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Sample records for molecular conformational generation

  1. Parallel cascade selection molecular dynamics (PaCS-MD) to generate conformational transition pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Kitao, Akio

    2013-07-01

    Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) is proposed as a molecular simulation method to generate conformational transition pathway under the condition that a set of "reactant" and "product" structures is known a priori. In PaCS-MD, the cycle of short multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations and selection of the structures close to the product structure for the next cycle are repeated until the simulated structures move sufficiently close to the product. Folding of 10-residue mini-protein chignolin from the extended to native structures and open-close conformational transition of T4 lysozyme were investigated by PaCS-MD. In both cases, tens of cycles of 100-ps MD were sufficient to reach the product structures, indicating the efficient generation of conformational transition pathway in PaCS-MD with a series of conventional MD without additional external biases. Using the snapshots along the pathway as the initial coordinates, free energy landscapes were calculated by the combination with multiple independent umbrella samplings to statistically elucidate the conformational transition pathways.

  2. Conformation, orientation and interaction in molecular monolayers: A surface second harmonic and sum frequency generation study

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Shen, Y.R.

    1988-12-01

    We have used sum frequency generation (SFG) to study the order in a silane monolayer before and after the deposition of a coadsorbed liquid crystal monolayer. We observe an increase in the order of the chain of the silane molecule induced by the interpenetration of the liquid crystal molecules. By using second harmonic generation (SHG) and SFG, we have studied the orientation and conformation of the liquid crystal molecule on clean and silane coated glass surfaces. On both surfaces, the biphenyl group is tilted by 70{degree} with the alkyl chain end pointing away from the surface. The shift in the C-H stretch frequencies in the coadsorbed system indicates a significant interaction between molecules. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Conformational Transitions in Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, M.; Janke, W.

    2008-11-01

    Proteins are the "work horses" in biological systems. In almost all functions specific proteins are involved. They control molecular transport processes, stabilize the cell structure, enzymatically catalyze chemical reactions; others act as molecular motors in the complex machinery of molecular synthetization processes. Due to their significance, misfolds and malfunctions of proteins typically entail disastrous diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Therefore, the understanding of the trinity of amino acid composition, geometric structure, and biological function is one of the most essential challenges for the natural sciences. Here, we glance at conformational transitions accompanying the structure formation in protein folding processes.

  4. Molecular mechanics conformational analysis of tylosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Petko M.

    1998-01-01

    The conformations of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotic tylosin were studied with molecular mechanics (AMBER∗ force field) including modelling of the effect of the solvent on the conformational preferences (GB/SA). A Monte Carlo conformational search procedure was used for finding the most probable low-energy conformations. The present study provides complementary data to recently reported analysis of the conformations of tylosin based on NMR techniques. A search for the low-energy conformations of protynolide, a 16-membered lactone containing the same aglycone as tylosin, was also carried out, and the results were compared with the observed conformation in the crystal as well as with the most probable conformations of the macrocyclic ring of tylosin. The dependence of the results on force field was also studied by utilizing the MM3 force field. Some particular conformations were computed with the semiempirical molecular orbital methods AM1 and PM3.

  5. The effect of the structure and conformational dynamics on quenching of triplet states of porphyrins and their chemical dimers by molecular oxygen and on singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashin, N. V.; Shchupak, E. E.; Sagun, E. I.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations are performed to analyze the factors affecting rate constant k T of quenching of the lowest triplet state by molecular oxygen and quantum yield γΔ of singlet oxygen generation in chemical dimers of porphyrins bound by phenyl spacers at one of the meso positions (OEP)2-Ph, (TPP)2, and their Zn complexes. It is established that, for both types of dimers, the triplet excitation is localized on one of the macrocycles. The steric hindrance of macrocycles at the site of the phenyl ring of (OEP)2-Ph, (ZnOEP)2-Ph, and their monomeric analogues OEP-Ph and ZnOEP-Ph facilitates its rotation by 90° in the triplet state. The lowest triplet state energy in this ( U) conformation is lower than 7800 cm-1, which makes impossible electronic excitation energy transfer to molecular oxygen. The potential barrier of transformation to the U conformation is considerably lower for dimers than for monomers. Because of this, the rate of conformational transformations for dimers is higher and some of the (OEP)2-Ph and (ZnOEP)2-Ph molecules have time to transform into the new U conformation before diffusion collision with O2 molecules in solution. This leads to a noticeable decrease in γΔ in accordance with experimental data. It is shown that the behavior of k T in the series of the studied dimers, their monomeric analogues, and relative compounds corresponds to the model of dipole-dipole electronic excitation energy transfer 1(3M⋯3Σ{g/-}) → 1(1M0⋯1Δg) in collisional complexes.

  6. DG-AMMOS: A New tool to generate 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization for in silico Screening

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Discovery of new bioactive molecules that could enter drug discovery programs or that could serve as chemical probes is a very complex and costly endeavor. Structure-based and ligand-based in silico screening approaches are nowadays extensively used to complement experimental screening approaches in order to increase the effectiveness of the process and facilitating the screening of thousands or millions of small molecules against a biomolecular target. Both in silico screening methods require as input a suitable chemical compound collection and most often the 3D structure of the small molecules has to be generated since compounds are usually delivered in 1D SMILES, CANSMILES or in 2D SDF formats. Results Here, we describe the new open source program DG-AMMOS which allows the generation of the 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and their energy minimization via Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization. The program is validated on the Astex dataset, the ChemBridge Diversity database and on a number of small molecules with known crystal structures extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database. A comparison with the free program Balloon and the well-known commercial program Omega generating the 3D of small molecules is carried out. The results show that the new free program DG-AMMOS is a very efficient 3D structure generator engine. Conclusion DG-AMMOS provides fast, automated and reliable access to the generation of 3D conformation of small molecules and facilitates the preparation of a compound collection prior to high-throughput virtual screening computations. The validation of DG-AMMOS on several different datasets proves that generated structures are generally of equal quality or sometimes better than structures obtained by other tested methods. PMID:19912625

  7. Conformation effects on the molecular orbitals of serine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke-Dong; Ma, Peng-Fei; Shan, Xu

    2011-03-01

    This paper calculates the five most stable conformers of serine with Hartree—Fock theory, density functional theory (B3LYP), Møller—Plesset perturbation theory (MP4(SDQ)) and electron propagation theory with the 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set. The calculated vertical ionization energies for the valence molecular orbitals of each conformer are in agreement with the experimental data, indicating that a range of molecular conformations would coexist in an equilibrium sample. Information of the five outer valence molecular orbitals for each conformer is explored in coordinate and momentum spaces using dual space analysis to investigate the conformational processes, which are generated from the global minimum conformer Ser1 by rotation of C2-C3 (Ser4), C1-C2 (Ser5) and C1-O2 (Ser2 and Ser3). Orbitals 28a, 27a and 26a are identified as the fingerprint orbitals for all the conformational processes. Project supported by the Doctoral Research Fund of Henan Normal University, China (Grant No. 525449).

  8. Molecular modeling of conformational properties of oligodepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajing; King, Michael; Suggs, Laura; Ren, Pengyu

    2007-10-01

    A depsipeptide is a chemical structure consisting of both ester and amide bonds. Quantum mechanics calculations have been performed to investigate the conformational properties of a depsidipeptide in the gas and solution phases. Similar to an alanine dipeptide, the depsidipeptide exhibits a strong preference for the polyproline II (PPII) helical conformation. Meanwhile, due to the changes in the intramolecular interaction, the propensity for beta-sheets and alpha-helices diminishes while an unusual inclination for the (phi,psi) = (-150 degrees ,0 degrees ) conformation was observed. A molecular mechanics model has been developed for polydepsipeptides based on the quantum mechanical study. Both simulated annealing and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on oligodepsipeptide sequences with alternating depsi and natural residues in solution. Novel helical structures have been indicated from the simulations. When glycine is used as the alternating natural amino acid residue, the PPII conformation of a depsi residue stabilizes the peptide into a right-handed helical structure while the alpha-helical conformation of the depsi residue favors an overall left-handed helical structure. The free energy analysis indicates that both the left- and the right-handed helices are equally likely to exist. When charged lysine is introduced as the alternating natural residue, however, it is found that the depsipeptide sequence prefers an extended conformation as in PPII. Our results indicate that the depsipeptide is potentially useful in designing protein mimetics with controllable structure, function, and chemistry. PMID:17877396

  9. Measuring the mechanical properties of molecular conformers

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, S. P.; Taylor, S.; Baran, J. D.; Champness, N. R.; Larsson, J. A.; Moriarty, P.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning probe-actuated single molecule manipulation has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for the systematic atomic-scale interrogation of molecular adsorbates. To date, however, the extent to which molecular conformation affects the force required to push or pull a single molecule has not been explored. Here we probe the mechanochemical response of two tetra(4-bromophenyl)porphyrin conformers using non-contact atomic force microscopy where we find a large difference between the lateral forces required for manipulation. Remarkably, despite sharing very similar adsorption characteristics, variations in the potential energy surface are capable of prohibiting probe-induced positioning of one conformer, while simultaneously permitting manipulation of the alternative conformational form. Our results are interpreted in the context of dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations which reveal significant differences in the diffusion barriers for each conformer. These results demonstrate that conformational variation significantly modifies the mechanical response of even simple porpyhrins, potentially affecting many other flexible molecules. PMID:26388232

  10. Generating static fluid spheres by conformal transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Loranger, Jonathan; Lake, Kayll

    2008-12-15

    We generate an explicit four-fold infinity of physically acceptable exact perfect fluid solutions of Einstein's equations by way of conformal transformations of physically unacceptable solutions (one way to view the use of isotropic coordinates). Special cases include the Schwarzschild interior solution and the Einstein static universe. The process we consider involves solving two equations of the Riccati type coupled by a single generating function rather than a specification of one of the two metric functions.

  11. Determining Geometrically Stable Domains in Molecular Conformation Sets.

    PubMed

    Romanowska, Julia; Nowiński, Krzysztof S; Trylska, Joanna

    2012-08-14

    Detecting significant conformational changes occurring in biomolecules is a challenging task, especially when considering tens to hundreds of thousands of conformations. Conformational variability can be described by dividing a biomolecule into dynamic domains, i.e., by finding compact fragments that move as coherent units. Typical approaches, based on calculating a dynamical cross-correlation matrix, are limited by their inability to reveal correlated rotations and anticorrelated motions. We propose a geometric approach for finding dynamic domains, where we compare traces of atomic movements in a pairwise manner, and search for their best superposition. A quaternion representation of rotation is used to simplify the complex calculations. The algorithm was implemented in a Java graphical program: Geometrically Stable Substructures (GeoStaS). The program processes PDB and DCD binary files with large structural sets for proteins, nucleic acids, and their complexes. We demonstrate its efficiency in analyzing (a) ensembles of structures generated by NMR experiments and (b) conformation sets from biomolecular simulations, such as molecular dynamics. The results provide a clear description of the molecular movements even for large biomolecules. Compared to a standard dynamic cross-correlation matrix, our algorithm detects the correlations in both translational and rotational motions. PMID:26592104

  12. Patterns and conformations in molecularly thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnet, Prem B.

    Molecularly thin films have been a subject of great interest for the last several years because of their large variety of industrial applications ranging from micro-electronics to bio-medicine. Additionally, molecularly thin films can be used as good models for biomembrane and other systems where surfaces are critical. Many different kinds of molecules can make stable films. My research has considered three such molecules: a polymerizable phospholipid, a bent-core molecules, and a polymer. One common theme of these three molecules is chirality. The phospolipid molecules studied here are strongly chiral, which can be due to intrinsically chiral centers on the molecules and also due to chiral conformations. We find that these molecules give rise to chiral patterns. Bent-core molecules are not intrinsically chiral, but individual molecules and groups of molecules can show chiral structures, which can be changed by surface interactions. One major, unconfirmed hypothesis for the polymer conformation at surface is that it forms helices, which would be chiral. Most experiments were carried out at the air/water interface, in what are called Langmuir films. Our major tools for studying these films are Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM) coupled with the thermodynamic information that can be deduced from surface pressure isotherms. Phospholipids are one of the important constituents of liposomes -- a spherical vesicle com-posed of a bilayer membrane, typically composed of a phospholipid and cholesterol bilayer. The application of liposomes in drug delivery is well-known. Crumpling of vesicles of polymerizable phospholipids has been observed. With BAM, on Langmuir films of such phospholipids, we see novel spiral/target patterns during compression. We have found that both the patterns and the critical pressure at which they formed depend on temperature (below the transition to a i¬‘uid layer). Bent-core liquid crystals, sometimes knows as banana liquid crystals, have drawn

  13. Conformational analyses of periplanone analogs by molecular mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, K; Mori, M; Okada, K; Chuman, T; Goto, H; Osawa, E; Sakakibara, K; Hirota, M

    1991-04-01

    Conformational parameters of pheromonally active analogs (1 and 2) of periplanones, the sex pheromones of the American cockroach, were investigated by molecular mechanics calculations. They existed in several conformers with small energy differences. These results were supported by NMR analysis. The structural features of the conformers of the analogs were compared with X-ray structures of periplanones. PMID:24258922

  14. Conformational Analysis in 18-Membered Macrolactones Based on Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Belaidi, Salah; Harkati, Dalal

    2011-01-01

    Conformational analysis of 18-ring membered macrolactones has been carried out using molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics. A high conformational flexibility of macrolactones was obtained, and an important stereoselectivity was observed for the complexed macrolides. For 18d macrolactone, which was presented by a most favored conformer with 20.1% without complex, it was populated with 50.1% in presence of Fe(CO)3. PMID:24052826

  15. Toward Focusing Conformational Ensembles on Bioactive Conformations: A Molecular Mechanics/Quantum Mechanics Study.

    PubMed

    Avgy-David, Hannah H; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2015-10-26

    The identification of bound conformations, namely, conformations adopted by ligands when binding their target is critical for target-based and ligand-based drug design. Bound conformations could be obtained computationally from unbound conformational ensembles generated by conformational search tools. However, these tools also generate many nonrelevant conformations thus requiring a focusing mechanism. To identify such a mechanism, this work focuses on a comparison of energies and structural properties of bound and unbound conformations for a set of FDA approved drugs whose complexes are available in the PDB. Unbound conformational ensembles were initially obtained with three force fields. These were merged, clustered, and reminimized using the same force fields and four QM methods. Bound conformations of all ligands were represented by their crystal structures or by approximations to these structures. Energy differences were calculated between global minima of the unbound state or the Boltzmann averaged energies of the unbound ensemble and the approximated bound conformations. Ligand conformations which resemble the X-ray conformation (RMSD < 1.0 Å) were obtained in 91%-97% and 96%-98% of the cases using the ensembles generated by the individual force fields and the reminimized ensembles, respectively, yet only in 52%-56% (original ensembles) and 47%-65% (reminimized ensembles) as global energy minima. The energy window within which the different methods identified the bound conformation (approximated by its closest local energy minimum) was found to be at 4-6 kcal/mol with respect to the global minimum and marginally lower with respect to a Boltzmann averaged energy of the unbound ensemble. Better approximations to the bound conformation obtained with a constrained minimization using the crystallographic B-factors or with a newly developed Knee Point Detection (KPD) method gave lower values (2-5 kcal/mol). Overall, QM methods gave lower energy differences than

  16. Molecular dynamics studies of the conformation of sorbitol

    PubMed Central

    Lerbret, A.; Mason, P.E.; Venable, R.M.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Pastor, R.W.; Brady, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a 3 m aqueous solution of D-sorbitol (also called D-glucitol) have been performed at 300 K, as well as at two elevated temperatures to promote conformational transitions. In principle, sorbitol is more flexible than glucose since it does not contain a constraining ring. However, a conformational analysis revealed that the sorbitol chain remains extended in solution, in contrast to the bent conformation found experimentally in the crystalline form. While there are 243 staggered conformations of the backbone possible for this open-chain polyol, only a very limited number were found to be stable in the simulations. Although many conformers were briefly sampled, only eight were significantly populated in the simulation. The carbon backbones of all but two of these eight conformers were completely extended, unlike the bent crystal conformation. These extended conformers were stabilized by a quite persistent intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl groups of carbon C-2 and C-4. The conformational populations were found to be in good agreement with the limited available NMR data except for the C-2–C-3 torsion (spanned by the O-2–O-4 hydrogen bond), where the NMR data supports a more bent structure. PMID:19744646

  17. ConfGen: a conformational search method for efficient generation of bioactive conformers.

    PubMed

    Watts, K Shawn; Dalal, Pranav; Murphy, Robert B; Sherman, Woody; Friesner, Rich A; Shelley, John C

    2010-04-26

    We describe the methodology, parametrization, and application of a conformational search method, called ConfGen, designed to efficiently generate bioactive conformers. We define efficiency as the ability to generate a bioactive conformation within a small total number of conformations using a reasonable amount of computer time. The method combines physics-based force field calculations with empirically derived heuristics designed to achieve efficient searching and prioritization of the ligand's conformational space. While many parameter settings are supported, four modes spanning a range of speed and quality trades-offs are defined and characterized. The validation set used to test the method is composed of ligands from 667 crystal structures covering a broad array of target and ligand classes. With the fastest mode, ConfGen uses an average of 0.5 s per ligand and generates only 14.3 conformers per ligand, at least one of which lies within 2.0 A root-mean-squared deviation of the crystal structure for 96% of the ligands. The most computationally intensive mode raises this recovery rate to 99%, while taking 8 s per ligand. Combining multiple search modes to "fill-in" holes in the conformation space or energy minimizing using an all-atom force field each lead to improvements in the recovery rates at higher resolutions. Overall, ConfGen is at least as good as competing programs at high resolution and demonstrates higher efficiency at resolutions sufficient for many downstream applications, such as pharmacophore modeling. PMID:20373803

  18. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  19. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn

    2013-12-14

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  20. Molecular conformational space analysis using computer graphics: going beyond FRODO.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, O

    1990-12-01

    The molecular graphics program FRODO has been modified to support analytical animation of molecular dynamics trajectories. The enhanced program, mdFRODO, supports all features available in FRODO and is interfaced to GROMOS. A variety of analytical animation modes is included. Extensive coloring and atom selection features are implemented to aid the user in distinguishing features of interest in a set of conformations. Molecular conformational space can be analyzed efficiently and comprehended. Animations may be viewed in stereo, and the animated object can be overlaid with any of the standard FRODO objects. The mdFRODO program is of wide use in molecular dynamics, X-ray crystallography and two-dimensional NMR work. Examples illustrating various aspects of collective motion in protein molecules are given and discussed. PMID:2282358

  1. Conformations of Low-Molecular-Weight Lignin Polymers in Water.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight lignin binds to cellulose during the thermochemical pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, which prevents the efficient hydrolysis of the cellulose to sugars. The binding properties of lignin are influenced strongly by the conformations it adopts. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution to investigate the dependence of the shape of lignin polymers on chain length and temperature. Lignin is found to adopt collapsed conformations in water at 300 and 500 K. However, at 300 K, a discontinuous transition is found in the shape of the polymer as a function of the chain length. Below a critical degree of polymerization, Nc =15, the polymer adopts less spherical conformations than above Nc. The transition disappears at high temperatures (500 K) at which only spherical shapes are adopted. An implication relevant to cellulosic biofuel production is that lignin will self-aggregate even at high pretreatment temperatures. PMID:26763657

  2. Close intramolecular sulfur-oxygen contacts: modified force field parameters for improved conformation generation.

    PubMed

    Lupyan, Dmitry; Abramov, Yuriy A; Sherman, Woody

    2012-11-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) offers an excellent data source to study small molecule conformations and molecular interactions. We have analyzed 130 small molecules from the CSD containing an intramolecular sulfur-oxygen distance less than the sum of their van der Waals (vdW) radii. Close S···O distances are observed in several important medicinal chemistry motifs (e.g. a carbonyl oxygen connected by a carbon or nitrogen linker to a sulfur) and are not treated well with existing parameters in the MMFFs or OPLS_2005 force fields, resulting in suboptimal geometries and energetics. In this work, we develop modified parameters for the OPLS_2005 force field to better treat this specific interaction in order to generate conformations close to those found in the CSD structures. We use a combination of refitting a force field torsional parameter, adding a specific atom pair vdW term, and attenuating the electrostatic interactions to obtain an improvement in the accuracy of geometry minimizations and conformational searches for these molecules. Specifically, in a conformational search 58 % of the cases produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å from the CSD crystal conformation with the modified OPLS force field parameters developed in this work. In contrast, 25 and 37 % produced a conformation less than 0.25 Å with the MMFFs and OPLS_2005 force fields, respectively. As an application of the new parameters, we generated conformations for the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib (trade name Inlyta) that could be correctly repacked into three observed polymorphic structures, which was not possible with conformations generated using MMFFs or OPLS_2005. The improved parameters can be mapped directly onto physical characteristics of the systems that are treated inadequately with the molecular mechanics force fields used in this study and potentially other force fields as well. PMID:23053737

  3. Molecular Visualization of Conformation-Triggered Flow Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Shirvanyants, David; Beers, Kathryn L.; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Dobrynin, Andrey V.; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S.

    2005-06-01

    A new type of flow fingering instability was observed in monolayer-thick polymer films as they spread on a solid substrate. Tracing the movement of individual molecules by atomic force microscopy enabled us to follow the development of the flow instability on the molecular level and to understand the underlying physical mechanism. The fingering instability was observed to be triggered by conformational changes of brushlike macromolecules in response to the pressure gradient driving the flow.

  4. Locally accessible conformations of proteins: multiple molecular dynamics simulations of crambin.

    PubMed Central

    Caves, L. S.; Evanseck, J. D.; Karplus, M.

    1998-01-01

    Multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of crambin with different initial atomic velocities are used to sample conformations in the vicinity of the native structure. Individual trajectories of length up to 5 ns sample only a fraction of the conformational distribution generated by ten independent 120 ps trajectories at 300 K. The backbone atom conformational space distribution is analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA). Four different major conformational regions are found. In general, a trajectory samples only one region and few transitions between the regions are observed. Consequently, the averages of structural and dynamic properties over the ten trajectories differ significantly from those obtained from individual trajectories. The nature of the conformational sampling has important consequences for the utilization of MD simulations for a wide range of problems, such as comparisons with X-ray or NMR data. The overall average structure is significantly closer to the X-ray structure than any of the individual trajectory average structures. The high frequency (less than 10 ps) atomic fluctuations from the ten trajectories tend to be similar, but the lower frequency (100 ps) motions are different. To improve conformational sampling in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins, as in nucleic acids, multiple trajectories with different initial conditions should be used rather than a single long trajectory. PMID:9541397

  5. Hierarchical Conformational Analysis of Native Lysozyme Based on Sub-Millisecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical organization of free energy landscape (FEL) for native globular proteins has been widely accepted by the biophysics community. However, FEL of native proteins is usually projected onto one or a few dimensions. Here we generated collectively 0.2 milli-second molecular dynamics simulation trajectories in explicit solvent for hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), and carried out detailed conformational analysis based on backbone torsional degrees of freedom (DOF). Our results demonstrated that at micro-second and coarser temporal resolutions, FEL of HEWL exhibits hub-like topology with crystal structures occupying the dominant structural ensemble that serves as the hub of conformational transitions. However, at 100ns and finer temporal resolutions, conformational substates of HEWL exhibit network-like topology, crystal structures are associated with kinetic traps that are important but not dominant ensembles. Backbone torsional state transitions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to beyond microseconds were found to be associated with various types of molecular interactions. Even at nanoseconds temporal resolution, the number of conformational substates that are of statistical significance is quite limited. These observations suggest that detailed analysis of conformational substates at multiple temporal resolutions is both important and feasible. Transition state ensembles among various conformational substates at microsecond temporal resolution were observed to be considerably disordered. Life times of these transition state ensembles are found to be nearly independent of the time scales of the participating torsional DOFs. PMID:26057625

  6. Electrostatic Swelling and Conformational Variation Observed in High-Generation Polyelectrolyte Dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Paul D; Chen, Wei-Ren; Herwig, Kenneth W; Hong, Kunlun; Liu, Yun; Porcar, L.; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Gregory Scott; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Chen, Chun-Yu; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily

    2010-01-01

    A coordinated study combining small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements was conducted to investigate the structural characteristics of aqueous (D2O) generation 7 and 8 (G7 & G8) PAMAM dendrimer solutions as a function of molecular protonation at room temperature. The change in intra-molecular conformation was clearly exhibited in the data analysis by separating the variation in the inter-molecular correlation. Our results unambiguously demonstrate an increased molecular size and evolved intra-molecular density profile upon increasing the molecular protonation. This is contrary to the existing understanding that in higher generation polyelectrolyte dendrimers, steric crowding stiffens the local motion of dendrimer segments exploring additional available intra-dendrimer volume and therefore inhibits the electrostatic swelling. Our observation is relevant to elucidation of the general microscopic picture of polyelectrolyte dendrimer structure, as well as the development of dendrimer-based packages with based on the stimuli-responsive principle.

  7. Origin of molecular conformational stability: Perspectives from molecular orbital interactions and density functional reactivity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shubin E-mail: schauer@unc.edu; Schauer, Cynthia K. E-mail: schauer@unc.edu

    2015-02-07

    To have a quantitative understanding about the origin of conformation stability for molecular systems is still an unaccomplished task. Frontier orbital interactions from molecular orbital theory and energy partition schemes from density functional reactivity theory are the two approaches available in the literature that can be used for this purpose. In this work, we compare the performance of these approaches for a total of 48 simple molecules. We also conduct studies to flexibly bend bond angles for water, carbon dioxide, borane, and ammonia molecules to obtain energy profiles for these systems over a wide range of conformations. We find that results from molecular orbital interactions using frontier occupied orbitals such as the highest occupied molecular orbital and its neighbors are only qualitatively, at most semi-qualitatively, trustworthy. To obtain quantitative insights into relative stability of different conformations, the energy partition approach from density functional reactivity theory is much more reliable. We also find that the electrostatic interaction is the dominant descriptor for conformational stability, and steric and quantum effects are smaller in contribution but their contributions are indispensable. Stable molecular conformations prefer to have a strong electrostatic interaction, small molecular size, and large exchange-correlation effect. This work should shed new light towards establishing a general theoretical framework for molecular stability.

  8. Frog: a FRee Online druG 3D conformation generator.

    PubMed

    Leite, T Bohme; Gomes, D; Miteva, M A; Chomilier, J; Villoutreix, B O; Tufféry, P

    2007-07-01

    In silico screening methods based on the 3D structures of the ligands or of the proteins have become an essential tool to facilitate the drug discovery process. To achieve such process, the 3D structures of the small chemical compounds have to be generated. In addition, for ligand-based screening computations or hierarchical structure-based screening projects involving a rigid-body docking step, it is necessary to generate multi-conformer 3D models for each input ligand to increase the efficiency of the search. However, most academic or commercial compound collections are delivered in 1D SMILES (simplified molecular input line entry system) format or in 2D SDF (structure data file), highlighting the need for free 1D/2D to 3D structure generators. Frog is an on-line service aimed at generating 3D conformations for drug-like compounds starting from their 1D or 2D descriptions. Given the atomic constitution of the molecules and connectivity information, Frog can identify the different unambiguous isomers corresponding to each compound, and generate single or multiple low-to-medium energy 3D conformations, using an assembly process that does not presently consider ring flexibility. Tests show that Frog is able to generate bioactive conformations close to those observed in crystallographic complexes. Frog can be accessed at http://bioserv.rpbs.jussieu.fr/Frog.html. PMID:17485475

  9. Sampling Molecular Conformers in Solution with Quantum Mechanical Accuracy at a Nearly Molecular-Mechanics Cost.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marta; Micciarelli, Marco; Laio, Alessandro; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-09-13

    We introduce a method to evaluate the relative populations of different conformers of molecular species in solution, aiming at quantum mechanical accuracy, while keeping the computational cost at a nearly molecular-mechanics level. This goal is achieved by combining long classical molecular-dynamics simulations to sample the free-energy landscape of the system, advanced clustering techniques to identify the most relevant conformers, and thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct the resulting populations, using quantum-mechanical energies from density functional theory. A quantitative criterion for assessing the accuracy thus achieved is proposed. The resulting methodology is demonstrated in the specific case of cyanin (cyanidin-3-glucoside) in water solution. PMID:27494227

  10. Conformational model of the Holliday junction transition deduced from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Ha, Taekjip; Schulten, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination plays a key role in the restart of stalled replication forks and in the generation of genetic diversity. During this process, two homologous DNA molecules undergo strand exchange to form a four-way DNA (Holliday) junction. In the presence of metal ions, the Holliday junction folds into the stacked-X structure that has two alternative conformers. Experiments have revealed the spontaneous transitions between these conformers, but their detailed pathways are not known. Here, we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the Holliday junction at physiological and elevated (400 K) temperatures. The simulations reveal new tetrahedral intermediates and suggest a schematic framework for conformer transitions. The tetrahedral intermediates bear resemblance to the junction conformation in complex with a junction-resolving enzyme, T7 endonuclease I, and indeed, one intermediate forms a stable complex with the enzyme as demonstrated in one simulation. We also describe free energy minima for various states of the Holliday junction system, which arise during conformer transitions. The results show that magnesium ions stabilize the stacked-X form and destabilize the open and tetrahedral intermediates. Overall, our study provides a detailed dynamic model of the Holliday junction undergoing a conformer transition. PMID:15613597

  11. Evolution of dendrimer conformational structure with generation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, Beatriz A. Pazmiño; Douglas, Jack F.

    2016-05-01

    We simulate the conformational structure of a coarse-grained model of dendrimer molecules in a good solvent as a function of generation number G and find that they evolve through substantially more complex structures than regular star polymers with increasing arms because of their hierarchical topological structure. As G increases, they evolve from 3-arm stars to branched polymers that geometrically resemble lattice animals, and then percolation clusters for G = 4 - 6 range. For larger G, the dendrimers become similar to porous particles, but the molecule segregates segregates into subdomains at G = 9, reflecting the branching complexity of the first dendrimer generation.

  12. Aripiprazole salts IV. Anionic plus solvato networks defining molecular conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Eleonora; Polla, Griselda; Baggio, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Five new examples of aripiprazole (arip) salts are presented, viz., the Harip phthalate [Harip+·C8H5O4-(I)], homophthalate [Harip+·C9H7O4-(II)] and thiosalicilate [Harip+·C7H4O2S-(III)] salts on one side, and two different dihidrogenphosphates, Harip+·H2PO4-·2(H3PO4)·H2O (IV) and Harip+·H2PO4-·H3PO4(V). Regarding the internal structure of the aripH+ cations, they do not differ from the already known moieties in bond distances and angles, while interesting differences in conformation can be observed, setting them apart in two groups: those in I, II and III present similar conformations to those in the so far reported arip salts presenting the same centrosymmetric R(8)22 dimeric synthon, but different to those in IV and V. In parallel, the anion (+ acid) groups define bulky systems of different dimensionality (1D in the former group, 2D in the latter). The correlation between arip molecular conformation and anionic network type is discussed. An interesting feature arises with the water solvato molecule in IV, disordered around an inversion center, in regard with its interaction with an (also disordered) phosphato O-H, in a way that an “orderly disordered” H-bonding scheme arises, complying with the S.G. symmetry requirements only on average.

  13. Molecular dynamics study on the electrostatic effect of protein conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sook Kang, Nam; Kwang Shin, Jae; Hyeok Yoon, Jeong; Shik John, Mu

    1993-05-01

    In order to examine in detail the effect of ionizable residues on the stability of α-helical structures, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations on melittin under controlled pH using a macroscopic dielectric model. We simulated at + 3-charged, + 6-charged and totally uncharged states of melittin. From these calculations, we obtained various conformational properties such as helical content, torsion angle trajectories, temperature factors and end-to-end distances. The +3-charged state corresponding to the basic pH range showed the most stable structure. Our analysis concluded that the helix is least stable at neutral pH including six positively charged residues, and helicity increases as the pH approaches the basic range. In addition, our results showed qualitatively the differences in the hinge-bending flexibility of the α-helix according to the pH.

