Science.gov

Sample records for molecular dynamics code

  1. Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics: A flexible and modular molecular dynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; Loyola, Claudia; González, Felipe; Peralta, Joaquín

    2010-12-01

    Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics (LPMD) is a highly modular and extensible molecular dynamics (MD) code using interatomic potential functions. LPMD is able to perform equilibrium MD simulations of bulk crystalline solids, amorphous solids and liquids, as well as non-equilibrium MD (NEMD) simulations such as shock wave propagation, projectile impacts, cluster collisions, shearing, deformation under load, heat conduction, heterogeneous melting, among others, which involve unusual MD features like non-moving atoms and walls, unstoppable atoms with constant-velocity, and external forces like electric fields. LPMD is written in C++ as a compromise between efficiency and clarity of design, and its architecture is based on separate components or plug-ins, implemented as modules which are loaded on demand at runtime. The advantage of this architecture is the ability to completely link together the desired components involved in the simulation in different ways at runtime, using a user-friendly control file language which describes the simulation work-flow. As an added bonus, the plug-in API (Application Programming Interface) makes it possible to use the LPMD components to analyze data coming from other simulation packages, convert between input file formats, apply different transformations to saved MD atomic trajectories, and visualize dynamical processes either in real-time or as a post-processing step. Individual components, such as a new potential function, a new integrator, a new file format, new properties to calculate, new real-time visualizers, and even a new algorithm for handling neighbor lists can be easily coded, compiled and tested within LPMD by virtue of its object-oriented API, without the need to modify the rest of the code. LPMD includes already several pair potential functions such as Lennard-Jones, Morse, Buckingham, MCY and the harmonic potential, as well as embedded-atom model (EAM) functions such as the Sutton-Chen and Gupta potentials. Integrators to

  2. MDMC2: A molecular dynamics code for investigating the fragmentation dynamics of multiply charged clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonhommeau, David A.; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2014-02-01

    MDMC2 is a parallel code for performing molecular dynamics simulations on multiply charged clusters. It is a valuable complement to MCMC2, a Monte Carlo program devoted to Monte Carlo simulations of multiply charged clusters in the NVT ensemble (Bonhommeau and Gaigeot, 2013). Both MCMC2 and MDMC2 codes employ a mesoscopic coarse-grained simplified representation of the clusters (or droplets): these clusters are composed of neutral and charged spherical particles/grains that may be polarisable. One grain can be either neutral or charged. The interaction potential is a sum of 2-body Lennard-Jones potentials (main cohesive contribution) and electrostatic terms (repulsive contribution), possibly supplemented by N-body polarisation interactions. There is no restriction imposed on the values of the particle charges and/or polarisabilities. An external field can also be applied to the whole system. The derivatives of the potential energy-surface are determined analytically which ensures an accurate integration of classical equations of motion by a velocity Verlet algorithm. Conservation rules, such as energy conservation or centre-of-mass linear momentum conservation, can be steadily checked during the simulation. The program also provides some statistical information on the run and configuration files that can be used for data post-treatment. MDMC2 is provided with a serial conjugate gradient program, called CGMC2, that uses the same analytical derivatives as MDMC2 and was found useful to probe the minima of the energy landscape explored during Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations performed on multiply charged clusters.

  3. COOL: A code for Dynamic Monte Carlo Simulation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    Cool is a program to simulate evaporative and sympathetic cooling for a mixture of two gases co-trapped in an harmonic potential. The collisions involved are assumed to be exclusively elastic, and losses are due to evaporation from the trap. Each particle is followed individually in its trajectory, consequently properties such as spatial densities or energy distributions can be readily evaluated. The code can be used sequentially, by employing one output as input for another run. The code can be easily generalised to describe more complicated processes, such as the inclusion of inelastic collisions, or the possible presence of more than two species in the trap. New version program summaryProgram title: COOL Catalogue identifier: AEHJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 097 733 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 425 722 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Desktop Operating system: Linux RAM: 500 Mbytes Classification: 16.7, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEHJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 182 (2011) 388 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of the sympathetic process occurring for two molecular gases co-trapped in a deep optical trap. Solution method: The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method exploits the decoupling, over a short time period, of the inter-particle interaction from the trapping potential. The particle dynamics is thus exclusively driven by the external optical field. The rare inter-particle collisions are considered with an acceptance/rejection mechanism, that is, by comparing a random number to the collisional probability

  4. Surface 3D nanostructuring by tightly focused laser pulse: simulations by Lagrangian code and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, Nail A.; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V.

    2016-02-01

    There are many important applications in which the ultrashort diffraction-limited and therefore tightly focused laser pulses irradiates metal films mounted on dielectric substrate. Here we present the detailed picture of laser peeling and 3D structure formation of the thin (relative to a depth of a heat affected zone in the bulk targets) gold films on glass substrate. The underlying physics of such diffraction-limited laser peeling was not well understood previously. Our approach is based on a physical model which takes into consideration the new calculations of the two-temperature (2T) equation of state (2T EoS) and the two-temperature transport coefficients together with the coupling parameter between electron and ion subsystems. The usage of the 2T EoS and the kinetic coefficients is required because absorption of an ultrashort pulse with duration of 10-1000 fs excites electron subsystem of metal and transfers substance into the 2T state with hot electrons (typical electron temperatures 1-3 eV) and much colder ions. It is shown that formation of submicrometer-sized 3D structures is a result of the electron-ion energy transfer, melting, and delamination of film from substrate under combined action of electron and ion pressures, capillary deceleration of the delaminated liquid metal or semiconductor, and ultrafast freezing of molten material. We found that the freezing is going in non-equilibrium regime with strongly overcooled liquid phase. In this case the Stefan approximation is non-applicable because the solidification front speed is limited by the diffusion rate of atoms in the molten material. To solve the problem we have developed the 2T Lagrangian code including all this reach physics in. We also used the high-performance combined Monte- Carlo and molecular dynamics code for simulation of surface 3D nanostructuring at later times after completion of electron-ion relaxation.

  5. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Large-Scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations on the BlueGene/L Platform using the Qbox Code

    SciTech Connect

    Gygi, F; Draeger, E W; de Supinski, B R; Yates, R K; Franchetti, F; Kral, S; Lorenz, J; Ueberhuber, C; Gunnels, J A; Sexton, J C

    2005-04-25

    We demonstrate that the Qbox code supports unprecedented large-scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics (FPMD) applications on the BlueGene/L supercomputer. Qbox is an FPMD implementation specifically designed for large-scale parallel platforms such as BlueGene/L. Strong scaling tests for a Materials Science application show an 86% scaling efficiency between 1024 and 32,768 CPUs. Measurements of performance by means of hardware counters show that 37% of the peak FPU performance can be attained.

  7. Rigid body constraints in HOOMD-Blue, a general purpose molecular dynamics code on graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung D.; Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-03-01

    Rigid body constraints are commonly used in a wide range of molecular modeling applications from the atomistic scale, modeling the bonds in molecules such as water, carbon dioxide, and benzene, to the colloidal scale, modeling macroscopic rods, plates and patchy nanoparticles. While the parallel implementations of rigid constraints for molecular dynamics simulations for distributed memory clusters have poor performance scaling, on shared memory systems, such as multi-core CPUs and many-core graphics processing units (GPUs), rigid body constraints can be parallelized so that significantly better performance is possible. We have designed a massively parallel rigid body constraint algorithm and implemented it in HOOMD-Blue, a GPU-accelerated, open-source, general purpose molecular dynamics simulation package. For typical simulations, the GPU implementation running on a single NVID IA GTX 480 card is twice as fast as LAMMPS running on 32 CPU cores. In the HOOMD-blue code package, rigid constraints can be used seamlessly with non-rigid parts of the system and with different integration methods, including NVE, NVT, NPT, and Brownian Dynamics. We have also incorporated the FIRE energy minimization algorithm, reformulated to be applicable to mixed systems of rigid bodies and non-rigid particles.

  8. Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC)is a state-of-the-art hydrodynamic model that can be used to simulate aquatic systems in one, two, and three dimensions. It has evolved over the past two decades to become one of the most widely used and technically defensible hydrodyn...

  9. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  10. Heuristic dynamic complexity coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škorupa, Jozef; Slowack, Jürgen; Mys, Stefaan; Lambert, Peter; Van de Walle, Rik

    2008-04-01

    Distributed video coding is a new video coding paradigm that shifts the computational intensive motion estimation from encoder to decoder. This results in a lightweight encoder and a complex decoder, as opposed to the predictive video coding scheme (e.g., MPEG-X and H.26X) with a complex encoder and a lightweight decoder. Both schemas, however, do not have the ability to adapt to varying complexity constraints imposed by encoder and decoder, which is an essential ability for applications targeting a wide range of devices with different complexity constraints or applications with temporary variable complexity constraints. Moreover, the effect of complexity adaptation on the overall compression performance is of great importance and has not yet been investigated. To address this need, we have developed a video coding system with the possibility to adapt itself to complexity constraints by dynamically sharing the motion estimation computations between both components. On this system we have studied the effect of the complexity distribution on the compression performance. This paper describes how motion estimation can be shared using heuristic dynamic complexity and how distribution of complexity affects the overall compression performance of the system. The results show that the complexity can indeed be shared between encoder and decoder in an efficient way at acceptable rate-distortion performance.

  11. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    The thesis work focusses upon two aspects of DNA, the polymer and the molecular code. Our approach was to bring single molecule micromanipulation methods to the study of DNA. It included a home built optical microscope combined with an atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer. This combined approach led to a novel method to graft a single DNA molecule onto a force cantilever using the optical tweezer and local heating. With this method, a force versus extension assay of double stranded DNA was realized. The resolution was about 10 picoN. To improve on this force measurement resolution, a simple light backscattering technique was developed and used to probe the DNA polymer flexibility and its fluctuations. It combined the optical tweezer to trap a DNA tethered bead and the laser backscattering to detect the beads Brownian fluctuations. With this technique the resolution was about 0.1 picoN with a millisecond access time, and the whole entropic part of the DNA force-extension was measured. With this experimental strategy, we measured the polymerization of the protein RecA on an isolated double stranded DNA. We observed the progressive decoration of RecA on the l DNA molecule, which results in the extension of l , due to unwinding of the double helix. The dynamics of polymerization, the resulting change in the DNA entropic elasticity and the role of ATP hydrolysis were the main parts of the study. A simple model for RecA assembly on DNA was proposed. This work presents a first step in the study of genetic recombination. Recently we have started a study of equilibrium binding which utilizes fluorescence polarization methods to probe the polymerization of RecA on single stranded DNA. In addition to the study of material properties of DNA and DNA-RecA, we have developed experiments for which the code of the DNA is central. We studied one aspect of DNA as a molecular code, using different techniques. In particular the programmatic use of template specificity makes

  12. Byte structure variable length coding (BS-VLC): a new specific algorithm applied in the compression of trajectories generated by molecular dynamics

    PubMed

    Melo; Puga; Gentil; Brito; Alves; Ramos

    2000-05-01

    Molecular dynamics is a well-known technique very much used in the study of biomolecular systems. The trajectory files produced by molecular dynamics simulations are extensive, and the classical lossless algorithms give poor efficiencies in their compression. In this work, a new specific algorithm, named byte structure variable length coding (BS-VLC), is introduced. Trajectory files, obtained by molecular dynamics applied to trypsin and a trypsin:pancreatic trypsin inhibitor complex, were compressed using four classical lossless algorithms (Huffman, adaptive Huffman, LZW, and LZ77) as well as the BS-VLC algorithm. The results obtained show that BS-VLC nearly triplicates the compression efficiency of the best classical lossless algorithm, preserving a near lossless behavior. Compression efficiencies close to 50% can be obtained with a high degree of precision, and the maximum efficiency possible (75%), within this algorithm, can be performed with good precision. PMID:10850759

  13. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  14. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  15. Large-Scale First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations on the BlueGene/L Platform using the Qbox Code

    SciTech Connect

    Gygi, F; Draeger, E; de Supinski, B; Yates, R K; Franchetti, F; Kral, S; Lorenz, J; Ueberhueber, C; Gunnels, J A; Sexton, J

    2006-01-04

    First-Principles Molecular Dynamics (FPMD) is an accurate, atomistic simulation approach that is routinely applied to a variety of areas including solid-state physics, chemistry, biochemistry and nanotechnology. FPMD enables one to perform predictive materials simulations, as no empirical or adjustable parameters are used to describe a given system. Instead, a quantum mechanical description of electrons is obtained by solving the Kohn-Sham equations within a pseudopotential plane-wave formalism. This rigorous first-principles treatment of electronic structure is computationally expensive and limits the size of tractable systems to a few hundred atoms on most currently available parallel computers. Developed specifically for large parallel systems at LLNL's Center for Applied Scientific Computing, the Qbox implementation of the FPMD method shows unprecedented performance and scaling on BlueGene/L.

  16. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  17. Casting polymer nets to optimize noisy molecular codes

    PubMed Central

    Tlusty, Tsvi

    2008-01-01

    Life relies on the efficient performance of molecular codes, which relate symbols and meanings via error-prone molecular recognition. We describe how optimizing a code to withstand the impact of molecular recognition noise may be understood from the statistics of a two-dimensional network made of polymers. The noisy code is defined by partitioning the space of symbols into regions according to their meanings. The “polymers” are the boundaries between these regions, and their statistics define the cost and the quality of the noisy code. When the parameters that control the cost–quality balance are varied, the polymer network undergoes a transition, where the number of encoded meanings rises discontinuously. Effects of population dynamics on the evolution of molecular codes are discussed. PMID:18550822

  18. VMD: visual molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, W; Dalke, A; Schulten, K

    1996-02-01

    VMD is a molecular graphics program designed for the display and analysis of molecular assemblies, in particular biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids. VMD can simultaneously display any number of structures using a wide variety of rendering styles and coloring methods. Molecules are displayed as one or more "representations," in which each representation embodies a particular rendering method and coloring scheme for a selected subset of atoms. The atoms displayed in each representation are chosen using an extensive atom selection syntax, which includes Boolean operators and regular expressions. VMD provides a complete graphical user interface for program control, as well as a text interface using the Tcl embeddable parser to allow for complex scripts with variable substitution, control loops, and function calls. Full session logging is supported, which produces a VMD command script for later playback. High-resolution raster images of displayed molecules may be produced by generating input scripts for use by a number of photorealistic image-rendering applications. VMD has also been expressly designed with the ability to animate molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories, imported either from files or from a direct connection to a running MD simulation. VMD is the visualization component of MDScope, a set of tools for interactive problem solving in structural biology, which also includes the parallel MD program NAMD, and the MDCOMM software used to connect the visualization and simulation programs. VMD is written in C++, using an object-oriented design; the program, including source code and extensive documentation, is freely available via anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web. PMID:8744570

  19. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Superposition State Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkatnathan, Arun; Voth, Gregory A

    2005-01-01

    The ergodic sampling of rough energy landscapes is crucial for understanding phenomena like protein folding, peptide aggregation, polymer dynamics, and the glass transition. These rough energy landscapes are characterized by the presence of many local minima separated by high energy barriers, where Molecular Dynamics (MD) fails to satisfy ergodicity. To enhance ergodic behavior, we have developed the Superposition State Molecular Dynamics (SSMD) method, which uses a superposition of energy states to obtain an effective potential for the MD simulation. In turn, the dynamics on this effective potential can be used to sample the configurational free energy of the real potential. The effectiveness of the SSMD method for a one-dimensional rough potential energy landscape is presented as a test case. PMID:26641113

  1. Scalable Molecular Dynamics with NAMD

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D.; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This paper, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Next, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, e.g., the Tcl scripting language. Finally, the paper provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. PMID:16222654

  2. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Program for Molecules

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-07

    ParBond is a parallel classical molecular dynamics code that models bonded molecular systems, typically of an organic nature. It uses classical force fields for both non-bonded Coulombic and Van der Waals interactions and for 2-, 3-, and 4-body bonded (bond, angle, dihedral, and improper) interactions. It integrates Newton''s equation of motion for the molecular system and evaluates various thermodynamical properties of the system as it progresses.

  3. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  4. Molecular Dynamics of Acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T Y.; Tai, Kaihsu; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2002-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are leading to a deeper understanding of the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Simulations have shown how breathing motions in the enzyme facilitate the displacement of substrate from the surface of the enzyme to the buried active site. The most recent work points to the complex and spatially extensive nature of such motions and suggests possible modes of regulation of the activity of the enzyme.

  5. TRACK : the new beam dynamics code.

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, V. N.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Lessner, E. S.; Mustapha, B.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The new ray-tracing code TRACK originally developed to fulfill the special requirements of the RIA accelerator systems is a general beam dynamics code. It is currently being used for the design and simulation of future proton and heavy-ion linacs at several Labs. This paper presents a general description of the code TRACK emphasizing its main new features and recent updates.

  6. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  7. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  8. TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

  9. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  10. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alder, B.J.

    1985-07-01

    The molecular dynamics computer simulation discovery of the slow decay of the velocity autocorrelation function in fluids is briefly reviewed in order to contrast that long time tail with those observed for the stress autocorrelation function in fluids and the velocity autocorrelation function in the Lorentz gas. For a non-localized particle in the Lorentz gas it is made plausible that even if it behaved quantum mechanically its long time tail would be the same as the classical one. The generalization of Fick's law for diffusion for the Lorentz gas, necessary to avoid divergences due to the slow decay of correlations, is presented. For fluids, that generalization has not yet been established, but the region of validity of generalized hydrodynamics is discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  13. COLD-SAT Dynamic Model Computer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, G.; Adams, N. S.

    1995-01-01

    COLD-SAT Dynamic Model (CSDM) computer code implements six-degree-of-freedom, rigid-body mathematical model for simulation of spacecraft in orbit around Earth. Investigates flow dynamics and thermodynamics of subcritical cryogenic fluids in microgravity. Consists of three parts: translation model, rotation model, and slosh model. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Coding and Dynamics of Memory. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickelgren, Wayne

    This report provides a nontechnical summary of a series of studies from a research project with three major foci: memory storage dynamics, memory retrieval dynamics, and coding in semantic memory. A theory of forgetting was developed, involving time and interference factors. Memory traces have two properties: strength and fragility. Consolidation…

  15. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated. PMID:24600690

  16. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-05-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed. (WHK)

  17. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery. PMID:26867211

  18. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoyin; Fan, Xu; Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery. PMID:26867211

  19. Dynamic-domain-decomposition parallel molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, S. G.; Ashok, I.; Jônsson, Hannes; Kalonji, Gretchen; Zahorjan, John

    1997-05-01

    Parallel molecular dynamics with short-range forces can suffer from load-imbalance problems and attendant performance degradation due to density variations in the simulated system. In this paper, we describe an approach to dynamical load balancing, enabled by the Ādhāra runtime system. The domain assigned to each processor is automatically and dynamically resized so as to evenly distribute the molecular dynamics computations across all the processors. The algorithm was tested on an Intel Paragon parallel computer for two and three-dimensional Lennard-Jones systems containing 99 458 and 256000 atoms, respectively, and using up to 256 processors. In these benchmarks, the overhead for carrying out the load-balancing operations was found to be small and the total computation time was reduced by as much as 50%.

  20. The Proteomic Code: a molecular recognition code for proteins

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C

    2007-01-01

    Background The Proteomic Code is a set of rules by which information in genetic material is transferred into the physico-chemical properties of amino acids. It determines how individual amino acids interact with each other during folding and in specific protein-protein interactions. The Proteomic Code is part of the redundant Genetic Code. Review The 25-year-old history of this concept is reviewed from the first independent suggestions by Biro and Mekler, through the works of Blalock, Root-Bernstein, Siemion, Miller and others, followed by the discovery of a Common Periodic Table of Codons and Nucleic Acids in 2003 and culminating in the recent conceptualization of partial complementary coding of interacting amino acids as well as the theory of the nucleic acid-assisted protein folding. Methods and conclusions A novel cloning method for the design and production of specific, high-affinity-reacting proteins (SHARP) is presented. This method is based on the concept of proteomic codes and is suitable for large-scale, industrial production of specifically interacting peptides. PMID:17999762

  1. IFR code for secondary particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, M.R.; Yu, S.S.

    1985-10-11

    A numerical simulation has been constructed to obtain a detailed, quantitative estimate of the electromagnetic fields and currents existing in the Advanced Test Accelerator under conditions of laser guiding. The code treats the secondary electrons by particle simulation and the beam dynamics by a time-dependent envelope model. The simulation gives a fully relativistic description of secondary electrons moving in self-consistent electromagnetic fields. The calculations are made using coordinates t, x, y, z for the electrons and t, ct-z, r for the axisymmetric electromagnetic fields and currents. Code results, showing in particular current enhancement effects, will be given.

  2. Adaptive Dynamic Event Tree in RAVEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur

    2014-11-01

    RAVEN is a software tool that is focused on performing statistical analysis of stochastic dynamic systems. RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other applications (system codes). Among the several capabilities currently present in RAVEN, there are five different sampling strategies: Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Grid, Adaptive and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampling methodologies. The scope of this paper is to present a new sampling approach, currently under definition and implementation: an evolution of the DET me

  3. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Tadmor, Ellad B.; Gibson, Joshua S.; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  4. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress. PMID:27179471

  5. Molecular dynamics and protein function

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M.; Kuriyan, J.

    2005-01-01

    A fundamental appreciation for how biological macromolecules work requires knowledge of structure and dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations provide powerful tools for the exploration of the conformational energy landscape accessible to these molecules, and the rapid increase in computational power coupled with improvements in methodology makes this an exciting time for the application of simulation to structural biology. In this Perspective we survey two areas, protein folding and enzymatic catalysis, in which simulations have contributed to a general understanding of mechanism. We also describe results for the F1 ATPase molecular motor and the Src family of signaling proteins as examples of applications of simulations to specific biological systems. PMID:15870208

  6. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel

  7. Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

    1999-05-21

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule.

  8. Integration methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Leimkuhler, B.J.; Reich, S.; Skeel, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation of a macromolecule requires the use of an efficient time-stepping scheme that can faithfully approximate the dynamics over many thousands of timesteps. Because these problems are highly nonlinear, accurate approximation of a particular solution trajectory on meaningful time intervals is neither obtainable nor desired, but some restrictions, such as symplecticness, can be imposed on the discretization which tend to imply good long term behavior. The presence of a variety of types and strengths of interatom potentials in standard molecular models places severe restrictions on the timestep for numerical integration used in explicit integration schemes, so much recent research has concentrated on the search for alternatives that possess (1) proper dynamical properties, and (2) a relative insensitivity to the fastest components of the dynamics. We survey several recent approaches. 48 refs., 2 figs.

  9. SORD: A New Rupture Dynamics Modeling Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, G.; Minster, B.; Day, S.

    2005-12-01

    We report on our progress in validating our rupture dynamics modeling code, capable of dealing with nonplanar faults and surface topography. The method uses a "mimetic" approach to model spontaneous rupture on a fault within a 3D isotropic anelastic solid, wherein the equations of motion are approximated with a second order Support-Operator method on a logically rectangular mesh. Grid cells are not required to be parallelepipeds, however, so that non-rectangular meshes can be supported to model complex regions. However, for areas in the mesh which are in fact rectangular, the code uses a streamlined version of the algorithm that takes advantage of the simplifications of the operators in such areas. The fault itself is modeled using a double node technique, and the rheology on the fault surface is modeled through a slip-weakening, frictional, internal boundary condition. The Support Operator Rupture Dynamics (SORD) code, was prototyped in MATLAB, and all algorithms have been validated against known (including analytical solutions, eg Kostrov, 1964) solutions or previously validated solutions. This validation effort is conducted in the context of the SCEC Dynamic Rupture model validation effort led by R. Archuleta and R. Harris. Absorbing boundaries at the model edges are handled using the perfectly matched layers method (PML) (Olsen & Marcinkovich, 2003). PML is shown to work extremely well on rectangular meshes. We show that our implementation is also effective on non-rectangular meshes under the restriction that the boundary be planar. For validation of the model we use a variety of test cases using two types of meshes: a rectangular mesh and skewed mesh. The skewed mesh amplifies any biases caused by the Support-Operator method on non-rectangular elements. Wave propagation and absorbing boundaries are tested with a spherical wave source. Rupture dynamics on a planar fault are tested against (1) a Kostrov analytical solution, (2) data from foam rubber scale models

  10. Simulation studies using multibody dynamics code DART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keat, James E.

    1989-01-01

    DART is a multibody dynamics code developed by Photon Research Associates for the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory (AFAL). The code is intended primarily to simulate the dynamics of large space structures, particularly during the deployment phase of their missions. DART integrates nonlinear equations of motion numerically. The number of bodies in the system being simulated is arbitrary. The bodies' interconnection joints can have an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom between 0 and 6. Motions across the joints can be large. Provision for simulating on-board control systems is provided. Conservation of energy and momentum, when applicable, are used to evaluate DART's performance. After a brief description of DART, studies made to test the program prior to its delivery to AFAL are described. The first is a large angle reorientating of a flexible spacecraft consisting of a rigid central hub and four flexible booms. Reorientation was accomplished by a single-cycle sine wave shape torque input. In the second study, an appendage, mounted on a spacecraft, was slewed through a large angle. Four closed-loop control systems provided control of this appendage and of the spacecraft's attitude. The third study simulated the deployment of the rim of a bicycle wheel configuration large space structure. This system contained 18 bodies. An interesting and unexpected feature of the dynamics was a pulsing phenomena experienced by the stays whole playout was used to control the deployment. A short description of the current status of DART is given.

  11. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale cavitation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-12-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the cavitation dynamics around intensely heated solid nanoparticles immersed in a model Lennard-Jones fluid. Specifically, we study the temporal evolution of vapor nanobubbles that form around the solid nanoparticles heated over ps time scale and provide a detail description of the following vapor formation and collapse. For 8 nm diameter nanoparticles we observe the formation of vapor bubbles when the liquid temperature 0.5-1 nm away from the nanoparticle surface reaches ˜90% of the critical temperature, which is consistent with the onset of spinodal decomposition. The peak heat flux from the hot solid to the surrounding liquid at the bubble formation threshold is ˜20 times higher than the corresponding steady state critical heat flux. Detailed analysis of the bubble dynamics indicates adiabatic formation followed by an isothermal final stage of growth and isothermal collapse.

  12. Dynamic alignment models for neural coding.

    PubMed

    Kollmorgen, Sepp; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2014-03-01

    Recently, there have been remarkable advances in modeling the relationships between the sensory environment, neuronal responses, and behavior. However, most models cannot encompass variable stimulus-response relationships such as varying response latencies and state or context dependence of the neural code. Here, we consider response modeling as a dynamic alignment problem and model stimulus and response jointly by a mixed pair hidden Markov model (MPH). In MPHs, multiple stimulus-response relationships (e.g., receptive fields) are represented by different states or groups of states in a Markov chain. Each stimulus-response relationship features temporal flexibility, allowing modeling of variable response latencies, including noisy ones. We derive algorithms for learning of MPH parameters and for inference of spike response probabilities. We show that some linear-nonlinear Poisson cascade (LNP) models are a special case of MPHs. We demonstrate the efficiency and usefulness of MPHs in simulations of both jittered and switching spike responses to white noise and natural stimuli. Furthermore, we apply MPHs to extracellular single and multi-unit data recorded in cortical brain areas of singing birds to showcase a novel method for estimating response lag distributions. MPHs allow simultaneous estimation of receptive fields, latency statistics, and hidden state dynamics and so can help to uncover complex stimulus response relationships that are subject to variable timing and involve diverse neural codes. PMID:24625448

  13. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  14. Fiftieth anniversary of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melker, Alexander I.

    2007-04-01

    The history of computer application in physics for solving nonlinear problems is considered. Examples from different branches of condensed matter physics (nonlinear vibrations of anharmonic chains of atoms, dynamics of radiation damage of crystals, deformation and fracture of crystals) are given. A new line of investigation and the results obtained in the field of computer simulation of physical processes realized in the department of metal physics and computer technologies in materials science are considered. This line incorporates both a study of self-organization and properties of new materials (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes) and biological objects by molecular dynamics technique as well as the development of new computer simulation methods.

  15. Trillion-atom molecular dynamics becomes a reality

    SciTech Connect

    Kadau, Kai; Germann, Timothy C

    2008-01-01

    By utilizing the molecular dynamics code SPaSM on Livermore's BlueGene/L architecture, consisting of 212 992 IBM PowerPC440 700 MHz processors, a molecular dynamics simulation was run with one trillion atoms. To demonstrate the practicality and future potential of such ultra large-scale simulations, the onset of the mechanical shear instability occurring in a system of Lennard-Jones particles arranged in a simple cubic lattice was simulated. The evolution of the instability was analyzed on-the-fly using the in-house developed massively parallel graphical object-rendering code MD{_}render.

  16. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Likhachev, I. V.; Balabaev, N. K.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  17. Molecular dynamics on vector computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, F.; Mountain, R. D.; Oconnell, J.

    1985-10-01

    An algorithm called the method of lights (MOL) has been developed for the computerized simulation of molecular dynamics. The MOL, implemented on the CYBER 205 computer, is based on sorting and reformulating the manner in which neighbor lists are compiled, and it uses data structures compatible with specialized vector statements that perform parallel computations. The MOL is found to reduce running time over standard methods in scalar form, and vectorization is shown to produce an order-of-magnitude reduction in execution time.

  18. Reading the Molecular Code in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Tfaily, M. M.; O'Brien, S. L.; Tolic, N.; Jastrow, J. D.; Amonette, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    There is much that we understand about the relationship between plants, microbes, soil, and water but that understanding is incomplete at the molecular scale. With advent of high throughput genomic sequencing we are beginning to appreciate the diversity of microbial community structure and function and its response to the rhythm of plant function. Through the lens of high-resolution mass spectrometry we are getting our first glimpses of the diversity of soil and pore water organic chemistry at the molecular level. In combination, these diverse data streams are revealing traces of chemical metabolic pathways. This approach promises to reveal many exciting future discoveries, shedding light into the "black box" that exists beneath our feet. In this talk we discuss our experience with the molecular characterization of soils from native prairie to restored prairie to active corn-soybean soils from the DOE funded CSiTE project in Batavia, Illinois. We focus on how common soil separation and fractionation techniques can affect the resulting molecular soil characterization by comparing whole soils to those that have been fractionated into micro- and macro-aggregates and their corresponding silt and clay fractions. When carefully utilized and interpreted these fractionation techniques can be utilized for deepening understanding of the biotic and abiotic chemical pathways effecting the organic chemistry in the different soil fractions. In highly fractionated soils we find significant differences in organic chemistry between silt and clay separates of corresponding hierarchical aggregate fractions. However the most biologically rich information resides in the whole soil. Here we see significant gradients in soil chemistry across to active agricultural to restored to native prairie soils. These results suggest a cautionary note, namely that soil fractionation prior to molecular characterization can reveal much about the "abiotic" interactions between organic molecules and

  19. Molecular dynamics for dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Watanabe, Gentaro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2012-08-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions about the nuclear structure. First, we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear "pasta", i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next, we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With the increase in density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei changes to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we discuss fragment formation in expanding nuclear matter. Our results suggest that a generally accepted scenario based on the liquid-gas phase transition is not plausible at lower temperatures.

  20. Multisurface Adiabatic Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tibor; Yosa Reyes, Juvenal; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Adiabatic reactive molecular dynamics (ARMD) simulation method is a surface-crossing algorithm for modeling chemical reactions in classical molecular dynamics simulations using empirical force fields. As the ARMD Hamiltonian is time dependent during crossing, it allows only approximate energy conservation. In the current work, the range of applicability of conventional ARMD is explored, and a new multisurface ARMD (MS-ARMD) method is presented, implemented in CHARMM and applied to the vibrationally induced photodissociation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the gas phase. For this, an accurate global potential energy surface (PES) involving 12 H2SO4 and 4 H2O + SO3 force fields fitted to MP2/6-311G++(2d,2p) reference energies is employed. The MS-ARMD simulations conserve total energy and feature both intramolecular H-transfer reactions and water elimination. An analytical treatment of the dynamics in the crossing region finds that conventional ARMD can approximately conserve total energy for limiting cases. In one of them, the reduced mass of the system is large, which often occurs for simulations of solvated biomolecular systems. On the other hand, MS-ARMD is a general approach for modeling chemical reactions including gas-phase, homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalytic reactions while conserving total energy in atomistic simulations. PMID:26580356

  1. A New Shared-Memory Programming Paradigm for Molecular Dynamics Simulations on the Intel Paragon

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the use of shared memory emulation with DOLIB (Distributed Object Library) to simplify parallel programming on the Intel Paragon. A molecular dynamics application is used as an example to illustrate the use of the DOLIB shared memory library. SOTON PAR, a parallel molecular dynamics code with explicit message-passing using a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, is rewritten using DOLIB primitives. The resulting code has no explicit message primitives and resembles a serial code. The new code can perform dynamic load balancing and achieves better performance than the original parallel code with explicit message-passing.

  2. A new shared-memory programming paradigm for molecular dynamics simulations on the Intel Paragon

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the use of shared memory emulation with DOLIB (Distributed Object Library) to simplify parallel programming on the Intel Paragon. A molecular dynamics application is used as an example to illustrate the use of the DOLIB shared memory library. SOTON-PAR, a parallel molecular dynamics code with explicit message-passing using a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, is rewritten using DOLIB primitives. The resulting code has no explicit message primitives and resembles a serial code. The new code can perform dynamic load balancing and achieves better performance than the original parallel code with explicit message-passing.

  3. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been undertaken in this work to explore structures and properties of polyethylene (PE), polyisobutylene (PIB), atactic polypropylene (aPP) and atactic polystyrene (aPS). This work has not only demonstrated the reliability of MD simulations by comparing results with available experiments, but more importantly has revealed structure-property relationships on a molecular level for these selected polymers. Structures of these amorphous polymers were characterized by radial distribution functions (RDFs) or scattering profiles, and properties of the polymers studied were pressure-volume -temperature (PVT) equation of state, enthalpy, cohesive energy, the diffusion coefficient of methane in the polymer, and glass transition temperature. Good agreement was found for these structures and properties between simulation and experiment. More importantly, the scientific understanding of structure-property relationships was established on a molecular level. In the order of aPP (PE), PIB and aPS, with the chain surface separation or free volume decreasing, the density increases and the diffusion coefficient decreases. Therefore, the effects of changes or modifications in the chemical structure of monomer molecules (substituting pendent hydrogen with methyl or phenyl) on polymeric materials performance were attributed to the effects of molecular chain structure on packing structure, which, in turn, affects the properties of these polymers. Local chain dynamics and relaxation have been studied for bulk PE and aPS. Cooperative transitions occur at second-neighbor bonds for PE, and first-neighbor bonds for aPS due to the role of side groups. The activation energy is a single torsional barrier for overall conformational transitions, and is single torsional barrier plus locally "trapped" barrier for relaxation. Temperature dependence is Arrhenius for transition time, and is WLF for relaxation time. The mean correlation times derived from

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  6. The "Collisions Cube" Molecular Dynamics Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John J.; Smith, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a molecular dynamics simulator that employs ping-pong balls as the atoms or molecules and is suitable for either large lecture halls or small classrooms. Discusses its use in illustrating many of the fundamental concepts related to molecular motion and dynamics and providing a three-dimensional perspective of molecular motion. (JRH)

  7. The Da Vinci code dynamically de-coded.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mariam

    2005-01-01

    The novel The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown has been on best-seller lists for over two years. An examination of Brown's previous novels reveals a well-designed plot line shared by all four novels that not only makes them good "thrillers" but also creates a mythological structure to the novels that draws on common unconscious fantasies in the same way that fairy tales do. One aspect of this mythological structure is the use of evil conspiracies (and benign ones as well) for the protagonist to overcome. In addition, The Da Vinci Code presents a religious theme involving legends about Mary Magdalene. This theme touches on the role of a feminine aspect to divinity in allowing for an erotic connection with the divine. PMID:16448349

  8. Dynamic Forces in Spur Gears - Measurement, Prediction, and Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Rebbechi, Brian; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1996-01-01

    Measured and computed values for dynamic loads in spur gears were compared to validate a new version of the NASA gear dynamics code DANST-PC. Strain gage data from six gear sets with different tooth profiles were processed to determine the dynamic forces acting between the gear teeth. Results demonstrate that the analysis code successfully simulates the dynamic behavior of the gears. Differences between analysis and experiment were less than 10 percent under most conditions.

  9. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaofan Tong, Qi

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation.

