Science.gov

Sample records for molecular marker-based estimation

  1. Marker-Based Estimation of Genetic Parameters in Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Linear mixed model (LMM) analysis has been recently used extensively for estimating additive genetic variances and narrow-sense heritability in many genomic studies. While the LMM analysis is computationally less intensive than the Bayesian algorithms, it remains infeasible for large-scale genomic data sets. In this paper, we advocate the use of a statistical procedure known as symmetric differences squared (SDS) as it may serve as a viable alternative when the LMM methods have difficulty or fail to work with large datasets. The SDS procedure is a general and computationally simple method based only on the least squares regression analysis. We carry out computer simulations and empirical analyses to compare the SDS procedure with two commonly used LMM-based procedures. Our results show that the SDS method is not as good as the LMM methods for small data sets, but it becomes progressively better and can match well with the precision of estimation by the LMM methods for data sets with large sample sizes. Its major advantage is that with larger and larger samples, it continues to work with the increasing precision of estimation while the commonly used LMM methods are no longer able to work under our current typical computing capacity. Thus, these results suggest that the SDS method can serve as a viable alternative particularly when analyzing ‘big’ genomic data sets. PMID:25025305

  2. Marker-based estimation of genetic parameters in genomics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Linear mixed model (LMM) analysis has been recently used extensively for estimating additive genetic variances and narrow-sense heritability in many genomic studies. While the LMM analysis is computationally less intensive than the Bayesian algorithms, it remains infeasible for large-scale genomic data sets. In this paper, we advocate the use of a statistical procedure known as symmetric differences squared (SDS) as it may serve as a viable alternative when the LMM methods have difficulty or fail to work with large datasets. The SDS procedure is a general and computationally simple method based only on the least squares regression analysis. We carry out computer simulations and empirical analyses to compare the SDS procedure with two commonly used LMM-based procedures. Our results show that the SDS method is not as good as the LMM methods for small data sets, but it becomes progressively better and can match well with the precision of estimation by the LMM methods for data sets with large sample sizes. Its major advantage is that with larger and larger samples, it continues to work with the increasing precision of estimation while the commonly used LMM methods are no longer able to work under our current typical computing capacity. Thus, these results suggest that the SDS method can serve as a viable alternative particularly when analyzing 'big' genomic data sets. PMID:25025305

  3. The use and abuse of genetic marker-based estimates of relatedness and inbreeding

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Helen R

    2015-01-01

    Genetic marker-based estimators remain a popular tool for measuring relatedness (rxy) and inbreeding (F) coefficients at both the population and individual level. The performance of these estimators fluctuates with the number and variability of markers available, and the relatedness composition and demographic history of a population. Several methods are available to evaluate the reliability of the estimates of rxy and F, some of which are implemented in the program COANCESTRY. I used the simulation module in COANCESTRY since assess the performance of marker-based estimators of rxy and F in a species with very low genetic diversity, New Zealand’s little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii). I also conducted a review of published papers that have used COANCESTRY as its release to assess whether and how the reliability of the estimates of rxy and F produced by genetic markers are being measured and reported in published studies. My simulation results show that even when the correlation between true (simulated) and estimated rxy or F is relatively high (Pearson’s r = 0.66–0.72 and 0.81–0.85, respectively) the imprecision of the estimates renders them highly unreliable on an individual basis. The literature review demonstrates that the majority of studies do not report the reliability of marker-based estimates of rxy and F. There is currently no standard practice for selecting the best estimator for a given data set or reporting an estimator’s performance. This could lead to experimental results being interpreted out of context and render the robustness of conclusions based on measures of rxy and F debatable. PMID:26357542

  4. Molecular marker-based prediction of hybrid performance in maize using unbalanced data from multiple experiments with factorial crosses.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Tobias A; Möhring, Jens; Maurer, Hans Peter; Dhillon, Baldev S; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Sørensen, Anker P; Frisch, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    In hybrid breeding, the prediction of hybrid performance (HP) is extremely important as it is difficult to evaluate inbred lines in numerous cross combinations. Recent developments such as doubled haploid production and molecular marker technologies have enhanced the prospects of marker-based HP prediction to accelerate the breeding process. Our objectives were to (1) predict HP using a combined analysis of hybrids and parental lines from a breeding program, (2) evaluate the use of molecular markers in addition to phenotypic and pedigree data, (3) evaluate the combination of line per se data with marker-based estimates, (4) study the effect of the number of tested parents, and (5) assess the advantage of haplotype blocks. An unbalanced dataset of 400 hybrids from 9 factorial crosses tested in different experiments and data of 79 inbred parents were subjected to combined analyses with a mixed linear model. Marker data of the inbreds were obtained with 20 AFLP primer-enzyme combinations. Cross-validation was used to assess the performance prediction of hybrids of which no or only one parental line was testcross evaluated. For HP prediction, the highest proportion of explained variance (R (2)), 46% for grain yield (GY) and 70% for grain dry matter content (GDMC), was obtained from line per se best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) estimates plus marker effects associated with mid-parent heterosis (TEAM-LM). Our study demonstrated that HP was efficiently predicted using molecular markers even for GY when testcross data of both parents are not available. This can help in improving greatly the efficiency of commercial hybrid breeding programs. PMID:19048224

  5. Molecular markers based on LTR retrotransposons BARE-1 and Jeli uncover different strata of evolutionary relationships in diploid wheats.

    PubMed

    Konovalov, Fedor A; Goncharov, Nikolay P; Goryunova, Svetlana; Shaturova, Aleksandra; Proshlyakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    Molecular markers based on retrotransposon insertions are widely used for various applications including phylogenetic analysis. Multiple cases were described where retrotransposon-based markers, namely sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP), were superior to other marker types in resolving the phylogenetic relationships due to their higher variability and informativeness. However, the patterns of evolutionary relationships revealed by SSAP may be dependent on the underlying retrotransposon activity in different periods of time. Hence, the proper choice of retrotransposon family is essential for obtaining significant results. We compared the phylogenetic trees for a diverse set of diploid A-genome wheat species (Triticum boeoticum, T. urartu and T. monococcum) based on two unrelated retrotransposon families, BARE-1 and Jeli. BARE-1 belongs to Copia class and has a uniform distribution between common wheat (T. aestivum) genomes of different origin (A, B and D), indicating similar activity in the respective diploid genome donors. Gypsy-class family Jeli was found by us to be an A-genome retrotransposon with >70% copies residing in A genome of hexaploid common wheat, suggesting a burst of transposition in the history of A-genome progenitors. The results indicate that a higher Jeli transpositional activity was associated with T. urartu versus T. boeoticum speciation, while BARE-1 produced more polymorphic insertions during subsequent intraspecific diversification; as an outcome, each retrotransposon provides more informative markers at the corresponding level of phylogenetic relationships. We conclude that multiple retroelement families should be analyzed for an image of evolutionary relationships to be solid and comprehensive. PMID:20407790

  6. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich.

    PubMed

    Marubodee, Rusama; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Isemura, Takehisa; Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits. PMID:26398819

  7. Construction of an SSR and RAD-Marker Based Molecular Linkage Map of Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich

    PubMed Central

    Chankaew, Sompong; Kaga, Akito; Naito, Ken; Ehara, Hiroshi; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich. (tuber cowpea) is an underutilized crop for consuming its tuber and mature seeds. Wild form of V. vexillata is a pan-tropical perennial herbaceous plant which has been used by local people as a food. Wild V. vexillata has also been considered as useful gene(s) source for V. unguiculata (cowpea), since it was reported to have various resistance gene(s) for insects and diseases of cowpea. To exploit the potential of V. vexillata, an SSR-based linkage map of V. vexillata was developed. A total of 874 SSR markers successfully amplified single DNA fragment in V. vexillata among 1,336 SSR markers developed from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean). An F2 population of 300 plants derived from a cross between salt resistant (V1) and susceptible (V5) accessions was used for mapping. A genetic linkage map was constructed using 82 polymorphic SSR markers loci, which could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 511.5 cM in length with a mean distance of 7.2 cM between adjacent markers. To develop higher density molecular linkage map and to confirm SSR markers position in a linkage map, RAD markers were developed and a combined SSR and RAD markers linkage map of V. vexillata was constructed. A total of 559 (84 SSR and 475 RAD) markers loci could be assigned to 11 linkage groups spanning 973.9 cM in length with a mean distance of 1.8 cM between adjacent markers. Linkage and genetic position of all SSR markers in an SSR linkage map were confirmed. When an SSR genetic linkage map of V. vexillata was compared with those of V. radiata and V. unguiculata, it was suggested that the structure of V. vexillata chromosome was considerably differentiated. This map is the first SSR and RAD marker-based V. vexillata linkage map which can be used for the mapping of useful traits. PMID:26398819

  8. Development of molecular markers, based on chloroplast and ribosomal DNA regions, to discriminate three popular medicinal plant species, Cynanchum wilfordii, Cynanchum auriculatum, and Polygonum multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun-Heui; Cho, KyeMan; Goo, YoungMin; Kim, ManBae; Shin, Young-Wook; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Identification of plant species is important for standardizing herbal medicine. Cynanchum wilfordii (Baekshuoh in Korean) and Polygonum multiflorum (Hashuoh in Korean) are important oriental medicinal herbs in Korea, Japan, and China. Cynanchum auriculatum is a faster growing and more productive plant than C. wilfordii; and, it is not recognized as a medicinal plant in the Korean Pharmacopoeia. C. wilfordii, P. multiflorum, and C. auriculatum are often misidentified in the Korean herbal medicine marketplace due to their morphological similarities and similar names. In this study, we investigated molecular authentication of these three medicinal plants using DNA sequences in the TrnL-F chloroplast intergenic region. Specific species identification was achieved by detecting allelic variations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) and high resolution melting curve analysis. Our results demonstrate that the intraspecific genetic distance between C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum is relatively low. We also developed a quantitative PCR assay using species-specific TrnL-F primers, which allowed us to estimate the ratio of C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum using varying ratios of mixed genomic DNA template from the two species. Additionally, to identify species in hybrid plants produced by cross-fertilization, we analyzed nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer regions in C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum by ARMS-PCR. Our results indicate that SNP-based molecular markers, usable to barcode tools could provide efficient and rapid authentication of these closely related medicinal plant species, and will be useful for preventing the distribution of products contaminated with adulterants. PMID:26902862

  9. Two molecular markers based on mitochondrial genomes for varieties identification of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids.

    PubMed

    Xincheng, Zhang; Kunci, Chen; Xinping, Zhu; Jian, Zhao; Qing, Luo; Xiaoyou, Hong; Wei, Li; Fengfang, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    The northern snakehead (Channa argus) and blotched snakehead (Channa maculata) and their reciprocal hybrids have played important roles in the Chinese freshwater aquaculture industry, with an annual production in China exceeding 400 thousand tons. While these are popular aquaculture breeds in China, it is not easy to identify northern snakehead, blotched snakehead, and their hybrids. Thus, a method should be developed to identify these varieties. To distinguish between the reciprocal hybrids (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂ and C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), the mitochondrial genome sequences of northern snakehead and blotched snakehead and their reciprocal hybrids were compared. Following the alignment and analysis of mtDNA sequences of northern snakehead, blotched snakehead and their hybrids, two pairs of specific primers were designed based on identified differences ranging from 12S rRNA to 16S rRNA gene. The BY1 primers amplified the same bands in the blotched snakehead and the hybrid (C. maculata ♀ × C. argus ♂), while producing no products in northern snakehead and the hybrid (C. argus ♀ × C. maculata ♂). Amplification with WY1 yielded the opposite results. Then, 30 individuals per fish were randomized to verify the primers, and the results showed that the primers were specific for breeds, as intended. The specific primers can not only simply distinguish between two kinds of hybrids, but also rapidly identify the two parents. This study provides a method of molecular marker identification to identify reciprocal hybrids. PMID:24438305

  10. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; transferability across the Aurantioideae subfamily1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ancillo, Gema; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. • Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. • Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level. PMID:25202535

  11. Expression Marker-Based Strategy to Improve Beef Quality

    PubMed Central

    Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Picard, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    For beef cattle research, a main objective is to control concomitantly the development of muscles and the qualities of beef cuts. Beef quality is a complex phenotype that is only detectable after slaughter and is highly variable. The beef industry is in need of tools to estimate beef quality of live cattle or online in abattoirs, with specific attention towards sensory attributes (tenderness, juiciness, flavour, and colour). Identification of relevant genetic and genomic markers is ongoing, especially for tenderness—a top priority quality attribute. In this paper, we describe the steps of an expression marker-based strategy to improve beef sensory quality, from the discovery of biomarkers that identify consistent beef and the biological functions governing beef tenderness to the integration of the knowledge into detection tests for desirable animals. These tools should soon be available for the management of sensory quality in the beef production chain for meeting market's demands and assuring good quality standards. PMID:27066527

  12. Evaluation of a Phylogenetic Marker Based on Genomic Segment B of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus: Facilitating a Feasible Incorporation of this Segment to the Molecular Epidemiology Studies for this Viral Agent

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, Orlando; Dolz, Roser; Valle, Rosa; Perera, Carmen L.; Bertran, Kateri; Frías, Maria T.; Ganges, Llilianne; Díaz de Arce, Heidy; Majó, Natàlia; Núñez, José I.; Pérez, Lester J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a highly contagious and acute viral disease, which has caused high mortality rates in birds and considerable economic losses in different parts of the world for more than two decades and it still represents a considerable threat to poultry. The current study was designed to rigorously measure the reliability of a phylogenetic marker included into segment B. This marker can facilitate molecular epidemiology studies, incorporating this segment of the viral genome, to better explain the links between emergence, spreading and maintenance of the very virulent IBD virus (vvIBDV) strains worldwide. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences of the segment B gene from IBDV strains isolated from diverse geographic locations were obtained from the GenBank Database; Cuban sequences were obtained in the current work. A phylogenetic marker named B-marker was assessed by different phylogenetic principles such as saturation of substitution, phylogenetic noise and high consistency. This last parameter is based on the ability of B-marker to reconstruct the same topology as the complete segment B of the viral genome. From the results obtained from B-marker, demographic history for both main lineages of IBDV regarding segment B was performed by Bayesian skyline plot analysis. Phylogenetic analysis for both segments of IBDV genome was also performed, revealing the presence of a natural reassortant strain with segment A from vvIBDV strains and segment B from non-vvIBDV strains within Cuban IBDV population. Conclusions/Significance This study contributes to a better understanding of the emergence of vvIBDV strains, describing molecular epidemiology of IBDV using the state-of-the-art methodology concerning phylogenetic reconstruction. This study also revealed the presence of a novel natural reassorted strain as possible manifest of change in the genetic structure and stability of the vvIBDV strains. Therefore, it highlights the need to obtain

  13. Generalized Mixture Models for Molecular Phylogenetic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jason; Sullivan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing availability of multigene sequence data during the past decade has enabled phylogeny estimation at phylogenomic scales. However, dealing with evolutionary process heterogeneity across the genome becomes increasingly challenging. Here we develop a mixture model approach that uses reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation to permit as many distinct models as the data require. Each additional model considered may be a fully parametrized general time-reversible model or any of its special cases. Furthermore, we expand the usual proposal mechanisms for topology changes to permit hard polytomies (i.e., zero-length internal branches). This new approach is implemented in the Crux software toolkit. We demonstrate the feasibility of using reversible jump MCMC on mixture models by reexamining a well-known 44-taxon mammalian data set comprising 22 concatenated genes. We are able to reproduce the results of the original analysis (with respect to bipartition support) when we make identical assumptions, but when we allow for polytomies and/or use data-driven mixture model estimation, we infer much lower bipartition support values for several key bipartitions. PMID:21873377

  14. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred. PMID:25780773

  15. Estimating metazoan divergence times with a molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Kevin J.; Lyons, Jessica B.; Nowak, Kristin S.; Takacs, Carter M.; Wargo, Matthew J.; McPeek, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Accurately dating when the first bilaterally symmetrical animals arose is crucial to our understanding of early animal evolution. The earliest unequivocally bilaterian fossils are ≈555 million years old. In contrast, molecular-clock analyses calibrated by using the fossil record of vertebrates estimate that vertebrates split from dipterans (Drosophila) ≈900 million years ago (Ma). Nonetheless, comparative genomic analyses suggest that a significant rate difference exists between vertebrates and dipterans, because the percentage difference between the genomes of mosquito and fly is greater than between fish and mouse, even though the vertebrate divergence is almost twice that of the dipteran. Here we show that the dipteran rate of molecular evolution is similar to other invertebrate taxa (echinoderms and bivalve molluscs) but not to vertebrates, which significantly decreased their rate of molecular evolution with respect to invertebrates. Using a data set consisting of the concatenation of seven different amino acid sequences from 23 ingroup taxa (giving a total of 11 different invertebrate calibration points scattered throughout the bilaterian tree and across the Phanerozoic), we estimate that the last common ancestor of bilaterians arose somewhere between 573 and 656 Ma, depending on the value assigned to the parameter scaling molecular substitution rate heterogeneity. These results are in accord with the known fossil record and support the view that the Cambrian explosion reflects, in part, the diversification of bilaterian phyla. PMID:15084738

  16. Estimating metazoan divergence times with a molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kevin J; Lyons, Jessica B; Nowak, Kristin S; Takacs, Carter M; Wargo, Matthew J; McPeek, Mark A

    2004-04-27

    Accurately dating when the first bilaterally symmetrical animals arose is crucial to our understanding of early animal evolution. The earliest unequivocally bilaterian fossils are approximately 555 million years old. In contrast, molecular-clock analyses calibrated by using the fossil record of vertebrates estimate that vertebrates split from dipterans (Drosophila) approximately 900 million years ago (Ma). Nonetheless, comparative genomic analyses suggest that a significant rate difference exists between vertebrates and dipterans, because the percentage difference between the genomes of mosquito and fly is greater than between fish and mouse, even though the vertebrate divergence is almost twice that of the dipteran. Here we show that the dipteran rate of molecular evolution is similar to other invertebrate taxa (echinoderms and bivalve molluscs) but not to vertebrates, which significantly decreased their rate of molecular evolution with respect to invertebrates. Using a data set consisting of the concatenation of seven different amino acid sequences from 23 ingroup taxa (giving a total of 11 different invertebrate calibration points scattered throughout the bilaterian tree and across the Phanerozoic), we estimate that the last common ancestor of bilaterians arose somewhere between 573 and 656 Ma, depending on the value assigned to the parameter scaling molecular substitution rate heterogeneity. These results are in accord with the known fossil record and support the view that the Cambrian explosion reflects, in part, the diversification of bilaterian phyla. PMID:15084738

  17. Improved estimates of coordinate error for molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Oeffner, Robert D.; Bunkóczi, Gábor; McCoy, Airlie J.; Read, Randy J.

    2013-11-01

    A function for estimating the effective root-mean-square deviation in coordinates between two proteins has been developed that depends on both the sequence identity and the size of the protein and is optimized for use with molecular replacement in Phaser. A top peak translation-function Z-score of over 8 is found to be a reliable metric of when molecular replacement has succeeded. The estimate of the root-mean-square deviation (r.m.s.d.) in coordinates between the model and the target is an essential parameter for calibrating likelihood functions for molecular replacement (MR). Good estimates of the r.m.s.d. lead to good estimates of the variance term in the likelihood functions, which increases signal to noise and hence success rates in the MR search. Phaser has hitherto used an estimate of the r.m.s.d. that only depends on the sequence identity between the model and target and which was not optimized for the MR likelihood functions. Variance-refinement functionality was added to Phaser to enable determination of the effective r.m.s.d. that optimized the log-likelihood gain (LLG) for a correct MR solution. Variance refinement was subsequently performed on a database of over 21 000 MR problems that sampled a range of sequence identities, protein sizes and protein fold classes. Success was monitored using the translation-function Z-score (TFZ), where a TFZ of 8 or over for the top peak was found to be a reliable indicator that MR had succeeded for these cases with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Good estimates of the r.m.s.d. are correlated with the sequence identity and the protein size. A new estimate of the r.m.s.d. that uses these two parameters in a function optimized to fit the mean of the refined variance is implemented in Phaser and improves MR outcomes. Perturbing the initial estimate of the r.m.s.d. from the mean of the distribution in steps of standard deviations of the distribution further increases MR success rates.

  18. Comparison of Markerless and Marker-Based Motion Capture Technologies through Simultaneous Data Collection during Gait: Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade markerless motion capture techniques have gained an increasing interest in the biomechanics community. In the clinical field, however, the application of markerless techniques is still debated. This is mainly due to a limited number of papers dedicated to the comparison with the state of the art of marker based motion capture, in term of repeatability of the three dimensional joints' kinematics. In the present work the application of markerless technique to data acquired with a marker-based system was investigated. All videos and external data were recorded with the same motion capture system and included the possibility to use markerless and marker-based methods simultaneously. Three dimensional markerless joint kinematics was estimated and compared with the one determined with traditional marker based systems, through the evaluation of root mean square distance between joint rotations. In order to compare the performance of markerless and marker-based systems in terms of clinically relevant joint angles estimation, the same anatomical frames of reference were defined for both systems. Differences in calibration and synchronization of the cameras were excluded by applying the same wand calibration and lens distortion correction to both techniques. Best results were achieved for knee flexion-extension angle, with an average root mean square distance of 11.75 deg, corresponding to 18.35% of the range of motion. Sagittal plane kinematics was estimated better than on the other planes also for hip and ankle (root mean square distance of 17.62 deg e.g. 44.66%, and 7.17 deg e.g. 33.12%), meanwhile estimates for hip joint were the most incorrect. This technique enables users of markerless technology to compare differences with marker-based in order to define the degree of applicability of markerless technique. PMID:24595273

  19. Utilizing Ion-Mobility Data to Estimate Molecular Masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan; Kanik, Isik

    2008-01-01

    A method is being developed for utilizing readings of an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS) to estimate molecular masses of ions that have passed through the spectrometer. The method involves the use of (1) some feature-based descriptors of structures of molecules of interest and (2) reduced ion mobilities calculated from IMS readings as inputs to (3) a neural network. This development is part of a larger effort to enable the use of IMSs as relatively inexpensive, robust, lightweight instruments to identify, via molecular masses, individual compounds or groups of compounds (especially organic compounds) that may be present in specific environments or samples. Potential applications include detection of organic molecules as signs of life on remote planets, modeling and detection of biochemicals of interest in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries, and detection of chemical and biological hazards in industrial, homeland-security, and industrial settings.

  20. In situ marker-based assessment of leaf trait evolutionary potential in a marginal European beech population.

    PubMed

    Bontemps, A; Lefèvre, F; Davi, H; Oddou-Muratorio, S

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary processes are expected to be crucial for the adaptation of natural populations to environmental changes. In particular, the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve in response to the species limiting conditions remains a major issue that requires to address their evolutionary potential. In situ quantitative genetic studies based on molecular markers offer the possibility to estimate evolutionary potentials manipulating neither the environment nor the individuals on which phenotypes are measured. The goal of this study was to estimate heritability and genetic correlations of a suite of leaf functional traits involved in climate adaptation for a natural population of the tree Fagus sylvatica, growing at the rear edge of the species range. Using two marker-based quantitative genetics approaches, we obtained consistent and significant estimates of heritability for leaf phenological (phenology of leaf flush), morphological (mass, area, ratio mass/area) and physiological (δ(13)C, nitrogen content) traits. Moreover, we found only one significant positive genetic correlation between leaf area and leaf mass, which likely reflected mechanical constraints. We conclude first that the studied population has considerable genetic diversity for important ecophysiological traits regarding drought adaptation and, second, that genetic correlations are not likely to impose strong genetic constraints to future population evolution. Our results bring important insights into the question of the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve. PMID:26679342

  1. Estimating Arrhenius parameters using temperature programmed molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imandi, Venkataramana; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic rates at different temperatures and the associated Arrhenius parameters, whenever Arrhenius law is obeyed, are efficiently estimated by applying maximum likelihood analysis to waiting times collected using the temperature programmed molecular dynamics method. When transitions involving many activated pathways are available in the dataset, their rates may be calculated using the same collection of waiting times. Arrhenius behaviour is ascertained by comparing rates at the sampled temperatures with ones from the Arrhenius expression. Three prototype systems with corrugated energy landscapes, namely, solvated alanine dipeptide, diffusion at the metal-solvent interphase, and lithium diffusion in silicon, are studied to highlight various aspects of the method. The method becomes particularly appealing when the Arrhenius parameters can be used to find rates at low temperatures where transitions are rare. Systematic coarse-graining of states can further extend the time scales accessible to the method. Good estimates for the rate parameters are obtained with 500-1000 waiting times.

  2. Estimating Arrhenius parameters using temperature programmed molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Imandi, Venkataramana; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-07-21

    Kinetic rates at different temperatures and the associated Arrhenius parameters, whenever Arrhenius law is obeyed, are efficiently estimated by applying maximum likelihood analysis to waiting times collected using the temperature programmed molecular dynamics method. When transitions involving many activated pathways are available in the dataset, their rates may be calculated using the same collection of waiting times. Arrhenius behaviour is ascertained by comparing rates at the sampled temperatures with ones from the Arrhenius expression. Three prototype systems with corrugated energy landscapes, namely, solvated alanine dipeptide, diffusion at the metal-solvent interphase, and lithium diffusion in silicon, are studied to highlight various aspects of the method. The method becomes particularly appealing when the Arrhenius parameters can be used to find rates at low temperatures where transitions are rare. Systematic coarse-graining of states can further extend the time scales accessible to the method. Good estimates for the rate parameters are obtained with 500-1000 waiting times. PMID:27448871

  3. The origin and diversification of eukaryotes: problems with molecular phylogenetics and molecular clock estimation

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Andrew J; Hug, Laura A

    2006-01-01

    Determining the relationships among and divergence times for the major eukaryotic lineages remains one of the most important and controversial outstanding problems in evolutionary biology. The sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes led to the first nearly comprehensive phylogenies of eukaryotes in the late 1980s, and supported a view where cellular complexity was acquired during the divergence of extant unicellular eukaryote lineages. More recently, however, refinements in analytical methods coupled with the availability of many additional genes for phylogenetic analysis showed that much of the deep structure of early rRNA trees was artefactual. Recent phylogenetic analyses of a multiple genes and the discovery of important molecular and ultrastructural phylogenetic characters have resolved eukaryotic diversity into six major hypothetical groups. Yet relationships among these groups remain poorly understood because of saturation of sequence changes on the billion-year time-scale, possible rapid radiations of major lineages, phylogenetic artefacts and endosymbiotic or lateral gene transfer among eukaryotes. Estimating the divergence dates between the major eukaryote lineages using molecular analyses is even more difficult than phylogenetic estimation. Error in such analyses comes from a myriad of sources including: (i) calibration fossil dates, (ii) the assumed phylogenetic tree, (iii) the nucleotide or amino acid substitution model, (iv) substitution number (branch length) estimates, (v) the model of how rates of evolution change over the tree, (vi) error inherent in the time estimates for a given model and (vii) how multiple gene data are treated. By reanalysing datasets from recently published molecular clock studies, we show that when errors from these various sources are properly accounted for, the confidence intervals on inferred dates can be very large. Furthermore, estimated dates of divergence vary hugely depending on the methods

  4. Intra-population comparison of vegetative and floral trait heritabilities estimated from molecular markers in wild Aquilegia populations.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Clara; Alcántara, Julio M; Rey, Pedro J; Bastida, Jesus M

    2011-09-01

    Measuring heritable genetic variation is important for understanding patterns of trait evolution in wild populations, and yet studies of quantitative genetic parameters estimated directly in the field are limited by logistic constraints, such as the difficulties of inferring relatedness among individuals in the wild. Marker-based approaches have received attention because they can potentially be applied directly to wild populations. For long-lived, self-compatible plant species where pedigrees are inadequate, the regression-based method proposed by Ritland has the appeal of estimating heritabilities from marker-based estimates of relatedness. The method has been difficult to implement in some plant populations, however, because it requires significant variance in relatedness across the population. Here, we show that the method can be readily applied to compare the ability of different traits to respond to selection, within populations. For several taxa of the perennial herb genus Aquilegia, we estimated heritabilities of floral and vegetative traits and, combined with estimates of natural selection, compared the ability to respond to selection of both types of traits under current conditions. The intra-population comparisons showed that vegetative traits have a higher potential for evolution, because although they are as heritable as floral traits, selection on them is stronger. These patterns of potential evolution are consistent with macroevolutionary trends in the European lineage of the genus. PMID:21504491

  5. Infrared marker-based tracking in an indoor unknown environment for augmented reality applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yetao; Weng, Dongdong; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2009-11-01

    Marker based tracking requires complicated preparation work that impedes its use in augmented reality applications. This paper presents a novel tracking scheme to be used in an indoor unknown scene by adapting simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) algorithms. An infrared (IR) marker system is specifically designed to simplify the feature recognition and tracking in SLAM process. With one initial IR marker, the other markers can be projected randomly onto a large-area environment. The pose of camera can be estimated with a monocular IR camera in real time. Experimental result demonstrates that the proposed system meets the requirements of accuracy for large-area tracking. A prototype system is built to show its feasibility in unknown environment and potential use in applications.

