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Sample records for molecular modeling investigations

  1. Investigation of crack tip dislocation emission in aluminum using multiscale molecular dynamics simulation and continuum modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakov, V. I.; Warner, D. H.; Zamora, R. J.; Saether, E.; Curtin, W. A.; Glaessgen, E. H.

    2014-04-01

    This work investigates the dislocation nucleation processes that occur at the tip of a crack in aluminum under a broad range of crystallographic orientations and temperatures. A concurrent multiscale molecular dynamics - continuum simulation framework is employed. The results are then interpreted using a Peierls continuum model that uses finite temperature material properties derived from molecular dynamics simulation. Under ramped loading, partial dislocation nucleation at the crack tip is found to lead to both full dislocation emission and twinning, depending upon the orientation, temperature, and magnitude of the applied load in the simulation. The origins of the dependencies are made apparent by the Peierls continuum model. The continuum model suggests that in many instances dislocation nucleation from the crack tip can be considered to be a strain rate independent process, yet still temperature dependent through the temperature dependence of the stacking fault energies and elastic constants.

  2. Molecular Modeling and Experimental Investigations of Nonlinear Optical Compounds Monosubstituted Derivatives of Dicyanovinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Antipin, Mikhail Yu.; Clark, Ronald D.; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; Frazier, Donald O.

    1999-01-01

    A search for potential nonlinear optical compounds was performed using the Cambridge Structure Database and molecular modeling. We investigated a series of monosubstituted derivatives of dicyanovinylbenzene, since the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of such derivatives (o-methoxy-dicyanovinylbenzene, DIVA) were studied earlier. The molecular geometry of these compounds was investigated with x-ray analysis and discussed along with the results of molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The influence of crystal packing on the planarity of the molecules of this series has been revealed. Two new compounds from the series studied, ortho-F and para-Cl-dicyanovinylbenzene, according to powder measurements, were found to be NLO compounds in the crystal state about 10 times more active than urea. The peculiarities of crystal structure formation in the framework of balance between van der Waals and electrostatic interactions have been discussed. The crystal shape of DIVA and two new NLO compounds have been calculated on the basis of the known crystal structure.

  3. Theoretical investigation on the glycan-binding specificity of Agrocybe cylindracea galectin using molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, Ponnusamy; Murugan, Veeramani; Selvin, Jeyasigamani F A; Gromiha, M Michael; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Veluraja, Kasinadar

    2015-09-01

    Galectins are β-galactoside binding proteins which have the ability to serve as potent antitumor, cancer biomarker, and induce tumor cell apoptosis. Agrocybe cylindracea galectin (ACG) is a fungal galectin which specifically recognizes α(2,3)-linked sialyllactose at the cell surface that plays extensive roles in the biological recognition processes. To investigate the change in glycan-binding specificity upon mutations, single point and double point site-directed in silico mutations are performed at the binding pocket of ACG. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies are carried out for the wild-type (ACG) and single point (ACG1) and double point (ACG2) mutated ACGs to investigate the dynamics of substituted mutants and their interactions with the receptor sialyllactose. Plausible binding modes are proposed for galectin-sialylglycan complexes based on the analysis of hydrogen bonding interactions, total pair-wise interaction energy between the interacting binding site residues and sialyllactose and binding free energy of the complexes using molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area. Our result shows that high contribution to the binding in different modes is due to the direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds. The binding specificity of double point mutant Y59R/N140Q of ACG2 is found to be high, and it has 26 direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds with a relatively low-binding free energy of -47.52 ± 5.2 kcal/mol. We also observe that the substituted mutant Arg59 is crucial for glycan-binding and for the preference of α(2,3)-linked sialyllactose at the binding pocket of ACG2 galectin. When compared with the wild-type and single point mutant, the double point mutant exhibits enhanced affinity towards α(2,3)-linked sialyllactose, which can be effectively used as a model for biological cell marker in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25760468

  4. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  5. Investigation on the protein-binding properties of icotinib by spectroscopic and molecular modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-xin; Xiong, Hang-xing; Li, Li-wei