  10. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  11. Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics with Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2012-02-01

    In the mixed quantum-classical description of molecular systems, only the quantum character of the electronic degrees of freedom is considered while the nuclear motion is treated at a classical level. In the adiabatic case, this picture corresponds to the Born-Oppenheimer limit where the nuclei move as point charges on the potential energy surface (PES) associated with a given electronic state. Despite the success of this approximation, many physical and chemical processes do not fall in the regime where nuclei and electrons can be considered decoupled. In particular, most photoreactions pass through regions of the PES in which electron-nuclear quantum interference effects are sizeable and often crucial for a correct description of the phenomena. Recently, we have developed a trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme that describes the nuclear wavepacket as an ensemble of particles following classical trajectories on PESs derived from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) [1]. The method is based on Tully's fewest switches trajectories surface hopping (TSH) where the nonadiabatic coupling elements between the different potential energy surfaces are computed on-the-fly as functionals of the ground state electron density or, equivalently, of the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbitals [2]. Here, we present the theoretical fundamentals of our approach together with an extension that allows for the direct coupling of the dynamics to an external electromagnetic field [3] as well as to the external potential generated by the environment (solvent effects) [4]. The method is applied to the study of the photodissociation dynamics of simple molecules in gas phase and to the description of the fast excited state dynamics of molecules in solution (in particular Ruthenium (II) tris(bipyridine) in water). [4pt] [1] E. Tapavicza, I. Tavernelli, U. Rothlisberger, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, (2007) 023001. [0pt] [2] Tavernelli I.; Tapavicza E.; Rothlisberger U., J. Chem

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular potentials and a few models of intermolecular interaction in liquid benzene are tested by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ 12-6) potential is too hard, which yields incorrect results. The exp-6 potential with a too hard repulsive term is also often used. Therefore, we took an expa-6 potential with a small Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This allows to modify the curvature of the potential. The MD simulations are carried out in the temperature range 280-352 K under normal pressure and at experimental density. The Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light is used for comparison. The results of MD simulations are comparable with the experimental values.

  13. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material. PMID:26262672

  14. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  15. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also resultmore » in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  17. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In this paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMPS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel®  Xeon Phi™ coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs. The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS.

  18. Langevin stabilization of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Jesús A.; Catarello, Daniel P.; Wozniak, Justin M.; Skeel, Robert D.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper we show the possibility of using very mild stochastic damping to stabilize long time step integrators for Newtonian molecular dynamics. More specifically, stable and accurate integrations are obtained for damping coefficients that are only a few percent of the natural decay rate of processes of interest, such as the velocity autocorrelation function. Two new multiple time stepping integrators, Langevin Molly (LM) and Brünger-Brooks-Karplus-Molly (BBK-M), are introduced in this paper. Both use the mollified impulse method for the Newtonian term. LM uses a discretization of the Langevin equation that is exact for the constant force, and BBK-M uses the popular Brünger-Brooks-Karplus integrator (BBK). These integrators, along with an extrapolative method called LN, are evaluated across a wide range of damping coefficient values. When large damping coefficients are used, as one would for the implicit modeling of solvent molecules, the method LN is superior, with LM closely following. However, with mild damping of 0.2 ps-1, LM produces the best results, allowing long time steps of 14 fs in simulations containing explicitly modeled flexible water. With BBK-M and the same damping coefficient, time steps of 12 fs are possible for the same system. Similar results are obtained for a solvated protein-DNA simulation of estrogen receptor ER with estrogen response element ERE. A parallel version of BBK-M runs nearly three times faster than the Verlet-I/r-RESPA (reversible reference system propagator algorithm) when using the largest stable time step on each one, and it also parallelizes well. The computation of diffusion coefficients for flexible water and ER/ERE shows that when mild damping of up to 0.2 ps-1 is used the dynamics are not significantly distorted.

  19. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  20. Molecular dynamics on APE100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Luciano Maria; Simonazzi, Riccardo; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    1995-09-01

    We have studied portability, efficiency and accuracy of a standard Molecular Dynamics simulation on the SIMD parallel computer APE100. Computing speed performance and physical system size range have been analyzed and compared with those of a conventional computer. Short range and long range potentials have been considered, and the comparative advantage of different simulation approaches has been assessed. For long range potentials, APE turns out to be faster than a conventional computer; large systems can be conveniently simulated using either the cloning approach (up to ˜ 10 5 particles) or a domain decomposition with the systolic method. In the case of short range potentials and systems with diffusion (like a liquid), APE is convenient only when using a large number of processors. In a special case (a crystal without diffusion), a specific domain decomposition technique with frames makes APE advantageous for intermediate and large systems. Using the latter technique we have studied in detail the effect of different numerical error sources, and compared the accuracy of APE with that of a conventional computer.

  1. Dynamics of riboswitches: Molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2014-10-01

    Riboswitch RNAs play key roles in bacterial metabolism and represent a promising new class of antibiotic targets for treatment of infectious disease. While many studies of riboswitches have been performed, the exact mechanism of riboswitch operation is still not fully understood at the atomistic level of detail. Molecular dynamics simulations are useful for interpreting existing experimental data and producing predictions for new experiments. Here, a wide range of computational studies on riboswitches is reviewed. By elucidating the key principles of riboswitch operation, computation may aid in the effort to design more specific antibiotics with affinities greater than those of the native ligand. Such a detailed understanding may be required to improve efficacy and reduce side effects. These studies are laying the groundwork for understanding the action mechanism of new compounds that inhibit riboswitch activity. Future directions such as magnesium effects, large-scale conformational changes, expression platforms and co-transcriptional folding are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches. PMID:24953187

  2. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oehrn, Yngve

    2007-11-29

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  3. Arithmetic coding as a non-linear dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Nithin; Vaidya, Prabhakar G.; Bhat, Kishor G.

    2009-04-01

    In order to perform source coding (data compression), we treat messages emitted by independent and identically distributed sources as imprecise measurements (symbolic sequence) of a chaotic, ergodic, Lebesgue measure preserving, non-linear dynamical system known as Generalized Luröth Series (GLS). GLS achieves Shannon's entropy bound and turns out to be a generalization of arithmetic coding, a popular source coding algorithm, used in international compression standards such as JPEG2000 and H.264. We further generalize GLS to piecewise non-linear maps (Skewed-nGLS). We motivate the use of Skewed-nGLS as a framework for joint source coding and encryption.

  4. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M; Hommes, G; Aubry, S; Arsenlis, A

    2011-09-27

    The ParaDiS code is developed to study bulk systems with periodic boundary conditions. When we try to perform discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for finite systems such as thin films or cylinders, the ParaDiS code must be extended. First, dislocations need to be contained inside the finite simulation box; Second, dislocations inside the finite box experience image stresses due to the free surfaces. We have developed in-house FEM subroutines to couple with the ParaDiS code to deal with free surface related issues in the dislocation dynamics simulations. This primer explains how the coupled code was developed, the main changes from the ParaDiS code, and the functions of the new FEM subroutines.

  5. Dynamic Malicious Code Detection Based on Binary Translator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhe; Li, Minglu; Weng, Chuliang; Luo, Yuan

    The binary translator is a software component of a computer system. It converts binary code of one ISA into binary code of another ISA. Recent trends show that binary translators have been used to save CPU power consumption and CPU die size, which makes binary translators a possible indispensable component of future computer systems. And such situation would give new opportunities to the security of these computer systems. One of the opportunities is that we can perform malicious code checking dynamically in the layer of binary translators. This approach has many advantages, both in terms of capability of detection and checking overhead. In this paper, we proposed a working dynamic malicious code checking module integrated to an existent open-source binary translator, QEMU, and explained that our module's capability of detection is superior to other malicious code checking methods while acceptable performance is still maintained.

  6. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  7. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  9. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  10. Fermionic Molecular Dynamics for Nuclear Dynamics and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnaoui, K. H. O.; Chomaz, Ph; Gulminelli, F.

    A new Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model based on a Skyrme functional is proposed in this paper. After introducing the basic formalism, some first applications to nuclear structure and nuclear thermodynamics are presented.

  11. Molecular dynamics: A stitch in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deupi, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Lengthy molecular dynamics simulations of complex systems at the atomic scale usually require supercomputers. Now, by stitching together many shorter independent simulations run 'in the cloud', this requirement has been circumvented, allowing two milliseconds of the dynamics of a G-protein-coupled receptor to be simulated.

  12. Dynamic molecular crystals with switchable physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sato, Osamu

    2016-06-21

    The development of molecular materials whose physical properties can be controlled by external stimuli - such as light, electric field, temperature, and pressure - has recently attracted much attention owing to their potential applications in molecular devices. There are a number of ways to alter the physical properties of crystalline materials. These include the modulation of the spin and redox states of the crystal's components, or the incorporation within the crystalline lattice of tunable molecules that exhibit stimuli-induced changes in their molecular structure. A switching behaviour can also be induced by changing the molecular orientation of the crystal's components, even in cases where the overall molecular structure is not affected. Controlling intermolecular interactions within a molecular material is also an effective tool to modulate its physical properties. This Review discusses recent advances in the development of such stimuli-responsive, switchable crystalline compounds - referred to here as dynamic molecular crystals - and suggests how different approaches can serve to prepare functional materials. PMID:27325090

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of large macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Perilla, Juan R.; Goh, Boon Chong; Cassidy, C. Keith; Liu, Bo; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Rudack, Till; Yu, Hang; Wu, Zhe; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Connecting dynamics to structural data from diverse experimental sources, molecular dynamics simulations permit the exploration of biological phenomena in unparalleled detail. Advances in simulations are moving the atomic resolution descriptions of biological systems into the million-to-billion atom regime, in which numerous cell functions reside. In this opinion, we review the progress, driven by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, in the study of viruses, ribosomes, bioenergetic systems, and other diverse applications. These examples highlight the utility of molecular dynamics simulations in the critical task of relating atomic detail to the function of supramolecular complexes, a task that cannot be achieved by smaller-scale simulations or existing experimental approaches alone. PMID:25845770

  15. Population Code Dynamics in Categorical Perception

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Chihiro I.; Tajima, Satohiro; Koida, Kowa; Komatsu, Hidehiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Categorical perception is a ubiquitous function in sensory information processing, and is reported to have important influences on the recognition of presented and/or memorized stimuli. However, such complex interactions among categorical perception and other aspects of sensory processing have not been explained well in a unified manner. Here, we propose a recurrent neural network model to process categorical information of stimuli, which approximately realizes a hierarchical Bayesian estimation on stimuli. The model accounts for a wide variety of neurophysiological and cognitive phenomena in a consistent framework. In particular, the reported complexity of categorical effects, including (i) task-dependent modulation of neural response, (ii) clustering of neural population representation, (iii) temporal evolution of perceptual color memory, and (iv) a non-uniform discrimination threshold, are explained as different aspects of a single model. Moreover, we directly examine key model behaviors in the monkey visual cortex by analyzing neural population dynamics during categorization and discrimination of color stimuli. We find that the categorical task causes temporally-evolving biases in the neuronal population representations toward the focal colors, which supports the proposed model. These results suggest that categorical perception can be achieved by recurrent neural dynamics that approximates optimal probabilistic inference in the changing environment. PMID:26935275

  16. Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

  17. Parallel implementation of three-dimensional molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this article is to report the parallel implementation of the 3D molecular dynamic simulation code for laser-cluster interactions. The benchmarking of the code has been done by comparing the simulation results with some of the experiments reported in the literature. Scaling laws for the computational time is established by varying the number of processor cores and number of macroparticles used. The capabilities of the code are highlighted by implementing various diagnostic tools. To study the dynamics of the laser-cluster interactions, the executable version of the code is available from the author.

  18. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies. PMID:24073784

  19. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  20. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Self, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  1. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids. PMID:27394112

  2. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture. PMID:25361284

  3. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  4. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  5. The MOLDY short-range molecular dynamics package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackland, G. J.; D'Mellow, K.; Daraszewicz, S. L.; Hepburn, D. J.; Uhrin, M.; Stratford, K.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a parallelised version of the MOLDY molecular dynamics program. This Fortran code is aimed at systems which may be described by short-range potentials and specifically those which may be addressed with the embedded atom method. This includes a wide range of transition metals and alloys. MOLDY provides a range of options in terms of the molecular dynamics ensemble used and the boundary conditions which may be applied. A number of standard potentials are provided, and the modular structure of the code allows new potentials to be added easily. The code is parallelised using OpenMP and can therefore be run on shared memory systems, including modern multicore processors. Particular attention is paid to the updates required in the main force loop, where synchronisation is often required in OpenMP implementations of molecular dynamics. We examine the performance of the parallel code in detail and give some examples of applications to realistic problems, including the dynamic compression of copper and carbon migration in an iron-carbon alloy. Program summaryProgram title: MOLDY Catalogue identifier: AEJU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJU_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 382 881 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 705 242 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95/OpenMP Computer: Any Operating system: Any Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes. OpenMP is required for parallel execution RAM: 100 MB or more Classification: 7.7 Nature of problem: Moldy addresses the problem of many atoms (of order 10 6) interacting via a classical interatomic potential on a timescale of microseconds. It is designed for problems where statistics must be gathered over a number of equivalent runs, such as

  6. Optimizing replica exchange moves for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2007-11-01

    We sketch the statistical physics framework of the replica exchange technique when applied to molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we draw attention to generalized move sets that allow a variety of optimizations as well as new applications of the method. PMID:18233794

  7. Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E.; Kelson, I. ); Doan, N.V. )

    1991-09-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption are carried out for a palladium crystal containing radioactive palladium atoms. The total desorption probability from various sites are computed, as well as the angular distribution of the desorbing atoms. The implications of the results to different experimental scenarios are discussed.

  8. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.; Nicolai, Adrien

    2013-01-01

    We use quantum mechanical calculations to develop a full set of force field parameters in order to perform molecular dynamics simulations to understand and optimize the molecular storage properties inside Graphene Oxide Frameworks (GOFs). A set of boron-related parameters for commonly used empirical force fields is determined to describe the non-bonded and bonded interactions between linear boronic acid linkers and graphene sheets of GOF materials. The transferability of the parameters is discussed and their validity is quantified by comparing quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical structural and vibrational properties. The application of the model to the dynamics of water inside the GOFs reveals significant variations in structural flexibility of GOF depending on the linker density, which is shown to be usable as a tuning parameter for desired diffusion properties.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of weak detonations.

    PubMed

    Am-Shallem, Morag; Zeiri, Yehuda; Zybin, Sergey V; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2011-12-01

    Detonation of a three-dimensional reactive nonisotropic molecular crystal is modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. The detonation process is initiated by an impulse, followed by the creation of a stable fast reactive shock wave. The terminal shock velocity is independent of the initiation conditions. Further analysis shows supersonic propagation decoupled from the dynamics of the decomposed material left behind the shock front. The dependence of the shock velocity on crystal nonlinear compressibility resembles solitary behavior. These properties categorize the phenomena as a weak detonation. The dependence of the detonation wave on microscopic potential parameters was investigated. An increase in detonation velocity with the reaction exothermicity reaching a saturation value is observed. In all other respects the model crystal exhibits typical properties of a molecular crystal. PMID:22304055

  11. Molecular dynamics of PLK1 during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Stephane; Sumara, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a key regulator of eukaryotic cell division. During mitosis, dynamic regulation of PLK1 is crucial for its roles in centrosome maturation, spindle assembly, microtubule–kinetochore attachment, and cytokinesis. Similar to other members of the PLK family, the molecular architecture of PLK1 protein is characterized by 2 domains—the kinase domain and the regulatory substrate-binding domain (polo-box domain)—that cooperate and control PLK1 function during mitosis. Mitotic cells employ many layers of regulation to activate and target PLK1 to different cellular structures in a timely manner. During the last decade, numerous studies have shed light on the precise molecular mechanisms orchestrating the mitotic activity of PLK1 in time and space. This review aims to discuss available data and concepts related to regulation of the molecular dynamics of human PLK1 during mitotic progression. PMID:27308323

  12. Extended Lagrangian quantum molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sanville, Edward J; Bock, Nicolas; Challacombe, William M; Cawkwell, Marc J; Niklasson, Anders M N; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Stephen; Sewell, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    A set of interatomic potentials for hydrocarbons that are based upon the self-consistent charge transfer tight-binding approximation to density functional theory have been developed and implemented into the quantum molecular dynamics code ''LATTE''. The interatomic potentials exhibit an outstanding level of transferability and have been applied in molecular dynamics simulations of tert-butylacetylene under thermodynamic conditions that correspond to its single-shock Hugoniot. We have achieved precise conservation of the total energy during microcanonical molecular dynamics trajectories under incomplete convergence via the extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism. In good agreement with the results of a series of flyer-plate impact experiments, our SCC-TB molecular dynamics simulations show that tert-butylactylene molecules polymerize at shock pressures around 6.1 GPa.

  13. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  14. Simulation of dynamic material response with the PAGOSA code

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Adams, T.F.

    1993-08-01

    The 3D Eulerian PAGOSA hydrocode is being run on the massively parallel Connection Machine (CM) to simulate the response of materials to dynamic loading, such as by high explosives or high velocity impact. The code has a variety of equation of state forms, plastic yield models, and fracture and fragmentation models. The numerical algorithms in PAGOSA and the implementation of material models are discussed briefly.

  15. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  16. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Brüning, C; Wehner, J; Hausner, J; Wenzel, M; Engel, V

    2016-07-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  17. Methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification/validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.; Aeschliman, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    The issues of verification, calibration, and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes has been receiving increasing levels of attention in the research literature and in engineering technology. Both CFD researchers and users of CFD codes are asking more critical and detailed questions concerning the accuracy, range of applicability, reliability and robustness of CFD codes and their predictions. This is a welcomed trend because it demonstrates that CFD is maturing from a research tool to the world of impacting engineering hardware and system design. In this environment, the broad issue of code quality assurance becomes paramount. However, the philosophy and methodology of building confidence in CFD code predictions has proven to be more difficult than many expected. A wide variety of physical modeling errors and discretization errors are discussed. Here, discretization errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential equations to algebraic equations, and their solution. Boundary conditions for both the partial differential equations and the discretized equations will be discussed. Contrasts are drawn between the assumptions and actual use of numerical method consistency and stability. Comments are also made concerning the existence and uniqueness of solutions for both the partial differential equations and the discrete equations. Various techniques are suggested for the detection and estimation of errors caused by physical modeling and discretization of the partial differential equations.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of cyclohexane interconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Chandler, David

    1990-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics calculations are reported for one C 6H 12 molecule in a bath of 250 CS 2 molecules at roomtemperature and liquid densities of 1.0, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 g/cm 3. The solvent contribution to the free energy of activation for the chair-boat isomerization has been determined to high accuracy. The transmission coefficient and reactive flux correlation functions have also been computed. The results obtained agree with earlier conclusions drawn from RISM integral equation calculations and stochastic molecular dynamics calculations. Namely, the solvent effect on the rate manifests a qualitative breakdown of transition state theory and the RRKM picture of unimolecular kinetics. Analysis of the activated trajectories indicate a significant degree of quasiperiodicity.

  19. ADAPTIVE MULTILEVEL SPLITTING IN MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS*

    PubMed Central

    Aristoff, David; Lelièvre, Tony; Mayne, Christopher G.; Teo, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive Multilevel Splitting (AMS) is a replica-based rare event sampling method that has been used successfully in high-dimensional stochastic simulations to identify trajectories across a high potential barrier separating one metastable state from another, and to estimate the probability of observing such a trajectory. An attractive feature of AMS is that, in the limit of a large number of replicas, it remains valid regardless of the choice of reaction coordinate used to characterize the trajectories. Previous studies have shown AMS to be accurate in Monte Carlo simulations. In this study, we extend the application of AMS to molecular dynamics simulations and demonstrate its effectiveness using a simple test system. Our conclusion paves the way for useful applications, such as molecular dynamics calculations of the characteristic time of drug dissociation from a protein target. PMID:26005670

  20. Molecular dynamics studies of polyurethane nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strankowska, J.; Piszczyk, Ł.; Strankowski, M.; Danowska, M.; Szutkowski, K.; Jurga, S.; Kwela, J.

    2013-10-01

    Polyurethane PEO-based hydrogels have a broad range of biomedical applicability. They are attractive for drug-controlled delivery systems, surgical implants and wound healing dressings. In this study, a PEO based polyurethane hydrogels containing Cloisite® 30B, an organically modified clay mineral, was synthesized. Structure of nanocomposite hydrogels was determined using XRD technique. Its molecular dynamics was studied by means of NMR spectroscopy, DMA and DSC analysis. The mechanical properties and thermal stability of the systems were improved by incorporation of clay and controlled by varying the clay content in polymeric matrix. Molecular dynamics of polymer chains depends on interaction of Cloisite® 30B nanoparticles with soft segments of polyurethanes. The characteristic nanosize effect is observed.

  1. New faster CHARMM molecular dynamics engine

    PubMed Central

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new faster molecular dynamics (MD) engine into the CHARMM software package. The new MD engine is faster both in serial (i.e., single CPU core) and parallel execution. Serial performance is approximately two times higher than in the previous version of CHARMM. The newly programmed parallelization method allows the MD engine to parallelize up to hundreds of CPU cores. PMID:24302199

  2. Nanoindentation of Zr by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu (芦子哲), Zizhe; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation are used to study the deformation behaviors of single crystal Zr for four different surface orientations. The comparison of results for two different potentials, an embedded atom method potential and a charged optimized many body potential, reveals the influence of stable and unstable stacking fault energy on dislocation behaviors under nanoindentation. The load-displacement curve, hardness and deformation behaviors of the various surface orientations Zr are compared and the elastic and plastic deformation behaviors are analyzed.

  3. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  4. Molecular crowding and protein enzymatic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-21

    The effects of molecular crowding on the enzymatic conformational dynamics and transport properties of adenylate kinase are investigated. This tridomain protein undergoes large scale hinge motions in the course of its enzymatic cycle and serves as prototype for the study of crowding effects on the cyclic conformational dynamics of proteins. The study is carried out at a mesoscopic level where both the protein and the solvent in which it is dissolved are treated in a coarse grained fashion. The amino acid residues in the protein are represented by a network of beads and the solvent dynamics is described by multiparticle collision dynamics that includes effects due to hydrodynamic interactions. The system is crowded by a stationary random array of hard spherical objects. Protein enzymatic dynamics is investigated as a function of the obstacle volume fraction and size. In addition, for comparison, results are presented for a modification of the dynamics that suppresses hydrodynamic interactions. Consistent with expectations, simulations of the dynamics show that the protein prefers a closed conformation for high volume fractions. This effect becomes more pronounced as the obstacle radius decreases for a given volume fraction since the average void size in the obstacle array is smaller for smaller radii. At high volume fractions for small obstacle radii, the average enzymatic cycle time and characteristic times of internal conformational motions of the protein deviate substantially from their values in solution or in systems with small density of obstacles. The transport properties of the protein are strongly affected by molecular crowding. Diffusive motion adopts a subdiffusive character and the effective diffusion coefficients can change by more than an order of magnitude. The orientational relaxation time of the protein is also significantly altered by crowding. PMID:22476233

  5. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  6. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  7. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  8. Dynamic Maintenance and Visualization of Molecular Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, C L; Pascucci, V; Shamir, A; Holt, R J; Netravali, A N

    2004-12-16

    Molecular surface computations are often necessary in order to perform synthetic drug design. A critical step in this process is the computation and update of an exact boundary representation for the molecular surface (e.g. the Lee-Richards surface). In this paper they introduce efficient techniques for computing a molecular surface boundary representation as a set of NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines) patches. This representation introduces for molecules the same geometric data structure used in the solid modeling community and enables immediate access to a wide range of modeling operations and techniques. Furthermore, this allows the use of any general solid modeling or visualization system as a molecular modeling interface. However, using such a representation in a molecular modeling environment raises several efficiency and update constraints, especially in a dynamic setting. For example, changes in the probe radius result in both geometric and topological changes to the set of patches. The techniques provide the option of trading accuracy of the representation for the efficiency of the computation, while still tracking the changes in the set of patches. In particular, they discuss two main classes of dynamic updates: one that keeps the topology of the molecular configuration fixed, and a more complicated case where the topology may be updated continuously. In general the generated output surface is represented in a format that can be loaded into standard solid modeling systems. It can also be directly triangulated or rendered, possibly at different levels of resolution, by a standard graphics library such as OpenGL without any additional effort.

  9. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of detonation on the roadrunner supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mniszewski, Susan; Cawkwell, Marc; Germann, Timothy C.

    2012-03-01

    The temporal and spatial scales intrinsic to a real detonating explosive are extremely difficult to capture using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Nevertheless, MD remains very attractive since it allows for the resolution of dynamic phenomena at the atomic scale. Large-scale reactive MD simulations in three dimensions require immense computational resources even when simple reactive force fields are employed. We focus on the REBO force field for 'AB' since it has been shown to support a detonation while being simple, analytic, and short-ranged. The transition from two-to three- dimensional simulations is being facilitated by the port of the REBO force field in the parallel MD code SPaSM to LANL's petaflop supercomputer 'Roadrunner'. We provide a detailed discussion of the challenges associated with computing interatomic forces on a hybrid Opteron/Cell BE computational architecture.

  11. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-01

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems. PMID:27276553

  12. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barber IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is {delta}-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  13. Spectroscopy and molecular dynamics in nonpolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, Karl Frederick

    This thesis considers the mechanisms by which molecular dynamics in nonpolar liquids influences solvation dynamics and vibrational energy relaxation. We use semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate photon echo signals for two simple fluids. We demonstrate that two new observables are directly related to the relevant molecular quantity, the frequency- frequency time correlation function (TCF), in contrast to the commonly measured 3PEPS, which cannot be simply related to this TCF at short times. We also present a semianalytic photon echo theory, based on an ansatz which determines the full time dependence from the short time expansion coefficients of the TCF. We demonstrate that this theory accurately predicts most photon echo observables, even when the theory's gaussian approximation is not accurate. We also consider vibrational energy relaxation (VER) in liquid oxygen. Using semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations and an intermolecular potential from the literature, we evaluate the required quantity (the spectral density of a certain force-force TCF) using the same ansatz described above. We demonstrate numerically that this procedure is accurate. Approximately relating this semiclassical rate to the fully quantum mechanical VER rate, using one of the more accurate ``quantum corrections'' available in the literature, yields a result which is in order-of-magnitude agreement with the experimental VER rate. We also calculate the VER rate for liquid oxygen/argon mixtures. The rotations of the solvent near a vibrationally excited molecule, and of that molecule itself, have important consequences for the short-time dynamics of the force-force TCF. We propose a simple statistical model which quantitatively explains the mole- fraction dependence of the observed VER rate. Next, we demonstrate that a newly-developed model for oxygen very accurately describes the liquid, by comparing to experimental measures of microscopic structure and dynamics. We also

  14. Wind tunnel requirements for computational fluid dynamics code verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of experiment in the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for aerodynamic flow field prediction is discussed. Requirements for code verification from two sources that pace the development of CFD are described for: (1) development of adequate flow modeling, and (2) establishment of confidence in the use of CFD to predict complex flows. The types of data needed and their accuracy differs in detail and scope and leads to definite wind tunnel requirements. Examples of testing to assess and develop turbulence models, and to verify code development, are used to establish future wind tunnel testing requirements. Versatility, appropriate scale and speed range, accessibility for nonintrusive instrumentation, computerized data systems, and dedicated use for verification were among the more important requirements identified.

  15. Mechanic: The MPI/HDF code framework for dynamical astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słonina, Mariusz; Goździewski, Krzysztof; Migaszewski, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the Mechanic, a new open-source code framework. It is designed to reduce the development effort of scientific applications by providing unified API (Application Programming Interface) for configuration, data storage and task management. The communication layer is based on the well-established Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard, which is widely used on variety of parallel computers and CPU-clusters. The data storage is performed within the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5). The design of the code follows core-module approach which allows to reduce the user’s codebase and makes it portable for single- and multi-CPU environments. The framework may be used in a local user’s environment, without administrative access to the cluster, under the PBS or Slurm job schedulers. It may become a helper tool for a wide range of astronomical applications, particularly focused on processing large data sets, such as dynamical studies of long-term orbital evolution of planetary systems with Monte Carlo methods, dynamical maps or evolutionary algorithms. It has been already applied in numerical experiments conducted for Kepler-11 (Migaszewski et al., 2012) and νOctantis planetary systems (Goździewski et al., 2013). In this paper we describe the basics of the framework, including code listings for the implementation of a sample user’s module. The code is illustrated on a model Hamiltonian introduced by (Froeschlé et al., 2000) presenting the Arnold diffusion. The Arnold web is shown with the help of the MEGNO (Mean Exponential Growth of Nearby Orbits) fast indicator (Goździewski et al., 2008a) applied onto symplectic SABAn integrators family (Laskar and Robutel, 2001).

  16. Dynamical Simulations of Molecular Clouds in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Jesus; Morris, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The formation of the central massive cluster of young stars orbiting the Galactic black hole, Sgr A*, has been modeled by several groups by invoking an almost radially infalling molecular cloud that interacts with the black hole and creates a dense, gaseous disk in which stars can then form. However, the dynamical origin of such a cloud remains an open question. We present simulations of the central 30-100 pc of the Milky Way, starting from a population of molecular clouds located in a disk with scale height of ~30 pc, using the N-body/smoothed-particle hydrodynamics code, Gadget2. We followed the dynamical evolution of clouds in a galactic potential that includes a bar to explore whether cloud collisions or a succession of cloud scatterings can remove sufficient angular momentum from a massive cloud to endow it with a predominantly radial orbit. Initial results illustrate the importance of tidal shear; while dense cloud cores remain identifiable for extended periods of time, much of the molecular mass ends up in tidal streams, so cannot be deflected onto low angular momentum orbits by their mutual interactions. At the completion of our ongoing computations, we will report on whether the cloud cores can undergo sufficient scattering to achieve low-angular-momentum orbits.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations from SNL's Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Plimpton, Steve; Thompson, Aidan; Crozier, Paul

    LAMMPS (http://lammps.sandia.gov/index.html) stands for Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator and is a code that can be used to model atoms or, as the LAMMPS website says, as a parallel particle simulator at the atomic, meso, or continuum scale. This Sandia-based website provides a long list of animations from large simulations. These were created using different visualization packages to read LAMMPS output, and each one provides the name of the PI and a brief description of the work done or visualization package used. See also the static images produced from simulations at http://lammps.sandia.gov/pictures.html The foundation paper for LAMMPS is: S. Plimpton, Fast Parallel Algorithms for Short-Range Molecular Dynamics, J Comp Phys, 117, 1-19 (1995), but the website also lists other papers describing contributions to LAMMPS over the years.

  18. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Canfield, Jesse M.; Hemez, Francois M.; Sauer, Jeremy A.

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  19. Local Refinements in Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackeldey, Konstantin; Weber, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Quantum mechanics provide a detailed description of the physical and chemical behavior of molecules. However, with increasing size of the system the complexity rises exponentially, which is prohibitive for efficient dynamical simulation. In contrast, classical molecular dynamics procure a coarser description by using less degrees of freedom. Thus, it seems natural to seek for an adequate trade-off between accurateness and computational feasibility in the simulation of molecules. Here, we propose a novel method, which combines classical molecular simulations with quantum mechanics for molecular systems. For this we decompose the state space of the respective molecule into subsets, by employing a meshfree partition of unity. We show, that this partition allows us to localize an empirical force field and to run locally constrained classical trajectories. Within each subset, we compute the energy on the quantum level for a fixed number of spatial states (ab initio points). With these energy values from the ab initio points we have a local scattered data problem, which can be solved by the moving least squares method.

  20. Symmetry Reduced Dynamics of Charged Molecular Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, David C. P.; Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D.; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Ratiu, Tudor S.

    2010-09-01

    The equations of motion are derived for the dynamical folding of charged molecular strands (such as DNA) modeled as flexible continuous filamentary distributions of interacting rigid charge conformations. The new feature is that these equations are nonlocal when the screened Coulomb interactions, or Lennard-Jones potentials between pairs of charges, are included. The nonlocal dynamics is derived in the convective representation of continuum motion by using modified Euler-Poincaré and Hamilton-Pontryagin variational formulations that illuminate the various approaches within the framework of symmetry reduction of Hamilton’s principle for exact geometric rods. In the absence of nonlocal interactions, the equations recover the classical Kirchhoff theory of elastic rods. The motion equations in the convective representation are shown to arise by a classical Lagrangian reduction associated to the symmetry group of the system. This approach uses the process of affine Euler-Poincaré reduction initially developed for complex fluids. On the Hamiltonian side, the Poisson bracket of the molecular strand is obtained by reduction of the canonical symplectic structure on phase space. A change of variables allows a direct passage from this classical point of view to the covariant formulation in terms of Lagrange-Poincaré equations of field theory. In another revealing perspective, the convective representation of the nonlocal equations of molecular strand motion is transformed into quaternionic form.

  1. Femtosecond molecular dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douhal, A.; Kim, S. K.; Zewail, A. H.

    1995-11-01

    HYDROGEN bonds commonly lend robustness and directionality to molecular recognition processes and supramolecular structures1,2. In particular, the two or three hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick base pairs bind the double-stranded DNA helix and determine the complementarity of the pairing. Watson and Crick pointed out3, however, that the possible tautomers of base pairs, in which hydrogen atoms become attached to the donor atom of the hydrogen bond, might disturb the genetic code, as the tautomer is capable of pairing with different partners. But the dynamics of hydrogen bonds in general, and of this tautomerization process in particular, are not well understood. Here we report observations of the femtosecond dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs (7-azaindole dimers) containing two hydrogen bonds. Because of the femtosecond resolution of proton motions, we are able to examine the cooperativity of formation of the tautomer (in which the protons on each base are shifted sequentially to the other base), and to determine the characteristic timescales of the motions in a solvent-free environment. We find that the first step occurs on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds, whereas the second step, to form the full tautomer, is much slower, taking place within several picoseconds; the timescales are changed significantly by replacing hydrogen with deuterium. These results establish the molecular basis of the dynamics and the role of quantum tunnelling.

  2. Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Garcia, Alejandro L.; Alder, Berni J.

    2008-02-01

    A novel Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics (SEDMD) algorithm is developed for the simulation of polymer chains suspended in a solvent. SEDMD combines event-driven molecular dynamics (EDMD) with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The polymers are represented as chains of hard-spheres tethered by square wells and interact with the solvent particles with hard-core potentials. The algorithm uses EDMD for the simulation of the polymer chain and the interactions between the chain beads and the surrounding solvent particles. The interactions between the solvent particles themselves are not treated deterministically as in EDMD, rather, the momentum and energy exchange in the solvent is determined stochastically using DSMC. The coupling between the solvent and the solute is consistently represented at the particle level retaining hydrodynamic interactions and thermodynamic fluctuations. However, unlike full MD simulations of both the solvent and the solute, in SEDMD the spatial structure of the solvent is ignored. The SEDMD algorithm is described in detail and applied to the study of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a hard-wall subjected to uniform shear. SEDMD closely reproduces results obtained using traditional EDMD simulations with two orders of magnitude greater efficiency. Results question the existence of periodic (cycling) motion of the polymer chain.

  3. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of aromatic hydrocarbon liquids

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, E.; Gupta, S.

    1990-01-01

    This project mainly involves a molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo study of the effect of molecular shape on thermophysical properties of bulk fluids with an emphasis on the aromatic hydrocarbon liquids. In this regard we have studied the modeling, simulation methodologies, and predictive and correlating methods for thermodynamic properties of fluids of nonspherical molecules. In connection with modeling we have studied the use of anisotropic site-site potentials, through a modification of the Gay-Berne Gaussian overlap potential, to successfully model the aromatic rings after adding the necessary electrostatic moments. We have also shown these interaction sites should be located at the geometric centers of the chemical groups. In connection with predictive methods, we have shown two perturbation type theories to work well for fluids modeled using one-center anisotropic potentials and the possibility exists for extending these to anisotropic site-site models. In connection with correlation methods, we have studied, through simulations, the effect of molecular shape on the attraction term in the generalized van der Waals equation of state for fluids of nonspherical molecules and proposed a possible form which is to be studied further. We have successfully studied the vector and parallel processing aspects of molecular simulations for fluids of nonspherical molecules.

  5. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called "dipolons"); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  6. Dynamic algorithm for correlation noise estimation in distributed video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thambu, Kuganeswaran; Fernando, Xavier; Guan, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Low complexity encoders at the expense of high complexity decoders are advantageous in wireless video sensor networks. Distributed video coding (DVC) achieves the above complexity balance, where the receivers compute Side information (SI) by interpolating the key frames. Side information is modeled as a noisy version of input video frame. In practise, correlation noise estimation at the receiver is a complex problem, and currently the noise is estimated based on a residual variance between pixels of the key frames. Then the estimated (fixed) variance is used to calculate the bit-metric values. In this paper, we have introduced the new variance estimation technique that rely on the bit pattern of each pixel, and it is dynamically calculated over the entire motion environment which helps to calculate the soft-value information required by the decoder. Our result shows that the proposed bit based dynamic variance estimation significantly improves the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) performance.