  6. ESTIMATION OF MOLECULAR DIFFUSIVITY IN ISOLATED ANIMAL TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    If molecular transport of a lipophilic toxicant in isolated tissues is truly a diffusion process, then it should be possible to describe the process in terms of mathematical equations commonly used to describe the conduction of heat in homogenous and isotropic solids. The present...

  7. Methods for the quantitative comparison of molecular estimates of clade age and the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julia A; Boyd, Clint A

    2015-01-01

    Approaches quantifying the relative congruence, or incongruence, of molecular divergence estimates and the fossil record have been limited. Previously proposed methods are largely node specific, assessing incongruence at particular nodes for which both fossil data and molecular divergence estimates are available. These existing metrics, and other methods that quantify incongruence across topologies including entirely extinct clades, have so far not taken into account uncertainty surrounding both the divergence estimates and the ages of fossils. They have also treated molecular divergence estimates younger than previously assessed fossil minimum estimates of clade age as if they were the same as cases in which they were older. However, these cases are not the same. Recovered divergence dates younger than compared oldest known occurrences require prior hypotheses regarding the phylogenetic position of the compared fossil record and standard assumptions about the relative timing of morphological and molecular change to be incorrect. Older molecular dates, by contrast, are consistent with an incomplete fossil record and do not require prior assessments of the fossil record to be unreliable in some way. Here, we compare previous approaches and introduce two new descriptive metrics. Both metrics explicitly incorporate information on uncertainty by utilizing the 95% confidence intervals on estimated divergence dates and data on stratigraphic uncertainty concerning the age of the compared fossils. Metric scores are maximized when these ranges are overlapping. MDI (minimum divergence incongruence) discriminates between situations where molecular estimates are younger or older than known fossils reporting both absolute fit values and a number score for incompatible nodes. DIG range (divergence implied gap range) allows quantification of the minimum increase in implied missing fossil record induced by enforcing a given set of molecular-based estimates. These metrics are used

  8. Combining Radiation Epidemiology With Molecular Biology-Changing From Health Risk Estimates to Therapeutic Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The authors herein summarize six presentations dedicated to the key session "molecular radiation epidemiology" of the ConRad meeting 2015. These presentations were chosen in order to highlight the promise when combining conventional radiation epidemiology with molecular biology. Conventional radiation epidemiology uses dose estimates for risk predictions on health. However, combined with molecular biology, dose-dependent bioindicators of effect hold the promise to improve clinical diagnostics and to provide target molecules for potential therapeutic intervention. One out of the six presentations exemplified the use of radiation-induced molecular changes as biomarkers of exposure by measuring stabile chromosomal translocations. The remaining five presentations focused on molecular changes used as bioindicators of the effect. These bioindicators of the effect could be used for diagnostic purposes on colon cancers (genomic instability), thyroid cancer (CLIP2), or head and neck squamous cell cancers. Therapeutic implications of gene expression changes were examined in Chernobyl thyroid cancer victims and Mayak workers. PMID:27356062

  9. Time-dependent estimates of molecular evolutionary rates: evidence and causes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Duchêne, Sebastián; Molak, Martyna; Shapiro, Beth

    2015-12-01

    We are writing in response to a recent critique by Emerson & Hickerson (2015), who challenge the evidence of a time-dependent bias in molecular rate estimates. This bias takes the form of a negative relationship between inferred evolutionary rates and the ages of the calibrations on which these estimates are based. Here, we present a summary of the evidence obtained from a broad range of taxa that supports a time-dependent bias in rate estimates, with a consideration of the potential causes of these observed trends. We also describe recent progress in improving the reliability of evolutionary rate estimation and respond to the concerns raised by Emerson & Hickerson (2015) about the validity of rates estimated from time-structured sequence data. In doing so, we hope to dispel some misconceptions and to highlight several research directions that will improve our understanding of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. PMID:26769402

  10. Estimation of biliary excretion of foreign compounds using properties of molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Ghafourian, Taravat

    2014-01-01

    Biliary excretion is one of the main elimination pathways for drugs and/or their metabolites. Therefore, an insight into the structural profile of cholephilic compounds through accurate modelling of the biliary excretion is important for the estimation of clinical pharmacokinetics in early stages of drug discovery. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships as computational tools for the estimation of biliary excretion and identification of the molecular properties controlling this process. The study used percentage of dose excreted intact into bile measured in vivo in rat for a diverse dataset of 217 compounds. Statistical techniques were multiple linear regression analysis, regression trees, random forest and boosted trees. A simple regression tree model generated using the CART algorithm was the most accurate in the estimation of the percentage of bile excretion of compounds, and this outperformed the more sophisticated boosted trees and random forest techniques. Analysis of the outliers indicated that the models perform best when lipophilicity is not too extreme (log P < 5.35) and for compounds with molecular weight above 280 Da. Molecular descriptors selected by all these models including the top ten incorporated in boosted trees and random forest indicated a higher biliary excretion for relatively hydrophilic compounds especially if they are anionic or cationic, and have a large molecular size. A statistically validated molecular weight threshold for potentially significant biliary excretion was above 348 Da. PMID:24202722

  11. IMPROVED METHOD FOR ESTIMATING MOLECULAR WEIGHTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM LOW RESOLUTION MASS SPECTRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved method of estimating molecular weights of volatile organic compound from their mass spectra has been developed and implemented with an expert system. he method is based on the strong correlation of MAXMASS, the highest mass with an intensity of 5% of the base peak in ...

  12. LARGE SCALE EVALUATION OF A PATTERN RECOGNITION/EXPERT SYSTEM FOR MASS SPECTRAL MOLECULAR WEIGHT ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fast, personal-computer based method of estimating molecular weights of organic compounds from low resolution mass I spectra has been thoroughly evaluated. he method is based on a rule-based pattern,recognition/expert system approach which uses empirical linear corrections whic...

  13. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 72 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lesquerella oil. The ratios of ion signal intensities (or relative abundances) of ...

  14. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 74 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using HPLC and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lequerella oil. The ratios of relative abundances of the fragment ions fr...

  15. A multilocus timescale for oomycete evolution estimated under three distinct molecular clock models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular clock methodologies allow for the estimation of divergence times across a variety of organisms; this can be particularly useful for groups lacking robust fossil histories, such as microbial eukaryotes with few distinguishing morphological traits. Here we have used a Bayesian molecular clock method under three distinct clock models to estimate divergence times within oomycetes, a group of fungal-like eukaryotes that are ubiquitous in the environment and include a number of devastating pathogenic species. The earliest fossil evidence for oomycetes comes from the Lower Devonian (~400 Ma), however the taxonomic affinities of these fossils are unclear. Results Complete genome sequences were used to identify orthologous proteins among oomycetes, diatoms, and a brown alga, with a focus on conserved regulators of gene expression such as DNA and histone modifiers and transcription factors. Our molecular clock estimates place the origin of oomycetes by at least the mid-Paleozoic (~430-400 Ma), with the divergence between two major lineages, the peronosporaleans and saprolegnialeans, in the early Mesozoic (~225-190 Ma). Divergence times estimated under the three clock models were similar, although only the strict and random local clock models produced reliable estimates for most parameters. Conclusions Our molecular timescale suggests that modern pathogenic oomycetes diverged well after the origin of their respective hosts, indicating that environmental conditions or perhaps horizontal gene transfer events, rather than host availability, may have driven lineage diversification. Our findings also suggest that the last common ancestor of oomycetes possessed a full complement of eukaryotic regulatory proteins, including those involved in histone modification, RNA interference, and tRNA and rRNA methylation; interestingly no match to canonical DNA methyltransferases could be identified in the oomycete genomes studied here. PMID:24884411

  16. Comparison of mode estimation methods and application in molecular clock analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, S. Blair; Shah, Prachi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Distributions of time estimates in molecular clock studies are sometimes skewed or contain outliers. In those cases, the mode is a better estimator of the overall time of divergence than the mean or median. However, different methods are available for estimating the mode. We compared these methods in simulations to determine their strengths and weaknesses and further assessed their performance when applied to real data sets from a molecular clock study. RESULTS: We found that the half-range mode and robust parametric mode methods have a lower bias than other mode methods under a diversity of conditions. However, the half-range mode suffers from a relatively high variance and the robust parametric mode is more susceptible to bias by outliers. We determined that bootstrapping reduces the variance of both mode estimators. Application of the different methods to real data sets yielded results that were concordant with the simulations. CONCLUSION: Because the half-range mode is a simple and fast method, and produced less bias overall in our simulations, we recommend the bootstrapped version of it as a general-purpose mode estimator and suggest a bootstrap method for obtaining the standard error and 95% confidence interval of the mode.

  17. Estimating the distribution of fitness effects from DNA sequence data: Implications for the molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Piganeau, Gwenaël; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for estimating the distribution of fitness effects of new amino acid mutations when those mutations can be assumed to be slightly advantageous, slightly deleterious, or strongly deleterious. We apply the method to mitochondrial data from several different species. In the majority of the data sets, the shape of the distribution is approximately exponential. Our results provide an estimate of the distribution of fitness effects of weakly selected mutations and provide a possible explanation for why the molecular clock is fairly constant across taxa and time. PMID:12925735

  18. Molecular marker based characterization and genetic diversity of wheat genotypes in relation to boron efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron deficient soils pose a critical problem to wheat production in many areas of the world including Bangladesh and causes significant yield reduction. Therefore, in the present study, 21 diverse wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes collected from three different countries (Bangladesh, India, a...

  19. Quantification of the effects of molecular marker oxidation on source apportionment estimates for motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anirban A.; Wagstrom, Kristina M.; Adams, Peter J.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2011-06-01

    Molecular markers are individual organic compounds used in receptor models to apportion fine particulate matter to sources. These models currently assume that molecular markers are chemically stable; however, recent laboratory experiments suggest they may be significantly oxidized on atmospherically relevant time scales. To investigate the effects of photo-oxidation, we extended a 3-D chemical transport model (PMCAMx) to simulate norhopane concentrations over the eastern United States during July 2001. Norhopane is an important molecular marker for motor vehicle exhaust. We examined eight different simulation scenarios, using different combinations of reaction rates and source profiles. The simulations including norhopane oxidation better reproduced the observed spatial patterns of norhopane concentrations than the non-reactive cases. Chemical mass balance (CMB) analysis was performed using the PMCAMx-predicted motor vehicle norhopane and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations to quantify the bias caused by oxidation on source apportionment estimates. Norhopane oxidation caused CMB to underestimate total vehicle OC by 10-50%, with larger biases in rural areas. This underestimation was largely due to changes in the amount of OC apportioned to gasoline vehicles which was reduced by as much as 100%. The OC apportioned to diesel vehicle emissions was relatively insensitive to norhopane reaction. Therefore, oxidation can substantially alter CMB estimates regarding the relative importance of gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions.

  20. Applying stability selection to consistently estimate sparse principal components in high-dimensional molecular data

    PubMed Central

    Sill, Martin; Saadati, Maral; Benner, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Principal component analysis (PCA) is a basic tool often used in bioinformatics for visualization and dimension reduction. However, it is known that PCA may not consistently estimate the true direction of maximal variability in high-dimensional, low sample size settings, which are typical for molecular data. Assuming that the underlying signal is sparse, i.e. that only a fraction of features contribute to a principal component (PC), this estimation consistency can be retained. Most existing sparse PCA methods use L1-penalization, i.e. the lasso, to perform feature selection. But, the lasso is known to lack variable selection consistency in high dimensions and therefore a subsequent interpretation of selected features can give misleading results. Results: We present S4VDPCA, a sparse PCA method that incorporates a subsampling approach, namely stability selection. S4VDPCA can consistently select the truly relevant variables contributing to a sparse PC while also consistently estimate the direction of maximal variability. The performance of the S4VDPCA is assessed in a simulation study and compared to other PCA approaches, as well as to a hypothetical oracle PCA that ‘knows’ the truly relevant features in advance and thus finds optimal, unbiased sparse PCs. S4VDPCA is computationally efficient and performs best in simulations regarding parameter estimation consistency and feature selection consistency. Furthermore, S4VDPCA is applied to a publicly available gene expression data set of medulloblastoma brain tumors. Features contributing to the first two estimated sparse PCs represent genes significantly over-represented in pathways typically deregulated between molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma. Availability and implementation: Software is available at https://github.com/mwsill/s4vdpca. Contact: m.sill@dkfz.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25861969

  1. Semiempirical molecular orbital estimation of the relative stability of bianthryls produced by anthracene pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, J.A.; Mukherjee, J.; Wornat, M.J.; Sarofim, A.F.; Rutledge, G.C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The pyrolysis of pure anthracene at temperatures between 1,200 and 1,500 K produced all six bianthryl isomers whose relative yields appear to be related to steric factors. To evaluate the hypothesis that thermodynamic factors govern the product distribution of bianthryls in this system, the relative enthalpies and entropies of biaryl isomers were estimated by molecular orbital modeling, using the semiempirical AM1 (Austin Model 1). Computational analysis of several isomer sets demonstrates that the relative stabilities of a large number of biaryl isomers are determined largely by steric interactions caused by structural features defined as bays, coves, and fjords. These steric factors affect both the degree of biaryl twist in the preferred conformation and the freedom of internal rotation. Molecular orbital modeling supports the hypothesis that a thermodynamic distribution of bianthryl isomers is produced by anthracene pyrolysis.

  2. Estimation of Linear Viscoelasticity of Polymer Melts in Molecular Dynamics Simulations Based on Relaxation Mode Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaoka, Nobuyuki; Hagita, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of relaxation mode analysis (RMA), we present an efficient method to estimate the linear viscoelasticity of polymer melts in a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Slow relaxation phenomena appeared in polymer melts cause a problem that a calculation of the stress relaxation function in MD simulations, especially in the terminal time region, requires large computational efforts. Relaxation mode analysis is a method that systematically extracts slow relaxation modes and rates of the polymer chain from the time correlation of its conformations. We show the computational cost may be drastically reduced by combining a direct calculation of the stress relaxation function based on the Green-Kubo formula with the relaxation rates spectra estimated by RMA. N. I. acknowledges the Graduate School Doctoral Student Aid Program from Keio University.

  3. Estimation of Molecular Acidity via Electrostatic Potential at the Nucleus and Valence Natural Atomic Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shubin; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2009-01-01

    An effective approach of estimating molecular pKa values from simple density functional calculations is proposed in this work. Both the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) at the nucleus of the acidic atom and the sum of valence natural atomic orbitals are employed for three categories of compounds, amines and anilines, carbonyl acids and alcohols, and sulfonic acids and thiols. A strong correlation between experimental pKa values and each of these two quantities for each of the three categories has been discovered. Moreover, if the MEP is subtracted by the isolated atomic MEP for each category of compounds, we observe a single unique linear relationship between the resultant MEP difference and experimental pKa data of amines, anilines, carbonyl acids, alcohols, sulfonic acids, thiols, and their substituents. These results can generally be utilized to simultaneously estimate pKa values at multiple sites with a single calculation for either relatively small molecules in drug design or amino acids in proteins and macromolecules. PMID:19317439

  4. Multiscale Estimation of Binding Kinetics Using Brownian Dynamics, Molecular Dynamics and Milestoning

    PubMed Central

    Votapka, Lane W.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic rate constants of binding were estimated for four biochemically relevant molecular systems by a method that uses milestoning theory to combine Brownian dynamics simulations with more detailed molecular dynamics simulations. The rate constants found using this method agreed well with experimentally and theoretically obtained values. We predicted the association rate of a small charged molecule toward both a charged and an uncharged spherical receptor and verified the estimated value with Smoluchowski theory. We also calculated the kon rate constant for superoxide dismutase with its natural substrate, O2 −, in a validation of a previous experiment using similar methods but with a number of important improvements. We also calculated the kon for a new system: the N-terminal domain of Troponin C with its natural substrate Ca2+. The kon calculated for the latter two systems closely resemble experimentally obtained values. This novel multiscale approach is computationally cheaper and more parallelizable when compared to other methods of similar accuracy. We anticipate that this methodology will be useful for predicting kinetic rate constants and for understanding the process of binding between a small molecule and a protein receptor. PMID:26505480

  5. Estimating the timing of early eukaryotic diversification with multigene molecular clocks

    PubMed Central

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Lahr, Daniel J. G.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Katz, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Although macroscopic plants, animals, and fungi are the most familiar eukaryotes, the bulk of eukaryotic diversity is microbial. Elucidating the timing of diversification among the more than 70 lineages is key to understanding the evolution of eukaryotes. Here, we use taxon-rich multigene data combined with diverse fossils and a relaxed molecular clock framework to estimate the timing of the last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes and the divergence of major clades. Overall, these analyses suggest that the last common ancestor lived between 1866 and 1679 Ma, consistent with the earliest microfossils interpreted with confidence as eukaryotic. During this interval, the Earth's surface differed markedly from today; for example, the oceans were incompletely ventilated, with ferruginous and, after about 1800 Ma, sulfidic water masses commonly lying beneath moderately oxygenated surface waters. Our time estimates also indicate that the major clades of eukaryotes diverged before 1000 Ma, with most or all probably diverging before 1200 Ma. Fossils, however, suggest that diversity within major extant clades expanded later, beginning about 800 Ma, when the oceans began their transition to a more modern chemical state. In combination, paleontological and molecular approaches indicate that long stems preceded diversification in the major eukaryotic lineages. PMID:21810989

  6. Pedigree-Free Estimates of Heritability in the Wild: Promising Prospects for Selfing Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laurene; Siol, Mathieu; Ronfort, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the genetic variance available for traits informs us about a population’s ability to evolve in response to novel selective challenges. In selfing species, theory predicts a loss of genetic diversity that could lead to an evolutionary dead-end, but empirical support remains scarce. Genetic variability in a trait is estimated by correlating the phenotypic resemblance with the proportion of the genome that two relatives share identical by descent (‘realized relatedness’). The latter is traditionally predicted from pedigrees (ΦA: expected value) but can also be estimated using molecular markers (average number of alleles shared). Nevertheless, evolutionary biologists, unlike animal breeders, remain cautious about using marker-based relatedness coefficients to study complex phenotypic traits in populations. In this paper, we review published results comparing five different pedigree-free methods and use simulations to test individual-based models (hereafter called animal models) using marker-based relatedness coefficients, with a special focus on the influence of mating systems. Our literature review confirms that Ritland’s regression method is unreliable, but suggests that animal models with marker-based estimates of relatedness and genomic selection are promising and that more testing is required. Our simulations show that using molecular markers instead of pedigrees in animal models seriously worsens the estimation of heritability in outcrossing populations, unless a very large number of loci is available. In selfing populations the results are less biased. More generally, populations with high identity disequilibrium (consanguineous or bottlenecked populations) could be propitious for using marker-based animal models, but are also more likely to deviate from the standard assumptions of quantitative genetics models (non-additive variance). PMID:23825602

  7. Marker-Based Hierarchical Segmentation and Classification Approach for Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Tilton, James C.; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    The Hierarchical SEGmentation (HSEG) algorithm, which is a combination of hierarchical step-wise optimization and spectral clustering, has given good performances for hyperspectral image analysis. This technique produces at its output a hierarchical set of image segmentations. The automated selection of a single segmentation level is often necessary. We propose and investigate the use of automatically selected markers for this purpose. In this paper, a novel Marker-based HSEG (M-HSEG) method for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. First, pixelwise classification is performed and the most reliably classified pixels are selected as markers, with the corresponding class labels. Then, a novel constrained marker-based HSEG algorithm is applied, resulting in a spectral-spatial classification map. The experimental results show that the proposed approach yields accurate segmentation and classification maps, and thus is attractive for hyperspectral image analysis.

  8. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using a novel marker-based error-resilient arithmetic coder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bormin; Sriraja, Y.; Wei, Shih-Chieh

    2006-08-01

    Entropy coding techniques aim to achieve the entropy of the source data by assigning variable-length codewords to symbols with the code lengths linked to the corresponding symbol probabilities. Entropy coders (e.g. Huffman coding, arithmetic coding), in one form or the other, are commonly used as the last stage in various compression schemes. While these variable-length coders provide better compression than fixed-length coders, they are vulnerable to transmission errors. Even a single bit error in the transmission process can cause havoc in the subsequent decoded stream. To cope with it, this research proposes a marker-based sentinel mechanism in entropy coding for error detection and recovery. We use arithmetic coding as an example to demonstrate this error-resilient technique for entropy coding. Experimental results on ultraspectral sounder data indicate that the marker-based error-resilient arithmetic coder provides remarkable robustness to correct transmission errors without significantly compromising the compression gains.

  9. Estimated Soft X-Ray Spectrum and Ionization of Molecular Hydrogen in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notani, Masahiro; Oka, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    From observed high H_3^+ column densities in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), a region with a radius of ˜150 pc at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy, H_2 ionization rates of ζ ˜ 3 × 10-15 s-1 have been reported. This ionization rate which is higher than those in dense clouds and diffuse clouds in the Galactic disk by ˜100 and ˜10, respectively, have been ascribed to high flux of cosmic rays due to the high density of supernova remnants in the region. We are studying the ionization rate due to X-rays intensely observed in the CMZ as a possible competing process. Last year we reported the estimated ionization rate due to observable X-rays with energy 1 - 10 keV as negligible compared to the observed ζ. However, just like cosmic ray ionization is dominated by low energy (E≤ 100 MeV) cosmic rays that are not directly observable because of deflection by solar magnetic field, the X-ray ionization is dominated by soft X-rays (E≤ 1 keV) that are not observable due to optical depth of the foreground gas. Our task therefore resembles those by Hayakawa et al. (1961) and Spitzer and Tomasko (1968) who estimated the cosmic ray ionization rate ζ based on high energy (> 1 GeV) cosmic ray observations. We use theoretical X-ray spectrum and interpolate the observed X-rays at 4 keV, which are observable nearly un-attenuated from the CMZ, to the low energy region. Two theoretical spectra are presented, one due to Bremsstrahlung with variable temperature and proper cut off and the other the advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model. Discussion of the calculations and the results will be presented. Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., and McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632 882 Geballe, T. R., and Oka, T. 2010, ApJ, 709 L70. Hayakawa,S.,Nishimura, S., Takayanagi, K. 1961, PASJ, 18 184 Spitzer,L. T., Tomasko, M. G. 1968, ApJ, 152 971 Yuan, F., Quataert, E., Narayan, R. 2003, JPJ, 598 301.

  10. Estimation of gas permeability of a zeolite membrane, based on a molecular simulation technique and permeation model

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigejirou; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Nakao, Shinichi

    2000-03-09

    A method for estimating gas permeability through a zeolite membrane, using a molecular simulation technique and a theoretical permeation model, is presented. The estimate of permeability is derived from a combination of an absorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficient based on the adsorption-diffusion model. The adsorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficients needed for the estimation were calculated using conventional Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient was converted to the mutual diffusion coefficient and the permeability estimated using the Fickian equation. The method was applied to the prediction of permeabilities of methane and ethylene in silicalite at 301 K. Calculated permeabilities were larger than the experimental values by more than an order of magnitude. However, the anisotropic permeability was consistent with the experimental data and the results obtained using a grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics technique (Pohl et al., Mol.Phys. 1996, 89(6), 1725--1731).

  11. Molecular phylogeny, divergence time estimates and historical biogeography within one of the world's largest monocot genera.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin-Qin; Zhou, Song-Dong; Huang, De-Qing; He, Xing-Jin; Wei, Xian-Qin

    2016-01-01

    A primary aim of historical biogeography is to identify the causal factors or processes that have shaped the composition and distribution of biotas over time. Another is to infer the evolution of geographic ranges of species and clades in a phylogenetic context. To this end, historical biogeography addresses important questions such as: Where were ancestors distributed? Where did lineages originate? Which processes cause geographic ranges to evolve through time? Allium subgenus Anguinum comprises approximately twelve taxa with a disjunct distribution in the high mountains from south-western Europe to eastern Asia and in northeastern North America. Although both the systematic position and the geographical limits of Anguinum have been identified, to date no molecular systematic study has been performed utilizing a comprehensive sampling of these species. With an emphasis on the Anguinum eastern Asian geographical group, the goals of the present study were: (i) to infer species-level phylogenetic relationships within Anguinum, (ii) to assess molecular divergence and estimated the times of the major splits in Anguinum and (iii) to trace the biogeographic history of the subgenus. Four DNA sequences (ITS, matK, trnH-psbA, rps16) were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Allium subgen. Anguinum RbcL sequences were used to estimate divergences time for Allium, and sequences of ITS were used to estimate the divergence times for Anguinum and its main lineages and to provide implications for the evolutionary history of the subgenus. Phylogenetic analyses for all Allium corroborate that Anguinum is monophyletic and indicate that Anguinum is composed of two sister groups: one with a Eurasian-American distribution, and the other restricted to eastern Asia. In the eastern Asian geographical group, incongruence between gene trees and morphology-based taxonomies was recovered as was incongruence between data from plastid and nuclear sequences. This incongruence is likely due to

  12. Molecular phylogeny, divergence time estimates and historical biogeography within one of the world's largest monocot genera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin-Qin; Zhou, Song-Dong; Huang, De-Qing; He, Xing-Jin; Wei, Xian-Qin

    2016-01-01

    A primary aim of historical biogeography is to identify the causal factors or processes that have shaped the composition and distribution of biotas over time. Another is to infer the evolution of geographic ranges of species and clades in a phylogenetic context. To this end, historical biogeography addresses important questions such as: Where were ancestors distributed? Where did lineages originate? Which processes cause geographic ranges to evolve through time? Allium subgenus Anguinum comprises approximately twelve taxa with a disjunct distribution in the high mountains from south-western Europe to eastern Asia and in northeastern North America. Although both the systematic position and the geographical limits of Anguinum have been identified, to date no molecular systematic study has been performed utilizing a comprehensive sampling of these species. With an emphasis on the Anguinum eastern Asian geographical group, the goals of the present study were: (i) to infer species-level phylogenetic relationships within Anguinum, (ii) to assess molecular divergence and estimated the times of the major splits in Anguinum and (iii) to trace the biogeographic history of the subgenus. Four DNA sequences (ITS, matK, trnH-psbA, rps16) were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Allium subgen. Anguinum. RbcL sequences were used to estimate divergences time for Allium, and sequences of ITS were used to estimate the divergence times for Anguinum and its main lineages and to provide implications for the evolutionary history of the subgenus. Phylogenetic analyses for all Allium corroborate that Anguinum is monophyletic and indicate that Anguinum is composed of two sister groups: one with a Eurasian–American distribution, and the other restricted to eastern Asia. In the eastern Asian geographical group, incongruence between gene trees and morphology-based taxonomies was recovered as was incongruence between data from plastid and nuclear sequences. This incongruence is likely due to

  13. Cherenkov radiation fluence estimates in tissue for molecular imaging and therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Gladstone, David; Pogue, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Cherenkov radiation has emerged as a novel source of light with a number of applications in the biomedical sciences. It's unique properties, including its broadband emission spectrum, spectral weighting in the ultraviolet and blue wavebands, and local generation of light within a given tissue have made it an attractive source of light for techniques ranging from widefield imaging to oximetry and phototherapy. To help guide the future development of this field in the context of molecular imaging, quantitative estimates of the light fluence rates of Cherenkov radiation from a number of radionuclide and external radiotherapy beams in tissue was explored for the first time. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these values were found to be on the order of 0.1 - 1 nW/cm2 per MBq/g for radionuclides and 1 - 10 μW/cm2 per Gy/sec for external radiotherapy beams, dependent on the given waveband and optical properties. For phototherapy applications, the total light fluence was found to be on the order of nJ/cm2 for radionuclides, and mJ/cm2 for radiotherapy beams. To validate these findings, experimental validation was completed with an MV x-ray photon beam incident onto a tissue phantom, confirming the magnitudes of the simulation values. The results indicate that diagnostic potential is reasonable for Cherenkov excitation of molecular probes, but phototherapy may remain elusive at these relatively low fluence values.