    2016-05-01

    Icotinib is a highly-selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer, which has been developed as a new targeted anti-tumor drug in China. In this work, the interaction of icotinib and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular probe and molecular modeling methods. The results showed that icotinib binds to Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule, resulting in icotinib-HSA complexes formed at ground state. The number of binding sites, equilibrium constants, and thermodynamic parameters of the reaction were calculated at different temperatures. The negative enthalpy change (ΔHθ) and entropy change (ΔSθ) indicated that the structure of new complexes was stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The distance between donor and acceptor was calculated according to Förster's non-radiation resonance energy transfer theory. The structural changes of HSA caused by icotinib binding were detected by synchronous spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Molecular modeling method was employed to unfold full details of the interaction at molecular level, most of which could be supported by experimental results. The study analyzed the probability that serum albumins act as carriers for this new anticarcinogen and provided fundamental information on the process of delivering icotinib to its target tissues, which might be helpful in understanding the mechanism of icotinib in cancer therapy.

  6. Investigation on the protein-binding properties of icotinib by spectroscopic and molecular modeling method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-Xin; Xiong, Hang-Xing; Li, Li-Wei

    2016-05-15

    Icotinib is a highly-selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer, which has been developed as a new targeted anti-tumor drug in China. In this work, the interaction of icotinib and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular probe and molecular modeling methods. The results showed that icotinib binds to Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule, resulting in icotinib-HSA complexes formed at ground state. The number of binding sites, equilibrium constants, and thermodynamic parameters of the reaction were calculated at different temperatures. The negative enthalpy change (ΔH(θ)) and entropy change (ΔS(θ)) indicated that the structure of new complexes was stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The distance between donor and acceptor was calculated according to Förster's non-radiation resonance energy transfer theory. The structural changes of HSA caused by icotinib binding were detected by synchronous spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Molecular modeling method was employed to unfold full details of the interaction at molecular level, most of which could be supported by experimental results. The study analyzed the probability that serum albumins act as carriers for this new anticarcinogen and provided fundamental information on the process of delivering icotinib to its target tissues, which might be helpful in understanding the mechanism of icotinib in cancer therapy. PMID:26963729

  7. Investigation of the interaction between amodiaquine and human serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Samari, Fayezeh; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Khayamian, Taghi; Gharaghani, Sajjad

    2012-08-01

    The interaction of amodiaquine (AQ) with human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Based on the sign and magnitude of the enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH(0) = -43.27 kJ mol(-1) and ΔS(0) = -50.03 J mol(-1) K(-1)), hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces were suggested as the main interacting forces. Moreover, the efficiency of energy transfer and distance between HSA and acceptor AQ was calculated. Finally, the binding of AQ to HSA was modeled by molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical results. Both experimental results and modeling methods suggested that AQ binds mainly to the sub-domain IIA of HSA. PMID:22658498

  8. Adsorption mechanisms of microcystin variant conformations at water-mineral interfaces: A molecular modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    Pochodylo, Amy L; Aoki, Thalia G; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2016-10-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are potent toxins released during cyanobacterial blooms. Clay minerals are implicated in trapping MCs within soil particles in surface waters and sediments. In the absence of molecular characterization, the relevance of previously proposed adsorption mechanisms is lacking. Towards obtaining this characterization, we conducted Monte Carlo simulations combined with molecular dynamics relaxation of two MC variants, MC-leucine-arginine (MC-LR) and MC-leucine-alanine (MC-LA), adsorbed on hydrated montmorillonite with different electrolytes. The resulting adsorbate structures revealed how MC conformations and aqueous conditions dictate binding interactions at the mineral surface. Electrostatic coupling between the arginine residue and a carboxylate in MC-LR excluded the participation of arginine in mediating adsorption on montmorillonite in a NaCl solution. However, in a CaCl2 solution, the complexation of Ca by two carboxylate moieties in MC-LR changed the MC conformation, which allowed arginine to mediate electrostatic interaction with the mineral. By contrast, due to the lack of arginine in MC-LA, complexation of Ca by only one carboxylate in MC-LA was required to favor Ca-bridging interaction with the mineral. Multiple water-bridged H-bonding interactions were also important in anchoring MCs at the mineral surface. Our modeling results offer molecular insights into the structural and chemical factors that can control the fate of MCs at water-mineral interfaces. PMID:27433998

