 100% correspondence between this deletion and the waxy phenotype. The frameshift mutation in the L gene results in the loss of L-type protein from starch granules. The L isoform with the tyrosine residue is present in starch granules but is nonfunctional. This loss of function may result from the

  10. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N; Dranginis, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Flo11-dependent phenotypes, including flocculation. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of this strain-specific phenotypic variability. Our data indicate that strain-specific differences in the level of flocculation result from significant sequence differences in the FLO11 alleles and do not depend on quantitative differences in FLO11 expression or on surface hydrophobicity. We further have shown that beads coated with amino-terminal domain peptide bind preferentially to homologous cells. These data show that variability in the structure of the Flo11 adhesion domain may thus be an important determinant of membership in microbial communities and hence may drive selection and evolution. PMID:27547826

  11. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    expression of Flo11-dependent phenotypes, including flocculation. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of this strain-specific phenotypic variability. Our data indicate that strain-specific differences in the level of flocculation result from significant sequence differences in the FLO11 alleles and do not depend on quantitative differences in FLO11 expression or on surface hydrophobicity. We further have shown that beads coated with amino-terminal domain peptide bind preferentially to homologous cells. These data show that variability in the structure of the Flo11 adhesion domain may thus be an important determinant of membership in microbial communities and hence may drive selection and evolution. PMID:27547826

  12. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Rowan M.; Caplan, David; Fadda, Elisa; Pomès, Régis

    2011-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  13. The molecular genetic basis and diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henrik Kjoerulf

    2002-11-01

    to be identified. The overall molecular genetic knowledge obtained about FH in Denmark forms the basis for the implementation and use of molecular genetic diagnostics of FH in daily clinical practice. PMID:12553167

  14. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of BaSi2 Films with Grain Size over 4 µm on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Masakazu; Nakamura, Kotaro; Du, Weijie; Ajmal Khan, M.; Koike, Shintaro; Toko, Kaoru; Usami, Noritaka; Saito, Noriyuki; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Suemasu, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    100-nm-thick BaSi2 epitaxial films were grown on Si(111) substrates by a two-step growth method including reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The Ba deposition rate and duration were varied from 0.25 to 1.0 nm/min and from 5 to 120 min during RDE, respectively. Plan-view transmission electron micrographs indicated that the grain size in the MBE-grown BaSi2 was significantly dependent on the RDE growth conditions and was varied from approximately 0.2 to more than 4 µm.

  15. General contraction of Gaussian basis sets. Part 2: Atomic natural orbitals and the calculation of atomic and molecular properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almloef, Jan; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    A recently proposed scheme for using natural orbitals from atomic configuration interaction (CI) wave functions as a basis set for linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) calculations is extended for the calculation of molecular properties. For one-electron properties like multipole moments, which are determined largely by the outermost regions of the molecular wave function, it is necessary to increase the flexibility of the basis in these regions. This is most easily done by uncontracting the outmost Gaussian primitives, and/or by adding diffuse primitives. A similar approach can be employed for the calculation of polarizabilities. Properties which are not dominated by the long-range part of the wave function, such as spectroscopic constants or electric field gradients at the nucleus, can generally be treated satisfactorily with the original atomic natural orbital (ANO) sets.

  16. General contraction of Gaussian basis sets. II - Atomic natural orbitals and the calculation of atomic and molecular properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almlof, Jan; Taylor, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    A recently proposed scheme for using natural orbitals from atomic configuration interaction wave functions as a basis set for linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) calculations is extended for the calculation of molecular properties. For one-electron properties like multipole moments, which are determined largely by the outermost regions of the molecular wave function, it is necessary to increase the flexibility of the basis in these regions. This is most easily done by uncontracting the outermost Gaussian primitives, and/or by adding diffuse primitives. A similar approach can be employed for the calculation of polarizabilities. Properties which are not dominated by the long-range part of the wave function, such as spectroscopic constants or electric field gradients at the nucleus, can generally be treated satisfactorily with the original atomic natural orbital sets.