  14. Dynamic conformational ensembles regulate casein kinase-1 isoforms: Insights from molecular dynamics and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surya Pratap; Gupta, Dwijendra K

    2016-04-01

    Casein kinase-1 (CK1) isoforms actively participate in the down-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway; however recent studies have shown their active roles in oncogenesis of various tissues through this pathway. Functional loss of two isoforms (CK1-α/ε) has been shown to activate the carcinogenic pathway which involves the stabilization of of cytoplasmic β-catenin. Development of anticancer therapeutics is very laborious task and depends upon the structural and conformational details of the target. This study focuses on, how the structural dynamics and conformational changes of two CK1 isoforms are synchronized in carcinogenic pathway. The conformational dynamics in kinases is the responsible for their action as has been supported by the molecular docking experiments. PMID:26788877

  15. Elucidating Molecular Motion through Structural and Dynamic Filters of Energy-Minimized Conformer Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Complex RNA structures are constructed from helical segments connected by flexible loops that move spontaneously and in response to binding of small molecule ligands and proteins. Understanding the conformational variability of RNA requires the characterization of the coupled time evolution of interconnected flexible domains. To elucidate the collective molecular motions and explore the conformational landscape of the HIV-1 TAR RNA, we describe a new methodology that utilizes energy-minimized structures generated by the program “Fragment Assembly of RNA with Full-Atom Refinement (FARFAR)”. We apply structural filters in the form of experimental residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to select a subset of discrete energy-minimized conformers and carry out principal component analyses (PCA) to corroborate the choice of the filtered subset. We use this subset of structures to calculate solution T1 and T1ρ relaxation times for 13C spins in multiple residues in different domains of the molecule using two simulation protocols that we previously published. We match the experimental T1 times to within 2% and the T1ρ times to within less than 10% for helical residues. These results introduce a protocol to construct viable dynamic trajectories for RNA molecules that accord well with experimental NMR data and support the notion that the motions of the helical portions of this small RNA can be described by a relatively small number of discrete conformations exchanging over time scales longer than 1 μs. PMID:24479561

  16. A script for automated 3-dimentional structure generation and conformer search from 2- dimentional chemical drawing.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Building 3-dimensional (3D) molecules is the starting point in molecular modeling. Conformer search and identification of a global energy minimum structure are often performed computationally during spectral analysis of data from NMR, IR, and VCD or during rational drug design through ligand-based, structure-based, and QSAR approaches. I herein report a convenient script that allows for automated building of 3D structures and conformer searching from 2-dimensional (2D) drawing of chemical structures. With this Bash shell script, which runs on Mac OS X and the Linux platform, the tasks are consecutively and iteratively executed without a 3D molecule builder via the command line interface of the free (academic) software OpenBabel, Balloon, and MOPAC2012. A large number of 2D chemical drawing files can be processed simultaneously, and the script functions with stereoisomers. Semi-empirical quantum chemical calculation ensures reliable ranking of the generated conformers on the basis of energy. In addition to an energy-sorted list of file names of the conformers, their Gaussian input files are provided for ab initio and density functional theory calculations to predict rigorous electronic energies, structures, and properties. This script is freely available to all scientists. PMID:24391363

  17. A Script for Automated 3-Dimentional Structure Generation and Conformer Search from 2- Dimentional Chemical Drawing

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Building 3-dimensional (3D) molecules is the starting point in molecular modeling. Conformer search and identification of a global energy minimum structure are often performed computationally during spectral analysis of data from NMR, IR, and VCD or during rational drug design through ligand-based, structure-based, and QSAR approaches. I herein report a convenient script that allows for automated building of 3D structures and conformer searching from 2-dimensional (2D) drawing of chemical structures. With this Bash shell script, which runs on Mac OS X and the Linux platform, the tasks are consecutively and iteratively executed without a 3D molecule builder via the command line interface of the free (academic) software OpenBabel, Balloon, and MOPAC2012. A large number of 2D chemical drawing files can be processed simultaneously, and the script functions with stereoisomers. Semi-empirical quantum chemical calculation ensures reliable ranking of the generated conformers on the basis of energy. In addition to an energy-sorted list of file names of the conformers, their Gaussian input files are provided for ab initio and density functional theory calculations to predict rigorous electronic energies, structures, and properties. This script is freely available to all scientists. PMID:24391363

  18. A numerical study of hybrid optimization methods for the molecular conformation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, J.C.; Martinez, M.L.

    1993-05-01

    An important area of research in computational biochemistry is the design of molecules for specific applications. The design of these molecules depends on the accurate determination of their three-dimensional structure or conformation. Under the assumption that molecules will settle into a configuration for which their energy is at a minimum, this design problem can be formulated as a global optimization problem. The solution of the molecular conformation problem can then be obtained, at least in principle, through any number of optimization algorithms. Unfortunately, it can easily be shown that there exist a large number of local minima for most molecules which makes this an extremely difficult problem for any standard optimization method. In this study, we present results for various optimization algorithms applied to a molecular conformation problem. We include results for genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, direct search methods, and several gradient methods. The major result of this study is that none of these standard methods can be used in isolation to efficiently generate minimum energy configurations. We propose instead several hybrid methods that combine properties of several local optimization algorithms. These hybrid methods have yielded better results on representative test problems than single methods.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Conformational Transitions of Adenylate Kinase: A Computational Evidence for the Conformational Selection Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jie; Hao, Pei; Li, Yi-Xue; Wang, Jing-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (ADK) is a monomeric phosphotransferase enzyme that catalyzes reversible transfer of phosphoryl group from ATP to AMP with a large-scale domain motion. The detailed mechanism for this conformational transition remains unknown. In the current study, we performed long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations on both open and closed states of ADK. Based on the structural analyses of the simulation trajectories, we detected over 20 times conformational transitions between the open and closed states of ADK and identified two novel conformations as intermediate states in the catalytic processes. With these findings, we proposed a possible mechanism for the large-scale domain motion of Escherichia coli ADK and its catalytic process: (1) the substrate free ADK adopted an open conformation; (2) ATP bound with LID domain closure; (3) AMP bound with NMP domain closure; (4) phosphoryl transfer occurred with ATP, and AMP converted into two ADPs, and no conformational transition was detected in the enzyme; (5) LID domain opened with one ADP released; (6) another ADP released with NMP domain open. As both open and closed states sampled a wide range of conformation transitions, our simulation strongly supported the conformational selection mechanism for Escherichia coli ADK. PMID:23936827

  20. Conformational analysis of methylphenidate: comparison of molecular orbital and molecular mechanics methods.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Skawinski, William J; Misra, Milind; Paris, Kristina A; Naik, Neelam H; Buono, Ronald A; Deutsch, Howard M; Venanzi, Carol A

    2004-11-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) binds to the cocaine binding site on the dopamine transporter and inhibits reuptake of dopamine, but does not appear to have the same abuse potential as cocaine. This study, part of a comprehensive effort to identify a drug treatment for cocaine abuse, investigates the effect of choice of calculation technique and of solvent model on the conformational potential energy surface (PES) of MP and a rigid methylphenidate (RMP) analogue which exhibits the same dopamine transporter binding affinity as MP. Conformational analysis was carried out by the AM1 and AM1/SM5.4 semiempirical molecular orbital methods, a molecular mechanics method (Tripos force field with the dielectric set equal to that of vacuum or water) and the HF/6-31G* molecular orbital method in vacuum phase. Although all three methods differ somewhat in the local details of the PES, the general trends are the same for neutral and protonated MP. In vacuum phase, protonation has a distinctive effect in decreasing the regions of space available to the local conformational minima. Solvent has little effect on the PES of the neutral molecule and tends to stabilize the protonated species. The random search (RS) conformational analysis technique using the Tripos force field was found to be capable of locating the minima found by the molecular orbital methods using systematic grid search. This suggests that the RS/Tripos force field/vacuum phase protocol is a reasonable choice for locating the local minima of MP. However, the Tripos force field gave significantly larger phenyl ring rotational barriers than the molecular orbital methods for MP and RMP. For both the neutral and protonated cases, all three methods found the phenyl ring rotational barriers for the RMP conformers/invertamers (denoted as cte, tte, and cta) to be: cte, tte > MP > cta. Solvation has negligible effect on the phenyl ring rotational barrier of RMP. The B3LYP/6-31G* density functional method was used to calculate the

  1. A method for finding candidate conformations for molecular replacement using relative rotation between domains of a known structure.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jay I; Lattman, Eaton E; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a methodology to obtain candidate conformations of multidomain proteins for use in molecular replacement. For each separate domain, the orientational relationship between the template and the target structure is obtained using standard molecular replacement. The orientational relationships of the domains are then used to calculate the relative rotation between the domains in the target conformation by using pose-estimation techniques from the field of robotics and computer vision. With the angle of relative rotation between the domains as a cost function, iterative normal-mode analysis is used to drive the template structure to a candidate conformation that matches the X-ray crystallographic data obtained for the target conformation. The selection of the correct intra-protein domain orientations from among the many spurious maxima in the rotation function (including orientations obtained from domains in symmetry mates rather than within the same copy of the protein) presents a challenge. This problem is resolved by checking R factors of each domain, measuring the absolute value of relative rotation between domains, and evaluating the cost value after each candidate conformation is driven to convergence with iterative NMA. As a validation, the proposed method is applied to three test proteins: ribose-binding protein, lactoferrin and calcium ATPase. In each test case, the orientation and translation of the final candidate conformation in the unit cell are generated correctly from the suggested procedure. The results show that the proposed method can yield viable candidate conformations for use in molecular replacement and can reveal the structural details and pose of the target conformation in the crystallographic unit cell. PMID:16552141

  2. Electronic structure and conformation of polymers from cluster molecular orbital and molecular mechanics calculations: Polyimide

    SciTech Connect

    Kafafi, S.A. ); LaFemina, J.P. ); Nauss, J.L. )

    1990-11-21

    Full geometry optimizations using molecular mechanics and the quantum chemical AM1 method have been carried out to determine the minimum energy conformation of pyromellitic dianhydride-oxydianiline polyimide (PMDA-ODA PI). The phenyl-imide twist angle for this compound was determined to be {approximately}30. These computations also provided a quantitative determination of the energy gap (7 eV), electron affinity ({minus}2 eV), and ionization potential (8.97 eV). Computations on the PMDA-ODA PI radical anion provided an estimate of the hopping barrier for an electron to hop from one chain to another (3.2 eV), the mechanism believed responsible for photoconduction. Moreover, the use of qualitative molecular orbital theory (QMOT) arguments provided an interpretation of these results in a simple molecular orbital framework.

  3. Molecular dynamics analysis of conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein during the initial steps of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Garcia, Fernando; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesus Ignacio; Mendieta, Jesus

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein is caused only by mechanical forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRA region undergoes a structural change from a beta + alpha conformation to an extended coil and then to an all-alpha conformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRS domains of F protein form three single {alpha}-helices prior to generation of the coiled coil. -- Abstract: The fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell membrane is mediated by fusion protein (F protein) present in the virus envelope, which undergoes a dramatic conformational change during the process. Unlike hemagglutinin in orthomyxovirus, this change is not mediated by an alteration of environmental pH, and its cause remains unknown. Steered molecular dynamics analysis leads us to suggest that the conformational modification is mediated only by stretching mechanical forces once the transmembrane fusion peptide of the protein is anchored to the cell membrane. Such elongating forces will generate major secondary structure rearrangement in the heptad repeat A region of the F protein; from {beta}-sheet conformation to an elongated coil and then spontaneously to an {alpha}-helix. In addition, it is proposed that the heptad repeat A region adopts a final three-helix coiled coil and that this structure appears after the formation of individual helices in each monomer.

  4. Ligand Induced Conformational Changes of the Human Serotonin Transporter Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design. PMID:23776432

  5. Ligand induced conformational changes of the human serotonin transporter revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Koldsø, Heidi; Autzen, Henriette Elisabeth; Grouleff, Julie; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design. PMID:23776432

  6. Influence of rotational energy barriers to the conformational search of protein loops in molecular dynamics and ranking the conformations.

    PubMed

    Tappura, K

    2001-08-15

    An adjustable-barrier dihedral angle potential was added as an extension to a novel, previously presented soft-core potential to study its contribution to the efficacy of the search of the conformational space in molecular dynamics. As opposed to the conventional soft-core potential functions, the leading principle in the design of the new soft-core potential, as well as of its extension, the soft-core and adjustable-barrier dihedral angle (SCADA) potential (referred as the SCADA potential), was to maintain the main equilibrium properties of the original force field. This qualifies the methods for a variety of a priori modeling problems without need for additional restraints typically required with the conventional soft-core potentials. In the present study, the different potential energy functions are applied to the problem of predicting loop conformations in proteins. Comparison of the performance of the soft-core and SCADA potential showed that the main hurdles for the efficient sampling of the conformational space of (loops in) proteins are related to the high-energy barriers caused by the Lennard-Jones and Coulombic energy terms, and not to the rotational barriers, although the conformational search can be further enhanced by lowering the rotational barriers of the dihedral angles. Finally, different evaluation methods were studied and a few promising criteria found to distinguish the near-native loop conformations from the wrong ones. PMID:11455590

  7. Molecular dynamics and neutron scattering study of the dependence of polyelectrolyte dendrimer conformation on counterion behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Do, Changwoo; Egami, T; Hong, Kunlun; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily; Liu, Yun; Porcar, L.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Smith, Sean C; Wu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique have been used to investigate the generation-5 (G5) polyelectrolyte polyamidoamine (PAMAM) starburst dendrimer with respect to its conformational dependence on counterion behavior at different levels of molecular charge. Satisfactory agreement is seen between the simulated results, such as the excess intra-dendrimer scattering length density (SLD) distribution and hydration level, and their experimental counterparts. The conformational evolution of charged dendrimer appears to be highly dependent on the association behavior of counterion. We explore the nature of the distribution of counterions around charged amines and qualitatively account for its sensitivity to the counterion valency on the difference of excess free energy. Moreover, via extending the concept of electrical double layer for compact charged colloids, we define an effective radius of charged dendrimer based on the spatial distribution of counterions in its vicinity. Within the same framework, the correlation between the strength of intra-dendrimer electrostatic repulsion and counterion valency and dynamics is also addressed.

  8. Investigation on surface molecular conformations and pervaporation performance of the poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zhennan; Wang, Xinping

    2009-05-01

    A simple method of changing pre-treatment temperature in the course of film formation was used to tune the surface structures of PVA membranes. Surface structure and property of the resulting membranes were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. The results show that PVA have different molecular conformations at the membrane surface while those membranes were prepared at different pre-treatment temperature. At higher pre-treatment temperatures, polar acetoxyl residues and hydroxyl groups of the PVA chains oriented in a more orderly fashion, as induced by the faster evaporation of water. When the membranes were in air, CH(3) groups adjacent to the acetoxyl groups covered the surface in order to minimize the surface free energy, while backbones of the PVA were rarely observed. These surfaces exhibited a hydrophilic nature upon contact with water due to rapid surface reconstruction. Conversely, at lower pre-treatment temperatures, the backbone CH(2) groups dominated the surface, forming a less hydrophilic surface. When the PVA membranes were employed to separate ethanol/water mixtures, it was found that the PVA membranes with more hydrophilic surface exhibited higher water selectivity. Our investigation indicates that molecular conformations on the membrane surface have considerable influence on pervaporation performance. PMID:19249794

  9. Prediction of enantiomeric selectivity in chromatography. Application of conformation-dependent and conformation-independent descriptors of molecular chirality.

    PubMed

    Aires-de-Sousa, João; Gasteiger, Johann

    2002-03-01

    In order to process molecular chirality by computational methods and to obtain predictions for properties that are influenced by chirality, a fixed-length conformation-dependent chirality code is introduced. The code consists of a set of molecular descriptors representing the chirality of a 3D molecular structure. It includes information about molecular geometry and atomic properties, and can distinguish between enantiomers, even if chirality does not result from chiral centers. The new molecular transform was applied to two datasets of chiral compounds, each of them containing pairs of enantiomers that had been separated by chiral chromatography. The elution order within each pair of isomers was predicted by means of Kohonen neural networks (NN) using the chirality codes as input. A previously described conformation-independent chirality code was also applied and the results were compared. In both applications clustering of the two classes of enantiomers (first eluted and last eluted enantiomers) could be successfully achieved by NN and accurate predictions could be obtained for independent test sets. The chirality code described here has a potential for a broad range of applications from stereoselective reactions to analytical chemistry and to the study of biological activity of chiral compounds. PMID:11885960

  10. Molecular simulations for the conformational assessment of a porphyrin-fullerene dyad in different environments.

    PubMed

    Tappura, Kirsi; Cramariuc, Oana; Hukka, Terttu I; Rantala, Tapio T

    2005-09-01

    Conformational space of a porphyrin-fullerene dyad with the donor and acceptor connected by a relatively flexible linker is studied by molecular dynamics simulations in both non-polar and polar solvents, as well as in vacuum. The most probable conformations obtained from the vacuum MD simulations were optimized with semi-empirical (SE) and density functional theory (DFT) methods and the extent of the structural changes is assessed. The computational results indicate the co-existence of different conformers in both polar and nonpolar solvents showing agreement with experimental results. The most probable vacuum conformations at 300 K are similar to the ones at 0 K, while the structures most often observed in the solvents show less compact conformations. Optimization with SE and DFT calculations leads to structures, which represent relatively well the folded conformations in solvent, which validates the electronic structure calculations relevant to describing photoinduced electron-transfer in H2P-O34-C60. PMID:16240023

  11. Temperature-induced dynamical conformational disorder in 4-vinyl benzoic acid molecular crystals: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Murugan, N Arul

    2005-09-01

    Extensive molecular simulations are carried out as a function of temperature to understand and quantify the conformational disorder in molecular crystals of 4-vinyl benzoic acid. The conformational disorder is found to be dynamic and associated with a flip-flop motion of vinyl groups. The population of minor conformer is less than 3% up to 300 K and is 13.2% at 350 K and these results are consistent with the experimental observations. At still higher temperatures, the population of minor conformer increases up to 25%. The evolution of structure at both molecular and unit-cell level of the molecular crystal as a function of temperature has been characterized by various quantities such as radial distribution functions, average cell parameters, volume, and interaction energies. The van't Hoff plot shows a nonlinear behavior at lower temperatures as it has been reported recently by Ogawa and co-workers in the case of stilbene, azobenzene, and N-(4-methylbenzylidene)-4-methylaniline molecular crystals. A set of rigid body simulations were also carried out to quantify the effect of conformational disorder on structural quantities such as unit-cell volume and interaction energy. The anomalous shrinkage of vinyl C=C bond length as a function of temperature has been explained by combining the results of simulations and a set of constrained optimizations using ab initio electronic structure calculations for various molecular structures differing in torsional angle. PMID:16164354

  12. Can chromatin conformation technologies bring light into human molecular pathology?

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Marta; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes involves many complex processes, in which chromatin structure plays an important role. In addition to the epigenetic effects, such as DNA methylation and phosphorylation or histone modifications, gene expression is also controlled by the spatial organization of chromatin. For example, distant regulatory elements (enhancers, insulators) may come into direct physical interaction with target genes or other regulatory elements located in genomic regions of up to several hundred kilobases in size. Such long-range interactions result in the formation of chromatin loops. In the last several years, there has been a rapid increase in our knowledge of the spatial organization of chromatin in the nucleus through the chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology. Here we review and compare the original 3C and 3C-based methods including chromosome conformation capture-on-chip (4C), chromosome conformation capture carbon copy (5C), hi-resolution chromosome confomation capture (HiC). In this article, we discuss different aspects of how the nuclear organization of chromatin is associated with gene expression regulation and how this knowledge is useful in translational medicine and clinical applications. We demonstrate that the knowledge of the chromatin 3D organization may help understand the mechanisms of gene expression regulation of genes involved in the development of human diseases, such as CFTR (responsible for cystic fibrosis) or IGFBP3 (associated with breast cancer pathogenesis). Additionally, 3C-derivative methods have been also useful in the diagnosis of some leukemia subtypes. PMID:26328275

  13. Vibrational modes and changing molecular conformation of perfluororubrene in thin films and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, F.; Scholz, R.; Gerlach, A.; Schreiber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of perfluororubrene (PF-RUB) in thin films on silicon wafers with a native oxide layer as well as on silicon wafers covered with a self-assembled monolayer and in dichloromethane solution. In comparison with computed Raman and IR spectra, we can assign the molecular modes and identify two molecular conformations with twisted and planar tetracene backbones of the molecule. Moreover, we employ Raman imaging techniques to study the morphology and distribution of the molecular conformation in PF-RUB thin films.

  14. Probing flexible conformations in molecular junctions by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Mingsen; Ye, Gui; Jiang, Jun; Cai, Shaohong; Sun, Guangyu

    2015-01-15

    The probe of flexible molecular conformation is crucial for the electric application of molecular systems. We have developed a theoretical procedure to analyze the couplings of molecular local vibrations with the electron transportation process, which enables us to evaluate the structural fingerprints of some vibrational modes in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Based on a model molecule of Bis-(4-mercaptophenyl)-ether with a flexible center angle, we have revealed and validated a simple mathematical relationship between IETS signals and molecular angles. Our results might open a route to quantitatively measure key geometrical parameters of molecular junctions, which helps to achieve precise control of molecular devices.

  15. New mechanistic insight in the thermal helix inversion of second-generation molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Klok, Martin; Walko, Martin; Geertsema, Edzard M; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of dibenzocyclohepten-5-ylidene as part of a unidirectional light-driven molecular motor allows a more complete picture of the pathway of thermal helix inversion to be developed. The most stable conformation is similar to that found in related motors in that it has, overall, an anti-folded structure with the substituent at the stereogenic centre adopting an axial orientation. Photochemical cis/trans isomerisation at -40 degrees C results in the formation of an isomer in a syn-folded conformation with the methyl group in an axial orientation. This contrasts with previous studies on related molecular rotary motors. The conformation of the higher energy intermediate typically observed for this class of compound is the anti-folded conformation, in which the methyl group is in an equatorial orientation. This conformation is available through an energetically uphill upper half ring inversion of the observed photochemical product. However, this pathway competes with a second process that leads to the more stable anti-folded conformation in which the methyl group is oriented axially. It has been shown that the conformations and pathways available for second-generation molecular motors can be described by using similar overall geometries. Differences in the metastable high-energy species are attributable to the relative energy and position on the reaction coordinate of the transition states. Kinetic studies on these new molecular motors thus provide important insights into the conformational dynamics of the rotation cycle. PMID:18979464

  16. Molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a natural neurotoxin from the star fruit: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the molecular structure and conformations of caramboxin, a neurotoxin recently isolated from the star fruit Averroha carambola. Among the seven conformers that exist within an energy window of ∼16.0 kcal/mol, two of them are the most favored ones with an energy difference of less than 2.0 kcal/mol. The computed chemical shifts of these two low-energy conformers are in good agreement with the experimental values determined in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide thus confirming the 2D chemical structure assigned to the neurotoxin. A topological analysis of the theoretical electronic charge density of four caramboxin conformers reveals the existence of intramolecular CH⋯O/N interactions which, in addition to the classical OH⋯O/N H-bonding interactions, contribute to decrease the conformational freedom of the neurotoxin.

  17. Influence of Molecular Solvation on the Conformation of Star Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Porcar, L.; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Smith, Gregory Scott; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    We have used neutron scattering to investigate the influence of concentration on the conformation of a star polymer. By varying the contrast between the solvent and isotopically labeled stars, we obtain the distributions of polymer and solvent within a star polymer from analysis of scattering data. A correlation between the local desolvation and the inward folding of star branches is discovered. From the perspective of thermodynamics, we find an analogy between the mechanism of polymer localization driven by solvent depletion and that of the hydrophobic collapse of polymers in solutions.

  18. Cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials: conformation, rearrangement, magnetism, and thermochromism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Tian, Yong-Hui; Kertesz, Prof. Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Cyclo-biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular materials with chair- and boat-conformations are studied by restricted and broken-symmetry DFT using the M06 family of meta-GGA functionals. The global minima of these molecular materials are magnetically silent due to the sigma-bond connecting the two phenalenyls, while the sigma-bond may undergo low-barrier sigmatropic rearrangements via pi-pi bonded paramagnetic intermediates. The validation of theory is performed for the chair-conformation by comparing the sigma-bonded structures and the rearrangement barriers with experimental data. The boat-conformation is then studied using the validated functional. The electronic spectra of both chair- and boat-conformations are calculated and their applications in thermochromism are discussed.

  19. A conformational study of N-tosyl oxazolidines using molecular mechanics and crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belvisi, Laura; Carugo, Oliviero; Poli, Giovanni

    1994-03-01

    The conformational behavior of (4 S,5 R)-4-methyl-5-phenyl-3- p-toluenesulfonyl oxazolidines has been investigated. This was accomplished by combining a comparative analysis of nine crystal structures with a molecular mechanics conformational search. The required parametrization of the sulfonamide group was achieved by the appropriate combination of ab initio derived parameters with specific geometric features extracted from the crystal structures.

  20. An NMR and molecular dynamics investigation of the avian prion hexarepeat conformational features in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Raiola, Luca; Muccioli, Luca; Tiberio, Giustiniano; Zannoni, Claudio; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla; Mendola, Diego La; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    The prion protein is a copper binding glycoprotein that in mammals can misfold into a pathogenic isoform leading to prion diseases, as opposed, surprisingly, to avians. The avian prion N-terminal tandem repeat is richer in prolines than the mammal one, and understanding their effect on conformation is of great biological importance. Here we succeeded in investigating the conformations of a single avian hexarepeat by means of NMR and molecular dynamics techniques. We found a high flexibility and a strong conformational dependence on pH: local turns are present at acidic and neutral pH, while unordered regions dominate at basic conditions.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of peptide conformations. These findings are consistent with experimental results, and give a molecular level interpretation for the reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to some extent upon graphene exposure. Meanwhile, this study provides some significant insights into the detailed mechanism of graphene-induced protein conformation transition.

  2. Molecular Clustering Interrelationships and Carbohydrate Conformation in Hull and Seeds Among Barley Cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    N Liu; P Yu

    2011-12-31

    The objective of this study was to use molecular spectral analyses with the diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT) bioanlytical technique to study carbohydrate conformation features, molecular clustering and interrelationships in hull and seed among six barley cultivars (AC Metcalfe, CDC Dolly, McLeod, CDC Helgason, CDC Trey, CDC Cowboy), which had different degradation kinetics in rumen. The molecular structure spectral analyses in both hull and seed involved the fingerprint regions of ca. 1536-1484 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to aromatic lignin semicircle ring stretch), ca. 1293-1212 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to cellulosic compounds in the hull), ca. 1269-1217 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to cellulosic compound in the seeds), and ca. 1180-800 cm{sup -1} (attributed mainly to total CHO C-O stretching vibrations) together with an agglomerative hierarchical cluster (AHCA) and principal component spectral analyses (PCA). The results showed that the DRIFT technique plus AHCA and PCA molecular analyses were able to reveal carbohydrate conformation features and identify carbohydrate molecular structure differences in both hull and seeds among the barley varieties. The carbohydrate molecular spectral analyses at the region of ca. 1185-800 cm{sup -1} together with the AHCA and PCA were able to show that the barley seed inherent structures exhibited distinguishable differences among the barley varieties. CDC Helgason had differences from AC Metcalfe, MeLeod, CDC Cowboy and CDC Dolly in carbohydrate conformation in the seed. Clear molecular cluster classes could be distinguished and identified in AHCA analysis and the separate ellipses could be grouped in PCA analysis. But CDC Helgason had no distinguished differences from CDC Trey in carbohydrate conformation. These carbohydrate conformation/structure difference could partially explain why the varieties were different in digestive behaviors in animals. The molecular spectroscopy

  3. Next-generation molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Aldape, Kenneth; Pfister, Stefan M

    2016-01-01

    The classification of brain tumors is based on the time-honored tradition of histologic examination, coupled with clinicopathologic correlation, and is based on the fundamental importance of microscopic morphologic interpretation. Supplementation by immunohistochemical markers is of substantial value to distinguish related entities and to confirm morphologic impressions. The use of techniques such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is also critical in specific situations. However, with these practices, it is clear that the use of state-of-the-art molecular techniques has great promise to add to classification to (1) reduce the subjectivity inherent in interobserver discordance, particularly with specific entities; and (2) elucidate the biologic diversity of entities that are not resolvable by routine methods. In this chapter, we discuss these possibilities, focusing on several tumor types affecting the central nervous system, including diffuse glioma and ependymoma. PMID:26948351

  4. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives.