  7. Learning to Estimate Dynamical State with Probabilistic Population Codes

    PubMed Central

    Sabes, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Tracking moving objects, including one’s own body, is a fundamental ability of higher organisms, playing a central role in many perceptual and motor tasks. While it is unknown how the brain learns to follow and predict the dynamics of objects, it is known that this process of state estimation can be learned purely from the statistics of noisy observations. When the dynamics are simply linear with additive Gaussian noise, the optimal solution is the well known Kalman filter (KF), the parameters of which can be learned via latent-variable density estimation (the EM algorithm). The brain does not, however, directly manipulate matrices and vectors, but instead appears to represent probability distributions with the firing rates of population of neurons, “probabilistic population codes.” We show that a recurrent neural network—a modified form of an exponential family harmonium (EFH)—that takes a linear probabilistic population code as input can learn, without supervision, to estimate the state of a linear dynamical system. After observing a series of population responses (spike counts) to the position of a moving object, the network learns to represent the velocity of the object and forms nearly optimal predictions about the position at the next time-step. This result builds on our previous work showing that a similar network can learn to perform multisensory integration and coordinate transformations for static stimuli. The receptive fields of the trained network also make qualitative predictions about the developing and learning brain: tuning gradually emerges for higher-order dynamical states not explicitly present in the inputs, appearing as delayed tuning for the lower-order states. PMID:26540152

  8. Learning to Estimate Dynamical State with Probabilistic Population Codes.

    PubMed

    Makin, Joseph G; Dichter, Benjamin K; Sabes, Philip N

    2015-11-01

    Tracking moving objects, including one's own body, is a fundamental ability of higher organisms, playing a central role in many perceptual and motor tasks. While it is unknown how the brain learns to follow and predict the dynamics of objects, it is known that this process of state estimation can be learned purely from the statistics of noisy observations. When the dynamics are simply linear with additive Gaussian noise, the optimal solution is the well known Kalman filter (KF), the parameters of which can be learned via latent-variable density estimation (the EM algorithm). The brain does not, however, directly manipulate matrices and vectors, but instead appears to represent probability distributions with the firing rates of population of neurons, "probabilistic population codes." We show that a recurrent neural network-a modified form of an exponential family harmonium (EFH)-that takes a linear probabilistic population code as input can learn, without supervision, to estimate the state of a linear dynamical system. After observing a series of population responses (spike counts) to the position of a moving object, the network learns to represent the velocity of the object and forms nearly optimal predictions about the position at the next time-step. This result builds on our previous work showing that a similar network can learn to perform multisensory integration and coordinate transformations for static stimuli. The receptive fields of the trained network also make qualitative predictions about the developing and learning brain: tuning gradually emerges for higher-order dynamical states not explicitly present in the inputs, appearing as delayed tuning for the lower-order states. PMID:26540152

  9. Thermostability of Enzymes from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zeiske, Tim; Stafford, Kate A; Palmer, Arthur G

    2016-06-14

    Thermodynamic stability is a central requirement for protein function, and one goal of protein engineering is improvement of stability, particularly for applications in biotechnology. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are used to predict in vitro thermostability of members of the bacterial ribonuclease HI (RNase H) family of endonucleases. The temperature dependence of the generalized order parameter, S, for four RNase H homologues, from psychrotrophic, mesophilic, and thermophilic organisms, is highly correlated with experimentally determined melting temperatures and with calculated free energies of folding at the midpoint temperature of the simulations. This study provides an approach for in silico mutational screens to improve thermostability of biologically and industrially relevant enzymes. PMID:27123810

  10. 8B structure in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, K. R.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.

    2015-04-01

    The structure of the light exotic nucleus 8B is investigated in the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model. The decay of 8B is responsible for almost the entire high- energy solar-neutrino flux, making structure calculations of 8B important for determining the solar core temperature. 8B is a proton halo candidate thought to exhibit clustering. FMD uses a wave-packet basis and is well-suited for modelling clustering and halos. For a multiconfiguration treatment we construct the many-body Hilbert space from antisymmetrised angular-momentum projected 8-particle states. First results show formation of a proton halo.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  12. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of ice XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Cummings, Peter T.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the newly discovered metastable ice XII. This new crystalline ice phase [C. Lobban, J.L. Finney, W.F. Kuhs, Nature (London) 391 (1998) 268] is proton-disordered. Thus 90 possible configurations of the unit cell can be constructed which differ only in the orientations of the water molecules. The simulation used the TIP4P potential model for water at constant temperature and density. About one-quarter of the initial configurations did not melt in the course of the simulation. This result is supportive of the experimental structure and also demonstrates the ability of this water model to study ice phases.

  14. Crystallization of nickel nanoclusters by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamati, H.; Gaminchev, K.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of bulk nickel and the crystallization of nickel nanocrystals via molecular dynamics using a potential in the framework of the second moment approximation of tight-binding theory. The melting behavior was simulated with the hysteresis approach by subsequently heating and cooling gradually the system over a wide range of temperatures. The crystallization of nickel nanoclusters consisting of 55, 147 and 309 atoms was achieved after repeatedly annealing and quenching the corresponding quasicrystals several times to avoid being trapped in a local energy minimum. The time over which the global minimum was reached was found to increase with the cluster size.

  15. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Becausemore » it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.« less

  16. Molecular dynamics at constant temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxvaerd, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for molecular dynamics (MD) at constant temperature and pressure are investigated. The ability to remain in a regular orbit in an intermittent chaotic regime is used as a criterion for long-time stability. A simple time-centered algorithm (leap frog) is found to be the most stable of the commonly used algorithms in MD. A model of N one-dimensional dimers with a double-well intermolecular potential, for which the distribution functions at constant temperature T and pressure P can be calculated, is used to investigate MD-NPT dynamics. A time-centered NPT algorithm is found to sample correctly and to be very robust with respect to volume scaling.

  17. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nicholas E; Chen, Lin X; Ratner, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    Due to the nonperiodic nature of charge transport in disordered systems, generating insight into static charge transport networks, as well as analyzing the network dynamics, can be challenging. Here, we apply time-dependent network analysis to scrutinize the charge transport networks of two representative molecular semiconductors: a rigid n-type molecule, perylenediimide, and a flexible p-type molecule, [Formula: see text] Simulations reveal the relevant timescale for local transfer integral decorrelation to be [Formula: see text]100 fs, which is shown to be faster than that of a crystalline morphology of the same molecule. Using a simple graph metric, global network changes are observed over timescales competitive with charge carrier lifetimes. These insights demonstrate that static charge transport networks are qualitatively inadequate, whereas average networks often overestimate network connectivity. Finally, a simple methodology for tracking dynamic charge transport properties is proposed. PMID:27439871

  18. Surface identification, meshing and analysis during large molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Laurent M.; Rudd, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Techniques are presented for the identification and analysis of surfaces and interfaces in atomistic simulations of solids. Atomistic and other particle-based simulations have no inherent notion of a surface, only atomic positions and interactions. The algorithms we develop here provide an unambiguous means to determine which atoms constitute the surface, and the list of surface atoms and a tessellation (meshing) of the surface are determined simultaneously. The tessellation is then used to calculate various surface integrals such as volume, area and shape (multiple moment). The principle of surface identification and tessellation is closely related to that used in the generation of the r-reduced surface, a step in the visualization of molecular surfaces used in biology. The algorithms have been implemented and demonstrated to run automatically (on the fly) in a large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the validity of the method in three applications in which the surfaces and interfaces evolve: void surfaces in ductile fracture, the surface morphology due to significant plastic deformation of a nanoscale metal plate, and the interfaces (grain boundaries) and void surfaces in a nanoscale polycrystalline system undergoing ductile failure. The technique is found to be quite robust, even when the topology of the surfaces changes as in the case of void coalescence where two surfaces merge into one. It is found to add negligible computational overhead to an MD code.

  19. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green's function reaction dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  20. Associating schizophrenia, long non-coding RNAs and neurostructural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Veronica; Durand, Dante; Lescallette, Adam R.; Vrana, Kent E.; Hong, L. Elliot; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Bellon, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component. But the exact nature and functional role of this genetic component in the pathophysiology of this mental illness remains a mystery. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a recently discovered family of molecules that regulate gene transcription through a variety of means. Consequently, lncRNAs could help us bring together apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia; namely, genomic deficiencies on one side and neuroimaging, as well as postmortem results on the other. In fact, the most consistent finding in schizophrenia is decreased brain size together with enlarged ventricles. This anomaly appears to originate from shorter and less ramified dendrites and axons. But a decrease in neuronal arborizations cannot explain the complex pathophysiology of this psychotic disorder; however, dynamic changes in neuronal structure present throughout life could. It is well recognized that the structure of developing neurons is extremely plastic. This structural plasticity was thought to stop with brain development. However, breakthrough discoveries have shown that neuronal structure retains some degree of plasticity throughout life. What the neuroscientific field is still trying to understand is how these dynamic changes are regulated and lncRNAs represent promising candidates to fill this knowledge gap. Here, we present evidence that associates specific lncRNAs with schizophrenia. We then discuss the potential role of lncRNAs in neurostructural dynamics. Finally, we explain how dynamic neurostructural modifications present throughout life could, in theory, reconcile apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia. PMID:26483630

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2006-05-01

    A previously proposed model for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of liquid sulfur dioxide, SO(2), has been reviewed. Thermodynamic, structural, and dynamical properties were calculated for a large range of thermodynamic states. Predicted (P,V,T) of simulated system agrees with an elaborated equation of state recently proposed for liquid SO(2). Calculated heat capacity, expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility are also in good agreement with experimental data. Calculated equilibrium structure agrees with X-ray and neutron scattering measurements on liquid SO(2). The model also predicts the same (SO(2))(2) dimer structure as previously determined by ab initio calculations. Detailed analysis of equilibrium structure of liquid SO(2) is provided, indicating that, despite the rather large dipole moment of the SO(2) molecule, the structure is mainly determined by the Lennard-Jones interactions. Both single-particle and collective dynamics are investigated. Temperature dependency of dynamical properties is given. The MD results are compared with previous findings obtained from the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering spectra of liquid SO(2), including wave-vector dependent structural relaxation, tau(k), and viscosity, eta(k). PMID:16640437

  2. Dynamic molecules: molecular dynamics for everyone. An internet-based access to molecular dynamic simulations: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin; Gutbrod, Peter; Hassayoun, Chokri; von Der Lieth, Claus-W

    2003-10-01

    Molecular dynamics is a rapidly developing field of science and has become an established tool for studying the dynamic behavior of biomolecules. Although several high quality programs for performing molecular dynamic simulations are freely available, only well-trained scientists are currently able to make use of the broad scientific potential that molecular dynamic simulations offer to gain insight into structural questions at an atomic level. The "Dynamic Molecules" approach is the first internet portal that provides an interactive access to set up, perform and analyze molecular dynamic simulations. It is completely based on standard web technologies and uses only publicly available software. The aim is to open molecular dynamics techniques to a broader range of users including undergraduate students, teachers and scientists outside the bioinformatics field. The time-limiting factors are the availability of free capacity on the computing server to run the simulations and the time required to transport the history file through the internet for the animation mode. The interactive access mode of the portal is acceptable for animations of molecules having up to about 500 atoms. PMID:12908101

  3. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  4. Dynamic Shear Modulus of Polymers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byutner, Oleksiy; Smith, Grant

    2001-03-01

    In this work we describe the methodology for using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) simulations to obtain the viscoelastic properties of polymers in the glassy regime. Specifically we show how the time dependent shear stress modulus and frequency dependent complex shear modulus in the high-frequency regime can be determined from the off-diagonal terms of the stress-tensor autocorrelation function obtained from MD trajectories using the Green-Kubo method and appropriate Fourier transforms. In order to test the methodology we have performed MD simulations of a low-molecular-weight polybutadiene system using quantum chemistry based potential functions. Values of the glassy modulus and the maximum loss frequency were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for polybutadiene at 298 K.

  5. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  7. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Boon, N J; Hoyle, R B

    2012-08-28

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)] on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods. PMID:22938213

  8. Implementation of Green's function molecular dynamics: An extension to LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling Ti; Bartels, Guido; Campañá, Carlos; Denniston, Colin; Müser, Martin H.

    2009-06-01

    The Green's function molecular dynamics method, which enables one to study the elastic response of a three-dimensional solid to an external stress field by taking into consideration only the surface atoms, was implemented as an extension to an open source classical molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS. This was done in the style of fixes. The first fix, FixGFC, measures the elastic stiffness coefficients for a (small) solid block of a given material by making use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. With the help of the second fix, FixGFMD, the coefficients obtained from FixGFC can then be used to compute the elastic forces for a (large) block of the same material. Both fixes are designed to be run in parallel and to exploit the functions provided by LAMMPS. Program summaryProgram title: FixGFC/FixGFMD Catalogue identifier: AECW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 33 469 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 383 631 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: All Operating system: Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized via MPI RAM: Depends on the problem Classification: 7.7 External routines: MPI, FFTW 2.1.5 ( http://www.fftw.org/), LAMMPS version May 21, 2008 ( http://lammps.sandia.gov/) Nature of problem: Using molecular dynamics to study elastically deforming solids imposes very high computational costs because portions of the solid far away from the interface or contact points need to be included in the simulation to reproduce the effects of long-range elastic deformations. Green's function molecular dynamics (GFMD) incorporates the full elastic response of semi-infinite solids so that only surface atoms have to be considered in molecular dynamics simulations, thus

  9. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The development of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in horizontal axis wind turbines was examined, and a brief overview of each code was given. The performance of individual codes was compared against two sets of test data measured on a 100 KW Mod-0 wind turbine. All codes are aeroelastic and include loads which are gravitational, inertial and aerodynamic in origin.

  10. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex plasmas: interaction of nonlinear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durniak, Celine; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2008-11-01

    Complex plasmas consist of micron sized microspheres immersed into ordinary ion-electron plasmas. They exist in solid, liquid, gaseous states and exhibit a range of dynamic phenomena such as waves, solitons, phase transitions, heat transfer. These phenomena can be modelled in complex plasmas at the microscopic or ``molecular'' scale, which is almost impossible in ordinary solids and liquids. We simulate a monolayer complex plasma consisting of 3000 negatively-charged particles (or grains) with the help of molecular dynamics computer simulations. The equations of grain motion are solved using a 5^th order Runge Kutta method taking into account interaction of every grain with each other via a Yukawa potential. The grains are confined more strongly in the vertical direction than in the horizontal. After seeding the grains randomly the code is run until the equilibrium is reached as the grain kinetics energy reduces due to damping force equal to the neutral friction in the experiments and a monolayer crystal lattice is formed. Then we investigate interactions between nonlinear waves in a monolayer strongly coupled complex plasma moving in three dimensions. Different excitations are applied during a short time symmetrically on both sides of the lattice. Structural properties and nonlinear waves characteristics are examined as the pulses propagate across the complex plasma in opposite directions.

  12. Towards Microsecond Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Hybrid Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, Scott S; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2010-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations continue to become an increasingly important component of molecular biochemistry and biophysics investigations. Performance improvements in the simulations based on molecular dynamics (MD) codes are widely desired. This is particularly driven by the rapid growth of biological data due to improvements in experimental techniques. Unfortunately, the factors, which allowed past performance improvements of MD simulations, particularly the increase in microprocessor clock frequencies, are no longer improving. Hence, novel software and hardware solutions are being explored for accelerating the performance of popular MD codes. In this paper, we describe our efforts to port and optimize LAMMPS, a popular MD framework, on hybrid processors: graphical processing units (GPUs) accelerated multi-core processors. Our implementation is based on porting the computationally expensive, non-bonded interaction terms on the GPUs, and overlapping the computation on the CPU and GPUs. This functionality is built on top of message passing interface (MPI) that allows multi-level parallelism to be extracted even at the workstation level with the multi-core CPUs as well as extend the implementation on GPU clusters. The results from a number of typically sized biomolecular systems are provided and analysis is performed on 3 generations of GPUs from NVIDIA. Our implementation allows up to 30-40 ns/day throughput on a single workstation as well as significant speedup over Cray XT5, a high-end supercomputing platform. Moreover, detailed analysis of the implementation indicates that further code optimization and improvements in GPUs will allow {approx}100 ns/day throughput on workstations and inexpensive GPU clusters, putting the widely-desired microsecond simulation time-scale within reach to a large user community.

  13. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations of multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dawei; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Bellaiche, L

    2012-08-10

    A first-principles-based approach is developed to simulate dynamical properties, including complex permittivity and permeability in the GHz-THz range, of multiferroics at finite temperatures. It includes both structural degrees of freedom and magnetic moments as dynamic variables in Newtonian and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations within molecular dynamics, respectively, with the couplings between these variables being incorporated. The use of a damping coefficient and of the fluctuation field in the LLG equations is required to obtain equilibrated magnetic properties at any temperature. No electromagnon is found in the spin-canted structure of BiFeO3. On the other hand, two magnons with very different frequencies are predicted via the use of this method. The smallest-in-frequency magnon corresponds to oscillations of the weak ferromagnetic vector in the basal plane being perpendicular to the polarization while the second magnon corresponds to magnetic dipoles going in and out of this basal plane. The large value of the frequency of this second magnon is caused by static couplings between magnetic dipoles with electric dipoles and oxygen octahedra tiltings. PMID:23006300

  14. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dawei; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Bellaiche, L.

    2012-08-01

    A first-principles-based approach is developed to simulate dynamical properties, including complex permittivity and permeability in the GHz-THz range, of multiferroics at finite temperatures. It includes both structural degrees of freedom and magnetic moments as dynamic variables in Newtonian and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations within molecular dynamics, respectively, with the couplings between these variables being incorporated. The use of a damping coefficient and of the fluctuation field in the LLG equations is required to obtain equilibrated magnetic properties at any temperature. No electromagnon is found in the spin-canted structure of BiFeO3. On the other hand, two magnons with very different frequencies are predicted via the use of this method. The smallest-in-frequency magnon corresponds to oscillations of the weak ferromagnetic vector in the basal plane being perpendicular to the polarization while the second magnon corresponds to magnetic dipoles going in and out of this basal plane. The large value of the frequency of this second magnon is caused by static couplings between magnetic dipoles with electric dipoles and oxygen octahedra tiltings.

  15. The PP1 binding code: a molecular-lego strategy that governs specificity.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Lesage, Bart; Görnemann, Janina; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; Bollen, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a single-domain hub protein with nearly 200 validated interactors in vertebrates. PP1-interacting proteins (PIPs) are ubiquitously expressed but show an exceptional diversity in brain, testis and white blood cells. The binding of PIPs is mainly mediated by short motifs that dock to surface grooves of PP1. Although PIPs often contain variants of the same PP1 binding motifs, they differ in the number and combination of docking sites. This molecular-lego strategy for binding to PP1 creates holoenzymes with unique properties. The PP1 binding code can be described as specific, universal, degenerate, nonexclusive and dynamic. PIPs control associated PP1 by interference with substrate recruitment or access to the active site. In addition, some PIPs have a subcellular targeting domain that promotes dephosphorylation by increasing the local concentration of PP1. The diversity of the PP1 interactome and the properties of the PP1 binding code account for the exquisite specificity of PP1 in vivo. PMID:22360570

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of high speed rarefied gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongari, Nishanth; Zhang, Yonghao; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-11-01

    To understand the molecular behaviour of gases in high speed rarefied conditions, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) numerical experiments using the open source code Open FOAM. We use shear-driven Couette flows as test cases, where the two parallel plates are moving with a speed of Uw in opposite directions with their temperatures set to Tw. The gas rarefaction conditions vary from slip to transition, and compressibility conditions vary from low speed isothermal to hypersonic flow regimes, i.e. Knudsen number (Kn) from 0.01 to 1 and Mach number (Ma) from 0.05 to 10. We measure the molecular velocity distribution functions, the spatial variation of gas mean free path profiles and other macroscopic properties. Our MD results convey that flow properties in the near-wall non-equilibrium region do not merely depend on Kn, but they are also significantly affected by Ma. These results may yield new insight into diffusive transport in rarefied gases at high speeds.

  17. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  18. Torus mapper: a code for dynamical models of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, James; McMillan, Paul J.

    2016-02-01

    We present a freely downloadable software package for modelling the dynamics of galaxies, which we call the Torus Mapper (TM). The package is based around `torus mapping', which is a non-perturbative technique for creating orbital tori for specified values of the action integrals. Given an orbital torus and a star's position at a reference time, one can compute its position at any other time, no matter how remote. One can also compute the velocities with which the star will pass through any given point and the contribution it will make to the time-averaged density there. A system of angle-action coordinates for the given potential can be created by foliating phase space with orbital tori. Such a foliation is facilitated by the ability of TM to create tori by interpolating on a grid of tori. We summarize the advantages of using TM rather than a standard time-stepper to create orbits, and give segments of code that illustrate applications of TM in several contexts, including setting up initial conditions for an N-body simulation. We examine the precision of the orbital tori created by TM and the behaviour of the code when orbits become trapped by a resonance.

  19. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  20. An extended-Lagrangian scheme for charge equilibration in reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Small, Patrick E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2015-07-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations describe chemical reactions at orders-of-magnitude faster computing speed compared with quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. A major computational bottleneck of RMD is charge-equilibration (QEq) calculation to describe charge transfer between atoms. Here, we eliminate the speed-limiting iterative minimization of the Coulombic energy in QEq calculation by adapting an extended-Lagrangian scheme that was recently proposed in the context of QMD simulations, Souvatzis and Niklasson (2014). The resulting XRMD simulation code drastically improves energy conservation compared with our previous RMD code, Nomura et al. (2008), while substantially reducing the time-to-solution. The XRMD code has been implemented on parallel computers based on spatial decomposition, achieving a weak-scaling parallel efficiency of 0.977 on 786,432 IBM Blue Gene/Q cores for a 67.6 billion-atom system.

  1. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  2. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  3. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed. PMID:27067383

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shock Induced Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Min

    2004-07-01

    This research focuses on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of shock induced detonation in Fe2O3+Al thermite mixtures. A MD model is developed to simulate non-equilibrium stress-induced reactions. The focus is on establishing a criterion for reaction initiation, energy content and rate of energy release as functions of mixture and reinforcement characteristics. A cluster functional potential is proposed for this purpose. The potential uses the electronegativity equalization to account for changes in the charge of different species according to local environment. Parameters in the potential are derived to fit to the properties of Fe, Al, Fe2O3, and Al2O3. NPT MD simulations are carried out to qualitatively check the energetics of the forward (Fe2O3+Al) as well as backward (Al2O3+Fe) thermite reactions. The results show that the potential can account for the energetics of thermite reactions.

  5. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  6. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chengyuan; Grest, Gary; Cheng, Shengfeng

    2015-03-01

    The evaporation of water from the liquid/vapor interface is studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for systems of more than a million atoms at 550K and 600K. The TIP4P-2005 water model whose liquid/vapor surface tension is in excellent agreement with experiments is used. Evaporative cooling at the interface is observed from temperature profiles determined from both translational and rotational kinetic energy. During evaporation, the density of water is slightly enhanced near the liquid-vapor interface. The velocity distribution of water molecules in the vapor phase during evaporation at various distances relative to the interface fit a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. While our results indicate an imbalance between evaporating and condensing water molecules, local thermal equilibrium is found to hold in addition to mechanical equilibrium. Department of Physics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.

  8. Cluster production within antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Clusters are quite important at various situations in heavy-ion collisions. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics was improved to take into account the correlations to form light clusters, such as deuterons and α particles, and light nuclei composed of several clusters. The momentum fluctuations of emitted particles are also taken into account by a simple method. Formation of fragments and light clusters in a wide range of heavy-ion collisions was well described with a single set of model parameters. Fragmentation in a proton induced reaction was also well reproduced by introducing cluster correlations. Calculated results demonstrate strong impacts of clusters in various observables including those usually regarded as probes of the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  9. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  10. Molecular-dynamics simulations of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.

    2001-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of nanometer-sized lead clusters have been performed using the Lim-Ong-Ercolessi glue potential [Surf. Sci. 269/270, 1109 (1992)]. The binding energies of clusters forming crystalline (fcc), decahedron and icosahedron structures are compared, showing that fcc cuboctahedra are the most energetically favored of these polyhedral model structures. However, simulations of the freezing of liquid droplets produced a characteristic form of surface-reconstructed ``shaved'' icosahedron, in which atoms are absent at the edges and apexes of the polyhedron. This arrangement is energetically favored for 600-4000 atom clusters. Larger clusters favor crystalline structures. Indeed, simulated freezing of a 6525-atom liquid droplet produced an imperfect fcc Wulff particle, containing a number of parallel stacking faults. The effects of temperature on the preferred structure of crystalline clusters below the melting point have been considered. The implications of these results for the interpretation of experimental data is discussed.

  11. Dielectrophoresis of nanocolloids: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Salonen, E; Terama, E; Vattulainen, I; Karttunen, M

    2005-10-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the motion of polarizable particles in non-uniform electric fields, has become an important tool for the transport, separation, and characterization of microparticles in biomedical and nanoelectronics research. In this article we present, to our knowledge, the first molecular dynamics simulations of DEP of nanometer-sized colloidal particles. We introduce a simplified model for a polarizable nanoparticle, consisting of a large charged macroion and oppositely charged microions, in an explicit solvent. The model is then used to study DEP motion of the particle at different combinations of temperature and electric field strength. In accord with linear response theory, the particle drift velocities are shown to be proportional to the DEP force. Analysis of the colloid DEP mobility shows a clear time dependence, demonstrating the variation of friction under non-equilibrium. The time dependence of the mobility further results in an apparent weak variation of the DEP displacements with temperature. PMID:16195818

  12. Dynamics of dewetting at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Blake, T D; Ledauphin, V; Ogonowski, G; Coninck, J De; Fornasiero, D; Ralston, J

    2007-03-27

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to model the dewetting of solid surfaces by partially wetting thin liquid films. Two levels of solid-liquid interaction are considered that give rise to large equilibrium contact angles. The initial length and thickness of the films are varied over a wide range at the nanoscale. Spontaneous dewetting is initiated by removing a band of molecules either from each end of the film or from its center. As observed experimentally and in previous simulations, the films recede at an initially constant speed, creating a growing rim of liquid with a constant receding dynamic contact angle. Consistent with the current understanding of wetting dynamics, film recession is faster on the more poorly wetted surface to an extent that cannot be explained solely by the increase in the surface tension driving force. In addition, the rates of recession of the thinnest films are found to increase with decreasing film thickness. These new results imply not only that the mobility of the liquid molecules adjacent to the solid increases with decreasing solid-liquid interactions, but also that the mobility adjacent to the free surface of the film is higher than in the bulk, so that the effective viscosity of the film decreases with thickness. PMID:17328565

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular polymer rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Djohari, Hadrian; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2010-11-01

    Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the equilibrium and rheological properties of dilute and semidilute solutions of head-to-tail associating polymers. In our simulation model, a spontaneous complementary reversible association between the donor and the acceptor groups at the ends of oligomers was achieved by introducing a combination of truncated pseudo-Coulombic attractive potential and Lennard Jones repulsive potential between donor, acceptor, and neighboring groups. We have calculated the equilibrium properties of supramolecular polymers, such as the ring/chain equilibrium, average molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution of self-assembled chains and rings, which all agree well with previous analytical and computer modeling results. We have investigated shear thinning of solutions of 8- and 20-bead associating oligomers with different association energies at different temperatures and oligomer volume fractions. All reduced viscosity data for a given oligomer length can be collapsed into one master curve, exhibiting two power-law regions of shear-thinning behavior with an exponent of -0.55 at intermediate ranges of the reduced shear rate β and -0.8 (or -0.9) at larger shear rates. The equilibrium viscosity of supramolecular solutions with different oligomer lengths and associating energies is found to obey a power-law scaling dependence on oligomer volume fraction with an exponent of 1.5, in agreement with the experimental observations for several dilute or semidilute solutions of supramolecular polymers. This implies that dilute and semidilute supramolecular polymer solutions exhibit high polydispersity but may not be sufficiently entangled to follow the reptation mechanism of relaxation.

  14. Promoter nucleosome dynamics regulated by signalling through the CTD code.

    PubMed

    Materne, Philippe; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Soriano, Ignacio; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Hidalgo, Elena; Mignion, Carole; Quintales, Luis; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in delineating transcribed regions within chromatin by recruiting histone methylases and deacetylases. Using genome-wide nucleosome mapping, we show that CTD S2 phosphorylation controls nucleosome dynamics in the promoter of a subset of 324 genes, including the regulators of cell differentiation ste11 and metabolic adaptation inv1. Mechanistic studies on these genes indicate that during gene activation a local increase of phospho-S2 CTD nearby the promoter impairs the phospho-S5 CTD-dependent recruitment of Set1 and the subsequent recruitment of specific HDACs, which leads to nucleosome depletion and efficient transcription. The early increase of phospho-S2 results from the phosphorylation of the CTD S2 kinase Lsk1 by MAP kinase in response to cellular signalling. The artificial tethering of the Lsk1 kinase at the ste11 promoter is sufficient to activate transcription. Therefore, signalling through the CTD code regulates promoter nucleosomes dynamics. PMID:26098123

  15. Promoter nucleosome dynamics regulated by signalling through the CTD code

    PubMed Central

    Materne, Philippe; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Soriano, Ignacio; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Hidalgo, Elena; Mignion, Carole; Quintales, Luis; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in delineating transcribed regions within chromatin by recruiting histone methylases and deacetylases. Using genome-wide nucleosome mapping, we show that CTD S2 phosphorylation controls nucleosome dynamics in the promoter of a subset of 324 genes, including the regulators of cell differentiation ste11 and metabolic adaptation inv1. Mechanistic studies on these genes indicate that during gene activation a local increase of phospho-S2 CTD nearby the promoter impairs the phospho-S5 CTD-dependent recruitment of Set1 and the subsequent recruitment of specific HDACs, which leads to nucleosome depletion and efficient transcription. The early increase of phospho-S2 results from the phosphorylation of the CTD S2 kinase Lsk1 by MAP kinase in response to cellular signalling. The artificial tethering of the Lsk1 kinase at the ste11 promoter is sufficient to activate transcription. Therefore, signalling through the CTD code regulates promoter nucleosomes dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09008.001 PMID:26098123

  16. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  17. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  18. Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations resolve apparent diffusion rate differences for proteins confined in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringe, J. W.; Ileri, N.; Levie, H. W.; Stroeve, P.; Ustach, V.; Faller, R.; Renaud, P.

    2015-08-01

    We use Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to examine molecular transport phenomena in nanochannels, explaining four orders of magnitude difference in wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) protein diffusion rates observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and by direct imaging of fluorescently-labeled proteins. We first use the ESPResSo Molecular Dynamics code to estimate the surface transport distance for neutral and charged proteins. We then employ a Monte Carlo model to calculate the paths of protein molecules on surfaces and in the bulk liquid transport medium. Our results show that the transport characteristics depend strongly on the degree of molecular surface coverage. Atomic force microscope characterization of surfaces exposed to WGA proteins for 1000 s show large protein aggregates consistent with the predicted coverage. These calculations and experiments provide useful insight into the details of molecular motion in confined geometries.

  19. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted using an assembly consisting of 105 indomethacin (IMC) molecules and 12 water molecules to investigate the underlying dynamic (e.g., rotational and translational diffusivities and conformation relaxation rates) and structural properties (e.g., conformation, hydrogen-bonding distributions, and interactions of water with IMC) of amorphous IMC. These properties may be important in predicting physical stability of this metastable material. The IMC model was constructed using X-ray diffraction data with the force-field parameters mostly assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03 and atomic charges calculated with the B3LYP/ccpVTZ30, IEFPCM, and RESP models. The assemblies were initially equilibrated in their molten state and cooled through the glass transition temperature to form amorphous solids. Constant temperature dynamic runs were then carried out above and below the T(g) (i.e., at 600 K (10 ns), 400 K (350 ns), and 298 K (240 ns)). The density (1.312 ± 0.003 g/cm(3)) of the simulated amorphous solid at 298 K was close to the experimental value (1.32 g/cm(3)) while the estimated T(g) (384 K) was ~64 degrees higher than the experimental value (320 K) due to the faster cooling rate. Due to the hindered rotation of its amide bond, IMC can exist in different diastereomeric states. Different IMC conformations were sufficiently sampled in the IMC melt or vapor, but transitions occurred rarely in the glass. The hydrogen-bonding patterns in amorphous IMC are more complex in the amorphous state than in the crystalline polymorphs. Carboxylic dimers that are dominant in α- and γ-crystals were found to occur at a much lower probability in the simulated IMC glasses while hydrogen-bonded IMC chains were more easily identified patterns in the simulated amorphous solids. To determine molecular diffusivity, a novel analytical method is proposed to deal with the non-Einsteinian behavior, in which the temporal

  1. GAS-PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: VIBRATIONAL DYNAMICS OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    MUCKERMAN,J.T.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions and properties of short-lived chemical intermediates. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high-temperature, flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in radicals involved in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical studies using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations, which provide insight into energy flow among the vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules and interference effects in multiple-surface dynamics.

  2. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Vibrational Dynamics of Polyatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Muckerman, J.T.

    1999-05-21

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions and properties of short-lived chemical intermediates. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high- temperature, flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometic sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals involved in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical studies using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations, which provide insight into energy flow among the vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules and interference effects in multiple-surface dynamics.

  3. Molecular codes defining rostrocaudal domains in the embryonic mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Ferran, José L.; Puelles, Luis; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2015-01-01

    The prosomeric model proposes that the hypothalamus is a rostral forebrain entity, placed ventral to the telencephalon and rostral to the diencephalon. Gene expression markers differentially label molecularly distinct dorsoventral progenitor domains, which represent continuous longitudinal bands across the hypothalamic alar and basal regions. There is also circumstantial support for a rostrocaudal subdivision of the hypothalamus into transverse peduncular (caudal) and terminal (rostral) territories (PHy, THy). In addition, there is evidence for a specialized acroterminal domain at the rostral midline of the terminal hypothalamus (ATD). The PHy and THy transverse structural units are presently held to form part of two hypothalamo-telencephalic prosomeres (hp1 and hp2, respectively), which end dorsally at the telencephalic septocommissural roof. PHy and THy have distinct adult nuclei, at all dorsoventral levels. Here we report the results of data mining from the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas database, looking for genes expressed differentially in the PHy, Thy, and ATD regions of the hypothalamus at several developmental stages. This search allowed us to identify additional molecular evidence supporting the postulated fundamental rostrocaudal bipartition of the mouse hypothalamus into the PHy and THy, and also corroborated molecularly the singularity of the ATD. A number of markers were expressed in Thy (Fgf15, Gsc, Nkx6.2, Otx1, Zic1/5), but were absent in PHy, while other genes showed the converse pattern (Erbb4, Irx1/3/5, Lmo4, Mfap4, Plagl1, Pmch). We also identified markers that selectively label the ATD (Fgf8/10/18, Otx2, Pomc, Rax, Six6). On the whole, these data help to explain why, irrespective of the observed continuity of all dorsoventral molecular hypothalamic subdivisions across PHy and THy, different nuclear structures originate within each of these two domains, and also why singular structures arise at the ATD, e.g., the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the

  4. Molecular codes defining rostrocaudal domains in the embryonic mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Ferran, José L; Puelles, Luis; Rubenstein, John L R

    2015-01-01

    The prosomeric model proposes that the hypothalamus is a rostral forebrain entity, placed ventral to the telencephalon and rostral to the diencephalon. Gene expression markers differentially label molecularly distinct dorsoventral progenitor domains, which represent continuous longitudinal bands across the hypothalamic alar and basal regions. There is also circumstantial support for a rostrocaudal subdivision of the hypothalamus into transverse peduncular (caudal) and terminal (rostral) territories (PHy, THy). In addition, there is evidence for a specialized acroterminal domain at the rostral midline of the terminal hypothalamus (ATD). The PHy and THy transverse structural units are presently held to form part of two hypothalamo-telencephalic prosomeres (hp1 and hp2, respectively), which end dorsally at the telencephalic septocommissural roof. PHy and THy have distinct adult nuclei, at all dorsoventral levels. Here we report the results of data mining from the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas database, looking for genes expressed differentially in the PHy, Thy, and ATD regions of the hypothalamus at several developmental stages. This search allowed us to identify additional molecular evidence supporting the postulated fundamental rostrocaudal bipartition of the mouse hypothalamus into the PHy and THy, and also corroborated molecularly the singularity of the ATD. A number of markers were expressed in Thy (Fgf15, Gsc, Nkx6.2, Otx1, Zic1/5), but were absent in PHy, while other genes showed the converse pattern (Erbb4, Irx1/3/5, Lmo4, Mfap4, Plagl1, Pmch). We also identified markers that selectively label the ATD (Fgf8/10/18, Otx2, Pomc, Rax, Six6). On the whole, these data help to explain why, irrespective of the observed continuity of all dorsoventral molecular hypothalamic subdivisions across PHy and THy, different nuclear structures originate within each of these two domains, and also why singular structures arise at the ATD, e.g., the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the

  5. Surface detection, meshing and analysis during large molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, L M; Rudd, R E

    2005-08-01

    New techniques are presented for the detection and analysis of surfaces and interfaces in atomistic simulations of solids. Atomistic and other particle-based simulations have no inherent notion of a surface, only atomic positions and interactions. The algorithms we introduce here provide an unambiguous means to determine which atoms constitute the surface, and the list of surface atoms and a tessellation (meshing) of the surface are determined simultaneously. The algorithms have been implemented and demonstrated to run automatically (on the fly) in a large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the validity of the method in three applications in which the surfaces and interfaces evolve: void surfaces in ductile fracture, the surface morphology due to significant plastic deformation of a nanoscale metal plate, and the interfaces (grain boundaries) and void surfaces in a nanoscale polycrystalline system undergoing ductile failure. The technique is found to be quite robust, even when the topology of the surfaces changes as in the case of void coalescence where two surfaces merge into one. It is found to add negligible computational overhead to an MD code, and is much less expensive than other techniques such as the solvent-accessible surface.