  9. Molecular Modeling of Myrosinase from Brassica oleracea: A Structural Investigation of Sinigrin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Park, Jong-In; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Myrosinase, which is present in cruciferous plant species, plays an important role in the hydrolysis of glycosides such as glucosinolates and is involved in plant defense. Brassicaceae myrosinases are diverse although they share common ancestry, and structural knowledge about myrosinases from cabbage (Brassica oleracea) was needed. To address this, we constructed a three-dimensional model structure of myrosinase based on Sinapis alba structures using Iterative Threading ASSEmbly Refinement server (I-TASSER) webserver, and refined model coordinates were evaluated with ProQ and Verify3D. The resulting model was predicted with β/α fold, ten conserved N-glycosylation sites, and three disulfide bridges. In addition, this model shared features with the known Sinapis alba myrosinase structure. To obtain a better understanding of myrosinase–sinigrin interaction, the refined model was docked using Autodock Vina with crucial key amino acids. The key nucleophile residues GLN207 and GLU427 were found to interact with sinigrin to form a hydrogen bond. Further, 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to examine myrosinase–sinigrin complex stability, revealing that residue GLU207 maintained its hydrogen bond stability throughout the entire simulation and structural orientation was similar to that of the docked state. This conceptual model should be useful for understanding the structural features of myrosinase and their binding orientation with sinigrin. PMID:26703735

  10. Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase Urzyme: a model to recapitulate molecular evolution and investigate intramolecular complementation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Yen; Kuhlman, Brian; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Hu, Hao; Weinreb, Violetta; Carter, Charles W

    2010-12-01

    We substantiate our preliminary description of the class I tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase minimal catalytic domain with details of its construction, structure, and steady-state kinetic parameters. Generating that active fragment involved deleting 65% of the contemporary enzyme, including the anticodon-binding domain and connecting peptide 1, CP1, a 74-residue internal segment from within the Rossmann fold. We used protein design (Rosetta), rather than phylogenetic sequence alignments, to identify mutations to compensate for the severe loss of modularity, thus restoring stability, as evidenced by renaturation described previously and by 70-ns molecular dynamics simulations. Sufficient solubility to enable biochemical studies was achieved by expressing the redesigned Urzyme as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters from amino acid activation assays showed that, compared with the native full-length enzyme, TrpRS Urzyme binds ATP with similar affinity. This suggests that neither of the two deleted structural modules has a strong influence on ground-state ATP binding. However, tryptophan has 10(3) lower affinity, and the Urzyme has comparably reduced specificity relative to the related amino acid, tyrosine. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed how CP1 may contribute significantly to cognate amino acid specificity. As class Ia editing domains are nested within the CP1, this finding suggests that this module enhanced amino acid specificity continuously, throughout their evolution. We call this type of reconstructed protein catalyst an Urzyme (Ur prefix indicates original, primitive, or earliest). It establishes a model for recapitulating very early steps in molecular evolution in which fitness may have been enhanced by accumulating entire modules, rather than by discrete amino acid sequence changes. PMID:20864539

  11. HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors: design, synthesis and molecular modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Laura; De Grazia, Sara; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-02-01

    This study is focused on a new series of benzylindole derivatives with various substituents at the benzene-fused ring, suggested by our 3D pharmacophore model developed for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs). All synthesized compounds proved to be active in the nanomolar range (6-35 nM) on the strand-transfer step (ST). In particular, derivative 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5,7-dimethoxy-1H-indol-3-yl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid (8e), presenting the highest best-fit value on pharmacophore model, showed a potency comparable to that of clinical INSTIs GS 9137 (1) and MK-0518 (2). The binding mode of our molecules has been investigated using the recently published crystal structure of the complex of full-length integrase from the prototype foamy virus in complex with its cognate DNA (PFV-IN/DNA). The results highlighted the ability of derivative 8e to assume the same binding mode of MK-0518 and GS 9137. PMID:21227550

  12. Nantenine as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor: SAR, enzyme kinetics and molecular modeling investigations

    PubMed Central

    Pecic, Stevan; McAnuff, Marie A.; Harding, Wayne W.