  14. High Sensitivity Method to Estimate Distribution of Hyaluronan Molecular Sizes in Small Biological Samples Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Lan; Dahl, Christen P.; Kerje, Susanne; Hansell, Peter; Mörner, Stellan; Lindqvist, Ulla; Engström-Laurent, Anna; Larsson, Göran; Hellman, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a negatively charged polydisperse polysaccharide where both its size and tissue concentration play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The various functions of hyaluronan depend on its molecular size. Up to now, it has been difficult to study the role of hyaluronan in diseases with pathological changes in the extracellular matrix where availability is low or tissue samples are small. Difficulty to obtain large enough biopsies from human diseased tissue or tissue from animal models has also restricted the study of hyaluronan. In this paper, we demonstrate that gas-phase electrophoretic molecular mobility analyzer (GEMMA) can be used to estimate the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes in biological samples with a limited amount of hyaluronan. The low detection level of the GEMMA method allows for estimation of hyaluronan molecular sizes from different parts of small organs. Hence, the GEMMA method opens opportunity to attain a profile over the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes and estimate changes caused by disease or experimental conditions that has not been possible to obtain before. PMID:26448761

  15. Divergence date estimation and a comprehensive molecular tree of extant cetaceans.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Spaulding, Michelle; Gatesy, John

    2009-12-01

    Cetaceans are remarkable among mammals for their numerous adaptations to an entirely aquatic existence, yet many aspects of their phylogeny remain unresolved. Here we merged 37 new sequences from the nuclear genes RAG1 and PRM1 with most published molecular data for the group (45 nuclear loci, transposons, mitochondrial genomes), and generated a supermatrix consisting of 42,335 characters. The great majority of these data have never been combined. Model-based analyses of the supermatrix produced a solid, consistent phylogenetic hypothesis for 87 cetacean species. Bayesian analyses corroborated odontocete (toothed whale) monophyly, stabilized basal odontocete relationships, and completely resolved branching events within Mysticeti (baleen whales) as well as the problematic speciose clade Delphinidae (oceanic dolphins). Only limited conflicts relative to maximum likelihood results were recorded, and discrepancies found in parsimony trees were very weakly supported. We utilized the Bayesian supermatrix tree to estimate divergence dates among lineages using relaxed-clock methods. Divergence estimates revealed rapid branching of basal odontocete lineages near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, the antiquity of river dolphin lineages, a Late Miocene radiation of balaenopteroid mysticetes, and a recent rapid radiation of Delphinidae beginning approximately 10 million years ago. Our comprehensive, time-calibrated tree provides a powerful evolutionary tool for broad-scale comparative studies of Cetacea. PMID:19699809

  16. Applying SNP-Derived Molecular Coancestry Estimates to Captive Breeding Programs.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Jamie A; Putnam, Andrea S; Navarro, Asako Y; Gurr, Jessica; Ryder, Oliver A

    2016-09-01

    Captive breeding programs for wildlife species typically rely on pedigrees to inform genetic management. Although pedigree-based breeding strategies are quite effective at retaining long-term genetic variation, management of zoo-based breeding programs continues to be hampered when pedigrees are poorly known. The objective of this study was to evaluate 2 options for generating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to resolve unknown relationships within captive breeding programs. We generated SNP data for a zoo-based population of addax (Addax nasomasculatus) using both the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip and double digest restriction site-associated DNA (ddRAD) sequencing. Our results demonstrated that estimates of allele sharing (AS) between pairs of individuals exhibited low variances. Average AS variances were highest when using 50 loci (SNPchipall = 0.00159; ddRADall = 0.0249), but fell below 0.0003 for the SNP chip dataset when sampling ≥250 loci and below 0.0025 for the ddRAD dataset when sampling ≥500 loci. Furthermore, the correlation between the SNPchipall and ddRADall AS datasets was 0.88 (95%CI = 0.84-0.91) when subsampling 500 loci. Collectively, our results indicated that both SNP genotyping methods produced sufficient data for accurately estimating relationships, even within an extremely bottlenecked population. Our results also suggested that analytic assumptions historically integrated into the addax pedigree are not adversely impacting long-term pedigree-based management; kinships calculated from the analytic pedigree were significantly correlated (P < 0.001) with AS estimates. Overall, our conclusions are intended to serve as both a proof of concept and a model for applying molecular data to the genetic management of captive breeding programs. PMID:27208150

  17. Cherenkov radiation fluence estimates in tissue for molecular imaging and therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Adam K; Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-09-01

    Cherenkov radiation has recently emerged as an interesting phenomenon for a number of applications in the biomedical sciences. Its unique properties, including broadband emission spectrum, spectral weight in the ultraviolet and blue wavebands, and local generation of light within a given tissue, have made it an attractive new source of light within tissue for molecular imaging and phototherapy applications. While several studies have investigated the total Cherenkov light yield from radionuclides in units of [photons/decay], further consideration of the light propagation in tissue is necessary to fully consider the utility of this signal in vivo. Therefore, to help further guide the development of this novel field, quantitative estimates of the light fluence rate of Cherenkov radiation from both radionuclides and radiotherapy beams in a biological tissue are presented for the first time. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these values were found to be on the order of 0.01-1 nW cm(-2) per MBq g(-1) for radionuclides, and 1-100 μW cm(-2) per Gy s(-1) for external radiotherapy beams, dependent on the given waveband, optical properties, and radiation source. For phototherapy applications, the total light fluence was found to be on the order of nJ cm(-2) for radionuclides, and mJ cm(-2) for radiotherapy beams. The results indicate that diagnostic potential is reasonable for Cherenkov excitation of molecular probes, but phototherapy may remain elusive at such exceedingly low fluence values. The results of this study are publicly available for distribution online at www.dartmouth.edu/optmed/. PMID:26270125

  18. Contribution of molecular analyses to the estimation of the risk of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, A M; Poza, J J; Martorell, L; López de Munain, A; Emparanza, J I; Baiget, M

    1995-01-01

    A molecular analysis of the maternal and child CTG repeat size and intergenerational amplification was performed in order to estimate the risk of having a child with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMD). In a study of 124 affected mother-child pairs (42 mother-CMD and 82 mother-non-CMD) the mean maternal CTG allele in CMD cases was three times higher (700 repeats) than in non-CMD cases (236 repeats). When the maternal allele was in the 50-300 repeats range, 90% of children were non-CMD. In contrast, when the maternal allele was greater than 300 repeats, 59% inherited the congenital form. Furthermore, the risk of having a CMD child is also related to the intergenerational amplification, which was significantly greater in the mother-CMD pairs than in the mother-non-CMD pairs. Although the risk of giving birth to a CMD child always exists for affected mothers, our data show that such a risk is considerably higher if the maternal allele is greater than 300 repeats. Images PMID:7760317

  19. Estimating the Phanerozoic history of the Ascomycota lineages: combining fossil and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Beimforde, Christina; Feldberg, Kathrin; Nylinder, Stephan; Rikkinen, Jouko; Tuovila, Hanna; Dörfelt, Heinrich; Gube, Matthias; Jackson, Daniel J; Reitner, Joachim; Seyfullah, Leyla J; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2014-09-01

    The phylum Ascomycota is by far the largest group in the fungal kingdom. Ecologically important mutualistic associations such as mycorrhizae and lichens have evolved in this group, which are regarded as key innovations that supported the evolution of land plants. Only a few attempts have been made to date the origin of Ascomycota lineages by using molecular clock methods, which is primarily due to the lack of satisfactory fossil calibration data. For this reason we have evaluated all of the oldest available ascomycete fossils from amber (Albian to Miocene) and chert (Devonian and Maastrichtian). The fossils represent five major ascomycete classes (Coniocybomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Laboulbeniomycetes, and Lecanoromycetes). We have assembled a multi-gene data set (18SrDNA, 28SrDNA, RPB1 and RPB2) from a total of 145 taxa representing most groups of the Ascomycota and utilized fossil calibration points solely from within the ascomycetes to estimate divergence times of Ascomycota lineages with a Bayesian approach. Our results suggest an initial diversification of the Pezizomycotina in the Ordovician, followed by repeated splits of lineages throughout the Phanerozoic, and indicate that this continuous diversification was unaffected by mass extinctions. We suggest that the ecological diversity within each lineage ensured that at least some taxa of each group were able to survive global crises and rapidly recovered. PMID:24792086

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Measurements to Estimate and Predict Protein-Ligand Residence Times.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Luca; Theret, Isabelle; Antoine, Mathias; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Charton, Yves; Fourquez, Jean-Marie; Wierzbicki, Michel; Boutin, Jean A; Ferry, Gilles; Decherchi, Sergio; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ducrot, Pierre; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-08-11

    Ligand-target residence time is emerging as a key drug discovery parameter because it can reliably predict drug efficacy in vivo. Experimental approaches to binding and unbinding kinetics are nowadays available, but we still lack reliable computational tools for predicting kinetics and residence time. Most attempts have been based on brute-force molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are CPU-demanding and not yet particularly accurate. We recently reported a new scaled-MD-based protocol, which showed potential for residence time prediction in drug discovery. Here, we further challenged our procedure's predictive ability by applying our methodology to a series of glucokinase activators that could be useful for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined scaled MD with experimental kinetics measurements and X-ray crystallography, promptly checking the protocol's reliability by directly comparing computational predictions and experimental measures. The good agreement highlights the potential of our scaled-MD-based approach as an innovative method for computationally estimating and predicting drug residence times. PMID:27391254

  1. Organic molecular markers for estimating the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Voos, G.; Mills, G.; O`Neill, J.; Jones, W.A.

    1995-12-01

    The weathering of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil environment is the sum of biological, physical and chemical processes. It is often difficult to clearly discern microbial from abiotic contributions to the overall process. Our study was initiated to investigate the use of molecular marker compounds (e.g., pristane and phytane) to estimate the biodegradation of petroleum compounds in diesel fuel contaminated soil. This experiment was conducted using mesocosms to simulate the environmental conditions in the SRS soil bioremediation facility. Soil samples were analyzed for hydrocarbon components using high-resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The ratios nC17/pristane and nC18/phytane declined during the 64-day experiment. The rate of decline of the marker compounds was significantly less than that of the n-alkanes C17 and C18, but was proportional to the decline in total extractable petroleum hydrocarbons. Analysis for other marker compounds, including diterpenoid hydrocarbons and the ratio of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to methylated PAHs, is continuing.

  2. Estimation of the mutual orientation and intermolecular interaction of C12Ex from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Velinova, Maria; Tsoneva, Yana; Ivanova, Anela; Tadjer, Alia

    2012-04-26

    Nonionic surfactants, such as poly(ethylene glycol) alkyl ethers (abbreviated as CyEx) show a rich phase behavior in aqueous solution, i.e., they form micellar, lamellar, cubic, and so forth phases depending on experimental parameters such as the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chain lengths, temperature, or concentration. The aim of the present study is to determine the nature of the preaggregates, which are inferred to exist before the actual self-assembly process in aqueous solution, and to assess the aptitude to their formation. The target molecules are C12E3, C12E4 and C12E5, surfactants of moderate water solubility. Coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (NPT/293 K) of two molecules of each species with explicit water in periodic boundary conditions are carried out to estimate the mutual orientation and the interaction between the surfactants in their dimers. The force fields are MARTINI and Amber99, the latter with self-derived parameters for the ether groups. The change in the orientation and distance between the molecules in the dimers are discussed based on different structural parameters. In addition, the interaction between the surfactants is evaluated from quantum chemistry calculations in terms of binding energy for the average structures from the cluster analysis. The solvent-solute interaction is quantified by the mean number of hydrogen bonds formed between them. On the basis of combined analysis, a series of different structures for subsequent study of the possible self-assembly patterns of C12E3, C12E4, and C12E5 is outlined. PMID:22448734

  3. A novel fully automatic scheme for fiducial marker-based alignment in electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Han, Renmin; Wang, Liansan; Liu, Zhiyong; Sun, Fei; Zhang, Fa

    2015-12-01

    Although the topic of fiducial marker-based alignment in electron tomography (ET) has been widely discussed for decades, alignment without human intervention remains a difficult problem. Specifically, the emergence of subtomogram averaging has increased the demand for batch processing during tomographic reconstruction; fully automatic fiducial marker-based alignment is the main technique in this process. However, the lack of an accurate method for detecting and tracking fiducial markers precludes fully automatic alignment. In this paper, we present a novel, fully automatic alignment scheme for ET. Our scheme has two main contributions: First, we present a series of algorithms to ensure a high recognition rate and precise localization during the detection of fiducial markers. Our proposed solution reduces fiducial marker detection to a sampling and classification problem and further introduces an algorithm to solve the parameter dependence of marker diameter and marker number. Second, we propose a novel algorithm to solve the tracking of fiducial markers by reducing the tracking problem to an incomplete point set registration problem. Because a global optimization of a point set registration occurs, the result of our tracking is independent of the initial image position in the tilt series, allowing for the robust tracking of fiducial markers without pre-alignment. The experimental results indicate that our method can achieve an accurate tracking, almost identical to the current best one in IMOD with half automatic scheme. Furthermore, our scheme is fully automatic, depends on fewer parameters (only requires a gross value of the marker diameter) and does not require any manual interaction, providing the possibility of automatic batch processing of electron tomographic reconstruction. PMID:26433028

  4. ESTIMATION OF GAS-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC RETENTION TIMES FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new type of computer program called SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) was developed to predict chemical reactivity parameters and physical properties of organic molecules from their molecular structures based on fundamental chemical structure theory. PARC'...

  5. Varations of molecular weight estimation by HP-size exclusion chromatography with UVA versus online DOC detection.

    PubMed

    Her, Namguk; Amy, Gary; Foss, David; Chow, Jaeweon

    2002-08-01

    High performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with ultraviolet absorbance (UVA) detection has been widely utilized to estimate the molecular weight (MW) and MW distribution of natural organic matter (NOM). However, the estimation of MW with UVA detection is inherently inaccurate because UVA at 254 nm only detects limited components (mostly pi bonded molecules) of NOM, and the molar absorptivity of these different NOM constituents is not equal. In comparison, a SEC chromatogram obtained with a DOC detector showed significant differences compared to a corresponding UVA chromatogram, resulting in different MW values as well as different estimates of polydispersivity. The MWs of Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA), Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA), and various mixtures thereof were estimated with HPSEC coupled with UVA and DOC detectors. The results show that UVA is not an adequate detector for quantitative analysis of MW estimation but rather can be used only for limited qualitative analysis. The NOM in several natural waters (Irvine Ranch, California groundwater, and Barr Lake, Colorado surface water) were also characterized to demonstrate the different MWs obtained with the two detectors. The results of the SEC-DOC chromatograms revealed NOM constituent peaks that went undetected by UVA. Utilizing online DOC detection, a better representation of NOM MWs was suggested, with NOM displaying higher weight-averaged MW (Mw) and lower number-averaged MW (Mn) as well as higher polydispersivity. A method for estimation of the MWs of NOM fractional components and polydispersivities is presented. PMID:12188370

  6. a Marker-Based Eulerian-Lagrangian Method for Multiphase Flow with Supersonic Combustion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jiangfeng

    2016-06-01

    The atomization of liquid fuel is a kind of intricate dynamic process from continuous phase to discrete phase. Procedures of fuel spray in supersonic flow are modeled with an Eulerian-Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics methodology. The method combines two distinct techniques and develops an integrated numerical simulation method to simulate the atomization processes. The traditional finite volume method based on stationary (Eulerian) Cartesian grid is used to resolve the flow field, and multi-component Navier-Stokes equations are adopted in present work, with accounting for the mass exchange and heat transfer occupied by vaporization process. The marker-based moving (Lagrangian) grid is utilized to depict the behavior of atomized liquid sprays injected into a gaseous environment, and discrete droplet model 13 is adopted. To verify the current approach, the proposed method is applied to simulate processes of liquid atomization in supersonic cross flow. Three classic breakup models, TAB model, wave model and K-H/R-T hybrid model, are discussed. The numerical results are compared with multiple perspectives quantitatively, including spray penetration height and droplet size distribution. In addition, the complex flow field structures induced by the presence of liquid spray are illustrated and discussed. It is validated that the maker-based Eulerian-Lagrangian method is effective and reliable.

  7. Marker-based monitoring of seated spinal posture using a calibrated single-variable threshold model.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Pauline; Dunne, Lucy E; Caulfield, Brian; Smyth, Barry

    2006-01-01

    This work, as part of a larger project developing wearable posture monitors for the work environment, seeks to monitor and model seated posture during computer use. A non-wearable marker-based optoelectronic motion capture system was used to monitor seated posture for ten healthy subjects during a calibration exercise and a typing task. Machine learning techniques were used to select overall spinal sagittal flexion as the best indicator of posture from a set of marker and vector variables. Overall flexion data from the calibration exercise were used to define a threshold model designed to classify posture for each subject, which was then applied to the typing task data. Results of the model were analysed visually by qualified physiotherapists with experience in ergonomics and posture analysis to confirm the accuracy of the calibration. The calibration formula was found to be accurate on 100% subjects. This process will be used as a comparative measure in the evaluation of several wearable posture sensors, and to inform the design of the wearable system. PMID:17946301

  8. The lognormal and gamma distribution models for estimating molecular weight distributions of polymers using PGSE NMR.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Nathan H; Nydén, Magnus; Röding, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    We present comprehensive derivations for the statistical models and methods for the use of pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR to characterize the molecular weight distribution of polymers via the well-known scaling law relating diffusion coefficients and molecular weights. We cover the lognormal and gamma distribution models and linear combinations of these distributions. Although the focus is on methodology, we illustrate the use experimentally with three polystyrene samples, comparing the NMR results to gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurements, test the accuracy and noise-sensitivity on simulated data, and provide code for implementation. PMID:27116223

  9. The lognormal and gamma distribution models for estimating molecular weight distributions of polymers using PGSE NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nathan H.; Nydén, Magnus; Röding, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    We present comprehensive derivations for the statistical models and methods for the use of pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR to characterize the molecular weight distribution of polymers via the well-known scaling law relating diffusion coefficients and molecular weights. We cover the lognormal and gamma distribution models and linear combinations of these distributions. Although the focus is on methodology, we illustrate the use experimentally with three polystyrene samples, comparing the NMR results to gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurements, test the accuracy and noise-sensitivity on simulated data, and provide code for implementation.

  10. Adaptive Green-Kubo estimates of transport coefficients from molecular dynamics based on robust error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Reese E.; Mandadapu, Kranthi K.

    2012-04-01

    We present a rigorous Green-Kubo methodology for calculating transport coefficients based on on-the-fly estimates of: (a) statistical stationarity of the relevant process, and (b) error in the resulting coefficient. The methodology uses time samples efficiently across an ensemble of parallel replicas to yield accurate estimates, which is particularly useful for estimating the thermal conductivity of semi-conductors near their Debye temperatures where the characteristic decay times of the heat flux correlation functions are large. Employing and extending the error analysis of Zwanzig and Ailawadi [Phys. Rev. 182, 280 (1969)], 10.1103/PhysRev.182.280 and Frenkel [in Proceedings of the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi", Course LXXV (North-Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1980)] to the integral of correlation, we are able to provide tight theoretical bounds for the error in the estimate of the transport coefficient. To demonstrate the performance of the method, four test cases of increasing computational cost and complexity are presented: the viscosity of Ar and water, and the thermal conductivity of Si and GaN. In addition to producing accurate estimates of the transport coefficients for these materials, this work demonstrates precise agreement of the computed variances in the estimates of the correlation and the transport coefficient with the extended theory based on the assumption that fluctuations follow a Gaussian process. The proposed algorithm in conjunction with the extended theory enables the calculation of transport coefficients with the Green-Kubo method accurately and efficiently.

  11. Estimating Animal Abundance in Ground Beef Batches Assayed with Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Simila, Janika; Platz, Sindey Schueler; Moore, Stephen S.; Plastow, Graham; Meghen, Ciaran N.

    2012-01-01

    Estimating animal abundance in industrial scale batches of ground meat is important for mapping meat products through the manufacturing process and for effectively tracing the finished product during a food safety recall. The processing of ground beef involves a potentially large number of animals from diverse sources in a single product batch, which produces a high heterogeneity in capture probability. In order to estimate animal abundance through DNA profiling of ground beef constituents, two parameter-based statistical models were developed for incidence data. Simulations were applied to evaluate the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of a joint likelihood function from multiple surveys, showing superiority in the presence of high capture heterogeneity with small sample sizes, or comparable estimation in the presence of low capture heterogeneity with a large sample size when compared to other existing models. Our model employs the full information on the pattern of the capture-recapture frequencies from multiple samples. We applied the proposed models to estimate animal abundance in six manufacturing beef batches, genotyped using 30 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, from a large scale beef grinding facility. Results show that between 411∼1367 animals were present in six manufacturing beef batches. These estimates are informative as a reference for improving recall processes and tracing finished meat products back to source. PMID:22479559

  12. Friction tensor for a pair of Brownian particles: Spurious finite-size effects and molecular dynamics estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Bocquet, L.; Hansen, J.P.; Piasecki, J.

    1997-10-01

    In this work, we show that in any finite system, the binary friction tenser for two Brownian particles cannot be directly estimated from an evaluation of the microscopic Green Kubo formula, involving the time integral of force-force autocorrelation functions. This pitfall is associated with a subtle inversion of the thermodynamic and long-time limits and leads to spurious results for the estimates of the friction matrix based on molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from a careful analysis of the coupled Langevin equations for two interacting Brownian particles, we derive a method to circumvent these effects and extract the binary friction tenser from the correlation function matrix of the instantaneous forces exerted by the bath particles on the fixed Brownian particles, and from the relaxation of the total momentum of the bath in a finite system. The general methodology is applied to the case of two hard or soft Brownian spheres in a bath of light particles. Numerical estimates of the relevant correlation functions and of the resulting self and mutual components of the matrix of friction tensors are obtained by molecular dynamics simulations for various spacings between the Brownian particles.

  13. Residual Seminal Vesicle Displacement in Marker-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer and the Impact on Margin Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantify residual interfraction displacement of seminal vesicles (SV) and investigate the efficacy of rotation correction on SV displacement in marker-based prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We also determined the effect of marker registration on the measured SV displacement and its impact on margin design. Methods and Materials: SV displacement was determined relative to marker registration by using 296 cone beam computed tomography scans of 13 prostate cancer patients with implanted markers. SV were individually registered in the transverse plane, based on gray-value information. The target registration error (TRE) for the SV due to marker registration inaccuracies was estimated. Correlations between prostate gland rotations and SV displacement and between individual SV displacements were determined. Results: The SV registration success rate was 99%. Displacement amounts of both SVs were comparable. Systematic and random residual SV displacements were 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm in the left-right direction, respectively, and 2.8 mm and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. Rotation correction did not reduce residual SV displacement. Prostate gland rotation around the left-right axis correlated with SV AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 42%); a correlation existed between both SVs for AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 62%); considerable correlation existed between random errors of SV displacement and TRE (R{sup 2} = 34%). Conclusions: Considerable residual SV displacement exists in marker-based IGRT. Rotation correction barely reduced SV displacement, rather, a larger SV displacement was shown relative to the prostate gland that was not captured by the marker position. Marker registration error partly explains SV displacement when correcting for rotations. Correcting for rotations, therefore, is not advisable when SV are part of the target volume. Margin design for SVs should take these uncertainties into

  14. Estimation of Henry's Law Constant for a Diverse Set of Organic Compounds from Molecular Structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) vapor pressure and activity coefficient models were coupled to estimate Henry’s Law Constant (HLC) in water and in hexadecane for a wide range of non-polar and polar organic compounds without modification or additional p...

  15. Estimation of Current Breed Differences in Multibreed Genetic Evaluations Using Quantitative and Molecular Approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this presentation were to review methods used in multibreed approaches in national cattle evaluation, suggest guidelines for utilizing information for research estimates of breed differences, describe the design of the multibreed research program (germplasm evaluation; GPE) at the ...

  16. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular diagnosis of Angelman syndrome: Estimated prevalence rate in a Danish country

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, M.B.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Hansen, L.K.; Wulff, K.

    1995-06-19

    Angelman syndrome (AS) was initially considered a rather rare abnormality, but in later years, with the possibilities for cytogenetic and molecular diagnosis an increasing number of patients have been reported. The incidence is quoted to be around 1:20,000. The etiology of AS is associated with the lack of maternal allele(s) of one or more loci at 15q11-q13, and is considered an effect of parental imprinting of that region, since a similar deficiency of paternal alleles leads to Prader-Willi syndrome. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Development of marker-based tracking methods for augmented reality applied to NPP maintenance work support and its experimental evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H.; Fujino, H.; Bian, Z.; Sekiyama, T.; Shimoda, H.; Yoshikawa, H.

    2006-07-01

    In this study, two types of marker-based tracking methods for Augmented Reality have been developed. One is a method which employs line-shaped markers and the other is a method which employs circular-shaped markers. These two methods recognize the markers by means of image processing and calculate the relative position and orientation between the markers and the camera in real time. The line-shaped markers are suitable to be pasted in the buildings such as NPPs where many pipes and tanks exist. The circular-shaped markers are suitable for the case that there are many obstacles and it is difficult to use line-shaped markers because the obstacles hide the part of the line-shaped markers. Both methods can extend the maximum distance between the markers and the camera compared to the legacy marker-based tracking methods. (authors)

  18. Estimation of the low-density (beta) lipoproteins of serum in health and disease using large molecular weight dextran sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Walton, K. W.; Scott, P. J.