  6. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  7. Microscopic dynamical description of proton-induced fission with the constrained molecular dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonta, N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.

    2015-08-01

    The microscopic description of nuclear fission still remains a topic of intense basic research. Understanding nuclear fission, apart from a theoretical point of view, is of practical importance for energy production and the transmutation of nuclear waste. In nuclear astrophysics, fission sets the upper limit to the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements via the r process. In this work we initiated a systematic study of intermediate-energy proton-induced fission using the constrained molecular dynamics (CoMD) code. The CoMD code implements an effective interaction with a nuclear matter compressibility of K =200 (soft equation of state) with several forms of the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon symmetry potential. Moreover, a constraint is imposed in the phase-space occupation for each nucleon restoring the Pauli principle at each time step of the collision. A proper choice of the surface parameter of the effective interaction has been made to describe fission. In this work, we present results of fission calculations for proton-induced reactions on: (a) 232Th at 27 and 63 MeV; (b) 235U at 10, 30, 60, and 100 MeV; and (c) 238U at 100 and 660 MeV. The calculated observables include fission-fragment mass distributions, total fission energies, neutron multiplicities, and fission times. These observables are compared to available experimental data. We show that the microscopic CoMD code is able to describe the complicated many-body dynamics of the fission process at intermediate and high energy and give a reasonable estimate of the fission time scale. Sensitivity of the results to the density dependence of the nucleon symmetry potential (and, thus, the nuclear symmetry energy) is found. Further improvements of the code are necessary to achieve a satisfactory description of low-energy fission in which shell effects play a dominant role.

  8. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D. Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-28

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  9. Modeling and Bio molecular Self-assembly via Molecular Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, L.

    2009-09-01

    Surfactants like materials can be used to increase the solubility of poorly soluble drugs in water and to increase drug bioavailability. A typical case study will be demonstrated using DPD simulation to model the distribution of anti-inflammatory drug molecules. Computer simulation is a convenient approach to understand drug distribution and solubility concepts without much wastage and costly experiments in the laboratory. Often in molecular dynamics (MD) the atoms are represented explicitly and the equation of motion as described by Newtonian dynamics is integrated explicitly. MD has been used to study spontaneous formation of micelles by hydrophobic molecules with amphiphilic head groups in bulk water, as well as stability of pre-configured micelles and membranes. DPD is a state-of the- art mesoscale simulation, it is a more recent molecular dynamics technique, originally developed for simulating complex fluids but lately also applied to membrane dynamics, hemodynamic in biomedical applications. Such fluids pervade industrial research from paints to pharmaceuticals and from cosmetics to the controlled release of drugs. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) can provide structural and dynamic properties of fluids in equilibrium, under shear or confined to narrow cavities, at length- and time-scales beyond the scope of traditional atomistic molecular dynamics simulation methods. Mesoscopic particles are used to represent clusters of molecules. The interaction conserves mass and momentum and as a consequence the dynamics is consistent with Navier-Stokes equations. In addition to the conservative forces, stochastic drive and dissipation is introduced to represent internal degrees of freedom in the mesoscopic particles. In this research, an initial study is being conducted using the aqueous solubilization of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug is studied theoretically in micellar solution of nonionic (dodecyl hexa(ethylene oxide), C12E6) surfactants possessing the

  10. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  11. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  12. Molecular Dynamics study on the Micellization of Rhamnolipids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munusamy, Elango; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2015-03-01

    Oil spills have become one of the most serious environmental and ecological problems owing to the growth of oil exploration, production and transportation. Millions of gallons of crude oil and refined products are spilled into marine waters worldwide each year. Large volumes of surfactants are applied to the ocean as a remediation strategy. Environmental and toxicity issues arise when such a voluminous amounts of chemical surfactants are applied. One prospective solution to this problem is to use greener surfactants that possess excellent biodegradation and toxicity characteristics relative to existing classes of commonly used surfactants. In this context, we are interested in designing and developing greener surfactants that are patterned after naturally occurring glycolipids. In the present work, we concentrate on one of the more commonly studied glycolipid, rhamnolipid (Rha1C10C10) . Despite the available experimental data, the molecular structure, shape and geometry of micelles formed by rhamnolipid is unknown. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the aggregation behavior of rhamnolipids in aqueous solution and at air-water interface. All calculations were performed in NPT ensembles at 300 K using NAMD 2.8, a parallel code designed for high-performance simulation of large biological macromolecule using the CHARMM force field. The results obtained from MD simulations on the aggregation of rhamnolipids in water and at air-water interface will be presented.

  13. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  14. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  15. Using RNA as Molecular Code for Programming Cellular Function.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Manish; Rostain, William; Prakash, Satya; Duncan, John N; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-08-19

    RNA is involved in a wide-range of important molecular processes in the cell, serving diverse functions: regulatory, enzymatic, and structural. Together with its ease and predictability of design, these properties can lead RNA to become a useful handle for biological engineers with which to control the cellular machinery. By modifying the many RNA links in cellular processes, it is possible to reprogram cells toward specific design goals. We propose that RNA can be viewed as a molecular programming language that, together with protein-based execution platforms, can be used to rewrite wide ranging aspects of cellular function. In this review, we catalogue developments in the use of RNA parts, methods, and associated computational models that have contributed to the programmability of biology. We discuss how RNA part repertoires have been combined to build complex genetic circuits, and review recent applications of RNA-based parts and circuitry. We explore the future potential of RNA engineering and posit that RNA programmability is an important resource for firmly establishing an era of rationally designed synthetic biology. PMID:26999422

  16. Trajectory NG: portable, compressed, general molecular dynamics trajectories.

    PubMed

    Spångberg, Daniel; Larsson, Daniel S D; van der Spoel, David

    2011-10-01

    We present general algorithms for the compression of molecular dynamics trajectories. The standard ways to store MD trajectories as text or as raw binary floating point numbers result in very large files when efficient simulation programs are used on supercomputers. Our algorithms are based on the observation that differences in atomic coordinates/velocities, in either time or space, are generally smaller than the absolute values of the coordinates/velocities. Also, it is often possible to store values at a lower precision. We apply several compression schemes to compress the resulting differences further. The most efficient algorithms developed here use a block sorting algorithm in combination with Huffman coding. Depending on the frequency of storage of frames in the trajectory, either space, time, or combinations of space and time differences are usually the most efficient. We compare the efficiency of our algorithms with each other and with other algorithms present in the literature for various systems: liquid argon, water, a virus capsid solvated in 15 mM aqueous NaCl, and solid magnesium oxide. We perform tests to determine how much precision is necessary to obtain accurate structural and dynamic properties, as well as benchmark a parallelized implementation of the algorithms. We obtain compression ratios (compared to single precision floating point) of 1:3.3-1:35 depending on the frequency of storage of frames and the system studied. PMID:21267752

  17. Statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics into peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes an elegant statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics at finite temperature into peridynamics, a continuum theory. Peridynamics is an efficient alternative to molecular dynamics enabling dynamics at larger length and time scales. In direct analogy with molecular dynamics, peridynamics uses a nonlocal model of force and does not employ stress/strain relationships germane to classical continuum mechanics. In contrast with classical continuum mechanics, the peridynamic representation of a system of linear springs and masses is shown to have the same dispersion relation as the original spring-mass system.

  18. A Molecular Code for Identity in the Vomeronasal System.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Yuetian; Xu, Pei S; Geerlof-Vidavsky, Ilan; Chong, Wongi; Gross, Michael L; Holy, Timothy E

    2015-10-01

    In social interactions among mammals, individuals are recognized by olfactory cues, but identifying the key signals among thousands of compounds remains a major challenge. To address this need, we developed a new technique, component-activity matching (CAM), to select candidate ligands that "explain" patterns of bioactivity across diverse complex mixtures. Using mouse urine from eight different sexes and strains, we identified 23 components to explain firing rates in seven of eight functional classes of vomeronasal sensory neurons. Focusing on a class of neurons selective for females, we identified a novel family of vomeronasal ligands, steroid carboxylic acids. These ligands accounted for much of the neuronal activity of urine from some female strains, were necessary for normal levels of male investigatory behavior of female scents, and were sufficient to trigger mounting behavior. CAM represents the first step toward an exhaustive characterization of the molecular cues for natural behavior in a mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26435105

  19. A vectorized code for the pseudofermion simulation of QCD with dynamical quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campostrini, Massimo; Moriarty, Kevin J. M.; Potvin, Jean; Rebbi, Claudio

    1988-08-01

    We present a FORTRAN code for the Monte Carlo simulation of Quantum Chromodynamics with dynamical fermions, using the pseudofermion algorithm. The code is fully vectorized and optimized for the CDC CYBER 205, taking advantage of high performance features like 32-bit arithmetic, gather/scatter hardware and asynchronous I/O. Nonetheless, the code is largely portable and performs well on other vector computers.

  20. Extra-coding RNAs regulate neuronal DNA methylation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Savell, Katherine E; Gallus, Nancy V N; Simon, Rhiana C; Brown, Jordan A; Revanna, Jasmin S; Osborn, Mary Katherine; Song, Esther Y; O'Malley, John J; Stackhouse, Christian T; Norvil, Allison; Gowher, Humaira; Sweatt, J David; Day, Jeremy J

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are essential regulators of the function and information storage capacity of neurons. DNA methylation is highly dynamic in the developing and adult brain, and is actively regulated by neuronal activity and behavioural experiences. However, it is presently unclear how methylation status at individual genes is targeted for modification. Here, we report that extra-coding RNAs (ecRNAs) interact with DNA methyltransferases and regulate neuronal DNA methylation. Expression of ecRNA species is associated with gene promoter hypomethylation, is altered by neuronal activity, and is overrepresented at genes involved in neuronal function. Knockdown of the Fos ecRNA locus results in gene hypermethylation and mRNA silencing, and hippocampal expression of Fos ecRNA is required for long-term fear memory formation in rats. These results suggest that ecRNAs are fundamental regulators of DNA methylation patterns in neuronal systems, and reveal a promising avenue for therapeutic targeting in neuropsychiatric disease states. PMID:27384705

  1. Extra-coding RNAs regulate neuronal DNA methylation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Savell, Katherine E.; Gallus, Nancy V. N.; Simon, Rhiana C.; Brown, Jordan A.; Revanna, Jasmin S.; Osborn, Mary Katherine; Song, Esther Y.; O'Malley, John J.; Stackhouse, Christian T.; Norvil, Allison; Gowher, Humaira; Sweatt, J. David; Day, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are essential regulators of the function and information storage capacity of neurons. DNA methylation is highly dynamic in the developing and adult brain, and is actively regulated by neuronal activity and behavioural experiences. However, it is presently unclear how methylation status at individual genes is targeted for modification. Here, we report that extra-coding RNAs (ecRNAs) interact with DNA methyltransferases and regulate neuronal DNA methylation. Expression of ecRNA species is associated with gene promoter hypomethylation, is altered by neuronal activity, and is overrepresented at genes involved in neuronal function. Knockdown of the Fos ecRNA locus results in gene hypermethylation and mRNA silencing, and hippocampal expression of Fos ecRNA is required for long-term fear memory formation in rats. These results suggest that ecRNAs are fundamental regulators of DNA methylation patterns in neuronal systems, and reveal a promising avenue for therapeutic targeting in neuropsychiatric disease states. PMID:27384705

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  3. A molecular dynamics study of dielectric friction

    SciTech Connect

    Kurnikova, M.G.; Waldeck, D.H.; Coalson, R.D.

    1996-07-01

    A molecular dynamics study of the friction experienced by the dye molecule resorufamine rotating in a polar solvent is performed. The validity of simple continuum theories of dielectric friction is tested. It is found that the Alavi{endash}Waldeck theory gives reasonable results for the zero frequency dielectric friction coefficient while the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory requires an unphysically small cavity radius. A procedure for evaluating the time dependent friction kernel from torques and angular velocities, which enables the contributions to the friction from the van der Waals and Coulomb forces to be evaluated separately, is suggested. This study of a realistic system shows that electrostatic interactions can enhance friction by at least two physical mechanisms. First is a contribution to the friction which arises solely from retardation of the solvent reaction field. Second is a contribution arising from local structural changes of the solvent which are driven by the electrostatic field, i.e., a change in the local viscosity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  5. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  6. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  7. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion. PMID:27431975

  8. Reaction ensemble molecular dynamics: Direct simulation of the dynamic equilibrium properties of chemically reacting mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, John K.; Lísal, Martin; Gubbins, Keith E.; Rice, Betsy M.

    2004-12-01

    A molecular simulation method to study the dynamics of chemically reacting mixtures is presented. The method uses a combination of stochastic and dynamic simulation steps, allowing for the simulation of both thermodynamic and transport properties. The method couples a molecular dynamics simulation cell (termed dynamic cell) to a reaction mixture simulation cell (termed control cell) that is formulated upon the reaction ensemble Monte Carlo (RxMC) method, hence the term reaction ensemble molecular dynamics. Thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in the dynamic cell by using a constant-temperature molecular dynamics simulation method. RxMC forward and reverse reaction steps are performed in the control cell only, while molecular dynamics steps are performed in both the dynamic cell and the control cell. The control cell, which acts as a sink and source reservoir, is maintained at reaction equilibrium conditions via the RxMC algorithm. The reaction ensemble molecular dynamics method is analogous to the grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics technique, while using some elements of the osmotic molecular dynamics method, and so simulates conditions that directly relate to real, open systems. The accuracy and stability of the method is assessed by considering the ammonia synthesis reaction N2+3H2⇔2NH3 . It is shown to be a viable method for predicting the effects of nonideal environments on the dynamic properties (particularly diffusion) as well as reaction equilibria for chemically reacting mixtures.

  9. The tubulin code: Molecular components, readout mechanisms, and functions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal filaments that are dynamically assembled from α/β-tubulin heterodimers. The primary sequence and structure of the tubulin proteins and, consequently, the properties and architecture of microtubules are highly conserved in eukaryotes. Despite this conservation, tubulin is subject to heterogeneity that is generated in two ways: by the expression of different tubulin isotypes and by posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Identifying the mechanisms that generate and control tubulin heterogeneity and how this heterogeneity affects microtubule function are long-standing goals in the field. Recent work on tubulin PTMs has shed light on how these modifications could contribute to a “tubulin code” that coordinates the complex functions of microtubules in cells. PMID:25135932

  10. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  11. The distributed diagonal force decomposition method for parallelizing molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Borštnik, Urban; Miller, Benjamin T; Brooks, Bernard R; Janežič, Dušanka

    2011-11-15

    Parallelization is an effective way to reduce the computational time needed for molecular dynamics simulations. We describe a new parallelization method, the distributed-diagonal force decomposition method, with which we extend and improve the existing force decomposition methods. Our new method requires less data communication during molecular dynamics simulations than replicated data and current force decomposition methods, increasing the parallel efficiency. It also dynamically load-balances the processors' computational load throughout the simulation. The method is readily implemented in existing molecular dynamics codes and it has been incorporated into the CHARMM program, allowing its immediate use in conjunction with the many molecular dynamics simulation techniques that are already present in the program. We also present the design of the Force Decomposition Machine, a cluster of personal computers and networks that is tailored to running molecular dynamics simulations using the distributed diagonal force decomposition method. The design is expandable and provides various degrees of fault resilience. This approach is easily adaptable to computers with Graphics Processing Units because it is independent of the processor type being used. PMID:21793007

  12. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Yin, Junqi; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  13. Dynamic conformational ensembles regulate casein kinase-1 isoforms: Insights from molecular dynamics and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surya Pratap; Gupta, Dwijendra K

    2016-04-01

    Casein kinase-1 (CK1) isoforms actively participate in the down-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway; however recent studies have shown their active roles in oncogenesis of various tissues through this pathway. Functional loss of two isoforms (CK1-α/ε) has been shown to activate the carcinogenic pathway which involves the stabilization of of cytoplasmic β-catenin. Development of anticancer therapeutics is very laborious task and depends upon the structural and conformational details of the target. This study focuses on, how the structural dynamics and conformational changes of two CK1 isoforms are synchronized in carcinogenic pathway. The conformational dynamics in kinases is the responsible for their action as has been supported by the molecular docking experiments. PMID:26788877

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Disordered Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2004-02-27

    The melting of zircon and the amorphous state produced by quenching from the melt were simulated by molecular dynamics using a new partial charge model combined with the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential. The model has been established for the description of the crystalline and aperiodic structures of zircon in order to be used for the simulation of displacement cascades. It provides an excellent fit to the structure, and accounts with convenient precision the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of zircon. The calculated melting temperature is about 2100 K. The activation energy for self-diffusion of ions in the liquid state was determined to be 190-200 kJ/mole. Melt quenching was employed to produce two different disordered states with distinct densities and structures. In the high density disordered state, the zircon structure is intact but the bond angle distributions are broader, 4% of the Si units are polymerized, and the volume swelling is about 8%. In the low density amorphous state, the Zr and Si coordination numbers are lower, and the Zr-O and Si-O bond lengths are shorter than corresponding values for the crystal. In addition, a highly polymerized Si network, with average connectivity of two, is observed in the low density amorphous state. These features have all been experimentally observed in natural metamict zircon. The present findings, when considered in light of experimental radiation effects studies, suggest that the swelling in zircon arises initially from disorder in the zircon crystal, and at high doses the disordered crystal is unable to accommodate the volume expansion and transforms to the amorphous state.

  15. Condensation on nanorods by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Donguk; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Many recent experimental studies have been conducted on constructing nanorods and nanowires to use in a wide range of applications. In this study, molecular dynamics is used to directly examine the condensation rate of nanorods and the results are compared with other basic configurations such as cubes or spheres. According to previous studies conducted by Suh and Yasuoka [J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 10631 (2011); 116, 14637 (2012)], a simple change in the configuration of the seed produces a shape effect, where the curvature of the solid seed surface directly affects the growth generating an orderly difference depending on the curvature. Nanoscale cuboids or nanorods were studied to find an aspect ratio effect when condensation occurs on the surface. Various aspect ratios were examined for different nanorod sizes over a wide range of supersaturation ratios. The results show that the growth rate of the nanorod is independent of the supersaturation ratio, which was also observed for the sphere and cube. The growth rate for the rod fell between those of the cube and the sphere, and this is due to an increase in the surface area of the nanorod compared to the cube and curvature effect in comparison with the sphere. A clear size dependence of the seed was observed, which is also similar to the cube and sphere. Furthermore, no aspect ratio influence was seen for the growth rate. This does not mean that the actual amount of condensation is the same for longer seeds, but rather from the definition of the growth rate, the amount of accumulation per unit area is the same for all seed lengths.

  16. Aneesur Rahman Prize Talk: Dynamics of Entangled Polymer Melts: Perceptive from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    2008-03-01

    Twenty years ago at the APS March Meeting, Kurt Kremer and I presented the first numerical evidence from computer simulations that the reptation model of Edwards and de Gennes correctly describes the dynamics of entangled linear polymer melts. For chains longer than the entanglement length Ne, the monomers of a chain move predominantly along their own contour. The distinctive signature of reptation dynamics, which we observed, was that on intermediate time scales, the mean squared displacement of a monomer increases with time as t^ 1/4. Though these early simulations were limited to chains of a few Ne, they demonstrated the potential of computer simulations to contribute to our understanding of polymer dynamics. Here I will review the progress over the past twenty years and present an outlook for the future in modeling entangled polymer melts and networks. With present day computers coupled with efficient parallel molecular dynamics codes, it is now possible to follow the equilibrium dynamics of chains of length 10-20Ne from the early Rouse regime to the long time diffusive regime. Result of these simulations support the earlier results obtained on chains of only a few Ne. Further evidence for the tube models of polymer dynamics has been obtained by identifying the primitive path mesh that characterizes the microscopic topological state of the computer- generated conformations of the chains. In particular, the plateau moduli derived on the basis of this analysis quantitatively reproduce experimental data for a wide spectrum of entangled polymer liquids including semi-dilute theta solutions of synthetic polymers, the corresponding dense melts, and solutions of semi-flexible (bio)polymers such as f-actin or suspensions of rodlike viruses. We also find that in agreement with the reptation model, the stress, end-to-end distance and entanglement length of an entangled melt subjected to uniaxial elongation, all relax on the same time scale.

  17. Strong scaling of general-purpose molecular dynamics simulations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Jens; Nguyen, Trung Dac; Anderson, Joshua A.; Lui, Pak; Spiga, Filippo; Millan, Jaime A.; Morse, David C.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a highly optimized implementation of MPI domain decomposition in a GPU-enabled, general-purpose molecular dynamics code, HOOMD-blue (Anderson and Glotzer, 2013). Our approach is inspired by a traditional CPU-based code, LAMMPS (Plimpton, 1995), but is implemented within a code that was designed for execution on GPUs from the start (Anderson et al., 2008). The software supports short-ranged pair force and bond force fields and achieves optimal GPU performance using an autotuning algorithm. We are able to demonstrate equivalent or superior scaling on up to 3375 GPUs in Lennard-Jones and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of up to 108 million particles. GPUDirect RDMA capabilities in recent GPU generations provide better performance in full double precision calculations. For a representative polymer physics application, HOOMD-blue 1.0 provides an effective GPU vs. CPU node speed-up of 12.5 ×.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Bio-Nano Systems with MBN Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubovich, A. V.; Solov'yov, I. A.; Solov'yov, A. V.

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations performed using a multi-purpose computer code MBN Explorer. In particular we consider the process of laser induced acoustic desorption of lysine amino acids from the surface of a nickel foil. We analyze the rate of lysine desorption from the nickel foil at different foil accelerations and suggest a simple theoretical model to describe the observed results. We note that despite the universality, the computational efficiency of MBN Explorer is comparable (and in some cases even higher) than the computational efficiency of other software packages, making MBN Explorer a possible alternative to the available codes.

  19. Application of computational fluid dynamics methods to improve thermal hydraulic code analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentell, Dennis Shannon, Jr.

    A computational fluid dynamics code is used to model the primary natural circulation loop of a proposed small modular reactor for comparison to experimental data and best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code results. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics code modeling capabilities make them attractive alternatives to the current conservative approach of coupled best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes and uncertainty evaluations. The results from a computational fluid dynamics analysis are benchmarked against the experimental test results of a 1:3 length, 1:254 volume, full pressure and full temperature scale small modular reactor during steady-state power operations and during a depressurization transient. A comparative evaluation of the experimental data, the thermal hydraulic code results and the computational fluid dynamics code results provides an opportunity to validate the best-estimate thermal hydraulic code's treatment of a natural circulation loop and provide insights into expanded use of the computational fluid dynamics code in future designs and operations. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine those physical phenomena most impactful on operations of the proposed reactor's natural circulation loop. The combination of the comparative evaluation and sensitivity analysis provides the resources for increased confidence in model developments for natural circulation loops and provides for reliability improvements of the thermal hydraulic code.

  20. COLLAPSE AND FRAGMENTATION OF MAGNETIC MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH THE ENZO AMR MHD CODE. I. UNIFORM DENSITY SPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic fields are important contributors to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density, and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer standard isothermal test case for three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) contraction without sustained collapse, forming a denser cloud core; (2) collapse to form a single protostar with significant spiral arms; and (3) collapse and fragmentation into binary or multiple protostar systems, with multiple spiral arms. Comparisons are also made with previous MHD calculations of similar clouds with a barotropic equations of state. These results for the collapse of initially uniform density spheres illustrate the central importance of both magnetic field direction and field strength for determining the outcome of dynamic protostellar collapse.

  1. CHARACTERIZING COUPLED CHARGE TRANSPORT WITH MULTISCALE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Jessica

    2011-08-31

    This is the final progress report for Award DE-SC0004920, entitled 'Characterizing coupled charge transport with multi scale molecular dynamics'. The technical abstract will be provided in the uploaded report.

  2. Dynamical Evolution of Supernova Remnants Breaking Through Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Wankee; Kim, Jongsoo; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-04-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code tep{har83}. We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the outermost dense shell of the remnant is divided into several layers. The divided layers are subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and fragmented. On the other hand, if an SNR breaks through an MC after the remnant enters the snowplow phase, the radiative shell is not divided to layers. We also compare the predictions of previous analytic solutions for the expansion of SNRs in stratified media with our one-dimensional simulations. Moreover, we produce synthetic X-ray surface brightness in order to research the center-bright X-ray morphology shown in thermal composite SNRs. In the late stages, a breakout SNR shows the center-bright X-ray morphology inside an MC in our results. We apply our model to the observational results of the X-ray morphology of the thermal composite SNR 3C 391.

  3. Electronic Structure and Molecular Dynamics Calculations for KBH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios; Shabaev, Andrew; Hoang, Khang; Mehl, Michael; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    In the search for hydrogen storage materials, alkali borohydrides MBH4 (M=Li, Na, K) are especially interesting because of their light weight and the high number of hydrogen atoms per metal atom. Electronic structure calculations can give insights into the properties of these complex hydrides and provide understanding of the structural properties and of the bonding of hydrogen. We have performed first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) and tight-binding (TB) calculations for KBH4 in both the high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) phases to understand its electronic and structural properties. Our DFT calculations were carried out using the VASP code. The results were then used as a database to develop a tight-binding Hamiltonian using the NRL-TB method. This approach allowed for computationally efficient calculations of phonon frequencies and elastic constants using the static module of the NRL-TB, and also using the molecular dynamics module to calculate mean-square displacements and formation energies of hydrogen vacancies.

  4. MDAnalysis: a toolkit for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Michaud-Agrawal, Naveen; Denning, Elizabeth J; Woolf, Thomas B; Beckstein, Oliver

    2011-07-30

    MDAnalysis is an object-oriented library for structural and temporal analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories and individual protein structures. It is written in the Python language with some performance-critical code in C. It uses the powerful NumPy package to expose trajectory data as fast and efficient NumPy arrays. It has been tested on systems of millions of particles. Many common file formats of simulation packages including CHARMM, Gromacs, Amber, and NAMD and the Protein Data Bank format can be read and written. Atoms can be selected with a syntax similar to CHARMM's powerful selection commands. MDAnalysis enables both novice and experienced programmers to rapidly write their own analytical tools and access data stored in trajectories in an easily accessible manner that facilitates interactive explorative analysis. MDAnalysis has been tested on and works for most Unix-based platforms such as Linux and Mac OS X. It is freely available under the GNU General Public License from http://mdanalysis.googlecode.com. PMID:21500218

  5. MDAnalysis: A Toolkit for the Analysis of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Michaud-Agrawal, Naveen; Denning, Elizabeth J.; Woolf, Thomas B.; Beckstein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    MDAnalysis is an object-oriented library for structural and temporal analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories and individual protein structures. It is written in the Python language with some performance-critical code in C. It uses the powerful NumPy package to expose trajectory data as fast and efficient NumPy arrays. It has been tested on systems of millions of particles. Many common file formats of simulation packages including CHARMM, Gromacs, Amber, and NAMD and the Protein Data Bank format can be read and written. Atoms can be selected with a syntax similar to CHARMM’s powerful selection commands. MDAnalysis enables both novice and experienced programmers to rapidly write their own analytical tools and access data stored in trajectories in an easily accessible manner that facilitates interactive explorative analysis. MDAnalysis has been tested on and works for most Unix-based platforms such as Linux and Mac OS X. It is freely available under the GNU Public License from http://mdanalysis.googlecode.com. PMID:21500218

  6. Masses, luminosities and dynamics of galactic molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Rivolo, A. R.; Mooney, T. J.; Barrett, J. W.; Sage, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies takes place in molecular clouds and the Milky Way is the only galaxy in which it is possible to resolve and study the physical properties and star formation activity of individual clouds. The masses, luminosities, dynamics, and distribution of molecular clouds, primarily giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way are described and analyzed. The observational data sets are the Massachusetts-Stony Brook CO Galactic Plane Survey and the IRAS far IR images. The molecular mass and infrared luminosities of glactic clouds are then compared with the molecular mass and infrared luminosities of external galaxies.

  7. Beyond Standard Molecular Dynamics: Investigating the Molecular Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Receptors with Enhanced Molecular Dynamics Methods

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological processes mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) take place on timescales that are not conveniently accessible to standard molecular dynamics (MD) approaches, notwithstanding the current availability of specialized parallel computer architectures, and efficient simulation algorithms. Enhanced MD-based methods have started to assume an important role in the study of the rugged energy landscape of GPCRs by providing mechanistic details of complex receptor processes such as ligand recognition, activation, and oligomerization. We provide here an overview of these methods in their most recent application to the field. PMID:24158803

  8. Molecular Dynamics Study of Potassium Azide (KN_3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossowski, M.; Hardy, J. R.

    1998-03-01

    An ab initio model developed for intermolecular and intramolecular potentials in ionic molecular solids(H. M. Lu and J. R. Hardy, Phys. Rev. B, 42, 8339 (1990)) is employed to study the phase diagram of potassium azide (KN_3). We performed first-principles static structural relaxation, supercell molecular dynamics, lattice- dynamical studies and predict the existence of a high temperature rotationally disordered phase in KN_3. A selected work on other members of the alkali azide family will also be discussed.

  9. HTMD: High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics for Molecular Discovery.

    PubMed

    Doerr, S; Harvey, M J; Noé, Frank; De Fabritiis, G

    2016-04-12

    Recent advances in molecular simulations have allowed scientists to investigate slower biological processes than ever before. Together with these advances came an explosion of data that has transformed a traditionally computing-bound into a data-bound problem. Here, we present HTMD, a programmable, extensible platform written in Python that aims to solve the data generation and analysis problem as well as increase reproducibility by providing a complete workspace for simulation-based discovery. So far, HTMD includes system building for CHARMM and AMBER force fields, projection methods, clustering, molecular simulation production, adaptive sampling, an Amazon cloud interface, Markov state models, and visualization. As a result, a single, short HTMD script can lead from a PDB structure to useful quantities such as relaxation time scales, equilibrium populations, metastable conformations, and kinetic rates. In this paper, we focus on the adaptive sampling and Markov state modeling features. PMID:26949976

  10. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  11. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A general engine dynamic analysis as a standard design study computational tool is described for the prediction and understanding of complex engine dynamic behavior. Improved definition of engine dynamic response provides valuable information and insights leading to reduced maintenance and overhaul costs on existing engine configurations. Application of advanced engine dynamic simulation methods provides a considerable cost reduction in the development of new engine designs by eliminating some of the trial and error process done with engine hardware development.

  12. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J.

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2 <111 > {110 } edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms.

  13. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2〈111〉{110} edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms. PMID:26871192

  14. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  16. Visualizing Functional Motions of Membrane Transporters with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins. PMID:23298176

  17. RPMDRATE: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, Yu. V.; Allen, J. W.; Green, W. H.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDRATE, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. Catalogue identifier: AENW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 94512 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1395674 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/95, Python (version 2.6.x or later, including any version of Python 3, is recommended). Computer: Not computer specific. Operating system: Any for which Python, Fortran 90/95 compiler and the required external routines are available. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: The program can efficiently utilize 4096+ processors, depending on problem and available computer. At low temperatures, 110 processors are reasonable for a typical umbrella integration run with an analytic potential energy function and gradients on the latest x86-64 machines.

  18. Source Authentication for Code Dissemination Supporting Dynamic Packet Size in Wireless Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daehee; Kim, Dongwan; An, Sunshin

    2016-01-01

    Code dissemination in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is a procedure for distributing a new code image over the air in order to update programs. Due to the fact that WSNs are mostly deployed in unattended and hostile environments, secure code dissemination ensuring authenticity and integrity is essential. Recent works on dynamic packet size control in WSNs allow enhancing the energy efficiency of code dissemination by dynamically changing the packet size on the basis of link quality. However, the authentication tokens attached by the base station become useless in the next hop where the packet size can vary according to the link quality of the next hop. In this paper, we propose three source authentication schemes for code dissemination supporting dynamic packet size. Compared to traditional source authentication schemes such as μTESLA and digital signatures, our schemes provide secure source authentication under the environment, where the packet size changes in each hop, with smaller energy consumption. PMID:27409616

  19. Source Authentication for Code Dissemination Supporting Dynamic Packet Size in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehee; Kim, Dongwan; An, Sunshin

    2016-01-01

    Code dissemination in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is a procedure for distributing a new code image over the air in order to update programs. Due to the fact that WSNs are mostly deployed in unattended and hostile environments, secure code dissemination ensuring authenticity and integrity is essential. Recent works on dynamic packet size control in WSNs allow enhancing the energy efficiency of code dissemination by dynamically changing the packet size on the basis of link quality. However, the authentication tokens attached by the base station become useless in the next hop where the packet size can vary according to the link quality of the next hop. In this paper, we propose three source authentication schemes for code dissemination supporting dynamic packet size. Compared to traditional source authentication schemes such as μTESLA and digital signatures, our schemes provide secure source authentication under the environment, where the packet size changes in each hop, with smaller energy consumption. PMID:27409616

  20. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  1. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  2. The Computer Simulation of Liquids by Molecular Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposes a mathematical computer model for the behavior of liquids using the classical dynamic principles of Sir Isaac Newton and the molecular dynamics method invented by other scientists. Concludes that other applications will be successful using supercomputers to go beyond simple Newtonian physics. (CW)

  3. Identifying the mechanisms of polymer friction through molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Minn, M; Satyanarayana, N; Sinha, Sujeet K; Tan, V B C

    2011-12-20

    Mechanisms governing the tribological behavior of polymer-on-polymer sliding were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Three main mechanisms governing frictional behavior were identified. Interfacial "brushing" of molecular chain ends over one another was observed as the key contribution to frictional forces. With an increase of the sliding speed, fluctuations in frictional forces reduced in both magnitude and periodicity, leading to dynamic frictional behavior. While "brushing" remained prevalent, two additional irreversible mechanisms, "combing" and "chain scission", of molecular chains were observed when the interfaces were significantly diffused. PMID:22044344

  4. CoCoNuT: General relativistic hydrodynamics code with dynamical space-time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmelmeier, Harald; Novak, Jérôme; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo

    2012-02-01

    CoCoNuT is a general relativistic hydrodynamics code with dynamical space-time evolution. The main aim of this numerical code is the study of several astrophysical scenarios in which general relativity can play an important role, namely the collapse of rapidly rotating stellar cores and the evolution of isolated neutron stars. The code has two flavors: CoCoA, the axisymmetric (2D) magnetized version, and CoCoNuT, the 3D non-magnetized version.

  5. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  6. PARMTEQ: A beam-dynamics code fo the RFQ linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1988-12-01

    The PARMTEQ code is used for generating the complete cell design of a radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator and for multiparticle simulation of the beam dynamics. We present a review of the code, with an emphasis on the physics used to describe the particle motion and the cell generation.

  7. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations at the Petascale (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, A.

    2013-12-01

    We are developing a divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic framework into a metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallelization scheme to perform large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The scheme has achieved parallel efficiency well over 0.9 on 786,432 IBM BlueGene/Q processors for 8.5 trillion-atom molecular dynamics and 1.9 trillion electronic degrees-of-freedom quantum molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory. Simulation results reveal intricate interplay between photoexcitation, mechanics, flow, and chemical reactions at the nanoscale. Specifically, we will discuss atomistic mechanisms of: (1) rapid hydrogen production from water using metallic alloy nanoparticles; (2) molecular control of charge transfer, charge recombination, and singlet fission for efficient solar cells; and (3) mechanically enhanced reaction kinetics in nanobubbles and nanojets.

  8. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  9. Study of the asymptotic dynamic aperture in the NICA collider using symplectic tracking codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, A. E.; Zenkevich, P. R.; Kozlov, O. S.

    2015-12-01

    The dependence of the dynamic aperture in the NICA collider on the number of turns has been calculated by MAD-X tracking code with the two independent algorithms: a program of symplectic tracking PTC (Polymorphic technology Tracking Code) and a program of the thin-lenses tracking method. The results of the numerical integration of particle motion forecast the asymptotic dynamic aperture and the possible losses of particles in the collider.