    2015-01-01

    Nantenine, as well as a number of flexible analogs, were evaluated for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in microplate spectrophotometric assays based on Ellman’s method. It was found that the rigid aporphine core of nantenine is an important structural requirement for its anticholinesterase activity. Nantenine showed mixed inhibition kinetics in enzyme assays. Molecular docking experiments suggest that nantenine binds preferentially to the catalytic site of AChE but is also capable of interacting with the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of the enzyme, thus accounting for its mixed inhibition profile. The aporphine core of nantenine may thus be a useful template for the design of novel PAS or dual-site AChE inhibitors. Inhibiting the PAS is desirable for prevention of aggregation of the amyloid peptide Aβ, a major causative factor in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). PMID:20583856

  13. Investigation of the effect of erythrosine B on amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juho; Kwon, Inchan; Jang, Seung Soon; Cho, Art E

    2016-04-01

    Neurotoxic plaques composed of 39 to 42 residue-long amyloid beta peptides (Aβs) are copiously present in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Erythrosine B (ER), a xanthene food dye, inhibits the formation of Aβ fibrils and Aβ-associated cytotoxicity in vitro. Here, in an attempt to elucidate the inhibition mechanism, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to demonstrate the conformational change of Aβ40 induced by ER molecules in atomistic detail. During the simulation, the ER bound to the surfaces of both N-terminus and C-terminus regions of Aβ40. Our result shows that ER interacts with the aromatic side chains at the N-terminus region resulting in destabilization of the inter-chain stacking of Aβ40. Moreover, the stablility of the helical structures at the residues from 13 to 16 suggests that ER disturbs conformational transition of Aβ40. At the C-terminus region, the bound ER blocks water molecules and stabilizes the α-helical structure. Regardless of the number of ER molecules used, the interruption of the formation of the salt-bridge between aspartic acid 23 and lysine 28 occurred. To further validate our analysis, binding free energies of ER at each binding site were evaluated. The finding of stronger binding energy at the N-terminus region supports an inhibition mechanism induced by stacking interaction between ER and phenylalanine. These findings could aid present and future treatment studies for AD by clarifying the inhibition mechanism of ER on the conformational transition of Aβ40 at the molecular level. Graphical Abstract Conformation of two ER molecules binding to the surface of Aβ40 peptide. The ERs and Aβ40 are represented by black and cyan color, respectively. PMID:27021211

  14. Investigation of the interaction between quercetin and human serum albumin by multiple spectra, electrochemical impedance spectra and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Zou, Ting; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yezhong; Liu, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Quercetin (Qu), a flavonoid compound, exists widely in the human diet and exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities. This work is aimed at studying the effect of Qu on the bioactive protein, human serum albumin (HSA) under simulated biophysical conditions. Multiple spectroscopic methods (including fluorescence and circular dichroism), electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and molecular modeling were employed to investigate the interaction between Qu and HSA. The fluorescence quenching and EIS experimental results showed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA was caused by formation of a Qu-HSA complex in the ground state, which belonged to the static quenching mechanism. Based on the calculated thermodynamic parameters, it concluded that the interaction was a spontaneous process and hydrogen bonds combined with van der Waal's forces played a major role in stabilizing the Qu-HSA complex. Molecular modeling results demonstrated that several amino acids participated in the binding process and the formed Qu-HSA complex was stabilized by H-bonding network at site I in sub-domain IIA, which was further confirmed by the site marker competitive experiments. The evidence from circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the secondary structure and microenvironment of HSA were changed. Alterations in the conformation of HSA were observed with a reduction in the amount of α helix from 59.9% (free HSA) to 56% (Qu-HSA complex), indicating a slight unfolding of the protein polypeptides. PMID:24801949

  15. Investigation of the Interaction between Patulin and Human Serum Albumin by a Spectroscopic Method, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yuqin, Li; Guirong, You; Zhen, Yang; Caihong, Liu; Baoxiu, Jia; Jiao, Chen; Yurong, Guo