  5. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Patil, Navinkumar J.; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  6. Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Kumar, Akshita; Sutanto, Clarinda N; Patil, Navinkumar J; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Amini, Shahrouz; Zappone, Bruno; Verma, Chandra; Miserez, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an adhesive primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus' assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant adhesives. PMID:26508080

  7. Fluctuation theory of molecular association and conformational equilibria

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuanfang; Smith, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    General expressions relating the effects of pressure, temperature, and composition on solute association and conformational equilibria using the fluctuation theory of solutions are provided. The expressions are exact and can be used to interpret experimental or computer simulation data for any multicomponent mixture involving molecules of any size and character at any composition. The relationships involve particle-particle, particle-energy, and energy-energy correlations within local regions in the vicinity of each species involved in the equilibrium. In particular, it is demonstrated that the results can be used to study peptide and protein association or aggregation, protein denaturation, and protein-ligand binding. Exactly how the relevant fluctuating properties may be obtained from experimental or computer simulation data are also outlined. It is shown that the enthalpy, heat capacity, and compressibility differences associated with the equilibrium process can, in principle, be obtained from a single simulation. Fluctuation based expressions for partial molar heat capacities, thermal expansions, and isothermal compressibilities are also provided. PMID:21744905

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of poly (ethylene oxide) hydration and conformation in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Udaya; Dormidontova, Elena

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most actively used polymers, especially in biomedical applications due to its high hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and potency to inhibit protein adsorption. PEO solubility and conformation in water depends on its capability to form hydrogen bonds. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations we investigated the details of water packing around PEO chain and characterized the type and lifetime of hydrogen bonds in aqueous and mixed solvent solutions. The observed polymer chain conformation varies from an extended coil in pure water to collapsed globule in hexane and a helical-like conformation in pure isobutyric acid or isobutyric acid -water mixture in agreement with experimental observations. We'll discuss the implications of protic solvent arrangement and stability of hydrogen bonds on PEO chain conformation and mobility. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  9. Artificial accelerators of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 facilitate rate-limiting conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Bettina K; Weiwad, Matthias; Rübbelke, Martin; Freiburger, Lee; Fischer, Gunter; Lorenz, Oliver R; Sattler, Michael; Richter, Klaus; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 undergoes an ATP-driven cycle of conformational changes in which large structural rearrangements precede ATP hydrolysis. Well-established small-molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 compete with ATP-binding. We wondered whether compounds exist that can accelerate the conformational cycle. In a FRET-based screen reporting on conformational rearrangements in Hsp90 we identified compounds. We elucidated their mode of action and showed that they can overcome the intrinsic inhibition in Hsp90 which prevents these rearrangements. The mode of action is similar to that of the co-chaperone Aha1 which accelerates the Hsp90 ATPase. However, while the two identified compounds influence conformational changes, they target different aspects of the structural transitions. Also, the binding site determined by NMR spectroscopy is distinct. This study demonstrates that small molecules are capable of triggering specific rate-limiting transitions in Hsp90 by mechanisms similar to those in protein cofactors. PMID:25244159

  10. Conformational analysis of environmental agents: use of X-ray crystallographic data to determine molecular reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Cody, V

    1985-01-01

    This paper explores the use of crystallographic techniques as an aid in understanding the molecular reactivities of a number of agents that are of concern to pharmacologists and toxicologists. The selected examples demonstrate the role of structural data in the determination of absolute configuration, configurational flexibility and active-site topology for a reactive species. For example, the role of absolute stereochemistry in understanding synthetic pyrethroid structure-activity relationships is shown from analysis of their crystal structures; conformational flexibility among DDT analogues, and the importance of conformational and electronic properties in phenylalkanoic acid herbicides are shown from systematic analysis of their crystal structures; and interpretation of active-site stereochemistry is made by study of computer modeling of enzyme inhibitors in the active sites of related protein crystal structures. Thus, the observed patterns in conformational flexibility and their resultant effects on substrate pharmacological profile can be interpreted in understanding the molecular level events that influence biological reactivity. PMID:3905372

  11. Better Informed Distance Geometry: Using What We Know To Improve Conformation Generation.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina; Landrum, Gregory A

    2015-12-28

    Small organic molecules are often flexible, i.e., they can adopt a variety of low-energy conformations in solution that exist in equilibrium with each other. Two main search strategies are used to generate representative conformational ensembles for molecules: systematic and stochastic. In the first approach, each rotatable bond is sampled systematically in discrete intervals, limiting its use to molecules with a small number of rotatable bonds. Stochastic methods, on the other hand, sample the conformational space of a molecule randomly and can thus be applied to more flexible molecules. Different methods employ different degrees of experimental data for conformer generation. So-called knowledge-based methods use predefined libraries of torsional angles and ring conformations. In the distance geometry approach, on the other hand, a smaller amount of empirical information is used, i.e., ideal bond lengths, ideal bond angles, and a few ideal torsional angles. Distance geometry is a computationally fast method to generate conformers, but it has the downside that purely distance-based constraints tend to lead to distorted aromatic rings and sp(2) centers. To correct this, the resulting conformations are often minimized with a force field, adding computational complexity and run time. Here we present an alternative strategy that combines the distance geometry approach with experimental torsion-angle preferences obtained from small-molecule crystallographic data. The torsional angles are described by a previously developed set of hierarchically structured SMARTS patterns. The new approach is implemented in the open-source cheminformatics library RDKit, and its performance is assessed by comparing the diversity of the generated ensemble and the ability to reproduce crystal conformations taken from the crystal structures of small molecules and protein-ligand complexes. PMID:26575315

  12. Molecular mechanics work station for protein conformational studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.; Levinthal, C.; Schoenborn, B.; Dimmier, G.; Rankowitz, C.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in computational problems in Biology has intensified over the last few years, partly due to the development of techniques for the rapid cloning, sequencing, and mutagenesis of genes from organisims ranging from E. coli to Man. The central dogma of molecular biology; that DNA codes for mRNA which codes for protein, has been understood in a linear programming sense since the genetic code was cracked. But what is not understood at present is how a protein, once assembled as a long sequence of amino acids, folds back on itself to produce a three-dimensional structure which is unique to that protein and which dictates its chemical and biological activity. This folding process is purely physics, and involves the time evolution of a system of several thousand atoms which interact with each other and with atoms from the surrounding solvent. Molecular dynamics simulations on smaller molecules suggest that approaches which treat the protein as a classical ensemble of atoms interacting with each other via an empirical Hamiltonian can yield the kind of predictive results one would like when applied to proteins.

  13. Probing the Conformation of FhaC with Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Frank; Lensink, Marc F.; Clantin, Bernard; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise; Villeret, Vincent; Ebel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Probing the solution structure of membrane proteins represents a formidable challenge, particularly when using small-angle scattering. Detergent molecules often present residual scattering contributions even at their match point in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. Here, we studied the conformation of FhaC, the outer-membrane, β-barrel transporter of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin adhesin. SANS measurements were performed on homogeneous solutions of FhaC solubilized in n-octyl-d17-βD-glucoside and on a variant devoid of the α helix H1, which critically obstructs the FhaC pore, in two solvent conditions corresponding to the match points of the protein and the detergent, respectively. Protein-bound detergent amounted to 142 ± 10 mol/mol as determined by analytical ultracentrifugation. By using molecular modeling and starting from three distinct conformations of FhaC and its variant embedded in lipid bilayers, we generated ensembles of protein-detergent arrangement models with 120–160 detergent molecules. The scattered curves were back-calculated for each model and compared with experimental data. Good fits were obtained for relatively compact, connected detergent belts, which occasionally displayed small detergent-free patches on the outer surface of the β barrel. The combination of SANS and modeling clearly enabled us to infer the solution structure of FhaC, with H1 inside the pore as in the crystal structure. We believe that our strategy of combining explicit atomic detergent modeling with SANS measurements has significant potential for structural studies of other detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. PMID:24988353

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26766517

  15. Equilibrium conformational dynamics in an RNA tetraloop from massively parallel molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Allison J.; Thompson, Erik J.; Patel, Sarav S.; Haldeman, Kristin; Sorin, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Conformational equilibrium within the ubiquitous GNRA tetraloop motif was simulated at the ensemble level, including 10 000 independent all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories totaling over 110 µs of simulation time. This robust sampling reveals a highly dynamic structure comprised of 15 conformational microstates. We assemble a Markov model that includes transitions ranging from the nanosecond to microsecond timescales and is dominated by six key loop conformations that contribute to fluctuations around the native state. Mining of the Protein Data Bank provides an abundance of structures in which GNRA tetraloops participate in tertiary contact formation. Most predominantly observed in the experimental data are interactions of the native loop structure within the minor groove of adjacent helical regions. Additionally, a second trend is observed in which the tetraloop assumes non-native conformations while participating in multiple tertiary contacts, in some cases involving multiple possible loop conformations. This tetraloop flexibility can act to counterbalance the energetic penalty associated with assuming non-native loop structures in forming tertiary contacts. The GNRA motif has thus evolved not only to readily participate in simple tertiary interactions involving native loop structure, but also to easily adapt tetraloop secondary conformation in order to participate in larger, more complex tertiary interactions. PMID:20223768

  16. Conformational diversity of bacterial FabH: implications for molecular recognition specificity.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Anuradha; Johnson, Michael E

    2015-02-01

    The molecular basis of variable substrate and inhibitor specificity of the highly conserved bacterial fatty acid synthase enzyme, FabH, across different bacterial species remains poorly understood. In the current work, we explored the conformational diversity of FabH enzymes to understand the determinants of diverse interaction specificity across Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal that FabH from E. coli and E. faecalis exhibit distinct native state conformational ensembles and dynamic behaviors. Despite strikingly similar substrate binding pockets, hot spot assessment using computational solvent mapping identified quite different favorable binding interactions between the two homologs. Our data suggest that FabH utilizes protein dynamics and seemingly minor sequence and structural differences to modulate its molecular recognition and substrate specificity across bacterial species. These insights will potentially facilitate the rational design and development of antibacterial inhibitors against FabH enzymes. PMID:25437098

  17. Theoretical studies on the molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durlak, Piotr; Berski, Sławomir; Latajka, Zdzisław

    2016-01-01

    The molecular structure, conformational preferences, topological and vibrational analysis of allicin has been investigated at two different approaches. Calculations have been carried out on static (DFT and MP2) levels with an assortment of Dunning's basis sets and dynamic CPMD simulations. In this both case within the isolated molecule approximation. The results point out that at least twenty different conformers coexist on the PES as confirmed by the flexible character of this molecule. The topological analysis of ELF showed very similar nature of the Ssbnd S and Ssbnd O bonds. The infrared spectrum has been calculated, and a comparative vibrational analysis has been performed.

  18. DFT molecular modeling and NMR conformational analysis of a new longipinenetriolone diester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M.; Guerra-Ramírez, Diana; Román-Marín, Luisa U.; Hernández-Hernández, Juan D.; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2006-05-01

    The structure and conformational behavior of the new natural compound (4 R,5 S,7 S,8 R,9 S,10 R,11 R)-longipin-2-en-7,8,9-triol-1-one 7-angelate-9-isovalerate (1) isolated from Stevia eupatoria, were studied by molecular modeling and NMR spectroscopy. A Monte Carlo search followed by DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G* level provided the theoretical conformations of the sesquiterpene framework, which were in full agreement with results derived from the 1H- 1H coupling constant analysis.

  19. Conformers, infrared spectrum, UV-induced photochemistry, and near-IR-induced generation of two rare conformers of matrix-isolated phenylglycine

    SciTech Connect

    Borba, Ana Fausto, Rui; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2014-10-21

    The conformational space of α-phenylglycine (PG) have been investigated theoretically at both the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) levels of approximation. Seventeen different minima were found on the investigated potential energy surfaces, which are characterized by different dominant intramolecular interactions: type I conformers are stabilized by hydrogen bonds of the type N–H···O=C, type II by a strong O–H···N hydrogen bond, type III by weak N–H···O–H hydrogen bonds, and type IV by a C=O···H–C contact. The calculations indicate also that entropic effects are relevant in determining the equilibrium populations of the conformers of PG in the gas phase, in particular in the case of conformers of type II, where the strong intramolecular O–H···N hydrogen bond considerably diminishes entropy by reducing the conformational mobility of the molecule. In consonance with the relative energies of the conformers and barriers for conformational interconversion, only 3 conformers of PG were observed for the compound isolated in cryogenic Ar, Xe, and N{sub 2} matrices: the conformational ground state (ICa), and forms ICc and IITa. All other significantly populated conformers existing in the gas phase prior to deposition convert either to conformer ICa or to conformer ICc during matrix deposition. The experimental observation of ICc had never been achieved hitherto. Narrowband near-IR irradiation of the first overtone of νOH vibrational mode of ICa and ICc in nitrogen matrices (at 6910 and 6930 cm{sup −1}, respectively) led to selective generation of two additional conformers of high-energy, ITc and ITa, respectively, which were also observed experimentally for the first time. In addition, these experiments also provided the key information for the detailed vibrational characterization of the 3 conformers initially present in the matrices. On the other hand, UV irradiation (λ = 255 nm) of PG isolated in a xenon matrix revealed that

  20. S-Shaped Conformation of the Quaterthiophene Molecular Backbone in Two-Dimensional Bisterpyridine-Derivative Self-Assembled Nanoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Yann; Shilova, Ekaterina; Latil, Sylvain; Jousselme, Bruno; Silly, Fabien

    2015-12-15

    The conformation and the two-dimensional self-assembly of 4'-(3',4″-dihexyloxy-5,2':5',2″:5″,2‴-quaterthien-2,5‴-diyl)-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) molecules are theoretically and experimentally investigated. This molecular building block forms a hydrogen-bonded chiral supramolecular nanoarchitecture on graphite at the solid/liquid interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that the molecule adopts an S-shaped conformation in this structure. DFTB+ calculations reveal that this conformation is not the lowest-energy conformation. The molecular nanoarchitecture appears to be stabilized by hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals interactions. I-, L-, and D-shaped molecular conformations are, however, locally observed at the domain boundary, but these conformations do not self-assemble into organized 2D structures. PMID:26624809

  1. CENCALC: a computational tool for conformational entropy calculations from molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ernesto; Díaz, Natalia; Méndez, Jefferson; Suárez, Dimas

    2013-09-01

    We present the CENCALC software that has been designed to estimate the conformational entropy of single molecules from extended Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations in the gas-phase or in solution. CENCALC uses both trajectory coordinates and topology information in order to characterize the conformational states of the molecule of interest by discretizing the time evolution of internal rotations. The implemented entropy methods are based on the mutual information expansion, which is built upon the converged probability density functions of the individual torsion angles, pairs of torsions, triads, and so on. Particularly, the correlation-corrected multibody local approximation selects an optimum cutoff in order to retrieve the maximum amount of genuine correlation from a given MD trajectory. We illustrate these capabilities by carrying out conformational entropy calculations for a decapeptide molecule either in its unbound form or in complex with a metalloprotease enzyme. CENCALC is distributed under the GNU public license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/cencalc/. PMID:24046838

  2. Molecular modeling of the conformational dynamics of the cellular prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Charles; Colling, Ian; Bartz, Jason; Soto, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Prions are infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a type of fatal neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Prions propagate biological information by conversion of the non-pathological version of the prion protein to the infectious conformation, PrPSc. A wealth of knowledge has shed light on the nature and mechanism of prion protein conversion. In spite of the significance of this problem, we are far from fully understanding the conformational dynamics of the cellular isoform. To remedy this situation we employ multiple biomolecular modeling techniques such as docking and molecular dynamics simulations to map the free energy landscape and determine what specific regions of the prion protein are most conductive to binding. The overall goal is to characterize the conformational dynamics of the cell form of the prion protein, PrPc, to gain insight into inhibition pathways against misfolding. NE EPSCoR FIRST Award to Patricia Soto.

  3. Modeling conformational transitions in kinases by molecular dynamics simulations: achievements, difficulties, and open challenges

    PubMed Central

    D'Abramo, Marco; Besker, Neva; Chillemi, Giovanni; Grottesi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases work because their flexibility allows to continuously switch from inactive to active form. Despite the large number of structures experimentally determined in such states, the mechanism of their conformational transitions as well as the transition pathways are not easily to capture. In this regard, computational methods can help to shed light on such an issue. However, due to the intrinsic sampling limitations, much efforts have been done to model in a realistic way the conformational changes occurring in protein kinases. In this review we will address the principal biological achievements and structural aspects in studying kinases conformational transitions and will focus on the main challenges related to computational approaches such as molecular modeling and MD simulations. PMID:24860596

  4. Effect of Na+ binding on the conformation, stability and molecular recognition properties of thrombin

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Vincenzo; De Dea, Elisa; Lucatello, Filippo; Frasson, Roberta

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of Na+ binding on the conformational, stability and molecular recognition properties of thrombin was investigated. The binding of Na+ reduces the CD signal in the far-UV region, while increasing the intensity of the near-UV CD and fluorescence spectra. These spectroscopic changes have been assigned to perturbations in the environment of aromatic residues at the level of the S2 and S3 sites, as a result of global rigidification of the thrombin molecule. Indeed, the Na+-bound form is more stable to urea denaturation than the Na+-free form by ∼2 kcal/mol (1 cal≡4.184 J). Notably, the effects of cation binding on thrombin conformation and stability are specific to Na+ and parallel the affinity order of univalent cations for the enzyme. The Na+-bound form is even more resistant to limited proteolysis by subtilisin, at the level of the 148-loop, which is suggestive of the more rigid conformation this segment assumes in the ‘fast’ form. Finally, we have used hirudin fragment 1–47 as a molecular probe of the conformation of thrombin recognition sites in the fast and ‘slow’ form. From the effects of amino acid substitutions on the affinity of fragment 1–47 for the enzyme allosteric forms, we concluded that the specificity sites of thrombin in the Na+-bound form are in a more open and permissible conformation, compared with the more closed structure they assume in the slow form. Taken together, our results indicate that the binding of Na+ to thrombin serves to stabilize the enzyme into a more open and rigid conformation. PMID:15971999

  5. Molecular mechanics approach for design and conformational studies of macrocyclic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohini, Akbar, Rifat; Kanungo, B. K.

    2015-08-01

    Computational Chemistry has revolutionized way of viewing molecules at the quantum mechanical scale by allowing simulating various chemical scenarios that are not possible to study in a laboratory. The remarkable applications of computational chemistry have promoted to design and test of the effectiveness of various methods for searching the conformational space of highly flexible molecules. In this context, we conducted a series of optimization and conformational searches on macrocyclic based ligands, 9N3Me5Ox, (1,4,7-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) and 12N3Me5Ox, (1,5,9-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,5,9-triazacyclododecane) and studied their selectivity and coordination behavior with some lanthanide metal ions in molecular mechanics and semiempirical methods. The methods include both systematic and random conformational searches for dihedral angles, torsion angles and Cartesian coordinates. Structural studies were carried out by using geometry optimization, coordination scans and electronic properties were evaluated. The results clearly show that chair-boat conformational isomer of 9N3Me5Ox ligand is more stable due to lower eclipsing ethane interaction and form stronger adduct complexes with lanthanide metal ion. This is because of the fact that, in a central unit of 9N3 of the ligand form six endo type bonds out of nine. The rest of bonds have trans conformation. In contrast, for the adduct of 12N3Me5Ox, two C-C bonds have on eclipsed conformation, and others have synclinal and antiperiplanar confirmations. The distortion of the two eclipsed conformations may affect the yields and the stability of the complexes.

  6. Molecular mechanics approach for design and conformational studies of macrocyclic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Rohini,; Akbar, Rifat; Kanungo, B. K.

    2015-08-28

    Computational Chemistry has revolutionized way of viewing molecules at the quantum mechanical scale by allowing simulating various chemical scenarios that are not possible to study in a laboratory. The remarkable applications of computational chemistry have promoted to design and test of the effectiveness of various methods for searching the conformational space of highly flexible molecules. In this context, we conducted a series of optimization and conformational searches on macrocyclic based ligands, 9N3Me5Ox, (1,4,7-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) and 12N3Me5Ox, (1,5,9-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,5,9-triazacyclododecane) and studied their selectivity and coordination behavior with some lanthanide metal ions in molecular mechanics and semiempirical methods. The methods include both systematic and random conformational searches for dihedral angles, torsion angles and Cartesian coordinates. Structural studies were carried out by using geometry optimization, coordination scans and electronic properties were evaluated. The results clearly show that chair-boat conformational isomer of 9N3Me5Ox ligand is more stable due to lower eclipsing ethane interaction and form stronger adduct complexes with lanthanide metal ion. This is because of the fact that, in a central unit of 9N3 of the ligand form six endo type bonds out of nine. The rest of bonds have trans conformation. In contrast, for the adduct of 12N3Me5Ox, two C-C bonds have on eclipsed conformation, and others have synclinal and antiperiplanar confirmations. The distortion of the two eclipsed conformations may affect the yields and the stability of the complexes.

  7. Molecular structure and conformational preferences of gaseous 1-iodo-1-silacyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, A. V.; Baskakov, A. A.; Berger, R. J. F.; Mitzel, N. W.; Oberhammer, H.; Arnason, I.; Wallevik, S. Ò.

    2012-03-01

    The molecular structure of the axial and equatorial conformers of 1-iodo-1-silacyclohexane, CH2(CH2CH2)2SiH-I, as well as thermodynamic equilibrium between these species were investigated by means of gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) and quantum chemical calculations up to MP2(full)/SDB-AUG-CC-pVTZ level of theory (MP2). According to electron diffraction data, the vapor of this compound comprises a mixture of conformers with chair conformation and Cs symmetry differing in the axial and equatorial position of the Si-I bond (axial = 73(7) mol%/equatorial = 27(7) mol%) at T = 352 K. This corresponds to a free energy difference of A = -0.59(22) kcal mol-1. The observed gas-phase electron diffraction parameters are in good agreement with those obtained from theory. NBO analysis revealed that axial conformer of 1-iodo-1-silacyclohexane is an example for electrostatic stabilization of a conformer which is unfavorable in terms of steric and conjugation interaction.

  8. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study of dissociative electron attachment to dialanine conformers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wen-Ling; Tian, Shan Xi

    2015-03-12

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) processes of six low-lying conformers (1-6) of dialanine in the gas phase are investigated by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The incoming electron is captured and primarily occupies the virtual molecular orbital π*, which is followed by the different dissociation processes. The electron attachments to conformers 1 and 2 having the stronger N-H···N and O-H···O intramolecular hydrogen bonds do not lead to fragmentations, but two different backbone bonds are broken in the DEAs to conformers 3 (or 4) and 6, respectively. It is interesting that the hydrogen abstraction of -NH from the terminal methyl group -CH3 is found in the roaming dissociation of the temporary anion of conformer 3. The present simulations enable us to have more insights into the peptide backbone bond breaks in the DEA process and demonstrate a promising way toward understanding of the radiation damages of complicated biological system. PMID:25679256

  9. Conformational Changes in Acetylcholine Binding Protein Investigated by Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad Hosseini Naveh, Zeynab; Malliavin, Therese E.; Maragliano, Luca; Cottone, Grazia; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies available on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, a complete account of the mechanistic aspects of their gating transition in response to ligand binding still remains elusive. As a first step toward dissecting the transition mechanism by accelerated sampling techniques, we study the ligand-induced conformational changes of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a widely accepted model for the full receptor extracellular domain. Using unbiased Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (TAMD) simulations we investigate the AChBP transition between the apo and the agonist-bound state. In long standard MD simulations, both conformations of the native protein are stable, while the agonist-bound structure evolves toward the apo one if the orientation of few key sidechains in the orthosteric cavity is modified. Conversely, TAMD simulations initiated from the native conformations are able to produce the spontaneous transition. With respect to the modified conformations, TAMD accelerates the transition by at least a factor 10. The analysis of some specific residue-residue interactions points out that the transition mechanism is based on the disruption/formation of few key hydrogen bonds. Finally, while early events of ligand dissociation are observed already in standard MD, TAMD accelerates the ligand detachment and, at the highest TAMD effective temperature, it is able to produce a complete dissociation path in one AChBP subunit. PMID:24551117

  10. Conformation of the umifenovir cation in the molecular and crystal structures of four carboxylic acid salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orola, Liana; Sarcevica, Inese; Kons, Artis; Actins, Andris; Veidis, Mikelis V.

    2014-01-01

    The umifenovir salts of maleic, salicylic, glutaric, and gentisic acid as well as the chloroform solvate of the salicylate were prepared. Single crystals of the five compounds were obtained and their molecular and crystal structures determined by X-ray diffraction. In each structure the conformation of phenyl ring with respect to the indole group of the umifenovir moiety is different. The water solubility and melting points of the studied umifenovir salts have been determined.

  11. Improved ligand binding energies derived from molecular dynamics: replicate sampling enhances the search of conformational space.

    PubMed

    Adler, Marc; Beroza, Paul

    2013-08-26

    Does a single molecular trajectory provide an adequate sample conformational space? Our calculations indicate that for Molecular Mechanics--Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) measurement of protein ligand binding, a single molecular dynamics trajectory does not provide a representative sampling of phase space. For a single trajectory, the binding energy obtained by averaging over a number of molecular dynamics frames in an equilibrated system will converge after an adequate simulation time. A separate trajectory with nearly identical starting coordinates (1% randomly perturbed by 0.001 Å), however, can lead to a significantly different calculated binding energy. Thus, even though the calculated energy converges for a single molecular dynamics run, the variation across separate runs implies that a single run inadequately samples the system. The divergence in the trajectories is reflected in the individual energy components, such as the van der Waals and the electrostatics terms. These results indicate that the trajectories sample different conformations that are not in rapid exchange. Extending the length of the dynamics simulation does not resolve the energy differences observed between different trajectories. By averaging over multiple simulations, each with a nearly equivalent starting structure, we find the standard deviation in the calculated binding energy to be ∼1.3 kcal/mol. The work presented here indicates that combining MM-PBSA with multiple samples of the initial starting coordinates will produce more precise and accurate estimates of protein/ligand affinity. PMID:23845109

  12. Spreading of Polymer Films at the Molecular Scale: Conformation, Orientation, and Fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Michael; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Sheiko, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Previously, we have reported that comb-like polymer macromolecules undergo a plug-flow with an insignificant contribution of molecular diffusion (Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 206103, 2004). It was also suggested that the composition of the flowing polymer melt was the same both inside the fluid reservoir (drop) and in the precursor film. This work called into question the macroscopic picture of polymer spreading. Through molecular imaging by AFM, we observe that macromolecules spread at different velocities depending on their size. We show that flow causes the molecules to align perpendicular to the flow direction We have also identified specific molecular conformations, such as hairpins, that become more abundant in spreading films. Lastly, we demonstrate that chain entanglements hinder permeation of long macromolecules from the drop to precursor film. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanism of spreading of polymer melts on natural, i.e. heterogeneous, substrates.

  13. Conformation study of ɛ-cyclodextrin: Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Khuntawee, Wasinee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Wolschann, Peter; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Kungwan, Nawee; Okumura, Hisashi; Hannongbua, Supot

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in large-ring cyclodextrins (LR-CDs) which are known to be good host molecules for larger ligands. The isolation of a defined size LR-CD is an essential prerequisite for studying their structural properties. Unfortunately the purification procedure of these substances turned out to be very laborious. Finally the problem could be circumvented by a theoretical consideration: the highly advantageous replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation (particularly suitable for studies of conformational changes) offers an ideal approach for studying the conformational change of ɛ-cyclodextrin (CD10), a smaller representative of LR-CDs. Three carbohydrate force fields and three solvent models were tested. The conformational behavior of CD10 was analyzed in terms of the flip (turn) of the glucose subunits within the macrocyclic ring. In addition a ranking of conformations with various numbers of turns was preformed. Our findings might be also helpful in the temperature controlled synthesis of LR-CDs as well as other experimental conditions, in particular for the host-guest reaction. PMID:26877001

  14. Ab initio computational studies on molecular conformation of N-methyl-glyphosate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliannan, P.; Naseer Ali, M. Mohamed; Venuvanalingam, P.

    Conformational analysis of N-methyl-glyphosate has been carried out using an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) method at the HF/3-21G* levels of theory and the results are compared with the results of a previously studied compound, namely glyphosate. The potential energy surface of the molecule obtained by varying the central torsion angles (Φ, Ψ) was investigated in detail. Fourteen conformers with 5 kcal mol-1 energy cut-off have been selected from the potential energy surface for geometry optimization to locate the true minimum on the conformational space. The minimum has been found to be at (-62°, 110°) for the central torsion angles. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bond interactions (O-H···O and C-H···O) and the interactions due to protons nearer to each other. This cationic field leads to the formation of a hydrophobic patch in this structure, as well as in the structures closer to the global minimum. This patch may destabilize the favourable interaction of N-methyl-glyphosate with the surrounding amino acid residues in the binding cavity as they form the cationic field throughout the glyphosate binding region.

  15. Major Ampullate Spider Silk with Indistinguishable Spidroin Dope Conformations Leads to Different Fiber Molecular Structures.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Justine; Lefèvre, Thierry; Auger, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    To plentifully benefit from its properties (mechanical, optical, biological) and its potential to manufacture green materials, the structure of spider silk has to be known accurately. To this aim, the major ampullate (MA) silk of Araneus diadematus (AD) and Nephila clavipes (NC) has been compared quantitatively in the liquid and fiber states using Raman spectromicroscopy. The data show that the spidroin conformations of the two dopes are indistinguishable despite their specific amino acid composition. This result suggests that GlyGlyX and GlyProGlyXX amino acid motifs (X = Leu, Glu, Tyr, Ser, etc.) are conformationally equivalent due to the chain flexibility in the aqueous environment. Species-related sequence specificity is expressed more extensively in the fiber: the β-sheet content is lower and width of the orientation distribution of the carbonyl groups is broader for AD (29% and 58°, respectively) as compared to NC (37% and 51°, respectively). β-Sheet content values are close to the proportion of polyalanine segments, suggesting that β-sheet formation is mainly dictated by the spidroin sequence. The extent of molecular alignment seems to be related to the presence of proline (Pro) that may decrease conformational flexibility and inhibit chain extension and alignment upon drawing. It appears that besides the presence of Pro, secondary structure and molecular orientation contribute to the different mechanical properties of MA threads. PMID:27548146

  16. Major Ampullate Spider Silk with Indistinguishable Spidroin Dope Conformations Leads to Different Fiber Molecular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Justine; Lefèvre, Thierry; Auger, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    To plentifully benefit from its properties (mechanical, optical, biological) and its potential to manufacture green materials, the structure of spider silk has to be known accurately. To this aim, the major ampullate (MA) silk of Araneus diadematus (AD) and Nephila clavipes (NC) has been compared quantitatively in the liquid and fiber states using Raman spectromicroscopy. The data show that the spidroin conformations of the two dopes are indistinguishable despite their specific amino acid composition. This result suggests that GlyGlyX and GlyProGlyXX amino acid motifs (X = Leu, Glu, Tyr, Ser, etc.) are conformationally equivalent due to the chain flexibility in the aqueous environment. Species-related sequence specificity is expressed more extensively in the fiber: the β-sheet content is lower and width of the orientation distribution of the carbonyl groups is broader for AD (29% and 58°, respectively) as compared to NC (37% and 51°, respectively). β-Sheet content values are close to the proportion of polyalanine segments, suggesting that β-sheet formation is mainly dictated by the spidroin sequence. The extent of molecular alignment seems to be related to the presence of proline (Pro) that may decrease conformational flexibility and inhibit chain extension and alignment upon drawing. It appears that besides the presence of Pro, secondary structure and molecular orientation contribute to the different mechanical properties of MA threads. PMID:27548146

  17. Imatinib (Gleevec@) conformations observed in single crystals, protein-Imatinib co-crystals and molecular dynamics: Implications for drug selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golzarroshan, B.; Siddegowda, M. S.; Li, Hong qi; Yathirajan, H. S.; Narayana, B.; Rathore, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    Structure and dynamics of the Leukemia drug, Imatinib, were examined using X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics studies. Comparison of conformations observed in single crystals with several reported co-crystals of protein-drug complexes suggests existence of two conserved conformations of Imatinib, extended and compact (or folded), corresponding to two binding modes of interaction with the receptor. Furthermore, these conformations are conserved throughout a dynamics simulation. The present study attempts to draw a parallel on conformations and binding patterns of interactions, obtained from small-molecule single-crystal and macromolecule co-crystal studies, and provides structural insights for understanding the high selectivity of this drug molecule.

  18. Development of a sensor to study the DNA conformation using molecular logic gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpan Datta; Dey, Dibyendu; Saha, Jaba; Chakraborty, Santanu; Bhattacharjee, D.; Hussain, Syed Arshad

    2015-02-01

    This communication reports our investigations on the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two laser dyes Acriflavine and Rhodamine B in absence and presence of DNA at different pH. It has been observed that energy transfer efficiency is largely affected by the presence of DNA as well as the pH of the system. It is well known that with increase in pH, DNA conformation changes from double stranded to single stranded (denaturation) and finally form random coil. Based on our experimental results two different types of molecular logic gates namely, XOR and OR logic have been demonstrated which can be used to have an idea about DNA conformation in solution.