  10. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-08-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin-rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation.

  11. Modeling Star-Forming Regions using a 3D Molecular Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughnane, R. M.; Redman, M. P.; Keto, E. R.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the 3-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer code, MOLLIE (MOLelcular LIne Explorer), for solving molecular and atomic excitation and radiation transfer in a molecular gas and predicting emergent spectra. The code implementation makes use of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration (ALI) method of Rybicki & Hummer (1991) to solve the radiative transfer equation along rays passing through a spherical model cloud. When convergence between level populations, the radiation field, and the point separation has been obtained, the grid is ray-traced to produce images that can be readily compared to observations. The optimization technique, Fast Simulated Annealing (FSA), adopted by MOLLIE to increase the probability of arriving at a satisfactory output in a timely fashion, is briefly considered.

  12. Implementing Molecular Dynamics for Hybrid High Performance Computers - 1. Short Range Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W Michael; Wang, Peng; Plimpton, Steven J; Tharrington, Arnold N

    2011-01-01

    The use of accelerators such as general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) have become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power requirements. Hybrid high performance computers, machines with more than one type of floating-point processor, are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. In this work, we discuss several important issues in porting a large molecular dynamics code for use on parallel hybrid machines - 1) choosing a hybrid parallel decomposition that works on central processing units (CPUs) with distributed memory and accelerator cores with shared memory, 2) minimizing the amount of code that must be ported for efficient acceleration, 3) utilizing the available processing power from both many-core CPUs and accelerators, and 4) choosing a programming model for acceleration. We present our solution to each of these issues for short-range force calculation in the molecular dynamics package LAMMPS. We describe algorithms for efficient short range force calculation on hybrid high performance machines. We describe a new approach for dynamic load balancing of work between CPU and accelerator cores. We describe the Geryon library that allows a single code to compile with both CUDA and OpenCL for use on a variety of accelerators. Finally, we present results on a parallel test cluster containing 32 Fermi GPGPUs and 180 CPU cores.

  13. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Numerical, Analytical, Experimental Study of Fluid Dynamic Forces in Seals. Volume 5; Description of Seal Dynamics Code DYSEAL and Labyrinth Seals Code KTK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur; Chupp, Raymond; Holle, Glenn; Scott, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to develop computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and simpler industrial codes for analyzing and designing advanced seals for air-breathing and space propulsion engines. The CFD code SCISEAL is capable of producing full three-dimensional flow field information for a variety of cylindrical configurations. An implicit multidomain capability allow the division of complex flow domains to allow optimum use of computational cells. SCISEAL also has the unique capability to produce cross-coupled stiffness and damping coefficients for rotordynamic computations. The industrial codes consist of a series of separate stand-alone modules designed for expeditious parametric analyses and optimization of a wide variety of cylindrical and face seals. Coupled through a Knowledge-Based System (KBS) that provides a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI), the industrial codes are PC based using an OS/2 operating system. These codes were designed to treat film seals where a clearance exists between the rotating and stationary components. Leakage is inhibited by surface roughness, small but stiff clearance films, and viscous pumping devices. The codes have demonstrated to be a valuable resource for seal development of future air-breathing and space propulsion engines

  15. Interpreting observations of molecular outflow sources: the MHD shock code mhd_vode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.

    2015-06-01

    The planar MHD shock code mhd_vode has been developed in order to simulate both continuous (C) type shock waves and jump (J) type shock waves in the interstellar medium. The physical and chemical state of the gas in steady-state may also be computed and used as input to a shock wave model. The code is written principally in FORTRAN 90, although some routines remain in FORTRAN 77. The documented program and its input data are described and provided as supplementary material, and the results of exemplary test runs are presented. Our intention is to enable the interested user to run the code for any sensible parameter set and to comprehend the results. With applications to molecular outflow sources in mind, we have computed, and are making available as supplementary material, integrated atomic and molecular line intensities for grids of C- and J-type models; these computations are summarized in the Appendices. Appendix tables, a copy of the current version of the code, and of the two model grids are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A63

  16. A New AMR Code for Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics in Dynamical Specetimes: Numerical Method and Code Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuk Tung; Etienne, Zachariah; Shapiro, Stuart

    2011-04-01

    The Illinois relativity group has written and tested a new GRMHD code, which is compatible with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) provided by the widely-used Cactus/Carpet infrastructure. Our code solves the Einstein-Maxwell-MHD system of coupled equations in full 3+1 dimensions, evolving the metric via the BSSN formalism and the MHD and magnetic induction equations via a conservative, high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. The induction equations are recast as an evolution equation for the magnetic vector potential. The divergenceless constraint div(B) = 0 is enforced by the curl of the vector potential. In simulations with uniform grid spacing, our MHD scheme is numerically equivalent to a commonly used, staggered-mesh constrained-transport scheme. We will present numerical method and code validation tests for both Minkowski and curved spacetimes. The tests include magnetized shocks, nonlinear Alfven waves, cylindrical explosions, cylindrical rotating disks, magnetized Bondi tests, and the collapse of a magnetized rotating star. Some of the more stringent tests involve black holes. We find good agreement between analytic and numerical solutions in these tests, and achieve convergence at the expected order.

  17. Three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation coupled with molecular dynamics in Amber

    PubMed Central

    Luchko, Tyler; Gusarov, Sergey; Roe, Daniel R.; Simmerling, Carlos; Case, David A.; Tuszynski, Jack; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    We present the three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation (also known as 3D-RISM) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by contracting solvent degrees of freedom, accelerated by extrapolating solvent-induced forces and applying them in large multi-time steps (up to 20 fs) to enable simulation of large biomolecules. The method has been implemented in the Amber molecular modeling package, and is illustrated here on alanine dipeptide and protein G. PMID:20440377

  18. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  19. i-PI: A Python interface for ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; More, Joshua; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2014-03-01

    Recent developments in path integral methodology have significantly reduced the computational expense of including quantum mechanical effects in the nuclear motion in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. However, the implementation of these developments requires a considerable programming effort, which has hindered their adoption. Here we describe i-PI, an interface written in Python that has been designed to minimise the effort required to bring state-of-the-art path integral techniques to an electronic structure program. While it is best suited to first principles calculations and path integral molecular dynamics, i-PI can also be used to perform classical molecular dynamics simulations, and can just as easily be interfaced with an empirical forcefield code. To give just one example of the many potential applications of the interface, we use it in conjunction with the CP2K electronic structure package to showcase the importance of nuclear quantum effects in high-pressure water. Catalogue identifier: AERN_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 138626 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3128618 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: Multiple architectures. Operating system: Linux, Mac OSX, Windows. RAM: Less than 256 Mb Classification: 7.7. External routines: NumPy Nature of problem: Bringing the latest developments in the modelling of nuclear quantum effects with path integral molecular dynamics to ab initio electronic structure programs with minimal implementational effort. Solution method: State-of-the-art path integral molecular dynamics techniques are implemented in a Python interface. Any electronic structure code can be patched to receive the atomic

  20. Visualizing global properties of a molecular dynamics trajectory.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Li, Shangyang; Makowski, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories are very large data sets that contain substantial information about the dynamic behavior of a protein. Condensing these data into a form that can provide intuitively useful understanding of the molecular behavior during the trajectory is a substantial challenge that has received relatively little attention. Here, we introduce the sigma-r plot, a plot of the standard deviation of intermolecular distances as a function of that distance. This representation of global dynamics contains within a single, one-dimensional plot, the average range of motion between pairs of atoms within a macromolecule. Comparison of sigma-r plots calculated from 10 ns trajectories of proteins representing the four major SCOP fold classes indicates diversity of dynamic behaviors which are recognizably different among the four classes. Differences in domain structure and molecular weight also produce recognizable features in sigma-r plots, reflective of differences in global dynamics. Plots generated from trajectories with progressively increasing simulation time reflect the increased sampling of the structural ensemble as a function of time. Single amino acid replacements can give rise to changes in global dynamics detectable through comparison of sigma-r plots. Dynamic behavior of substructures can be monitored by careful choice of interatomic vectors included in the calculation. These examples provide demonstrations of the utility of the sigma-r plot to provide a simple measure of the global dynamics of a macromolecule. PMID:26522428

  1. Object-Oriented Parallel Particle-in-Cell Code for Beam Dynamics Simulation in Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.; Decky, V.

    1999-11-13

    In this paper, we present an object-oriented three-dimensional parallel particle-in-cell code for beam dynamics simulation in linear accelerators. A two-dimensional parallel domain decomposition approach is employed within a message passing programming paradigm along with a dynamic load balancing. Implementing object-oriented software design provides the code with better maintainability, reusability, and extensibility compared with conventional structure based code. This also helps to encapsulate the details of communications syntax. Performance tests on SGI/Cray T3E-900 and SGI Origin 2000 machines show good scalability of the object-oriented code. Some important features of this code also include employing symplectic integration with linear maps of external focusing elements and using z as the independent variable, typical in accelerators. A successful application was done to simulate beam transport through three superconducting sections in the APT linac design.

  2. An improved version of the Green's function molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling Ti; Denniston, Colin; Müser, Martin H.

    2011-02-01

    This work presents an improved version of the Green's function molecular dynamics method (Kong et al., 2009; Campañá and Müser, 2004 [1,2]), which enables one to study the elastic response of a three-dimensional solid to an external stress field by taking into consideration only atoms near the surface. In the previous implementation, the effective elastic coefficients measured at the Γ-point were altered to reduce finite size effects: their eigenvalues corresponding to the acoustic modes were set to zero. This scheme was found to work well for simple Bravais lattices as long as only atoms within the last layer were treated as Green's function atoms. However, it failed to function as expected in all other cases. It turns out that a violation of the acoustic sum rule for the effective elastic coefficients at Γ (Kong, 2010 [3]) was responsible for this behavior. In the new version, the acoustic sum rule is enforced by adopting an iterative procedure, which is found to be physically more meaningful than the previous one. In addition, the new algorithm allows one to treat lattices with bases and the Green's function slab is no longer confined to one layer. New version program summaryProgram title: FixGFC/FixGFMD v1.12 Catalogue identifier: AECW_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECW_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 206 436 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 314 850 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: All Operating system: Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Code has been parallelized using MPI directives. RAM: Depends on the problem Classification: 7.7 External routines: LAMMPS ( http://lammps.sandia.gov/), MPI ( http

  3. Molecular Mechanotransduction: how forces trigger cytoskeletal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlicher, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses elicit cellular reactions mediated by chemical signals. Defective responses to forces underlie human medical disorders, such as cardiac failure and pulmonary injury. Despite detailed knowledge of the cytoskeleton's structure, the specific molecular switches that convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signals have remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FLNa) as a central mechanotransduction element of the cytoskeleton by using Fluorescence Loss After photoConversion (FLAC), a novel high-speed alternative to FRAP. We reconstituted a minimal system consisting of actin filaments, FLNa and two FLNa-binding partners: the cytoplasmic tail of ß-integrin, and FilGAP. Integrins form an essential mechanical linkage between extracellular and intracellular environments, with ß integrin tails connecting to the actin cytoskeleton by binding directly to filamin. FilGAP is a FLNa-binding GTPase-activating protein specific for Rac, which in vivo regulates cell spreading and bleb formation. We demonstrate that both externally-imposed bulk shear and myosin II driven forces differentially regulate the binding of integrin and FilGAP to FLNa. Consistent with structural predictions, strain increases ß-integrin binding to FLNa, whereas it causes FilGAP to dissociate from FLNa, providing a direct and specific molecular basis for cellular mechanotransduction. These results identify the first molecular mechanotransduction element within the actin cytoskeleton, revealing that mechanical strain of key proteins regulates the binding of signaling molecules. Moreover, GAP activity has been shown to switch cell movement from mesenchymal to amoeboid motility, suggesting that mechanical forces directly impact the invasiveness of cancer.

  4. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Hybrid SCM/SAC-OCDMA Transmissions System using Dynamic Cyclic Shift Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd, Thanaa Hussein; Aljunid, S. A.; Fadhil, Hilal Adnan; Radhi, Ibrahim Fadhil; Saad, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the performance of a hybrid scheme of Subcarrier Multiplexing (SCM) technique in a Spectral Amplitude Coding (SAC) Optical Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) transmissions system is evaluated. The hybrid system is design using new code family; we call it Dynamic Cyclic Shift (DCS) code. The DCS code design for SAC-OCDMA system to reduce the effect of Multi Access Interference due to it property of low cross-correlation (λC ≤ 1) between code words. In contrast, the SCM scheme shows the ability to increase the data rate of SAC-OCDMA system. Consequently, the hybrid SCM/SAC-OCDMA system could be one promising solution to the high-capacity access network with low cost effective, good flexibility and enhanced security, which makes an attractive candidate for next-generation broadband access network.

  6. An evaluation and analysis of three dynamic watershed acidification codes (MAGIC, ETD, and ILWAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.; Eary, L.E.; Vail, L.W.; Girvin, D.C.; Liebetrau, A.M.; Hibler, L.F.; Miley, T.B.; Monsour, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is currently using the dynamic watershed acidification codes MAGIC, ILWAS, and ETD to assess the potential future impact of the acidic deposition on surface water quality by simulating watershed acid neutralization processes. The reliability of forecasts made with these codes is of considerable concern. The present study evaluates the process formulations (i.e., conceptual and numerical representation of atmospheric, hydrologic geochemical and biogeochemical processes), compares their approaches to calculating acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and estimates the relative effects (sensitivity) of perturbations in the input data on selected output variables for each code. Input data were drawn from three Adirondack (upstate New York) watersheds: Panther Lake, Clear Pond, and Woods Lake. Code calibration was performed by the developers of the codes. Conclusions focus on summarizing the adequacy of process formulations, differences in ANC simulation among codes and recommendations for further research to increase forecast reliability. 87 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  7. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  8. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    PubMed

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney. PMID:26489820

  9. Hydrolysis of Al3+ from constrained molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Hirata, Masaru; Kimura, Takaumi

    2006-02-21

    We investigated the hydrolysis reactions of Al(3+) in AlCl(3) aqueous solution using the constrained molecular dynamics based on the Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics method. By employing the proton-aluminum coordination number as a reaction coordinate in the constrained molecular dynamics the deprotonation as well as dehydration processes are successfully realized. From our free-energy difference of DeltaG(0) approximately 8.0 kcal mol(-1) the hydrolysis constant pK(a1) is roughly estimated as 5.8, comparable to the literature value of 5.07. We show that the free-energy difference for the hydrolysis of Al(3+) in acidic conditions is at least 4 kcal mol(-1) higher than that in neutral condition, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction is inhibited by the presence of excess protons located around the hydrated ion, in agreement with the change of the predominant species by pH. PMID:16497053

  10. Studying Interactions by Molecular Dynamics Simulations at High Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Toppo, Stefano; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.; Viglino, Paolo; Ursini, Fulvio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study molecular encounters and recognition. In recent works, simulations using high concentration of interacting molecules have been performed. In this paper, we consider the practical problems for setting up the simulation and to analyse the results of the simulation. The simulation of beta 2-microglobulin association and the simulation of the binding of hydrogen peroxide by glutathione peroxidase are provided as examples. PMID:22500085

  11. Energy conserving, linear scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, M J; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-10-01

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with long-term conservation of the total energy and a computational cost that scales linearly with system size have been obtained simultaneously. Linear scaling with a low pre-factor is achieved using density matrix purification with sparse matrix algebra and a numerical threshold on matrix elements. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] yields microcanonical trajectories with the approximate forces obtained from the linear scaling method that exhibit no systematic drift over hundreds of picoseconds and which are indistinguishable from trajectories computed using exact forces. PMID:23039583

  12. Mitochondrial dynamics: molecular mechanisms and the role in the heart.

    PubMed

    Jazbutyte, V

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles which actively move along the cytoskeleton within the cell, change their shape and undergo fusion and fission. The heart is a metabolically active organ with high energy demands and rich in mitochondria. Mitochondria not only supply the heart with the high energy compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but also actively participate in cell signaling and apoptotic events and communicate with the cytosol. Recent advantages in molecular biology and imaging techniques helped to study mitochondrial dynamics directly in the cell and under real time conditions. In this review, I will briefly summarize current knowledge about molecular machinery mediating mitochondrial fusion/ fission, its link to apoptosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20440252

  13. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid peptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, M.; Rao, F.; Seeber, M.; Caflisch, A.

    2004-12-01

    The replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) approach is applied to four oligomeric peptide systems. At physiologically relevant temperature values REMD samples conformation space and aggregation transitions more efficiently than constant temperature molecular dynamics (CTMD). During the aggregation process the energetic and structural properties are essentially the same in REMD and CTMD. A condensation stage toward disordered aggregates precedes the β-sheet formation. Two order parameters, borrowed from anisotropic fluid analysis, are used to monitor the aggregation process. The order parameters do not depend on the peptide sequence and length and therefore allow to compare the amyloidogenic propensity of different peptides.

  14. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  15. How Dynamic Visualization Technology can Support Molecular Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Dalit

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and gas. They interact with the visualizations and carry out inquiry activities to make and refine connections between observable phenomena and atomic level processes related to phase change. The explanations proposed by 300 pairs of students in response to pre/post-assessment items have been analyzed using a scale for measuring the level of molecular reasoning. Results indicate that from pretest to posttest, students make progress in their level of molecular reasoning and are better able to connect intermolecular forces and phase change in their explanations. The paper presents the results through the lens of improvement patterns and the metaphor of the "ladder of molecular reasoning," and discusses how this adds to our understanding of the benefits of interacting with dynamic molecular visualizations.

  16. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  17. Chroma sampling and modulation techniques in high dynamic range video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Krishnan, Madhu; Topiwala, Pankaj

    2015-09-01

    High Dynamic Range and Wide Color Gamut (HDR/WCG) Video Coding is an area of intense research interest in the engineering community, for potential near-term deployment in the marketplace. HDR greatly enhances the dynamic range of video content (up to 10,000 nits), as well as broadens the chroma representation (BT.2020). The resulting content offers new challenges in its coding and transmission. The Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) of the International Standards Organization (ISO) is currently exploring coding efficiency and/or the functionality enhancements of the recently developed HEVC video standard for HDR and WCG content. FastVDO has developed an advanced approach to coding HDR video, based on splitting the HDR signal into a smoothed luminance (SL) signal, and an associated base signal (B). Both signals are then chroma downsampled to YFbFr 4:2:0 signals, using advanced resampling filters, and coded using the Main10 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, which has been developed jointly by ISO/IEC MPEG and ITU-T WP3/16 (VCEG). Our proposal offers both efficient coding, and backwards compatibility with the existing HEVC Main10 Profile. That is, an existing Main10 decoder can produce a viewable standard dynamic range video, suitable for existing screens. Subjective tests show visible improvement over the anchors. Objective tests show a sizable gain of over 25% in PSNR (RGB domain) on average, for a key set of test clips selected by the ISO/MPEG committee.

  18. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  19. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  20. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  1. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e -ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computer simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  2. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-14

    Here, we present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e-ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computermore » simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.« less

  3. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  4. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  5. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets' spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar; Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-01

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet's spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  6. Plastic dislocation motion via nonequilibrium molecular and continuum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Ladd, A.J.C.; Hoover, N.E.

    1980-09-29

    The classical two-dimensional close-packed triangular lattice, with nearest-neighbor spring forces, is a convenient standard material for the investigation of dislocation motion and plastic flow. Two kinds of calculations, based on this standard material, are described here: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations, incorporating adiabatic strains described with the help of Doll's Tensor, and (2) Continuum Dynamics simulations, incorporating periodic boundaries and dislocation interaction through stress-field superposition.

  7. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    SciTech Connect

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  8. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics: Dissipation Due to Internal Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2001-12-21

    We describe progress on the issue of pathological elastic wave reflection in atomistic and multiscale simulation. First we briefly review Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (CGMD). Originally CGMD was formulated as a Hamiltonian system in which energy is conserved. This formulation is useful for many applications, but recently CGMD has been extended to include generalized Langevin forces. Here we describe how Langevin dynamics arise naturally in CGMD, and we examine the implication for elastic wave scattering.

  9. Electron trapping in amorphous silicon: A quantum molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin H.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.

    1990-12-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations provide the real-time dynamics of electrons and ions through numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger and Newton equations, respectively. Using the QMD approach we have investigated the localization behavior of an excess electron in amorphous silicon at finite temperatures. For time scales on the order of a few picoseconds, we find the excess electron is localized inside a void of radius {approximately}3 {Angstrom} at finite temperatures. 12 refs.

  10. A fast recursive algorithm for molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.; Vaidehi, N.; Rodriguez, G.

    1993-01-01

    The present recursive algorithm for solving molecular systems' dynamical equations of motion employs internal variable models that reduce such simulations' computation time by an order of magnitude, relative to Cartesian models. Extensive use is made of spatial operator methods recently developed for analysis and simulation of the dynamics of multibody systems. A factor-of-450 speedup over the conventional O(N-cubed) algorithm is demonstrated for the case of a polypeptide molecule with 400 residues.

  11. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil : a new parallel computing environment for a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Kimizuka, Hajime; Kaburaki, Hideo

    2002-08-01

    A new parallel computing environment, called as ``Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil'', has been developed to carry out a large-scale short-range molecular dynamics simulation of solids. The stencil is written in C language using MPI for parallelization and designed successfully to separate and conceal parts of the programs describing cutoff schemes and parallel algorithms for data communication. This has been made possible by introducing the concept of image atoms. Therefore, only a sequential programming of the force calculation routine is required for executing the stencil in parallel environment. Typical molecular dynamics routines, such as various ensembles, time integration methods, and empirical potentials, have been implemented in the stencil. In the presentation, the performance of the stencil on parallel computers of Hitachi, IBM, SGI, and PC-cluster using the models of Lennard-Jones and the EAM type potentials for fracture problem will be reported.

  12. Multiparticle dynamics in the E-phi tracking code ESME

    SciTech Connect

    James A. MacLachlan

    2002-06-21

    ESME has developed over a twenty year period from its origins as a program for modeling rf gymnastics to a rather general facility for that fraction of beam dynamics of synchrotrons and storage rings which can be properly treated in the two dimensional longitudinal phase space. The features of this program which serve particularly for multiparticle calculations are described, some underling principles are noted, and illustrative results are given.

  13. Multiparticle Dynamics in the E-φ Tracking Code ESME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, James A.

    2002-12-01

    ESME has developed over a twenty year period from its origins as a program for modeling rf gymnastics to a rather general facility for that fraction of beam dynamics of synchrotrons and storage rings which can be properly treated in the two dimensional longitudinal phase space. The features of this program which serve particularly for multiparticle calculations are described, some uderlying principles are noted, and illustrative results are given.

  14. Code System for Static and Dynamic Piping System Analysis.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-07-07

    EPIPE is used for design or design evaluation of complex large piping systems. The piping systems can be viewed as a network of straight pipe elements (or tangents) and curved elements (pipe bends) interconnected at joints (or nodes) with intermediate supports and anchors. The system may be subject to static loads such as thermal, dead weight, internal pressure, or dynamic loads such as earthquake motions and flow-induced vibrations, or any combination of these.

  15. Superspreading: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Muller, Erich; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Recently, we have observed that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. Here, we present the structural characteristics and kinetics of the droplet spreading during the different stages of this process, and we compare our results with experimental data for trisiloxane and poly oxy ethylene surfactants. In this way, we highlight and explore the differences between surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. EPSRC Platform Grant MACIPh (EP/L020564/).

  16. Molecular circuits for dynamic noise filtering.

    PubMed

    Zechner, Christoph; Seelig, Georg; Rullan, Marc; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-04-26

    The invention of the Kalman filter is a crowning achievement of filtering theory-one that has revolutionized technology in countless ways. By dealing effectively with noise, the Kalman filter has enabled various applications in positioning, navigation, control, and telecommunications. In the emerging field of synthetic biology, noise and context dependency are among the key challenges facing the successful implementation of reliable, complex, and scalable synthetic circuits. Although substantial further advancement in the field may very well rely on effectively addressing these issues, a principled protocol to deal with noise-as provided by the Kalman filter-remains completely missing. Here we develop an optimal filtering theory that is suitable for noisy biochemical networks. We show how the resulting filters can be implemented at the molecular level and provide various simulations related to estimation, system identification, and noise cancellation problems. We demonstrate our approach in vitro using DNA strand displacement cascades as well as in vivo using flow cytometry measurements of a light-inducible circuit in Escherichia coli. PMID:27078094

  17. kspectrum: an open-source code for high-resolution molecular absorption spectra production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymet, V.; Coustet, C.; Piaud, B.

    2016-01-01

    We present the kspectrum, scientific code that produces high-resolution synthetic absorption spectra from public molecular transition parameters databases. This code was originally required by the atmospheric and astrophysics communities, and its evolution is now driven by new scientific projects among the user community. Since it was designed without any optimization that would be specific to any particular application field, its use could also be extended to other domains. kspectrum produces spectral data that can subsequently be used either for high-resolution radiative transfer simulations, or for producing statistic spectral model parameters using additional tools. This is a open project that aims at providing an up-to-date tool that takes advantage of modern computational hardware and recent parallelization libraries. It is currently provided by Méso-Star (http://www.meso-star.com) under the CeCILL license, and benefits from regular updates and improvements.

  18. Probing Molecular Dynamics by Laser-Induced Backscattering Holography.

    PubMed

    Haertelt, Marko; Bian, Xue-Bin; Spanner, Michael; Staudte, André; Corkum, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    We use differential holography to overcome the forward scattering problem in strong-field photoelectron holography. Our differential holograms of H_{2} and D_{2} molecules exhibit a fishbonelike structure, which arises from the backscattered part of the recolliding photoelectron wave packet. We demonstrate that the backscattering hologram can resolve the different nuclear dynamics between H_{2} and D_{2} with subangstrom spatial and subcycle temporal resolution. In addition, we show that attosecond electron dynamics can be resolved. These results open a new avenue for ultrafast studies of molecular dynamics in small molecules. PMID:27081975

  19. Probing Molecular Dynamics by Laser-Induced Backscattering Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haertelt, Marko; Bian, Xue-Bin; Spanner, Michael; Staudte, André; Corkum, Paul B.

    2016-04-01

    We use differential holography to overcome the forward scattering problem in strong-field photoelectron holography. Our differential holograms of H2 and D2 molecules exhibit a fishbonelike structure, which arises from the backscattered part of the recolliding photoelectron wave packet. We demonstrate that the backscattering hologram can resolve the different nuclear dynamics between H2 and D2 with subangstrom spatial and subcycle temporal resolution. In addition, we show that attosecond electron dynamics can be resolved. These results open a new avenue for ultrafast studies of molecular dynamics in small molecules.

  20. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  1. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics in isolated molecules and molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, I. V.; Radloff, W.

    2006-06-01

    During the past decade the understanding of photo-induced ultrafast dynamics in molecular systems has improved at an unforeseen speed and a wealth of detailed insight into the fundamental processes has been obtained. This review summarizes our present knowledge on ultrafast dynamics in isolated molecules and molecular clusters evolving after excitation with femtosecond pulses as studied by pump-probe analysis in real time. Experimental tools and methods as well as theoretical models are described which have been developed to glean information on primary, ultrafast processes in photophysics, photochemistry and photobiology. The relevant processes are explained by way of example—from wave packet dynamics in systems with a few atoms all the way to internal conversion via conical intersections in bio-chromophores. A systematic overview on characteristic systems follows, starting with diatomic and including larger organic molecules as well as various types of molecular clusters, such as micro-solvated chromophore molecules. For conciseness the focus is on molecular systems which remain unperturbed by the laser pulses—apart from the excitation and detection processes as such. Thus, only some aspects of controlling and manipulating molecular reactions by shaped and/or very intense laser pulses are discussed briefly for particularly instructive examples, illustrating the perspectives of this prospering field. The material presented in this review comprises some prototypical examples from earlier pioneering work but emphasizes studies from recent years and covers the most important and latest developments until January 2006.

  3. Relating Soil Organic Matter Dynamics to its Molecular Structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our understanding of the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) must be integrated with a sound knowledge of it biochemical complexity. The molecular structure of SOM was determined in 98% sand soils to eliminate the known protective effects of clay on the amount and turnover rate of the SOM constitu...

  4. Clustering Molecular Dynamics Trajectories for Optimizing Docking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V.; Ruiz, Duncan D.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  5. Clustering molecular dynamics trajectories for optimizing docking experiments.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  6. Molecular vibrational dynamics in PMMA studied by femtosecond CARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Sheng; Zhou, Boyang; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yuanqin

    2014-11-01

    The ultrafast molecular vibrational dynamics in PMMA sheets is studied by femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The C-H stretch modes at 2870 cm-1 and 3008 cm-1 in PMMA sheets are excited and detected. The coherence relaxation times and beat wavenumbers of the Raman modes are obtained.

  7. Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nanotube Tip Assisted Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    In this report we detail the development and application of an efficient quantum molecular dynamics computational algorithm and its application to the nanotube-tip assisted reactions on silicon and diamond surfaces. The calculations shed interesting insights into the microscopic picture of tip surface interactions.

  8. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  9. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  10. Nanoscale probing of dynamics in local molecular environments.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Joanna M; Sass, Paul M; Teichen, Paul E; Eaves, Joel D; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-11-19

    Vibrational spectroscopy can provide information about structure, coupling, and dynamics underlying the properties of complex molecular systems. While measurements of spectral line broadening can probe local chemical environments, the spatial averaging in conventional spectroscopies limits insight into underlying heterogeneity, in particular in disordered molecular solids. Here, using femtosecond infrared scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM), we resolve in vibrational free-induction decay (FID) measurements a high degree of spatial heterogeneity in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a dense molecular model system. In nanoscopic probe volumes as small as 10(3) vibrational oscillators, we approach the homogeneous response limit, with extended vibrational dephasing times of several picoseconds, that is, up to 10 times the inhomogeneous lifetime, and spatial average converging to the bulk ensemble response. We simulate the dynamics of relaxation with a finite set of local vibrational transitions subject to random modulations in frequency. The combined results suggest that the observed heterogeneity arises due to static and dynamic variations in the local molecular environment. This approach thus provides real-space and real-time visualization of the subensemble dynamics that define the properties of many functional materials. PMID:26528865

  11. Nonholonomic Hamiltonian Method for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Reacting Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric; Bass, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Conventional molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks employ a holonomic Hamiltonian formulation: the breaking and forming of covalent bonds is described by potential functions. In general these potential functions: (a) are algebraically complex, (b) must satisfy strict smoothness requirements, and (c) contain many fitted parameters. In recent research the authors have developed a new noholonomic formulation of reacting molecular dynamics. In this formulation bond orders are determined by rate equations and the bonding-debonding process need not be described by differentiable functions. This simplifies the representation of complex chemistry and reduces the number of fitted model parameters. Example applications of the method show molecular level shock to detonation simulations in nitromethane and RDX. Research supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  12. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors.

    PubMed

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable 'gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the 'gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules. PMID:26160223

  13. Diversity dynamics: molecular phylogenies need the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Quental, Tiago B; Marshall, Charles R

    2010-08-01

    Over the last two decades, new tools in the analysis of molecular phylogenies have enabled study of the diversification dynamics of living clades in the absence of information about extinct lineages. However, computer simulations and the fossil record show that the inability to access extinct lineages severely limits the inferences that can be drawn from molecular phylogenies. It appears that molecular phylogenies can tell us only when there have been changes in diversification rates, but are blind to the true diversity trajectories and rates of origination and extinction that have led to the species that are alive today. We need to embrace the fossil record if we want to fully understand the diversity dynamics of the living biota. PMID:20646780

  14. A dynamic data structure for flexible molecular maintenance and informatics

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Chowdhury, Rezaul Alam; Rasheed, Muhibur

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: We present the ‘Dynamic Packing Grid’ (DPG), a neighborhood data structure for maintaining and manipulating flexible molecules and assemblies, for efficient computation of binding affinities in drug design or in molecular dynamics calculations. Results: DPG can efficiently maintain the molecular surface using only linear space and supports quasi-constant time insertion, deletion and movement (i.e. updates) of atoms or groups of atoms. DPG also supports constant time neighborhood queries from arbitrary points. Our results for maintenance of molecular surface and polarization energy computations using DPG exhibit marked improvement in time and space requirements. Availability: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~bajaj/cvc/software/DPG.shtml Contact: bajaj@cs.utexas.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21115440

  15. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable `gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the `gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules.

  16. Rational Prediction with Molecular Dynamics for Hit Identification

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sara E; Swift, Robert V; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Although the motions of proteins are fundamental for their function, for pragmatic reasons, the consideration of protein elasticity has traditionally been neglected in drug discovery and design. This review details protein motion, its relevance to biomolecular interactions and how it can be sampled using molecular dynamics simulations. Within this context, two major areas of research in structure-based prediction that can benefit from considering protein flexibility, binding site detection and molecular docking, are discussed. Basic classification metrics and statistical analysis techniques, which can facilitate performance analysis, are also reviewed. With hardware and software advances, molecular dynamics in combination with traditional structure-based prediction methods can potentially reduce the time and costs involved in the hit identification pipeline. PMID:23110535

  17. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  18. Metal cluster structures and properties from Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Calaminici, Patrizia Köster, Andreas M. Vásquez-Pérez, José Manuel Martínez, Gabriel Ulises Gamboa

    2015-01-22

    Density functional theory (DFT) Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of metal clusters are presented. The calculations have been performed with the deMon2k [1] code employing all-electron basis sets and local and non-local functionals. The capability to perform reasonable long (∼ 100 ps) first-principle BOMD simulations in order to explore potential energy landscape of metallic clusters will be presented [2,3]. The evolution of the cluster structures and properties, such as polarizability and heat capacity, with temperature is discussed.

  19. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics/molecular

  20. Electric field control of proton-transfer molecular switching: molecular dynamics study on salicylidene aniline.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Joanna; Sadlej, Joanna; Sobolewski, Andrzej L

    2015-06-14

    In this letter, we propose a novel, ultrafast, efficient molecular switch whose switching mechanism involves the electric field-driven intramolecular proton transfer. By means of ab initio quantum chemical calculations and on-the-fly dynamics simulations, we examine the switching performance of an isolated salicylidene aniline molecule and analyze the perspectives of its possible use as an electric field-controlled molecular electronics unit. PMID:25986469

  1. Multiscale equation-free algorithms for molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Mansour, Andrew

    Molecular dynamics is a physics-based computational tool that has been widely employed to study the dynamics and structure of macromolecules and their assemblies at the atomic scale. However, the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulation is limited because of the broad spectrum of timescales involved. To overcome this limitation, an equation-free algorithm is presented for simulating these systems using a multiscale model cast in terms of atomistic and coarse-grained variables. Both variables are evolved in time in such a way that the cross-talk between short and long scales is preserved. In this way, the coarse-grained variables guide the evolution of the atom-resolved states, while the latter provide the Newtonian physics for the former. While the atomistic variables are evolved using short molecular dynamics runs, time advancement at the coarse-grained level is achieved with a scheme that uses information from past and future states of the system while accounting for both the stochastic and deterministic features of the coarse-grained dynamics. To complete the multiscale cycle, an atom-resolved state consistent with the updated coarse-grained variables is recovered using algorithms from mathematical optimization. This multiscale paradigm is extended to nanofluidics using concepts from hydrodynamics, and it is demonstrated for macromolecular and nanofluidic systems. A toolkit is developed for prototyping these algorithms, which are then implemented within the GROMACS simulation package and released as an open source multiscale simulator.

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics: concepts, recent developments, and future trends.

    PubMed

    Iftimie, Radu; Minary, Peter; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2005-05-10

    The methodology of ab initio molecular dynamics, wherein finite-temperature dynamical trajectories are generated by using forces computed "on the fly" from electronic structure calculations, has had a profound influence in modern theoretical research. Ab initio molecular dynamics allows chemical processes in condensed phases to be studied in an accurate and unbiased manner, leading to new paradigms in the elucidation of microscopic mechanisms, rationalization of experimental data, and testable predictions of new phenomena. The purpose of this work is to give a brief introduction to the technique and to review several important recent developments in the field. Several illustrative examples showing the power of the technique have been chosen. Perspectives on future directions in the field also will be given. PMID:15870204

  3. Emulating Molecular Orbitals and Electronic Dynamics with Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühmann, Dirk-Sören; Weitenberg, Christof; Sengstock, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, ultracold atoms in optical lattices have proven their great value as quantum simulators for studying strongly correlated phases and complex phenomena in solid-state systems. Here, we reveal their potential as quantum simulators for molecular physics and propose a technique to image the three-dimensional molecular orbitals with high resolution. The outstanding tunability of ultracold atoms in terms of potential and interaction offer fully adjustable model systems for gaining deep insight into the electronic structure of molecules. We study the orbitals of an artificial benzene molecule and discuss the effect of tunable interactions in its conjugated π electron system with special regard to localization and spin order. The dynamical time scales of ultracold atom simulators are on the order of milliseconds, which allows for the time-resolved monitoring of a broad range of dynamical processes. As an example, we compute the hole dynamics in the conjugated π system of the artificial benzene molecule.