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of patulin with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in vitro under normal physiological conditions. The study was performed using fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), circular dichroism (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and molecular modeling techniques. The quenching mechanism was investigated using the association constants, the number of binding sites, and basic thermodynamic parameters. A dynamic quenching mechanism occurred between HSA and patulin, and the binding constants (K) were 2.60 × 104, 4.59 × 104, and 7.01 × 104 M−1 at 288, 300, and 310 K, respectively. Based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance between the HSA and patulin was determined to be 2.847 nm. The ΔG0, ΔH0, and ΔS0 values across various temperatures indicated that hydrophobic interaction was the predominant binding force. The UV-Vis and CD results confirmed that the secondary structure of HSA was altered in the presence of patulin. The AFM results revealed that the individual HSA molecule dimensions were larger after interaction with patulin. In addition, molecular modeling showed that the patulin-HSA complex was stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond forces. The study results suggested that a weak intermolecular interaction occurred between patulin and HSA. Overall, the results are potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of patulin when it is combined with the biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological, testing and other experiments. PMID:25110690

  16. Animal models and molecular imaging tools to investigate lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Elliot L.; Colovos, Christos; Bograd, Adam J.; White, Julie; Sadelain, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis is a strong predictor of poor outcome in cancer patients. Animal studies of lymph node metastasis are constrained by difficulties in the establishment of appropriate animal models, limitations in the noninvasive monitoring of lymph node metastasis progression, and challenges in the pathologic confirmation of lymph node metastases. In this comprehensive review, we summarize available preclinical animal cancer models for noninvasive imaging and identification of lymph node metastases of non-hematogenous cancers. Furthermore, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of common noninvasive imaging modalities used to identify tumor-bearing lymph nodes and provide guidelines for their pathological confirmation. PMID:21556810

  17. Pairing preferences of the model mono-valence mono-atomic ions investigated by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhao, Ying; Li, HuanHuan; Zhuang, Wei E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn; Gao, Yi Qin E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn

    2014-05-14

    We carried out a series of potential of mean force calculations to study the pairing preferences of a series of model mono-atomic 1:1 ions with evenly varied sizes. The probabilities of forming the contact ion pair (CIP) and the single water separate ion pair (SIP) were presented in the two-dimensional plots with respect to the ion sizes. The pairing preferences reflected in these plots largely agree with the empirical rule of matching ion sizes in the small and big size regions. In the region that the ion sizes are close to the size of the water molecule; however, a significant deviation from this conventional rule is observed. Our further analysis indicated that this deviation originates from the competition between CIP and the water bridging SIP state. The competition is mainly an enthalpy modulated phenomenon in which the existing of the water bridging plays a significant role.

  18. Investigation of vital pathogenic target orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTase) from Thermus thermophilus HB8: Phylogenetic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Prabhu, Damodharan; Richard, Mariadasse; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2016-06-01

    Biosynthesis pathways of pyrimidine and purine are shown to play an important role in regular cellular activities. The biosynthesis can occur either through de novo or salvage pathways based on the requirement of the cell. The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway has been linked to several disorders and various autoimmune diseases. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) is an important enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of orotate to orotate monophosphate in the fifth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of 228 OPRTase sequences shows the distribution of proteins across different living forms of life. High structural similarities between Thermusthermophilus and other organisms kindled us to concentrate on OPRTase as an anti-pathogenic target. In this study, a homology model of OPRTase was constructed using 2P1Z as a template. About 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the conformational stability and dynamic patterns of the protein. The amino acid residues (Met1, Asp2, Glu43, Ala44, Glu47, Lys51, Ala157 and Leu158) lining in the binding site were predicted using SiteMap. Further, structure based virtual screening was performed on the predicted binding site using ChemBridge, Asinex, Binding, NCI, TosLab and Zinc databases. Compounds retrieved from the screening collections were manually clustered. The resultant protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, which further validates the binding modes of the hits. The study may provide better insight for designing potent anti-pathogenic agent. PMID:26861612

  19. Investigating Hydrophilic Pores in Model Lipid Bilayers using Molecular Simulations: Correlating Bilayer Properties with Pore Formation Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides show remarkable ability to translocate across physiological membranes. Along with factors such as electric potential induced-perturbations of membrane structure and surface tension effects, experiments invoke pore-like membrane configurations during the solute transfer process into vesicles and cells. The initiation and formation of pores are associated with a non-trivial free energy cost, thus necessitating consideration of the factors associated with pore formation and attendant free energetics. Due to experimental and modeling challenges related to the long timescales of the translocation process, we use umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations with a lipid-density based order parameter to investigate membrane pore-formation free energy employing Martini coarse-grained models. We investigate structure and thermodynamic features of the pore in 18 lipids spanning a range of head-groups, charge states, acyl chain lengths and saturation. We probe the dependence of pore-formation barriers on area per lipid, lipid bilayer thickness, membrane bending rigidities in three different lipid classes. The pore formation free energy in pure bilayers and peptide translocating scenarios are significantly coupled with bilayer thickness. Thicker bilayers require more reversible work to create pores. Pore formation free energy is higher in peptide-lipid systems relative to the peptide-free lipid systems due to penalties to maintain solvation of charged hydrophilic solutes within the membrane environment. PMID:25614183