    1964-01-01

    Studies have been made of the factors affecting the specificity of the interaction between high molecular weight dextran sulphate and low-density lipoproteins, both in pure solution and in serum. The results have been used in the development of a simple assay method for the serum concentration of low-density lipoproteins in small volumes of serum. The results obtained by this assay procedure have been found to correlate acceptably with parallel estimations of low-density lipoproteins by an ultracentrifugal technique and by paper electrophoresis. The technique has been applied to a survey of serum levels of these proteins in a normal population. The results have been compared with data in the literature. Satisfactory agreement was found between mean levels, matched for age and sex, between the dextran sulphate method and those methods based ultimately on chemical estimation of one or more components of the isolated lipoproteins. A systematic difference was observed when the dextran sulphate method was compared with estimates based on analytical ultracentrifugation or turbidimetry using amylopectin sulphate. Some indication of the range of application of the dextran sulphate method in clinical chemistry is provided. Images PMID:14227432

  19. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Infidum similis, Including Morphological Data and Estimation of its Genome Size.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salazar, Elizabeth A; Rosas-Valdez, Rogelio; Gregory, T Ryan; Violante-González, Juan

    2016-08-01

    :   Infidum similis Travassos, 1916 (Dicrocoeliidae: Leipertrematinae) was found in the gall bladder of Leptophis diplotropis Günther, 1872 from El Podrido, Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico. A phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of the 28S ribosomal RNA using maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference (BI) analyses was carried out to assess its phylogenetic position within suborder Xiphidiata, alongside members of the superfamilies Gorgoderoidea and Plagiorchoidea. The phylogenetic trees showed that the genus is most-closely related to the Plagiorchoidea rather than to the Gorgoderoidea, in keeping with previous taxonomic designations. Phylogenies obtained from ML and BI analysis of the 28S rDNA gene revealed a well supported clade in which Choledocystus hepaticus (Lutz, 1928) Sullivan, 1977 is sister to I. similis. On the other hand, a tree obtained using a partial sequence of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) mtDNA gene (ML and BI analysis), with species supposed to be closely related to I. similis according to 28S, does not support this relatedness. Based on the independence of Infidum from the subfamily Leipertrematinae Yamaguti, 1958 , our results clearly demonstrated that the genus corresponds to a different family and with species closely related to C. hepaticus within Plagiorchoidea. New data are presented about the tegumental surface of I. similis by scanning electron microscopy as well as the estimation of its haploid genome size using Feulgen Image Analysis Densitometry of sperm nuclei as part of the characterization of this species. This is the first genome size estimated for a member of Plagiorchiida, and these data will provide a new source of knowledge on helminth diversity and evolutionary studies. This constitutes the first host record, and new geographical distribution, for this species in Mexico. PMID:26998629

  20. Estimation of Transition-Metal Empirical Parameters for Molecular Mechanical Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Šebesta, Filip; Sláma, Vladislav; Melcr, Josef; Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2016-08-01

    Force-field parameters of the first row transition metals together with a few additional common elements such as those from the second (Rh, Ru) and third (Hg, Pt) rows of elements in ligated forms were determined based on the density functional theory calculations. Bonding characteristics were determined by averaging metal-ligand force constants in optimal geometries from several chosen complexes of each metal in the most common oxidation numbers and structural arrangements. Parameters of Lennard-Jones potential were determined based on a supermolecular model. Our determined molecular mechanical parameters are compared with presently available parameters published by other groups. We performed two different kinds of testing in order to demonstrate the reliability of these parameters in the case of ligated metallo complexes. First, the nonbonding potential was constructed for an additional set of 19 larger systems containing common complexes with organic molecules. The second test compares the Pt-O and Pt-H radial distribution functions for cisplatin in a box of TIP3P water with lately published studies. PMID:27337427

  1. Mass estimates for very cold (<8 K) gas in molecular cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, J.; Linz, H.; Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.; Bacmann, A.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The mass of prestellar cores is an essential ingredient to understand the onset of star formation in the core. The low level of emission from cold dust may keep parts of this dust hidden from observation. Aims: We aim to determine the fraction of core mass in the temperature range <8 K that can be expected for typical low- and high-mass star formation regions. Methods: We calculated the dust temperature within standard spherically symmetric prestellar cores for a grid of density power laws in the outer core regions, core masses, and variations in the external multicomponent radiation field. We assume the dust is composed of amorphous silicate and carbon and we discuss variations of its optical properties. As a measure for the distribution of cores and clumps, we used core mass functions derived for various environments. In view of the high densities in very cold central regions, dust and gas temperatures are assumed to be equal. Results: We find that the fraction of mass with temperatures <8 K in typical low- and high-mass cores is <20%. It is possible to obtain higher fractions of very cold gas by placing intermediate- or high-mass cores in a typical low-mass star formation environment. We show that the mass uncertainty arising from far-infrared to mm modeling of very cold dust emission is smaller than the mass uncertainty owing to the unknown dust opacities. Conclusions: Under typical star formation conditions, dust with temperatures <8 K covers a small mass fraction in molecular cloud cores, but may play a more important role for special cases. The major unknown in determining the total core mass from thermal dust emission is the uncertainty in the dust opacity, not in the underestimated very cold dust mass.

  2. Optical coherence tomography in estimating molecular diffusion of drugs and analytes in ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2009-02-01

    Aside from other ocular drug delivery methods, topical application and follow up drug diffusion through the cornea and sclera of the eye remain the favored method, as they impose the least pain and discomfort to the patient. However, this delivery route suffers from the low permeability of epithelial tissues and drug washout, thus reducing the effectiveness of the drug and ability to reach its target in effective concentrations. In order to better understand the behavioral characteristics of diffusion in ocular tissue, a method for noninvasive imaging of drug diffusion is needed. Due to its high resolution and depth-resolved imaging capabilities, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been utilized in quantifying the molecular transport of different drugs and analytes in vitro in the sclera and the cornea. Diffusion of Metronidazole (0.5%), Dexamethasone (0.2%), Ciprofloxacin (0.3%), Mannitol (20%), and glucose solution (20%) in rabbit sclera and cornea were examined. Their permeability coefficients were calculated by using OCT signal slope and depth-resolved amplitude methods as function of time and tissue depth. For instance, mannitol was found to have a permeability coefficient of (8.99 +/- 1.43) × 10-6 cm/s in cornea (n=4) and (6.18 +/- 1.08) × 10-6 cm/s in sclera (n=5). We also demonstrate the capability of OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring and quantifying of glucose diffusion in different layers of the sclera. We found that the glucose diffusion rate is not uniform throughout the tissue and is increased from approximately (2.39 +/- 0.73) × 10-6 cm/s at the epithelial side to (8.63 +/- 0.27) × 10-6 cm/s close to the endothelial side of the sclera. In addition, discrepancy in the permeability rates of glucose solutions with different concentrations was observed. Such diffusion studies could enhance our knowledge and potentially pave the way for advancements of therapeutic and diagnostic techniques in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  3. Marker based standardization of polyherbal formulation (SJT-DI-02) by high performance thin layer chromatography method

    PubMed Central

    Ladva, Bhakti J.; Mahida, Vijay M.; Kantaria, Urmi D.; Gokani, Rina H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preparation of highly standardized herbal products with respect to chemical composition and biological activity is considered to be a valuable approach in this field. SJT-DI-02 polyherbal formulation was successfully developed at our institute and filed for patent at Mumbai patent office. Objective: The present work was marker based standardization of patented, novel and efficacious polyherbal formulation namely SJT-DI-02 for the treatment of diabetes. The SJT-DI-02 was comprised of dried extracts of rhizomes of Acorus calamus, leaves of Aegle marmelose, fruits of Benincasa hispida, roots of Chlorophytum arendinaceum, seeds of Eugenia jambolana, leaves of Ocimum sanctum, pericarp of Punica granatum, seeds of Tamarindus indica. Selected plants were collected, dried and extracted with suitable solvents. The formulation was prepared by mixing different fractions of extracts. Materials and Methods: For successful and best standardization, first of all selection and procurement was carried out. Selection is done on the basis of therapeutic efficacy and amount of the marker present in the particular plant part. At the time of procurement side by side phytochemical screening and estimation of phytoconstituents was carried out. After completion of preliminary screening using characterized markers, we tried to develop best TLC systems using selected solvent composition. Finally well-developed TLC systems were applied in HPTLC. In the present study polyherbal formulation was standardized by using different four markers. TLC Densitometric methods were developed using HPTLC for the quantification of these marker compounds. Solvent systems were optimized to achieve best resolution of the marker compounds from other components of the sample extract. The identity of the bands in the sample extracts were confirmed by comparing the Rf and the absorption spectra by overlaying their UV absorption spectra with those of their respective standards. The purity of the bands

  4. Molecular and morphological phylogenetics of chelonine parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), with a critical assessment of divergence time estimations.

    PubMed

    Kittel, Rebecca N; Austin, Andrew D; Klopfstein, Seraina

    2016-08-01

    Parasitoid wasps of the subfamily Cheloninae are both species rich and poorly known. Although the taxonomy of Cheloninae appears to be relatively stable, there is no clear understanding of relationships among higher-level taxa. We here applied molecular phylogenetic analyses using three markers (COI, EF1α, 28S) and 37 morphological characters to elucidate the evolution and systematics of these wasps. Analyses were based on 83 specimens representing 13 genera. All genera except Ascogaster, Phanerotoma, and Pseudophanerotoma formed monophyletic groups; Furcidentia (stat. rev.) is raised to generic rank. Neither Chelonus (Chelonus) nor Chelonus (Microchelonus) were recovered as monophyletic, but together formed a monophyletic lineage. The tribes Chelonini and Odontosphaeropygini formed monophyletic groups, but the Phanerotomini sensu Zettel and Pseudophanerotomini were retrieved as either para- or polyphyletic. The genera comprising the former subfamily Adeliinae were confirmed as being nested within the Cheloninae. To estimate the age of the subfamily, we used 16 fossil taxa. Three approaches were compared: fixed-rate dating, node dating, and total-evidence dating, with age estimates differing greatly between the three methods. Shortcomings of each approach in relation to our dataset are discussed, and none of the age estimates is deemed sufficiently reliable. Given that most dating studies use a single method only, in most cases without presenting analyses on the sensitivity to priors, it is likely that numerous age estimates in the literature suffer from a similar lack of robustness. We argue for a more rigorous approach to dating analyses and for a faithful presentation of uncertainties in divergence time estimates. Given the results of the phylogenetic analysis the following taxonomic changes are proposed: Furcidentia Zettel (stat. rev.), previously treated as a subgenus of Pseudophanerotoma Zettel is raised to generic rank; Microchelonus Szépligeti (syn. nov

  5. SSR and SRAP marker-based linkage map of Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yinshan; Lin, Hong; Liu, Zhendong; Zhao, Yuhui; Guo, Xiuwu; Li, Kun

    2014-01-01

    An F1 population was created by the cross ‘87-1’ × ‘9-22’. The female parent ‘87-1’ was an extremely early maturing cultivar with strong flavour. The male parent was an excellent breeding line producing large berries maturing late. The mapping population included 149 randomly chosen individuals. Molecular genetic map for each parent and the consensus map were constructed using simple sequence repeat and sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers by software JoinMap 3.0. The ‘87-1’ map covers a total length of 1272.9 cM distributed in 21 linkage groups and consists of 163 molecular markers with an average distance between adjacent markers of 8.9 cM. The ‘9-22’ map covers a total length of 1267.4 cM distributed in 20 linkage groups and consists of 158 molecular markers with an average distance between adjacent markers of 9.1 cM. The consensus map covers a total length of 1537.1 cM distributed in 21 linkage groups and one doublet and consists of 217 molecular markers with an average distance of 7.8 cM between adjacent markers. The length of the linkage groups is 69.8 cM on average. The map covers the 19 chromosomes of the Vitis genome and can lay a solid foundation for further studies such as quantative trait loci (QTL) mapping of correlated traits and marker-assisted selection. PMID:26019507

  6. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  7. Assessing performance of single-sample molecular genetic methods to estimate effective population size: empirical evidence from the endangered Gochu Asturcelta pig breed.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Juan; Álvarez, Isabel; Fernandez, Iván; Menéndez-Arias, Nuria A; Goyache, Félix

    2016-07-01

    Estimating effective population size (N e ) using linkage disequilibrium (LD) information (N e( LD ) ) has the operational advantage of using a single sample. However, N e( LD ) estimates assume discrete generations and its performance are constrained by demographic issues. However, such concerns have received little empirical attention so far. The pedigree of the endangered Gochu Asturcelta pig breed includes individuals classified into discrete filial generations and individuals with generations overlap. Up to 780 individuals were typed with a set of 17 microsatellites. Performance of N e( LD ) was compared with N e estimates obtained using genealogical information, molecular coancestry (N e(M) ) and a temporal (two-sample) method (N e( JR ) ). Molecular-based estimates of N e exceeded those obtained using pedigree data. Estimates of N e( LD ) for filial generations F3 and F4 (17.0 and 17.3, respectively) were lower and steadier than those obtained using yearly or biannual samplings. N e( LD ) estimated for samples including generations overlap could only be compared with those obtained for the discrete filial generations when sampling span approached a generation interval and demographic correction for bias was applied. Single-sample N e(M) estimates were lower than their N e( LD ) counterparts. N e(M) estimates are likely to partially reflect the number of founders rather than population size. In any case, estimates of LD and molecular coancestry tend to covary and, therefore, N e(M) and N e( LD ) can hardly be considered independent. Demographically adjusted estimates of N e( JR ) and N e( LD ) took comparable values when: (1) the two samples used for the former were separated by one equivalent to discrete generations in the pedigree and (2) sampling span used for the latter approached a generation interval. Overall, the empirical evidence given in this study suggested that the advantage of using single-sample methods to obtain molecular-based estimates of N e

  8. A Marker-Based Approach for the Automated Selection of a Single Segmentation from a Hierarchical Set of Image Segmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Y.; Tilton, J. C.; Benediktsson, J. A.; Chanussot, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hierarchical SEGmentation (HSEG) algorithm, which combines region object finding with region object clustering, has given good performances for multi- and hyperspectral image analysis. This technique produces at its output a hierarchical set of image segmentations. The automated selection of a single segmentation level is often necessary. We propose and investigate the use of automatically selected markers for this purpose. In this paper, a novel Marker-based HSEG (M-HSEG) method for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Two classification-based approaches for automatic marker selection are adapted and compared for this purpose. Then, a novel constrained marker-based HSEG algorithm is applied, resulting in a spectral-spatial classification map. Three different implementations of the M-HSEG method are proposed and their performances in terms of classification accuracies are compared. The experimental results, presented for three hyperspectral airborne images, demonstrate that the proposed approach yields accurate segmentation and classification maps, and thus is attractive for remote sensing image analysis.

  9. Molecular techniques in ecohealth research toolkit: facilitating estimation of aggregate gastroenteritis burden in an irrigated periurban landscape.

    PubMed

    Tserendorj, Ariuntuya; Anceno, Alfredo J; Houpt, Eric R; Icenhour, Crystal R; Sethabutr, Orntipa; Mason, Carl S; Shipin, Oleg V

    2011-09-01

    Assessment of microbial hazards associated with certain environmental matrices, livelihood strategies, and food handling practices are constrained by time-consuming conventional microbiological techniques that lead to health risk assessments of narrow geographic or time scope, often targeting very few pathogens. Health risk assessment based on one or few indicator organisms underestimates true disease burden due a number of coexisting causative pathogens. Here, we employed molecular techniques in a survey of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Vibrio cholera, and Rotavirus A densities in canal water with respect to seasonality and spatial distribution of point-nonpoint pollution sources. Three irrigational canals stretching across nearly a 150-km(2) periurban landscape, traditionally used for agricultural irrigation but function as vital part of municipal wastewater stabilization in recent years, were investigated. Compiled stochastic data (pathogen concentration, susceptible populations) and literature-obtained deterministic data (pathogen dose-response model parameter values) were used in estimating waterborne gastroenteritis burden. Exposure scenarios include swimming or fishing, consuming canal water-irrigated vegetables, and ingesting or inhaling water aerosols while working in canal water-irrigated fields. Estimated annual gastroenteritis burden due individual pathogens among the sampling points was -10.6log(10) to -2.2log(10) DALYs. Aggregated annual gastroenteritis burden due all the target pathogens per sampling point was -3.1log(10) to -1.9log(10) DALYs, far exceeding WHO acceptable limit of -6.0log(10) DALYs. The present approach will facilitate the comprehensive collection of surface water microbiological baseline data and setting of benchmarks for interventions aimed at reducing microbial hazards in similar landscapes worldwide. PMID:22146856

  10. Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. ); Gotchy, R.L. )

    1990-10-01

    A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Multiple Environment Single System Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (MESS-QM/MM) Calculations. 1. Estimation of Polarization Energies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy calculations, it is often advantageous to have a frozen geometry for the quantum mechanical (QM) region. For such multiple-environment single-system (MESS) cases, two schemes are proposed here for estimating the polarization energy: the first scheme, termed MESS-E, involves a Roothaan step extrapolation of the self-consistent field (SCF) energy; whereas the other scheme, termed MESS-H, employs a Newton–Raphson correction using an approximate inverse electronic Hessian of the QM region (which is constructed only once). Both schemes are extremely efficient, because the expensive Fock updates and SCF iterations in standard QM/MM calculations are completely avoided at each configuration. They produce reasonably accurate QM/MM polarization energies: MESS-E can predict the polarization energy within 0.25 kcal/mol in terms of the mean signed error for two of our test cases, solvated methanol and solvated β-alanine, using the M06-2X or ωB97X-D functionals; MESS-H can reproduce the polarization energy within 0.2 kcal/mol for these two cases and for the oxyluciferin–luciferase complex, if the approximate inverse electronic Hessians are constructed with sufficient accuracy. PMID:25321186

  12. Effect of thermal processing on estimated metabolizable protein supply to dairy cattle from camelina seeds: relationship with protein molecular structural changes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Quanhui; Khan, Nazir A; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-20

    This study evaluated the effect of thermal processing on the estimated metabolizable protein (MP) supply to dairy cattle from camelina seeds (Camelina sativa L. Crantz) and determined the relationship between heat-induced changes in protein molecular structural characteristics and the MP supply. Seeds from two camelina varieties were sampled in two consecutive years and were either kept raw or were heated in an autoclave (moist heating) or in an air-draft oven (dry heating) at 120 °C for 1 h. The MP supply to dairy cattle was modeled by three commonly used protein evaluation systems. The protein molecular structures were analyzed by Fourier transform/infrared-attenuated total reflectance molecular spectroscopy. The results showed that both the dry and moist heating increased the contents of truly absorbable rumen-undegraded protein (ARUP) and total MP and decreased the degraded protein balance (DPB). However, the moist-heated camelina seeds had a significantly higher (P < 0.05) content of ARUP and total MP and a significantly lower (P < 0.05) content of DPB than did the dry-heated camelina seeds. The regression equations showed that intensities of the protein molecular structural bands can be used to estimate the contents of ARUP, MP, and DPB with high accuracy (R(2) > 0.70). These results show that protein molecular structural characteristics can be used to rapidly assess the MP supply to dairy cattle from raw and heat-treated camelina seeds. PMID:25046194

  13. A comparison of morphological and molecular-based surveys to estimate the species richness of Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira (bacillariophyta), in the Bay of Fundy.

    PubMed

    Hamsher, Sarah E; LeGresley, Murielle M; Martin, Jennifer L; Saunders, Gary W

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the ability of morphology and molecular-based surveys to estimate species richness for two species-rich diatom genera, Chaetoceros Ehrenb. and Thalassiosira Cleve, in the Bay of Fundy. Phytoplankton tows were collected from two sites at intervals over two years and subsampled for morphology-based surveys (2010, 2011), a culture-based DNA reference library (DRL; 2010), and a molecular-based survey (2011). The DRL and molecular-based survey utilized the 3' end of the RUBISCO large subunit (rbcL-3P) to identify genetic species groups (based on 0.1% divergence in rbcL-3P), which were subsequently identified morphologically to allow comparisons to the morphology-based survey. Comparisons were compiled for the year (2011) by site (n = 2) and by season (n = 3). Of the 34 taxa included in the comparisons, 50% of taxa were common to both methods, 35% were unique to the molecular-based survey, and 12% were unique to the morphology-based survey, while the remaining 3% of taxa were unidentified genetic species groups. The morphology-based survey excelled at identifying rare taxa in individual tow subsamples, which were occasionally missed with the molecular approach used here, while the molecular methods (the DRL and molecular-based survey), uncovered nine cryptic species pairs and four previously overlooked species. The last mentioned were typically difficult to identify and were generically assigned to Thalassiosira spp. during the morphology-based survey. Therefore, for now we suggest a combined approach encompassing routine morphology-based surveys accompanied by periodic molecular-based surveys to monitor for cryptic and difficult to identify taxa. As sequencing technologies improve, molecular-based surveys should become routine, leading to a more accurate representation of species composition and richness in monitoring programs. PMID:24130665

  14. Methods for Locating the Tibio-Femoral Contact Pathway in Total Knee Replacements Using Marker-Based Gait Analysis and Standard Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Hannah J; Swanson, Andrea; Knowlton, Christopher; Inoue, Nozomu; Wimmer, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to develop and test techniques for tracking the path of contact between the tibial and femoral total knee replacement components during level over-ground walking. The tibio-femoral path of contact could be an indicator of the in vivo performance of a total knee replacement as an estimator of areas of contact between the implant components. A longer contact path, indicative of more sliding between the implant components during walking, could indicate an implant at risk for increased wear. In addition, the tibio-femoral contact path determines the position and length of the muscle and ligament lever arms about the knee, and can subsequently influence knee contact force calculations. Methods Two methods were developed to predict the tibio-femoral contact pathways for total knee replacement devices. Both methods used patient-specific knee kinematics obtained during gait analysis, standard radiographs obtained during clinical follow-ups, and point-clouds of the tibial and femoral bearing surfaces. The validity of the techniques was evaluated with knee wear simulator tests and comparisons to wear scars on postmortem retrieved tibial components. Results The average total anterior-posterior distance covered by the contact path for ten patients implanted with a total knee replacement was 29.01 mm on the lateral side, and 21.80 mm on the medial side. Both methods for predicting the tibiofemoral contact pathways yielded similar results, and fell within the wear scars of simulator-tested and postmortem retrieved implants. Conclusions The methods for predicting the tibio-femoral contact pathway using marker-based gait analysis and standard clinical radiographs are computationally simple, and reliably predict contact path characteristics as evaluated against wear scars from knee wear simulator tests and postmortem retrieved implants. PMID:25328466

  15. Effective one step-iterative fiducial marker-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Berger, Martin; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    We previously introduced three different fiducial marker-based correction methods (2D projection shifting, 2D projection warping, and 3D image warping) for patients' involuntary motion in the lower body during weight-bearing Carm CT scanning. The 3D warping method performed better than 2D methods since it could more accurately take into account the lower body motion in 3D. However, as the 3D warping method applies different rotational and translational movement to the reconstructed image for each projection frame, distance-related weightings were slightly twisted and thus result in overlaying background noise over the entire image. In order to suppress background noise and artifacts (e.g. metallic marker-caused streaks), the 3D warping method has been improved by incorporating bilateral filtering and a Landwebertype iteration in one step. A series of projection images of five healthy volunteers standing at various flexion angles were acquired using a C-arm cone-beam CT system with a flat panel. A horizontal scanning trajectory of the C-arm was calibrated to generate projection matrices. Using the projection matrices, the static reference marker coordinates in 3D were estimated and used for the improved 3D warping method. The improved 3D warping method effectively reduced background noise down below the noise level of 2D methods and also eliminated metal-generated streaks. Thus, improved visibility of soft tissue structures (e.g. fat and muscle) was achieved while maintaining sharp edges at bone-tissue interfaces. Any high resolution weight-bearing cone-beam CT system can apply this method for motion compensation.

  16. Application of DNA barcoding in biodiversity studies of shallow-water octocorals: molecular proxies agree with morphological estimates of species richness in Palau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, C. S.; Brown, A. S.; Brayton, C.; Hunt, C. B.; van Ofwegen, L. P.

    2014-06-01

    The application of DNA barcoding to anthozoan cnidarians has been hindered by their slow rates of mitochondrial gene evolution and the failure to identify alternative molecular markers that distinguish species reliably. Among octocorals, however, multilocus barcodes can distinguish up to 70 % of morphospecies, thereby facilitating the identification of species that are ecologically important but still very poorly known taxonomically. We tested the ability of these imperfect DNA barcodes to estimate species richness in a biodiversity survey of the shallow-water octocoral fauna of Palau using multilocus ( COI, mtMutS, 28S rDNA) sequences obtained from 305 specimens representing 38 genera of octocorals. Numbers and identities of species were estimated independently (1) by a taxonomic expert using morphological criteria and (2) by assigning sequences to molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) using predefined genetic distance thresholds. Estimated numbers of MOTUs ranged from 73 to 128 depending on the barcode and distance threshold applied, bracketing the estimated number of 118 morphospecies. Concordance between morphospecies identifications and MOTUs ranged from 71 to 75 % and differed little among barcodes. For the speciose and ecologically dominant genus Sinularia, however, we were able to identify 95 % of specimens correctly simply by comparing mtMutS sequences and in situ photographs of colonies to an existing vouchered database. Because we lack a clear understanding of species boundaries in most of these taxa, numbers of morphospecies and MOTUs are both estimates of the true species diversity, and we cannot currently determine which is more accurate. Our results suggest, however, that the two methods provide comparable estimates of species richness for shallow-water Indo-Pacific octocorals. Use of molecular barcodes in biodiversity surveys will facilitate comparisons of species richness and composition among localities and over time, data that do not

  17. Pleistocene Speciation in North American Lichenized Fungi and the Impact of Alternative Species Circumscriptions and Rates of Molecular Evolution on Divergence Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Steven D.; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Stenroos, Soili; Clair, Larry L. St.