  4. Drugs That Target Dynamic Microtubules: A New Molecular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Richard A.; Gernert, Kim M.; Nettles, James H.; Aneja, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules have long been considered an ideal target for anticancer drugs because of the essential role they play in mitosis, forming the dynamic spindle apparatus. As such, there is a wide variety of compounds currently in clinical use and in development that act as antimitotic agents by altering microtubule dynamics. Although these diverse molecules are known to affect microtubule dynamics upon binding to one of the three established drug domains (taxane, vinca alkaloid, or colchicine site), the exact mechanism by which each drug works is still an area of intense speculation and research. In this study, we review the effects of microtubule-binding chemotherapeutic agents from a new perspective, considering how their mode of binding induces conformational changes and alters biological function relative to the molecular vectors of microtubule assembly or disassembly. These “biological vectors” can thus be used as a spatiotemporal context to describe molecular mechanisms by which microtubule-targeting drugs work. PMID:21381049

  5. Multi-petaflop/s quantum and reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    We have developed a divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic framework for large quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations. The algorithms have achieved parallel efficiency over 0.98 on 786,432 IBM Blue Gene/Q processors for 39.8 trillion electronic degrees-of-freedom QMD in the framework of density functional theory and 67.6 billion-atom RMD. We will discuss several applications including (1) 16,616-atom QMD simulation of rapid hydrogen production from water using metallic alloy nanoparticles, (2) 6,400-atom nonadiabatic QMD simulation of exciton dynamics for efficient solar cells, and (3) 112 million-atom RMD simulation of nanocarbon synthesis by high temperature oxidation of SiC nanoparticles.

  6. Molecular codes for neuronal individuality and cell assembly in the brain.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The brain contains an enormous, but finite, number of neurons. The ability of this limited number of neurons to produce nearly limitless neural information over a lifetime is typically explained by combinatorial explosion; that is, by the exponential amplification of each neuron's contribution through its incorporation into "cell assemblies" and neural networks. In development, each neuron expresses diverse cellular recognition molecules that permit the formation of the appropriate neural cell assemblies to elicit various brain functions. The mechanism for generating neuronal assemblies and networks must involve molecular codes that give neurons individuality and allow them to recognize one another and join appropriate networks. The extensive molecular diversity of cell-surface proteins on neurons is likely to contribute to their individual identities. The clustered protocadherins (Pcdh) is a large subfamily within the diverse cadherin superfamily. The clustered Pcdh genes are encoded in tandem by three gene clusters, and are present in all known vertebrate genomes. The set of clustered Pcdh genes is expressed in a random and combinatorial manner in each neuron. In addition, cis-tetramers composed of heteromultimeric clustered Pcdh isoforms represent selective binding units for cell-cell interactions. Here I present the mathematical probabilities for neuronal individuality based on the random and combinatorial expression of clustered Pcdh isoforms and their formation of cis-tetramers in each neuron. Notably, clustered Pcdh gene products are known to play crucial roles in correct axonal projections, synaptic formation, and neuronal survival. Their molecular and biological features induce a hypothesis that the diverse clustered Pcdh molecules provide the molecular code by which neuronal individuality and cell assembly permit the combinatorial explosion of networks that supports enormous processing capability and plasticity of the brain. PMID:22518100

  7. Laser-enhanced dynamics in molecular rate processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present discussion deals with some theoretical aspects associated with the description of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation, where the radiation actually interacts with the molecular dynamics. Whereas for weak and even moderately intense radiation, the absorption and stimulated emission of photons by a molecular system can be described by perturbative methods, for intense radiation, perturbation theory is usually not adequate. Limiting the analysis to the gas phase, an attempt is made to describe nonperturbative approaches applicable to the description of such processes (in the presence of intense laser radiation) as electronic energy transfer in molecular (in particular atom-atom) collisions; collision-induced ionization and emission; and unimolecular dissociation.

  8. Molecular dynamics computer simulation of permeation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.I.; Heffelfinger, G.S.; Fisler, D.K.; Ford, D.M.

    1997-12-31

    In this work the authors simulate permeation of gases and cations in solid models using molecular mechanics and a dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics technique. The molecular sieving nature of microporous zeolites are discussed and compared with that for amorphous silica made by sol-gel methods. One mesoporous and one microporous membrane model are tested with Lennard-Jones gases corresponding to He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4}. The mesoporous membrane model clearly follows a Knudsen diffusion mechanism, while the microporous model having a hard-sphere cutoff pore diameter of {approximately}3.4 {angstrom} demonstrates molecular sieving of the methane ({sigma} = 3.8 {angstrom}) but anomalous behavior for Ar ({sigma} = 3.4 {angstrom}). Preliminary results of Ca{sup +} diffusion in calcite and He/H{sub 2} diffusion in polyisobutylene are also presented.

  9. A random rotor molecule: Vibrational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Shi, Xing-Qiang; Lin, Zijing; Van Hove, Michel A.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular structures that permit intramolecular rotational motion have the potential to function as molecular rotors. We have employed density functional theory and vibrational frequency analysis to study the characteristic structure and vibrational behavior of the molecule (4',4″″-(bicyclo[2,2,2]octane-1,4-diyldi-4,1-phenylene)-bis-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine. IR active vibrational modes were found that favor intramolecular rotation. To demonstrate the rotor behavior of the isolated single molecule, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures were carried out. This molecular rotor is expected to be thermally triggered via excitation of specific vibrational modes, which implies randomness in its direction of rotation.

  10. The SCEC-USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise - Recent Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R.

    2012-12-01

    We summarize recent progress by the SCEC-USGS Dynamic Rupture Code Verification Group, that examines if SCEC and USGS researchers' spontaneous-rupture computer codes agree when computing benchmark scenarios of dynamically propagating earthquake rupture. Our latest benchmarks have involved dynamic rupture propagating on planar vertical strike-slip faults with heterogeneous initial stress conditions and cases of dynamic rupture on branching vertical strike-slip faults. The heterogeneous initial stress cases produced good agreement among the codes and we are confident that this was a successful endeavor. The branching fault cases will be a focus of continued study because those results were not as successful as hoped. We are examining the reasons for this mismatch of the branching fault benchmark results, and have a number of ideas to explore. Our next benchmark exercises will continue with dynamic rupture on branching vertical strike-slip faults, until we obtain good matches among the code results. We will also investigate another fault geometry, the case of a stepover in a vertical strike-slip fault.

  11. Phantom of RAMSES (POR): A new Milgromian dynamicsN-body code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüghausen, Fabian; Famaey, Benoit; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    Since its first formulation in 1983, Milgromian dynamics (MOND) has been very successful in predicting the gravitational potential of galaxies from the distribution of baryons alone, including general scaling relations and detailed rotation curves of large statistical samples of individual galaxies covering a large range of masses and sizes. Most predictions however rely on static models, and only a handful of N-body codes have been developed over the years to investigate the consequences of the Milgromian framework for the dynamics of complex evolving dynamical systems. In this work, we present a new Milgromian N-body code, which is a customized version of the RAMSES code (Teyssier 2002) and thus comes with all its features: it includes particles and gas dynamics, and importantly allows for high spatial resolution of complex systems due to the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) technique. It further allows the direct comparison between Milgromian simulations and standard Newtonian simulations with dark matter particles. We provide basic tests of this customized code and demonstrate its performance by presenting N-body computations of dark-matter-free spherical equilibrium models as well as dark-matter-free disk galaxies in Milgromian dynamics.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code. Marine Hydrokinetic Module User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse D.

    2014-03-01

    This document describes the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) input file and subroutines for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC), which is a combined hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality model based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) developed by John Hamrick [1], formerly sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and now maintained by Tetra Tech, Inc. SNL-EFDC has been previously enhanced with the incorporation of the SEDZLJ sediment dynamics model developed by Ziegler, Lick, and Jones [2-4]. SNL-EFDC has also been upgraded to more accurately simulate algae growth with specific application to optimizing biomass in an open-channel raceway for biofuels production [5]. A detailed description of the input file containing data describing the MHK device/array is provided, along with a description of the MHK FORTRAN routine. Both a theoretical description of the MHK dynamics as incorporated into SNL-EFDC and an explanation of the source code are provided. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the original EFDC [6] and sediment dynamics SNL-EFDC manuals [7]. Through this document, the authors provide information for users who wish to model the effects of an MHK device (or array of devices) on a flow system with EFDC and who also seek a clear understanding of the source code, which is available from staff in the Water Power Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  13. Dynamic Divisive Normalization Predicts Time-Varying Value Coding in Decision-Related Circuits

    PubMed Central

    LoFaro, Thomas; Webb, Ryan; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Normalization is a widespread neural computation, mediating divisive gain control in sensory processing and implementing a context-dependent value code in decision-related frontal and parietal cortices. Although decision-making is a dynamic process with complex temporal characteristics, most models of normalization are time-independent and little is known about the dynamic interaction of normalization and choice. Here, we show that a simple differential equation model of normalization explains the characteristic phasic-sustained pattern of cortical decision activity and predicts specific normalization dynamics: value coding during initial transients, time-varying value modulation, and delayed onset of contextual information. Empirically, we observe these predicted dynamics in saccade-related neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex. Furthermore, such models naturally incorporate a time-weighted average of past activity, implementing an intrinsic reference-dependence in value coding. These results suggest that a single network mechanism can explain both transient and sustained decision activity, emphasizing the importance of a dynamic view of normalization in neural coding. PMID:25429145

  14. Dynamic divisive normalization predicts time-varying value coding in decision-related circuits.

    PubMed

    Louie, Kenway; LoFaro, Thomas; Webb, Ryan; Glimcher, Paul W

    2014-11-26

    Normalization is a widespread neural computation, mediating divisive gain control in sensory processing and implementing a context-dependent value code in decision-related frontal and parietal cortices. Although decision-making is a dynamic process with complex temporal characteristics, most models of normalization are time-independent and little is known about the dynamic interaction of normalization and choice. Here, we show that a simple differential equation model of normalization explains the characteristic phasic-sustained pattern of cortical decision activity and predicts specific normalization dynamics: value coding during initial transients, time-varying value modulation, and delayed onset of contextual information. Empirically, we observe these predicted dynamics in saccade-related neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex. Furthermore, such models naturally incorporate a time-weighted average of past activity, implementing an intrinsic reference-dependence in value coding. These results suggest that a single network mechanism can explain both transient and sustained decision activity, emphasizing the importance of a dynamic view of normalization in neural coding. PMID:25429145

  15. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  16. A proposed methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification, calibration, and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschliman, D. P.; Oberkampf, W. L.; Blottner, F. G.

    Verification, calibration, and validation (VCV) of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. The exact manner in which code VCV activities are planned and conducted, however, is critically important. It is suggested that the way in which code validation, in particular, is often conducted--by comparison to published experimental data obtained for other purposes--is in general difficult and unsatisfactory, and that a different approach is required. This paper describes a proposed methodology for CFD code VCV that meets the technical requirements and is philosophically consistent with code development needs. The proposed methodology stresses teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the VCV process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. A novel approach to uncertainty analysis is described which can both distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error, and whose attributes are used to help define an appropriate experimental design for code VCV experiments. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow over a sliced sphere/cone of varying geometrical complexity.

  17. Impact of dynamic rate coding aspects of mobile phone networks on forensic voice comparison.

    PubMed

    Alzqhoul, Esam A S; Nair, Balamurali B T; Guillemin, Bernard J

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that landline and mobile phone networks are different in their ways of handling the speech signal, and therefore in their impact on it. But the same is also true of the different networks within the mobile phone arena. There are two major mobile phone technologies currently in use today, namely the global system for mobile communications (GSM) and code division multiple access (CDMA) and these are fundamentally different in their design. For example, the quality of the coded speech in the GSM network is a function of channel quality, whereas in the CDMA network it is determined by channel capacity (i.e., the number of users sharing a cell site). This paper examines the impact on the speech signal of a key feature of these networks, namely dynamic rate coding, and its subsequent impact on the task of likelihood-ratio-based forensic voice comparison (FVC). Surprisingly, both FVC accuracy and precision are found to be better for both GSM- and CDMA-coded speech than for uncoded. Intuitively one expects FVC accuracy to increase with increasing coded speech quality. This trend is shown to occur for the CDMA network, but, surprisingly, not for the GSM network. Further, in respect to comparisons between these two networks, FVC accuracy for CDMA-coded speech is shown to be slightly better than for GSM-coded speech, particularly when the coded-speech quality is high, but in terms of FVC precision the two networks are shown to be very similar. PMID:26385720

  18. A proposed methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification, calibration, and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1995-07-01

    Verification, calibration, and validation (VCV) of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. The exact manner in which code VCV activities are planned and conducted, however, is critically important. It is suggested that the way in which code validation, in particular, is often conducted--by comparison to published experimental data obtained for other purposes--is in general difficult and unsatisfactory, and that a different approach is required. This paper describes a proposed methodology for CFD code VCV that meets the technical requirements and is philosophically consistent with code development needs. The proposed methodology stresses teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the VCV process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. A novel approach to uncertainty analysis is described which can both distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error, and whose attributes are used to help define an appropriate experimental design for code VCV experiments. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow over a sliced sphere/cone of varying geometrical complexity.

  19. Special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Fernando; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi; Vrakking, Marc

    2014-06-01

    In the last few years, the advent of novel experimental and theoretical approaches has made possible the investigation of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics in ways not anticipated before. Experimentally, the introduction of novel light sources such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and XUV/x-ray free electron lasers, and the emergence of novel detection strategies, such as time-resolved electron/x-ray diffraction and the fully coincident detection of electrons and fragment ions in reaction microscopes, has significantly expanded the arsenal of available techniques, and has taken studies of molecular dynamics into new domains of spectroscopic, spatial and temporal resolution, the latter including first explorations into the attosecond domain, thus opening completely new avenues for imaging electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules. Along the way, particular types of molecular dynamics, e.g., dynamics around conical intersections, have gained an increased prominence, sparked by the realization of the essential role that this dynamics plays in relaxation pathways in important bio-molecular systems. In the short term, this will allow one to uncover and control the dynamics of elementary chemical processes such as, e.g., ultrafast charge migration, proton transfer, isomerization or multiple ionization, and to address new key questions about the role of attosecond coherent electron dynamics in chemical reactivity. The progress on the theoretical side has been no less impressive. Novel generations of supercomputers and a series of novel computational strategies have allowed nearly exact calculations in small molecules, as well as highly successful approximate calculations in large, polyatomic molecules, including biomolecules. Frequent and intensive collaborations involving both theory and experiment have been essential for the progress that has been accomplished. The special issue 'Ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics' seeks to provide an overview of the current

  20. High-resolution, high sensitivity detectors for molecular imaging with radionuclides: The coded aperture option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusanno, F.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lo Meo, S.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Santavenere, F.; Lanza, R. C.; Majewski, S.; Cinti, M. N.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Orsini Cancelli, V.; De Notaristefani, F.; Bollini, D.; Navarria, F.; Moschini, G.

    2006-12-01

    Molecular imaging with radionuclides is a very sensitive technique because it allows to obtain images with nanomolar or picomolar concentrations. This has generated a rapid growth of interest in radionuclide imaging of small animals. Indeed radiolabeling of small molecules, antibodies, peptides and probes for gene expression enables molecular imaging in vivo, but only if a suitable imaging system is used. Detecting small tumors in humans is another important application of such techniques. In single gamma imaging, there is always a well known tradeoff between spatial resolution and sensitivity due to unavoidable collimation requirements. Limitation of the sensitivity due to collimation is well known and affects the performance of imaging systems, especially if only radiopharmaceuticals with limited uptake are available. In many cases coded aperture collimation can provide a solution, if the near field artifact effect can be eliminated or limited. At least this is the case for "small volumes" imaging, involving small animals. In this paper 3D-laminography simulations and preliminary measurements with coded aperture collimation are presented. Different masks have been designed for different applications showing the advantages of the technique in terms of sensitivity and spatial resolution. The limitations of the technique are also discussed.

  1. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  2. A colorful origin for the genetic code: information theory, statistical mechanics and the emergence of molecular codes.

    PubMed

    Tlusty, Tsvi

    2010-09-01

    The genetic code maps the sixty-four nucleotide triplets (codons) to twenty amino-acids. While the biochemical details of this code were unraveled long ago, its origin is still obscure. We review information-theoretic approaches to the problem of the code's origin and discuss the results of a recent work that treats the code in terms of an evolving, error-prone information channel. Our model - which utilizes the rate-distortion theory of noisy communication channels - suggests that the genetic code originated as a result of the interplay of the three conflicting evolutionary forces: the needs for diverse amino-acids, for error-tolerance and for minimal cost of resources. The description of the code as an information channel allows us to mathematically identify the fitness of the code and locate its emergence at a second-order phase transition when the mapping of codons to amino-acids becomes nonrandom. The noise in the channel brings about an error-graph, in which edges connect codons that are likely to be confused. The emergence of the code is governed by the topology of the error-graph, which determines the lowest modes of the graph-Laplacian and is related to the map coloring problem. PMID:20558115

  3. A Molecular Bar-Coded DNA Repair Resource for Pooled Toxicogenomic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, John P.; Patil, Ashish; Zappala, Maria R.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Cunningham, Richard P.; Begley, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage from exogenous and endogenous sources can promote mutations and cell death. Fortunately, cells contain DNA repair and damage signalling pathways to reduce the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of DNA damage. The identification of specific DNA repair proteins and the coordination of DNA repair pathways after damage has been a central theme to the field of Genetic Toxicology and we have developed a tool for use in this area. We have produced 99 molecular bar-coded Escherichia coli gene-deletion mutants specific to DNA repair and damage signalling pathways, and each bar-coded mutant can be tracked in pooled format using bar-code specific microarrays. Our design adapted bar-codes developed for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gene Deletion Project, which allowed us to utilize an available microarray product for pooled gene-exposure studies. Microarray-based screens were used for en masse identification of individual mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). As expected, gene deletion mutants specific to direct, base excision, and recombinational DNA repair pathways were identified as MMS-sensitive in our pooled assay, thus validating our resource. We have demonstrated that molecular bar-codes designed for S. cerevisiae are transferable to E. coli, and that they can be used with pre-existing microarrays to perform competitive growth experiments. Further, when comparing microarray to traditional plate-based screens both over-lapping and distinct results were obtained, which is a novel technical finding, with discrepancies between the two approaches explained by differences in output measurements (DNA content verse cell mass). The microarray-based classification of Δtag and ΔdinG cells as depleted after MMS exposure, contrary to plate-based methods, led to the discovery that Δtag and ΔdinG cells show a filamentation phenotype after MMS exposure, thus accounting for the discrepancy. A novel biological finding is the observation that while ΔdinG cells

  4. Parallelizing a molecular dynamics algorithm on a multiprocessor workstation using OpenMP.

    PubMed

    Tarmyshov, Konstantin B; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2005-01-01

    The atomistic molecular dynamics program YASP has been parallelized for shared-memory computer architectures. Parallelization was restricted to the most CPU-time-consuming parts: neighbor-list construction, calculation of nonbonded, angle and dihedral forces, and constraints. Most of the sequential FORTRAN code was kept; parallel constructs were inserted as compiler directives using the OpenMP standard. Only in the case of the neighbor list did the data structure have to be changed. The parallel code achieves a useful speedup over the sequential version for systems of several thousand atoms and above. On an IBM Regatta p690+, the throughput increases with the number of processors up to a maximum of 12-16 processors depending on the characteristics of the simulated systems. On dual-processor Xeon systems, the speedup is about 1.7. PMID:16309301

  5. A reduced basis method for molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent-Finley, Rachel Elisabeth

    In this dissertation, we develop a method for molecular simulation based on principal component analysis (PCA) of a molecular dynamics trajectory and least squares approximation of a potential energy function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a computational tool used to study molecular systems as they evolve through time. With respect to protein dynamics, local motions, such as bond stretching, occur within femtoseconds, while rigid body and large-scale motions, occur within a range of nanoseconds to seconds. To capture motion at all levels, time steps on the order of a femtosecond are employed when solving the equations of motion and simulations must continue long enough to capture the desired large-scale motion. To date, simulations of solvated proteins on the order of nanoseconds have been reported. It is typically the case that simulations of a few nanoseconds do not provide adequate information for the study of large-scale motions. Thus, the development of techniques that allow longer simulation times can advance the study of protein function and dynamics. In this dissertation we use principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the dominant characteristics of an MD trajectory and to represent the coordinates with respect to these characteristics. We augment PCA with an updating scheme based on a reduced representation of a molecule and consider equations of motion with respect to the reduced representation. We apply our method to butane and BPTI and compare the results to standard MD simulations of these molecules. Our results indicate that the molecular activity with respect to our simulation method is analogous to that observed in the standard MD simulation with simulations on the order of picoseconds.

  6. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  7. Benchmark of the IMPACT Code for High Intensity Beam DynamicsSimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.

    2006-11-16

    , an envelope matching and analysis code, and a number of pre- and post-processing codes were also developed to form the IMPACT code suite. The IMPACT code suite has been used to study beam dynamics in the SNS linac, the J-PARC linac commissioning, the CERN superconducting linac design, the Los Alamos Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) halo experiment, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac design, and the FERMI{at}Elettra FEL linac design [3-8]. It has also been used to study space-charge resonance in anisotropic beams [9-11].

  8. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  9. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  10. Structural, dynamic, and electrostatic properties of fully hydrated DMPC bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations accelerated with graphical processing units (GPUs).

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Narayan; Bauer, Brad A; Lucas, Timothy R; Patel, Sandeep; Taufer, Michela

    2011-11-15

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of fully hydrated DMPC bilayers performed on graphics processing units (GPUs) using current state-of-the-art non-polarizable force fields and a local GPU-enabled molecular dynamics code named FEN ZI. We treat the conditionally convergent electrostatic interaction energy exactly using the particle mesh Ewald method (PME) for solution of Poisson's Equation for the electrostatic potential under periodic boundary conditions. We discuss elements of our implementation of the PME algorithm on GPUs as well as pertinent performance issues. We proceed to show results of simulations of extended lipid bilayer systems using our program, FEN ZI. We performed simulations of DMPC bilayer systems consisting of 17,004, 68,484, and 273,936 atoms in explicit solvent. We present bilayer structural properties (atomic number densities, electron density profiles), deuterium order parameters (S(CD)), electrostatic properties (dipole potential, water dipole moments), and orientational properties of water. Predicted properties demonstrate excellent agreement with experiment and previous all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We observe no statistically significant differences in calculated structural or electrostatic properties for different system sizes, suggesting the small bilayer simulations (less than 100 lipid molecules) provide equivalent representation of structural and electrostatic properties associated with significantly larger systems (over 1000 lipid molecules). We stress that the three system size representations will have differences in other properties such as surface capillary wave dynamics or surface tension related effects that are not probed in the current study. The latter properties are inherently dependent on system size. This contribution suggests the suitability of applying emerging GPU technologies to studies of an important class of biological environments, that of lipid bilayers and their associated integral

  11. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  12. Visual TSUNAMI: A Versatile, User-Friendly, Multidimensional Ablation and Gas-Dynamics Design Code

    SciTech Connect

    Debonnel, C.S.; Wang, T.X.; Suzuki, M.; Garcia, E.; Peterson, P.F.

    2005-05-15

    Gas dynamics phenomena in thick-liquid protected inertial fusion target chambers have been explored since the early 1990's with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. The code has been recently redesigned entirely to make use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers, while expanding its capability to a larger variety of systems. The new code is named 'Visual Tsunami' to emphasize the programming language of its core, Fortran 95, as well as its graphics-based input file builder and output processors. It is aimed at providing a user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role.

  13. Inlet-Compressor Analysis Performed Using Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Gary L.; Suresh, Ambady; Townsend, Scott

    1999-01-01

    A thorough understanding of dynamic interactions between inlets and compressors is extremely important to the design and development of propulsion control systems, particularly for supersonic aircraft such as the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are routinely used to analyze individual propulsion components. By coupling the appropriate CFD component codes, it is possible to investigate inlet-compressor interactions. The objectives of this work were to gain a better understanding of inlet-compressor interaction physics, formulate a more realistic compressor-face boundary condition for time-accurate CFD simulations of inlets, and to take a first step toward the CFD simulation of an entire engine by coupling multidimensional component codes. This work was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center by a team of civil servants and support service contractors as part of the High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP).

  14. Accelerating ring-polymer molecular dynamics with parallel-replica dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Yaung; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F

    2016-06-28

    Nuclear quantum effects are important for systems containing light elements, and the effects are more prominent in the low temperature regime where the dynamics also becomes sluggish. We show that parallel replica (ParRep) dynamics, an accelerated molecular dynamics approach for infrequent-event systems, can be effectively combined with ring-polymer molecular dynamics, a semiclassical trajectory approach that gives a good approximation to zero-point and tunneling effects in activated escape processes. The resulting RP-ParRep method is a powerful tool for reaching long time scales in complex infrequent-event systems where quantum dynamics are important. Two illustrative examples, symmetric Eckart barrier crossing and interstitial helium diffusion in Fe and Fe-Cr alloy, are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and long-time scale capability of this approach. PMID:27369499

  15. Accelerating ring-polymer molecular dynamics with parallel-replica dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-Yaung; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear quantum effects are important for systems containing light elements, and the effects are more prominent in the low temperature regime where the dynamics also becomes sluggish. We show that parallel replica (ParRep) dynamics, an accelerated molecular dynamics approach for infrequent-event systems, can be effectively combined with ring-polymer molecular dynamics, a semiclassical trajectory approach that gives a good approximation to zero-point and tunneling effects in activated escape processes. The resulting RP-ParRep method is a powerful tool for reaching long time scales in complex infrequent-event systems where quantum dynamics are important. Two illustrative examples, symmetric Eckart barrier crossing and interstitial helium diffusion in Fe and Fe-Cr alloy, are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and long-time scale capability of this approach.

  16. Concise NMR approach for molecular dynamics characterizations in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Courtier-Murias, Denis

    2013-08-22

    Molecular dynamics characterisations in solids can be carried out selectively using dipolar-dephasing experiments. Here we show that the introduction of a sum of Lorentzian and Gaussian functions greatly improve fittings of the "intensity versus time" data for protonated carbons in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The Lorentzian term accounts for remote intra- and intermolecular (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions, which vary from one molecule to another or for different carbons within the same molecule. Thus, by separating contributions from weak remote interactions, more accurate Gaussian decay constants, T(dd), can be extracted for directly bonded (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions. Reorientations of the (1)H-(13)C bonds lead to the increase of T(dd), and by measuring dipolar-dephasing constants, insight can be gained into dynamics in solids. We have demonstrated advantages of the method using comparative dynamics studies in the α and γ polymorphs of glycine, cyclic amino acids L-proline, DL-proline and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, the Ala residue in different dipeptides, as well as adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. It was possible to distinguish subtle differences in dynamics of different carbon sites within a molecule in polymorphs and in L- and DL-forms. The presence of overall molecular motions is shown to lead to particularly large differences in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The differences in dynamics can be attributed to differences in noncovalent interactions. In the case of hexamethylenetetramine, for example, the presence of C-H···N interactions leads to nearly rigid molecules. Overall, the method allows one to gain insight into the role of noncovalent interactions in solids and their influence on the molecular dynamics. PMID:23879450

  17. Dynamic jamming effects on code synchronization of frequency-hop spread-spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grouw, M. G.; Wickert, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    A general scheme for the code synchronization of Frequency-Hop Spread-Spectrum (FHSS) is presented. Synchronization performance is observed in the presence of channel dynamics and is characterized by mean synchronization time and mean time to loss of lock. A fixed-threshold multiple-dwell synchronization scheme is shown to adequately mitigate the effects of random hop jamming.

  18. AN EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS OF THREE DYNAMIC WATERSHED ACIDIFICATION CODES (MAGIC, ETD, AND ILWAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently using the dynamic watershed acidification codes MAGIC, ILWAS, and ETD to assess the potential future impact of acidic deposition on surface water quality by simulating watershed acid neutralization processes. The reliability o...

  19. Pseudo generators for under-resolved molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittracher, A.; Hartmann, C.; Junge, O.; Koltai, P.

    2015-09-01

    Many features of a molecule which are of physical interest (e.g. molecular conformations, reaction rates) are described in terms of its dynamics in configuration space. This article deals with the projection of molecular dynamics in phase space onto configuration space. Specifically, we study the situation that the phase space dynamics is governed by a stochastic Langevin equation and study its relation with the configurational Smoluchowski equation in the three different scaling regimes: Firstly, the Smoluchowski equations in non-Cartesian geometries are derived from the overdamped limit of the Langevin equation. Secondly, transfer operator methods are used to describe the metastable behaviour of the system at hand, and an explicit small-time asymptotics is derived on which the Smoluchowski equation turns out to govern the dynamics of the position coordinate (without any assumptions on the damping). By using an adequate reduction technique, these considerations are then extended to one-dimensional reaction coordinates. Thirdly, we sketch three different approaches to approximate the metastable dynamics based on time-local information only.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : sediment transport user manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Thanh, Phi Hung X.; James, Scott Carlton

    2008-09-01

    This document describes the sediment transport subroutines and input files for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC). Detailed descriptions of the input files containing data from Sediment Erosion at Depth flume (SEDflume) measurements are provided along with the description of the source code implementing sediment transport. Both the theoretical description of sediment transport employed in SNL-EFDC and the source code are described. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the EFDC manual (Hamrick 1996) because there will be no reference to the hydrodynamics in EFDC. Through this document, the authors aim to provide the necessary information for new users who wish to implement sediment transport in EFDC and obtain a clear understanding of the source code.

  1. Validation of a plant dynamics code for 4S - Test analysis of natural circulation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sebe, F.; Horie, H.; Matsumiya, H.; Fanning, T. H.

    2012-07-01

    A plant transient dynamics code for a sodium-cooled fast reactor was developed by Toshiba. The code is used to evaluate the safety performance of Super-Safe, Small, and Simple reactor (4S) for Anticipated Operational Occurrences (AOOs), Design Basis Accident (DBA) and Beyond DBA (BDBA). The code is currently undergoing verification and validation (V and V). As one of the validation, test analysis of the Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)-17 performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II was conducted. The SHRT-17 is protected loss of flow test. The purpose of this validation is to confirm capability of the code to simulate natural circulation behavior of the plant. As a result, good agreements are shown between the analytical results and the measured data which were available from instrumented subassembly. The detailed validation result of the natural circulation behavior is described in this paper. (authors)

  2. Analysis of motion features for molecular dynamics simulation of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Mayumi; Toda, Mikito; Sekijima, Masakazu; Takata, Masami; Joe, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a new method for time series analysis using the wavelet transformation has been proposed by Sakurai et al. We apply it to molecular dynamics simulation of Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase (TLL). Introducing indexes to characterize collective motion of the protein, we have obtained the following two results. First, time evolution of the collective motion involves not only the dynamics within a single potential well but also takes place wandering around multiple conformations. Second, correlation of the collective motion between secondary structures shows that collective motion exists involving multiple secondary structures. We discuss future prospects of our study involving 'disordered proteins'.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  4. Finite Temperature Quasicontinuum: Molecular Dynamics without all the Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, L; Tadmor, E B; Miller, R E; Phillips, R

    2005-02-02

    Using a combination of statistical mechanics and finite-element interpolation, the authors develop a coarse-grained (CG) alternative to molecular dynamics (MD) for crystalline solids at constant temperature. The new approach is significantly more efficient than MD and generalizes earlier work on the quasi-continuum method. The method is validated by recovering equilibrium properties of single crystal Ni as a function of temperature. CG dynamical simulations of nanoindentation reveal a strong dependence on temperature of the critical stress to nucleate dislocations under the indenter.

  5. Application of two dimensional periodic molecular dynamics to interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, David H.; Slater, Ben; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1997-08-01

    We have applied two-dimensional molecular dynamics to the surface of a crystalline aspartame and the interface between the crystal face and a solvent (water). This has allowed us to look at the dynamic processes at the surface. Understanding the surface structure and properties are important to controlling the crystal morphology. The thermodynamic ensemble was constant Number, surface Area and Temperature (NAT). The calculations have been carried out using a 2D Ewald summation and 2D periodic boundary conditions for the short range potentials. The equations of motion integration has been carried out using the standard velocity Verlet algorithm.

  6. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  7. Molecular dynamics and the phase transition in solid C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, R.; Dabbagh, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Haddon, R. C.; Makhija, A. V.; Zahurak, S. M.

    1991-09-01

    The molecular reorientational dynamics in two phases of solid C60 with C-13 NMR measurements are characterized. A change in the nature of the dynamics, indicated by a change in kinetic parameters extracted from spin-lattice relaxation data, occurs at the phase transition at 260 K. Above the transition, the molecules appear to execute continuous rotational diffusion; below the transition, they appear to jump between symmetry-equivalent orientations. This interpretation is consistent with the X-ray-diffraction results of Heiney et al. (1991) as well as the NMR relaxation and spectral data.

  8. Molecular Dynamics and Electron Density Studies of Siderophores and Peptides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, Krzysztof Andrzej

    1990-08-01

    The dissertation comprises three separate studies of siderophores and peptides. In the first of these studies the relative potential energies for a series of diastereomers of a siderophore neocoprogen I are evaluated with molecular mechanics force field methods. Charges on the hydroxamate moiety are determined with a synthetic model siderophore compound using valence population refinements, and alternatively, with the theoretical ab initio/ESP calculations. The single diastereomer found in the crystal structure is among four characterized by the low potential energy, while prevalence of Delta vs. Lambda configuration about the iron is found to be a property of the entire series. In the second study the crystal structure of a ferrichrome siderophore ferrirhodin is reported. The crystal structure conformation of the molecular backbone as well as the iron coordination geometry compare well with other ferrichrome structures. The differences between the acyl groups of ferrirubin and ferrirhodin are explored using the methods of molecular mechanics. The third study a 300 ps, 300 K, in vacuo molecular dynamics simulation of didemnin A and B yields distinct molecular conformers, which are different from the one found in the crystal structure or modeled in solution, using the Nuclear Overhauser Effect data. Evaluations of the relative potential energy are performed with short 10 ps simulations in solution. Didemnins are natural depsipeptides isolated from a Caribbean tunicate and characterized by particularly potent antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activity. Conformationally rigid and flexible regions of the molecule are described. A short review of the molecular mechanics methodology is given in the introduction.

  9. Visual verification and analysis of cluster detection for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grottel, Sebastian; Reina, Guido; Vrabec, Jadran; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A current research topic in molecular thermodynamics is the condensation of vapor to liquid and the investigation of this process at the molecular level. Condensation is found in many physical phenomena, e.g. the formation of atmospheric clouds or the processes inside steam turbines, where a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of condensation processes will help to optimize energy efficiency and avoid problems with droplets of macroscopic size. The key properties of these processes are the nucleation rate and the critical cluster size. For the calculation of these properties it is essential to make use of a meaningful definition of molecular clusters, which currently is a not completely resolved issue. In this paper a framework capable of interactively visualizing molecular datasets of such nucleation simulations is presented, with an emphasis on the detected molecular clusters. To check the quality of the results of the cluster detection, our framework introduces the concept of flow groups to highlight potential cluster evolution over time which is not detected by the employed algorithm. To confirm the findings of the visual analysis, we coupled the rendering view with a schematic view of the clusters' evolution. This allows to rapidly assess the quality of the molecular cluster detection algorithm and to identify locations in the simulation data in space as well as in time where the cluster detection fails. Thus, thermodynamics researchers can eliminate weaknesses in their cluster detection algorithms. Several examples for the effective and efficient usage of our tool are presented. PMID:17968118

  10. IllinoisGRMHD: an open-source, user-friendly GRMHD code for dynamical spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah B.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Haas, Roland; Mösta, Philipp; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2015-09-01

    In the extreme violence of merger and mass accretion, compact objects like black holes and neutron stars are thought to launch some of the most luminous outbursts of electromagnetic and gravitational wave energy in the Universe. Modeling these systems realistically is a central problem in theoretical astrophysics, but has proven extremely challenging, requiring the development of numerical relativity codes that solve Einstein's equations for the spacetime, coupled to the equations of general relativistic (ideal) magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) for the magnetized fluids. Over the past decade, the Illinois numerical relativity (ILNR) group's dynamical spacetime GRMHD code has proven itself as a robust and reliable tool for theoretical modeling of such GRMHD phenomena. However, the code was written ‘by experts and for experts’ of the code, with a steep learning curve that would severely hinder community adoption if it were open-sourced. Here we present IllinoisGRMHD, which is an open-source, highly extensible rewrite of the original closed-source GRMHD code of the ILNR group. Reducing the learning curve was the primary focus of this rewrite, with the goal of facilitating community involvement in the code's use and development, as well as the minimization of human effort in generating new science. IllinoisGRMHD also saves computer time, generating roundoff-precision identical output to the original code on adaptive-mesh grids, but nearly twice as fast at scales of hundreds to thousands of cores.