  19. Conformational features of an actuator containing calix[4]arene and thiophene: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zanuy, David; Casanovas, Jordi; Aleman, Carlos

    2006-05-25

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for poly(calix[4]arene bis(bithiophene)) in dichloromethane solution. This material responds to its electronic structure variations with significant conformational changes, producing contraction-expansion movements. Simulations have been performed for the three states of this molecular actuator (reduced, oxidized-nondeprotonated, and oxidized-deprotonated), a specific force-field being developed for each case. Results, which are fully consistent with previous ab initio quantum mechanical calculations on an isolated actuating unit, have revealed important findings about the dynamics of the system. Analyses of the flexibility/rigidity of the molecular chain with the state, the interaction of the polymer with the solvent molecules and the influence of environmental factors (as the viscosity of solvent, the counterions and the thermal agitation) on the dynamics have provided important insights to the actuation mechanism. PMID:16706442

  20. Designing Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Shift Populations of the Conformational States of Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Aykut, Ayse Ozlem; Atilgan, Ali Rana; Atilgan, Canan

    2013-01-01

    We elucidate the mechanisms that lead to population shifts in the conformational states of calcium-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM). We design extensive molecular dynamics simulations to classify the effects that are responsible for adopting occupied conformations available in the ensemble of NMR structures. Electrostatic interactions amongst the different regions of the protein and with its vicinal water are herein mediated by lowering the ionic strength or the pH. Amino acid E31, which is one of the few charged residues whose ionization state is highly sensitive to pH differences in the physiological range, proves to be distinctive in its control of population shifts. E31A mutation at low ionic strength results in a distinct change from an extended to a compact Ca2+-CaM conformation within tens of nanoseconds, that otherwise occur on the time scales of microseconds. The kinked linker found in this particular compact form is observed in many of the target-bound forms of Ca2+-CaM, increasing the binding affinity. This mutation is unique in controlling C-lobe dynamics by affecting the fluctuations between the EF-hand motif helices. We also monitor the effect of the ionic strength on the conformational multiplicity of Ca2+-CaM. By lowering the ionic strength, the tendency of nonspecific anions in water to accumulate near the protein surface increases, especially in the vicinity of the linker. The change in the distribution of ions in the vicinal layer of water allows N- and C- lobes to span a wide variety of relative orientations that are otherwise not observed at physiological ionic strength. E31 protonation restores the conformations associated with physiological environmental conditions even at low ionic strength. PMID:24339763

  1. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics and Protein Conformational Change: A Theoretical and Practical Guide Using a Membrane Embedded Model Neurotransmitter Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Gedeon, Patrick C.; Thomas, James R.; Madura, Jeffry D.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation provides a powerful and accurate method to model protein conformational change, yet timescale limitations often prevent direct assessment of the kinetic properties of interest. A large number of molecular dynamic steps are necessary for rare events to occur, which allow a system to overcome energy barriers and conformationally transition from one potential energy minimum to another. For many proteins, the energy landscape is further complicated by a multitude of potential energy wells, each separated by high free-energy barriers and each potentially representative of a functionally important protein conformation. To overcome these obstacles, accelerated molecular dynamics utilizes a robust bias potential function to simulate the transition between different potential energy minima. This straightforward approach more efficiently samples conformational space in comparison to classical molecular dynamics simulation, does not require advanced knowledge of the potential energy landscape and converges to the proper canonical distribution. Here, we review the theory behind accelerated molecular dynamics and discuss the approach in the context of modeling protein conformational change. As a practical example, we provide a detailed, step-by-step explanation of how to perform an accelerated molecular dynamics simulation using a model neurotransmitter transporter embedded in a lipid cell membrane. Changes in protein conformation of relevance to the substrate transport cycle are then examined using principle component analysis. PMID:25330967

  2. Adsorption mechanisms of microcystin variant conformations at water-mineral interfaces: A molecular modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    Pochodylo, Amy L; Aoki, Thalia G; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2016-10-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are potent toxins released during cyanobacterial blooms. Clay minerals are implicated in trapping MCs within soil particles in surface waters and sediments. In the absence of molecular characterization, the relevance of previously proposed adsorption mechanisms is lacking. Towards obtaining this characterization, we conducted Monte Carlo simulations combined with molecular dynamics relaxation of two MC variants, MC-leucine-arginine (MC-LR) and MC-leucine-alanine (MC-LA), adsorbed on hydrated montmorillonite with different electrolytes. The resulting adsorbate structures revealed how MC conformations and aqueous conditions dictate binding interactions at the mineral surface. Electrostatic coupling between the arginine residue and a carboxylate in MC-LR excluded the participation of arginine in mediating adsorption on montmorillonite in a NaCl solution. However, in a CaCl2 solution, the complexation of Ca by two carboxylate moieties in MC-LR changed the MC conformation, which allowed arginine to mediate electrostatic interaction with the mineral. By contrast, due to the lack of arginine in MC-LA, complexation of Ca by only one carboxylate in MC-LA was required to favor Ca-bridging interaction with the mineral. Multiple water-bridged H-bonding interactions were also important in anchoring MCs at the mineral surface. Our modeling results offer molecular insights into the structural and chemical factors that can control the fate of MCs at water-mineral interfaces. PMID:27433998

  3. Electron transport in asymmetric biphenyl molecular junctions: effects of conformation and molecule-electrode distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Sweta; Srivastava, Pankaj; Pattanaik, Manisha; Jain, Sandeep Kumar

    2014-09-01

    On the basis of ab-initio calculations, we predict the effect of conformation and molecule-electrode distance on transport properties of asymmetric molecular junctions for different electrode materials M (M = Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt). The asymmetry in these junctions is created by connecting one end of the biphenyl molecule to conjugated double thiol (model A) and single thiol (model B) groups, while the other end to Cu atom. A variety of phenomena viz. rectification, negative differential resistance (NDR), switching has been observed that can be controlled by tailoring the interface state properties through molecular conformation and molecule-electrode distance for various M. These properties are further analyzed by calculating transmission spectra, molecular orbitals, and orbital energy. It is found that Cu electrode shows significantly enhanced rectifying performance with change in torsion angles, as well as with increase in molecule-electrode distances than Au and Ag electrodes. Moreover, Pt electrode manifests distinctive multifunctional behavior combining switch, diode, and NDR. Thus, the Pt electrode is suggested to be a good potential candidate for a novel multifunctional electronic device. Our findings are compared with available experimental and theoretical results. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://http//dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2014-50133-2

  4. Molecular Neuroanatomy: A Generation of Progress

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Jonathan D.; Wu, Da-Yu; Satterlee, John

    2014-01-01

    The neuroscience research landscape has changed dramatically over the past decade. An impressive array of neuroscience tools and technologies have been generated, including brain gene expression atlases, genetically encoded proteins to monitor and manipulate neuronal activity and function, cost effective genome sequencing, new technologies enabling genome manipulation, new imaging methods and new tools for mapping neuronal circuits. However, despite these technological advances, several significant scientific challenges must be overcome in the coming decade to enable a better understanding of brain function and to develop next generation cell type-targeted therapeutics to treat brain disorders. For example, we do not have an inventory of the different types of cells that exist in the brain, nor do we know how to molecularly phenotype them. We also lack robust technologies to map connections between cells. This review will provide an overview of some of the tools and technologies neuroscientists are currently using to move the field of molecular neuroanatomy forward and also discuss emerging technologies that may enable neuroscientists to address these critical scientific challenges over the coming decade. PMID:24388609

  5. Quantitative Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Surfaces and Interfaces: Lineshape, Polarization and Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfei; Velarde, Luis; Gan, Wei; Fu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) can provide detailed information and understanding of molecular vibrational spectroscopy, orientational and conformational structure, and interactions of molecular surfaces and interfaces, through quantitative measurement and analysis. In this review, we present the current status and discuss the main developments on the measurement of intrinsic SFG spectral lineshape, formulations for polarization measurement and orientation analysis of the SFG-VS spectra. The main focus is to present a coherent formulation and discuss the main concepts or issues that can help to make SFG-VS a quantitative analytical and research tool in revealing the chemistry and physics of complex molecular surface and interface.

  6. Divalent Ion Dependent Conformational Changes in an RNA Stem-Loop Observed by Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We compare the performance of five magnesium (Mg2+) ion models in simulations of an RNA stem loop which has an experimentally determined divalent ion dependent conformational shift. We show that despite their differences in parametrization and resulting van der Waals terms, including differences in the functional form of the nonbonded potential, when the RNA adopts its folded conformation, all models behave similarly across ten independent microsecond length simulations with each ion model. However, when the entire structure ensemble is accounted for, chelation of Mg2+ to RNA is seen in three of the five models, most egregiously and likely artifactual in simulations using a 12-6-4 model for the Lennard-Jones potential. Despite the simple nature of the fixed point-charge and van der Waals sphere models employed, and with the exception of the likely oversampled directed chelation of the 12-6-4 potential models, RNA–Mg2+ interactions via first shell water molecules are surprisingly well described by modern parameters, allowing us to observe the spontaneous conformational shift from Mg2+ free RNA to Mg2+ associated RNA structure in unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27294370

  7. Divalent Ion Dependent Conformational Changes in an RNA Stem-Loop Observed by Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Hall, Kathleen B; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2016-07-12

    We compare the performance of five magnesium (Mg(2+)) ion models in simulations of an RNA stem loop which has an experimentally determined divalent ion dependent conformational shift. We show that despite their differences in parametrization and resulting van der Waals terms, including differences in the functional form of the nonbonded potential, when the RNA adopts its folded conformation, all models behave similarly across ten independent microsecond length simulations with each ion model. However, when the entire structure ensemble is accounted for, chelation of Mg(2+) to RNA is seen in three of the five models, most egregiously and likely artifactual in simulations using a 12-6-4 model for the Lennard-Jones potential. Despite the simple nature of the fixed point-charge and van der Waals sphere models employed, and with the exception of the likely oversampled directed chelation of the 12-6-4 potential models, RNA-Mg(2+) interactions via first shell water molecules are surprisingly well described by modern parameters, allowing us to observe the spontaneous conformational shift from Mg(2+) free RNA to Mg(2+) associated RNA structure in unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27294370

  8. Nonadditivity in Conformational Entropy upon Molecular Rigidification Reveals a Universal Mechanism Affecting Folding Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Vorov, Oleg K.; Livesay, Dennis R.; Jacobs, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we employed a Maxwell counting distance constraint model (McDCM) to describe α-helix formation in polypeptides. Unlike classical helix-coil transition theories, the folding mechanism derives from nonadditivity in conformational entropy caused by rigidification of molecular structure as intramolecular cross-linking interactions form along the backbone. For example, when a hydrogen bond forms within a flexible region, both energy and conformational entropy decrease. However, no conformational entropy is lost when the region is already rigid because atomic motions are not constrained further. Unlike classical zipper models, the same mechanism also describes a coil-to-β-hairpin transition. Special topological features of the helix and hairpin structures allow the McDCM to be solved exactly. Taking full advantage of the fact that Maxwell constraint counting is a mean field approximation applied to the distribution of cross-linking interactions, we present an exact transfer matrix method that does not require any special topological feature. Upon application of the model to proteins, cooperativity within the folding transition is yet again appropriately described. Notwithstanding other contributing factors such as the hydrophobic effect, this simple model identifies a universal mechanism for cooperativity within polypeptide and protein-folding transitions, and it elucidates scaling laws describing hydrogen-bond patterns observed in secondary structure. In particular, the native state should have roughly twice as many constraints as there are degrees of freedom in the coil state to ensure high fidelity in two-state folding cooperativity, which is empirically observed. PMID:21320459

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Elucidate Conformational Dynamics Responsible for the Cyclization Reaction in TEAS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Chen, Nanhao; Wu, Ruibo

    2016-05-23

    The Mg-dependent 5-epi-aristolochene synthase from Nicotiana tabacum (called TEAS) could catalyze the linear farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) substrate to form bicyclic hydrocarbon 5-epi-aristolochene. The cyclization reaction mechanism of TEAS was proposed based on static crystal structures and quantum chemistry calculations in a few previous studies, but substrate FPP binding kinetics and protein conformational dynamics responsible for the enzymatic catalysis are still unclear. Herein, by elaborative and extensive molecular dynamics simulations, the loop conformation change and several crucial residues promoting the cyclization reaction in TEAS are elucidated. It is found that the unusual noncatalytic NH2-terminal domain is essential to stabilize Helix-K and the adjoining J-K loop of the catalytic COOH-terminal domain. It is also illuminated that the induce-fit J-K/A-C loop dynamics is triggered by Y527 and the optimum substrate binding mode in a "U-shape" conformation. The U-shaped ligand binding pose is maintained well with the cooperative interaction of the three Mg(2+)-containing coordination shell and conserved residue W273. Furthermore, the conserved Arg residue pair R264/R266 and aromatic residue pair Y527/W273, whose spatial orientations are also crucial to promote the closure of the active site to a hydrophobic pocket, as well as to form π-stacking interactions with the ligand, would facilitate the carbocation migration and electrophilic attack involving the catalytic reaction. Our investigation more convincingly proves the greater roles of the protein local conformational dynamics than do hints from the static crystal structure observations. Thus, these findings can act as a guide to new protein engineering strategies on diversifying the sesquiterpene products for drug discovery. PMID:27082764

  10. Retrieving transient conformational molecular structure information from inner-shell photoionization of laser-aligned molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Yu, Chao; Lucchese, R. R.; Lin, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a scheme to retrieve transient conformational molecular structure information using photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) that have averaged over partial alignments of isolated molecules. The photoelectron is pulled out from a localized inner-shell molecular orbital by an X-ray photon. We show that a transient change in the atomic positions from their equilibrium will lead to a sensitive change in the alignment-averaged PADs, which can be measured and used to retrieve the former. Exploiting the experimental convenience of changing the photon polarization direction, we show that it is advantageous to use PADs obtained from multiple photon polarization directions. A simple single-scattering model is proposed and benchmarked to describe the photoionization process and to do the retrieval using a multiple-parameter fitting method. PMID:27025410

  11. Retrieving transient conformational molecular structure information from inner-shell photoionization of laser-aligned molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xu; Le, Anh -Thu; Yu, Chao; Lucchese, R. R.; Lin, C. D.

    2016-03-30

    We discuss a scheme to retrieve transient conformational molecular structure information using photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) that have averaged over partial alignments of isolated molecules. The photoelectron is pulled out from a localized inner-shell molecular orbital by an X-ray photon. We show that a transient change in the atomic positions from their equilibrium will lead to a sensitive change in the alignment-averaged PADs, which can be measured and used to retrieve the former. Exploiting the experimental convenience of changing the photon polarization direction, we show that it is advantageous to use PADs obtained from multiple photon polarization directions. Lastly, amore » simple single-scattering model is proposed and benchmarked to describe the photoionization process and to do the retrieval using a multiple-parameter fitting method.« less

  12. Retrieving transient conformational molecular structure information from inner-shell photoionization of laser-aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Le, Anh-Thu; Yu, Chao; Lucchese, R. R.; Lin, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a scheme to retrieve transient conformational molecular structure information using photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) that have averaged over partial alignments of isolated molecules. The photoelectron is pulled out from a localized inner-shell molecular orbital by an X-ray photon. We show that a transient change in the atomic positions from their equilibrium will lead to a sensitive change in the alignment-averaged PADs, which can be measured and used to retrieve the former. Exploiting the experimental convenience of changing the photon polarization direction, we show that it is advantageous to use PADs obtained from multiple photon polarization directions. A simple single-scattering model is proposed and benchmarked to describe the photoionization process and to do the retrieval using a multiple-parameter fitting method.

  13. Biological hydroperoxides and singlet molecular oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sayuri; Ronsein, Graziella E; Prado, Fernanda M; Uemi, Miriam; Corrêa, Thais C; Toma, Izaura N; Bertolucci, Agda; Oliveira, Mauricio C B; Motta, Flávia D; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Mascio, Paolo Di

    2007-01-01

    The decomposition of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) into peroxyl radicals is a potential source of singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O(2)) in biological systems. Recently, we have clearly demonstrated the generation of (1)O(2) in the reaction of lipid hydroperoxides with biologically important oxidants such as metal ions, peroxynitrite and hypochlorous acid. The approach used to unequivocally demonstrate the generation of (1)O(2) in these reactions was the use of an isotopic labeled hydroperoxide, the (18)O-labeled linoleic acid hydroperoxide, the detection of labeled compounds by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and the direct spectroscopic detection and characterization of (1)O(2) light emission. Using this approach we have observed the formation of (18)O-labeled (1)O(2) by chemical trapping of (1)O(2) with anthracene derivatives and detection of the corresponding labeled endoperoxide by HPLC-MS/MS. The generation of (1)O(2) was also demonstrated by direct spectral characterization of (1)O(2) monomol light emission in the near-infrared region (lambda = 1270 nm). In summary, our studies demonstrated that LOOH can originate (1)O(2). The experimental evidences indicate that (1)O(2) is generated at a yield close to 10% by the Russell mechanism, where a linear tetraoxide intermediate is formed in the combination of two peroxyl radicals. In addition to LOOH, other biological hydroperoxides, including hydroperoxides formed in proteins and nucleic acids, may also participate in reactions leading to the generation (1)O(2). This hypothesis is currently being investigated in our laboratory. PMID:17505972

  14. Subfemtosecond Pulse Generation by Molecular Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexei V.

    2002-05-01

    We describe a new source of coherent radiation, with spectrum extending over many octaves of optical bandwidth [1]. We demonstrate collinear generation of mutually-coherent spectral sidebands, ranging in wavelength from 2.95 μm in infrared to 195 nm in ultraviolet, with energy above 1 mJ per 10 ns pulse for each of the nine central sidebands. The essence of our technique is the adiabatic preparation of a macroscopic molecular ensemble in a single vibrational superposition-state [2]. When this is achieved, coherent molecular motion modulates laser light and produces a wide FM-like spectrum, which allows sub-cycle subfemtosecond pulse compression [3-5]. We use this source in two experiments: (I) We demonstrate generation and detection of amplitude and frequency modulated light with a 90 THz modulation frequency [6]. (II) We demonstrate coherent control of multiphoton ionization on a few-femtosecond time scale, under conditions where photoionization requires eleven photons of the lowest frequency and five photons of the highest frequency of the spectrum. Furthermore, we use the pulse-shape dependent ionization as a tool for characterization of our single-cycle waveform [7]. This is a first step toward studying subfemtosecond atomic and molecular dynamics. Future possibilities include studies of multiphoton phenomena as functions of molecular coordinates, and as functions of optical sub-cycle phase. REFERENCES: [1] A. V. Sokolov, D. R. Walker, D. D. Yavuz, G. Y. Yin, and S. E. Harris, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 562 (2000). [2] S. E. Harris and A. V. Sokolov, Phys. Rev. A 55, R4019 (1997). [3] S. E. Harris and A. V. Sokolov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2894 (1998). [4] A. V. Sokolov, D. D. Yavuz, and S. E. Harris, Opt. Lett. 24, 557-559 (1999). [5] A. V. Sokolov, Opt. Lett. 24, 1248 (1999). [6] A. V. Sokolov, D. D. Yavuz, D. R. Walker, G. Y. Yin, and S. E. Harris, Phys. Rev. A 63, 051801 (2001). [7] A. V. Sokolov, D. R. Walker, D. D. Yavuz, G. Y. Yin, and S. E. Harris, Phys. Rev

  15. Generation and characterization of novel conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies for α-synuclein pathology.

    PubMed

    Vaikath, Nishant N; Majbour, Nour K; Paleologou, Katerina E; Ardah, Mustafa T; van Dam, Esther; van de Berg, Wilma D J; Forrest, Shelley L; Parkkinen, Laura; Gai, Wei-Ping; Hattori, Nobutaka; Takanashi, Masashi; Lee, Seung-Jae; Mann, David M A; Imai, Yuzuru; Halliday, Glenda M; Li, Jia-Yi; El-Agnaf, Omar M A

    2015-07-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn), a small protein that has the intrinsic propensity to aggregate, is implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA), which are collectively known as synucleinopathies. Genetic, pathological, biochemical, and animal modeling studies provided compelling evidence that α-syn aggregation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of PD and related synucleinopathies. It is therefore of utmost importance to develop reliable tools that can detect the aggregated forms of α-syn. We describe here the generation and characterization of six novel conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies that recognize specifically α-syn aggregates but not the soluble, monomeric form of the protein. The antibodies described herein did not recognize monomers or fibrils generated from other amyloidogenic proteins including β-syn, γ-syn, β-amyloid, tau protein, islet amyloid polypeptide and ABri. Interestingly, the antibodies did not react to overlapping linear peptides spanning the entire sequence of α-syn, confirming further that they only detect α-syn aggregates. In immunohistochemical studies, the new conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies showed underappreciated small micro-aggregates and very thin neurites in PD and DLB cases that were not observed with generic pan antibodies that recognize linear epitope. Furthermore, employing one of our conformation-specific antibodies in a sandwich based ELISA, we observed an increase in levels of α-syn oligomers in brain lysates from DLB compared to Alzheimer's disease and control samples. Therefore, the conformation-specific antibodies portrayed herein represent useful tools for research, biomarkers development, diagnosis and even immunotherapy for PD and related pathologies. PMID:25937088

  16. Isolation of Ion-Driven Conformations in Diphenylacetylene Molecular Switches Using Cryogenic Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolk, Arron B.; Garand, Etienne; Jones, Ian M.; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Hamilton, Rew; Johnson, Mark A.

    2012-06-01

    We report the infrared predissociation spectra of a family of ionic diphenylacetylene molecular switch complexes. The electrosprayed complexes were trapped and cooled in a cryogenic (10K) quadrupole ion trap and tagged with molecular deuterium. The infrared spectra of the vibrationally cold species reveal sharp transitions over a wide energy range (800 - 3800 cm-1), facilitating comparison to harmonic spectra. The evolution of the band pattern upon derivatization of the complexes exposes the signatures of the amide, urea, and carbonyl functionalities, enabling unambiguous identification of the non-covalent interactions that control the secondary structure of the molecule. Complexation with the tetramethylammonium cation reveals a conformation analogous to that of the neutral molecule, while halide ion attachment induces a conformational change similar to that observed earlier in solution. In several cases, both the donor and acceptor groups involved in the multidentate H-bonds are observed, providing a microscopic mechanical picture of the interactions at play. I. Jones, and A. Hamilton, Angew. Chem. Intl. Edit. 50, 4597 (2011).

  17. A Conformational Analysis Study on the Melanocortin 4 Receptor Using Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Mousavi, Atefeh

    2015-09-01

    Taking into account the uncertainties involved in 3D model of biomolecule developed by homology modeling (HM), it is important to opportunely validate the initial structure before employing for different purposes such as drug design. Extended simulation times and the necessity of correct representation of interactions within the protein and the nearby molecules impose significant limitations on molecular dynamics (MD)-based refinement of structures developed by HM. Consequently, there is a pressing requirement for more efficient methods for HM and subsequent validation of developed structure. Multiple MD simulation runs are well suited for producing ensembles of structures. In this context, a computational investigation was presented to study the structure of melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit phospholipids bilayer. Several MD runs with different initial velocities were employed to sample conformations in the neighborhood of the native structure of receptor, collecting trajectories spanning 0.21 ms. The coherence between the results, different structural analysis, and the convergence of parameters derived by principal component analysis (PCA) shows that an accurate description of the MC4R conformational space around the native state was achieved by multiple MD trajectories. PMID:25487745

  18. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Lecture: 2D IR Spectroscopy of Peptide Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    Descriptions of protein and peptide conformation are colored by the methods we use to study them. Protein x-ray and NMR structures often lead to impressions of rigid or well-defined conformations, even though these are dynamic molecules. The conformational fluctuations and disorder of proteins and peptides is more difficult to quantify. This presentation will describe an approach toward characterizing and quantifying structural heterogeneity and disorder in peptides using 2D IR spectroscopy. Using amide I vibrational spectroscopy, isotope labeling strategies, and computational modeling based on molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state models allows us to characterize distinct peptide conformers and conformational variation. The examples illustrated include the beta-hairpin tripzip2 and elastin-like peptides.

  19. Analysis and elimination of a bias in targeted molecular dynamics simulations of conformational transitions: application to calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Karplus, Martin

    2012-07-26

    The popular targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) method for generating transition paths in complex biomolecular systems is revisited. In a typical TMD transition path, the large-scale changes occur early and the small-scale changes tend to occur later. As a result, the order of events in the computed paths depends on the direction in which the simulations are performed. To identify the origin of this bias, and to propose a method in which the bias is absent, variants of TMD in the restraint formulation are introduced and applied to the complex open ↔ closed transition in the protein calmodulin. Due to the global best-fit rotation that is typically part of the TMD method, the simulated system is guided implicitly along the lowest-frequency normal modes, until the large spatial scales associated with these modes are near the target conformation. The remaining portion of the transition is described progressively by higher-frequency modes, which correspond to smaller-scale rearrangements. A straightforward modification of TMD that avoids the global best-fit rotation is the locally restrained TMD (LRTMD) method, in which the biasing potential is constructed from a number of TMD potentials, each acting on a small connected portion of the protein sequence. With a uniform distribution of these elements, transition paths that lack the length-scale bias are obtained. Trajectories generated by steered MD in dihedral angle space (DSMD), a method that avoids best-fit rotations altogether, also lack the length-scale bias. To examine the importance of the paths generated by TMD, LRTMD, and DSMD in the actual transition, we use the finite-temperature string method to compute the free energy profile associated with a transition tube around a path generated by each algorithm. The free energy barriers associated with the paths are comparable, suggesting that transitions can occur along each route with similar probabilities. This result indicates that a broad ensemble of paths needs to

  20. Sampling small-scale and large-scale conformational changes in proteins and molecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Mi-Ran; Mousseau, N.; Derreumaux, P.

    2007-03-01

    Sampling of small-scale and large-scale motions is important in various computational tasks, such as protein-protein docking and ligand binding. Here, we report further development and applications of the activation-relaxation technique for internal coordinate space trajectories (ARTIST). This method generates conformational moves of any complexity and size by identifying and crossing well-defined saddle points connecting energy minima. Simulations on two all-atom proteins and three protein complexes containing between 70 and 300 amino acids indicate that ARTIST opens the door to the full treatment of all degrees of freedom in dense systems such as protein-protein complexes.

  1. Quantum/molecular mechanics study of firefly bioluminescence on luciferase oxidative conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-07-01

    This is the first report of a computational study of the color tuning mechanism of firefly bioluminescence, using the oxidative conformation of luciferase. The results of these calculations demonstrated that the electrostatic field generated by luciferase is fundamental both for the emission shift and efficiency. Further calculations indicated that a shift in emission is achieved by modulating the energy, at different degrees, of the emissive and ground states. These differences in energy modulation will then lead to changes in the energy gap between the states.

  2. Two-loop conformal generators for leading-twist operators in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, V. M.; Manashov, A. N.; Moch, S.; Strohmaier, M.

    2016-03-01

    QCD evolution equations in minimal subtraction schemes have a hidden symmetry: one can construct three operators that commute with the evolution kernel and form an SL(2) algebra, i.e. they satisfy (exactly) the SL(2) commutation relations. In this paper we find explicit expressions for these operators to two-loop accuracy going over to QCD in non-integer d = 4 - 2ɛ space-time dimensions at the intermediate stage. In this way conformal symmetry of QCD is restored on quantum level at the specially chosen (critical) value of the coupling, and at the same time the theory is regularized allowing one to use the standard renormalization procedure for the relevant Feynman diagrams. Quantum corrections to conformal generators in d = 4 - 2ɛ effectively correspond to the conformal symmetry breaking in the physical theory in four dimensions and the SL(2) commutation relations lead to nontrivial constraints on the renormalization group equations for composite operators. This approach is valid to all orders in perturbation theory and the result includes automatically all terms that can be identified as due to a nonvanishing QCD β-function (in the physical theory in four dimensions). Our result can be used to derive three-loop evolution equations for flavor-nonsinglet quark-antiquark operators including mixing with the operators containing total derivatives. These equations govern, e.g., the scale dependence of generalized hadron parton distributions and light-cone meson distribution amplitudes.

  3. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the β-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-01

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the β6.3-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed β4.4-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed β4.4-helix, right-handed and left-handed β6.3-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite β-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed β6.3-helix and β4.4-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these β-helix structures. The results suggested that β6.3-helix is more stable than β4.4-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the β6.3-helix conformation.

  4. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the beta-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-28

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the beta(6.3)-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed beta(4.4)-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed beta(4.4)-helix, right-handed and left-handed beta(6.3)-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite beta-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed beta(6.3)-helix and beta(4.4)-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these beta-helix structures. The results suggested that beta(6.3)-helix is more stable than beta(4.4)-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the beta(6.3)-helix conformation. PMID:19894978

  5. Combinatorial selection of molecular conformations and supramolecular synthons in quercetin cocrystal landscapes: a route to ternary solids

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization of 28 binary and ternary cocrystals of quercetin with dibasic coformers is analyzed in terms of a combinatorial selection from a solution of preferred molecular conformations and supramolecular synthons. The crystal structures are characterized by distinctive O—H⋯N and O—H⋯O based synthons and are classified as nonporous, porous and helical. Variability in molecular conformation and synthon structure led to an increase in the energetic and structural space around the crystallization event. This space is the crystal structure landscape of the compound and is explored by fine-tuning the experimental conditions of crystallization. In the landscape context, we develop a strategy for the isolation of ternary cocrystals with the use of auxiliary template molecules to reduce the molecular and supramolecular ‘confusion’ that is inherent in a molecule like quercetin. The absence of concomitant polymorphism in this study highlights the selectivity in conformation and synthon choice from the virtual combinatorial library in solution. PMID:26175900

  6. Molecular conformation-controlled vesicle/micelle transition of cationic trimeric surfactants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxian; Hou, Yanbo; Deng, Manli; Huang, Xu; Yu, Defeng; Xiang, Junfeng; Liu, Yu; Li, Zhibo; Wang, Yilin

    2010-06-01

    Two star-like trimeric cationic surfactants with amide groups in spacers, tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) and tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)tris(2-aminoethyl)amine trichloride (DDAD), have been synthesized, and the aggregation behavior of the surfactants in aqueous solution has been investigated by surface tension, electrical conductivity, isothermal titration microcalorimetry, dynamic light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, and NMR techniques. Typically, both the surfactants form vesicles just above critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and then the vesicles transfer to micelles gradually with an increase of the surfactant concentration. It is approved that the conformation of the surfactant molecules changes in this transition process. Just above the CAC, the hydrophobic chains of the surfactant molecules pack more loosely because of the rigid spacer and intramolecular electrostatic repulsion in the three-charged headgroup. With the increase of the surfactant concentration, hydrophobic interaction becomes strong enough to pack the hydrophobic tails tightly and turn the molecular conformation into a pyramid-like shape, thus leading to the vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:20426428

  7. A molecular modeling approach to understand the structure and conformation relationship of (GlcpA)Xylan.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingbin; Kang, Ji; Wu, Yan; Cui, Steve W; Hu, Xinzhong; Yada, Rickey Y

    2015-12-10

    The structure and conformation relationships of a heteropolysaccharide (GlcpA)Xylan in terms of various molecular weights, Xylp/GlcpA ratio and the distribution of GlcpA along xylan chain were investigated using computer modeling. The adiabatic contour maps of xylobiose, XylpXylp(GlcpA) and (GlcpA)XylpXylp(GlcpA) indicated that the insertion of the side group (GlcpA) influenced the accessible conformational space of xylobiose molecule. RIS-Metropolis Monte Carlo method indicated that insertion of GlcpA side chain induced a lowering effect of the calculated chain extension at low GlcpA:Xylp ratio (GlcpA:Xylp = 1:3). The chain, however, became extended when the ratio of GlcpA:Xylp above 2/3. It was also shown that the spatial extension of the polymer chains was dependent on the distribution of side chain: the random distribution demonstrated the most flexible structure compared to block and alternative distribution. The present studies provide a unique insight into the dependence of both side chain ratio and distribution on the stiffness and flexibility of various (GlcpA)Xylan molecules. PMID:26428114

  8. Long-range conformational transition of a photoswitchable allosteric protein: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Knecht, Volker; Walser, Reto; Hamm, Peter; Stock, Gerhard

    2014-11-26

    A local perturbation of a protein may lead to functional changes at some distal site. An example is the PDZ2 domain of human tyrosine phosphatase 1E, which shows an allosteric transition upon binding to a peptide ligand. Recently Buchli et al. presented a time-resolved study of this transition by covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove and using a femtosecond laser pulse that triggers the cis-trans photoisomerization of azobenzene. To aid the interpretation of these experiments, in this work seven microsecond runs of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations each for the wild-type PDZ2 in the ligand-bound and -free state, as well as the photoswitchable protein (PDZ2S) in the cis and trans states of the photoswitch, in explicit water were conducted. First the theoretical model is validated by recalculating the available NMR data from the simulations. By comparing the results for PDZ2 and PDZ2S, it is analyzed to what extent the photoswitch indeed mimics the free-bound transition. A detailed description of the conformational rearrangement following the cis-trans photoisomerization of PDZ2S reveals a series of photoinduced structural changes that propagate from the anchor residues of the photoswitch via intermediate secondary structure segments to the C-terminus of PDZ2S. The changes of the conformational distribution of the C-terminal region is considered as the distal response of the isolated allosteric protein. PMID:25365469

  9. Conformationally Constrained Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3: Evaluation and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Pijus K.; Limbrick, Donald; Coleman, David R.; Dyer, Garrett A.; Ren, Zhiyong; Birtwistle, J. Sanderson; Xiong, Chiyi; Chen, Xiaomin; Briggs, James M.; McMurray, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is involved in aberrant growth and survival signals in malignant tumor cells and is a validated target for anti-cancer drug design. We are targeting its SH2 domain to prevent docking to cytokine and growth factor receptors and subsequent signaling. The amino acids of our lead phosphopeptide, Ac-pTyr-Leu-Pro-Gln-Thr-Val-NH2, were replaced with conformationally constrained mimics. Structure-affinity studies led to the peptidomimetic, pCinn-Haic-Gln-NHBn (21) which had an IC50 of 162 nM (fluorescence polarization), as compared to 290 nM for the lead phosphopeptide (pCinn = 4-phosphoryloxycinnamate, Haic = (2S,5S)-5-amino-1,2,4,5,6,7-hexahydro-4-oxo-azepino[3,2,1-hi]indole-2-carboxylic acid). pCinn-Haic-Gln-OH was docked to the SH2 domain (AUTODOCK) and the two highest populated clusters were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations. Both converged to a common peptide conformation. The complex exhibits unique hydrogen bonding between Haic and Gln and Stat3 as well as hydrophobic interactions between the protein and pCinn and Haic. PMID:19334714

  10. Molecular identification of Amazonian stingless bees using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Souza, M T; Carvalho-Zilse, G A

    2014-01-01

    In countries containing a mega diversity of wildlife, such as Brazil, identifying and characterizing biological diversity is a continuous process for the scientific community, even in face of technological and scientific advances. This activity demands initiatives for the taxonomic identification of highly diverse groups, such as stingless bees, including molecular analysis strategies. This type of bee is distributed in all of the Brazilian states, with the highest species diversity being found in the State of Amazônia. However, the estimated number of species diverges among taxonomists. These bees are considered the main pollinators in the Amazon rainforest, in which they obtain food and shelter; however, their persistence is constantly threatened by deforestation pressure. Hence, it is important to classify the number and abundance of bee specie, to measure their decline and implement meaningful, priority conservation strategies. This study aims to maximize the implementation of more direct, economic and successful techniques for the taxonomic identification of stingless bees. Specifically, the genes 16S rRNA and COI from mitochondrial DNA were used as molecular markers to differentiate 9 species of Amazonian stingless bees based on DNA polymorphism, using the polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique. We registered different, exclusive SSCP haplotypes for both genes in all species analyzed. These results demonstrate that SSCP is a simple and cost-effective technique that is applicable to the molecular identification of stingless bee species. PMID:25117306

  11. Multiple Conformational States of Proteins: A Molecular Dynamics Analysis of Myoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elber, R.; Karplus, M.