  20. Investigation of the stable isotopic compositions of atmospheric trace gases: From crossed molecular beam experiments to global scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, Kathleen Anne

    The chemical and physical mechanisms that control the isotopic compositions of atmospheric H2 and NO2 were investigated in the laboratory and with numerical models of the atmosphere. For H 2, motivated by the need for an accurate global H2 budget to predict the potential consequences of a hydrogen fuel cell economy, the isotopic composition of H2 produced from CH4 oxidation (deltaDhnu), a major H2 source, was examined using 2D model simulations. Using known and estimating unknown isotope effects, model results showed that large variations in oxidant concentrations, temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients, and wavelengths of available light lead to large variations in deltaDhnu with latitude, altitude, and season. Thus, previous estimates, which assumed that deltaDhnu could be easily extrapolated from observations of stratospheric H2, are neither accurate nor as precise as believed. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrated that measurements of the CHDO photolysis quantum yields as a function of wavelength are needed to resolve the large uncertainties in the global H2 isotope budget. For NO2, crossed molecular beam experiments of the molecular-level mechanisms by which the 18O(3P)+NO2 and 18O(1D)+NO2 reactions lead to isotope exchange or O2+NO products were performed and analyzed and provide new evidence for the structures and lifetimes of the reactive intermediates formed. For both O(1D)+NO2 and O( 3P)+NO2, isotope exchange and O2+NO formation proceed via two distinct complexes: a long-lived symmetric NO3* complex that facilitates isotope exchange and an asymmetric peroxonitrate intermediate, OONO*, that leads to O2+NO. The branching ratio for O2+NO formation vs. isotope exchange is 52:48 for O(3P)+NO 2 and 97:3 for O(1D)+NO2. Motivated by these results, the sensitivity of the isotopic composition of NO2 to the O(3P)+NO2 and O(1D)+NO2 isotope exchange reactions, and to uncertainties in the formation rate of 17O16O16O and in the branching ratio for

  1. Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (-COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic -OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities with

  2. Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (–COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic –OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities

  3. X-Ray Scattering Investigation of Molecular Orientation During Shear Flow in Model Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugaz, V. M.; Burghardt, W. R.

    1998-03-01

    We describe the use of in-situ x-ray scattering techniques to directly measure the influence of flow on molecular orientation in two different model thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs). These model materials, one a polyester and the other a polyether, are both composed of rigid mesogens randomly copolymerized with flexible spacer chains of two different lengths. This architecture provides both LCPs with an accessible isotropic transition temperature, thereby allowing a well-defined thermal history to be established prior to application of shear flow. We present measurements of molecular orientation in steady shear flow, during relaxation after cessation of shear flow, and in the transient periods during shear flow inception and reversal. These results are then compared with corresponding rheological data, providing a unique opportunity to directly correlate structural and rheological behavior in each material as well as between materials.

  4. Investigations on the interactions of diclofenac sodium with HSA and ctDNA using molecular modeling and multispectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yanrui; Hao, Erjun; Hui, Guangquan; Guo, Wei; Cui, Fengling

    2013-06-01

    A tentative study on interaction of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was conducted by using multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques under simulative physiological conditions. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that the quenching mechanisms were static quenching. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy clearly demonstrated the occurrence of conformational changes of HSA with addition of DF-Na. In addition, competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that DF-Na can bind to ctDNA relatively strong via groove binding. Based on the values of thermodynamic parameters and the results of molecular modeling, it was confirmed that hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond were the mainly binding forces in DF-Na-HSA and DF-Na-DNA systems. The binding distance between DF-Na and HSA was also determined using the theory of the Förster energy transference.