  11. A proposed framework for computational fluid dynamics code calibration/validation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.

    1993-12-31

    The paper reviews the terminology and methodology that have been introduced during the last several years for building confidence n the predictions from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CID) codes. Code validation terminology developed for nuclear reactor analyses and aerospace applications is reviewed and evaluated. Currently used terminology such as ``calibrated code,`` ``validated code,`` and a ``validation experiment`` is discussed along with the shortcomings and criticisms of these terms. A new framework is proposed for building confidence in CFD code predictions that overcomes some of the difficulties of past procedures and delineates the causes of uncertainty in CFD predictions. Building on previous work, new definitions of code verification and calibration are proposed. These definitions provide more specific requirements for the knowledge level of the flow physics involved and the solution accuracy of the given partial differential equations. As part of the proposed framework, categories are also proposed for flow physics research, flow modeling research, and the application of numerical predictions. The contributions of physical experiments, analytical solutions, and other numerical solutions are discussed, showing that each should be designed to achieve a distinctively separate purpose in building confidence in accuracy of CFD predictions. A number of examples are given for each approach to suggest methods for obtaining the highest value for CFD code quality assurance.

  12. Analysis and compensation for code Doppler effect of BDS II signal under high dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Fangling

    2016-01-01

    In high dynamic circumstances, the acquisition of BDS (BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) signal would be affected by the pseudo-code Doppler. The pseudo-code frequency shift is more prominent and complex when BOC modulation has been adopted by BDS-II, but is not yet involved in current compensation algorithm. In addition, the most frequently used code Doppler compensation algorithm is modifying the sampling rate or local bit rate, which not only increases the complexity of the acquisition and tracking, but also is barely realizable for the hardware receiver to modify the local frequency. Therefore, this paper proposes a code Doppler compensation method based on double estimator receiver, which simultaneously controls NCO delay of code tracking loop and subcarrier tracking loop to compensate for pseudo-code frequency shift. The simulation and test are implemented with BDS-II BOC signal. The test results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively compensate for pseudo-code Doppler of BOC signal and has detection probability 3dB higher than the uncompensated situation when the false alarm rate is under 0.01 and the coherent integration time is 1ms.

  13. Extrapolated gradientlike algorithms for molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, I P

    2006-09-01

    A class of symplectic algorithms is introduced to integrate the equations of motion in many-body systems. The algorithms are derived on the basis of an advanced gradientlike decomposition approach. Its main advantage over the standard gradient scheme is the avoidance of time-consuming evaluations of force gradients by force extrapolation without any loss of precision. As a result, the efficiency of the integration improves significantly. The algorithms obtained are analyzed and optimized using an error-function theory. The best among them are tested in actual molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations for comparison with well-known nongradient and gradient algorithms such as the Störmer-Verlet, Runge-Kutta, Cowell-Numerov, Forest-Ruth, Suzuki-Chin, and others. It is demonstrated that for moderate and high accuracy, the extrapolated algorithms should be considered as the most efficient for the integration of motion in molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:17025782

  14. Human Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibitors: A Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Pinto, B. Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is an important enzyme in fermentative glycolysis, generating most energy for cancer cells that rely on anaerobic respiration even under normal oxygen concentrations. This renders LDHA a promising molecular target for the treatment of various cancers. Several efforts have been made recently to develop LDHA inhibitors with nanomolar inhibition and cellular activity, some of which have been studied in complex with the enzyme by X-ray crystallography. In this work, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) study of the binding interactions of selected ligands with human LDHA. Conventional MD simulations demonstrate different binding dynamics of inhibitors with similar binding affinities, whereas steered MD simulations yield discrimination of selected LDHA inhibitors with qualitative correlation between the in silico unbinding difficulty and the experimental binding strength. Further, our results have been used to clarify ambiguities in the binding modes of two well-known LDHA inhibitors. PMID:24466056

  15. Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myo, Takayuki; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Suhara, Tadahiro

    2015-07-01

    We develop a new formalism to treat nuclear many-body systems using the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It has become evident that the tensor interaction plays an important role in nuclear many-body systems due to the role of the pion in strongly interacting systems. We take the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) as a basic framework and add a tensor correlation operator acting on the AMD wave function using the concept of the tensor-optimized shell model. We demonstrate a systematical and straightforward formulation utilizing the Gaussian integration and differentiation method and the antisymmetrization technique to calculate all the matrix elements of the many-body Hamiltonian. We can include the three-body interaction naturally and calculate the matrix elements systematically in the progressive order of the tensor correlation operator. We call the new formalism "tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics".

  16. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  17. Annihilation of craters: Molecular dynamic simulations on a silver surface

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksson, K. O. E.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2007-12-15

    The ability of silver cluster ions containing 13 atoms to fill in a preexisting crater with a radius of about 28 A ring on a silver (001) target has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and the molecular-dynamics-Monte Carlo corrected effective medium potential. The largest lateral distance r between crater and ion was about three times the radius of the preexisting crater, namely, 75 A ring . The results reveal that when r<20 A ring and r>60 A ring the preexisting crater is partially filled in, and for other distances there is a net growth of the crater. The lattice damage created by the cluster ions, the total sputtering yield, the cluster sputtering yield, and simulated transmission electron microscopy images of the irradiated targets are also presented.

  18. An implicit divalent counterion force field for RNA molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Paul S.; Mak, Chi H.

    2016-03-01

    How to properly account for polyvalent counterions in a molecular dynamics simulation of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids remains an open question. Not only do counterions such as Mg2+ screen electrostatic interactions, they also produce attractive intrachain interactions that stabilize secondary and tertiary structures. Here, we show how a simple force field derived from a recently reported implicit counterion model can be integrated into a molecular dynamics simulation for RNAs to realistically reproduce key structural details of both single-stranded and base-paired RNA constructs. This divalent counterion model is computationally efficient. It works with existing atomistic force fields, or coarse-grained models may be tuned to work with it. We provide optimized parameters for a coarse-grained RNA model that takes advantage of this new counterion force field. Using the new model, we illustrate how the structural flexibility of RNA two-way junctions is modified under different salt conditions.

  19. Molecular dynamic simulation of non-melt laser annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liren, Yan; Dai, Li; Wei, Zhang; Zhihong, Liu; Wei, Zhou; Quan, Wang

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is performed to study the process of material annealing caused by a 266 nm pulsed laser. A micro-mechanism describing behaviors of silicon and impurity atoms during the laser annealing at a non-melt regime is proposed. After ion implantation, the surface of the Si wafer is acted by a high energy laser pulse, which loosens the material and partially frees both Si and impurity atoms. While the residual laser energy is absorbed by valence electrons, these atoms are recoiled and relocated to finally form a crystal. Energy-related movement behavior is observed by using the molecular dynamic method. The non-melt laser anneal appears to be quite sensitive to the energy density of the laser, as a small excess energy may causes a significant impurity diffusion. Such a result is also supported by our laser anneal experiment.

  20. Time series analysis of molecular dynamics simulation using wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Mikito

    2012-08-01

    A new method is presented to extract nonstationary features of slow collective motion toward time series data of molecular dynamics simulation for proteins. The method consists of the following two steps: (1) the wavelet transformation and (2) the singular value decomposition (SVD). The wavelet transformation enables us to characterize time varying features of oscillatory motions and SVD enables us to reduce the degrees of freedom of the movement. We apply the method to molecular dynamics simulation of various proteins such as Adenylate Kinase from Escherichia coli (AKE) and Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase (TLL). Moreover, we introduce indexes to characterize collective motion of proteins. These indexes provide us with information of nonstationary deformation of protein structures. We discuss future prospects of our study involving "intrinsically disordered proteins".

  1. Molecular dynamics studies of U1A-RNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, C M; Kollman, P A

    1999-01-01

    The U1A protein binds to a hairpin RNA and an internal-loop RNA with picomolar affinities. To probe the molecular basis of U1A binding, we performed state-of-the-art nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations on both complexes. The good agreement with experimental structures supports the protocols used in the simulations. We compare the dynamics, hydrogen-bonding occupancies, and interfacial flexibility of both complexes and also describe a rigid-body motion in the U1A-internal loop complex that is not observed in the U1A-hairpin simulation. We relate these observations to experimental mutational studies and highlight their significance in U1A binding affinity and specificity. PMID:10024175

  2. Coherent Amplification of Ultrafast Molecular Dynamics in an Optical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igal; Pe'er, Avi

    2016-02-01

    Optical oscillators present a powerful optimization mechanism. The inherent competition for the gain resources between possible modes of oscillation entails the prevalence of the most efficient single mode. We harness this "ultrafast" coherent feedback to optimize an optical field in time, and show that, when an optical oscillator based on a molecular gain medium is synchronously pumped by ultrashort pulses, a temporally coherent multimode field can develop that optimally dumps a general, dynamically evolving vibrational wave packet, into a single vibrational target state. Measuring the emitted field opens a new window to visualization and control of fast molecular dynamics. The realization of such a coherent oscillator with hot alkali dimers appears within experimental reach.

  3. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work. PMID:19449821

  4. Predicting Low Energy Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors using Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating dopant density profiles in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. Their scheme incorporates several necessary methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and pair specific screened Coulomb potentials. Accumulative damage is accounted for using a Kinchin-Pease type model, inelastic energy loss is represented by a Firsov expression, and electronic stopping is described by a modified Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains a single adjustable ion-target dependent parameter. Thus, the program is easily extensible beyond a given validation range, and is therefore truly predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy and to situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using the code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon and gallium-arsenide. Here they can predict the experimental profile over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  5. An Efficient Molecular Dynamics Scheme for Predicting Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1998-09-15

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating the concentration profile of dopants implanted in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. The program incorporates methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model, instead of the binary collision approximation (BCA) used in implant simulators such as TRIM and Marlowe, to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and screened Coulomb potentials. Inelastic energy loss is accounted for using a Firsov model, and electronic stopping is described by a Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains the single adjustable parameter for the entire scheme. Thus, the program is easily extensible to new ion-target combinations with the minimum of tuning, and is predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy, large angle implants, and for situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using their code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon, silicon-germanium blends, and gallium-arsenide. They can predict the experimental profiles over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  6. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  7. Complete Characterization of Molecular Dynamics in Ultrashort Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Feuerstein, B.; Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A.; Zrost, K.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Niederhausen, T.; Thumm, U.

    2007-10-12

    Reaction Microscope-based, complete, and time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging of vibrating and dissociating D{sub 2}{sup +} molecules with femtosecond time-resolution allowed us to perform an internuclear distance (R-)dependent Fourier analysis of the corresponding wave packets. Calculations demonstrate that the obtained two-dimensional R-dependent frequency spectra enable the complete characterization of the wave packet dynamics and directly visualize the field-modified molecular potential curves in intense, ultrashort laser pulses.

  8. Probing Molecular Dynamics at Attosecond Resolution with Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X. M.; Zhao, Z. X.; Lin, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    The kinetic energy distribution of D+ ions resulting from the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with D2 molecules is calculated based on the rescattering model. From analyzing the molecular dynamics, it is shown that the recollision time between the ionized electron and the D+2 ion can be read from the D+ kinetic energy peaks to attosecond accuracy. We further suggest that a more precise reading of the clock can be achieved by using shorter fs laser pulses (about 15fs).

  9. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  10. Quantum tunneling splittings from path-integral molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Edit; Wales, David J; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-21

    We illustrate how path-integral molecular dynamics can be used to calculate ground-state tunnelling splittings in molecules or clusters. The method obtains the splittings from ratios of density matrix elements between the degenerate wells connected by the tunnelling. We propose a simple thermodynamic integration scheme for evaluating these elements. Numerical tests on fully dimensional malonaldehyde yield tunnelling splittings in good overall agreement with the results of diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. PMID:27004863

  11. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1993-08-01

    Gingold, Lucy, and Monaghan invented a grid-free version of continuum mechanics ``smoothed-particle hydrodynamics,`` in 1977. It is a likely contributor to ``hybrid`` simulations combining atomistic and continuum simulations. We describe applications of this particle-based continuum technique from the closely-related standpoint of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We compare chaotic Lyapunov spectra for atomistic solids and fluids with those which characterize a two-dimensional smoothed-particle fluid system.

  12. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  13. Improving the performance of molecular dynamics simulations on parallel clusters.

    PubMed

    Borstnik, Urban; Hodoscek, Milan; Janezic, Dusanka

    2004-01-01

    In this article a procedure is derived to obtain a performance gain for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on existing parallel clusters. Parallel clusters use a wide array of interconnection technologies to connect multiple processors together, often at different speeds, such as multiple processor computers and networking. It is demonstrated how to configure existing programs for MD simulations to efficiently handle collective communication on parallel clusters with processor interconnections of different speeds. PMID:15032512

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide. PMID:26358333

  15. Molecular evolution of coding and non-coding sequences of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene in the family Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Maj, Andrzej; Zwierzchowski, Lech

    2006-01-01

    The GHR gene exon 1A and exon 4 with fragments of its flanking introns were sequenced in twelve Bovidae species and the obtained sequences were aligned and analysed by the ClustalW method. In coding exon 4 only three interspecies differences were found, one of which had an effect on the amino-acid sequence--leucine 152 proline. The average mutation frequency in non-coding exon 1A was 10.5 per 100 bp, and was 4.6-fold higher than that in coding exon 4 (2.3 per 100 bp). The mutation frequency in intron sequences was similar to that in non-coding exon 1A (8.9 vs 10.5/100 bp). For non-coding exon 1A, the mutation levels were lower within than between the subfamilies Bovinae and Caprinae. Exon 4 was 100% identical within the genera Ovis, Capra, Bison, and Bos and 97.7% identical for Ovis moschatus, Ammotragus lervia and Bovinae species. The identity level of non-coding exon 1A of the GHR gene was 93.8% between species belonging to Bovinae and Caprinae. The average mutation rate was 0.2222/100 bp/MY and 0.0513/100 bp/MY for the Bovidae GHR gene exons 1A and 4, respectively. Thus, the GHR gene is well conserved in the Bovidae family. Also, in this study some novel intraspecies polymorphisms were found for cattle and sheep. PMID:17044257

  16. Revisiting Molecular Dynamics on a CPU/GPU system: Water Kernel and SHAKE Parallelization

    PubMed Central

    Ruymgaart, A. Peter; Elber, Ron

    2012-01-01

    We report Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Open-MP parallel implementations of water-specific force calculations and of bond constraints for use in Molecular Dynamics simulations. We focus on a typical laboratory computing-environment in which a CPU with a few cores is attached to a GPU. We discuss in detail the design of the code and we illustrate performance comparable to highly optimized codes such as GROMACS. Beside speed our code shows excellent energy conservation. Utilization of water-specific lists allows the efficient calculations of non-bonded interactions that include water molecules and results in a speed-up factor of more than 40 on the GPU compared to code optimized on a single CPU core for systems larger than 20,000 atoms. This is up four-fold from a factor of 10 reported in our initial GPU implementation that did not include a water-specific code. Another optimization is the implementation of constrained dynamics entirely on the GPU. The routine, which enforces constraints of all bonds, runs in parallel on multiple Open-MP cores or entirely on the GPU. It is based on Conjugate Gradient solution of the Lagrange multipliers (CG SHAKE). The GPU implementation is partially in double precision and requires no communication with the CPU during the execution of the SHAKE algorithm. The (parallel) implementation of SHAKE allows an increase of the time step to 2.0fs while maintaining excellent energy conservation. Interestingly, CG SHAKE is faster than the usual bond relaxation algorithm even on a single core if high accuracy is expected. The significant speedup of the optimized components transfers the computational bottleneck of the MD calculation to the reciprocal part of Particle Mesh Ewald (PME). PMID:23264758

  17. Revisiting Molecular Dynamics on a CPU/GPU system: Water Kernel and SHAKE Parallelization.

    PubMed

    Ruymgaart, A Peter; Elber, Ron

    2012-11-13

    We report Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Open-MP parallel implementations of water-specific force calculations and of bond constraints for use in Molecular Dynamics simulations. We focus on a typical laboratory computing-environment in which a CPU with a few cores is attached to a GPU. We discuss in detail the design of the code and we illustrate performance comparable to highly optimized codes such as GROMACS. Beside speed our code shows excellent energy conservation. Utilization of water-specific lists allows the efficient calculations of non-bonded interactions that include water molecules and results in a speed-up factor of more than 40 on the GPU compared to code optimized on a single CPU core for systems larger than 20,000 atoms. This is up four-fold from a factor of 10 reported in our initial GPU implementation that did not include a water-specific code. Another optimization is the implementation of constrained dynamics entirely on the GPU. The routine, which enforces constraints of all bonds, runs in parallel on multiple Open-MP cores or entirely on the GPU. It is based on Conjugate Gradient solution of the Lagrange multipliers (CG SHAKE). The GPU implementation is partially in double precision and requires no communication with the CPU during the execution of the SHAKE algorithm. The (parallel) implementation of SHAKE allows an increase of the time step to 2.0fs while maintaining excellent energy conservation. Interestingly, CG SHAKE is faster than the usual bond relaxation algorithm even on a single core if high accuracy is expected. The significant speedup of the optimized components transfers the computational bottleneck of the MD calculation to the reciprocal part of Particle Mesh Ewald (PME). PMID:23264758

  18. Scattering studies of molecular dynamics of complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ciya

    The dynamics of complex fluids is studied by modeling the spectrum of density fluctuation: dynamic structure factor. The theoretic models are compared with experimental measurements by X-ray and molecular dynamics simulation results. In time scale, the dynamics of supercooled water can be well separated into short time and long time dynamics. While the long time dynamics is modeled well by a stretch exponential and explained as cage relaxations by mode coupling theory, the short time dynamics is under study in this thesis. We introduce two models for the short time dynamics. One model assumes that the short time movement of particles inside a cage is in a harmonic potential well with a vibrational frequency distribution function having a two-peak structure. The relationship of density of state with the single particle dynamic structure factor is employed to formulate the model. The other model treats the in-cage rattlings as collisions between hard sphere particles which can be modeled by a kinetic theory. A modification of the kinetic theory has to be used to account for the cage effect on the short time dynamics. The idea that the short time dynamics can be considered separately from long time dynamics is verified by the potential landscape view. The inherent structure which is defined as a local minimum in the potential function varies from time to time as the result of the crossing- basin of system in the potential landscape. The within basin movement regarded as short time rattlings can be eliminated by calculating the intermediate scattering function of the inherent structure, which shows an almost identical behavior as the long time part of original intermediate scattering function. A recent development of high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering technique brings a challenge on how to deal with the form factors of different atoms in the explanation of the measured dynamic structure factor. A generalized dynamic structure factor is defined to include the

  19. Molecular dynamics of a water jet from a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Yonebayashi, Toru; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2009-04-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) can be viewed as a molecular nozzle. It has a cylindrical shape of atomistic regularity, and the diameter can be even less than 1 nm. We have conducted molecular-dynamics simulations of water jet from a (6,6) CNT that confines water in a form of single-file molecular chain. The results show that the water forms nanoscale clusters at the outlet and they are released intermittently. The jet breakup is dominated by the thermal fluctuations, which leads to the strong dependence on the temperature. The cluster size n decreases and the release frequency f increases at higher temperatures. The f roughly follows the reaction kinetics by the transition state theory. The speed of a cluster is proportional to the 1/sqrt[n] because of the central limit theorem. These properties make great contrast with the macroscopic liquid jets. PMID:19518333

  20. Dynamics in a supercooled molecular liquid: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, Adele; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero

    2001-06-01

    We report extensive simulations of liquid supercooled states for a simple three-site molecular model, introduced by Lewis and Wahnstrom [Phys. Rev. E >50, 3865 (1994)] to mimic the behavior of ortho-terphenyl. The large system size and the long simulation length allow us to calculate very precisely (in a large q-vector range) self-correlation and collective correlation functions, providing a clean and simple reference model for theoretical descriptions of molecular liquids in supercooled states. The time and wave-vector dependence of the site-site correlation functions are compared (neglecting the molecular constraints) with detailed ideal mode-coupling theory predictions. Except for the wave-vector region where the dynamics are controlled by the center of mass (around 9 nm{sup {minus}1}), the theoretical predictions compare very well with the simulation data.

  1. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets’ spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-15

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet’s spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  2. Single Stock Dynamics on High-Frequency Data: From a Compressed Coding Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fushing, Hsieh; Chen, Shu-Chun; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS), and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors. PMID:24586235

  3. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    PubMed

    Fushing, Hsieh; Chen, Shu-Chun; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS), and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors. PMID:24586235

  4. Exploiting molecular dynamics in Nested Sampling simulations of small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkoff, Nikolas S.; Baldock, Robert J. N.; Várnai, Csilla; Wild, David L.; Csányi, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    Nested Sampling (NS) is a parameter space sampling algorithm which can be used for sampling the equilibrium thermodynamics of atomistic systems. NS has previously been used to explore the potential energy surface of a coarse-grained protein model and has significantly outperformed parallel tempering when calculating heat capacity curves of Lennard-Jones clusters. The original NS algorithm uses Monte Carlo (MC) moves; however, a variant, Galilean NS, has recently been introduced which allows NS to be incorporated into a molecular dynamics framework, so NS can be used for systems which lack efficient prescribed MC moves. In this work we demonstrate the applicability of Galilean NS to atomistic systems. We present an implementation of Galilean NS using the Amber molecular dynamics package and demonstrate its viability by sampling alanine dipeptide, both in vacuo and implicit solvent. Unlike previous studies of this system, we present the heat capacity curves of alanine dipeptide, whose calculation provides a stringent test for sampling algorithms. We also compare our results with those calculated using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and find good agreement. We show the computational effort required for accurate heat capacity estimation for small peptides. We also calculate the alanine dipeptide Ramachandran free energy surface for a range of temperatures and use it to compare the results using the latest Amber force field with previous theoretical and experimental results.

  5. Fast parallel algorithms for short-range molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, S.

    1993-05-01

    Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a subset of atoms; the second assigns each a subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently -- those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 10,000,000 atoms on three parallel supercomputers, the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860, and Intel Delta. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and the Intel Delta performs about 30 times faster than a single Y-MP processor and 12 times faster than a single C90 processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

  6. Applications of the molecular dynamics flexible fitting method.

    PubMed

    Trabuco, Leonardo G; Schreiner, Eduard; Gumbart, James; Hsin, Jen; Villa, Elizabeth; Schulten, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has established itself as a key method in structural biology, permitting the structural characterization of large biomolecular complexes in various functional states. The data obtained through single-particle cryo-EM has recently seen a leap in resolution thanks to landmark advances in experimental and computational techniques, resulting in sub-nanometer resolution structures being obtained routinely. The remaining gap between these data and revealing the mechanisms of molecular function can be closed through hybrid modeling tools that incorporate known atomic structures into the cryo-EM data. One such tool, molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF), uses molecular dynamics simulations to combine structures from X-ray crystallography with cryo-EM density maps to derive atomic models of large biomolecular complexes. The structures furnished by MDFF can be used subsequently in computational investigations aimed at revealing the dynamics of the complexes under study. In the present work, recent applications of MDFF are presented, including the interpretation of cryo-EM data of the ribosome at different stages of translation and the structure of a membrane-curvature-inducing photosynthetic complex. PMID:20932910

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  8. Molecular-level dynamics of refractory dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, J.; Gerdts, G.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-04-01

    Refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) accounts for most of the global oceanic organic carbon inventory. Processes leading to its formation and factors determining its stability are still largely unknown. We hypothesize that refractory DOM carries a universal molecular signature. Characterizing spatial and temporal variability in this universal signature is a key to understanding dynamics of refractory DOM. We present results from a long-term study of the DOM geo-metabolome in the open North Sea. Geo-metabolomics considers the entity of DOM as a population of compounds, each characterized by a specific function and reactivity in the cycling of energy and elements. Ten-thousands of molecular formulae were identified in DOM by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry analysis (FT-ICR-MS, Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry). The DOM pool in the North Sea was influenced by a complex interplay of processes that produced, transformed and degraded dissolved molecules. We identified a stable fraction in North Sea DOM with a molecular composition similar to deep ocean DOM. Molecular-level changes in this stable fraction provide novel information on dynamics and interactions of refractory DOM.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Calculation of Carbon/Hydrocarbon Reflection Coefficients on a Graphite Surface Employing Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alman, D. A.; Ruzic, D. N.; Brooks, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    Reflection coefficients of carbon and hydrocarbon molecules have been calculated with a molecular dynamics code. The code uses the Brenner hydrocarbon potential, an empirical many-body potential that can model the chemical bonding in small hydrocarbon molecules and graphite surfaces. A variety of incident energies and angles have been studied. Typical results for carbon show reflection coefficients 0.4 at thermal energy, decreasing to a minimum of 0.15 at 10-20 eV, and then increasing again. Distributed computing is used to distribute the work among 10-20 desktop PCs in the laboratory. The system consists of a client application run on all of the PCs and a single server machine that distributes work and compiles the results sent back from the clients. The client-server software is written in Java and requires no commercial software packages. Thus, the MD code benefits from multiprocessor-like speed-up at no additional cost by using the idle CPU cycles that would otherwise be wasted. These calculations represent an important improvement to the WBC code, which has been used to model surface erosion, core plasma contamination, and tritium codeposition in many fusion design studies and experiments.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of triclinic lysozyme in a crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Liu, Chunmei; Deckman, Jason; Case, David A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals can enlighten interpretation of experimental X-ray crystallography data and elucidate structural dynamics and heterogeneity in biomolecular crystals. Furthermore, because of the direct comparison against experimental data, they can inform assessment of molecular dynamics methods and force fields. We present microsecond scale results for triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme in a supercell consisting of 12 independent unit cells using four contemporary force fields (Amber ff99SB, ff14ipq, ff14SB, and CHARMM 36) in crystalline and solvated states (for ff14SB only). We find the crystal simulations consistent across multiple runs of the same force field and robust to various solvent equilibration schemes. However, convergence is slow compared with solvent simulations. All the tested force fields reproduce experimental structural and dynamic properties well, but Amber ff14SB maintains structure and reproduces fluctuations closest to the experimental model: its average backbone structure differs from the deposited structure by 0.37Å; by contrast, the average backbone structure in solution differs from the deposited by 0.65Å. All the simulations are affected by a small progressive deterioration of the crystal lattice, presumably due to imperfect modeling of hydrogen bonding and other crystal contact interactions; this artifact is smallest in ff14SB, with average lattice positions deviating by 0.20Å from ideal. Side-chain disorder is surprisingly low with fewer than 30% of the nonglycine or alanine residues exhibiting significantly populated alternate rotamers. Our results provide helpful insight into the methodology of biomolecular crystal simulations and indicate directions for future work to obtain more accurate energy models for molecular dynamics. PMID:26013419

  11. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    PubMed

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio

  12. mDCC_tools: characterizing multi-modal atomic motions in molecular dynamics trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Kota; Mohan, Neetha; Fukuda, Ikuo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We previously reported the multi-modal Dynamic Cross Correlation (mDCC) method for analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories. This method quantifies the correlation coefficients of atomic motions with complex multi-modal behaviors by using a Bayesian-based pattern recognition technique that can effectively capture transiently formed, unstable interactions. Here, we present an open source toolkit for performing the mDCC analysis, including pattern recognitions, complex network analyses and visualizations. We include a tutorial document that thoroughly explains how to apply this toolkit for an analysis, using the example trajectory of the 100 ns simulation of an engineered endothelin-1 peptide dimer. Availability and implementation: The source code is available for free at http://www.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp/rcsfp/pi/mdcctools/, implemented in C ++ and Python, and supported on Linux. Contact: kota.kasahara@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153575

  13. Dynamical consequences of a constraint on the Langevin thermostat in molecular cluster simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, Jake L.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Ford, Ian J.

    2014-11-17

    We investigate some unusual behaviour observed while performing molecular dynamics simulations with the DL_POLY_4.03 code. Under the standard Langevin thermostat, atoms appear to be thermalised to different temperatures, depending on their mass and on the total number of particles in the system. We find that an imposed constraint whereby no thermal noise acts on the centre of mass of the system is the cause of the unexpected behaviour. This is demonstrated by solving the stochastic dynamics for the constrained thermostat and comparing the results with simulation data. The effect of the constraint can be considerable for small systems with disparate masses. By removing the constraint the Langevin thermostat may be restored to its intended behaviour and this has been implemented as an option in DL_POLY_4.05. SMK was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  14. Efficient molecular dynamics using geodesic integration and solvent–solute splitting

    PubMed Central

    Leimkuhler, Benedict

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to Langevin dynamics in the presence of holonomic constraints based on decomposition of the system into components representing geodesic flow, constrained impulse and constrained diffusion. We show that a particular ordering of the components results in an integrator that is an order of magnitude more accurate for configurational averages than existing alternatives. Moreover, by combining the geodesic integration method with a solvent–solute force splitting, we demonstrate that stepsizes of at least 8 fs can be used for solvated biomolecules with high sampling accuracy and without substantially altering diffusion rates, approximately increasing by a factor of two the efficiency of molecular dynamics sampling for such systems. The methods described in this article are easily implemented using the standard apparatus of modern simulation codes. PMID:27279779

  15. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  16. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  17. Development of a CFD Code for Analysis of Fluid Dynamic Forces in Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh M.; Przekwas, Andrzej J.; Singhal, Ashok K.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to develop a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for the analysis of fluid flow in cylindrical seals and evaluation of the dynamic forces on the seals. This code is expected to serve as a scientific tool for detailed flow analysis as well as a check for the accuracy of the 2D industrial codes. The features necessary in the CFD code are outlined. The initial focus was to develop or modify and implement new techniques and physical models. These include collocated grid formulation, rotating coordinate frames and moving grid formulation. Other advanced numerical techniques include higher order spatial and temporal differencing and an efficient linear equation solver. These techniques were implemented in a 2D flow solver for initial testing. Several benchmark test cases were computed using the 2D code, and the results of these were compared to analytical solutions or experimental data to check the accuracy. Tests presented here include planar wedge flow, flow due to an enclosed rotor, and flow in a 2D seal with a whirling rotor. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results for an annular seal and a 7-cavity labyrinth seal are also included.

  18. Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization Based on Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-01

    This program performs atomic scale computer simulations of the structure and dynamics of metallic system using energetices based on the Embedded Atom Method. The program performs two types of calculations. First, it performs local energy minimization of all atomic positions to determine ground state and saddle point energies and structures. Second, it performs molecular dynamics simulations to determine thermodynamics or miscroscopic dynamics of the system. In both cases, various constraints can be applied to themore » system. The volume of the system can be varied automatically to achieve any desired external pressure. The temperature in molecular dynamics simulations can be controlled by a variety of methods. Further, the temperature control can be applied either to the entire system or just a subset of the atoms that would act as a thermal source/sink. The motion of one or more of the atoms can be constrained to either simulate the effects of bulk boundary conditions or to facilitate the determination of saddle point configurations. The simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  19. Molecular interferometer to decode attosecond electron-nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martín, Fernando

    2014-03-18

    Understanding the coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules by using pump-probe schemes requires not only the use of short enough laser pulses but also wavelengths and intensities that do not modify the intrinsic behavior of the system. In this respect, extreme UV pulses of few-femtosecond and attosecond durations have been recognized as the ideal tool because their short wavelengths ensure a negligible distortion of the molecular potential. In this work, we propose the use of two twin extreme UV pulses to create a molecular interferometer from direct and sequential two-photon ionization processes that leave the molecule in the same final state. We theoretically demonstrate that such a scheme allows for a complete identification of both electronic and nuclear phases in the wave packet generated by the pump pulse. We also show that although total ionization yields reveal entangled electronic and nuclear dynamics in the bound states, doubly differential yields (differential in both electronic and nuclear energies) exhibit in addition the dynamics of autoionization, i.e., of electron correlation in the ionization continuum. Visualization of such dynamics is possible by varying the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses. PMID:24591647

  20. Molecular interferometer to decode attosecond electron–nuclear dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules by using pump–probe schemes requires not only the use of short enough laser pulses but also wavelengths and intensities that do not modify the intrinsic behavior of the system. In this respect, extreme UV pulses of few-femtosecond and attosecond durations have been recognized as the ideal tool because their short wavelengths ensure a negligible distortion of the molecular potential. In this work, we propose the use of two twin extreme UV pulses to create a molecular interferometer from direct and sequential two-photon ionization processes that leave the molecule in the same final state. We theoretically demonstrate that such a scheme allows for a complete identification of both electronic and nuclear phases in the wave packet generated by the pump pulse. We also show that although total ionization yields reveal entangled electronic and nuclear dynamics in the bound states, doubly differential yields (differential in both electronic and nuclear energies) exhibit in addition the dynamics of autoionization, i.e., of electron correlation in the ionization continuum. Visualization of such dynamics is possible by varying the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses. PMID:24591647

  1. The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Taste Coding in the Legs of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Frederick; Dahanukar, Anupama; Weiss, Linnea A.; Kwon, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    To understand the principles of taste coding, it is necessary to understand the functional organization of the taste organs. Although the labellum of the Drosophila melanogaster head has been described in detail, the tarsal segments of the legs, which collectively contain more taste sensilla than the labellum, have received much less attention. We performed a systematic anatomical, physiological, and molecular analysis of the tarsal sensilla of Drosophila. We construct an anatomical map of all five tarsal segments of each female leg. The taste sensilla of the female foreleg are systematically tested with a panel of 40 diverse compounds, yielding a response matrix of ∼500 sensillum–tastant combinations. Six types of sensilla are characterized. One type was tuned remarkably broadly: it responded to 19 of 27 bitter compounds tested, as well as sugars; another type responded to neither. The midleg is similar but distinct from the foreleg. The response specificities of the tarsal sensilla differ from those of the labellum, as do n-dimensional taste spaces constructed for each organ, enhancing the capacity of the fly to encode and respond to gustatory information. We examined the expression patterns of all 68 gustatory receptors (Grs). A total of 28 Gr–GAL4 drivers are expressed in the legs. We constructed a receptor-to-sensillum map of the legs and a receptor-to-neuron map. Fourteen Gr–GAL4 drivers are expressed uniquely in the bitter-sensing neuron of the sensillum that is tuned exceptionally broadly. Integration of the molecular and physiological maps provides insight into the underlying basis of taste coding. PMID:24849350

  2. Temperature Effects on Soft Polymeric Nanoparticles: Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, Sabina; Grest, Gary S.; Perahia, Dvora

    Luminescent polymers collapsed into soft nanoparticles or polydots have emerged as the potential candidates for biomedical applications such as drug delivery and biosensing. Here, using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation, the temperatures effects on the stability, internal structure and dynamics of polydots formed by substituted and bare dialkyl paraphenylene ethynylenes (PPEs) will be discussed. We find that with increasing temperature from 300 K to 600K both substituted and bare PPE polydots expand but do not fully unfold and remain in their confined state. As observed visually and by measurement of structure factor S(q), the overall shape of the both type of polydots changes from spherical to elongated with the increase in temperature. These effects are more pronounced for bare PPE polydots which show that interdigitation of side chains in substituted PPE polydots enhances stability. In addition, the side chains are more dynamic than the backbone.. NSF CHE 1308298 2013-2016.

  3. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain's threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  5. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices.

  6. A molecular dynamics study of the ionic liquid, choline acetate.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Jon A L; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyung J

    2016-06-01

    Structural and dynamic properties of the ionic liquid (IL) choline acetate are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The hydroxyl group of choline shows significant hydrogen-bonding interactions with the oxygen atoms of acetate. Nearly all choline cations are found to form a hydrogen bond with acetate anions at 400 K, while about 67% of cations participate in hydrogen-bonding interactions at 600 K. At 400 K, subdiffusive and prominent non-Gaussian behavior persist for t > 10 ns. At 600 K, the usual diffusion regime is obtained after a few hundred ps of subdiffusive behavior. Analysis of reorientational motions of acetate ions, particularly those of their short axes, indicates a high degree of dynamic heterogeneity, in agreement with previous work on different IL systems. PMID:27188287

  7. SCISEAL: A CFD code for analysis of fluid dynamic forces in seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Przekwas, Andrzej

    1994-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation is made of the objectives, capabilities, and test results of the computer code SCISEAL. Currently, the seal code has: a finite volume, pressure-based integration scheme; colocated variables with strong conservation approach; high-order spatial differencing, up to third-order; up to second-order temporal differencing; a comprehensive set of boundary conditions; a variety of turbulence models and surface roughness treatment; moving grid formulation for arbitrary rotor whirl; rotor dynamic coefficients calculated by the circular whirl and numerical shaker methods; and small perturbation capabilities to handle centered and eccentric seals.