    2013-01-01

    Pleistocene climatic fluctuations influenced patterns of genetic variation and promoted speciation across a wide range of species groups. Lichens are commonly found in habitats that were directly impacted by glacial cycles; however, the role of Pleistocene climate in driving speciation in most lichen symbionts remains unclear. This uncertainty is due in part to limitations in our ability to accurately recognize independently evolving lichen-forming fungal lineages and a lack of relevant fossil calibrations. Using a coalescent-based species tree approach, we estimated divergence times for two sister clades in the genus Xanthoparmelia (Parmeliaceae) restricted to western North America. We assessed the influence of two different species circumscription scenarios and various locus-specific rates of molecular evolution on divergence estimates. Species circumscriptions were validated using the program BP&P. although speciation was generally supported in both scenarios, divergence times differed between traditional species circumscriptions and those based on genetic data, with more recent estimates resulting from the former. Similarly, rates of evolution for different loci resulted in variable divergence time estimates. However, our results unambiguously indicate that diversification in the sampled Xanthoparmelia clades occurred during the Pleistocene. Our study highlights the potential impact of ambiguous species circumscriptions and uncertain rates of molecular evolution on estimating divergence times within a multilocus species tree framework. PMID:24386465

  18. Quality Assurance and Commissioning of an Infrared Marker-Based Patient Positioning System for Frameless Extracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tejpal; Phurailatpam, Reena; Ajay, Mishra; Rajeshri, Pai; Pranshu, Mohindra; Supriya, Chopra

    2007-01-01

    Rapid advancements in imaging technology have led to remarkable improvements in identification and localization of tumors, ushering the era of high-precision techniques in contemporary radiotherapy practice. However, uncertainties in patient set-up and organ motion during a course of fractionated radiotherapy can compromise precision of radiation therapy. Excellent accuracy has been achieved with invasive and non-invasive fixation systems for stereotactic radiotherapy. This report describes the commissioning procedure and Quality Assurance studies done to evaluate the accuracy of isocenter localization by an infrared marker-based positioning system (ExacTrac). The ExacTrac has two infrared cameras that emit and detect infrared rays from reflective markers and construct three-dimensional coordinates of each marker. It detects the difference of the actual isocenter position from the planned isocenter coordinates in three translational (lateral, longitudinal, vertical, or x,y,z axes) and three rotational axes (six degree of freedom). This study performed on a flat and static phantom shows excellent accuracy achieved by the ExacTrac system. The positioning accuracy of ExacTrac (± 1 mm translational displacement and ± 1° rotational errors) can be a valuable tool in implementing frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Nevertheless, it needs to be further evaluated on patients with inherent motion and greater positional uncertainty before being adopted in clinical practice. PMID:23675057

  19. Model-based approach for human kinematics reconstruction from markerless and marker-based motion analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Sholukha, V; Bonnechere, B; Salvia, P; Moiseev, F; Rooze, M; Van Sint Jan, S

    2013-09-27

    Modeling tools related to the musculoskeletal system have been previously developed. However, the integration of the real underlying functional joint behavior is lacking and therefore available kinematic models do not reasonably replicate individual human motion. In order to improve our understanding of the relationships between muscle behavior, i.e. excursion and motion data, modeling tools must guarantee that the model of joint kinematics is correctly validated to ensure meaningful muscle behavior interpretation. This paper presents a model-based method that allows fusing accurate joint kinematic information with motion analysis data collected using either marker-based stereophotogrammetry (MBS) (i.e. bone displacement collected from reflective markers fixed on the subject's skin) or markerless single-camera (MLS) hardware. This paper describes a model-based approach (MBA) for human motion data reconstruction by a scalable registration method for combining joint physiological kinematics with limb segment poses. The presented results and kinematics analysis show that model-based MBS and MLS methods lead to physiologically-acceptable human kinematics. The proposed method is therefore available for further exploitation of the underlying model that can then be used for further modeling, the quality of which will depend on the underlying kinematic model. PMID:23972432

  20. Estimate of Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo for a Molecular Atmosphere over Ocean using Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The shortwave broadband albedo at the top of a molecular atmosphere over ocean between 40deg N and 40deg S is estimated using radiance measurements from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The albedo monotonically increases from 0.059 at a solar zenith angle of 10deg to 0.107 at a solar zenith angle of 60deg. The estimated uncertainty in the albedo is 3.5 x 10(exp -3) caused by the uncertainty in CERES-derived irradiances, uncertainty in VIRS-derived aerosol optical thicknesses, variations in ozone and water vapor, and variations in surface wind speed. The estimated uncertainty is similar in magnitude to the standard deviation of 0.003 that is derived from 72 areas divided by 20deg latitude by 20deg longitude grid boxes. The empirically estimated albedo is compared with the modeled albedo using a radiative transfer model combined with an ocean surface bidirectional reflectivity model. The modeled albedo with standard tropical atmosphere is 0.061 and 0.111 at the solar zenith angles of 10deg and 60deg, respectively. This empirically estimated albedo can be used to estimate the direct radiative effect of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere over oceans.

  1. Breaking the bottleneck: Use of molecular tailoring approach for the estimation of binding energies at MP2/CBS limit for large water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Nandi, Apurba; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2016-03-01

    A pragmatic method based on the molecular tailoring approach (MTA) for estimating the complete basis set (CBS) limit at Møller-Plesset second order perturbation (MP2) theory accurately for large molecular clusters with limited computational resources is developed. It is applied to water clusters, (H2O)n (n = 7, 8, 10, 16, 17, and 25) optimized employing aug-cc-pVDZ (aVDZ) basis-set. Binding energies (BEs) of these clusters are estimated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVNZ (aVNZ) [N = T, Q, and 5 (whenever possible)] levels of theory employing grafted MTA (GMTA) methodology and are found to lie within 0.2 kcal/mol of the corresponding full calculation MP2 BE, wherever available. The results are extrapolated to CBS limit using a three point formula. The GMTA-MP2 calculations are feasible on off-the-shelf hardware and show around 50%-65% saving of computational time. The methodology has a potential for application to molecular clusters containing ˜100 atoms.

  2. Statistical Estimation of the Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy Based On Direct Protein-Ligand Interaction Obtained by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a method for estimating protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG) based on the direct protein-ligand interaction obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation. Using this method, we estimated the ΔG value statistically by the average values of the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between each amino acid of the target protein and the ligand molecule. In addition, we introduced fluctuations in the accessible surface area (ASA) and dihedral angles of the protein-ligand complex system as the entropy terms of the ΔG estimation. The present method included the fluctuation term of structural change of the protein and the effective dielectric constant. We applied this method to 34 protein-ligand complex structures. As a result, the correlation coefficient between the experimental and calculated ΔG values was 0.81, and the average error of ΔG was 1.2 kcal/mol with the use of the fixed parameters. These results were obtained from a 2 nsec molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:24281257

  3. Ionization Energies, Electron Affinities, and Polarization Energies of Organic Molecular Crystals: Quantitative Estimations from a Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM)-Tuned Range-Separated Density Functional Approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haitao; Ryno, Sean; Zhong, Cheng; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Sun, Zhenrong; Körzdörfer, Thomas; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-14

    We propose a new methodology for the first-principles description of the electronic properties relevant for charge transport in organic molecular crystals. This methodology, which is based on the combination of a nonempirical, optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional with the polarizable continuum model, is applied to a series of eight representative molecular semiconductor crystals. We show that it provides ionization energies, electron affinities, and transport gaps in very good agreement with experimental values, as well as with the results of many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation at a fraction of the computational costs. Hence, this approach represents an easily applicable and computationally efficient tool to estimate the gas-to-crystal phase shifts of the frontier-orbital quasiparticle energies in organic electronic materials. PMID:27183355

  4. Estimating the Gibbs energy of hydration from molecular dynamics trajectories obtained by integral equations of the theory of liquids in the RISM approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, D. A.; Sobolev, E. V.

    2011-04-01

    A method of integral equations of the theory of liquids in the reference interaction site model (RISM) approximation is used to estimate the Gibbs energy averaged over equilibrium trajectories computed by molecular mechanics. Peptide oxytocin is selected as the object of interest. The Gibbs energy is calculated using all chemical potential formulas introduced in the RISM approach for the excess chemical potential of solvation and is compared with estimates by the generalized Born model. Some formulas are shown to give the wrong sign of Gibbs energy changes when peptide passes from the gas phase into water environment; the other formulas give overestimated Gibbs energy changes with the right sign. Note that allowance for the repulsive correction in the approximate analytical expressions for the Gibbs energy derived by thermodynamic perturbation theory is not a remedy.

  5. Estimation of octanol/water partition coefficient and aqueous solubility of environmental chemicals using molecular fingerprints and machine learning methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Octanol/water partition coefficient (logP) and aqueous solubility (logS) are two important parameters in pharmacology and toxicology studies, and experimental measurements are usually time-consuming and expensive. In the present research, novel methods are presented for the estim...

  6. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K- Δ E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO 2-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log Kint between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces.

  7. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Hay, B.P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K-{Delta}E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO{sub 2}-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log K{sup int} between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces. 39 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Ambient gas/particle partitioning. 3. Estimating partition coefficients of apolar, polar, and ionizable organic compounds by their molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Arp, Hans Peter H; Gosses, Kai-Uwe

    2009-03-15

    Equilibrium gas/particle partitioning coefficients of terrestrial aerosols, Kip, are dependent on various intermolecular interactions that can be quantified by experimentally determined compound-specific descriptors. For many compounds of environmental interest, such as emerging contaminants and atmospheric phototransformation products, these compound-specific descriptors are unknown or immeasurable. Often, only the molecular structure is known. Here we present the ability of two computer programs to predict equilibrium partitioning to terrestrial aerosols solely on the basis of molecular structure: COSMOtherm and SPARC. The greatest hurdle with designing such an approach is to identify suitable molecular surrogates to represent the dominating sorbing phases, which for ambient terrestrial aerosols are the water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) phase and the mixed-aqueous phase. For the WI0M phase, hypothetical urban secondary organic aerosol structural units from Kalberer et al. Science 2004, 303, 1659-1662 were investigated as input surrogates, and for the mixed-aqueous phase mildly acidic water was used as a surrogate. Using a validation data set of more than 1400 experimentally determined Kip values for polar, apolar, and ionic compounds ranging over 9 orders of magnitude (including semivolatile compounds such as PCDD/Fs, pesticides, and PBDEs), SPARC and COSMOtherm were generally able to predict Kip values well within an order of magnitude over an ambient range of temperature and relative humidity. This is remarkable as these two models were not fitted or calibrated to any experimental data. As these models can be used for potentially any organic molecule, they are particularly recommended for environmental screening purposes and for use when experimental compound descriptor data are not available. PMID:19368193

  9. Baseline correction of a correlation model for improving the prediction accuracy of infrared marker-based dynamic tumor tracking.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Mami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Yamada, Masahiro; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Ueki, Nami; Kaneko, Shuji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that the baseline drift of external and internal respiratory motion reduced the prediction accuracy of infrared (IR) marker-based dynamic tumor tracking irradiation (IR Tracking) using the Vero4DRT system. Here, we proposed a baseline correction method, applied immediately before beam delivery, to improve the prediction accuracy of IR Tracking. To perform IR Tracking, a four-dimensional (4D) model was constructed at the beginning of treatment to correlate the internal and external respiratory signals, and the model was expressed using a quadratic function involving the IR marker position (x) and its velocity (v), namely function F(x,v). First, the first 4D model, F1st(x,v), was adjusted by the baseline drift of IR markers (BDIR) along the x-axis, as function F'(x,v). Next, BDdetect, that defined as the difference between the target positions indicated by the implanted fiducial markers (Pdetect) and the predicted target positions with F'(x,v) (Ppredict) was determined using orthogonal kV X-ray images at the peaks of the Pdetect of the end-inhale and end-exhale phases for 10 s just before irradiation. F'(x,v) was corrected with BDdetect to compensate for the residual error. The final corrected 4D model was expressed as Fcor(x,v) = F1st{(x-BDIR),v}-BDdetect. We retrospectively applied this function to 53 paired log files of the 4D model for 12 lung cancer patients who underwent IR Tracking. The 95th percentile of the absolute differences between Pdetect and Ppredict (|Ep|) was compared between F1st(x,v) and Fcor(x,v). The median 95th percentile of |Ep| (units: mm) was 1.0, 1.7, and 3.5 for F1st(x,v), and 0.6, 1.1, and 2.1 for Fcor(x,v) in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Over all treatment sessions, the 95th percentile of |Ep| peaked at 3.2 mm using Fcor(x,v) compared with 8.4 mm using F1st(x,v). Our proposed method improved the prediction accuracy of IR Tracking by correcting the baseline drift

  10. Potential for bias and low precision in molecular divergence time estimation of the Canopy of Life: an example from aquatic bird families

    PubMed Central

    van Tuinen, Marcel; Torres, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in divergence time estimation is frequently studied from many angles but rarely from the perspective of phylogenetic node age. If appropriate molecular models and fossil priors are used, a multi-locus, partitioned analysis is expected to equally minimize error in accuracy and precision across all nodes of a given phylogeny. In contrast, if available models fail to completely account for rate heterogeneity, substitution saturation and incompleteness of the fossil record, uncertainty in divergence time estimation may increase with node age. While many studies have stressed this concern with regard to deep nodes in the Tree of Life, the inference that molecular divergence time estimation of shallow nodes is less sensitive to erroneous model choice has not been tested explicitly in a Bayesian framework. Because of available divergence time estimation methods that permit fossil priors across any phylogenetic node and the present increase in efficient, cheap collection of species-level genomic data, insight is needed into the performance of divergence time estimation of shallow (<10 MY) nodes. Here, we performed multiple sensitivity analyses in a multi-locus data set of aquatic birds with six fossil constraints. Comparison across divergence time analyses that varied taxon and locus sampling, number and position of fossil constraint and shape of prior distribution showed various insights. Deviation from node ages obtained from a reference analysis was generally highest for the shallowest nodes but determined more by temporal placement than number of fossil constraints. Calibration with only the shallowest nodes significantly underestimated the aquatic bird fossil record, indicating the presence of saturation. Although joint calibration with all six priors yielded ages most consistent with the fossil record, ages of shallow nodes were overestimated. This bias was found in both mtDNA and nDNA regions. Thus, divergence time estimation of shallow nodes may suffer

  11. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of eight new reciprocal translocations in the pig species. Estimation of their incidence in French populations

    PubMed Central

    Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain; Yerle, Martine; Séguéla, Anne; Berland, Hélène-Marie; Brun-Baronnat, Corinne; Bonnet, Nathalie; Darré, Roland

    2002-01-01

    Eight new cases of reciprocal translocation in the domestic pig are described. All the rearrangements were highlighted using GTG banding techniques. Chromosome painting experiments were also carried out to confirm the proposed hypotheses and to accurately locate the breakpoints. Three translocations, rcp(4;6)(q21;p14), rcp(2;6)(p17;q27) and rcp(5;17)(p12;q13) were found in boars siring small litters (8.3 and 7.4 piglets born alive per litter, on average, for translocations 2/6 and 5/17, respectively). The remaining five, rcp(5;8)(p12;q21), rcp(15;17)(q24;q21), rcp(7;8)(q24;p21), rcp(5;8)(p11;p23) and rcp(3;15)(q27;q13) were identified in young boars controlled before entering reproduction. A decrease in prolificacy of 22% was estimated for the 3/15 translocation after reproduction of the boar carrier. A parental origin by inheritance of the translocation was established for the (5;8)(p11;p23) translocation. The overall incidence of reciprocal translocations in the French pig populations over the 2000/2001 period was estimated (0.34%). PMID:12081804

  12. Estimating contemporary early life-history dispersal in an estuarine fish: integrating molecular and otolith elemental approaches.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, I R; Campana, S E; Bentzen, P

    2008-03-01

    Dispersal during the early life history of the anadromous rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, was examined using assignment testing and mixture analysis of multilocus genotypes and otolith elemental composition. Six spawning areas and associated estuarine nurseries were sampled throughout southeastern Newfoundland. Samples of adults and juveniles isolated by > 25 km displayed moderate genetic differentiation (F(ST) ~ 0.05), whereas nearby (< 25 km) spawning and nursery samples displayed low differentiation (F(ST) < 0.01). Self-assignment and mixture analysis of adult spawning samples supported the hypothesis of independence of isolated spawning locations (> 80% self-assignment) with nearby runs self-assigning at rates between 50 % and 70%. Assignment and mixture analysis of juveniles using adult baselines indicated high local recruitment at several locations (70-90%). Nearby (< 25 km) estuaries at the head of St Mary's Bay showed mixtures of individuals (i.e. 20-40% assignment to adjacent spawning location). Laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry transects across otoliths of spawning adults of unknown dispersal history were used to estimate dispersal among estuaries across the first year of life. Single-element trends and multivariate discriminant function analysis (Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca) classified the majority of samples as estuarine suggesting limited movement between estuaries (< 0.5%). The mixtures of juveniles evident in the genetic data at nearby sites and a lack of evidence of straying in the otolith data support a hypothesis of selective mortality of immigrants. If indeed selective mortality of immigrants reduces the survivorship of dispersers, estimates of dispersal in marine environments that neglect survival may significantly overestimate gene flow. PMID:18321254

  13. An equation to estimate the difference between theoretically predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed molecular weights for an acidic peptide.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yihong; Zhu, Qinfang; Huang, Delai; Zhao, Shuyi; Jan Lo, Li; Peng, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The molecular weight (MW) of a protein can be predicted based on its amino acids (AA) composition. However, in many cases a non-chemically modified protein shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW larger than its predicted size. Some reports linked this fact to high content of acidic AA in the protein. However, the exact relationship between the acidic AA composition and the SDS PAGE-displayed MW is not established. Zebrafish nucleolar protein Def is composed of 753 AA and shows an SDS PAGE-displayed MW approximately 13 kDa larger than its predicted MW. The first 188 AA in Def is defined by a glutamate-rich region containing ~35.6% of acidic AA. In this report, we analyzed the relationship between the SDS PAGE-displayed MW of thirteen peptides derived from Def and the AA composition in each peptide. We found that the difference between the predicted and SDS PAGE-displayed MW showed a linear correlation with the percentage of acidic AA that fits the equation y = 276.5x - 31.33 (x represents the percentage of acidic AA, 11.4% ≤ x ≤ 51.1%; y represents the average ΔMW per AA). We demonstrated that this equation could be applied to predict the SDS PAGE-displayed MW for thirteen different natural acidic proteins. PMID:26311515

  14. Estimation of interaction between oriented immobilized green fluorescent protein and its antibody by high performance affinity chromatography and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Lingjian; Gao, Xiaokang; Chen, Hongwei; Zhao, Xinfeng; Bian, Liujiao; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2015-07-01

    Although green fluorescence protein (GFP) and its antibody are widely used to track a protein or a cell in life sciences, the binding behavior between them remains unclear. In this work, diazo coupling method that synthesized a new stationary GFP was oriented immobilized on the surface of macro-porous silica gel by a phase. The stationary phase was utilized to confirm the validation of injection amount-dependent analysis in exploring protein-protein interaction that use GFP antibody as a probe. GFP antibody was proved to have one type of binding site on immobilized GFP. The number of binding site and association constant were calculated to be (6.41 ± 0.76) × 10(-10) M and (1.39 ± 0.12) × 10(9) M(-1). Further analysis by molecular docking showed that the binding of GFP to its antibody is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. These results indicated that injection amount-dependent analysis is capable of exploring the protein-protein interactions with the advantages of ligand and time saving. It is a valuable methodology for the ligands, which are expensive or difficult to obtain. PMID:25727342

  15. The equilibrium molecular structures of 2-deoxyribose and fructose by the semiexperimental mixed estimation method and coupled-cluster computations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Natalja; Demaison, Jean; Cocinero, Emilio J; Écija, Patricia; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Vogt, Jürgen

    2016-06-21

    Fructose and deoxyribose (24 and 19 atoms, respectively) are too large for determining accurate equilibrium structures, either by high-level ab initio methods or by experiments alone. We show in this work that the semiexperimental (SE) mixed estimation (ME) method offers a valuable alternative for equilibrium structure determinations in moderate-sized molecules such as these monosaccharides or other biochemical building blocks. The SE/ME method proceeds by fitting experimental rotational data for a number of isotopologues, which have been corrected with theoretical vibration-rotation interaction parameters (αi), and predicate observations for the structure. The derived SE constants are later supplemented by carefully chosen structural parameters from medium level ab initio calculations, including those for hydrogen atoms. The combined data are then used in a weighted least-squares fit to determine an equilibrium structure (r). We applied the ME method here to fructose and 2-deoxyribose and checked the accuracy of the calculations for 2-deoxyribose against the high level ab initio r structure fully optimized at the CCSD(T) level. We show that the ME method allows determining a complete and reliable equilibrium structure for relatively large molecules, even when experimental rotational information includes a limited number of isotopologues. With a moderate computational cost the ME method could be applied to larger molecules, thereby improving the structural evidence for subtle orbital interactions such as the anomeric effect. PMID:27212641

  16. The molecular marker-based comparison of Azotobacter spp. populations isolated from industrial soils of Cracow-Nowa Huta steelworks (southern Poland) and the adjacent agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Lenart-Boroń, Anna M; Wolny-Koładka, Katarzyna A; Boroń, Piotr M; Mitka, Józef R

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of Azotobacter spp., which has beneficial effects on plant development, is related to various soil properties, such as pH and fertility. This study evaluated the prevalence of Azotobacter spp. in industrial (H) and agricultural soils (P) in Nowa Huta, Cracow and determined the phenotypic and genetic diversity of these bacteria. The examined bacteria were present in 40% of H and in 50% of P soils. Taxonomic identification of the bacterial isolates indicated the presence of three species--A. salinestris, A. chroococcum and A. vinelandii. The genetic diversity, determined using two fingerprinting methods--Random Analysis of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Rep-PCR (BOX) revealed high level of population diversity. In AMOVA analysis most of diversity was attributed to within-population variation (76-85%), and only 3.78-6.18% was associated with among-group H and P variation. Global test of differences revealed distinct population structure within bacterial strains isolated from H and P areas only for BOX markers (Fst = 0.05732, P = 0.00275). Phenetic analyses: UPGMA and DCA better discriminated H and P groups based on RAPD data. Both BOX and RAPD methods provided an insight into the genetic complexity of Azotobacter spp. variation in soils of different land-use types. PMID:24798904

  17. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  18. Evolution on a volcanic conveyor belt: using phylogeographic reconstructions and K-Ar-based ages of the Hawaiian Islands to estimate molecular evolutionary rates.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R C; McIntosh, C E; Tarr, C L

    1998-04-01

    The Hawaiian Islands form as the Pacific Plate moves over a 'hot spot' in the earth's mantle where magma extrudes through the crust to build huge shield volcanos. The islands subside and erode as the plate carries them to the north-west, eventually to become coral atolls and seamounts. Thus islands are ordered linearly by age, with the oldest islands in the north-west (e.g. Kauai at 5.1 Ma) and the youngest in the south-east (e.g. Hawaii at 0.43 Ma). K-Ar estimates of the date of an island's formation provide a maximum age for the taxa inhabiting the island. These ages can be used to calibrate rates of molecular change under the following assumptions: (i) K-Ar dates are accurate; (ii) tree topologies show that derivation of taxa parallels the timing of island formation; (iii) populations do not colonize long after island emergence; (iv) the coalescent point for sister taxa does not greatly predate the formation of the colonized younger island; (v) saturation effects and (vi) among-lineage rate variation are minimal or correctable; and (vii) unbiased standard errors of distances and regressions can be estimated from multiple pairwise comparisons. We use the approach to obtain overall corrected rate calibrations for: (i) part of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in Hawaiian drepanidines (0.016 sequence divergence/Myr); (ii) the Yp1 gene in Hawaiian Drosophila (0.019/Myr Kambysellis et al. 1995); and (iii) parts of the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA and tRNAval in Laupala crickets (0.024-0.102/Myr, Shaw 1996). We discuss the reliability of the estimates given the assumptions (i-vii) above and contrast the results with previous calibrations of Adh in Hawaiian Drosophila and chloroplast DNA in lobeliods. PMID:9628004

  19. Technical note: Use of marker-based relationships with multiple-trait derivative-free restricted maximal likelihood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widespread use of the set of MTDFREML computer programs for genetic evaluation and estimation of genetic parameters has led to significant improvement in traits of economic importance. The initial version of this software package, however, was generally limited to use of pedigree-based relations...

  20. SU-E-J-24: Can Fiducial Marker-Based Setup Using ExacTrac Be An Alternative to Soft Tissue-Based Setup Using Cone-Beam CT for Prostate IMRT?

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, S; Utsunomiya, S; Abe, E; Aoyama, H; Satou, H; Sakai, H; Yamada, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess an accuracy of fiducial maker-based setup using ExacTrac (ExT-based setup) as compared with soft tissue-based setup using Cone-beam CT (CBCT-based setup) for patients with prostate cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the purpose of investigating whether ExT-based setup can be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. Methods: The setup accuracy was analyzed prospectively for 7 prostate cancer patients with implanted three fiducial markers received IMRT. All patients were treated after CBCT-based setup was performed and corresponding shifts were recorded. ExacTrac images were obtained before and after CBCT-based setup. The fiducial marker-based shifts were calculated based on those two images and recorded on the assumption that the setup correction was carried out by fiducial marker-based auto correction. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences and the correlation between CBCT and ExT shifts were estimated. Results: A total of 178 image dataset were analyzed. On the differences between CBCT and ExT shifts, 133 (75%) of 178 image dataset resulted in smaller differences than 3 mm in all dimensions. Mean differences in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were 1.8 ± 1.9 mm, 0.7 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. The percentages of shift agreements within ±3 mm were 76% for AP, 90% for SI, and 100% for LR. The Pearson coefficient of correlation for CBCT and ExT shifts were 0.80 for AP, 0.80 for SI, and 0.65 for LR. Conclusion: This work showed that the accuracy of ExT-based setup was correlated with that of CBCT-based setup, implying that ExT-based setup has a potential ability to be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. The further work is to specify the conditions that ExT-based setup can provide the accuracy comparable to CBCT-based setup.