  17. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Nonsteroidal Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Antagonists: Molecular Basis of FXR Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Si, Pei; Wang, Lei; Xu, Yong; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Jin; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Weihua; Chen, Lili; Li, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an important role in the regulation of cholesterol, lipid, and glucose metabolism. Recently, several studies on the molecular basis of FXR antagonism have been reported. However, none of these studies employs an FXR antagonist with nonsteroidal scaffold. On the basis of our previously reported FXR antagonist with a trisubstituted isoxazole scaffold, a novel nonsteroidal FXR ligand was designed and used as a lead for structural modification. In total, 39 new trisubstituted isoxazole derivatives were designed and synthesized, which led to pharmacological profiles ranging from agonist to antagonist toward FXR. Notably, compound 5s (4'-[(3-{[3-(2-chlorophenyl)-5-(2-thienyl)isoxazol-4-yl]methoxy}-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl]biphenyl-2-carboxylic acid), containing a thienyl-substituted isoxazole ring, displayed the best antagonistic activity against FXR with good cellular potency (IC50 =12.2 ± 0.2 μM). Eventually, this compound was used as a probe in a molecular dynamics simulation assay. Our results allowed us to propose an essential molecular basis for FXR antagonism, which is consistent with a previously reported antagonistic mechanism; furthermore, E467 on H12 was found to be a hot-spot residue and may be important for the future design of nonsteroidal antagonists of FXR. PMID:25982493

  18. Formation of large-grain-sized BaSi2 epitaxial layers grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, M.; Toh, K.; Toko, K.; Hara, K. O.; Usami, N.; Saito, N.; Yoshizawa, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2013-09-01

    BaSi2 epitaxial films were grown on Si(111) substrates by a two-step growth method including reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). To enlarge the grain size of BaSi2, the Ba deposition rate and duration were varied from 0.25 to 1.0 nm/min and from 5 to 120 min during RDE, respectively. The effect of post-annealing was also investigated at 760 °C for 10 min. Plan-view transmission electron micrographs indicated that the grain size in the MBE-grown BaSi2 was significantly increased up to approximately 4.0 μm, which is much larger than 0.2 μm, reported previously.

  19. Discriminating the molecular basis of hepatotoxicity using the large-scale characteristic molecular signatures of toxicants by expression profiling analysis.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Ryu, So Yeon; Noh, Ji Heon; Lee, Min-Jae; Jang, Ja-Jun; Ryu, Jae Chun; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie, Hongjian; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Sug Hyung; Park, Won Sang; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2008-07-30

    Predicting the potential human health risk posed by chemical stressors has long been a major challenge for toxicologists, and the use of microarrays to measure responses to toxicologically relevant genes, and to identify selective, sensitive biomarkers of toxicity is a major application of predictive and discovery toxicology. To investigate this possibility, we investigated whether carcinogens (at doses known to induce liver tumors in chronic exposure bioassays) deregulate characteristic sets of genes in mice. Male C3H/He mice were dosed with two hepatocarcinogens (vinyl chloride (VC, 50-25 mg/kg), aldrin (AD, 0.8-0.4 mg/kg)), or two non-hepatocarcinogens (copper sulfate (CS, 150-60 mg/kg), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T, 150-60 mg/kg)). Large-scale molecular changes elicited by these four hepatotoxicants in liver tissues were analyzed using DNA microarray. Three days after administration, no significant phenotypic changes were induced by these four different hepatotoxicants in terms of histological examination or blood biochemical assay. However, unsupervised hierarchical analysis of gene expressional changes induced by hepatotoxicants resulted in two major gene subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., a carcinogen (VN, AD) and non-carcinogen group (CS, 2,4,5-T), and also revealed that distinct molecular signatures exist. These signatures were founded on well-defined functional gene categories and may differentiate genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Venn diagram analysis allowed us to identify carcinogen and non-carcinogen-associated molecular signatures. Using statistical methods, we analyzed outlier genes for four different classes (genotoxic-, non-genotoxic-carcinogen, genotoxic-, non-genotoxic non-carcinogen) in terms of their potential to predict different modes-of-action. In conclusion, the identification of large-scale molecular changes in different hepatocarcinogen exposure models revealed that different types of hepatotoxicants are

  20. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H. J.; de Jong, Govardus A. H.; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A.; Baumert, Joseph L.; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L.; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  1. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H J; de Jong, Govardus A H; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A; Baumert, Joseph L; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  2. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Mathhew E; Powell, Frank L

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1345-1385, 2016. PMID:27347896

  3. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Powell, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. PMID:27347896

  4. Molecular Dipole Moments within the Incremental Scheme Using the Domain-Specific Basis-Set Approach.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Benjamin; Coriani, Sonia; Friedrich, Joachim