  5. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  6. Probing the interaction of a therapeutic flavonoid, pinostrobin with human serum albumin: multiple spectroscopic and molecular modeling investigations.

    PubMed

    Feroz, Shevin R; Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Bakri, Zarith S D; Malek, Sri N A; Tayyab, Saad

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of a pharmacologically important flavonoid, pinostrobin (PS) with the major transport protein of human blood circulation, human serum albumin (HSA) has been examined using a multitude of spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking studies. Analysis of the fluorescence quenching data showed a moderate binding affinity (1.03 × 10(5) M(-1) at 25°C) between PS and HSA with a 1∶1 stoichiometry. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data (ΔS = +44.06 J mol(-1) K(-1) and ΔH = -15.48 kJ mol(-1)) and molecular simulation results suggested the involvement of hydrophobic and van der Waals forces, as well as hydrogen bonding in the complex formation. Both secondary and tertiary structural perturbations in HSA were observed upon PS binding, as revealed by intrinsic, synchronous, and three-dimensional fluorescence results. Far-UV circular dichroism data revealed increased thermal stability of the protein upon complexation with PS. Competitive drug displacement results suggested the binding site of PS on HSA as Sudlow's site I, located at subdomain IIA, and was well supported by the molecular modelling data. PMID:24116089

  7. Probing the Interaction of a Therapeutic Flavonoid, Pinostrobin with Human Serum Albumin: Multiple Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Feroz, Shevin R.; Mohamad, Saharuddin B.; Bakri, Zarith S. D.; Malek, Sri N. A.; Tayyab, Saad

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of a pharmacologically important flavonoid, pinostrobin (PS) with the major transport protein of human blood circulation, human serum albumin (HSA) has been examined using a multitude of spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking studies. Analysis of the fluorescence quenching data showed a moderate binding affinity (1.03 × 105 M−1 at 25°C) between PS and HSA with a 1∶1 stoichiometry. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data (ΔS = +44.06 J mol−1 K−1 and ΔH = −15.48 kJ mol−1) and molecular simulation results suggested the involvement of hydrophobic and van der Waals forces, as well as hydrogen bonding in the complex formation. Both secondary and tertiary structural perturbations in HSA were observed upon PS binding, as revealed by intrinsic, synchronous, and three-dimensional fluorescence results. Far-UV circular dichroism data revealed increased thermal stability of the protein upon complexation with PS. Competitive drug displacement results suggested the binding site of PS on HSA as Sudlow’s site I, located at subdomain IIA, and was well supported by the molecular modelling data. PMID:24116089

  8. The identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHFR inhibitors and the investigation of their binding preferences by using molecular modelling

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Yu; Chang, Zhe; Yang, Yanhui; Pu, Jing; Sun, Tao; Kaur, Sargit; Sacchettini, James C.; Jung, Hunmin; Lin Wong, Wee; Fah Yap, Lee; Fong Ngeow, Yun; Paterson, Ian C.; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    It is an urgent need to develop new drugs for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and the enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a recognised drug target. The crystal structures of methotrexate binding to mt- and h-DHFR separately indicate that the glycerol (GOL) binding site is likely to be critical for the function of mt-DHFR selective inhibitors. We have used in silico methods to screen NCI small molecule database and a group of related compounds were obtained that inhibit mt-DHFR activity and showed bactericidal effects against a test Mtb strain. The binding poses were then analysed and the influence of GOL binding site was studied by using molecular modelling. By comparing the chemical structures, 4 compounds that might be able to occupy the GOL binding site were identified. However, these compounds contain large hydrophobic side chains. As the GOL binding site is more hydrophilic, molecular modelling indicated that these compounds were failed to occupy the GOL site. The most potent inhibitor (compound 6) demonstrated limited selectivity for mt-DHFR, but did contain a novel central core (7H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinazoline-1,3-diamine), which may significantly expand the chemical space of novel mt-DHFR inhibitors. Collectively, these observations will inform future medicinal chemistry efforts to improve the selectivity of compounds against mt-DHFR. PMID:26471125