    1987-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of myoglobin provides the first direct demonstration that the potential energy surface of a protein is characterized by a large number of thermally accessible minima in the neighborhood of the native structure (for example, approximately 2000 minima were sampled in a 300-picosecond trajectory). This is expected to have important consequences for the interpretation of the activity of transport proteins and enzymes. Different minima correspond to changes in the relative orientation of the helices coupled with side-chain rearrangements that preserve the close packing of the protein interior. The conformational space sampled by the simulation is similar to that found in the evolutionary development of the globins. Glasslike behavior is expected at low temperatures. The minima obtained from the trajectory do not satisfy certain criteria for ultrametricity.

  12. Evidence from molecular dynamics simulations of conformational preorganization in the ribonuclease H active site

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kate A.; Palmer III, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease H1 (RNase H) enzymes are well-conserved endonucleases that are present in all domains of life and are particularly important in the life cycle of retroviruses as domains within reverse transcriptase. Despite extensive study, especially of the E. coli homolog, the interaction of the highly negatively charged active site with catalytically required magnesium ions remains poorly understood. In this work, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of the E. coli homolog in complex with magnesium ions, as well as simulations of other homologs in their apo states. Collectively, these results suggest that the active site is highly rigid in the apo state of all homologs studied and is conformationally preorganized to favor the binding of a magnesium ion. Notably, representatives of bacterial, eukaryotic, and retroviral RNases H all exhibit similar active-site rigidity, suggesting that this dynamic feature is only subtly modulated by amino acid sequence and is primarily imposed by the distinctive RNase H protein fold. PMID:25075292

  13. Effects of molecular conformation on the spectroscopic properties of 4,4‧-disubstituted benzylideneanilines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhengjun; Wu, Feng; Yi, Bing; Cao, Chenzhong; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the molecular conformation and spectroscopic properties of unsymmetrical 4,4‧-disubstituted benzylideneanilines, was explored by the combination of experiment and reference data. Crystal structure information and spectroscopic behaviors of the seventeen samples p-X-C6H4CHdbnd NC6H4-p-Y (X = NMe2, OMe, Me, Cl, CN, or NO2, Ydbnd NMe2, OMe, Me, Cl, CN, or NO2) were provided for this study. Among these seventeen compounds, nine ones were synthesized firstly, and five crystal structures were determined and analyzed. It was observed that the twist angle of the aniline ring with respect to the rest of the molecule (τ) is systematically controlled by the substituent at the aromatic ring. The correlation results show that the UV maximum absorption in wavenumbers (υmax) is dependent on the substituent at the aromatic ring and the dihedral angle τ of the titled molecules, and a sine function of τ (sin(τ)) is suitable to modify the substituent effects on the υmax. However, the dihedral angle τ has a limited effect on the values of 13C NMR chemical shifts δC(Cdbnd N). The results indicate that the dihedral angle τ has an significant effect on UV spectra of Schiff bases with different parent structure although there is something different about the parameter metrics. While it has a relatively limited effect on the values of δC(Cdbnd N) in both unsymmetrical and unsymmetrical Schiff bases. This study provides an sufficient evidence of the molecular conformation on spectroscopic properties of Schiff bases.

  14. Conformational Melding Permits a Conserved Binding Geometry in TCR Recognition of Foreign and Self Molecular Mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-03-16

    Molecular mimicry between foreign and self Ags is a mechanism of TCR cross-reactivity and is thought to contribute to the development of autoimmunity. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes the foreign Ag Tax from the human T cell leukemia virus-1 when presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. In a possible link with the autoimmune disease human T cell leukemia virus-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, A6 also recognizes a self peptide from the neuronal protein HuD in the context of HLA-A2. We found in our study that the complexes of the HuD and Tax epitopes with HLA-A2 are close but imperfect structural mimics and that in contrast with other recent structures of TCRs with self Ags, A6 engages the HuD Ag with the same traditional binding mode used to engage Tax. Although peptide and MHC conformational changes are needed for recognition of HuD but not Tax and the difference of a single hydroxyl triggers an altered TCR loop conformation, TCR affinity toward HuD is still within the range believed to result in negative selection. Probing further, we found that the HuD-HLA-A2 complex is only weakly stable. Overall, these findings help clarify how molecular mimicry can drive self/nonself cross-reactivity and illustrate how low peptide-MHC stability can permit the survival of T cells expressing self-reactive TCRs that nonetheless bind with a traditional binding mode.

  15. A classical molecular dynamics investigation of the free energy and structure of short polyproline conformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2010-09-01

    Folded polyproline peptides can exist as either left-(PPII) or right-handed (PPI) helices, depending on their environment. In this work, we have characterized the conformations and the free energy landscapes of Ace-(Pro)n-Nme, n =2,3,…,9, and 13 peptides both in vacuo and in an implicit solvent environment. In order to enhance the sampling provided by regular molecular dynamics simulations, we have used the recently developed adaptively biased molecular dynamics method—which provides an accurate description of the free energy landscapes in terms of a set of relevant collective variables—combined with Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics methods. The collective variables, which are chosen so as to reflect the stable structures and the "slow modes" of the polyproline system, were based primarily on properties of length and of the cis/trans isomerization associated with the prolyl bonds. Results indicate that the space of peptide structures is characterized not just by pure PPII and PPI structures, but rather by a broad distribution of stable minima with similar free energies. These results are in agreement with recent experimental work. In addition, we have used steered molecular dynamics methods in order to quantitatively estimate the free energy difference of PPI and PPII for peptides of the length n =2,…,5 in vacuo and implicit water and qualitatively investigate transition pathways and mechanisms for the PPII to PPI transitions. A zipper-like mechanism, starting from either the center of the peptide or the amidated end, appear to be the most likely mechanisms for the PPII→PPI transition for the longer peptides.

  16. Molecular conformation of the full-length tumor suppressor NF2/Merlin—a small angle neutron scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh, Jahan Ali; Ju, Jeong Ho; Atchiba, Moussoubaou; Allaire, Marc; Stanley, Christopher; Heller, William T.; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2014-01-01

    Summary The tumor suppressor protein Merlin inhibits cell proliferation upon establishing cell-cell contacts. Because Merlin has high sequence similarity to the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of proteins, the structural model of ERM protein autoinhibition and cycling between closed/resting and open/active conformational states is often employed to explain Merlin function. However, recent biochemical studies suggest alternative molecular models of Merlin function. Here, we have determined the low resolution molecular structure and binding activity of Merlin and a Merlin(S518D) mutant that mimics the inactivating phosphorylation at S518 using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and binding experiments. SANS shows that in solution both Merlin and Merlin(S518D) adopt a closed conformation, but binding experiments indicate that a significant fraction of either Merlin or Merlin(S518D) is capable of binding to the target protein NHERF1. Upon binding to the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipid, the wild-type Merlin adopts a more open conformation than in solution, but Merlin(S518D) remains in a closed conformation. This study supports a rheostat model of Merlin in NHERF1 binding, and contributes to resolve a controversy about the molecular conformation and binding activity of Merlin. PMID:24882693

  17. a Combined Molecular Dynamics and NMR Spectroscopic Protocol for the Conformational Analysis of Oligosaccharides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Vikram

    A combined experimental and theoretical protocol for the conformational analysis of oligosaccharides is presented. Three disaccharides, methyl alpha - scD-mannopyranosyl-(1 to 3)-alpha- scD-mannopyranoside, methyl beta- scD-galactopyranosyl-(1 to 4)-beta- scD-glucopyranoside, and propyl beta- scD-2-acetamido -2-deoxy glucopyranosyl-(1 to 3)- alpha- scL-rhamnopyranoside, are used to evaluate a protocol for conformational analysis that makes use of molecular dynamics calculations with the CHARMM force field. Dynamics trajectories computed in vacuo and in water are used to calculate time-averaged NMR parameters such as spin-lattice relaxation times (T_1 ), Nuclear Overhauser Enhancements (NOE), and heteronuclear spin-spin coupling constants (^3J _{rm CH}). The calculated NMR parameters are then compared to experimental values and used to evaluate the computational procedure. The energetically accessible conformations are effectively sampled by the simulations. The method has been extended to the conformational analysis of higher-order oligosaccharides corresponding to the cell-wall polysaccharide of the Streptococcus Group A, and the Shigella flexneri Y O-antigen. The Streptococcus Group A cell-wall polysaccharide is comprised of a backbone of rhamnopyranosyl units connected by alternating alpha- scL-(1 to 3) and alpha- scL -(1 to 2) linkages, to which are attached N-acetyl-beta- scD-glucosamine ( beta- scD-GlcpNAc) residues at the 3 positions of the rhamnose backbone.rm A&rm B^'qquad A^'& rm Bqquad Acr[{-alpha}{-}L{-}Rha {it p}{-}(1to2){-alpha }{-}L{-}Rha{it p} {-}(1to3){-alpha}{ -}L{-}Rha{it p}-(1to2) -alpha-L-Rha{it p}{-}(1 to3){-alpha}{-}L{- }Rha{it p}{-}cr&uparrow(1 to3)&uparrow(1to3)crbeta {-}D{-}&rm Glc{it p }NAcqquadbeta{-}D{-}& rm Glc{it p}NAccr&rm C ^'&rm C] A branched trisaccharide (A^' -(C)B), a tetrasaccharide (A^' -(C)B-A), a pentasaccharide (C^' -B^'-A ^'-(C)B), and two hexasaccharides (C^'-B^ '-A^' -(C)B-A) and (A-(C^')B ^'-A^' -(C)B), have been chosen

  18. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Link between Imatinib Resistance and Kinase Conformational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lovera, Silvia; Morando, Maria; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics. PMID:26606374

  19. Conformational processing of oncogenic v-Src kinase by the molecular chaperone Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Boczek, Edgar E.; Reefschläger, Lasse G.; Dehling, Marco; Struller, Tobias J.; Häusler, Elisabeth; Seidl, Andreas; Kaila, Ville R. I.; Buchner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone involved in the activation of numerous client proteins, including many kinases. The most stringent kinase client is the oncogenic kinase v-Src. To elucidate how Hsp90 chaperones kinases, we reconstituted v-Src kinase chaperoning in vitro and show that its activation is ATP-dependent, with the cochaperone Cdc37 increasing the efficiency. Consistent with in vivo results, we find that Hsp90 does not influence the almost identical c-Src kinase. To explain these findings, we designed Src kinase chimeras that gradually transform c-Src into v-Src and show that their Hsp90 dependence correlates with compactness and folding cooperativity. Molecular dynamics simulations and hydrogen/deuterium exchange of Hsp90-dependent Src kinase variants further reveal increased transitions between inactive and active states and exposure of specific kinase regions. Thus, Hsp90 shifts an ensemble of conformations of v-Src toward high activity states that would otherwise be metastable and poorly populated. PMID:26056257

  20. Mechanism of Mcl-1 Conformational Regulation Upon Small Molecule Binding Revealed by Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anhui; Song, Ting; Wang, Ziqian; Liu, Yubo; Fan, Yudan; Zhang, Yahui; Zhang, Zhichao

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of interactions between Mcl-1 and proapoptotic proteins is considered to be a therapeutic strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Here, we adopted molecular dynamics simulation with molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann/surface area method (MM-PB/SA) to study the inhibition mechanism of three Mcl-1 inhibitors, compounds 1, 2 and 3. Analysis of energy components shows that the better binding free energy of compound 3 than compounds 1 and 2 is attributable to the van der Waals energy (ΔEvdw ) and non-polar solvation energy (ΔGnp ) upon binding. In addition to the excellent agreement with previous experimentally determined affinities, our simulation results further show a bend of helix 4 on Mcl-1 upon compound 3 binding, which is driven by hydrophobic interaction with residue Val(253) , leading to a narrowed BH3-binding groove to impede Puma(BH) (3) binding. The computational result is consistent with our competitive isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays, which shows that the competitive ability of compound 3 toward Mcl-1/Puma(BH) (3) complex is improved beyond its direct binding affinity toward Mcl-1 itself, and compound 3 exhibits much more efficiency to compete with Puma(BH) (3) than compound 2. Our study provides a new strategy to improve inhibitory activity on Mcl-1 based on the conformational dynamic change. PMID:26518611

  1. Computer simulations of cyclic and acyclic cholinergic agonists: conformational search and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    McGroddy, K A; Brady, J W; Oswald, R E

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on aqueous solutions of two chemically similar nicotinic cholinergic agonists in order to compare their structural and dynamical differences. The cyclic 1,1-dimethyl-4-acetylpiperazinium iodide (HPIP) molecule was previously shown to be a strong agonist for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (McGroddy et al., 1993), while the acyclic N,N,N,N'-tetramethyl-N'-acetylethylenediamine iodide (HTED) derivative is much less potent. These differences were expected to arise from differences in the solution structures and internal dynamics of the two molecules. HPIP was originally thought to be relatively rigid; however, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the acetyl portion of the molecule undergoes significant ring dynamics on a psec timescale. The less constrained HTED molecule is relatively rigid, with only one transition observed about any of the major dihedrals in four 100 psec simulations, each started from a different conformation. The average structures obtained from the simulations are very similar to the starting minimized structure in each case, except for the HTED simulation where a single rotation about the N-C-C-N(+) backbone occurred. In each case, HTED had three to five more water molecules in its primary solvation shell than HPIP, indicating that differences in the energetics of desolvation before binding may partially explain the increased potency of HPIP as compared to HTED. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:8161685

  2. Biophysical exploration of protein-flavonol recognition: effects of molecular properties and conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui

    2016-04-28

    The current work explores the biomolecular recognition of a series of flavonols by a protein and then uncovers the influences of the structural features of flavonols and the protein's own characteristics, e.g. the dynamics and flexibility, on the bioavailability of flavonols by using the pivotal biomacromolecule hemoglobin as a model. The experimental results revealed that flavonol may lead to a notable decrease in the steady-state fluorescence intensity of the β-37 Trp residue, and in the meantime the R-T transition of the protein transpired. Such noncovalent recognition forms the ground-state adduct, with an association intensity of 3.991 × 10(4) M(-1) in the reaction process, which has already been authenticated by the detailed analysis of time-resolved fluorescence and UV/vis absorption spectra. Furthermore, flavonol can form hydrogen bonds and π-conjugation effects with several amino acid residues on the polypeptide chain, for example, Trp-37, Arg-40, Asp-99 and Asn-102, and this event would induce self-regulation of the compact, regular conformation of the protein to a certain extent, which explicitly corroborates the results of circular dichroism. According to the study of molecular docking and structure-activity relationships, we could see that the recognition capacities of the protein-flavonols are inversely interrelated with the C log P values of the flavonol molecules. Moreover, the properties of the substituents in the structural B-ring unit of flavonols, i.e. polarity, position and number, will also prominently affect the degree of affinity and bioavailability of the protein-flavonol complexes. The analytical results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation testified that the discussions of the structure-activity relationships are entirely logical, and the conformations of the amino acid residues forming noncovalent interactions tend to be stable in the MD simulation, as further elucidated from the dynamics data. Plainly, molecular recognition of

  3. Distance Geometry Protocol to Generate Conformations of Natural Products to Structurally Interpret Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Collision Cross Sections

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) allows the separation of ionized molecules based on their charge-to-surface area (IM) and mass-to-charge ratio (MS), respectively. The IM drift time data that is obtained is used to calculate the ion-neutral collision cross section (CCS) of the ionized molecule with the neutral drift gas, which is directly related to the ion conformation and hence molecular size and shape. Studying the conformational landscape of these ionized molecules computationally provides interpretation to delineate the potential structures that these CCS values could represent, or conversely, structural motifs not consistent with the IM data. A challenge in the IM-MS community is the ability to rapidly compute conformations to interpret natural product data, a class of molecules exhibiting a broad range of biological activity. The diversity of biological activity is, in part, related to the unique structural characteristics often observed for natural products. Contemporary approaches to structurally interpret IM-MS data for peptides and proteins typically utilize molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to sample conformational space. However, MD calculations are computationally expensive, they require a force field that accurately describes the molecule of interest, and there is no simple metric that indicates when sufficient conformational sampling has been achieved. Distance geometry is a computationally inexpensive approach that creates conformations based on sampling different pairwise distances between the atoms within the molecule and therefore does not require a force field. Progressively larger distance bounds can be used in distance geometry calculations, providing in principle a strategy to assess when all plausible conformations have been sampled. Our results suggest that distance geometry is a computationally efficient and potentially superior strategy for conformational analysis of natural products to interpret gas-phase CCS data. PMID:25360896

  4. Exploring the structure and conformational landscape of human leptin. A molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Chimal-Vega, Brenda; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Carrillo Vazquez, Jonathan; Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge L; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G

    2015-11-21

    Leptin is a hormone that regulates energy homeostasis, inflammation, hematopoiesis and immune response, among other functions (Houseknecht et al., 1998; Zhang et al., 1995; Paz-Filho et al., 2010). To obtain its crystallographic structure, it was necessary to substitute a tryptophan for a glutamic acid at position 100, thus creating a mutant leptin that has been reported to have biological activity comparable to the activity of the wild type but that crystallizes more readily. Here, we report a comparative study of the conformational space of WT and W100E leptin using molecular dynamics simulations performed at 300, 400, and 500 K. We detected differences between the interactions of the two proteins with local and distal effects, resulting in changes in the conformation, accessible surface area, compactness, electrostatic potential and dynamic behavior. Additionally, the series of unfolding events that occur when leptin is subjected to high temperature differs for the two constructs. We observed that both proteins are mostly unstructured after 20 ns of MD simulation at 500 K. However, WT leptin maintains a significant amount of secondary structure in helix α2, while the most stable region of W100E leptin is helix α3. Furthermore, we found that the region between residues 25 and 42 might adopt interconverting secondary structures ranging from α-helices and random coils to β-strand structures. Thus, this region can be considered an intrinsically disordered region. This atomistic description supports our understanding of leptin signaling and consequently might facilitate the use of leptin in treatments for the pathophysiologies in which it is implicated. PMID:26342543

  5. Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    McTigue, Michele; Murray, Brion William; Chen, Jeffrey H.; Deng, Ya-Li; Solowiej, James; Kania, Robert S.

    2012-09-17

    We performed analyses of compounds in clinical development which have shown that ligand efficient-molecules with privileged physical properties and low dose are less likely to fail in the various stages of clinical testing, have fewer postapproval withdrawals, and are less likely to receive black box safety warnings. However, detailed side-by-side examination of molecular interactions and properties within single drug classes are lacking. As a class, VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) have changed the landscape of how cancer is treated, particularly in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which is molecularly linked to the VEGF signaling axis. Despite the clear role of the molecular target, member molecules of this validated drug class exhibit distinct clinical efficacy and safety profiles in comparable renal cell carcinoma clinical studies. The first head-to-head randomized phase III comparative study between active VEGFR TKIs has confirmed significant differences in clinical performance [Rini BI, et al. (2011) Lancet 378:193–1939]. To elucidate how fundamental drug potency–efficiency is achieved and impacts differentiation within the VEGFR TKI class, we determined potencies, time dependence, selectivities, and X-ray structures of the drug–kinase complexes using a VEGFR2 TK construct inclusive of the important juxtamembrane domain. Collectively, the studies elucidate unique drug–kinase interactions that are dependent on distinct juxtamembrane domain conformations, resulting in significant potency and ligand efficiency differences. Finally, the identified structural trends are consistent with in vitro measurements, which translate well to clinical performance, underscoring a principle that may be broadly applicable to prospective drug design for optimal in vivo performance.

  6. Conformation-dependent Molecular Orientation Deduced from First-principles Modeling of Oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated and Amide Group Containing Alkanethiolates Self-assembled on Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malysheva, L.; Onipko, A.; Valiokas, R.; Liedberg, B.

    2005-09-01

    We report orientation angles for the alkyl chain, amide group, and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) portion within self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of OEG-terminated and amide containing alkanethiolates which, depending on the OEG length and substrate temperature, display unique conformations — all-trans or helical. Optimized geometries of the molecular constituents, characteristic vibration frequencies and transition dipole moments are obtained by using DFT methods with gradient corrections. These ab initio data are subsequently used to simulate infrared reflection-absorption (RA) spectra associated with different conformations and orientations. The obtained results have generated a deeper knowledge of the internal SAM structure, which is crucial for understanding phase and folding characteristics, interaction with water and ultimately the protein repellent properties of OEG-containing SAMs.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Escherichia coli HPPK apo-enzyme reveal a network of conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kaifu; He, Hongqing; Yang, Minghui; Yan, Honggao

    2015-11-10

    6-Hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (HPPK) catalyzes the first reaction in the folate biosynthetic pathway. Comparison of its X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance structures suggests that the enzyme undergoes significant conformational change upon binding to its substrates, especially in three catalytic loops. Experimental research has shown that even when confined by crystal contacts, loops 2 and 3 remain rather flexible when the enzyme is in its apo form, raising questions about the putative large-scale induced-fit conformational change of HPPK. To investigate the loop dynamics in a crystal-free environment, we performed conventional molecular dynamics simulations of the apo-enzyme at two different temperatures (300 and 350 K). Our simulations show that the crystallographic B-factors considerably underestimate the loop dynamics; multiple conformations of loops 2 and 3, including the open, semi-open, and closed conformations that an enzyme must adopt throughout its catalytic cycle, are all accessible to the apo-enzyme. These results revise our previous view of the functional mechanism of conformational change upon MgATP binding and offer valuable structural insights into the workings of HPPK. In this paper, conformational network analysis and principal component analysis related to the loops are discussed to support the presented conclusions. PMID:26492157

  8. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H. J.; de Jong, Govardus A. H.; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A.; Baumert, Joseph L.; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L.; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  9. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H J; de Jong, Govardus A H; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A; Baumert, Joseph L; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  10. On the connection between nonmonotonic taste behavior and molecular conformation in solution: The case of rebaudioside-A.

    PubMed

    Chopade, Prashant D; Sarma, Bipul; Santiso, Erik E; Simpson, Jeffrey; Fry, John C; Yurttas, Nese; Biermann, Kari L; Chen, Jie; Trout, Bernhardt L; Myerson, Allan S

    2015-12-28

    The diterpene steviol glycoside, rebaudioside A, is a natural high potency non-caloric sweetener extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. This compound shows a parabolic change in sweet taste intensity with temperature which contrasts with the general finding for other synthetic or natural sweeteners whose sweet taste increases with temperature. The nonmonotonic taste behavior was determined by sensory analysis using large taste panels. The conformational landscape of rebaudioside A was established at a range of temperatures by means of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulation. The relationship between various conformations and the observed sweetness of rebaudioside A is described. PMID:26723665

  11. On the connection between nonmonotonic taste behavior and molecular conformation in solution: The case of rebaudioside-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopade, Prashant D.; Sarma, Bipul; Santiso, Erik E.; Simpson, Jeffrey; Fry, John C.; Yurttas, Nese; Biermann, Kari L.; Chen, Jie; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Myerson, Allan S.

    2015-12-01

    The diterpene steviol glycoside, rebaudioside A, is a natural high potency non-caloric sweetener extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. This compound shows a parabolic change in sweet taste intensity with temperature which contrasts with the general finding for other synthetic or natural sweeteners whose sweet taste increases with temperature. The nonmonotonic taste behavior was determined by sensory analysis using large taste panels. The conformational landscape of rebaudioside A was established at a range of temperatures by means of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulation. The relationship between various conformations and the observed sweetness of rebaudioside A is described.

  12. On the connection between nonmonotonic taste behavior and molecular conformation in solution: The case of rebaudioside-A

    SciTech Connect

    Chopade, Prashant D.; Sarma, Bipul; Santiso, Erik E.; Chen, Jie; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Myerson, Allan S.; Simpson, Jeffrey; Fry, John C.; Biermann, Kari L.; Yurttas, Nese

    2015-12-28

    The diterpene steviol glycoside, rebaudioside A, is a natural high potency non-caloric sweetener extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. This compound shows a parabolic change in sweet taste intensity with temperature which contrasts with the general finding for other synthetic or natural sweeteners whose sweet taste increases with temperature. The nonmonotonic taste behavior was determined by sensory analysis using large taste panels. The conformational landscape of rebaudioside A was established at a range of temperatures by means of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulation. The relationship between various conformations and the observed sweetness of rebaudioside A is described.