  1. Molecular pedigree reconstruction and estimation of evolutionary parameters in a wild Atlantic salmon river system with incomplete sampling: a power analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pedigree reconstruction using genetic analysis provides a useful means to estimate fundamental population biology parameters relating to population demography, trait heritability and individual fitness when combined with other sources of data. However, there remain limitations to pedigree reconstruction in wild populations, particularly in systems where parent-offspring relationships cannot be directly observed, there is incomplete sampling of individuals, or molecular parentage inference relies on low quality DNA from archived material. While much can still be inferred from incomplete or sparse pedigrees, it is crucial to evaluate the quality and power of available genetic information a priori to testing specific biological hypotheses. Here, we used microsatellite markers to reconstruct a multi-generation pedigree of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) using archived scale samples collected with a total trapping system within a river over a 10 year period. Using a simulation-based approach, we determined the optimal microsatellite marker number for accurate parentage assignment, and evaluated the power of the resulting partial pedigree to investigate important evolutionary and quantitative genetic characteristics of salmon in the system. Results We show that at least 20 microsatellites (ave. 12 alleles/locus) are required to maximise parentage assignment and to improve the power to estimate reproductive success and heritability in this study system. We also show that 1.5 fold differences can be detected between groups simulated to have differing reproductive success, and that it is possible to detect moderate heritability values for continuous traits (h2 ~ 0.40) with more than 80% power when using 28 moderately to highly polymorphic markers. Conclusion The methodologies and work flow described provide a robust approach for evaluating archived samples for pedigree-based research, even where only a proportion of the total population is sampled. The

  2. Prediction of hybrid performance in maize using molecular markers and joint analyses of hybrids and parental inbreds.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Tobias A; Möhring, Jens; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Kusterer, Barbara; Dhillon, Baldev S; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Frisch, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The identification of superior hybrids is important for the success of a hybrid breeding program. However, field evaluation of all possible crosses among inbred lines requires extremely large resources. Therefore, efforts have been made to predict hybrid performance (HP) by using field data of related genotypes and molecular markers. In the present study, the main objective was to assess the usefulness of pedigree information in combination with the covariance between general combining ability (GCA) and per se performance of parental lines for HP prediction. In addition, we compared the prediction efficiency of AFLP and SSR marker data, estimated marker effects separately for reciprocal allelic configurations (among heterotic groups) of heterozygous marker loci in hybrids, and imputed missing AFLP marker data for marker-based HP prediction. Unbalanced field data of 400 maize dent x flint hybrids from 9 factorials and of 79 inbred parents were subjected to joint analyses with mixed linear models. The inbreds were genotyped with 910 AFLP and 256 SSR markers. Efficiency of prediction (R (2)) was estimated by cross-validation for hybrids having no or one parent evaluated in testcrosses. Best linear unbiased prediction of GCA and specific combining ability resulted in the highest efficiencies for HP prediction for both traits (R (2) = 0.6-0.9), if pedigree and line per se data were used. However, without such data, HP for grain yield was more efficiently predicted using molecular markers. The additional modifications of the marker-based approaches had no clear effect. Our study showed the high potential of joint analyses of hybrids and parental inbred lines for the prediction of performance of untested hybrids. PMID:19916002

  3. Estimation of activation energy for electroporation and pore growth rate in liquid crystalline and gel phases of lipid bilayers using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Amit Kumar; Kanchi, Subbarao; Venkataraman, V; Ayappa, K G; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-11-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of electroporation in POPC and DPPC lipid bilayers have been carried out at different temperatures ranging from 230 K to 350 K for varying electric fields. The dynamics of pore formation, including threshold field, pore initiation time, pore growth rate, and pore closure rate after the field is switched off, was studied in both the gel and liquid crystalline (Lα) phases of the bilayers. Using an Arrhenius model of pore initiation kinetics, the activation energy for pore opening was estimated to be 25.6 kJ mol(-1) and 32.6 kJ mol(-1) in the Lα phase of POPC and DPPC lipids respectively at a field strength of 0.32 V nm(-1). The activation energy decreases to 24.2 kJ mol(-1) and 23.7 kJ mol(-1) respectively at a higher field strength of 1.1 V nm(-1). At temperatures below the melting point, the activation energy in the gel phase of POPC and DPPC increases to 28.8 kJ mol(-1) and 34.4 kJ mol(-1) respectively at the same field of 1.1 V nm(-1). The pore closing time was found to be higher in the gel than in the Lα phase. The pore growth rate increases linearly with temperature and quadratically with field, consistent with viscosity limited growth models. PMID:26372335

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of a near-infrared fluorescent marker based on dual wavelength pump-probe excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Theiss, Christoph; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has been used to determine the spatial distribution of fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, from images acquired in phantoms and in vivo. Most methods involve the acquisition of multiwavelength images and rely on differences in the absorption spectra of the tissue chromophores to estimate the spatial distribution and abundance of the latter using spectral decomposition techniques, such as model based inversion schemes. However, the inversion of 3-D images can be computationally expensive. Experimental approaches to localising contrast agents may therefore be useful, especially if quantification is not essential. This work aims to develop a method for determining the spatial distribution of a near-infrared fluorescent cell marker from images acquired using dual wavelength excitation. The excitation wavelengths coincided with the absorption and emission spectrum of the fluorophore. The contrast mechanism relies on reducing the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore by inducing stimulated emission. This changes the amount of energy thermalized by the fluorophore, and hence the photoacoustic signal amplitude. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the background may be removed by subtracting two images acquired with and without pulse delay between the pump and probe pulses. To characterise the fluorophore, the signal amplitude is measured in a cuvette as a function of pulse delay, concentration, and fluence. The spatial distribution of the fluorophore is determined from images acquired in realistic tissue phantoms. This method may be suitable for in vivo applications, such as imaging of exogenous or genetically expressed fluorescent cell markers.

  5. Genome-Wide Analysis of Microsatellite Markers Based on Sequenced Database in Chinese Spring Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Wang, Changbiao; Tang, Zhaohui; Ren, Yongkang; Li, Yali; Zhang, Dayong; Dong, Yanhui; Zhao, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are distributed across both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and have been widely used for genetic studies and molecular marker-assisted breeding in crops. Though an ordered draft sequence of hexaploid bread wheat have been announced, the researches about systemic analysis of SSRs for wheat still have not been reported so far. In the present study, we identified 364,347 SSRs from among 10,603,760 sequences of the Chinese spring wheat (CSW) genome, which were present at a density of 36.68 SSR/Mb. In total, we detected 488 types of motifs ranging from di- to hexanucleotides, among which dinucleotide repeats dominated, accounting for approximately 42.52% of the genome. The density of tri- to hexanucleotide repeats was 24.97%, 4.62%, 3.25% and 24.65%, respectively. AG/CT, AAG/CTT, AGAT/ATCT, AAAAG/CTTTT and AAAATT/AATTTT were the most frequent repeats among di- to hexanucleotide repeats. Among the 21 chromosomes of CSW, the density of repeats was highest on chromosome 2D and lowest on chromosome 3A. The proportions of di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats on each chromosome, and even on the whole genome, were almost identical. In addition, 295,267 SSR markers were successfully developed from the 21 chromosomes of CSW, which cover the entire genome at a density of 29.73 per Mb. All of the SSR markers were validated by reverse electronic-Polymerase Chain Reaction (re-PCR); 70,564 (23.9%) were found to be monomorphic and 224,703 (76.1%) were found to be polymorphic. A total of 45 monomorphic markers were selected randomly for validation purposes; 24 (53.3%) amplified one locus, 8 (17.8%) amplified multiple identical loci, and 13 (28.9%) did not amplify any fragments from the genomic DNA of CSW. Then a dendrogram was generated based on the 24 monomorphic SSR markers among 20 wheat cultivars and three species of its diploid ancestors showing that monomorphic SSR markers represented a promising source to

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Microsatellite Markers Based on Sequenced Database in Chinese Spring Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhaohui; Ren, Yongkang; Li, Yali; Zhang, Dayong; Dong, Yanhui; Zhao, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are distributed across both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and have been widely used for genetic studies and molecular marker-assisted breeding in crops. Though an ordered draft sequence of hexaploid bread wheat have been announced, the researches about systemic analysis of SSRs for wheat still have not been reported so far. In the present study, we identified 364,347 SSRs from among 10,603,760 sequences of the Chinese spring wheat (CSW) genome, which were present at a density of 36.68 SSR/Mb. In total, we detected 488 types of motifs ranging from di- to hexanucleotides, among which dinucleotide repeats dominated, accounting for approximately 42.52% of the genome. The density of tri- to hexanucleotide repeats was 24.97%, 4.62%, 3.25% and 24.65%, respectively. AG/CT, AAG/CTT, AGAT/ATCT, AAAAG/CTTTT and AAAATT/AATTTT were the most frequent repeats among di- to hexanucleotide repeats. Among the 21 chromosomes of CSW, the density of repeats was highest on chromosome 2D and lowest on chromosome 3A. The proportions of di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats on each chromosome, and even on the whole genome, were almost identical. In addition, 295,267 SSR markers were successfully developed from the 21 chromosomes of CSW, which cover the entire genome at a density of 29.73 per Mb. All of the SSR markers were validated by reverse electronic-Polymerase Chain Reaction (re-PCR); 70,564 (23.9%) were found to be monomorphic and 224,703 (76.1%) were found to be polymorphic. A total of 45 monomorphic markers were selected randomly for validation purposes; 24 (53.3%) amplified one locus, 8 (17.8%) amplified multiple identical loci, and 13 (28.9%) did not amplify any fragments from the genomic DNA of CSW. Then a dendrogram was generated based on the 24 monomorphic SSR markers among 20 wheat cultivars and three species of its diploid ancestors showing that monomorphic SSR markers represented a promising source to

  7. SU-E-J-39: Dosimetric Benefit of Implanted Marker-Based CBCT Setup for Definitive Prostatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, H; Wu, Z; Bluemenfeld, P; Chu, J; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Daily setup for definitive prostatic radiotherapy is challenged by suboptimal visibility of the prostate boundary and daily variation of rectum shape and position. For patients with improved bowel preparation, we conducted a dosimetric comparison between prostate implanted marker (IM)-based daily setup and anterior rectal wall (ARW)-based setup, with the hypothesis that the former leads to adequate target coverage with better rectal sparing. Methods Five IMRT/VMAT prostate cases with implanted markers were selected for analysis. Daily CBCT showed improvement of the rectal volume compared to planning CT. For each patient, the prostate and rectum were contoured on three CBCT images (fraction 5/15/25) with subsequent physician review. The CBCTs were then registered to a planning CT using IM-based registration. The deviation of ARW positions from planning CT to CBCT were analyzed at various sup-inf levels (−1.8 cm to 1.8 cm from level of prostate center). To estimate the potential dosimetric impact from ARW-based setup, the treatment plans were recalculated using A-P shifts ranging from −1mm to +6mm. Clinically important rectum DVH values including Dmax, D3cc and Dmean were computed. Results For the studied patients, we observed on average 32% rectum volume reduction from planning CT to CBCT. As a Results, the ARW on average shifts posteriorly by −1mm to +5mm, depending on the sup-inf level of observation, with larger shifts observed at more superior levels. Recalculation shows that when ARW shifts 1mm posteriorly, ARW-based CBCT setup leads to a 1.0%, 4.2%, and 3.2% increase in rectum Dmax, D3cc, and Dmean, respectively, compared to IM-based setup. The dosimetric deviations increase to 4.7%, 25.8% and 24.7% when ARW shifts 6mm posteriorly. No significant prostate-only dose difference was observed. Conclusion For patients with improved bowel preparation, IM-based CBCT setup leads to accurate prostate coverage along with significantly lower rectal dose

  8. A Preliminary Study of Genetic Variation in Populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae) from North-East Brazil, Estimated with AFLP Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, I. M.; Mayo, S. J.; van den Berg, C.; Fay, M. F.; Chester, M.; Lexer, C.; Kirkup, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study sought genetic evidence of long-term isolation in populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae), a herbaceous, probably outbreeding, humid forest hemi-epiphyte, in the brejo forests of Ceará (north-east Brazil), and clarification of their relationships with populations in Amazonia and the Atlantic forest of Brazil. Methods Within-population genetic diversity and between-population dissimilarity were estimated using AFLP molecular markers in 75 individuals from eight populations located in Ceará, the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and Amazonia. Key Results The populations showed a clinal pattern of weak genetic differentiation over a large geographical region (FST = 0·1896). A strong correlation between genetic and geographical distance (Mantel test: r = 0·6903, P = 0·002) suggests a historical pattern of isolation by distance. Genetic structure analysis revealed at least two distinct gene pools in the data. The two isolated Ceará populations are significantly different from each other (pairwise ΦPT = 0·137, P = 0·003) and as diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·1832, 0·1706) as those in the Atlantic and Amazon forest regions. The population in southern Brazil is less diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·127) than the rest. The Ceará populations are related to those of the Atlantic forest rather than those from Amazonia (AMOVA, among-groups variation = 11·95 %, P = 0·037). Conclusions The gene pools detected within an overall pattern of clinal variation suggest distinct episodes of gene flow, possibly correlated with past humid forest expansions. The Ceará populations show no evidence of erosion of genetic diversity, although this was expected because of their isolation. Their genetic differentiation and relatively high diversity reinforce the importance of conserving the endangered brejo forests. PMID:17823112

  9. Molecular sizes of amino acid transporters in the luminal membrane from the kidney cortex, estimated by the radiation-inactivation method.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Demeule, M; Jetté, M; Potier, M

    1990-01-01

    Renal brush-border membrane vesicles from rat kidney cortex were irradiated in frozen state with a gamma-radiation source. Initial rates of influx into these vesicles were estimated for substrates such as L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-proline and L-leucine to establish the molecular sizes of their carriers. Transport was measured in initial-rate conditions to avoid artifacts arising from a decrease in the driving force caused by a modification of membrane permeability. Initial rates of Na(+)-independent uptakes for those four substrates appeared unaffected in the dose range used (0-6 Mrad), indicating that the passive permeability of the membrane towards these substrates was unaffected. However, at higher doses of irradiation the Na+ influx and the intravesicular volume evaluated by the uptake of glucose at equilibrium were altered by radiation. Thus Na(+)-dependent influx values were corrected for volume changes, and the corrected values were used to compute radiation-inactivation sizes of the transport systems. Their respective values for L-glutamic acid, L-proline, L-leucine and L-alanine carriers were 250, 224, 293 and 274 kDa. The presence of the free-radicals scavenger benzoic acid in the frozen samples during irradiation did not affect the uptake of glucose, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that freezing samples in a cryoprotective medium was enough to prevent secondary inactivation of transporters by free radicals. Uptakes of beta-alanine and L-lysine were much less affected by radiation. The radiation-inactivation size of the Na(+)-dependent beta-alanine carrier was 127 kDa and that of the L-lysine carrier was 90 kDa. PMID:1971509

  10. Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

  11. Molecular electrostatic potentials by systematic molecular fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, David M.; Collins, Michael A.

    2013-11-14

    A simple method is presented for estimating the molecular electrostatic potential in and around molecules using systematic molecular fragmentation. This approach estimates the potential directly from the electron density. The accuracy of the method is established for a set of organic molecules and ions. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by estimating the binding energy of a water molecule in an internal cavity in the protein ubiquitin.

  12. Ghost marker detection and elimination in marker-based optical tracking systems for real-time tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Guanghua Li, Jonathan; Huang, Yin; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To propose a simple model to explain the origin of ghost markers in marker-based optical tracking systems (OTS) and to develop retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. Methods: In marker-based OTS, ghost markers are virtual markers created due to the cross-talk between the two camera sensors, which can lead to system execution failure or inaccuracy in patient tracking. As a result, the users have to limit the number of markers and avoid certain marker configurations to reduce the chances of ghost markers. In this work, the authors propose retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. The two camera sensors were treated as mathematical points in space. The authors identified the coplanar within limit (CWL) condition as the necessary condition for ghost marker occurrence. A simple ghost marker detection method was proposed based on the model. Ghost marker elimination was achieved through pattern matching: a ghost marker-free reference set was matched with the optical marker set observed by the OTS; unmatched optical markers were eliminated as either ghost markers or misplaced markers. The pattern matching problem was formulated as a constraint satisfaction problem (using pairwise distances as constraints) and solved with an iterative backtracking algorithm. Wildcard markers were introduced to address missing or misplaced markers. An experiment was designed to measure the sensor positions and the limit for the CWL condition. The ghost marker detection and elimination algorithms were verified with samples collected from a five-marker jig and a nine-marker anthropomorphic phantom, rotated with the treatment couch from −60° to +60°. The accuracy of the pattern matching algorithm was further validated with marker patterns from 40 patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). For this purpose, a synthetic optical marker pattern was created for each patient by introducing ghost markers, marker position

  13. Molecular dynamics estimates for the thermodynamic properties of the Fe-S liquid cores of the Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, O. L.; Belashchenko, D. K.

    2016-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed for the physical and chemical properties of solid and liquid Fe-S solutions using the embedded atom model (EAM) potential as applied to the internal structure of the Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede under the assumption that the satellites' cores can be described by a two-component iron-sulfur system. Calculated results are presented for the thermodynamic parameters including the caloric, thermal, and elastic properties (specific heat, thermal expansion, Grüneisen parameter, density, compression module, velocity of sound, and adiabatic gradient) of the Fe-S solutions at sulfur concentrations of 0-18 at %, temperatures of up to 2500 K, and pressures of up to 14 GPa. The velocity of sound, which increases as pressure rises, is weakly dependent on sulfur concentration and temperature. For the Moon's outer Fe-S core (~5 GPa/2000 K), which contains 6-16 at % (3.5-10 wt %) sulfur, the density and the velocity of sound are estimated at 6.3-7.0 g/cm3 and 4000 ± 50 m/s, respectively. The MD calculations are compared with the interpretation of the Apollo observations (Weber et al., 2011) to show a good consistency of the velocity of P-waves in the Moon's liquid core whereas the thermodynamic density of the Fe-S core is not consistent with the seismic models with ρ = 5.1-5.2 g/cm3 (Garcia et al., 2011; Weber et al., 2011). The revision the density values for the core leads to the revision of its size and mass. At sulfur concentrations of 3.5-10 wt %, the density of the Fe-S melt is 20-30% higher that the seismic density of the core. Therefore, the most likely radius of the Moon's outer core must be less than 330 km (Weber et al., 2011) because, provided that the constraint on the Moon's mass and moment of inertia is satisfied, an increase in the density of the core must lead to a reduction of its radius. For Jupiter's Galilean moons Io, Europa, and Ganymede, constraints are obtained on the size, density, and sound velocity of

  14. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: Analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-21

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ∼ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  15. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-21

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ∼ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  16. ESTIMATION OF HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER AND PHOSPHATE ESTER COMPOUNDS IN AQUEOUS SYSTEMS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE BY SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid ester and phosphate ester compounds in aqueous non- aqueous and systems strictly from molecular structure. The energy diffe...

  17. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Mitsoura, Eleni; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  18. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles Mitsoura, Eleni; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-07

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  19. USING CARBOHYDRATES AS MOLECULAR MARKERS TO DETERMINE THE CONTRIBUTION OF AGRICULTURAL SOIL TO AMBIENT FINE AND COURSE PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Project research optimized the quantification technique for carbohydrates that also allows quantification of other non-polar molecular markers based on using an isotopically labeled internal standard (D-glucose-1,2,3,4,5,6,6-d7) to monitor extraction efficiency, extraction usi...

  20. Detection of "punctuated equilibrium" by bayesian estimation of speciation and extinction rates, ancestral character states, and rates of anagenetic and cladogenetic evolution on a molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Folmer

    2008-11-01

    Algorithms are presented to simultaneously estimate probabilities of speciation and extinction, rates of anagenetic and cladogenetic phenotypic evolution, as well as ancestral character states, from a complete ultrametric species-level phylogeny with dates assigned to all bifurcations and one or more phenotypes in three or more extant species, using Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. The algorithms also estimate missing phenotypes of extant species and numbers of speciation events that occurred on all branches of the phylogeny. The algorithms are discussed and their performance is evaluated using simulated data. That evaluation shows that precise estimation of rates of evolution of one or a few phenotypes requires large phylogenies. Estimation accuracy improves with the number of species on the phylogeny. PMID:18752617

  1. Estimation of molecular upper remission limit for monitoring minimal residual disease in peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients by WT1 expression

    PubMed Central

    POLÁK, JAROSLAV; HÁJKOVÁ, HANA; MAALAUFOVÁ-SOUKUPOVÁ, JACQUELINE; MARKOVÁ, JANA; ŠÁLEK, CYRIL; SCHWARZ, JIŘÍ; HAŠKOVEC, CEDRIK

    2012-01-01

    To date, approximately one half of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients do not have a suitable specific molecular marker for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD). The Wilm’s tumour gene (WT1) has been suggested as a possible molecular marker of MRD in AML. The expression of WT1 in peripheral blood (PB) was measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in peripheral leukocytes from 151 patients with AML at diagnosis. WT1 expression was significantly elevated, i.e. up to 3 orders of magnitude in the majority (80%) of AML patients at diagnosis compared to the PB of healthy donors. Sequence samples of the long-term followed-up AML patients treated with chemotherapy and/or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation were analysed for WT1 expression. The results revealed that the hematological relapses were preceded (median, 1.8 months) by an increase in WT1 gene expression. For the practical utility of this gene as a molecular marker of relapse, it was necessary to determine an upper remission limit, crossing which would signal hematological relapse. The upper remission limit was determined in our set of patients to be 0.02 WT1/ABL. The AML patients who consequently relapsed crossed this upper remission limit; however, those in permanent remission did not. Therefore, this upper remission limit could be taken as the border of molecular relapse of AML patients. Moreover, insufficient decline of WT1 expression under the upper remission limit following induction and/or consolidation therapy was associated with markedly high risk of relapse. The results show that our upper remission limit can be taken as the border of molecular relapse of AML patients and WT1 levels following initial therapy as a beneficial prognostic marker. PMID:22969857

  2. Accurate pose estimation using single marker single camera calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Sarthak; Erat, Okan; Wang, Lejing; Weidert, Simon; Euler, Ekkehard; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2013-03-01

    Visual marker based tracking is one of the most widely used tracking techniques in Augmented Reality (AR) applications. Generally, multiple square markers are needed to perform robust and accurate tracking. Various marker based methods for calibrating relative marker poses have already been proposed. However, the calibration accuracy of these methods relies on the order of the image sequence and pre-evaluation of pose-estimation errors, making the method offline. Several studies have shown that the accuracy of pose estimation for an individual square marker depends on camera distance and viewing angle. We propose a method to accurately model the error in the estimated pose and translation of a camera using a single marker via an online method based on the Scaled Unscented Transform (SUT). Thus, the pose estimation for each marker can be estimated with highly accurate calibration results independent of the order of image sequences compared to cases when this knowledge is not used. This removes the need for having multiple markers and an offline estimation system to calculate camera pose in an AR application.

  3. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. Part I. Numerical model-based optimization

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keil, Andreas; Besier, Thor F.; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Maier, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human subjects in standing positions are apt to show much more involuntary motion than in supine positions. The authors aimed to simulate a complicated realistic lower body movement using the four-dimensional (4D) digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom. The authors also investigated fiducial marker-based motion compensation methods in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) space. The level of involuntary movement-induced artifacts and image quality improvement were investigated after applying each method. Methods: An optical tracking system with eight cameras and seven retroreflective markers enabled us to track involuntary motion of the lower body of nine healthy subjects holding a squat position at 60° of flexion. The XCAT-based knee model was developed using the 4D XCAT phantom and the optical tracking data acquired at 120 Hz. The authors divided the lower body in the XCAT into six parts and applied unique affine transforms to each so that the motion (6 degrees of freedom) could be synchronized with the optical markers’ location at each time frame. The control points of the XCAT were tessellated into triangles and 248 projection images were created based on intersections of each ray and monochromatic absorption. The tracking data sets with the largest motion (Subject 2) and the smallest motion (Subject 5) among the nine data sets were used to animate the XCAT knee model. The authors defined eight skin control points well distributed around the knees as pseudo-fiducial markers which functioned as a reference in motion correction. Motion compensation was done in the following ways: (1) simple projection shifting in 2D, (2) deformable projection warping in 2D, and (3) rigid body warping in 3D. Graphics hardware accelerated filtered backprojection was implemented and combined with the three correction methods in order to speed up the simulation process. Correction fidelity was evaluated as a function of number of markers used (4–12) and

  4. Molecular clocks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y; Ho, Simon Y W

    2016-05-23

    In the 1960s, several groups of scientists, including Emile Zuckerkandl and Linus Pauling, had noted that proteins experience amino acid replacements at a surprisingly consistent rate across very different species. This presumed single, uniform rate of genetic evolution was subsequently described using the term 'molecular clock'. Biologists quickly realised that such a universal pacemaker could be used as a yardstick for measuring the timescale of evolutionary divergences: estimating the rate of amino acid exchanges per unit of time and applying it to protein differences across a range of organisms would allow deduction of the divergence times of their respective lineages (Figure 1). PMID:27218841

  5. SSR marker-based analysis of genetic relatedness among sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) from breeding programs in China and other countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capillary electrophoresis-based molecular genotyping was conducted on 35 sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum spp. hybrids) and five clones of related wild species with 20 polymorphic SSR DNA markers. A total of 251 alleles were identified with 248 alleles displaying varying degrees of polymorphism and t...

  6. Genome-Wide Identification of SSR and SNP Markers Based on Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing of a Thailand Wild Sacred Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera).

    PubMed

    Hu, Jihong; Gui, Songtao; Zhu, Zhixuan; Wang, Xiaolei; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Genomic resources such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), insertions and deletions (InDels) and SSRs (simple sequence repeats) are essential for crop improvement and better utilization in genetic breeding. However, the resources for the sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) are still limited. In the present study, to dissect large-scale genomic molecular marker resources for sacred lotus, we re-sequenced a Thailand sacred lotus cultivar 'Chiang Mai wild lotus' and compared with the reported lotus genome 'Middle lake wild lotus'. A total of 3,180,059 SNPs, 328, 251 InDels and 14,191 SVs were found between the two genomes. The functional impact analyses of these SNPs indicated that they may be involved in metabolic processes, binding, catalytic activity, etc. Mining the genome sequences for SSRs showed that 191,657 SSRs were identified with a frequency of one SSR per 4.23 kb and 103,656 SSR primer pairs were designed. Furthermore, 14, 502 EST-SSRs were also indentified using the available RNA-seq data in the NCBI. A subset of 150 SSRs (genomic and EST-SSRs) was randomly selected for validation and genetic diversity analysis. The genotypes could be easily distinguished using these SSR markers and the 'Chiang Mai wild lotus' was obviously differentiated from the other Chinese accessions. This study provides considerable amounts of genomic resources and markers for the quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification and molecular selection of the species, which could have a potential role in various applications in sacred lotus breeding. PMID:26606530

  7. Genome-Wide Identification of SSR and SNP Markers Based on Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing of a Thailand Wild Sacred Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhixuan; Wang, Xiaolei; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Genomic resources such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), insertions and deletions (InDels) and SSRs (simple sequence repeats) are essential for crop improvement and better utilization in genetic breeding. However, the resources for the sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) are still limited. In the present study, to dissect large-scale genomic molecular marker resources for sacred lotus, we re-sequenced a Thailand sacred lotus cultivar ‘Chiang Mai wild lotus’ and compared with the reported lotus genome ‘Middle lake wild lotus’. A total of 3,180,059 SNPs, 328, 251 InDels and 14,191 SVs were found between the two genomes. The functional impact analyses of these SNPs indicated that they may be involved in metabolic processes, binding, catalytic activity, etc. Mining the genome sequences for SSRs showed that 191,657 SSRs were identified with a frequency of one SSR per 4.23 kb and 103,656 SSR primer pairs were designed. Furthermore, 14, 502 EST-SSRs were also indentified using the available RNA-seq data in the NCBI. A subset of 150 SSRs (genomic and EST-SSRs) was randomly selected for validation and genetic diversity analysis. The genotypes could be easily distinguished using these SSR markers and the ‘Chiang Mai wild lotus’ was obviously differentiated from the other Chinese accessions. This study provides considerable amounts of genomic resources and markers for the quantitative trait locus (QTL) identification and molecular selection of the species, which could have a potential role in various applications in sacred lotus breeding. PMID:26606530

  8. Molecular replacement.

    PubMed

    Toth, Eric A

    2007-01-01

    As more protein structures are solved, the likelihood that current structural investigations will involve proteins for which there exists no homologous structure continually decreases. The extraction of phase information from diffraction experiments is one of several great barriers that crystallographers must overcome on the path to structure solution. One means to overcome this obstacle, the technique of molecular replacement, uses the structural similarity between proteins with similar sequences to give a good first estimate of the phases for the diffraction data of the protein of interest. The programs that execute this technique currently come in many flavors, from traditional Patterson-based methods, to stochastic searches in greater than three dimensions, to maximum likelihood-enhanced molecular replacement, each possessing unique advantages that can shake loose a recalcitrant solution. As crystallographers aim to solve larger macromolecular complexes that more faithfully depict the actors in cellular events, having existing phase information for parts of those biological machines will reinforce the technological advancements in data collection and structure solution that have already produced mammoth structures like the ribosome, yielding an ever-clearer picture of the inner workings of biology. PMID:17172763

  9. Marker-based cloning of the region containing the UhAvr1 avirulence gene from the basidiomycete barley pathogen Ustilago hordei.