    2016-07-12

    We present the first implementation of the fully automated incremental scheme for CCSD unrelaxed dipole moments using the domain-specific basis-set approach. Truncation parameters are varied, and the accuracy of the method is statistically analyzed for a test set of 20 molecules. The local approximations introduce small errors at second order and negligible ones at third order. For a third-order incremental CCSD expansion with a CC2 error correction, a cc-pVDZ/SV domain-specific basis set (tmain = 3.5 Bohr), and the truncation parameter f = 30 Bohr, we obtain a mean error of 0.00 mau (-0.20 mau) and a standard deviation of 1.95 mau (2.17 mau) for the total dipole moments (Cartesian components of the dipole vectors). By analyzing incremental CCSD energies, we demonstrate that the MP2 and CC2 error correction schemes are an exclusive correction for the domain-specific basis-set error. Our implementation of the incremental scheme provides fully automated computations of highly accurate dipole moments at reduced computational cost and is fully parallelized in terms of the calculation of the increments. Therefore, one can utilize the incremental scheme, on the same hardware, to extend the basis set in comparison to standard CCSD and thus obtain a better total accuracy. PMID:27300371

  5. 27ps DFT Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a-maltose: A Reduced Basis Set Study.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DFT molecular dynamics simulations are time intensive when carried out on carbohydrates such as alpha-maltose, requiring up to three or more weeks on a fast 16-processor computer to obtain just 5ps of constant energy dynamics. In a recent publication [1] forces for dynamics were generated from B3LY...

  6. (Molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Studies on the molecular mechanisms by which Escherichia Coli and Micrococcus luteus repair pyrimidine dimers induced in their DNA by ultraviolet light are reported. The studies involve the isolation and enzymatic activity of the ucr system. The specific roles of ucr A and ucr B proteins are sought. In addition the expression of the ucr genes in mammalian cells is addressed. 35 refs. (DT)

  7. Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-06-27

    Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of

  8. Genetic, molecular and physiological basis of variation in Drosophila gut immunocompetence

    PubMed Central

    Bou Sleiman, Maroun S.; Osman, Dani; Massouras, Andreas; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Lemaitre, Bruno; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Gut immunocompetence involves immune, stress and regenerative processes. To investigate the determinants underlying inter-individual variation in gut immunocompetence, we perform enteric infection of 140 Drosophila lines with the entomopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila and observe extensive variation in survival. Using genome-wide association analysis, we identify several novel immune modulators. Transcriptional profiling further shows that the intestinal molecular state differs between resistant and susceptible lines, already before infection, with one transcriptional module involving genes linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism contributing to this difference. This genetic and molecular variation is physiologically manifested in lower ROS activity, lower susceptibility to ROS-inducing agent, faster pathogen clearance and higher stem cell activity in resistant versus susceptible lines. This study provides novel insights into the determinants underlying population-level variability in gut immunocompetence, revealing how relatively minor, but systematic genetic and transcriptional variation can mediate overt physiological differences that determine enteric infection susceptibility. PMID:26213329

  9. The Molecular Basis for Ca2+ Signalling by NAADP: Two-Pore Channels in a Complex?

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Jonathan S.; Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Walseth, Timothy F.; Patel, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    NAADP is a potent Ca2+ mobilizing messenger in a variety of cells but its molecular mechanism of action is incompletely understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the poorly characterized two-pore channels (TPCs) in animals are NAADP sensitive Ca2+-permeable channels. TPCs localize to the endo-lysosomal system but are functionally coupled to the better characterized endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channels to generate physiologically relevant complex Ca2+ signals. Whether TPCs directly bind NAADP is not clear. Here we discuss the idea based on recent studies that TPCs are the pore-forming subunits of a protein complex that includes tightly associated, low molecular weight NAADP-binding proteins. PMID:25309835

  10. Review and update on the molecular basis of Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar Francisco; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal diseases are uncommon pathologies and one of the most harmful causes of childhood and adult blindness. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe kind of these diseases accounting for approximately 5% of the whole retinal dystrophies and 20% of the children that study on blind schools. Clinical ophthalmologic findings including severe vision loss, nystagmus and ERG abnormalities should be suspected through the first year of life in this group of patients. Phenotypic variability is found when LCA patients have a full ophthalmologic examination. However, a correct diagnosis may be carried out; the determination of ophthalmologic clues as light sensibility, night blindness, fundus pigmentation, among other, join with electroretinographics findings, optical coherence tomography, and new technologies as molecular gene testing may help to reach to a precise diagnosis. Several retinal clinical features in LCA may suggest a genetic or gene particular defect; thus genetic-molecular tools could directly corroborate the clinical diagnosis. Currently, approximately 20 genes have been associated to LCA. In this review, historical perspective, clinical ophthalmological findings, new molecular-genetics technologies, possible phenotype-genotypes correlations, and gene therapy for some LCA genes are described. PMID:25685757