  13. Formation of smooth, conformal molecular layers on ZnO surfaces via photochemical grafting.

    PubMed

    Ruther, Rose E; Franking, Ryan; Huhn, Alex M; Gomez-Zayas, Jaritza; Hamers, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    We have investigated the photochemical grafting of organic alkenes to atomically flat ZnO(10 ̅10) single crystals and ZnO nanorods as a way to produce functional molecule-semiconductor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy shows that photochemical grafting produces highly conformal, smooth molecular layers with no detectable changes in the underlying structure of the ZnO terraces or steps. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that grafting of a methyl ester-terminated alkene terminates near one monolayer, while alkenes bearing a trifluoroacetamide-protected amine form very smooth multilayers. Even with multilayers, it is possible to deprotect the amines and to link a second molecule to the surface with excellent efficiency and without significant loss of molecules from the surface. This demonstrates that the use of photochemical grafting, even in the case of multilayer formation, enables multistep chemical processes to be conducted on the ZnO surface. Photoresponse measurements demonstrate that functionalization of the surface does not affect the ability to induce field effects in the underlying ZnO, thereby suggesting that this approach to functionalization may be useful for applications in sensing and in hybrid organic-inorganic transistors and related devices. PMID:21777005

  14. Charge-dependent conformations and dynamics of pamam dendrimers revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin

    Neutron scattering and fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) are employed to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers with ethylenediamine (EDA) core under various charge conditions. Regarding to the conformational characteristics, we focus on scrutinizing density profile evolution of PAMAM dendrimers as the molecular charge of dendrimer increases from neutral state to highly charged condition. It should be noted that within the context of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), the dendrimers are composed of hydrocarbon component (dry part) and the penetrating water molecules. Though there have been SANS experiments that studied the charge-dependent structural change of PAMAM dendrimers, their results were limited to the collective behavior of the aforementioned two parts. This study is devoted to deepen the understanding towards the structural responsiveness of intra-molecular polymeric and hydration parts separately through advanced contrast variation SANS data analysis scheme available recently and unravel the governing principles through coupling with MD simulations. Two kinds of acids, namely hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, are utilized to tune the pH condition and hence the molecular charge. As far as the dynamical properties, we target at understanding the underlying mechanism that leads to segmental dynamic enhancement observed from quasielstic neutron scattering (QENS) experiment previously. PAMAM dendrimers have a wealth of potential applications, such as drug delivery agency, energy harvesting medium, and light emitting diodes. More importantly, it is regarded as an ideal system to test many theoretical predictions since dendrimers conjugate both colloid-like globular shape and polymer-like flexible chains. This Ph.D. research addresses two main challenges in studying PAMAM dendrimers. Even though neutron scattering is an ideal tool to study this PAMAM dendrimer solution due to its matching temporal and

  15. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  16. Conformational Analysis of a Dermatan Sulfate-Derived Tetrasaccharide by NMR, Molecular Modeling, and Residual Dipolar Couplings

    PubMed Central

    Silipo, Alba; Zhang, Zhenqing; Cañada, F. Javier; Molinaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The solution conformation behavior of a dermatan-derived tetrasaccharide—ΔHexA-(1→3)-GalNAc4S-β-(1→4)-IdoA-α-(1→3)-red-GalNAc4S (S is a sulfate group)—has been explored by means of NMR spectroscopy, especially by NOE-based conformational analysis. The tetrasaccharide was present as four species, two of which are chemically different in the anomeric orientation of the reducing 2-deoxy-2-acetamido-galactose (red-GalNAc) residue, while the other two are the result of different conformations of the iduronic acid (IdoA) unit. The two α–-interconverting anomers were present in a 0.6:1 ratio. Ring conformations have been defined by analysis of 3JH,H coupling constants and interresidual NOE contacts. Both 2-deoxy-2-acetamido-galactose (GalNAc) residues were found in the 4C1 chair conformation, the unsaturated uronic acid (Δ-Hex A) adopts a strongly predominant half-chair 1H2 conformation, while the IdoA residue exists either in the 1C4 chair or in the 2S0 skewed boat geometries, in a 4:1 ratio. There is a moderate flexibility of Φ and Ψ torsions as suggested by nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), molecular modeling (MM), and molecular dynamics (MD) studies. This was further investigated by residual dipolar couplings (RDCs). One-bond C–H RDCs (1DC,H) and long-range H–H (3DH,H) RDCs were measured for the tetrasaccharide in a phage solution and interpreted in combination with restrained MD simulation. The RDC-derived data substantially confirmed the validity of the conformer distribution resulting from the NOE-derived simulations, but allowed an improved definition of the conformational behavior of the oligosaccharides in solution. In summary, the data show a moderate flexibility of the four tetrasaccharide species at the central glycosidic linkage. Differences in the shapes of species with the IdoA in skew and in chair conformations and in the distribution of the sulfate groups have also been highlighted. PMID:18072186

  17. Exploring the conformational and binding properties of unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric and trimeric Bcl-2 through docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zacarías-Lara, Oscar J; Correa-Basurto, José; Bello, Martiniano

    2016-07-01

    B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) is commonly associated with the progression and preservation of cancer and certain lymphomas; therefore, it is considered as a biological target against cancer. Nevertheless, evidence of all its structural binding sites has been hidden because of the lack of a complete Bcl-2 model, given the presence of a flexible loop domain (FLD), which is responsible for its complex behavior. FLD region has been implicated in phosphorylation, homotrimerization, and heterodimerization associated with Bcl-2 antiapoptotic function. In this contribution, homology modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the microsecond (µs) time-scale and docking calculations were combined to explore the conformational complexity of unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric and trimeric Bcl-2 systems. Conformational ensembles generated through MD simulations allowed for identifying the most populated unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric conformations, which were used as starting models to obtain trimeric complexes through protein-protein docking calculations, also submitted to µs MD simulations. Principal component analysis showed that FLD represents the main contributor to total Bcl-2 mobility, and is affected by phosphorylation and oligomerization. Subsequently, based on the most representative unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric and trimeric Bcl-2 conformations, docking studies were initiated to identify the ligand binding site of several known Bcl-2 inhibitors to explain their influence in homo-complex formation and phosphorylation. Docking studies showed that the different conformational states experienced by FLD, such as phosphorylation and oligomerization, play an essential role in the ability to make homo and hetero-complexes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 393-413, 2016. PMID:27016043

  18. Influence of a lipid bilayer on the conformational behavior of amphotericin B derivatives - A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Neumann, Anna; Borowski, Edward; Baginski, Maciej

    2009-04-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is an effective but very toxic antifungal antibiotic. In our laboratory a series of AmB derivatives of improved selectivity of action was synthesized and tested. To understand molecular basis of this improvement, comparative conformational studies of amphotericin B and its two more selective derivatives were carried out in an aqueous solution and in a lipid membrane. These molecular simulation studies revealed that within a membrane environment the conformational behavior of the derivatives differs significantly from the one observed for the parent molecule. Possible reasons for such a difference are analyzed. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the observed conformational transition within the polar head of AmB derivatives may lead to destabilization of antibiotic-induced transmembrane channels. Consequently, the selective toxicity of the derivatives should increase as ergosterol-rich liquid-ordered domains are more rigid and conformationally ordered than their cholesterol-containing counterparts, and as such may better support less stable channel structure. PMID:19185412

  19. Conformational Transition Pathways of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Domain from Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Bayesian Clustering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is aberrantly activated in various cancer cells and an important target for cancer treatment. Deep understanding of EGFR conformational changes between the active and inactive states is of pharmaceutical interest. Here we present a strategy combining multiply targeted molecular dynamics simulations, unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, and Bayesian clustering to investigate transition pathways during the activation/inactivation process of EGFR kinase domain. Two distinct pathways between the active and inactive forms are designed, explored, and compared. Based on Bayesian clustering and rough two-dimensional free energy surfaces, the energy-favorable pathway is recognized, though DFG-flip happens in both pathways. In addition, another pathway with different intermediate states appears in our simulations. Comparison of distinct pathways also indicates that disruption of the Lys745-Glu762 interaction is critically important in DFG-flip while movement of the A-loop significantly facilitates the conformational change. Our simulations yield new insights into EGFR conformational transitions. Moreover, our results verify that this approach is valid and efficient in sampling of protein conformational changes and comparison of distinct pathways. PMID:25136273

  20. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  1. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  2. Cluster analysis of molecular simulation trajectories for systems where both conformation and orientation of the sampled states are important.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Clustering methods have been widely used to group together similar conformational states from molecular simulations of biomolecules in solution. For applications such as the interaction of a protein with a surface, the orientation of the protein relative to the surface is also an important clustering parameter because of its potential effect on adsorbed-state bioactivity. This study presents cluster analysis methods that are specifically designed for systems where both molecular orientation and conformation are important, and the methods are demonstrated using test cases of adsorbed proteins for validation. Additionally, because cluster analysis can be a very subjective process, an objective procedure for identifying both the optimal number of clusters and the best clustering algorithm to be applied to analyze a given dataset is presented. The method is demonstrated for several agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithms used in conjunction with three cluster validation techniques. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27292100

  3. DETECTION OF MOLECULAR MONOLAYERS BY OPTICAL. SECOND HARMONIC GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. K.; Heinz, T. F.; Ricard, D.; Shen, Y. R.

    1980-12-01

    Second harmonic generation is shown to be sensitive enough to detect molecular monolayers adsorbed on a silver surface. Adsorption of AgCl and pyridine on silver during and after an electrolytic cycle can be easily observed,

  4. On the use of Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings to the grid generation for global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Wang, B.; Liu, J.

    2015-02-01

    In this article we propose two conformal mapping based grid generation algorithms for global ocean general circulation models (OGCMs). Contrary to conventional, analytical forms based dipolar or tripolar grids, the new algorithms are based on Schwarz-Christoffel (SC) conformal mapping with prescribed boundary information. While dealing with the basic grid design problem of pole relocation, these new algorithms also address more advanced issues such as smoothed scaling factor, or the new requirements on OGCM grids arisen from the recent trend of high-resolution and multi-scale modeling. The proposed grid generation algorithm could potentially achieve the alignment of grid lines to coastlines, enhanced spatial resolution in coastal regions, and easier computational load balance. Since the generated grids are still orthogonal curvilinear, they can be readily utilized in existing Bryan-Cox-Semtner type ocean models. The proposed methodology can also be applied to the grid generation task for regional ocean modeling where complex land-ocean distribution is present.

  5. A New Efficient Method for Generating Conformations of Unfolded Proteins with Diverse Main-Chain Dihedral-Angle Distributions.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yasutaka; Shimbo, Yudai; Nonaka, Takamasa; Soda, Kunitsugu

    2011-07-12

    A new method for generating polypeptide-chain conformations has been developed for studying structural characteristics of unfolded proteins. It enables us to generate a large number of conformations very rapidly by avoiding atomic collisions efficiently with the use of main-chain dihedral-angle distributions derived from a crystal-structure database of proteins. In addition, combining main-chain dihedral-angle distributions for the amino acid residues incorporated in different secondary structures, we can obtain diverse conformational ensembles with different structural features. Structural characteristics of proteins denatured in high-concentration denaturant solution were analyzed by comparing predictions from this method with results from solution X-ray scattering (SXS) measurement. Analysis of the dependence of the mean square radius (Rsq) of protein on the number of residues and the shape of its Kratky profile has confirmed that the highly denaturing solvent serves as a good solvent in accordance with previous reports. It was also found that, in order for a conformational ensemble to reproduce experimental data, the percentage in which main-chain dihedral angles are found in the α region must be in the range of 20-40%. It agrees with studies on the (3)JHNα coupling constant using the multidimensional NMR method. These results confirm that our method for generating diverse conformations of polypeptide chains is very useful to the conformational analysis of unfolded protein, because it enables us to analyze comprehensively both of the local structural features obtained from NMR and the global ones obtained from SXS. PMID:26606484

  6. Molecular structure and conformational composition of 1,1-dichlorobutane: a gas-phase electron diffraction and ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarset, Kirsten; Hagen, Kolbjørn; Stølevik, Reidar

    1997-09-01

    Gas-phase electron diffraction data obtained at 23°C, together with results from ab initio molecular orbital calculations ( {HF}/{6-31 G(d)}). were used to determine the structure and conformational composition of 1,1-dichlorobutane. Of the five distinguishable conformers (AA, G + A, AG +, G + G + and G + G -), the G + A conformer was found to be the low-energy form, and the investigation also indicated that certain amounts of the AA and G + G - conformers might be present. The symbols describing the conformers refer to torsion about the C 1C 2 and C 2C 3 bonds, anti (A) with H 5C 1C 2C 3 and C 1C 2C 3C 4 torsion angles of 180° and gauche (G + or G -) with torsion angles of + 60° or 300° (-60°) respectively. The results for the principal distances ( rg) and angles (∠ α) from the combined electron diffraction/ab initio study for the G + A conformer, with estimated 2σ uncertainties, were as follows: r( C1 C2) = 1.521(4) Å, r( C2 C3) = 1.539(4) Å, r( C3 C4) = 1.546(4) Å, r( C Cl6) = 1.782(3) Å, r( CCl7) = 1.782(3) Å, = 1.106(6) Å, ∠C 1C 2C 3 = 114.4(13)°, ∠C 2C 3C 4 = 112.5(13)°, ∠CCCl 6 = 110.4(7)°, ∠CCCl 7 = 111.9(7)°, <∠CCH> = 108.9(47)°. Only average values for r(CC), r(CCl), r(CH), ∠CCC, ∠CCX and ∠CCH were determined in the least-square refinements; the differences between the values for these parameters in the same conformer and between the different conformers were kept constant at the values obtained from the ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  7. Theoretical studies of a molecular beam generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    The following is a proposed baseline model that is being developed for the simulation of hydrodynamic generator, which can be converted at a later date to magnetohydrodynamic MHD thruster by adding the necessary electric and magnetic fields. The following development will include the electric and magnetic terms, however, the initial computer program will not include these terms. The analysis that follows is a one species, single temperature model constructed over a domain that is defined by an enclosed region.

  8. Applying Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Identify Rarely Sampled Ligand-bound Conformational States of Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase, an Antibacterial Target

    PubMed Central

    Sinko, William; de Oliveira, César; Williams, Sarah; Van Wynsberghe, Adam; Durrant, Jacob D; Cao, Rong; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a cis-prenyltransferase enzyme, which is required for cell wall biosynthesis in bacteria. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is an attractive target for antimicrobial therapy. We performed long molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies on undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase to investigate its dynamic behavior and the influence of protein flexibility on the design of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors. We also describe the first X-ray crystallographic structure of Escherichia coli apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a highly flexible protein, with mobile binding pockets in the active site. By carrying out docking studies with experimentally validated undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors using high- and low-populated conformational states extracted from the molecular dynamics simulations, we show that structurally dissimilar compounds can bind preferentially to different and rarely sampled conformational states. By performing structural analyses on the newly obtained apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase and other crystal structures previously published, we show that the changes observed during the molecular dynamics simulation are very similar to those seen in the crystal structures obtained in the presence or absence of ligands. We believe that this is the first time that a rare ‘expanded pocket’ state, key to drug design and verified by crystallography, has been extracted from a molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:21294851

  9. Applying Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Identify Rarely Sampled Ligand-bound Conformational States of Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase, an Antibacterial Target

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, William; de Oliveira, César; Williams, Sarah; Van Wynsberghe, Adam; Durrant, Jacob D.; Cao, Rong; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2012-04-30

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a cis-prenyltransferase enzyme, which is required for cell wall biosynthesis in bacteria. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is an attractive target for antimicrobial therapy. We performed long molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies on undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase to investigate its dynamic behavior and the influence of protein flexibility on the design of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors. We also describe the first X-ray crystallographic structure of Escherichia coli apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase is a highly flexible protein, with mobile binding pockets in the active site. By carrying out docking studies with experimentally validated undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase inhibitors using high- and low-populated conformational states extracted from the molecular dynamics simulations, we show that structurally dissimilar compounds can bind preferentially to different and rarely sampled conformational states. By performing structural analyses on the newly obtained apo-undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase and other crystal structures previously published, we show that the changes observed during the molecular dynamics simulation are very similar to those seen in the crystal structures obtained in the presence or absence of ligands. We believe that this is the first time that a rare 'expanded pocket' state, key to drug design and verified by crystallography, has been extracted from a molecular dynamics simulation.

  10. Modeling Signal Propagation Mechanisms and Ligand-Based Conformational Dynamics of the Hsp90 Molecular Chaperone Full-Length Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Giulia; Verkhivker, Gennady; Colombo, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone essential for protein folding and activation in normal homeostasis and stress response. ATP binding and hydrolysis facilitate Hsp90 conformational changes required for client activation. Hsp90 plays an important role in disease states, particularly in cancer, where chaperoning of the mutated and overexpressed oncoproteins is important for function. Recent studies have illuminated mechanisms related to the chaperone function. However, an atomic resolution view of Hsp90 conformational dynamics, determined by the presence of different binding partners, is critical to define communication pathways between remote residues in different domains intimately affecting the chaperone cycle. Here, we present a computational analysis of signal propagation and long-range communication pathways in Hsp90. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the full-length Hsp90 dimer, combined with essential dynamics, correlation analysis, and a signal propagation model. All-atom MD simulations with timescales of 70 ns have been performed for complexes with the natural substrates ATP and ADP and for the unliganded dimer. We elucidate the mechanisms of signal propagation and determine “hot spots” involved in interdomain communication pathways from the nucleotide-binding site to the C-terminal domain interface. A comprehensive computational analysis of the Hsp90 communication pathways and dynamics at atomic resolution has revealed the role of the nucleotide in effecting conformational changes, elucidating the mechanisms of signal propagation. Functionally important residues and secondary structure elements emerge as effective mediators of communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the C-terminal interface. Furthermore, we show that specific interdomain signal propagation pathways may be activated as a function of the ligand. Our results support a “conformational selection model” of the Hsp90 mechanism, whereby the protein may exist in a

  11. Electronic transport in biphenyl single-molecule junctions with carbon nanotubes electrodes: The role of molecular conformation and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Brito Silva, C. A. Jr.; Granhen, E. R.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P.; Del Nero, J.; Pinheiro, F. A.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate, by means of ab initio calculations, electronic transport in molecular junctions composed of a biphenyl molecule attached to metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance is proportional to cos{sup 2} {theta}, with {theta} the angle between phenyl rings, when the Fermi level of the contacts lies within the frontier molecular orbitals energy gap. This result, which agrees with experiments in biphenyl junctions with nonorganic contacts, suggests that the cos{sup 2} {theta} law has a more general applicability, irrespective of the nature of the electrodes. We calculate the geometrical degree of chirality of the junction, which only depends on the atomic positions, and demonstrate that it is not only proportional to cos{sup 2} {theta} but also is strongly correlated with the current through the system. These results indicate that molecular conformation plays the preponderant role in determining transport properties of biphenyl-carbon nanotubes molecular junctions.

  12. A molecular dynamics description of the conformational flexibility of the L-iduronate ring in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Jesús; Nieto, Pedro M; Martín-Lomas, Manuel

    2003-07-01

    For a synthetic hexasaccharide model it is shown that the conformational flexibility of the L-iduronate ring in glycosaminoglycans can be adequately described by using the PME methodology together with simulation protocols suitable for highly charged systems. PMID:12868729

  13. Observation of conformers with laser electronic spectroscopy in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philis, John G.; Kosmidis, Constantine E.; Tsekeris, Pericles

    1998-07-01

    We discuss the ability and effectiveness of electronic spectroscopy to reveal rotational isomerism by presenting some examples of the S1 implied by S0 electronic spectra of non-rigid molecules. One or two photon electronic spectra have multiple features when the molecule has more than one conformational preference. Torsional bands showing up in the spectrum complicate the assignment of conformers. Hole burning experiments give definite conclusions on the existence of rotational isomerism and an example from the literature is given.

  14. Molecular structure and pronounced conformational flexibility of doxorubicin in free and conjugated state within a drug-peptide compound.

    PubMed

    Tsoneva, Yana; Jonker, Hendrik R A; Wagner, Manfred; Tadjer, Alia; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Ivanova, Anela

    2015-02-19

    The search for targeted drug delivery systems requires the design of drug-carrier complexes, which could both reach the malignant cells and preserve the therapeutic substance activity. A promising strategy aimed at enhancing the uptake and reducing the systemic toxicity is to bind covalently the drug to a cell-penetrating peptide. To understand the structure-activity relationship in such preparations, the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin was investigated by unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations, supported by NMR, which yielded its molecular geometry in aqueous environment. Furthermore, the structure and dynamics of a conjugate of the drug with a cell-penetrating peptide was obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution. The geometries of the unbound compounds were characterized at different temperatures, as well as the extent to which they change after covalent binding and whether/how they influence each other in the drug-peptide conjugate. The main structural fragments that affect the conformational ensemble of every molecule were found. The results show that the transitions between different substructures of the three compounds require a modest amount of energy. At increased temperature, either more conformations become populated as a result of the thermal fluctuations or the relative shares of the various conformers equalize at the nanosecond scale. These frequent structural interconversions suggest expressed conformational freedom of the molecules. Conjugation into the drug-peptide compound partially immobilizes the molecules of the parent compounds. Nevertheless, flexibility still exists, as well as an effective intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding that stabilizes the structures. We observe compact packing of the drug within the peptide that is also based on stacking interactions. All this outlines the drug-peptide conjugate as a prospective building block of a more complex drug-carrier system. PMID:25603129

  15. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Local Structural Characteristics of DNA Oligonucleotides: Studies of Helical Axis Deformations, Conformational Sequence Dependence and Modified Nucleoside Perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise-May, Shirley

    The present DNA studies investigate the local structure of DNA oligonucleotides in order to characterize helical axis deformations, sequence dependent fine structure and modified nucleoside perturbations of selected oligonucleotide sequences. The molecular dynamics method is used to generate an ensemble of energetically feasible DNA conformations which can then be analyzed for dynamical conformational properties, some of which can be compared to experimentally derived values. A theory and graphical presentation for the analysis of helical deformations of DNA based on the configurational statistics of polymers, called "Persistence Analysis", was designed. The results of the analysis on prototype forms, static crystal structures and two solvated MD simulations of the sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) indicate that all of the expected features of bending can be sensitively and systematically identified by this approach. Comparison of the relative performance of three molecular dynamics potential functions commonly used for dynamical modeling of biological macromolecules; CHARMm, AMBER and GROMOS was investigated via in vacuo MD simulations on the dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)_2 with respect to the conformational properties of each dynamical model and their ability to support A and B families of DNA. Vacuum molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMm force field carried out on simple homo- and heteropolymers of DNA led to the conclusion that sequence dependent fine structure appears to be well defined for adenine-thymine rich sequences both at the base pair and base step level whereas much of the the fine structure found in cytosine -guanine rich sequences appears to be context dependent. The local conformational properties of the homopolymer poly (dA) -poly (dT) revealed one dynamical model which was found in general agreement with fiber models currently available. Investigation of the relative structural static and dynamical effect of the misincorporation of

  16. Characterization of Molecular Determinants of the Conformational Stability of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor: Leucine 46 Hydrophobic Pocket

    PubMed Central

    El-Turk, Farah; Fauvet, Bruno; Ashrafi, Amer; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Cho, Min-Kyu; Neri, Marilisa; Cascella, Michele; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Pojer, Florence; Zweckstetter, Markus; Lashuel, Hilal

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is a key mediator of inflammatory responses and innate immunity and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The oligomerization of MIF, more specifically trimer formation, is essential for its keto-enol tautomerase activity and probably mediates several of its interactions and biological activities, including its binding to its receptor CD74 and activation of certain signaling pathways. Therefore, understanding the molecular factors governing the oligomerization of MIF and the role of quaternary structure in modulating its structural stability and multifunctional properties is crucial for understanding the function of MIF in health and disease. Herein, we describe highly conserved intersubunit interactions involving the hydrophobic packing of the side chain of Leu46 onto the β-strand β3 of one monomer within a hydrophobic pocket from the adjacent monomer constituted by residues Arg11, Val14, Phe18, Leu19, Val39, His40, Val41, Val42, and Pro43. To elucidate the structural significance of these intersubunit interactions and their relative contribution to MIF’s trimerization, structural stability and catalytic activity, we generated three point mutations where Leu46 was replaced by glycine (L46G), alanine (L46A) and phenylalanine (L46F), and their structural properties, stability, oligomerization state, and catalytic activity were characterized using a battery of biophysical methods and X-ray crystallography. Our findings provide new insights into the role of the Leu46 hydrophobic pocket in stabilizing the conformational state of MIF in solution. Disrupting the Leu46 hydrophobic interaction perturbs the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein but has no effect on its oligomerization state. PMID:23028743

  17. Quantitative sampling of conformational heterogeneity of a DNA hairpin using molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Voltz, Karine; Léonard, Jérémie; Touceda, Patricia Tourón; Conyard, Jamie; Chaker, Ziyad; Dejaegere, Annick; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Haacke, Stefan; Stote, Roland H.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and time resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy were combined to quantitatively describe the conformational landscape of the DNA primary binding sequence (PBS) of the HIV-1 genome, a short hairpin targeted by retroviral nucleocapsid proteins implicated in the viral reverse transcription. Three 2-aminopurine (2AP) labeled PBS constructs were studied. For each variant, the complete distribution of fluorescence lifetimes covering 5 orders of magnitude in timescale was measured and the populations of conformers experimentally observed to undergo static quenching were quantified. A binary quantification permitted the comparison of populations from experimental lifetime amplitudes to populations of aromatically stacked 2AP conformers obtained from simulation. Both populations agreed well, supporting the general assumption that quenching of 2AP fluorescence results from pi-stacking interactions with neighboring nucleobases and demonstrating the success of the proposed methodology for the combined analysis of TRF and MD data. Cluster analysis of the latter further identified predominant conformations that were consistent with the fluorescence decay times and amplitudes, providing a structure-based rationalization for the wide range of fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, the simulations provided evidence of local structural perturbations induced by 2AP. The approach presented is a general tool to investigate fine structural heterogeneity in nucleic acid and nucleoprotein assemblies. PMID:26896800

  18. (13)CHD2-CEST NMR spectroscopy provides an avenue for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Rennella, Enrico; Huang, Rui; Velyvis, Algirdas; Kay, Lewis E

    2015-10-01

    An NMR experiment for quantifying slow (millisecond) time-scale exchange processes involving the interconversion between visible ground state and invisible, conformationally excited state conformers is presented. The approach exploits chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and makes use of (13)CHD2 methyl group probes that can be readily incorporated into otherwise highly deuterated proteins. The methodology is validated with an application to a G48A Fyn SH3 domain that exchanges between a folded conformation and a sparsely populated and transiently formed unfolded ensemble. Experiments on a number of different protein systems, including a 360 kDa half-proteasome, establish that the sensitivity of this (13)CHD2 (13)C-CEST technique can be upwards of a factor of 5 times higher than for a previously published (13)CH3 (13)C-CEST approach (Bouvignies and Kay in J Biomol NMR 53:303-310, 2012), suggesting that the methodology will be powerful for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins. PMID:26271302

  19. Quantitative sampling of conformational heterogeneity of a DNA hairpin using molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Voltz, Karine; Léonard, Jérémie; Touceda, Patricia Tourón; Conyard, Jamie; Chaker, Ziyad; Dejaegere, Annick; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Haacke, Stefan; Stote, Roland H

    2016-04-20

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and time resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy were combined to quantitatively describe the conformational landscape of the DNA primary binding sequence (PBS) of the HIV-1 genome, a short hairpin targeted by retroviral nucleocapsid proteins implicated in the viral reverse transcription. Three 2-aminopurine (2AP) labeled PBS constructs were studied. For each variant, the complete distribution of fluorescence lifetimes covering 5 orders of magnitude in timescale was measured and the populations of conformers experimentally observed to undergo static quenching were quantified. A binary quantification permitted the comparison of populations from experimental lifetime amplitudes to populations of aromatically stacked 2AP conformers obtained from simulation. Both populations agreed well, supporting the general assumption that quenching of 2AP fluorescence results from pi-stacking interactions with neighboring nucleobases and demonstrating the success of the proposed methodology for the combined analysis of TRF and MD data. Cluster analysis of the latter further identified predominant conformations that were consistent with the fluorescence decay times and amplitudes, providing a structure-based rationalization for the wide range of fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, the simulations provided evidence of local structural perturbations induced by 2AP. The approach presented is a general tool to investigate fine structural heterogeneity in nucleic acid and nucleoprotein assemblies. PMID:26896800

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations give insight into the conformational change, complex formation, and electron transfer pathway for cytochrome P450 reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sündermann, Axel; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR) undergoes a large conformational change to allow for an electron transfer to a redox partner to take place. After an internal electron transfer over its cofactors, it opens up to facilitate the interaction and electron transfer with a cytochrome P450. The open conformation appears difficult to crystallize. Therefore, a model of a human CYPOR in the open conformation was constructed to be able to investigate the stability and conformational change of this protein by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Since the role of the protein is to provide electrons to a redox partner, the interactions with cytochrome P450 2D6 (2D6) were investigated and a possible complex structure is suggested. Additionally, electron pathway calculations with a newly written program were performed to investigate which amino acids relay the electrons from the FMN cofactor of CYPOR to the HEME of 2D6. Several possible interacting amino acids in the complex, as well as a possible electron transfer pathway were identified and open the way for further investigation by site directed mutagenesis studies. PMID:23832577

  1. Molecular mechanism for generation of antibody memory

    PubMed Central

    Shivarov, Velizar; Shinkura, Reiko; Doi, Tomomitsu; Begum, Nasim A.; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Okazaki, Il-Mi; Ito, Satomi; Nonaka, Taichiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Honjo, Tasuku

    2008-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the essential enzyme inducing the DNA cleavage required for both somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin gene. We originally proposed the RNA-editing model for the mechanism of DNA cleavage by AID. We obtained evidence that fulfils three requirements for CSR by this model, namely (i) AID shuttling between nucleus and cytoplasm, (ii) de novo protein synthesis for CSR, and (iii) AID–RNA complex formation. The alternative hypothesis, designated as the DNA-deamination model, assumes that the in vitro DNA deamination activity of AID is representative of its physiological function in vivo. Furthermore, the resulting dU was removed by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) to generate a basic site, followed by phosphodiester bond cleavage by AP endonuclease. We critically examined each of these provisional steps. We identified a cluster of mutants (H48A, L49A, R50A and N51A) that had particularly higher CSR activities than expected from their DNA deamination activities. The most striking was the N51A mutant that had no ability to deaminate DNA in vitro but retained approximately 50 per cent of the wild-type level of CSR activity. We also provide further evidence that UNG plays a non-canonical role in CSR, namely in the repair step of the DNA breaks. Taking these results together, we favour the RNA-editing model for the function of AID in CSR. PMID:19022739

  2. Molecular modeling, mutational analysis and conformational switching in IL27: An in silico structural insight towards AIDS research.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-01-15

    The advancement in proteomics and bioinformatics provokes to discern the molecular-level probe for HIV inhibitor; human interleukin-27 (IL27). Documentation documents that tyrosine residues in IL27 play a pivotal role for interacting with HIV, causing apoptosis of the HIV+ cells. Primarily, 3D structure of human wild-type (WT) IL27 was built through manifold molecular modeling techniques after the satisfaction of stereo-chemical properties. Its essential tyrosine residues were identified. Two mutant models for IL27 were prepared following the similar protocol by first substituting the tyrosine residues with glycine (MT_G) and then with alanine (MT_A) in the WT protein. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to obtain a stable conformation. Conformational alterations in WT, MT_G and MT_A (before and after MD simulation) disclosed that MT_A was the steadiest one with the best secondary structure conformation supported by statistical significances. Though huge RMSD variations were observed on superimposing the MT structures on WT individually, the MTs were examined to share similar SCOP/CATH fold with TM-score=0.8, indicating that they retained their functionality even after mutation. Electrostatic surface potential again unveiled MT_A to be the most stable one. MT_A was thereby revealed to be the potent peptide inhibitor for HIV. This probe presents a pathway to investigate and compare the bio-molecular interaction of WT IL27 and MT_A IL27 (strongest model) with HIV in the future. This is the first report regarding the structural biology of IL27 accompanied by alteration at its genetic level and delving into the unknown residue-level and functional biochemistry for bringing about an annihilation towards AIDS. PMID:26432006

  3. Conformational analysis of vitamin D 3 derivatives by molecular mechanics . Part II. 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Ricardo A.; Rios, Miguel A.; Tovar, Clara A.; Maestro, Miguel

    1989-10-01

    The conformational analysis of vitamin D 3 derivatives, including the biologically active form 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (III) and several synthetic analogues: b-deoxy-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (IV), 3-deoxy-3α-methyl-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (V), 3-deoxy-3β-methyl-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (VI), and 3-deoxy-3,3-dimethyl-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (VII), has been carried out employing Allinger's molecular mechanics method. The results obtained for conformational equilibrium populations are found to be in good agreement with those provided by NMR studies. Comparison of the active form of vitamin D 3 (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3) with the other species reveals no important geometrical differences.

  4. Traversing the folding pathway of proteins using temperature-aided cascade molecular dynamics with conformation-dependent charges.