    PubMed Central

    Linning, R; Lin, D; Lee, N; Abdennadher, M; Gaudet, D; Thomas, P; Mills, D; Kronstad, J W; Bakkeren, G

    2004-01-01

    Race-cultivar specialization during the interaction of the basidiomycete smut pathogen Ustilago hordei with its barley host was described in the 1940s. Subsequent genetic analyses revealed the presence of dominant avirulence genes in the pathogen that conform to the gene-for-gene theory. This pathosystem therefore presents an opportunity for the molecular genetic characterization of fungal genes controlling avirulence. We performed a cross between U. hordei strains to obtain 54 progeny segregating for three dominant avirulence genes on three differential barley cultivars. Bulked segregant analysis was used to identify RAPD and AFLP markers tightly linked to the avirulence gene UhAvr1. The UhAvr1 gene is located in an area containing repetitive DNA and this region is undetectable in cosmid libraries prepared from the avirulent parental strain. PCR and hybridization probes developed from the linked markers were therefore used to identify cosmid clones from the virulent (Uhavr1) parent. By walking on Uhavr1-linked cosmid clones, a nonrepetitive, nearby probe was found that recognized five overlapping BAC clones spanning 170 kb from the UhAvr1 parent. A contig of the clones in the UhAvr1 region was constructed and selected probes were used for RFLP analysis of the segregating population. This approach genetically defined an approximately 80-kb region that carries the UhAvr1 gene and provided cloned sequences for subsequent genetic analysis. UhAvr1 represents the first avirulence gene cloned from a basidiomycete plant pathogen. PMID:15020410

  10. Primate molecular divergence dates.

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E; Young, Nathan M

    2006-11-01

    With genomic data, alignments can be assembled that greatly increase the number of informative sites for analysis of molecular divergence dates. Here, we present an estimate of the molecular divergence dates for all of the major primate groups. These date estimates are based on a Bayesian analysis of approximately 59.8 kbp of genomic data from 13 primates and 6 mammalian outgroups, using a range of paleontologically supported calibration estimates. Results support a Cretaceous last common ancestor of extant primates (approximately 77 mya), an Eocene divergence between platyrrhine and catarrhine primates (approximately 43 mya), an Oligocene origin of apes and Old World monkeys (approximately 31 mya), and an early Miocene (approximately 18 mya) divergence of Asian and African great apes. These dates are examined in the context of other molecular clock studies. PMID:16815047

  11. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjects in vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  12. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pal, Saikat; Beaupré, Gary S.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  13. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  14. Estimating Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Margaret; Scott, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss mass as one of the three fundamental measurements (the others being length and time), noting that estimation of mass is little taught and assessed in primary schools. This article briefly explores the reasons for this in terms of culture, practice, and the difficulty of assessing estimation of mass. An activity using the…

  15. Temperature estimators in computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, César; González-Cataldo, Felipe; Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2016-05-01

    Temperature is a key physical quantity that is used to describe equilibrium between two bodies in thermal contact. In computer simulations, the temperature is usually estimated by means of the equipartition theorem, as an average over the kinetic energy. However, recent studies have shown that the temperature can be estimated using only the particles positions, which has been called configurational temperature. Through classical molecular dynamics simulations of 108-argon-atoms system, we compare the performance of four different temperature estimators: the usual kinetic temperature and three configurational temperatures, Our results show that the different estimators converge to the same value, but their fluctuations are different.

  16. Molecular Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Willets, Katherine A

    2016-06-12

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics. PMID:27049633

  17. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  18. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  19. Attitude Estimation or Quaternion Estimation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    2003-01-01

    The attitude of spacecraft is represented by a 3x3 orthogonal matrix with unity determinant, which belongs to the three-dimensional special orthogonal group SO(3). The fact that all three-parameter representations of SO(3) are singular or discontinuous for certain attitudes has led to the use of higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterizations, especially the four-component quaternion. In attitude estimation, we are faced with the alternatives of using an attitude representation that is either singular or redundant. Estimation procedures fall into three broad classes. The first estimates a three-dimensional representation of attitude deviations from a reference attitude parameterized by a higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterization. The deviations from the reference are assumed to be small enough to avoid any singularity or discontinuity of the three-dimensional parameterization. The second class, which estimates a higher-dimensional representation subject to enough constraints to leave only three degrees of freedom, is difficult to formulate and apply consistently. The third class estimates a representation of SO(3) with more than three dimensions, treating the parameters as independent. We refer to the most common member of this class as quaternion estimation, to contrast it with attitude estimation. We analyze the first and third of these approaches in the context of an extended Kalman filter with simplified kinematics and measurement models.

  20. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Estimating risk.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    A free mobile phone app has been launched providing nurses and other hospital clinicians with a simple way to identify high-risk surgical patients. The app is a phone version of the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool (SORT), originally developed for online use with computers by researchers from the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death and the University College London Hospital Surgical Outcomes Research Centre. SORT uses information about patients' health and planned surgical procedures to estimate the risk of death within 30 days of an operation. The percentages are only estimates, taking into account the general risks of the procedures and some information about patients, and should not be confused with patient-specific estimates in individual cases. PMID:27369709

  2. Estimation Destinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threewit, Fran

    This book leads students through a journey of hands-on investigations of skill-based estimation. The 30 lessons in the book are grouped into four units: Holding Hands, The Real Scoop, Container Calculations, and Estimeasurements. In each unit children work with unique, real materials intended to build an awareness of number, quantity, and…

  3. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  4. Molecular Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    In the last decades, several scientific researches have been focused on studying how to encompass and convert - by a theoretical pathway - the information encoded in the molecular structure into one or more numbers used to establish quantitative relationships between structures and properties, biological activities, or other experimental properties. Molecular descriptors are formally mathematical representations of a molecule obtained by a well-specified algorithm applied to a defined molecular representation or a well-specified experimental procedure. They play a fundamental role in chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, environmental protection policy, toxicology, ecotoxicology, health research, and quality control. Evidence of the interest of the scientific community in the molecular descriptors is provided by the huge number of descriptors proposed up today: more than 5000 descriptors derived from different theories and approaches are defined in the literature and most of them can be calculated by means of dedicated software applications. Molecular descriptors are of outstanding importance in the research fields of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) and quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs), where they are the independent chemical information used to predict the properties of interest. Along with the definition of appropriate molecular descriptors, the molecular structure representation and the mathematical tools for deriving and assessing models are other fundamental components of the QSAR/QSPR approach. The remarkable progress during the last few years in chemometrics and chemoinformatics has led to new strategies for finding mathematical meaningful relationships between the molecular structure and biological activities, physico-chemical, toxicological, and environmental properties of chemicals. Different approaches for deriving molecular descriptors here reviewed and some of the most relevant descriptors are presented in

  5. Molecular Haeckel.

    PubMed

    Elinson, Richard P; Kezmoh, Lorren

    2010-07-01

    More than a century ago, Ernst Haeckel created embryo drawings to illustrate the morphological similarity of vertebrate early embryos. These drawings have been both widely presented and frequently criticized. At the same time that the idea of morphological similarity was recently attacked, there has been a growing realization of molecular similarities in the development of tissues and organs. We have surveyed genes expressed in vertebrate embryos, and we have used them to construct drawings that we call Molecular Haeckels. The Molecular Haeckels emphasize that, based on gene expression, there is a greater similarity among vertebrate embryos than even Haeckel might have imagined. PMID:20549737

  6. Computationally Designed Molecularly Imprinted Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Dumitru; Lagowski, Jolanta; Faid, Karim

    2004-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for different molecular systems in order to predict the binding affinities, binding energies, binding distances and the active site groups between the simulated molecular systems and different bio-ligands (theophylline and its derivatives), which have been designed and minimized using molecular simulation techniques. The first simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and functional monomer, such as methacrylic acid and its derivatives. For each pair of molecular systems, (10 monomers with a ligand and 10 monomers without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between a ligand and the corresponding monomers. The analysis of the simulated functional monomers with ligands indicates that the functional group of monomers interacting with ligands tends to be either COOH or CH2=CH. The distances between the ligand and monomer, in the most stable cases as indicated above, are between 2.0-4.5 Å. The second simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and a polymer. The polymers were obtained from monomers that were simulated above. And similar to monomer study, for each pair of molecular systems, (polymer with a ligand and polymer without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between ligand and the corresponding polymer. The binding distance between the active site of a polymer and a ligand will also be discussed.

  7. Estimates of missing heritability for complex traits in Brown Swiss cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic selection estimates genetic merit based on dense SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotypes and phenotypes. This requires that SNPs explain a large fraction of the genetic variance. The objectives of this work were: (1) to estimate the fraction of genetic variance explained by dense genome-wide markers using 54 K SNP chip genotyping, and (2) to evaluate the effect of alternative marker-based relationship matrices and corrections for the base population on the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers. Methods Two alternative marker-based relationship matrices were estimated using 35 706 SNPs on 1086 dairy bulls. Both pedigree- and marker-based relationship matrices were fitted simultaneously or separately in an animal model to estimate the fraction of variance not explained by the markers, i.e. the fraction explained by the pedigree. The phenotypes considered in the analysis were the deregressed estimated breeding values (dEBV) for milk, fat and protein yield and for somatic cell score (SCS). Results When dEBV were not sufficiently accurate (50 or 70%), the estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers was around 65% for yield traits and 45% for SCS. Scaling marker genotypes with locus-specific frequencies of heterozygotes slightly increased the variance explained by markers, compared with scaling with the average frequency of heterozygotes across loci. The estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers using separately both relationships matrices followed the same trends but the results were underestimated. With less accurate dEBV estimates, the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers was underestimated, which is probably an artifact due to the dEBV being estimated by a pedigree-based animal model. Conclusions When using only highly accurate dEBV, the proportion of the genetic variance explained by the Illumina 54 K SNP chip was approximately 80% for Brown Swiss cattle

  8. Molecular printing

    PubMed Central

    Braunschweig, Adam B.; Huo, Fengwei; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular printing techniques, which involve the direct transfer of molecules to a substrate with submicrometre resolution, have been extensively developed over the past decade and have enabled many applications. Arrays of features on this scale have been used to direct materials assembly, in nanoelectronics, and as tools for genetic analysis and disease detection. The past decade has witnessed the maturation of molecular printing led by two synergistic technologies: dip-pen nanolithography and soft lithography. Both are characterized by material and substrate flexibility, but dip-pen nanolithography has unlimited pattern design whereas soft lithography has limited pattern flexibility but is low in cost and has high throughput. Advances in DPN tip arrays and inking methods have increased the throughput and enabled applications such as multiplexed arrays. A new approach to molecular printing, polymer-pen lithography, achieves low-cost, high-throughput and pattern flexibility. This Perspective discusses the evolution and future directions of molecular printing. PMID:21378889

  9. Molecular Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.

    2005-07-01

    Part I. Molecular Clouds and the Distribution of Molecules in the Milky Way and Other Galaxies: 1. Molecular clouds in the Milky Way P. Friberg and A. Hjalmarson; 2. Molecules in galaxies L. Blitz; Part II. Diffuse Molecular Clouds: 3. Diffuse cloud chemistry E. F. Van Dishoeck; 4. Observations of velocity and density structure in diffuse clouds W. D. Langer; 5. Shock chemistry in diffuse clouds T. W. Hartquist, D. R. Flower and G. Pineau des Forets; Part III. Quiescent Dense Clouds: 6. Chemical modelling of quiescent dense interstellar clouds T. J. Millar; 7. Interstellar grain chemistry V. Buch; 8. Large molecules and small grains in astrophysics S. H. Lepp; Part IV. Studies of Molecular Processes: 9. Molecular photoabsorption processes K. P. Kirby; 10. Interstellar ion chemistry: laboratory studies D. Smith, N. G. Adams and E. E. Ferguson; 11. Theoretical considerations on some collisional processes D. R. Bates; 12. Collisional excitation processes E. Roueff; 13. Neutral reactions at Low and High Temperatures M. M. Graff; Part V. Atomic Species in Dense Clouds: 14. Observations of atomic species in dense clouds G. J. Melnick; 15. Ultraviolet radiation in molecular clouds W. G. Roberge; 16. Cosmic ray induced photodissociation and photoionization of interstellar molecules R. Gredel; 17. Chemistry in the molecular cloud Barnard 5 S. B. Charnley and D. A. Williams; 18. Molecular cloud structure, motions, and evolution P. C. Myers; Part VI. H in Regions of Massive Star Formation: 19. Infrared observations of line emission from molecular hydrogen T. R. Geballe; 20. Shocks in dense molecular clouds D. F. Chernoff and C. F. McKee; 21. Dissociative shocks D. A. Neufeld; 22. Infrared molecular hydrogen emission from interstellar photodissociation regions A. Sternberg; Part VII. Molecules Near Stars and in Stellar Ejecta: 23. Masers J. M. Moran; 24. Chemistry in the circumstellar envelopes around mass-losing red giants M. Jura; 25. Atoms and molecules in supernova 1987a R

  10. Molecular Spintronics using Molecular Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    A revolution in electronics is in view, with the contemporary evolution of two novel disciplines, spintronics and molecular electronics. A fundamental link between these two fields can be established using molecular magnetic materials and, in particular, single-molecule magnets [1], which combine the classic macroscale properties of a magnet with the quantum properties of a nanoscale entity. The resulting field, molecular spintronics aims at manipulating spins and charges in electronic devices containing one or more molecules. In this context, we want to fabricate, characterize and study molecular devices (molecular spin-transistor, molecular spin-valve and spin filter, molecular double-dot devices, carbon nanotube nano-SQUIDs, etc.) in order to read and manipulate the spin states of the molecule and to perform basic quantum operations. The talk will discuss this--still largely unexplored--field and present our the first important results [2,3].[4pt] [1] L. Bogani & W. Wernsdorfer, Nature Mat. 7, 179 (2008).[0pt] [2] J.-P. Cleuziou, W. Wernsdorfer, V. Bouchiat, T. Ondarcuhu, M. Monthioux, Nature Nanotech. 1, 53-59 (2006).[0pt] [3] N. Roch, S. Florens, V. Bouchiat, W. Wernsdorfer, F. Balestro, Nature 453, 633 (2008).

  11. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat. PMID:23052831

  12. Spatial distribution of carbonaceous aerosol in the southeastern United States using molecular markers and carbon isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mei; Ke, Lin; Edgerton, Eric S.; Schauer, James J.; Dong, Meiyu; Russell, Armistead G.

    2006-05-01

    Spatial variations of source contributions to fine organic carbon (OC) and fine particles in the southeastern United States were investigated using molecular marker-based chemical mass balance modeling (CMB-MM) and carbon isotope analysis. Nine primary emission sources were resolved with wood combustion (average 1.73 μg m-3, 23 ± 14% of measured OC) being the most dominant contributor to OC, followed by gasoline engine exhaust (0.45 μg m-3, 6.1 ± 6.2% of OC), diesel engine exhaust (0.43 μg m-3, 4.8 ± 4.1% of OC), and meat cooking (0.30 μg m-3, 4.1 ± 2.6% of OC). Measurable contributions from vegetative detritus, cigarette smoke, road dust, and natural gas exhaust were found. The impact of coke facilities was estimated for the first time in Birmingham, Alabama, and contributed 0.52 μg m-3 on average to fine OC. The unexplained OC accounted for 54 ± 26% of measured OC, possibly because of contributions from secondary OC, other unidentified primary sources and the possible positive artifact of OC. The urban excess of OC from diesel exhaust, gasoline exhaust and meat cooking can be seen from the results of the urban-rural pair in Alabama. Detailed chemical analysis revealed the wood burning episode at the rural site and an episode of secondary formation in the study region. The 14C analysis, a tool to study the relative contributions of contemporary and fossil carbon contents of fine particles, agreed well with the CMB-MM analysis. Both reflected a higher fossil fraction of carbon at urban sites especially in Birmingham, Alabama.

  13. Molecular fountain.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-09-01

    A molecular fountain directs slowly moving molecules against gravity to further slow them to translational energies that they can be trapped and studied. If the molecules are initially slow enough they will return some time later to the position from which they were launched. Because this round trip time can be on the order of a second a single molecule can be observed for times sufficient to perform Hz level spectroscopy. The goal of this LDRD proposal was to construct a novel Molecular Fountain apparatus capable of producing dilute samples of molecules at near zero temperatures in well-defined user-selectable, quantum states. The slowly moving molecules used in this research are produced by the previously developed Kinematic Cooling technique, which uses a crossed atomic and molecular beam apparatus to generate single rotational level molecular samples moving slowly in the laboratory reference frame. The Kinematic Cooling technique produces cold molecules from a supersonic molecular beam via single collisions with a supersonic atomic beam. A single collision of an atom with a molecule occurring at the correct energy and relative velocity can cause a small fraction of the molecules to move very slowly vertically against gravity in the laboratory. These slowly moving molecules are captured by an electrostatic hexapole guiding field that both orients and focuses the molecules. The molecules are focused into the ionization region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and are ionized by laser radiation. The new molecular fountain apparatus was built utilizing a new design for molecular beam apparatus that has allowed us to miniaturize the apparatus. This new design minimizes the volumes and surface area of the machine allowing smaller pumps to maintain the necessary background pressures needed for these experiments.

  14. Molecular Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Michael

    The prospects of using organic materials in electronics and optoelectronics applications have attracted scientists and technologists since the 1970s. This field has become known as molecular electronics. Some successes have already been achieved, for example the liquid-crystal display. Other products such as organic light-emitting displays, chemical sensors and plastic transistors are developing fast. There is also a keen interest in exploiting technologies at the molecular scale that might eventually replace silicon devices. This chapter provides some of the background physics and chemistry to the interdisciplinary subject of molecular electronics. A review of some of the possible application areas for organic materials is presented and some speculation is provided regarding future directions.

  15. Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John D.

    1995-02-01

    This book describes the chemical and physical structure of molecular crystals, their optical and electronic properties, and the reactions between neighboring molecules in crystals. In the second edition, the author has taken into account research that has undergone extremely rapid development since the first edition was published in 1987. For instance, he gives extensive coverage to the applications of molecular materials in high-technology devices (e.g. optical communications, laser printers, photocopiers, liquid crystal displays, solar cells, and more). There is also an entirely new chapter on the recently discovered Buckminsterfullerene carbon molecule (C60) and organic non-linear optic materials.

  16. WearDY: Wearable dynamics. A prototype for human whole-body force and motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Nori, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Motion capture is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications towards human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of dynamic information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for human wearable dynamic (WearDY) motion capture for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. Our conceptual framework encompasses traditional passive markers based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational framework for estimating dynamic quantities originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present preliminary experimental analysis of our framework on subjects performing a two Degrees-of-Freedom bowing task and we estimate the motion and dynamic quantities. We discuss the implication of our proposal towards the design of a novel wearable force and motion capture suit and its applications.

  17. Molecular gastronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    For centuries, cooks have been applying recipes without looking for the mechanisms of the culinary transformations. A scientific discipline that explores these changes from raw ingredients to eating the final dish, is developing into its own field, termed molecular gastronomy. Here, one of the founders of the discipline discusses its aims and importance.

  18. FORT Molecular Ecology Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Stevens, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the Fort Collins Science Center Molecular Ecology Laboratory is to use the tools and concepts of molecular genetics to address a variety of complex management questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information from these studies is used to support wildlife-management planning and conservation actions. Current and past studies have provided information to assess taxonomic boundaries, inform listing decisions made under the Endangered Species Act, identify unique or genetically depauperate populations, estimate population size or survival rates, develop management or recovery plans, breed wildlife in captivity, relocate wildlife from one location to another, and assess the effects of environmental change.

  19. The Application of Classification and Regression Trees for the Triage of Women for Referral to Colposcopy and the Estimation of Risk for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A Study Based on 1625 Cases with Incomplete Data from Molecular Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pouliakis, Abraham; Karakitsou, Efrossyni; Chrelias, Charalampos; Pappas, Asimakis; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Valasoulis, George; Kyrgiou, Maria; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Karakitsos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Nowadays numerous ancillary techniques detecting HPV DNA and mRNA compete with cytology; however no perfect test exists; in this study we evaluated classification and regression trees (CARTs) for the production of triage rules and estimate the risk for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in cases with ASCUS+ in cytology. Study Design. We used 1625 cases. In contrast to other approaches we used missing data to increase the data volume, obtain more accurate results, and simulate real conditions in the everyday practice of gynecologic clinics and laboratories. The proposed CART was based on the cytological result, HPV DNA typing, HPV mRNA detection based on NASBA and flow cytometry, p16 immunocytochemical expression, and finally age and parous status. Results. Algorithms useful for the triage of women were produced; gynecologists could apply these in conjunction with available examination results and conclude to an estimation of the risk for a woman to harbor CIN expressed as a probability. Conclusions. The most important test was the cytological examination; however the CART handled cases with inadequate cytological outcome and increased the diagnostic accuracy by exploiting the results of ancillary techniques even if there were inadequate missing data. The CART performance was better than any other single test involved in this study. PMID:26339651

  20. Molecular astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, G.

    1989-01-01

    A brief history of Molecular Astrophysics is presented. The first molecules in space were identified in the 1920s in comets followed soon after by those in planetary atmospheres. The recent identification by MCKELLAR of the dimer of H 2, that is, (H 2) 2 in the atmosphere of Jupiter as well as the discovery, by DROSSART, MAILLARD, WATSON and others, of the H 3+ ion in the auroral zone of Jupiter are described. In this laboratory there is a continuing interest in interstellar molecules. Several molecules and molecular ions were observed by collaboration of laboratory spectroscopists and astronomers. Only the most recent ones are discussed. Also a few of the molecules not yet observed but likely to be observed are mentioned.

  1. Molecular Thermometry

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kevin M.; Hernandez, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Conventional temperature measurements rely on material responses to heat, which can be detected visually. When Galileo developed an air expansion based device to detect temperature changes, Santorio, a contemporary physician, added a scale to create the first thermometer. With this instrument, patients’ temperatures could be measured, recorded and related to changing health conditions. Today, advances in materials science and bioengineering provide new ways to report temperature at the molecular level in real time. In this review the scientific foundations and history of thermometry underpin a discussion of the discoveries emerging from the field of molecular thermometry. Intracellular nanogels and heat sensing biomolecules have been shown to accurately report temperature changes at the nano-scale. Various systems will soon provide the ability to accurately measure temperature changes at the tissue, cellular, and even sub-cellular level, allowing for detection and monitoring of very small changes in local temperature. In the clinic this will lead to enhanced detection of tumors and localized infection, and accurate and precise monitoring of hyperthermia based therapies. Some nanomaterial systems have even demonstrated a theranostic capacity for heat-sensitive, local delivery of chemotherapeutics. Just as early thermometry moved into the clinic, so too will these molecular thermometers. PMID:20139796

  2. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  3. Joint angle estimation with accelerometers for dynamic postural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianting; Kharboutly, Haissam; Benali, Abderraouf; Benamar, Faïz; Bouzit, Mourad

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a new accelerometer based method for estimating the posture of a subject standing on a dynamic perturbation platform. The induced perturbation is used to study the control mechanisms as well as the balance requirements that regulate the upright standing. These perturbations are translated into different intensity levels of speed and acceleration along longitudinal and lateral directions of motion. In our method, the human posture is modeled by a tridimensional, three-segment inverted pendulum which simultaneously takes into account both the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral strategies of hip and ankle. Four tri-axial accelerometers are used her, one accelerometer is placed on the platform, and the other three are attached to a human subject. Based on the results, the joint angle estimated compare closely to measurements from magnetic encoders placed on an articulated arm joint. The results were also comparable to those found when using a high-end optical motion capture system coupled with advanced biomechanical simulation software. This paper presents the comparisons of our accelerometer-based method with encoder and optical marker based method of the estimated joint angles under different dynamics perturbations. PMID:26338097

  4. Molecular Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Mechanics (MM) force fields are the methods of choice for protein simulations, which are essential in the study of conformational flexibility. Given the importance of protein flexibility in drug binding, MM is involved in most if not all Computational Structure-Based Drug Discovery (CSBDD) projects. This section introduces the reader to the fundamentals of MM, with a special emphasis on how the target data used in the parametrization of force fields determine their strengths and weaknesses. Variations and recent developments such as polarizable force fields are discussed. The section ends with a brief overview of common force fields in CSBDD. PMID:23947650

  5. Molecular thermometry of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbine, B.H.; Lippert, T.; Dick, J.J.

    1997-07-01

    When a solid object with a velocity <1 km/s strikes a solid high explosive, the increase in the bulk temperature of the explosive is usually too low to thermally initiate it. It is believed, however, that the energy in the stress or shock wave created by the impact can heat individual microscopic regions that ignite and cause detonation. Although many mechanisms have been suggested for how the impact energy creates these hot spots, there has been no real-time observation of their growth at early times because of their small dimensions (estimated to be 0.1--10 {micro}m), the short times required for their growth (estimated to be 0.5 {micro}s--1 ms), and because their temperatures are too low (estimated to be <2,000 K) for them to radiate much energy in the visible. One possible way to observe early hot-spot growth is to measure temperature-dependent changes in the optical properties--absorbance, diffuse reflection, Raman spectra--of either the components of the explosive or of molecules attached to them. This temperature measurement technique is called molecular thermometry. Molecular thermometers can respond to heating within a few picoseconds with spatial resolution that can, in principle, approach the diameter of a single molecule. Temperatures as high as 900 C have been measured by molecular thermometers in laser-pulse-heated polymers. The authors discuss the literature pertaining to molecular thermometry, the effect of stress on the optical properties of some molecules that may be used as thermometers, and experiments that have used molecular thermometry to probe, on the picosecond time scale, shock excitation of the vibrational modes of molecules of energetic material. The authors also suggest ways to use molecular thermometers to observe hot-spot formation in PBX9501, a plastic-bonded explosive, subjected to impact.

  6. Water in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Frerking, M. A.; Gulkis, S.; Pickett, H. M.; Wilson, W. J.; Pagani, L.; Lecacheux, A.; Encrenaz, P.

    1991-01-01

    The G.P. Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) was used to make initial observations of the half-millimeter ground-state transition of water in seven giant molecular clouds and in two late-type stars. No significant detections were made, and the resulting upper limits are significantly below those expected from other, indirect observations and from several theoretical models. The implied interstellar H2O/CO abundance is less than 0.003 in the cores of three giant molecular clouds. This value is less than expected from cloud chemistry models and also than estimates based on HDO and H3O(+) observations.

  7. Ovarian cancer: emerging molecular-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sourbier, Carole

    2012-01-01

    With about 22,000 new cases estimated in 2012 in the US and 15,500 related deaths, ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and aggressive disease. Even though most of patients are sensitive to chemotherapy treatment following surgery, recurring disease is almost always lethal, and only about 30% of the women affected will be cured. Thanks to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer malignancy, new therapeutic options with molecular-targeted agents have become available. This review discusses the rationale behind molecular-targeted therapies and examines how newly identified molecular targets may enhance personalized therapies for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:22807625

  8. Estimating potential evapotranspiration with improved radiation estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is of great importance to estimation of surface energy budget and water balance calculation. The accurate estimation of PET will facilitate efficient irrigation scheduling, drainage design, and other agricultural and meteorological applications. However, accuracy o...