  8. Study of transient self-consistent beam dynamics in RF linacs using a particle tracing code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mytrochenko, V. V.; Opanasenko, A.

    2006-03-01

    The paper describes a simulation technique for study of unsteady self-consistent dynamics of charged particles in RF linacs that consist of cavities and travelling wave sections. The approach proposed is based on unsteady theories of the excitation of cavities and waveguides by a beam of charged particles and RF feeders. The theory of waveguide excitation is extended to the case of spatially inhomogeneous travelling-wave structures. The SUPERFISH code is used to evaluate the characteristics of the axisymmetric travelling-wave sections. The PARMELA code is applied for simulation of particle motion and to obtain data required for solving the equations for excitation of the RF structures by the beam.

  9. Extended Molecular Dynamics Methods for Vortex Dynamics in Nano-structured Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Masaru; Sato, Osamu

    Using improved molecular dynamics simulation method, we study vortex dynamics in nano-scaled superconductors. Heat generations during vortex motion, heat transfer in superconductors, and entropy forces to vortices are incorporated. Also quasi-particle relaxations after vortex motion, and their attractive "retarded" forces to other vortices are incorporated using the condensation-energy field. We show the time development of formation of vortex channel flow in a superconducting Corbino-disk.

  10. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26075210

  11. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Voter, Arthur F; Perez, Danny; Shim, Y; Amar, J G

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) [10, 19, 23] to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what

  12. A molecular code dictates sequence-specific DNA recognition by homeodomains.

    PubMed Central

    Damante, G; Pellizzari, L; Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Viglino, P; Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1996-01-01

    Most homeodomains bind to DNA sequences containing the motif 5'-TAAT-3'. The homeodomain of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1HD) binds to sequences containing a 5'-CAAG-3' core motif, delineating a new mechanism for differential DNA recognition by homeodomains. We investigated the molecular basis of the DNA binding specificity of TTF-1HD by both structural and functional approaches. As already suggested by the three-dimensional structure of TTF-1HD, the DNA binding specificities of the TTF-1, Antennapedia and Engrailed homeodomains, either wild-type or mutants, indicated that the amino acid residue in position 54 is involved in the recognition of the nucleotide at the 3' end of the core motif 5'-NAAN-3'. The nucleotide at the 5' position of this core sequence is recognized by the amino acids located in position 6, 7 and 8 of the TTF-1 and Antennapedia homeodomains. These data, together with previous suggestions on the role of amino acids in position 50, indicate that the DNA binding specificity of homeodomains can be determined by a combinatorial molecular code. We also show that some specific combinations of the key amino acid residues involved in DNA recognition do not follow a simple, additive rule. Images PMID:8890172

  13. Molecular Dynamics Analysis of Lysozyme Protein in Ethanol-Water Mixed Solvent Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochije, Henry Ikechukwu

    Effect of protein-solvent interaction on the protein structure is widely studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Despite such extensive studies molecular level understanding of proteins and some simple solvents is still not fully understood. This work focuses on detailed molecular dynamics simulations to study of solvent effect on lysozyme protein, using water, alcohol and different concentrations of water-alcohol mixtures as solvents. The lysozyme protein structure in water, alcohol and alcohol-water mixture (0-12% alcohol) was studied using GROMACS molecular dynamics simulation code. Compared to water environment, the lysozome structure showed remarkable changes in solvents with increasing alcohol concentration. In particular, significant changes were observed in the protein secondary structure involving alpha helices. The influence of alcohol on the lysozyme protein was investigated by studying thermodynamic and structural properties. With increasing ethanol concentration we observed a systematic increase in total energy, enthalpy, root mean square deviation (RMSD), and radius of gyration. a polynomial interpolation approach. Using the resulting polynomial equation, we could determine above quantities for any intermediate alcohol percentage. In order to validate this approach, we selected an intermediate ethanol percentage and carried out full MD simulation. The results from MD simulation were in reasonably good agreement with that obtained using polynomial approach. Hence, the polynomial approach based method proposed here eliminates the need for computationally intensive full MD analysis for the concentrations within the range (0-12%) studied in this work.

  14. Molecular dynamics modeling and characterization of graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rezwanur

    The current work focuses on the characterization of graphene based nanocomposites using molecular dynamic simulation and multiscale modeling approaches. Both graphene-epoxy and graphene-cellulose nanocomposites were considered in this study. A hierarchical multiscale modeling approach has been proposed using peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, the mechanical properties of crosslinked graphene/epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposites were investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The influence of graphene's weight concentration, aspect ratio and dispersion on stress-strain response and elastic properties were studied. The results show significant improvement in Young's modulus and shear modulus for the G-Ep system in comparison to the neat epoxy resin. It appears that the RDF, molecular energy and aspect ratios are influenced by both graphene concentrations and aspect ratios. The graphene concentrations in the range of 1-3% are seen to improve Young's modulus and shorter graphenes are observed to be more effective than larger ones. In addition, the dispersed graphene system is more promising in enhancing in-plane elastic modulus than the agglomerated graphene system. The cohesive and pullout forces versus displacements data were plotted under normal and shear modes in order to characterize interfacial properties. The cohesive force is significantly improved by attaching the graphene with a chemical bond at the graphene-epoxy interface. In the second part of the work, cellulose was considered to study the mechanical properties of graphene-cellulose bionanocomposite. Similar to graphene-epoxy systems, the effect of graphene dispersion and agglomeration were studied in the stress-strain plots of graphene-cellulose system. A pcff forcefield was used to define intermolecular and intramolecular interactions. The effect of graphene's aspect ratio and weight concentration on the structural property of each unitcell was

  15. Molecular dynamics studies of protein folding and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng

    This thesis applies molecular dynamics simulations and statistical mechanics to study: (i) protein folding; and (ii) protein aggregation. Most small proteins fold into their native states via a first-order-like phase transition with a major free energy barrier between the folded and unfolded states. A set of protein conformations corresponding to the free energy barrier, Delta G >> kBT, are the folding transition state ensemble (TSE). Due to their evasive nature, TSE conformations are hard to capture (probability ∝ exp(-DeltaG/k BT)) and characterize. A coarse-grained discrete molecular dynamics model with realistic steric constraints is constructed to reproduce the experimentally observed two-state folding thermodynamics. A kinetic approach is proposed to identify the folding TSE. A specific set of contacts, common to the TSE conformations, is identified as the folding nuclei which are necessary to be formed in order for the protein to fold. Interestingly, the amino acids at the site of the identified folding nuclei are highly conserved for homologous proteins sharing the same structures. Such conservation suggests that amino acids that are important for folding kinetics are under selective pressure to be preserved during the course of molecular evolution. In addition, studies of the conformations close to the transition states uncover the importance of topology in the construction of order parameter for protein folding transition. Misfolded proteins often form insoluble aggregates, amyloid fibrils, that deposit in the extracellular space and lead to a type of disease known as amyloidosis. Due to its insoluble and non-crystalline nature, the aggregation structure and, thus the aggregation mechanism, has yet to be uncovered. Discrete molecular dynamics studies reveal an aggregate structure with the same structural signatures as in experimental observations and show a nucleation aggregation scenario. The simulations also suggest a generic aggregation mechanism

  16. Computational Studies on the Anharmonic Dynamics of Molecular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, John S.

    Molecular nanoclusters present ideal systems to probe the physical forces and dynamics that drive the behavior of larger bulk systems. At the nanocluster limit the first instances of several phenomena can be observed including the breaking of hydrogen and molecular bonds. Advancements in experimental and theoretical techniques have made it possible to explore these phenomena in great detail. The most fruitful of these studies have involved the use of both experimental and theoretical techniques to leverage to strengths of the two approaches. This dissertation seeks to explore several important phenomena of molecular clusters using new and existing theoretical methodologies. Three specific systems are considered, hydrogen chloride clusters, mixed water and hydrogen chloride clusters and the first cluster where hydrogen chloride autoionization occurs. The focus of these studies remain as close as possible to experimentally observable phenomena with the intention of validating, simulating and expanding on experimental work. Specifically, the properties of interested are those related to the vibrational ground and excited state dynamics of these systems. Studies are performed using full and reduced dimensional potential energy surface alongside advanced quantum mechanical methods including diffusion Monte Carlo, vibrational configuration interaction theory and quasi-classical molecular dynamics. The insight gained from these studies are great and varied. A new on-they-fly ab initio method for studying molecular clusters is validated for (HCl)1--6. A landmark study of the dissociation energy and predissociation mechanism of (HCl)3 is reported. The ground states of mixed (HCl)n(H2O)m are found to be highly delocalized across multiple stationary point configurations. Furthermore, it is identified that the consideration of this delocalization is required in vibrational excited state calculations to achieve agreement with experimental measurements. Finally, the theoretical

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  18. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies in Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H.G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods.

  19. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2012-05-29

    The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

  20. Study of critical dynamics in fluids via molecular dynamics in canonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sutapa; Das, Subir K

    2015-12-01

    With the objective of understanding the usefulness of thermostats in the study of dynamic critical phenomena in fluids, we present results for transport properties in a binary Lennard-Jones fluid that exhibits liquid-liquid phase transition. Various collective transport properties, calculated from the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in canonical ensemble, with different thermostats, are compared with those obtained from MD simulations in microcanonical ensemble. It is observed that the Nosé-Hoover and dissipative particle dynamics thermostats are useful for the calculations of mutual diffusivity and shear viscosity. The Nosé-Hoover thermostat, however, as opposed to the latter, appears inadequate for the study of bulk viscosity. PMID:26687057

  1. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-01

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica® package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics. Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  2. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica{sup ®} package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics . Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  3. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica(®) package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics. Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories. PMID:24588150

  4. Analysis of molecular oxygen exit pathways in cyanobacterial photosystem II: Molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Dontsova, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    In thylakoids of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic organisms, the light-induced production of molecular oxygen is catalyzed by the giant lipid-pigment-protein complex called photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex is buried deep in the lumenal part of PSII, and dioxygen molecules need to pass through the protein environment in order to leave the active site of the enzyme free. Previous studies aimed at finding oxygen channels in PSII were based on either an analysis of the cavities within is static structure or experiments on the insertion of noble gas molecules into PSII crystals under elevated pressure. In these studies, some possible exit pathways for the molecules were found and the static positions of molecular oxygen were determined. In the present work, the oxygen movement in the transport system of PSII is simulated by molecular dynamics.

  5. Exploring the Photophysical Properties of Molecular Systems Using Excited State Accelerated ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we employ excited state accelerated ab initio molecular dynamics (A-AIMD) to efficiently study the excited state energy landscape and photophysical topology of a variety of molecular systems. In particular, we focus on two important challenges for the modeling of excited electronic states: (i) the identification and characterization of conical intersections and crossing seams, in order to predict different and often competing radiationless decay mechanisms, and (ii) the description of the solvent effect on the absorption and emission spectra of chemical species in solution. In particular, using as examples the Schiff bases formaldimine and salicylidenaniline, we show that A-AIMD can be readily employed to explore the conformational space around crossing seams in molecular systems with very different photochemistry. Using acetone in water as an example, we demonstrate that the enhanced configurational space sampling may be used to accurately and efficiently describe both the prominent features and line-shapes of absorption and emission spectra. PMID:22904696

  6. Validating clustering of molecular dynamics simulations using polymer models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful technique for sampling the meta-stable and transitional conformations of proteins and other biomolecules. Computational data clustering has emerged as a useful, automated technique for extracting conformational states from MD simulation data. Despite extensive application, relatively little work has been done to determine if the clustering algorithms are actually extracting useful information. A primary goal of this paper therefore is to provide such an understanding through a detailed analysis of data clustering applied to a series of increasingly complex biopolymer models. Results We develop a novel series of models using basic polymer theory that have intuitive, clearly-defined dynamics and exhibit the essential properties that we are seeking to identify in MD simulations of real biomolecules. We then apply spectral clustering, an algorithm particularly well-suited for clustering polymer structures, to our models and MD simulations of several intrinsically disordered proteins. Clustering results for the polymer models provide clear evidence that the meta-stable and transitional conformations are detected by the algorithm. The results for the polymer models also help guide the analysis of the disordered protein simulations by comparing and contrasting the statistical properties of the extracted clusters. Conclusions We have developed a framework for validating the performance and utility of clustering algorithms for studying molecular biopolymer simulations that utilizes several analytic and dynamic polymer models which exhibit well-behaved dynamics including: meta-stable states, transition states, helical structures, and stochastic dynamics. We show that spectral clustering is robust to anomalies introduced by structural alignment and that different structural classes of intrinsically disordered proteins can be reliably discriminated from the clustering results. To our knowledge, our framework is the

  7. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    DOE PAGESBeta

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficientmore » as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.« less

  8. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  9. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-10-28

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  10. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.

  11. Modeling and Computer Simulation: Molecular Dynamics and Kinetic Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B.D.; Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    2000-10-10

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous advances in the realistic multiscale simulation of complex physical phenomena, such as irradiation and aging effects of materials, made possible by the enormous progress achieved in computational physics for calculating reliable, yet tractable interatomic potentials and the vast improvements in computational power and parallel computing. As a result, computational materials science is emerging as an important complement to theory and experiment to provide fundamental materials science insight. This article describes the atomistic modeling techniques of molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC), and an example of their application to radiation damage production and accumulation in metals. It is important to note at the outset that the primary objective of atomistic computer simulation should be obtaining physical insight into atomic-level processes. Classical molecular dynamics is a powerful method for obtaining insight about the dynamics of physical processes that occur on relatively short time scales. Current computational capability allows treatment of atomic systems containing as many as 10{sup 9} atoms for times on the order of 100 ns (10{sup -7}s). The main limitation of classical MD simulation is the relatively short times accessible. Kinetic Monte Carlo provides the ability to reach macroscopic times by modeling diffusional processes and time-scales rather than individual atomic vibrations. Coupling MD and KMC has developed into a powerful, multiscale tool for the simulation of radiation damage in metals.

  12. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander J.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav N.; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2015-07-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In most cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems.

  13. Towards imaging of ultrafast molecular dynamics using FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzée, A.; Johnsson, P.; Rading, L.; Hundertmark, A.; Siu, W.; Huismans, Y.; Düsterer, S.; Redlin, H.; Tavella, F.; Stojanovic, N.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Lépine, F.; Holland, D. M. P.; Schlatholter, T.; Hoekstra, R.; Fukuzawa, H.; Ueda, K.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2013-08-01

    The dissociation dynamics induced by a 100 fs, 400 nm laser pulse in a rotationally cold Br2 sample was characterized by Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI) using a time-delayed extreme ultra-violet (XUV) FEL pulse, obtained from the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). The momentum distribution of atomic fragments resulting from the 400 nm-induced dissociation was measured with a velocity map imaging spectrometer and used to monitor the internuclear distance as the molecule dissociated. By employing the simultaneously recorded in-house timing electro-optical sampling data, the time resolution of the final results could be improved to 300 fs, compared to the inherent 500 fs time-jitter of the FEL pulse. Before dissociation, the Br2 molecules were transiently ‘fixed in space’ using laser-induced alignment. In addition, similar alignment techniques were used on CO2 molecules to allow the measurement of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) directly in the molecular frame (MF). Our results on MFPADs in aligned CO2 molecules, together with our investigation of the dissociation dynamics of the Br2 molecules with CEI, show that information about the evolving molecular structure and electronic geometry can be retrieved from such experiments, therefore paving the way towards the study of complex non-adiabatic dynamics in molecules through XUV time-resolved photoion and photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water: Hybrid density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Todorova, T; Seitsonen, A; Hutter, J; Kuo, W; Mundy, C

    2005-09-12

    The structure, dynamical and electronic properties of liquid water utilizing different hybrid density functionals were tested within the plane wave framework of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. The computational approach, which employs modified functionals with short-ranged Hartree-Fock exchange, was first tested in calculations of the structural and bonding properties of the water dimer and cyclic water trimer. Liquid water simulations were performed at the state point of 350 K at the experimental density. Simulations included three different hybrid functionals, a meta functional, four gradient corrected functionals, the local density and Hartree-Fock approximation. It is found that hybrid functionals are superior in reproducing the experimental structure and dynamical properties as measured by the radial distribution function and self diffusion constant when compared to the pure density functionals. The local density and Hartree-Fock approximations show strongly over- and under-structured liquids, respectively. Hydrogen bond analysis shows that the hybrid functionals give slightly smaller averaged numbers of hydrogen bonds and similar hydrogen bond populations as pure density functionals. The average molecular dipole moments in the liquid from the three hybrid functionals are lower than from the corresponding pure density functionals.

  15. Molecular-dynamics simulations of void collapse in shocked model-molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintmire, J. W.; Robertson, D. H.; White, C. T.

    1994-06-01

    We have carried out a series of molecular-dynamics simulations on a model three-dimensional molecular solid to study the dynamics of shock-induced collapse of void defects. Molecular-dynamics methods were used for a model system of identical particles arranged as diatomic molecules aligned with the center of mass of each molecule at fcc lattice sites, using a \\{111\\} layering for the two-dimensional boundary conditions. The diatoms were internally coupled via a harmonic potential; all other interactions were modeled with Morse potentials between all particles other than the immediate diatomic partner. Using this model, we have investigated the effect of a cylindrical void at right angles to the direction of layering (and impact). Depending on the strength of the incident shock wave, the void is found to collapse either smoothly and symmetrically (like a balloon gradually losing air), or asymmetrically and turbulently. In the latter case, we note the transient formation (for periods of several hundreds of femtoseconds) of ``hot spots'' at the void location both in terms of the local effective temperature and the vibrational energies of the diatoms.

  16. Molecular stopwatches, cogwheels and ``spinflakes'': studying the dynamics of molecular superrotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Alexander; Hepburn, John; Milner, Valery

    2015-05-01

    Using the technique of an optical centrifuge, we excite diatomic molecules to ultrafast synchronous rotation. Femtosecond velocity-map imaging allows us to visualize and study the coherent dynamics of molecular superrotors under field free conditions and in external magnetic field. We demonstrate that when the created rotational wave packet is narrow, its free evolution is nondispersing and follows the motion of a classically rotating dumbbell or a hand of the smallest natural stopwatch. For wider rotational distributions, we observe the breakdown of classical rotation, when a dumbbell shape changes to that of a ``quantum cogwheel'' - a molecular state simultaneously aligned along multiple direction. Our measurements in external magnetic field reveal other peculiar aspects of the rich dynamics of molecular superrotors. The rotation of a non-magnetic molecule interacts with the applied field only weakly, giving rise to slow precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field direction. In contrast, the electronic spin of a paramagnetic superrotor mediates this interaction, causing the initial disk-like angular distribution to split into several spatial components, each precessing with its own frequency determined by the spin projection.

  17. The SCEC-USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise - Recent Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R.

    2013-12-01

    I summarize recent progress by the SCEC-USGS Dynamic Rupture Code Verification Group, that examines if the results produced by researchers' earthquake simulation codes agree with each other when computing benchmark scenarios of dynamically propagating earthquake ruptures. To date we have tested the codes against benchmarks that incorporate a range of features, including a single planar vertical fault, a single planar dipping fault, slip-weakening, rate-state, and thermal pressurization friction, elastic and plastic off-fault behavior, complete stress drops that lead to supershear rupture velocities and extreme ground motion, and, heterogeneous initial stresses. Our most recent benchmarks have involved complexities in fault geometry, with computationally simulated earthquakes spontaneously propagating on parallel non-co-planar vertical strike-slip faults and on branching vertical strike-slip faults. The parallel strike-slip fault case has been discussed in the published literature over the past decades, from both observational and theoretical perspectives, and the results are sometimes used in hazard estimates for multi-fault earthquake ruptures. The branching fault case has been a focus of study due to its potential application to a number of geologically hazardous settings. Group members used their individual computer codes and achieved satisfactory agreement among the codes' results for both sets of these recent benchmarks, the parallel faults and the branched faults. Our next benchmark exercise will continue on the theme of complex fault geometry and investigate the case of a geometrical asperity on an otherwise planar fault. We also plan to work on developing suitable quantitative metrics for our code comparisons. For more information about our group and our work, please see our website and our group's overview papers, Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2009, and Harris et al., Seismological Research Letters, 2011.

  18. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    PubMed

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  19. Algorithms of GPU-enabled reactive force field (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mo; Li, Xiaoxia; Guo, Li

    2013-04-01

    Reactive force field (ReaxFF), a recent and novel bond order potential, allows for reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF MD) simulations for modeling larger and more complex molecular systems involving chemical reactions when compared with computation intensive quantum mechanical methods. However, ReaxFF MD can be approximately 10-50 times slower than classical MD due to its explicit modeling of bond forming and breaking, the dynamic charge equilibration at each time-step, and its one order smaller time-step than the classical MD, all of which pose significant computational challenges in simulation capability to reach spatio-temporal scales of nanometers and nanoseconds. The very recent advances of graphics processing unit (GPU) provide not only highly favorable performance for GPU enabled MD programs compared with CPU implementations but also an opportunity to manage with the computing power and memory demanding nature imposed on computer hardware by ReaxFF MD. In this paper, we present the algorithms of GMD-Reax, the first GPU enabled ReaxFF MD program with significantly improved performance surpassing CPU implementations on desktop workstations. The performance of GMD-Reax has been benchmarked on a PC equipped with a NVIDIA C2050 GPU for coal pyrolysis simulation systems with atoms ranging from 1378 to 27,283. GMD-Reax achieved speedups as high as 12 times faster than Duin et al.'s FORTRAN codes in Lammps on 8 CPU cores and 6 times faster than the Lammps' C codes based on PuReMD in terms of the simulation time per time-step averaged over 100 steps. GMD-Reax could be used as a new and efficient computational tool for exploiting very complex molecular reactions via ReaxFF MD simulation on desktop workstations. PMID:23454611

  20. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : pH effects user manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Janardhanam, Vijay; James, Scott Carlton

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the implementation level changes in the source code and input files of Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC) that are necessary for including pH effects into algae-growth dynamics. The document also gives a brief introduction to how pH effects are modeled into the algae-growth model. The document assumes that the reader is aware of the existing algae-growth model in SNL-EFDC. The existing model is described by James, Jarardhanam and more theoretical considerations behind modeling pH effects are presented therein. This document should be used in conjunction with the original EFDC manual and the original water-quality manual.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Fracture of Model Epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-01-18

    The failure of thermosetting polymer adhesives is an important problem which particularly lacks understanding from the molecular viewpoint. While linear elastic fracture mechanics works well for such polymers far from the crack tip, the method breaks down near the crack tip where large plastic deformation occurs and the molecular details become important [1]. Results of molecular dynamics simulations of highly crosslinked polymer networks bonded to a solid surface are presented here. Epoxies are used as the guide for modeling. The focus of the simulations is the network connectivity and the interfacial strength. In a random network, the bond stress is expected to vary, and the most stressed bonds will break first [2]. Crack initiation should occur where a cluster of highly constrained bonds exists. There is no reason to expect crack initiation to occur at the interface. The results to be presented show that the solid surface limits the interfacial bonding resulting in stressed interfacial bonds and interfacial fracture. The bonds in highly-crosslinked random networks do not become stressed as expected. The sequence of molecular structural deformations that lead to failure has been determined and found to be strongly dependent upon the network connectivity. The structure of these networks and its influence on the stress-strain behavior will be discussed in general. A set of ideal, ordered networks have been constructed to manipulate the deformation sequence to achieve different fracture modes (i.e. cohesive vs. adhesive).

  2. Generalized master equations for exciton dynamics in molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Michael; May, V.

    1995-02-01

    The paper demonstrates the applicability of a special type of density matrix theory for the derivation of generalized Master equations. The density matrix theory has been formulated for the description of the dissipative electron transfer dynamics in molecular complexes. The theoretical approach is based on a representation of the density matrix in appropriately taken diabatic electron-vibrational states. Dissipative effects are taken into account by a coupling of these states to further vibrational modes of the molecular complex as well as to environmental degrees of freedom. The approach is applied to a two-center system as well as to a molecular chain. Memory kernels are derived in second order with respect to the inter-center coupling. The kernels are discussed under the assumption of a quick intra-center relaxation for a part of the vibrational modes as well as for all vibrational modes. Standard expressions for the transition rates between different sites are extended to include finite life times of the vibrational levels. Results which have been obtained in the study of the so-called spin boson model can be simply reproduced. The application of the derived generalized Master equations to the investigation of the motion of Frenkel excitons in molecular chains is also presented.

  3. Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The nanochannel flow past permeable walls with nanopores is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, including the density distribution, velocity field, molecular penetration mechanism and surface friction coefficient. A low density distribution has been found at the gas-wall interface demonstrating the low pressure region. In addition, there exists a jump of the gas density on the permeable surface, which indicates the discontinuity of the density distribution across the permeable surface. On the other hand, the nanoscale vortices are observed in nanopores of the permeable wall, and the reduced mass flux of the flow in nanopores results in a shifted hydrodynamic boundary above the permeable surface. Particularly the slip length of the gas flow on the permeable surface is pronounced a non-linear function of the molecular mean free path, which produces a large value of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) and a big portion of the diffusive refection. Moreover, the gas-gas interaction and multi-collision among gas molecules may take place in nanopores, which contribute to large values of TMAC. Consequently the boundary friction coefficient on the permeable surface is increased because of the energy dissipation consumed by the nanoscale vortices in nanopores. The molecular boundary condition provides us with a new picture of the nanochannel flow past the permeable wall with nanopores.

  4. Three-dimensional interactive Molecular Dynamics program for the study of defect dynamics in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, M.; Kuronen, A.; Robles, M.; Kaski, K.

    2007-01-01

    The study of crystal defects and the complex processes underlying their formation and time evolution has motivated the development of the program ALINE for interactive molecular dynamics experiments. This program couples a molecular dynamics code to a Graphical User Interface and runs on a UNIX-X11 Window System platform with the MOTIF library, which is contained in many standard Linux releases. ALINE is written in C, thus giving the user the possibility to modify the source code, and, at the same time, provides an effective and user-friendly framework for numerical experiments, in which the main parameters can be interactively varied and the system visualized in various ways. We illustrate the main features of the program through some examples of detection and dynamical tracking of point-defects, linear defects, and planar defects, such as stacking faults in lattice-mismatched heterostructures. Program summaryTitle of program:ALINE Catalogue identifier:ADYJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYJ_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers:DEC ALPHA 300, Intel i386 compatible computers, G4 Apple Computers Installations:Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland Operating systems under which the program has been tested:True64 UNIX, Linux-i386, Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.4 Programming language used:Standard C and MOTIF libraries Memory required to execute with typical data:6 Mbytes but may be larger depending on the system size No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 901 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:449 559 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem:Some phenomena involving defects take place inside three-dimensional crystals at times which can be hardly predicted. For this reason they are

  5. ALEGRA -- A massively parallel h-adaptive code for solid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, R.M.; Wong, M.K.; Boucheron, E.A.; Weatherby, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    ALEGRA is a multi-material, arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) code for solid dynamics designed to run on massively parallel (MP) computers. It combines the features of modern Eulerian shock codes, such as CTH, with modern Lagrangian structural analysis codes using an unstructured grid. ALEGRA is being developed for use on the teraflop supercomputers to conduct advanced three-dimensional (3D) simulations of shock phenomena important to a variety of systems. ALEGRA was designed with the Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) paradigm, in which the mesh is decomposed into sub-meshes so that each processor gets a single sub-mesh with approximately the same number of elements. Using this approach the authors have been able to produce a single code that can scale from one processor to thousands of processors. A current major effort is to develop efficient, high precision simulation capabilities for ALEGRA, without the computational cost of using a global highly resolved mesh, through flexible, robust h-adaptivity of finite elements. H-adaptivity is the dynamic refinement of the mesh by subdividing elements, thus changing the characteristic element size and reducing numerical error. The authors are working on several major technical challenges that must be met to make effective use of HAMMER on MP computers.

  6. Dynamics of Nanoscale Grain-Boundary Decohesion in Aluminum by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Phillips, D. R.; Glaessegen, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics and energetics of intergranular crack growth along a flat grain boundary in aluminum is studied by a molecular-dynamics simulation model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions. Using the ability of the molecular-dynamics simulation to identify atoms involved in different atomistic mechanisms, it was possible to identify the energy contribution of different processes taking place during crack growth. The energy contributions were divided as: elastic energy, defined as the potential energy of the atoms in fcc crystallographic state; and plastically stored energy, the energy of stacking faults and twin boundaries; grain-boundary and surface energy. In addition, monitoring the amount of heat exchange with the molecular-dynamics thermostat gives the energy dissipated as heat in the system. The energetic analysis indicates that the majority of energy in a fast growing crack is dissipated as heat. This dissipation increases linearly at low speed, and faster than linear at speeds approaching 1/3 the Rayleigh wave speed when the crack tip becomes dynamically unstable producing periodic dislocation bursts until the crack is blunted.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Homogeneous Crystallization in Polymer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth from the melt of polyethylene-like polymer were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The crystallinity was determined by using the site order parameter method (SOP), which described local order degree around an atom. Snapshots of the simulations showed evolution of the nucleation and the crystal growth through SOP images clearly. The isothermal crystallization kinetics was determined at different temperatures. The rate of crystallization, Kc, and the Avrami exponents, n, were determined as a function of temperature. The forming of nucleis was traced to reveal that the nucleis were formed with more ordered cores and less ordered shells. A detailed statistical analysis of the MD snapshots and trajectories suggested conformations of the polymer chains changed smoothly from random coil to chain folded lamella in the crystallization processes.

  8. Molecular encryption and reconfiguration for remodeling of dynamic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihui; Gaddes, Erin R; Chen, Niancao; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-11

    Dynamic materials have been widely studied for regulation of cell adhesion that is important to a variety of biological and biomedical applications. These materials can undergo changes mainly through one of the two mechanisms: ligand release in response to chemical, physical, or biological stimuli, and ligand burial in response to mechanical stretching or the change of electrical potential. This study demonstrates an encrypted ligand and a new hydrogel that are capable of inducing and inhibiting cell adhesion, which is controlled by molecular reconfiguration. The ligand initially exhibits an inert state; it can be reconfigured into active and inert states by using unblocking and recovering molecules in physiological conditions. Since molecular reconfiguration does not require the release of the ligand from the hydrogels, inhibiting and inducing cell adhesion on the hydrogels can be repeated for multiple cycles. PMID:25808026

  9. Spotting the difference in molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Shun; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-08-21

    Comparing two trajectories from molecular simulations conducted under different conditions is not a trivial task. In this study, we apply a method called Linear Discriminant Analysis with ITERative procedure (LDA-ITER) to compare two molecular simulation results by finding the appropriate projection vectors. Because LDA-ITER attempts to determine a projection such that the projections of the two trajectories do not overlap, the comparison does not suffer from a strong anisotropy, which is an issue in protein dynamics. LDA-ITER is applied to two test cases: the T4 lysozyme protein simulation with or without a point mutation and the allosteric protein PDZ2 domain of hPTP1E with or without a ligand. The projection determined by the method agrees with the experimental data and previous simulations. The proposed procedure, which complements existing methods, is a versatile analytical method that is specialized to find the "difference" between two trajectories. PMID:27544096

  10. Permeance of H2 through porous graphene from molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjun; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2013-12-01

    A recent experiment (Koenig et al., 2012 [15]) demonstrated the capability of porous graphene as one-atom-thin membrane to separate gases by molecular sieving. A quantitative connection between the measured leak rate and the simulated gas permeance has yet to be established. Using H2 as a model gas, here we determine its permeance through porous graphene from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Trajectories are used to directly obtain H2 flux, pressure drop across the graphene membrane, and subsequently, H2 permeance. The permeance is determined to be on the order of 105 GPU (gas permeance unit) for pressure driving forces ranging from 2 to 163 atm. By relating to the experimental leak rate, we then use the permeation data to estimate the pore density in the experimentally created porous graphene.

  11. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of thermophysical properties of fluid ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Wang, Cong; Zheng, Fawei; Zhang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    We have performed first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory to study the thermophysical properties of ethane under extreme conditions. We present results for the equation of state of fluid ethane in the warm dense region. The optical conductivity is calculated via the Kubo-Greenwood formula from which the dc conductivity and optical reflectivity are derived. The close correlation between the nonmetal-metal transition of ethane and its decomposition, that ethane dissociates significantly into molecular and/or atomic hydrogen and some long alkane chains, has been systematically studied by analyzing the optical conductivity spectra, pair correlation functions, electronic density of states, and charge density distribution of fluid ethane.

  12. Structure factor and rheology of chain molecules from molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejón-González, Omar; Castillo-Tejas, Jorge; Manero, Octavio; Alvarado, Juan F. J.

    2013-05-01

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics were performed to determine the relationship between the static structure factor, the molecular conformation, and the rheological properties of chain molecules. A spring-monomer model with Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic and Lennard-Jones force field potentials was used to describe chain molecules. The equations of motion were solved for shear flow with SLLOD equations of motion integrated with Verlet's algorithm. A multiple time scale algorithm extended to non-equilibrium situations was used as the integration method. Concentric circular patterns in the structure factor were obtained, indicating an isotropic Newtonian behavior. Under simple shear flow, some peaks in the structure factor were emerged corresponding to an anisotropic pattern as chains aligned along the flow direction. Pure chain molecules and chain molecules in solution displayed shear-thinning regions. Power-law and Carreau-Yasuda models were used to adjust the generated data. Results are in qualitative agreement with rheological and light scattering experiments.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code V. 1 0.0 (Beta)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-20

    The DOE has funded Sandia National Labs (SNL) to develop an open-source modeling tool to guide the design and layout of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) arrays to maximize power production while minimizing environmental effects. This modeling framework simulates flows through and around MHK arrays while quantifying environmental responses. As an augmented version of US EPA's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), SNL-EFDC includes: (1) a new module that simulates energy conversion (momentum withdrawal) by MHK devices withmore » commensurate changes in the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, (2) new, advanced sediment dynamics routines, and (3) augmented water quality modules.« less

  14. Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code V. 1 0.0 (Beta)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    The DOE has funded Sandia National Labs (SNL) to develop an open-source modeling tool to guide the design and layout of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) arrays to maximize power production while minimizing environmental effects. This modeling framework simulates flows through and around MHK arrays while quantifying environmental responses. As an augmented version of US EPA's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), SNL-EFDC includes: (1) a new module that simulates energy conversion (momentum withdrawal) by MHK devices with commensurate changes in the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, (2) new, advanced sediment dynamics routines, and (3) augmented water quality modules.

  15. Mathematical framework for the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems with the RAVEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Rabiti, C.; Mandelli, D.; Alfonsi, A.; Cogliati, J.; Kinoshita, R.

    2013-07-01

    RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control Environment) is a software code under development at Idaho National Laboratory aimed at performing probabilistic risk assessment and uncertainty quantification using RELAP-7, for which it acts also as a simulation controller. In this paper we will present the equations characterizing a dynamic stochastic system and we will then discuss the behavior of each stochastic term and how it is accounted for in the RAVEN software design. Moreover we will present preliminary results of the implementation. (authors)

  16. GASPS: A time-dependent, one-dimensional, planar gas dynamics computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.E.; Sutton, S.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1986-12-05

    GASP is a transient, one-dimensional planar gas dynamic computer code that can be used to calculate the propagation of a shock wave. GASP, developed at LLNL, solves the one-dimensional planar equations governing momentum, mass and energy conservation. The equations are cast in an Eulerian formulation where the mesh is fixed in space, and material flows through it. Thus it is necessary to account for convection of material from one cell to its neighbor.

  17. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  18. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly. PMID:24811627

  19. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-07

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  20. SALT (System Analysis Language Translater): A steady state and dynamic systems code

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.; Geyer, H.

    1983-01-01

    SALT (System Analysis Language Translater) is a lumped parameter approach to system analysis which is totally modular. The modules are all precompiled and only the main program, which is generated by SALT, needs to be compiled for each unique system configuration. This is a departure from other lumped parameter codes where all models are written by MACROS and then compiled for each unique configuration, usually after all of the models are lumped together and sorted to eliminate undetermined variables. The SALT code contains a robust and sophisticated steady-sate finder (non-linear equation solver), optimization capability and enhanced GEAR integration scheme which makes use of sparsity and algebraic constraints. The SALT systems code has been used for various technologies. The code was originally developed for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems. It was easily extended to liquid metal MHD systems by simply adding the appropriate models and property libraries. Similarly, the model and property libraries were expanded to handle fuel cell systems, flue gas desulfurization systems, combined cycle gasification systems, fluidized bed combustion systems, ocean thermal energy conversion systems, geothermal systems, nuclear systems, and conventional coal-fired power plants. Obviously, the SALT systems code is extremely flexible to be able to handle all of these diverse systems. At present, the dynamic option has only been used for LMFBR nuclear power plants and geothermal power plants. However, it can easily be extended to other systems and can be used for analyzing control problems. 12 refs.