    PubMed

    Jani, Vinod; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Joshi, Rajendra

    2016-07-01

    Protein folding is a multi-micro second time scale event and involves many conformational transitions. Crucial conformational transitions responsible for biological functions of biomolecules are difficult to capture using current state-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Protein folding, being a stochastic process, witnesses these transitions as rare events. Many new methodologies have been proposed for observing these rare events. In this work, a temperature-aided cascade MD is proposed as a technique for studying the conformational transitions. Folding studies for Engrailed homeodomain and Immunoglobulin domain B of protein A have been carried out. Using this methodology, the unfolded structures with RMSD of 20 Å were folded to a structure with RMSD of 2 Å. Three sets of cascade MD runs were carried out using implicit solvation, explicit solvation, and charge updation scheme. In the charge updation scheme, charges based on the conformation obtained are calculated and are updated in the topology file. In all the simulations, the structure of 2 Å was reached within a few nanoseconds using these methods. Umbrella sampling has been performed using snapshots from the temperature-aided cascade MD simulation trajectory to build an entire conformational transition pathway. The advantage of the method is that the possible pathways for a particular reaction can be explored within a short duration of simulation time and the disadvantage is that the knowledge of the start and end state is required. The charge updation scheme adds the polarization effects in the force fields. This improves the electrostatic interaction among the atoms, which may help the protein to fold faster. PMID:26872480

  5. Molecular Crowding Affects the Conformational Fluctuations, Peroxidase Activity, and Folding Landscape of Yeast Cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Chakraborty, Ritobrita; Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-04-26

    To understand how a protein folds and behaves inside living cells, the effects of synthetic crowding media on protein folding, function, stability, and association have been studied in detail. Because the effect of excluded volume is more prominent in an extended state than in the native protein, a majority of these studies have been conducted in the unfolded state of different model proteins. Here, we have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other biophysical methods to investigate the effect of crowding agents Ficoll70 and Dextran70 on the nativelike state of cytochrome c from yeast. Yeast cytochrome c (y-cytc) contains a substantial expanded state in its native folded condition, which is present in equilibrium with a compact conformer in aqueous buffer. We have found that the crowding medium affects the native state equilibrium between compact and expanded states, shifting its population toward the compact conformer. As a result, the peroxidase activity of y-cytc decreases. Urea-induced protein stability measurements show that the compaction destabilizes the protein due to charge repulsions between similar charged clusters. Interestingly, the time constant of conformational fluctuations between the compact and expanded conformers has been found to increase in the crowded milieu, suggesting a crucial role of the solution microviscosity. PMID:27050502

  6. Emission behaviors of unsymmetrical 1,3-diaryl-β-diketones: A model perfectly disclosing the effect of molecular conformation on luminescence of organic solids

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao; Li, Feng; Han, Shenghua; Zhang, Yufei; Jiao, Chuanjun; Wei, Jinbei; Ye, Kaiqi; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    A series of unsymmetrical 1,3-diaryl-β-diketones 1–6 displaying molecular conformation-dependent fluorescence quantum yields have been synthesized. Crystals with planar molecular conformation such as 1, 2, 3 and 4 are highly fluorescent (φf: 39–53%), and the one holding slightly twisted conformation (5) is moderately luminescent (φf = 17%), while crystal 6 possessing heavily bent structure is completely nonluminous (φf ~ 0). The distinct fluorescence efficiencies are ascribed to their different molecular conformations, since all the crystals hold the same crystal system, space group and crystal packing structures. Additionally, the fluorescent crystals 1–5 display low threshold amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) with small full widths at half-maximum (FWHM: 3–7 nm), indicating their potential as candidates for organic crystal lasing devices. PMID:25771808

  7. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, Dimitrios; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials. PMID:27458530

  8. Study on the Application of the Combination of TMD Simulation and Umbrella Sampling in PMF Calculation for Molecular Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Xue, Tuo; Song, Chunnian; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) based on the combination of targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations and umbrella samplings as a function of physical coordinates have been applied to explore the detailed pathways and the corresponding free energy profiles for the conformational transition processes of the butane molecule and the 35-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP35). The accurate PMF profiles for describing the dihedral rotation of butane under both coordinates of dihedral rotation and root mean square deviation (RMSD) variation were obtained based on the different umbrella samplings from the same TMD simulations. The initial structures for the umbrella samplings can be conveniently selected from the TMD trajectories. For the application of this computational method in the unfolding process of the HP35 protein, the PMF calculation along with the coordinate of the radius of gyration (Rg) presents the gradual increase of free energies by about 1 kcal/mol with the energy fluctuations. The feature of conformational transition for the unfolding process of the HP35 protein shows that the spherical structure extends and the middle α-helix unfolds firstly, followed by the unfolding of other α-helices. The computational method for the PMF calculations based on the combination of TMD simulations and umbrella samplings provided a valuable strategy in investigating detailed conformational transition pathways for other allosteric processes. PMID:27171075

  9. Molecular simulations of conformation change and aggregation of HIV-1 Vpr13-33 on graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Songwei; Zhou, Guoquan; Guo, Jianzhong; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Junlang

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments have reported that the fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, can assemble and change its conformation after adsorbed on graphene oxide (GO) and then reduce its cytotoxicity. This discovery is of great importance, since the mutation of Vpr13-33 can decrease the viral replication, viral load and delay the disease progression. However, the interactions between Vpr13-33 and GO at atomic level are still unclear. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the dynamic process of the adsorption of Vpr13-33 onto GO and the conformation change after aggregating on GO surface. We found that Vpr13-33 was adsorbed on GO surface very quickly and lost its secondary structure. The conformation of peptides-GO complex was highly stable because of π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions. When two peptides aggregated on GO, they did not dimerize, since the interactions between the two peptides were much weaker than those between each peptide and GO. PMID:27097898

  10. Molecular simulations of conformation change and aggregation of HIV-1 Vpr13-33 on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Songwei; Zhou, Guoquan; Guo, Jianzhong; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Junlang

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments have reported that the fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, can assemble and change its conformation after adsorbed on graphene oxide (GO) and then reduce its cytotoxicity. This discovery is of great importance, since the mutation of Vpr13-33 can decrease the viral replication, viral load and delay the disease progression. However, the interactions between Vpr13-33 and GO at atomic level are still unclear. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the dynamic process of the adsorption of Vpr13-33 onto GO and the conformation change after aggregating on GO surface. We found that Vpr13-33 was adsorbed on GO surface very quickly and lost its secondary structure. The conformation of peptides-GO complex was highly stable because of π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions. When two peptides aggregated on GO, they did not dimerize, since the interactions between the two peptides were much weaker than those between each peptide and GO. PMID:27097898

  11. Study on the Application of the Combination of TMD Simulation and Umbrella Sampling in PMF Calculation for Molecular Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Xue, Tuo; Song, Chunnian; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) based on the combination of targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations and umbrella samplings as a function of physical coordinates have been applied to explore the detailed pathways and the corresponding free energy profiles for the conformational transition processes of the butane molecule and the 35-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP35). The accurate PMF profiles for describing the dihedral rotation of butane under both coordinates of dihedral rotation and root mean square deviation (RMSD) variation were obtained based on the different umbrella samplings from the same TMD simulations. The initial structures for the umbrella samplings can be conveniently selected from the TMD trajectories. For the application of this computational method in the unfolding process of the HP35 protein, the PMF calculation along with the coordinate of the radius of gyration (Rg) presents the gradual increase of free energies by about 1 kcal/mol with the energy fluctuations. The feature of conformational transition for the unfolding process of the HP35 protein shows that the spherical structure extends and the middle α-helix unfolds firstly, followed by the unfolding of other α-helices. The computational method for the PMF calculations based on the combination of TMD simulations and umbrella samplings provided a valuable strategy in investigating detailed conformational transition pathways for other allosteric processes. PMID:27171075

  12. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  13. Enhanced Conformational Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solvated Peptides: Fragment-Based Local Elevation Umbrella Sampling.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Halvor S; Daura, Xavier; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2010-09-14

    A new method, fragment-based local elevation umbrella sampling (FB-LEUS), is proposed to enhance the conformational sampling in explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of solvated polymers. The method is derived from the local elevation umbrella sampling (LEUS) method [ Hansen and Hünenberger , J. Comput. Chem. 2010 , 31 , 1 - 23 ], which combines the local elevation (LE) conformational searching and the umbrella sampling (US) conformational sampling approaches into a single scheme. In LEUS, an initial (relatively short) LE build-up (searching) phase is used to construct an optimized (grid-based) biasing potential within a subspace of conformationally relevant degrees of freedom, which is then frozen and used in a (comparatively longer) US sampling phase. This combination dramatically enhances the sampling power of MD simulations but, due to computational and memory costs, is only applicable to relevant subspaces of low dimensionalities. As an attempt to expand the scope of the LEUS approach to solvated polymers with more than a few relevant degrees of freedom, the FB-LEUS scheme involves an US sampling phase that relies on a superposition of low-dimensionality biasing potentials optimized using LEUS at the fragment level. The feasibility of this approach is tested using polyalanine (poly-Ala) and polyvaline (poly-Val) oligopeptides. Two-dimensional biasing potentials are preoptimized at the monopeptide level, and subsequently applied to all dihedral-angle pairs within oligopeptides of 4,  6,  8, or 10 residues. Two types of fragment-based biasing potentials are distinguished: (i) the basin-filling (BF) potentials act so as to "fill" free-energy basins up to a prescribed free-energy level above the global minimum; (ii) the valley-digging (VD) potentials act so as to "dig" valleys between the (four) free-energy minima of the two-dimensional maps, preserving barriers (relative to linearly interpolated free-energy changes) of a prescribed magnitude

  14. Vibrational spectra and molecular conformation of taurine and its related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Keiichi; Mandai, Yoshitaka; Matsuura, Hiroatsu

    1992-04-01

    IR and Raman spectra have been measured for taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) and its sodium salt in the solid state and Raman spectra for aqueous solutions of taurine with different pH values. Normal coordinate treatment has been carried out. The analysis of the spectra has indicated that, in the solid state, the molecule of taurine takes the gauche form while that of the sodium salt takes the trans form, and that the trans and gauche forms coexist in both acidic and basic aqueous solutions. The CS stretching bands for the gauche and trans forms were observed at 742 cm -1 and 803 cm -1 respectively. These bands were applied to a conformational analysis of other compounds containing a taurine skeleton; sodium taurocholate takes the gauche conformation about the bond axis NCCS.

  15. Molecular tubes for lipid sensing: tube conformations control analyte selectivity and fluorescent response.

    PubMed

    Avetta, Christopher T; Shorthill, Berkeley J; Ren, Chun; Glass, Timothy E

    2012-01-20

    Two fluorescent sensors for lipids have been prepared and tested for detection of a number of hydrophobic compounds of varying shape and size. The data suggest that the two sensors have a different mode of fluorescent response. Yet, the two sensors are only different in the bridging group--one having a flexible amide and one having a rigid allyl bridge. The fluorescence data are explained based on a difference in conformation of the two sensors in aqueous solution. PMID:22263717

  16. Molecular docking study of conformational polymorph: building block of crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Rashmi; Tewari, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Ved Prakash; Singh, Praveen; Dangi, Jawahar Singh; Puerta, Carmen; Valerga, Pedro; Kant, Rajni

    2013-01-01

    Two conformational polymorphs of novel 2-[2-(3-cyano-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-2H-pyridin-1-yl)-ethoxy]-4,6-dimethyl nicotinonitrile have been developed. The crystal structure of both polymorphs (1a and 1b) seems to be stabilized by weak interactions. A difference was observed in the packing of both polymorphs. Polymorph 1b has a better binding affinity with the cyclooxygenase (COX-2) receptor than the standard (Nimesulide). PMID:24250264

  17. The molecular mechanism of heme loss from oxidized soluble guanylate cyclase induced by conformational change.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Yuan, Hong; Xu, Qiming; Zhang, Huijuan; Zhou, Yajun; Huang, Zhong-Xian; Tan, Xiangshi

    2016-05-01

    Heme oxidation and loss of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is thought to be an important contributor to the development of cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, it remains unknown why the heme loses readily in oxidized sGC. In the current study, the conformational change of sGC upon heme oxidation by ODQ was studied based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the heme and a fluorophore fluorescein arsenical helix binder (FlAsH-EDT2) labeled at different domains of sGC β1. This study provides an opportunity to monitor the domain movement of sGC relative to the heme. The results indicated that heme oxidation by ODQ in truncated sCC induced the heme-associated αF helix moving away from the heme, the Per/Arnt/Sim domain (PAS) domain moving closer to the heme, but led the helical domain going further from the heme. We proposed that the synergistic effect of these conformational changes of the discrete region upon heme oxidation forces the heme pocket open, and subsequent heme loss readily. Furthermore, the kinetic studies suggested that the heme oxidation was a fast process and the conformational change was a relatively slow process. The kinetics of heme loss from oxidized sGC was monitored by a new method based on the heme group de-quenching the fluorescence of FlAsH-EDT2. PMID:26876536

  18. Multiple Simulated Annealing-Molecular Dynamics (MSA-MD) for Conformational Space Search of Peptide and Miniprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Xu, Wei-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Protein and peptide structure predictions are of paramount importance for understanding their functions, as well as the interactions with other molecules. However, the use of molecular simulation techniques to directly predict the peptide structure from the primary amino acid sequence is always hindered by the rough topology of the conformational space and the limited simulation time scale. We developed here a new strategy, named Multiple Simulated Annealing-Molecular Dynamics (MSA-MD) to identify the native states of a peptide and miniprotein. A cluster of near native structures could be obtained by using the MSA-MD method, which turned out to be significantly more efficient in reaching the native structure compared to continuous MD and conventional SA-MD simulation. PMID:26492886

  19. Molecular and environmental factors governing non-covalent bonding interactions and conformations of phosphorous functionalized γ-cyclodextrin hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Recent strategies in molecular drugs-design shift efforts to nanomedicine. Large supra-molecular inclusion systems are implemented as therapeutics. The sophistication of design is based on major advances of cyclodextrins (CDs) as host molecules. They are friendly towards biological environment. CDs have good (bio)compatibility as well. CDs can form host-guest macromolecular systems incorporating small molecules with suitable shapes due to non-covalent interactions. Innovative strategies yield to polymeric nano-particles; micelles; linear polymers and/or CDs-functionalized dendrimeric nanostructures; nanofibers as well as hydrogels. Attractive are phosphorous containing (bio)matrerials, having high selectivity toward biological active molecules. The non-covalent interactions in aquatic CD-systems contribute to stability of host-guest systems under physiological conditions, determining conformational preferences of host-CD macromolecule and guest small molecular template. In this paper we have reported complementation application of mass spectrometric (MS) and quantum chemical analysis of phosphorous chemically substituted γ-cyclodextrin hydrates γ-CDPO/nH2O (n ∊ [0-14]), studying neutral and polynegatively charged molecules as an effort to describe realistic a representative scale of physiological conditions. The binding affinity and molecular conformations are discussed. The 250 neutral and charged systems (γ-CDPOHm/nH2O, n ∊ [10][0,14], m ∊ [0,15], γ-CDPOH-8/nH2O.8Na(+), and γ-CDPOH-16/nH2O.16Na(+)) in four main domains of non-covalent hydrogen bonding interactions are studied. PMID:26944657

  20. Two forms of loops generate the chromatin conformation of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changying; Gerasimova, Tatiana; Hao, Haiping; Ivanova, Irina; Chakraborty, Tirtha; Selimyan, Roza; Oltz, Eugene M.; Sen, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene locus undergoes radial re-positioning within the nucleus and locus contraction in preparation for gene recombination. We demonstrate that IgH locus conformation involves two levels of chromosomal compaction. At the first level the locus folds into several multi-looped domains. One such domain at the 3′ end of the locus requires an enhancer, Eμ; two other domains at the 5′ end are Eμ-independent. At the second level, these domains are brought into spatial proximity by Eμ-dependent interactions with specific sites within the VH region. Eμ is also required for radial re-positioning of IgH alleles indicating its essential role in large scale chromosomal movements in developing lymphocytes. Our observations provide a comprehensive view of the conformation of IgH alleles in pro-B cells and the mechanisms by which it is established. PMID:21982154

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guo; Mcmahon, Benjamin H; Tung, Chang - Shung

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

  2. Modular hyperthermostable bacterial endo-β-1,4-mannanase: molecular shape, flexibility and temperature-dependent conformational changes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Viviam M; Colussi, Francieli; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Braz, Antonio S K; Squina, Fabio M; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Garcia, Wanius

    2014-01-01

    Endo-β-1,4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a hyperthermostable enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-mannoside linkages in various mannan-containing polysaccharides. A recent study reported that TpMan is composed of a GH5 catalytic domain joined by a linker to a carbohydrate-binding domain. However, at this moment, there is no three-dimensional structure determined for TpMan. Little is known about the conformation of the TpMan as well as the role of the length and flexibility of the linker on the spatial arrangement of the constitutive domains. In this study, we report the first structural characterization of the entire TpMan by small-angle X-ray scattering combined with the three-dimensional structures of the individual domains in order to shed light on the low-resolution model, overall dimensions, and flexibility of this modular enzyme at different temperatures. The results are consistent with a linker with a compact structure and that occupies a small volume with respect to its large number of amino acids. Furthermore, at 20°C the results are consistent with a model where TpMan is a molecule composed of three distinct domains and that presents some level of molecular flexibility in solution. Even though the full enzyme has some degree of molecular flexibility, there might be a preferable conformation, which could be described by the rigid-body modeling procedure. Finally, the results indicate that TpMan undergoes a temperature-driven transition between conformational states without a significant disruption of its secondary structure. Our results suggest that the linker can optimize the geometry between the other two domains with respect to the substrate at high temperatures. These studies should provide a useful basis for future biophysical studies of entire TpMan. PMID:24671161

  3. Modular Hyperthermostable Bacterial Endo-β-1,4-Mannanase: Molecular Shape, Flexibility and Temperature-Dependent Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Braz, Antonio S. K.; Squina, Fabio M.; Oliveira, Cristiano L. P.; Garcia, Wanius

    2014-01-01

    Endo-β-1,4-mannanase from Thermotoga petrophila (TpMan) is a hyperthermostable enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-mannoside linkages in various mannan-containing polysaccharides. A recent study reported that TpMan is composed of a GH5 catalytic domain joined by a linker to a carbohydrate-binding domain. However, at this moment, there is no three-dimensional structure determined for TpMan. Little is known about the conformation of the TpMan as well as the role of the length and flexibility of the linker on the spatial arrangement of the constitutive domains. In this study, we report the first structural characterization of the entire TpMan by small-angle X-ray scattering combined with the three-dimensional structures of the individual domains in order to shed light on the low-resolution model, overall dimensions, and flexibility of this modular enzyme at different temperatures. The results are consistent with a linker with a compact structure and that occupies a small volume with respect to its large number of amino acids. Furthermore, at 20°C the results are consistent with a model where TpMan is a molecule composed of three distinct domains and that presents some level of molecular flexibility in solution. Even though the full enzyme has some degree of molecular flexibility, there might be a preferable conformation, which could be described by the rigid-body modeling procedure. Finally, the results indicate that TpMan undergoes a temperature-driven transition between conformational states without a significant disruption of its secondary structure. Our results suggest that the linker can optimize the geometry between the other two domains with respect to the substrate at high temperatures. These studies should provide a useful basis for future biophysical studies of entire TpMan. PMID:24671161

  4. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line. PMID:27575170

  5. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line.

  6. The effect of poly(trimethylene carbonate) molecular weight on macrophage behavior and enzyme adsorption and conformation.

    PubMed

    Vyner, Moira C; Li, Anne; Amsden, Brian G

    2014-11-01

    Poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with molecular weights greater than 100 kg/mol is known to degrade readily in vivo while PTMC of less than 70 kg/mol is resistant to degradation. The reason for the molecular weight dependent degradation rate of PTMC is unclear, and may be due to differences in macrophage behavior or enzyme adsorption or activity. Macrophage number and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and esterase were measured when cultured on 60 and 100 kg/mol PTMC. Cholesterol esterase and lipase were adsorbed to 60 and 100 kg/mol PTMC and mass and viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed enzyme layers were measured. No significant differences were observed in macrophage number or production of degradative species. Significant differences were measured in mass, shear modulus and viscosity of the adsorbed cholesterol esterase layer, suggesting that the cholesterol esterase is adsorbing in a different conformation on the 60 and 100 kg/mol PTMC. Despite similar bulk moduli, the surface modulus of 60 kg/mol PTMC was significantly lower than 100 kg/mol. It is proposed that the difference in surface stiffness and polymer chain flexibility affect the arrangement of water bound to and freed from the polymer chains during adsorption, thus affecting enzymatic adsorption, conformation, and activity. PMID:25109440

  7. Generation of monoclonal antibodies specific of the postfusion conformation of the Pneumovirinae fusion (F) protein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura; Olmedillas, Eduardo; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Terrón, María C; Luque, Daniel; Palomo, Concepción; Melero, José A

    2015-11-01

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires fusion of the viral and cell membranes mediated by one of the major virus glycoproteins, the fusion (F) glycoprotein which transits from a metastable pre-fusion conformation to a highly stable post-fusion structure during the membrane fusion process. F protein refolding involves large conformational changes of the protein trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) from each protomer into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of the Pneumovirinae F proteins, and as extension of previous work (Palomo et al., 2014), a general strategy was designed to obtain polyclonal and particularly monoclonal antibodies specific of the 6HB motif of the Pneumovirinae fusion protein. The antibodies reported here should assist in the characterization of the structural changes that the F protein of human metapneumovirus or respiratory syncytial virus experiences during the process of membrane fusion. PMID:26275682

  8. MoFlow: visualizing conformational changes in molecules as molecular flow improves understanding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Current visualizations of molecular motion use a Timeline-analogous representation that conveys "first the molecule was shaped like this, then like this...". This scheme is orthogonal to the Pathline-like human understanding of motion "this part of the molecule moved from here to here along this path". We present MoFlow, a system for visualizing molecular motion using a Pathline-analogous representation. Results The MoFlow system produces high-quality renderings of molecular motion as atom pathlines, as well as interactive WebGL visualizations, and 3D printable models. In a preliminary user study, MoFlow representations are shown to be superior to canonical representations for conveying molecular motion. Conclusions Pathline-based representations of molecular motion are more easily understood than timeline representations. Pathline representations provide other advantages because they represent motion directly, rather than representing structure with inferred motion. PMID:26361501

  9. Pseudo generators for under-resolved molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittracher, A.; Hartmann, C.; Junge, O.; Koltai, P.

    2015-09-01

    Many features of a molecule which are of physical interest (e.g. molecular conformations, reaction rates) are described in terms of its dynamics in configuration space. This article deals with the projection of molecular dynamics in phase space onto configuration space. Specifically, we study the situation that the phase space dynamics is governed by a stochastic Langevin equation and study its relation with the configurational Smoluchowski equation in the three different scaling regimes: Firstly, the Smoluchowski equations in non-Cartesian geometries are derived from the overdamped limit of the Langevin equation. Secondly, transfer operator methods are used to describe the metastable behaviour of the system at hand, and an explicit small-time asymptotics is derived on which the Smoluchowski equation turns out to govern the dynamics of the position coordinate (without any assumptions on the damping). By using an adequate reduction technique, these considerations are then extended to one-dimensional reaction coordinates. Thirdly, we sketch three different approaches to approximate the metastable dynamics based on time-local information only.

  10. High-resolution microwave and infrared molecular-beam studies of the conformers of 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, S.C.; Philips, L.A.; Fraser, G.T.; Lovas, F.J.

    1996-12-31

    High-resolution microwave and infrared molecular-beam spectra have been measured for 1,1,2,2-tetrafluorethane (HFC134). For the higher-energy, polar, C{sub 1}-symmetry, gauche conformer, microwave spectra have been recorded for the normal and mono-{sup 13}C isotopomers and analyzed to determine a C-C bond length of 1.512(4) {Angstrom} and a CCF angle of 109.7(3){degrees}. A tunable microwave-sideband CO{sub 2} laser and electric-resonance optothermal spectrometer have been used to measure the infrared spectrum of the {nu}{sub 6}, C-C stretch of the gauche conformer near 906 cm{sup -1}. Microwave-infrared double resonance and precise ground-state combination-differences provided by the microwave measurements guide the assignment of the spectrum. A b- and c-type spectrum is observed and fit to a Watson asymmetric-top Hamiltonian to within the experimental uncertainty of 0.3 MHz. The high quality of the fit and the similarity of the centrifugal distortion constants to the ground-state values indicate that the band is effectively unperturbed. A number of strong unassigned lines are present in the spectrum. These transitions do not display any microwave-infrared double resonance effect. The attribution of these transitions to the nonpolar anti conformer is ruled out since the transition intensities are sensitive to the field strength of the inhomogeneous electric field used to focus the molecules. Pulsed slit-jet diode-laser spectra have been recorded for the {nu}{sub 16}, anti conformer near 1127 cm{sup -1}. An a- and c-type hybrid band is observed consistent with previous low-resolution assignments of this vibration to a B. mode. A total of 522 non-blended transitions were assigned and fit to determine ground- and excited-state constants. The ground-state constants of A = 5134.952(65), B = 3148.277(27), and C = 2067.106(43) MHz are the first experimental determination of rotational constants for this conformer.

  11. GRID3C: Computer program for generation of C type multilevel, three dimensional and boundary conforming periodic grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer program, GRID3C, was developed for accurately generating periodic, boundary conforming, three dimensional, consecutively refined computational grids applicable to realistic axial turbomachinery geometries. The method is based on using two functions to generate two dimensional grids on a number of coaxial axisymmetric surfaces positioned between the centerbody and the outer radial boundary. These boundary fitted grids are of the C type and are characterized by quasi-orthogonality and geometric periodicity. The built in nonorthogonal coordinate stretchings and shearings cause the grid clustering in the regions of interest. The stretching parameters are part of the input to GRID3C. In its present version GRID3C can generate and store a maximum of four consecutively refined three dimensional grids. The output grid coordinates can be calculated either in the Cartesian or in the cylindrical coordinate system.

  12. Conformational flexibility in designing peptides for immunology: the molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Stavrakoudis, Athanassios

    2010-09-01

    Computational modeling techniques and computer simulations have become a routine in biological sciences and have gained great attention from researchers. Molecular dynamics simulation is a valuable tool towards an understanding of the complex structure of biological systems, especially in the study of the flexibility of the biological molecules such as peptides or proteins. Peptides play a very important role in human physiology and control many of the processes involved in the immune system response. Designing new and optimal peptide vaccines is one of the hottest challenges of the 21(st) century science and it brings together researchers from different fields. Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be a helpful tool assisting laboratory work, saving financial sources and opening possibilities for exploring properties of the molecular systems that are hardly accessible by conventional experimental methods. Present review is dedicated to the recent contributions in applications of molecular dynamics simulations in peptide design for immunological purposes, such as B or T cell epitopes. PMID:20412039

  13. Molecular mechanics (MM3) study of the conformations of methyl esters and N, N-dimethylamides of diastereoisomeric 4-cyano-3,4-diphenyl-butanoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. M.

    2000-10-01

    Molecular mechanics (MM3 force field) was used to examine an unexpected observation by NMR for a preference of conformations with synclinal protons around the C(3)-C(4) bond in methyl esters and dimethylamides of diastereoisomeric 4-cyano-3,4-diphenyl-butanoic acids. After the reoptimization of three torsional parameters, related to structural units containing a cyano group, we obtained a good correlation between the MM3 computed populations of the conformations and the estimates from vicinal coupling constants. The electrostatic interactions have the decisive contribution for lowering the energies of the preferred conformations.

  14. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites. PMID:26963288

  15. Molecular docking sites designed for the generation of highly crystalline covalent organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascherl, Laura; Sick, Torben; Margraf, Johannes T.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Calik, Mona; Hettstedt, Christina; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Döblinger, Markus; Clark, Timothy; Chapman, Karena W.; Auras, Florian; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) formed by connecting multidentate organic building blocks through covalent bonds provide a platform for designing multifunctional porous materials with atomic precision. As they are promising materials for applications in optoelectronics, they would benefit from a maximum degree of long-range order within the framework, which has remained a major challenge. We have developed a synthetic concept to allow consecutive COF sheets to lock in position during crystal growth, and thus minimize the occurrence of stacking faults and dislocations. Hereby, the three-dimensional conformation of propeller-shaped molecular building units was used to generate well-defined periodic docking sites, which guided the attachment of successive building blocks that, in turn, promoted long-range order during COF formation. This approach enables us to achieve a very high crystallinity for a series of COFs that comprise tri- and tetradentate central building blocks. We expect this strategy to be transferable to a broad range of customized COFs.

  16. Influence of sodium alginate pretreated by ultrasound on papain properties: Activity, structure, conformation and molecular weight and distribution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liping; Cao, Yanping; Xu, Duoxia; You, Sasa; Han, Fu

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of sodium alginate (ALG) pretreated by ultrasound on the enzyme activity, structure, conformation and molecular weight and distribution of papain. ALG solutions were pretreated with ultrasound at varying power (0.05, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35, 0.45W/cm(2)), 135kHz, 50°C for 20min. The maximum relative activity of papain increased by 10.53% when mixed with ALG pretreated by ultrasound at 0.25W/cm(2), compared with the untreated ALG. The influence of ultrasound pretreated ALG on the conformation and secondary structure of papain were assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra revealed that ultrasound pretreated ALG increased the number of tryptophan on papain surface, especially at 0.25W/cm(2). It indicated that ultrasound pretreatment induced molecular unfolding, causing the exposure of more hydrophobic groups and regions from inside to the outside of the papain molecules. Furthermore, ultrasound pretreated ALG resulted in minor changes in the secondary structure of the papain. The content of α-helix was slightly increased after ultrasound pretreatment and no significant change was observed at different ultrasound powers. ALG pretreated by ultrasound enhanced the stability of the secondary structure of papain, especially at 0.25W/cm(2). The free sulfhydryl (SH) content of papain was slightly increased and then decreased with the increase of ultrasonic power. The maximum content of free SH was observed at 0.25W/cm(2), under which the content of the free SH increased by 6.36% compared with the untreated ALG. Dynamic light scattering showed that the effect of ultrasound treatment was mainly the homogenization of the ALG particles in the mixed dispersion. The gel permeation chromatography coupled with the multi-angle laser light scattering photometer analysis showed that the molecular weight (Mw) of papain/ALG was decreased and then increased with the ultrasonic

  17. Molecular conformation and orientational order in nCB liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobinata, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Chandani, A. D. L.; Maeda, Shiro

    1986-08-01

    A resonance Raman probe method for determining the second and fourth orientational order parameters ( P¯2 and P¯4) in liquid crystals is described. The method was applied to a series of nematic nCB near the nematic—isotropic transition temperature, using all trans β-carotene as a resonant probe. Both P¯2 and P¯4, thus obtained show a distinct even—odd effect, that is, zigzag change of the parameter value against the length of alkyl end chain. The origin of the even—odd effect was investigated by the mean field theory, taking the conformation variety of end chain into account following the method of Marcelja. On the basis of calculation, the function of the alkyl chain in the formation of the liquid crystalline state is discussed.

  18. Molecular conformational analysis, vibrational spectra, NBO, NLO analysis and molecular docking study of bis[(E)-anthranyl-9-acrylic]anhydride based on density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Mary, Y Sheena; Panicker, C Yohannan; Thiemann, Thies; Al-Azani, Mariam; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A; Van Alsenoy, C; Raju, K; War, Javeed Ahmad; Srivastava, S K

    2015-12-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of bis[(E)-anthranyl-9-acrylic]anhydride were recorded and analyzed. The conformational behavior is also investigated. The vibrational wave numbers were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The data obtained from wave number calculations are used to assign vibrational bands obtained in Infrared and Raman spectra. Potential energy distribution was done using GAR2PED program. The geometrical parameters are compared with related structures. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using Natural Bonding Orbital (NBO) analysis. The Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) and Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) analysis are used to determine the charge transfer within the molecule. Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) was performed by the DFT method. The calculated first hyperpolarizability of the title compound is comparable with the reported values of similar derivatives and is 4.23 times that of the standard nonlinear optical (NLO) material urea and the title compound and its derivatives are an attractive object for future studies of nonlinear optical properties. To evaluate the in silico antitumor activity of the title compound molecular docking studies were carried out against protein Bcl-xL. The (1)H-NMR spectrum is also reported. PMID:26143327

  19. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display β-barrel conformations: A replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 μs show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of β-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient β-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  20. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation. PMID:26275931

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation on the Conformational Transition of the Mad2 Protein from the Open to the Closed State

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaoqun; Zhu, Yanyan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2014-01-01

    The Mad2 protein, with two distinct conformations of open- and closed-states, is a key player in the spindle checkpoint. The closed Mad2 state is more active than the open one. We carried out conventional and targeted molecular dynamics simulations for the two stable Mad2 states and their conformational transition to address the dynamical transition mechanism from the open to the closed state. The intermediate structure in the transition process shows exposure of the β6 strand and an increase of space around the binding sites of β6 strand due to the unfolding of the β7/8 sheet and movement of the β6/4/5 sheet close to the αC helix. Therefore, Mad2 binding to the Cdc20 protein in the spindle checkpoint is made possible. The interconversion between these two states might facilitate the functional activity of the Mad2 protein. Motion correlation analysis revealed the allosteric network between the β1 strand and β7/8 sheet via communication of the β5-αC loop and the β6/4/5 sheet in this transition process. PMID:24690997

  2. Molecular dynamics study displays near in-line attack conformations in the hammerhead ribozyme self-cleavage reaction

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rhonda A.; Bruice, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) calculations by using one of the recently solved crystal structures of a hammerhead ribozyme. By rotating the α, β, γ, δ, ɛ, and ζ torsion angles of the phosphate linkage of residue 17, the nucleobase at the cleavage site was slightly rotated out of the active site toward the solution. Unconstrained MD simulations exceeding 1 ns were performed on this starting structure solvated in water with explicit counter ions and two Mg2+ ions at the active site. Our results reveal that near attack conformations consistently were formed in the simulation. These near attack conformations are characterized by assumption of the 2′-hydroxyl to a near in-line position for attack on the -O-(PO2−)-O- phosphorous. Also during the time course of the MD study, one Mg2+ moved immediately to associate with a pro-R phosphate oxygen in the conserved core region, and the second Mg2+ remained associated with the pro-R oxygen on the phosphate linkage undergoing hydrolysis. These results are in accord with a one-metal ion mechanism of catalysis and give insight into the possible roles of many of the conserved residues in the ribozyme. PMID:9736692

  3. Conformational studies of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, K.; Stawikowski, M.; Ślusarz, R.; Sikorska, E.; Lesner, A.; Łęgowska, A.; Rolka, K.