  9. Molecular Markers and Cotton Genetic Improvement: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zaffar; Ali Khan, Asif; Qayyum, Abdul; Ali Abid, Muhammad; Noor, Etrat; Qadir Ahmad, Muhammad; Hasan Abbasi, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS) are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i) comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii) genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii) identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv) marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands. PMID:25401149

  10. Molecular markers and cotton genetic improvement: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Malik, Waqas; Ashraf, Javaria; Iqbal, Muhammad Zaffar; Khan, Asif Ali; Qayyum, Abdul; Ali Abid, Muhammad; Noor, Etrat; Ahmad, Muhammad Qadir; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Narrow genetic base and complex allotetraploid genome of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is stimulating efforts to avail required polymorphism for marker based breeding. The availability of draft genome sequence of G. raimondii and G. arboreum and next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the development of high-throughput marker technologies in cotton. The concepts of genetic diversity, QTL mapping, and marker assisted selection (MAS) are evolving into more efficient concepts of linkage disequilibrium, association mapping, and genomic selection, respectively. The objective of the current review is to analyze the pace of evolution in the molecular marker technologies in cotton during the last ten years into the following four areas: (i) comparative analysis of low- and high-throughput marker technologies available in cotton, (ii) genetic diversity in the available wild and improved gene pools of cotton, (iii) identification of the genomic regions within cotton genome underlying economic traits, and (iv) marker based selection methodologies. Moreover, the applications of marker technologies to enhance the breeding efficiency in cotton are also summarized. Aforementioned genomic technologies and the integration of several other omics resources are expected to enhance the cotton productivity and meet the global fiber quantity and quality demands. PMID:25401149

  11. SURFACE VOLUME ESTIMATES FOR INFILTRATION PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volume balance calculations used in surface irrigation engineering analysis require estimates of surface storage. These calculations are often performed by estimating upstream depth with a normal depth formula. That assumption can result in significant volume estimation errors when upstream flow d...

  12. Ensemble estimators for multivariate entropy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sricharan, Kumar; Wei, Dennis; Hero, Alfred O.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of estimation of density functionals like entropy and mutual information has received much attention in the statistics and information theory communities. A large class of estimators of functionals of the probability density suffer from the curse of dimensionality, wherein the mean squared error (MSE) decays increasingly slowly as a function of the sample size T as the dimension d of the samples increases. In particular, the rate is often glacially slow of order O(T−γ/d), where γ > 0 is a rate parameter. Examples of such estimators include kernel density estimators, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) density estimators, k-NN entropy estimators, intrinsic dimension estimators and other examples. In this paper, we propose a weighted affine combination of an ensemble of such estimators, where optimal weights can be chosen such that the weighted estimator converges at a much faster dimension invariant rate of O(T−1). Furthermore, we show that these optimal weights can be determined by solving a convex optimization problem which can be performed offline and does not require training data. We illustrate the superior performance of our weighted estimator for two important applications: (i) estimating the Panter-Dite distortion-rate factor and (ii) estimating the Shannon entropy for testing the probability distribution of a random sample. PMID:25897177

  13. Molecular morphology of cyanobacterial phycobilisomes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H.W.; Kycia, J.H.

    1982-09-01

    Phycobilisomes were isolated from several cyanobacteria following cell lysis with Triton X-100. They were purified by phosphate precipitation and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Their phycobiliprotein compositions were quantitatively determined by application of sets of simultaneous absorbance equations to gel chromatographic separations of the chromoproteins. Phycobilisomes purified from several cyanobacteria had characteristic elution times on agarose gel chromatography. Combining electron microscope observations of phycobilisome structure, phycobiliprotein composition, and agarose gel chromatography estimates of molecular weight permitted the calculation of many details of phycobilisome molecular structure. Complementary chromatic adaptation resulted in a change of phycobilisome composition and structure. The polypeptide compositions of phycobilisomes were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose gel chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The phycobilisomes were composed of phycobilipeptides derived from the constituent phycobiliproteins. Higher molecular-weight phycobilipeptide aggregates were also observed. The dominant forces responsible for the maintenance of phycobilisome structure are concluded to be hydropohobic interactions.

  14. Price and cost estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  15. Estimation of intermolecular interactions in polymer networks

    SciTech Connect

    Subrananian, P.R.; Galiatsatos, V.

    1993-12-31

    Strain-birefringence measurements have been used to estimate intermolecular interactions in polymer networks. The intensity of the interaction has been quantified through a theoretical scheme recently proposed by Erman. The results show that these interactions diminish with decreasing molecular weight between cross-links and decreasing cross-link functionality.

  16. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  17. ESTIMATION OF PHYSIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  18. Estimating avian population size using Bowden's estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Avian researchers often uniquely mark birds, and multiple estimators could be used to estimate population size using individually identified birds. However, most estimators of population size require that all sightings of marked birds be uniquely identified, and many assume homogeneous detection probabilities. Bowden's estimator can incorporate sightings of marked birds that are not uniquely identified and relax assumptions required of other estimators. I used computer simulation to evaluate the performance of Bowden's estimator for situations likely to be encountered in bird studies. When the assumptions of the estimator were met, abundance and variance estimates and confidence-interval coverage were accurate. However, precision was poor for small population sizes (N ??? 50) unless a large percentage of the population was marked (>75%) and multiple (???8) sighting surveys were conducted. If additional birds are marked after sighting surveys begin, it is important to initially mark a large proportion of the population (pm ??? 0.5 if N ??? 100 or pm > 0.1 if N ??? 250) and minimize sightings in which birds are not uniquely identified; otherwise, most population estimates will be overestimated by >10%. Bowden's estimator can be useful for avian studies because birds can be resighted multiple times during a single survey, not all sightings of marked birds have to uniquely identify individuals, detection probabilities among birds can vary, and the complete study area does not have to be surveyed. I provide computer code for use with pilot data to design mark-resight surveys to meet desired precision for abundance estimates. ?? 2009 by The American Ornithologists' Union. All rights reserved.

  19. The molecular matching problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular chemistry contains many difficult optimization problems that have begun to attract the attention of optimizers in the Operations Research community. Problems including protein folding, molecular conformation, molecular similarity, and molecular matching have been addressed. Minimum energy conformations for simple molecular structures such as water clusters, Lennard-Jones microclusters, and short polypeptides have dominated the literature to date. However, a variety of interesting problems exist and we focus here on a molecular structure matching (MSM) problem.

  20. Biogeographic calibrations for the molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y. W.; Tong, K. Jun; Foster, Charles S. P.; Ritchie, Andrew M.; Lo, Nathan; Crisp, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular estimates of evolutionary timescales have an important role in a range of biological studies. Such estimates can be made using methods based on molecular clocks, including models that are able to account for rate variation across lineages. All clock models share a dependence on calibrations, which enable estimates to be given in absolute time units. There are many available methods for incorporating fossil calibrations, but geological and climatic data can also provide useful calibrations for molecular clocks. However, a number of strong assumptions need to be made when using these biogeographic calibrations, leading to wide variation in their reliability and precision. In this review, we describe the nature of biogeographic calibrations and the assumptions that they involve. We present an overview of the different geological and climatic events that can provide informative calibrations, and explain how such temporal information can be incorporated into dating analyses. PMID:26333662

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huaiyong; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhan, Gangming; Wei, Guorong; Zhou, Xinli; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus. PMID:26068192

  2. Direct Density Derivative Estimation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroaki; Noh, Yung-Kyun; Niu, Gang; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Estimating the derivatives of probability density functions is an essential step in statistical data analysis. A naive approach to estimate the derivatives is to first perform density estimation and then compute its derivatives. However, this approach can be unreliable because a good density estimator does not necessarily mean a good density derivative estimator. To cope with this problem, in this letter, we propose a novel method that directly estimates density derivatives without going through density estimation. The proposed method provides computationally efficient estimation for the derivatives of any order on multidimensional data with a hyperparameter tuning method and achieves the optimal parametric convergence rate. We further discuss an extension of the proposed method by applying regularized multitask learning and a general framework for density derivative estimation based on Bregman divergences. Applications of the proposed method to nonparametric Kullback-Leibler divergence approximation and bandwidth matrix selection in kernel density estimation are also explored. PMID:27140943

  3. Phylogenetic informativeness reconciles ray-finned fish molecular divergence times

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Discordance among individual molecular age estimates, or between molecular age estimates and the fossil record, is observed in many clades across the Tree of Life. This discordance is attributed to a variety of variables including calibration age uncertainty, calibration placement, nucleotide substitution rate heterogeneity, or the specified molecular clock model. However, the impact of changes in phylogenetic informativeness of individual genes over time on phylogenetic inferences is rarely analyzed. Using nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data for ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) as an example, we extend the utility of phylogenetic informativeness profiles to predict the time intervals when nucleotide substitution saturation results in discordance among molecular ages estimated. Results We demonstrate that even with identical calibration regimes and molecular clock methods, mitochondrial based molecular age estimates are systematically older than those estimated from nuclear sequences. This discordance is most severe for highly nested nodes corresponding to more recent (i.e., Jurassic-Recent) divergences. By removing data deemed saturated, we reconcile the competing age estimates and highlight that the older mtDNA based ages were driven by nucleotide saturation. Conclusions Homoplasious site patterns in a DNA sequence alignment can systematically bias molecular divergence time estimates. Our study demonstrates that PI profiles can provide a non-arbitrary criterion for data exclusion to mitigate the influence of homoplasy on time calibrated branch length estimates. Analyses of actinopterygian molecular clocks demonstrate that scrutiny of the time scale on which sequence data is informative is a fundamental, but generally overlooked, step in molecular divergence time estimation. PMID:25103329

  4. IMRT boost dose planning on dominant intraprostatic lesions: Gold marker-based three-dimensional fusion of CT with dynamic contrast-enhanced and {sup 1}H-spectroscopic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Emile N.J.T. van . E-mail: E.vanLin@rther.umcn.nl; Fuetterer, Jurgen J.; Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J.; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Kollenburg, Peter van; Huisman, Henk Jan J.; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Leer, Jan Willem; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-05-01

    , and a feasible mechanism for treatment implementation has to be studied to extend these preliminary tumor control and toxicity estimates.

  5. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  6. Molecular implementation of molecular shift register memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N. (Inventor); Onuchic, Jose N. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic shift register memory (20) at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron transfer molecules (22) and the information is shifted by photoinduced (26) electron transfer reactions. Thus, multi-step sequences of charge transfer reactions are used to move charge with high efficiency down a molecular chain. The device integrates compositions of the invention onto a VLSI substrate (36), providing an example of a molecular electronic device which may be fabricated. Three energy level schemes, molecular implementation of these schemes, optical excitation strategies, charge amplification strategies, and error correction strategies are described.

  7. Information geometric density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Marchand-Maillet, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We investigate kernel density estimation where the kernel function varies from point to point. Density estimation in the input space means to find a set of coordinates on a statistical manifold. This novel perspective helps to combine efforts from information geometry and machine learning to spawn a family of density estimators. We present example models with simulations. We discuss the principle and theory of such density estimation.

  8. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perroni, C. A.; Ninno, D.; Cataudella, V.

    2016-09-01

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron–vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  9. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions. PMID:27420149

  10. ESTIMATING IRRIGATION COSTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Having accurate estimates of the cost of irrigation is important when making irrigation decisions. Estimates of fixed costs are critical for investment decisions. Operating cost estimates can assist in decisions regarding additional irrigations. This fact sheet examines the costs associated with ...

  11. Price Estimation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Aster, R. W.; Firnett, P. J.; Miller, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG4, program provides comparatively simple, yet relatively accurate estimate of price of manufactured product. IPEG4 processes user supplied input data to determine estimate of price per unit of production. Input data include equipment cost, space required, labor cost, materials and supplies cost, utility expenses, and production volume on industry wide or process wide basis.

  12. Dating Phylogenies with Hybrid Local Molecular Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Aris-Brosou, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Background Because rates of evolution and species divergence times cannot be estimated directly from molecular data, all current dating methods require that specific assumptions be made before inferring any divergence time. These assumptions typically bear either on rates of molecular evolution (molecular clock hypothesis, local clocks models) or on both rates and times (penalized likelihood, Bayesian methods). However, most of these assumptions can affect estimated dates, oftentimes because they underestimate large amounts of rate change. Principal Findings A significant modification to a recently proposed ad hoc rate-smoothing algorithm is described, in which local molecular clocks are automatically placed on a phylogeny. This modification makes use of hybrid approaches that borrow from recent theoretical developments in microarray data analysis. An ad hoc integration of phylogenetic uncertainty under these local clock models is also described. The performance and accuracy of the new methods are evaluated by reanalyzing three published data sets. Conclusions It is shown that the new maximum likelihood hybrid methods can perform better than penalized likelihood and almost as well as uncorrelated Bayesian models. However, the new methods still tend to underestimate the actual amount of rate change. This work demonstrates the difficulty of estimating divergence times using local molecular clocks. PMID:17849008

  13. Interstellar clouds and molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1977-01-01

    Data obtained from the Copernicus Orbiting Astronomical Observatory, launched in 1972 and still obtaining information, are used in a discussion of the interstellar medium. The Copernicus instruments have facilitated direct estimates for the density and temperature of individual interstellar clouds, and improved the ability to determine where along the line of sight a cloud lies with respect to background stars. The physical characteristics of hydrogen molecules are considered, with attention to the formation and destruction of interstellar hydrogen. The differences between 'thin' clouds, in which molecular hydrogen is optically thin, and 'thick' clouds are examined. Several features of the interstellar medium are described.

  14. Progress in molecular SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, S.

    1987-04-15

    A review of sputtering and molecular ion emission is presented. New derivatization techniques have produced lower detection limits for molecular secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Spectra of representative organic compounds are presented.

  15. Molecular electronics: Observation of molecular rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Waldeck, D.H.; Beratan, D.N. )

    1993-07-30

    The authors review some experiments in molecular rectification and their implication for commercial uses of molecular electronic devices. Two of the cases involve rectification by single molecules which consist of an electron donor on one side, an electron acceptor on the other side, and a bridge in between, coupled to electrodes. The third case involves rectification at a graphite electrode derivatized with a Cu phthalocyanine derivative, and probed with a Pt/Ir scanning tunneling microscope tip. Some potential applications of molecular devices are in high-density memory storage of holographic memory devices, neural networks, cellular automata, and chemical and biochemical sensors.

  16. Estimating Prices of Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.; Chamberlain, R. G.; Zendejas, S. C.; Lee, T. S.; Malhotra, S.

    1986-01-01

    Company-wide or process-wide production simulated. Price Estimation Guidelines (IPEG) program provides simple, accurate estimates of prices of manufactured products. Simplification of SAMIS allows analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform greater number of sensitivity studies. Although developed for photovoltaic industry, readily adaptable to standard assembly-line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG program estimates annual production price per unit. IPEG/PC program written in TURBO PASCAL.

  17. Estimating Airline Operating Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs were used to develop an airline operating cost model which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model permits estimates of aircraft related costs, i.e., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees. A method for estimating the costs of certain types of airline delay is also described.

  18. Molecular Research in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular research and biotechnology have long been fields of study with applications useful to aquaculture and other animal sciences. Molecular Research in Aquaculture looks to provide an understanding of molecular research and its applications to the aquaculture industry in a format that allows in...

  19. Molecular Graphics and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jacques; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Explains molecular graphics, i.e., the application of computer graphics techniques to investigate molecular structure, function, and interaction. Structural models and molecular surfaces are discussed, and a theoretical model that can be used for the evaluation of intermolecular interaction energies for organometallics is described. (45…

  20. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  1. Updated Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    16-page report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, the Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction Price Book for preparing conceptual, budget, funding, cost-estimating, and preliminary cost-engineering reports. Updated annually from 1974 through 1985 with actual bid prices and government estimates. Includes labor and material quantities and prices with contractor and subcontractor markups for buildings, facilities, and systems at Kennedy Space Center. While data pertains to aerospace facilities, format and cost-estimating techniques guide estimation of costs in other construction applications.

  2. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  3. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of the weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.

  4. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  5. Signal analysis of behavioral and molecular cycles

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Joel D; Funes, Pablo; Dowse, Harold B; Hall, Jeffrey C

    2002-01-01

    Background Circadian clocks are biological oscillators that regulate molecular, physiological, and behavioral rhythms in a wide variety of organisms. While behavioral rhythms are typically monitored over many cycles, a similar approach to molecular rhythms was not possible until recently; the advent of real-time analysis using transgenic reporters now permits the observations of molecular rhythms over many cycles as well. This development suggests that new details about the relationship between molecular and behavioral rhythms may be revealed. Even so, behavioral and molecular rhythmicity have been analyzed using different methods, making such comparisons difficult to achieve. To address this shortcoming, among others, we developed a set of integrated analytical tools to unify the analysis of biological rhythms across modalities. Results We demonstrate an adaptation of digital signal analysis that allows similar treatment of both behavioral and molecular data from our studies of Drosophila. For both types of data, we apply digital filters to extract and clarify details of interest; we employ methods of autocorrelation and spectral analysis to assess rhythmicity and estimate the period; we evaluate phase shifts using crosscorrelation; and we use circular statistics to extract information about phase. Conclusion Using data generated by our investigation of rhythms in Drosophila we demonstrate how a unique aggregation of analytical tools may be used to analyze and compare behavioral and molecular rhythms. These methods are shown to be versatile and will also be adaptable to further experiments, owing in part to the non-proprietary nature of the code we have developed. PMID:11825337

  6. Engineering molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  7. Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center data aid in efficient construction-cost managment. Report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction price book for preparing conceptual budget, funding cost estimating, and preliminary cost engineering reports. Report based on actual bid prices and Government estimates.

  8. Estimating mutual information.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y), from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density mu(x,y). In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M(X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if mu(x,y)=mu(x)mu(y). This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y. In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation. PMID:15244698

  9. Estimating Health Services Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    In computer program NOROCA populations statistics from National Center for Health Statistics used with computational procedure to estimate health service utilization rates, physician demands (by specialty) and hospital bed demands (by type of service). Computational procedure applicable to health service area of any size and even used to estimate statewide demands for health services.

  10. Fano factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Rajdl, Kamil; Lansky, Petr

    2014-02-01

    Fano factor is one of the most widely used measures of variability of spike trains. Its standard estimator is the ratio of sample variance to sample mean of spike counts observed in a time window and the quality of the estimator strongly depends on the length of the window. We investigate this dependence under the assumption that the spike train behaves as an equilibrium renewal process. It is shown what characteristics of the spike train have large effect on the estimator bias. Namely, the effect of refractory period is analytically evaluated. Next, we create an approximate asymptotic formula for the mean square error of the estimator, which can also be used to find minimum of the error in estimation from single spike trains. The accuracy of the Fano factor estimator is compared with the accuracy of the estimator based on the squared coefficient of variation. All the results are illustrated for spike trains with gamma and inverse Gaussian probability distributions of interspike intervals. Finally, we discuss possibilities of how to select a suitable observation window for the Fano factor estimation. PMID:24245675

  11. Molecular identification and phylogenetic relationship of green algae, Spirogyra ellipsospora (Chlorophyta) using ISSR and rbcL markers

    PubMed Central

    Wongsawad, Pheravut; Peerapornpisal, Yuwadee

    2014-01-01

    Spirogyra is found in a wide range of habitats, including small stagnant water bodies, rivers, and streams. Spirogyra ellipsospora is common in northern Thailand. Species identification of the Spirogyra species based only on morphological characteristics can be difficult. A reliable and accurate method is required to evaluate genetic variations. This study aims to apply molecular approaches for the identification of S. ellipsospora using microsatellites and rbcL markers. Based on DNA sequencing, the rbcL gene was sequenced and the data was analyzed using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) program in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database. The sequence of S. ellipsospora from this study revealed definitive identity matches in the range of 99% for the consensus sequences of S. ellipsospora. The 10 primers of ISSR could be amplified by 92 amplification fragments. The DNA fragments and the rbcL sequence data grouped the Spirogyra specimens into two distinct clusters. PMID:25313288

  12. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software — http://pyemma.org — as of version 2.0.

  13. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  14. Trapping cold molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Ch; Hogan, S D; Merkt, F

    2011-11-14

    Translationally cold H(2) molecules excited to non-penetrating |M(J)| = 3 Rydberg states of principal quantum number in the range 21-37 have been decelerated and trapped using time-dependent inhomogeneous electric fields. The |M(J)| = 3 Rydberg states were prepared from the X (1)Σ(+)(u)(v = 0, J = 0) ground state using a resonant three-photon excitation sequence via the B (1)Σ(+)(u)(v = 3, J = 1) and I (1)Π(g) (v = 0, J = 2) intermediate states and circularly polarized laser radiation. The circular polarization of the vacuum ultraviolet radiation used for the B ← X transition was generated by resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing in xenon and the degree of circular polarization was determined to be 96%. To analyse the deceleration and trapping experiments, the Stark effect in Rydberg states of molecular hydrogen was calculated using a matrix diagonalization procedure similar to that presented by Yamakita et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 121, 1419. Particular attention was given to the prediction of zero-field positions of low-l states and of avoided crossings between Rydberg-Stark states with different values of |M(J)|. The calculated Stark maps and probabilities for diabatic traversal of the avoided crossings were used as input to Monte-Carlo particle-trajectory simulations. These simulations provide a quantitatively satisfactory description of the experimental data and demonstrate that particle loss caused by adiabatic traversals of avoided crossings between adjacent |M(J)| = 3 Stark states of H(2) is small at principal quantum numbers beyond n = 25. The main source of trap losses was found to be from collisional processes. Predissociation following the absorption of blackbody radiation is estimated to be the second most important trap-loss mechanism at room temperature, and trap loss by spontaneous emission is negligible under our experimental conditions. PMID:21818497

  15. Estimating cell populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. S.; Castleman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An important step in the diagnosis of a cervical cytology specimen is estimating the proportions of the various cell types present. This is usually done with a cell classifier, the error rates of which can be expressed as a confusion matrix. We show how to use the confusion matrix to obtain an unbiased estimate of the desired proportions. We show that the mean square error of this estimate depends on a 'befuddlement matrix' derived from the confusion matrix, and how this, in turn, leads to a figure of merit for cell classifiers. Finally, we work out the two-class problem in detail and present examples to illustrate the theory.

  16. Pore Velocity Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devary, J. L.; Doctor, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    Geostatistical data analysis techniques were used to stochastically model the spatial variability of groundwater pore velocity in a potential waste repository site. Kriging algorithms were applied to Hanford Reservation data to estimate hydraulic conductivities, hydraulic head gradients, and pore velocities. A first-order Taylor series expansion for pore velocity was used to statistically combine hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head gradient, and effective porosity surfaces and uncertainties to characterize the pore velocity uncertainty. Use of these techniques permits the estimation of pore velocity uncertainties when pore velocity measurements do not exist. Large pore velocity estimation uncertainties were found to be located in the region where the hydraulic head gradient relative uncertainty was maximal.

  17. Trawsfynydd Plutonium Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Bruce D.; Gerlach, David C.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Livingston, J.

    2009-11-20

    Report serves to document an estimate of the cumulative plutonium production of the Trawsfynydd Unit II reactor (Traws II) over its operating life made using the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The estimate of the plutonium production in Traws II provided in this report has been generated under blind conditions. In other words, the estimate ofthe Traws II plutonium production has been generated without the knowledge of the plutonium production declared by the reactor operator (Nuclear Electric). The objective of this report is to demonstrate that the GIRM can be employed to serve as an accurate tool to verify weapons materials production declarations.

  18. Estimating airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    A review was made of the factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs. From this work, an airline operating cost model was developed which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model, similar in some respects to the standard Air Transport Association of America (ATA) Direct Operating Cost Model, permits estimates of aircraft-related costs not now included in the standard ATA model (e.g., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees). A study of the cost of aircraft delay was also made and a method for estimating the cost of certain types of airline delay is described.

  19. DISPERSION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, Roger H.; Kirby, Larry; Dotson, Jessie L.; Houde, Martin; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2009-05-01

    We describe a method for determining the dispersion of magnetic field vectors about large-scale fields in turbulent molecular clouds. The method is designed to avoid inaccurate estimates of magnetohydrodynamic or turbulent dispersion-and help avoiding inaccurate estimates of field strengths-due to a large-scale, nonturbulent field structure when using the well known method of Chandrasekhar and Fermi. Our method also provides accurate, independent estimates of the turbulent to large-scale magnetic field strength ratio. We discuss applications to the molecular clouds OMC-1, M17, and DR21(Main)

  20. Standardized molecular typing.

    PubMed

    Müller, F M; Lischewski, A; Harmsen, D; Hacker, J

    1999-01-01

    Molecular typing methods are useful tools in molecular mycology. The results of these biotyping procedures may help to identify pathogenic strains in order to detect sources of nosocomial infection and for the investigation of epidemiological relationships. With respect to the facultative pathogen, Candida albicans, various methods such as pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), DNA fingerprinting methods and hybridization with repetitive DNA elements have been described as useful tools in molecular epidemiology. The previously described hybridization method with the Candida albicans specific CARE-2 probe and subsequent rehybridization with a molecular size marker is a standardized reproducible typing method for comparison of results obtained in different laboratories. In a larger epidemiological study conducted at the University Hospital of Würzburg analysing clinical C. albicans isolates, we were able to describe relationships between sequential patient isolates. These findings demonstrate that standardized molecular typing methods are a powerful tool in molecular mycology studies. PMID:10865907

  1. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  2. Multidimensional synthetic estimation filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Stanley E., Jr.; Juday, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    The synthetic estimation filter (SEF) crafts an affine variation into its response to a changing parameter (e.g. scale or rotation). Sets of such filters are used in an estimation correlator to reduce the number of filters required for a given tracking accuracy. By overspecifying the system (one more SEF than parameters to be tracked), the ratio of correlation responses between filters forms a robust estimator into the spanned domain of the parameters. Previous results dealt with a laboratory correlator which could track a single parameter. This paper explores the SEF and the estimator's extension to more dimensions. A 2D example is given in which a reduction of filters from 25 to 3 is demonstrated to span a 4-degree square portion of pose space.

  3. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golodova, E.; Shchepakina, E.

    2006-12-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models.

  4. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method.

  5. Cost-Estimation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    COSTIT computer program estimates cost of electronic design by reading item-list file and file containing cost for each item. Accuracy of cost estimate based on accuracy of cost-list file. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The Sun version (NPO-19587). PC version (NPO-19157).

  6. Capital cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The capital cost estimate for the nuclear process heat source (NPHS) plant was made by: (1) using costs from the current commercial HTGR for electricity production as a base for items that are essentially the same and (2) development of new estimates for modified or new equipment that is specifically for the process heat application. Results are given in tabular form and cover the total investment required for each process temperature studied.

  7. Efficient Bayesian Phase Estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Nathan; Granade, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a new method called rejection filtering that we use to perform adaptive Bayesian phase estimation. Our approach has several advantages: it is classically efficient, easy to implement, achieves Heisenberg limited scaling, resists depolarizing noise, tracks time-dependent eigenstates, recovers from failures, and can be run on a field programmable gate array. It also outperforms existing iterative phase estimation algorithms such as Kitaev's method. PMID:27419551

  8. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  9. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  10. Estimating networks with jumps

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Mladen; Xing, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    We study the problem of estimating a temporally varying coefficient and varying structure (VCVS) graphical model underlying data collected over a period of time, such as social states of interacting individuals or microarray expression profiles of gene networks, as opposed to i.i.d. data from an invariant model widely considered in current literature of structural estimation. In particular, we consider the scenario in which the model evolves in a piece-wise constant fashion. We propose a procedure that estimates the structure of a graphical model by minimizing the temporally smoothed L1 penalized regression, which allows jointly estimating the partition boundaries of the VCVS model and the coefficient of the sparse precision matrix on each block of the partition. A highly scalable proximal gradient method is proposed to solve the resultant convex optimization problem; and the conditions for sparsistent estimation and the convergence rate of both the partition boundaries and the network structure are established for the first time for such estimators. PMID:25013533