    2015-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 is the smallest and the most potent among BBI inhibitors. It is also an interesting object for SAR studies since it is cyclic 14 amino acid molecule which additionally contains disulfide bridge. We showed that elimination of head-to-tail cycliztion did not influence its activity. Moreover peptoid monomers of Nlys and Nphe introduced in the substrate specificity P1 position of monocyclic SFTI-1 preserved trypsin and chymotripsin inhibitory activity respectively and made P1-P1‧ bond proteolytically stable. These findings motivated us to perform conformational analysis of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations. Obtained structure occurred to be in a good agreement with published structures for wild-type SFTI-1, its monocyclic analog with disulfide bridge only as well as one containing Nlys peptoid monomer in P1 position.

  4. The Dynamic Conformational Cycle of the Group I Chaperonin C-Termini Revealed via Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Frydman, Judith; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Chaperonins are large ring shaped oligomers that facilitate protein folding by encapsulation within a central cavity. All chaperonins possess flexible C-termini which protrude from the equatorial domain of each subunit into the central cavity. Biochemical evidence suggests that the termini play an important role in the allosteric regulation of the ATPase cycle, in substrate folding and in complex assembly and stability. Despite the tremendous wealth of structural data available for numerous orthologous chaperonins, little structural information is available regarding the residues within the C-terminus. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are presented which localize the termini throughout the nucleotide cycle of the group I chaperonin, GroE, from Escherichia coli. The simulation results predict that the termini undergo a heretofore unappreciated conformational cycle which is coupled to the nucleotide state of the enzyme. As such, these results have profound implications for the mechanism by which GroE utilizes nucleotide and folds client proteins. PMID:25822285

  5. The dynamic conformational cycle of the group I chaperonin C-termini revealed via molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Kevin M; Frydman, Judith; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-01-01

    Chaperonins are large ring shaped oligomers that facilitate protein folding by encapsulation within a central cavity. All chaperonins possess flexible C-termini which protrude from the equatorial domain of each subunit into the central cavity. Biochemical evidence suggests that the termini play an important role in the allosteric regulation of the ATPase cycle, in substrate folding and in complex assembly and stability. Despite the tremendous wealth of structural data available for numerous orthologous chaperonins, little structural information is available regarding the residues within the C-terminus. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are presented which localize the termini throughout the nucleotide cycle of the group I chaperonin, GroE, from Escherichia coli. The simulation results predict that the termini undergo a heretofore unappreciated conformational cycle which is coupled to the nucleotide state of the enzyme. As such, these results have profound implications for the mechanism by which GroE utilizes nucleotide and folds client proteins. PMID:25822285

  6. A theoretical approach to the influence of the macrocycle conformation on the molecular electronic structure in Mg-porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Poveda, L A; Ferro, V R; García de la Vega, J M; González-Jonte, R H

    2001-02-01

    Nonplanar saddled (sad) ruffled (ruf) and domed (dom) conformations of the Mg-porphyrin (MgP) macrocycle in several degrees of deformation have been computed. These symmetrical distortion modes were induced in unsubstituted macrocycle using molecular definitions for calculations which permits us to achieve a systematical variation of the nonplanarity varying only a convenient geometrical parameter of the molecule. Series of nonplanar macrocycles like those synthesized in previous works employing peripheral substitutions are obtained. The procedure here used to induce deformations gives the possibility of investigating the modulator role of the out-of-plane distortions on the geometry and electronic properties of the porphyrin avoiding additional influences due to the substituents or the surrounding protein scaffolding. PMID:11272704

  7. Ab initio molecular orbital and infrared spectroscopic study of the conformation of secondary amides: derivatives of formanilide, acetanilide and benzylamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, S.; Hadjieva, B.; Galabov, B.

    1999-09-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations at HF/4-31G level and infrared spectroscopic data for the frequencies are applied to analyse the grouping in a series model aromatic secondary amides: formanilide; acetanilide; o-methylacetanilide; 2,6-dimethylformanilide, 2,6-dimethylacetanilide; N-benzylacetamide and N-benzylformamide. The theoretical and experimental data obtained show that the conformational state of the molecules studied is determined by the fine balance of several intramolecular factors: resonance effect between the amide group and the aromatic ring, steric interaction between various substituents around the -NH-CO- grouping in the aromatic ring, conjugation between the carbonyl bond and the nitrogen lone pair as well as direct field influences inside the amide group.

  8. Order and conformation of biphenyl in cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals: a combined atomistic molecular dynamics and 1H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Pizzirusso, Antonio; Di Pietro, Maria Enrica; De Luca, Giuseppina; Celebre, Giorgio; Longeri, Marcello; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio

    2014-05-19

    The alignment of biphenyl (2P) in the liquid-crystal phases of 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) is investigated by using a combination of predictive atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and (1)H liquid-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (LXNMR) residual dipolar coupling measurements. A detailed comparison and validation of the MD results with LXNMR is provided, showing a good agreement between the simulated and experimental dipolar couplings at the same reduced temperature. MD is then used to examine the location of 2P in the smectic phase, which is unavailable to LXNMR, and 2P is found to be rather uniformly distributed. The combination of MD and NMR spectroscopy provides detailed information about the order, interconnection between orientation and conformation, local positional order, and interactions with the liquid-crystalline solvent. PMID:24692106

  9. Interfacial molecular interactions based on the conformation recognition between the insoluble antitumor drug AD-1 and DSPC.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tian; Cao, Xiuxiu; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Jian; Shi, Caihong; Su, Jia; Zhang, Yu; Gou, Jingxin; He, Haibing; Guo, Haiyan; Tang, Xing; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-10-01

    In this study, molecular interactions between the anti-cancer agent 20(R)-25-methoxyl-dammarane-3β, 12β, 20-triol (AD-1) and phospholipid 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) were investigated using the Langmuir film balance technique. The characteristics of binary Langmuir monolayers consisting of DSPC and AD-1 were conducted on the basis of the surface pressure-area per molecule (π-A) isotherms. It was found that the drug was able to become efficiently inserted into preformed DSPC monolayers, indicating a preferential interaction between AD-1 and DSPC. For the examined lateral pressure at 20mN/m, the largest negative values of ΔGex were found for the AD-1/DSPC monolayer, which should be the most stable. Based on the calculated values of ΔGex, we found that the AD-1/DSPC systems exhibited the best mixed characteristics when the molar fraction of the AD-1 was 0.8; at that relative concentration, the AD-1 molecules can mix better and interact with the phospholipid molecules. In addition, the drug-DSPC binary supramolecular structure was also deposited on the mica plates as shown by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Finally, molecular docking calculations explained satisfactorily that, based on the conformations interactions (conformation recognition), even at an AD-1/DSPC molar ratio as high as 8:2, the interfacial stabilization of the AD-1/DSPC system was fairly strong due to hydrophobic interactions. A higher loading capacity of DSPC might be possible, as it is associated with a more flexible geometrical environment, which allows these supramolecular structures to accept larger increases in drug loading upon steric binding. PMID:27469574

  10. High-Resolution Microwave and Infrared Molecular Beam Studies of the Conformers of 1, 1, 2, 2-Tetrafluoroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Steven C.; Philips, Laura A.; Fraser, Gerry; Lovas, Fj; Xu, Li-Hong; Sharpe, Steven W.)

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution microwave and infrared molecular-beam spectra have been measure for 1,1,2,2-tetraflouroethane (HFC134). For the higher energy, polar, C2 symmetry, gauche conformer, microwave spectra have been recorded for the normal and mono-13C isotopomers and analyzed to determine a C-C bond length of 1.512(4)?, in good agreement with a recent ab initio value (MP2/6-31**) of 1.515?[S. Papasavva, K.H. Illinger, and J.E. Kenny, J. Phys. Chem 100 10100-10110(1996)]. A tunable microwave-sideband CO2 laser and electric-resonance optethermal spectrometer have been used to measure the infrared spectrum of the v6, C-C stretch of the gauche conformer near 906 cm-1. Microwave-infrared double resonance and precise ground state combination differences provided by the microwave measurements guide the assignment of the spectrum. The observation of a c-type spectrum definitively establishes that the upper state vibration is of A symmetry in the C2 point group. The spectrum is fit to a Watson asymmetric-top Hamiltonian to a standard deviation of 0.24 MHz. A weak perturbation shifts the line positions for transitions near J=Kc=20 by as much as 12 MHz. The identity of the perturber is unknown. Pulsed slit-jet diode-laser spectra have been recorded for the v16 vibration of the anti conformer near 1127 cm-1. An a- and c-type hybrid band is observed, consistent with a Bu symmetry mode. Previous low-resolution studies have attributed the 1127-cm-1 mode to either a Bu or an Au symmetry vibration. A total of 522 nonblended transitions were assigned and fit to determine ground and excited state constants. The ground state constants of A=52 5.952(65) MHz, B= 3148.277(27) MHz, and C= 2067.106(43) MHz are the first experimental determinations of the rotational constants for this conformer. Here, type A standard uncertainties are given in the parenthese.

  11. Molecular Breeding for Improved Second Generation Bioenergy Crops.

    PubMed

    Allwright, Mike R; Taylor, Gail

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing urgency to develop and deploy sustainable sources of energy to reduce our global dependency on finite, high-carbon fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic feedstocks, used in power and liquid fuel generation, are valuable sources of non-food plant biomass. They are cultivated with minimal inputs on marginal or degraded lands to prevent competition with arable agriculture and offer significant potential for sustainable intensification (the improvement of yield without the necessity for additional inputs) through advanced molecular breeding. This article explores progress made in next generation sequencing, advanced genotyping, association genetics, and genetic modification in second generation bioenergy production. Using poplar as an exemplar where most progress has been made, a suite of target traits is also identified giving insight into possible routes for crop improvement and deployment in the immediate future. PMID:26541073

  12. Structural and spectroscopic properties of the second generation phosphorus-viologen “molecular asterisk”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandukov, A. E.; Katir, N.; Majoral, J. P.; El Kadib, A.; Caminade, A. M.; Bousmina, M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2013-11-01

    The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the second generation phosphorus-viologen “molecular asterisk” G2 built from cyclotriphosphazene core with 12 viologen units and 6 terminal phosphonate groups have been recorded and analyzed. The experimental X-ray data of 1,1-bis(4-formylbenzyl)-4,4‧-bipyridinium bis(hexaflurophosphate) was used in molecular modeling studies. The optimization of isolated 1,1-bis(4-formylbenzyl)-4,4‧-bipyridinium (BFBP) molecule without counter ions PF6- does not lead to significant changes of dihedral angles, thus the molecular conformation does not depend on interactions with the counter ions. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for G2 on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that G2 has a kind of “egg timer” structure with planar Osbnd C6H4sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd N(CH3)sbnd fragments and slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of G2 were interpreted by means of potential energy distribution.

  13. Small Molecules Detected by Second-Harmonic Generation Modulate the Conformation of Monomeric α-Synuclein and Reduce Its Aggregation in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Moree, Ben; Yin, Guowei; Lázaro, Diana F.; Munari, Francesca; Strohäker, Timo; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Zweckstetter, Markus; Salafsky, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are structurally dynamic molecules that perform specialized functions through unique conformational changes accessible in physiological environments. An ability to specifically and selectively control protein function via conformational modulation is an important goal for development of novel therapeutics and studies of protein mechanism in biological networks and disease. Here we applied a second-harmonic generation-based technique for studying protein conformation in solution and in real time to the intrinsically disordered, Parkinson disease related protein α-synuclein. From a fragment library, we identified small molecule modulators that bind to monomeric α-synuclein in vitro and significantly reduce α-synuclein aggregation in a neuronal cell culture model. Our results indicate that the conformation of α-synuclein is linked to the aggregation of protein in cells. They also provide support for a therapeutic strategy of targeting specific conformations of the protein to suppress or control its aggregation. PMID:26396193

  14. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  15. Co-conformational Exchange Triggered by Molecular Recognition in a Di(acylamino)pyridine-Based Molecular Shuttle Containing Two Pyridine Rings at the Macrocycle.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cuezva, Alberto; Carro-Guillen, Fernando; Pastor, Aurelia; Marin-Luna, Marta; Orenes, Raul-Angel; Alajarin, Mateo; Berna, Jose

    2016-06-17

    We describe the incorporation of endo-pyridine units into the tetralactam ring of di(acylamino)pyridine-based rotaxanes. This macrocycle strongly associates with the linear interlocked component as confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies of rotaxane 2 b. Dynamic NMR studies of 2 b in solution revealed a rotational energy barrier that was higher than that of the related rotaxane 2 a, which lacks of pyridine rings in the macrocycle. The macrocycle distribution of the molecular shuttle 4 b, containing two endo-pyridine rings, shows that the major co-conformer is that with the cyclic component sitting over the di(acylamino)pyridine station. DFT calculations also support the marked preference of the ring for occupying the heterocyclic binding site. The association of N-hexylthymine with the di(acylamino)pyridine binding site of 4 b led to the formation of a rare 'S'-shaped co-conformer in which the tetralactam ring interacts simultaneously with both stations of the thread. PMID:26698891

  16. The role of conformational selection in the molecular recognition of the wild type and mutants XPA67-80 peptides by ERCC1.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Elisa

    2015-07-01

    Molecular recognition is a fundamental step in the coordination of biomolecular pathways. Understanding how recognition and binding occur between highly flexible protein domains is a complex task. The conformational selection theory provides an elegant rationalization of the recognition mechanism, especially valid in cases when unstructured protein regions are involved. The recognition of a poorly structured peptide, namely XPA67-80 , by its target receptor ERCC1, falls in this challenging study category. The microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, discussed in this work, show that the conformational propensity of the wild type XPA67-80 peptide in solution supports conformational selection as the key mechanism driving its molecular recognition by ERCC1. Moreover, all the mutations of the XPA67-80 peptide studied here cause a significant increase of its conformational disorder, relative to the wild type. Comparison to experimental data suggests that the loss of the recognized structural motifs at the microscopic time scale can contribute to the critical decrease in binding observed for one of the mutants, further substantiating the key role of conformational selection in recognition. Ultimately, because of the high sequence identity and analogy in binding, it is conceivable that the conclusions of this study on the XPA67-80 peptide also apply to the ERCC1-binding domain of the XPA protein. PMID:25973722

  17. Deleting the Redundant TSH Receptor C-Peptide Region Permits Generation of the Conformationally Intact Extracellular Domain by Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Salazar, Larry M; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2015-07-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) extracellular domain (ECD) comprises a N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and an hinge region (HR), the latter contributing to ligand binding and critical for receptor activation. The crystal structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain component has been solved, but previous attempts to generate conformationally intact complete ECD or the isolated HR component for structural analysis have failed. The TSHR HR contains a C-peptide segment that is removed during spontaneous TSHR intramolecular cleavage into disulfide linked A- and B-subunits. We hypothesized that deletion of the redundant C-peptide would overcome the obstacle to generating conformationally intact TSHR ECD protein. Indeed, lacking the C-peptide region, the TSHR ECD (termed ECD-D1) and the isolated HR (termed HR-D1) were secreted into medium of insect cells infected with baculoviruses coding for these modified proteins. The identities of TSHR ECD-D1 and HR-D1 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting using TSHR-specific monoclonal antibodies. The TSHR-ECD-D1 in conditioned medium was folded correctly, as demonstrated by its ability to inhibit radiolabeled TSH binding to the TSH holoreceptor. The TSHR ECD-D1 purification was accomplished in a single step using a TSHR monoclonal antibody affinity column, whereas the HR-D1 required a multistep protocol with a low yield. In conclusion, we report a novel approach to generate the TSHR ECD, as well as the isolated HR in insect cells, the former in sufficient amounts for structural studies. However, such studies will require previous complexing of the ECD with a ligand such as TSH or a thyroid-stimulating antibody. PMID:25860033

  18. Conformationally Constrained Penta(hetero)cyclic Molecular Architectures via Photoassisted Diversity-Oriented Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Umstead, Weston J.; Mukhina, Olga A.

    2015-01-01

    Intramolecular cycloadditions of photogenerated azaxylylenes provide access to unprecedented polyheterocyclic scaffolds, suitable for subsequent postphotochemical modifications to further grow molecular complexity. Here we explore approaches to rapid “assembly” of novel photoprecursors with nitrogen/oxygen-rich tethers capable of producing potential pharmacophores and also compatible with subsequent 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions to furnish pentacyclic heterocycles with new structural cores, minimal number of rotatable bonds, and a high content of sp3 hybridized carbons. The modular “assembly” of the photoprecursors and potential variety of postphotochemical modifications of primary photoproducts provide framework for combinatorial implementation of this synthetic strategy. PMID:26257575

  19. Viscoelasticity Enhancement of Surfactant Solutions Depends on Molecular Conformation: Influence of Surfactant Headgroup Structure and Its Counterion.

    PubMed

    Lutz-Bueno, Viviane; Pasquino, Rossana; Liebi, Marianne; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Fischer, Peter

    2016-05-01

    During the anisotropic growth from globular to wormlike micelles, the basic interactions among distinct parts of the surfactant monomer, its counterion, and additives are fundamental to tune molecular self-assembly. We investigate the addition of sodium salicylate (NaSal) to hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride and bromide (CTAC and CTAB), 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and bromide (CPyCl and CPyBr), and benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium chloride (BDMC), which have the same hydrophobic tail. Their potential to enhance viscoelasticity by anisotropic micellar growth upon salt addition was compared in terms of (i) the influence of the headgroup structure, and (ii) the influence of surfactant counterion type. Employing proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), we focused on the molecular conformation of surfactant monomers in the core and polar shell regions of the micelles and their interactions with increasing concentration of NaSal. The viscoelastic response was investigated by rotational and oscillatory rheology. We show that micellar growth rates can be tuned by varying the flexibility and size of the surfactant headgroup as well as the dissociation degree of the surfactant counterion, which directly influences the strength of headgroup-counterion pairing. As a consequence, the morphological transitions depend directly on charge neutralization by electrostatic screening. For example, the amount of salt necessary to start the rodlike-to-wormlike micelle growth depends directly on the number of dissociated counterions in the polar shell. PMID:27081871

  20. Molecular dynamics of ion transport through the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Bagnéris, Claire; McCusker, Emily C.; DeCaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.; Wallace, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel pore from Magnetococcus sp. (NaVMs) has provided the basis for a molecular dynamics study defining the channel’s full ion translocation pathway and conductance process, selectivity, electrophysiological characteristics, and ion-binding sites. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations permitted a complete time-course characterization of the protein in a membrane system, capturing the plethora of conductance events and revealing a complex mixture of single and multi-ion phenomena with decoupled rapid bidirectional water transport. The simulations suggest specific localization sites for the sodium ions, which correspond with experimentally determined electron density found in the selectivity filter of the crystal structure. These studies have also allowed us to identify the ion conductance mechanism and its relation to water movement for the NavMs channel pore and to make realistic predictions of its conductance properties. The calculated single-channel conductance and selectivity ratio correspond closely with the electrophysiology measurements of the NavMs channel expressed in HEK 293 cells. The ion translocation process seen in this voltage-gated sodium channel is clearly different from that exhibited by members of the closely related family of voltage-gated potassium channels and also differs considerably from existing proposals for the conductance process in sodium channels. These studies simulate sodium channel conductance based on an experimentally determined structure of a sodium channel pore that has a completely open transmembrane pathway and activation gate. PMID:23542377

  1. Thermally induced irreversible conformational changes in collagen probed by optical second harmonic generation and laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Theodossiou, T; Rapti, G S; Hovhannisyan, V; Georgiou, E; Politopoulos, K; Yova, D

    2002-01-01

    Irreversible thermal conformational changes induced to collagen have been studied by optical methods. More specifically, second harmonic generation (SHG) from incident nanosecond Ng:YAG 1064 nm radiation and laser-induced fluorescence by 337 nm, pulsed nanosecond nitrogen laser excitation, at 405, 410 and 415 nm emission wavelengths were registered at eight temperatures (40 degrees, 50 degrees, 55 degrees, 60 degrees, 65 degrees, 70 degrees, 75 degrees and 80 degrees C) and normalised with respect to the corresponding values at the ambient temperature of 30 degrees C. The heating protocol used in this work, was selected to monitor only permanent changes reflecting in the optical properties of the samples under investigation. In this context, the SHG, directly related to the collagen fibril population in triple helix conformation, indicated on irreversible phase transition around 64 degrees C. On the other hand fluorescence related to the destruction of cross-linked chromophores in collagen, some of which are related to the triple helix tertiary structure, also indicated a permanent phase transition around 63 degrees C. These results are in agreement with previous results from studies with differential scanning calorimetry. However SHG and fluorescence, being non-invasive optical methods are expected to have a significant impact in the fields of laser ablative surgery and laser tissue welding. PMID:11845366

  2. On the use of Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings to the grid generation for global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Wang, B.; Liu, J.

    2015-10-01

    In this article we propose two grid generation methods for global ocean general circulation models. Contrary to conventional dipolar or tripolar grids, the proposed methods are based on Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings that map areas with user-prescribed, irregular boundaries to those with regular boundaries (i.e., disks, slits, etc.). The first method aims at improving existing dipolar grids. Compared with existing grids, the sample grid achieves a better trade-off between the enlargement of the latitudinal-longitudinal portion and the overall smooth grid cell size transition. The second method addresses more modern and advanced grid design requirements arising from high-resolution and multi-scale ocean modeling. The generated grids could potentially achieve the alignment of grid lines to the large-scale coastlines, enhanced spatial resolution in coastal regions, and easier computational load balance. Since the grids are orthogonal curvilinear, they can be easily utilized by the majority of ocean general circulation models that are based on finite difference and require grid orthogonality. The proposed grid generation algorithms can also be applied to the grid generation for regional ocean modeling where complex land-sea distribution is present.

  3. Generation and reception of ultrasonic guided waves in composite plates using conformable piezoelectric transmitters and optical-fiber detectors.

    PubMed

    Gachagan, A; Hayward, G; McNab, A; Reynolds, P; Pierce, S G; Philp, W R; Culshaw, B

    1999-01-01

    A condition monitoring nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system, combining the generation of ultrasonic Lamb waves in thin composite plates and their subsequent detection using an embedded optical fiber system is described. The acoustic source is of low profile with respect to the composite plate thickness, surface conformable, and able to efficiently launch a known Lamb wave mode, at operating frequencies between 100 and 500 kHz, over typical propagation distances of 100 to 500 mm. It incorporates both piezocomposite technology and interdigital design techniques to generate the fundamental symmetrical Lamb wave mode in both metallic and carbon-fiber composite plates. Linear systems and finite element modeling techniques have been used to evaluate the operation of the transducer structure, and this is supplemented by experimental verification of the simulated data. An optical fiber, either bonded to the surface or embedded across the length of the composite plate samples, is used to detect the propagating ultrasonic Lamb waves. Single mode silica fiber has been used in conjunction with a portable 633 nm Mach-Zehnder interferometer for signal demodulation and subsequent data acquisition. This hybrid system is shown to generate and detect the fundamental symmetrical Lamb wave (s(0)) in both carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforced composite plates. Importantly, the system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) associated with the acoustic source compares favorably with s(0) Lamb wave generation using a conventional transducer and angled perspex wedge arrangement. PMID:18238400

  4. An examination of polymorphic stability and molecular conformational flexibility as a function of crystal size associated with the nucleation and growth of benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Robert B; Pencheva, Klimentina; Roberts, Kevin J

    2007-01-01

    The polymorphic behaviour of the aromatic ketone, benzophenone, which is a conformationally flexible molecule and forms crystal structures dominated by van der Waals intermolecular interactions, is examined. Crystallization of this material from the undercooled molten state yields the two known polymorphic forms, i.e. the stable alpha-form and the metastable beta-form. The relative, energetic stabilities are examined using both crystal lattice and molecular conformational modelling techniques. Examination of nano-sized faceted molecular clusters of these forms, with cluster sizes ranging from 3 to 100 molecules, reveals that at very small cluster size (< 5 molecules) the relative energetic stability of clusters representative for the two forms become very similar, indicating that for high melting undercooling (i.e. small critical cluster size for nucleation) crystallization of the metastable beta-phase becomes more likely. Detailed analysis of the variation in molecular conformations within the simulated molecular clusters reveals more disordered three-dimensional structures at small compared to larger cluster sizes. The conformational disorder was found to be higher for the metastable beta-form. This observation, together with the lower stability of clusters for this form is indicative of the difficulty in achieving crystallization of the metastable beta-form from the melt, which requires a considerable undercooling. PMID:17955805

  5. Conformational and Molecular Structures of α,β-Unsaturated Acrylonitrile Derivatives: Photophysical Properties and Their Frontier Orbitals.

    PubMed

    Percino, María Judith; Cerón, Margarita; Rodríguez, Oscar; Soriano-Moro, Guillermo; Castro, María Eugenia; Chapela, Víctor M; Siegler, Maxime A; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We report single crystal X-ray diffraction (hereafter, SCXRD) analyses of derivatives featuring the electron-donor N-ethylcarbazole or the (4-diphenylamino)phenyl moieties associated with a -CN group attached to a double bond. The compounds are (2Z)-3-(4-(diphenylamino)-phenyl)-2-(pyridin-3-yl)prop-2-enenitrile (I), (2Z)-3-(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)-2-(pyridin-4-yl)-prop-2-enenitrile (II) and (2Z)-3-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazol-3-yl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)enenitrile (III). SCXRD analyses reveal that I and III crystallize in the monoclinic space groups P2/c with Z' = 2 and C2/c with Z' = 1, respectively. Compound II crystallized in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn with Z' = 1. The molecular packing analysis was conducted to examine the pyridine core effect, depending on the ortho, meta- and para-positions of the nitrogen atom, with respect to the optical properties and number of independent molecules (Z'). It is found that the double bond bearing a diphenylamino moiety introduced properties to exhibit a strong π-π-interaction in the solid state. The compounds were examined to evaluate the effects of solvent polarity, the role of the molecular structure, and the molecular interactions on their self-assembly behaviors. Compound I crystallized with a cell with two conformers, anti and syn, due to interaction with solvent. DFT calculations indicated the anti and syn structures of I are energetically stable (less than 1 eV). Also electrochemical and photophysical properties of the compounds were investigated, as well as the determination of optimization calculations in gas and different solvent (chloroform, cyclohexane, methanol, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran, dichloromethane and dimethyl sulfoxide) in the Gaussian09 program. The effect of solvent by PCM method was also investigated. The frontier HOMO and LUMO energies and gap energies are reported. PMID:27043499

  6. Molecular conformation changes of PET films under high-energy Ar ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changlong; Jin, Yunfan; Zhu, Zhiyong; Sun, Youmei; Hou, Mingdong; Wang, Zhiguang; Wang, Yanbin; Zhang, Chonghong; Chen, Xiaoxi; Liu, Jie; Li, Baoquan

    2000-06-01

    Investigation of the surface modification in molecular structure of semicrystalline polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films induced by Ar ion bombardment is presented. The PET samples are analysed by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A significant loss of crystallinity is observed, which is related to the configuration transformation of ethylene glycol residue from the trans into the gauche. Chain scissions are observed at the para position of di-substituted benzene rings, -CO bonds and C-O bonds. The C-O bonds are destroyed more selectively than -CO bonds. The benzene ring structures show only small change under irradiation and do not participate in degradation process. Extra CC bonds and alkyne end groups are created above a critical dose of 4.0 MGy. The results are briefly discussed.

  7. Molecular conformations of triton X 114 in the presence of a small amount of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheliaskova, A.; Blinc, R.; Zupancic, I.; Sepe, A.; Derzhanski, A.

    1989-04-01

    The viscosity of the binary system Triton X 114-water and the self-diffusion of the detergent molecules of Triton X 114 have been determined experimentally in the region of small water concentrations (0-10 wt% of water). The temperature was varied from 10 to 50°C in steps of 5°C. The self-diffusion was measured by means of the NMR method. The viscosity of the samples was determined by an efflux viscosimeter. A deviation of the experimentally obtained temperature trend of the viscosity and of the molecular mobility from the theoretical expected exponential dependence was found. This may be due to the building of dimers from the detergent molecules, whose number increases in the low temperature interval.

  8. Effects of osmolytes on the helical conformation of model peptide: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrnejad, Faramarz; Ghahremanpour, Mohammad Mehdi; Khadem-Maaref, Mahmoud; Doustdar, Farahnoosh

    2011-01-01

    Co-solvents such as glycerol and sorbitol are small organic molecules solvated in the cellular solutions that can have profound effects on the protein structures. Here, the molecular dynamics simulations and comparative structural analysis of magainin, as a peptide model, in pure water, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/water, glycerol/water, and sorbitol/water are reported. Our results show that the peptide NMR structure is largely maintained its native structure in osmolytes-water mixtures. The simulation data indicates that the stabilizing effect of glycerol and sorbitol is induced by preferential accumulation of glycerol and sorbitol molecules around the nonpolar and aromatic residues. Thus, the presence of glycerol and sorbitol molecules decreases the interactions of water molecules with the hydrophobic residues of the peptide, and the alpha helical structure is stabilized.

  9. Heteroligand molecular "stirrups" using conformationally flexible ditopic pyridyl-pyrazolyl ligands.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinzhen; Turner, David R; Harding, Lindsay P; Batten, Stuart R

    2009-08-17

    Heteroligand molecular "stirrups" form by the self-assembly of flexible ditopic ligands in combination with 4,4'-bipyridine and [(dppp)Pd)](2+). Crystallographic analysis shows that the ligands, bis[3-(4-pyridyl)pyrazolyl]-m-xylene (mXy(4py3pz)) and bis[4-(4-pyridyl)pyrazolyl]-p-xylene (pXy(4py4pz)) form complexes of the type [{(dppp)Pd}(2)(4,4'-bipy)(L)].4OTf (1.4OTf and 2.4OTf, respectively) in the solid state, with remarkably similar structures considering the differences in substitution patterns between the two ligands. The self-assembly of both 1(4+) and 2(4+) is assisted by face-to-face pi interactions on the exterior of the macrocycle between the phenyl rings of the dppp ligands and the pyridyl groups of the ditopic ligands. PMID:19594137

  10. Molecular Characterization of Transgenic Events Using Next Generation Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mammadov, Jafar; Ye, Liang; Soe, Khaing; Richey, Kimberly; Cruse, James; Zhuang, Meibao; Gao, Zhifang; Evans, Clive; Rounsley, Steve; Kumpatla, Siva P.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for the commercial use of genetically modified (GM) crops has been increasing in light of the projected growth of world population to nine billion by 2050. A prerequisite of paramount importance for regulatory submissions is the rigorous safety assessment of GM crops. One of the components of safety assessment is molecular characterization at DNA level which helps to determine the copy number, integrity and stability of a transgene; characterize the integration site within a host genome; and confirm the absence of vector DNA. Historically, molecular characterization has been carried out using Southern blot analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing. While this is a robust approach to characterize the transgenic crops, it is both time- and resource-consuming. The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has provided highly sensitive and cost- and labor-effective alternative for molecular characterization compared to traditional Southern blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated the successful application of both whole genome sequencing and target capture sequencing approaches for the characterization of single and stacked transgenic events and compared the results and inferences with traditional method with respect to key criteria required for regulatory submissions. PMID:26908260