  9. The identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHFR inhibitors and the investigation of their binding preferences by using molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Yu; Chang, Zhe; Yang, Yanhui; Pu, Jing; Sun, Tao; Kaur, Sargit; Sacchettini, James C; Jung, Hunmin; Lin Wong, Wee; Fah Yap, Lee; Fong Ngeow, Yun; Paterson, Ian C; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    It is an urgent need to develop new drugs for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and the enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a recognised drug target. The crystal structures of methotrexate binding to mt- and h-DHFR separately indicate that the glycerol (GOL) binding site is likely to be critical for the function of mt-DHFR selective inhibitors. We have used in silico methods to screen NCI small molecule database and a group of related compounds were obtained that inhibit mt-DHFR activity and showed bactericidal effects against a test Mtb strain. The binding poses were then analysed and the influence of GOL binding site was studied by using molecular modelling. By comparing the chemical structures, 4 compounds that might be able to occupy the GOL binding site were identified. However, these compounds contain large hydrophobic side chains. As the GOL binding site is more hydrophilic, molecular modelling indicated that these compounds were failed to occupy the GOL site. The most potent inhibitor (compound 6) demonstrated limited selectivity for mt-DHFR, but did contain a novel central core (7H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinazoline-1,3-diamine), which may significantly expand the chemical space of novel mt-DHFR inhibitors. Collectively, these observations will inform future medicinal chemistry efforts to improve the selectivity of compounds against mt-DHFR. PMID:26471125

  10. Investigations on the Interactions of 5-Fluorouracil with Herring Sperm DNA: Steady State/Time Resolved and Molecular Modeling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Karthikeyan, Subramani; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the interaction of 5-Fluorouracil with herring sperm DNA is reported using spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. This binding study of 5-FU with hs-DNA is of paramount importance in understanding chemico-biological interactions for drug design, pharmacy and biochemistry without altering the original structure. The challenge of the study was to find the exact binding mode of the drug 5-Fluorouracil with hs-DNA. From the absorption studies, a hyperchromic effect was observed for the herring sperm DNA in the presence of 5-Fluorouracil and a binding constant of 6.153 × 103 M-1 for 5-Fluorouracil reveals the existence of weak interaction between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. Ethidium bromide loaded herring sperm DNA showed a quenching in the fluorescence intensity after the addition of 5-Fluorouracil. The binding constants for 5-Fluorouracil stranded DNA and competitive bindings of 5-FU interacting with DNA-EB systems were examined by fluorescence spectra. The Stern-Volmer plots and fluorescence lifetime results confirm the static quenching nature of the drug-DNA complex. The binding constant Kb was 2.5 × 104 L mol-1 and the number of binding sites are 1.17. The 5-FU on DNA system was calculated using double logarithmic plot. From the Forster nonradiative energy transfer study it has been found that the distance of 5-FU from DNA was 4.24 nm. In addition to the spectroscopic results, the molecular modeling studies also revealed the major groove binding as well as the partial intercalation mode of binding between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. The binding energy and major groove binding as -6.04 kcal mol-1 and -6.31 kcal mol-1 were calculated from the modeling studies. All the testimonies manifested that binding modes between 5-Fluorouracil and DNA were evidenced to be groove binding and in partial intercalative mode.

  11. A comparison investigation of DNP-binding effects to HSA and HTF by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Zolfagharzadeh, Mahboobeh; Pirouzi, Maliheh; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction between 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) with the two drug carrier proteins - human serum albumin (HSA) and human holo transferrin (HTF). Hence, binding characteristics of DNP to HSA and HTF were analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. Based on results obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy, DNP had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA and HTF through a static quenching procedure. The binding constant and the number of binding sites were calculated as 2.3 × 10(11) M(-1) and .98 for HSA, and 1.7 × 10(11) M(-1) and 1.06 for HTF, respectively. In addition, synchronous fluorescence results showed that the microenvironment of Trp had a slight tendency of increasing its hydrophobicity, whereas the microenvironment of the Tyr residues of HSA did not change and that of HTF showed a significant trend (red shift of about 4 nm) of an increase in polarity. The distance between donor and acceptor was obtained by the Förster energy according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and was found to be 3.99 and 3.72 nm for HSA and HTF, respectively. The critical induced aggregation concentration (CCIAC) of the drug on both proteins was determined and confirmed by an inflection point of the zeta potential behavior. Circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of DNP caused a decrease of the α-helical content of HSA and HTF, and induced a remarkable mild denaturation of both proteins. The molecular modeling data confirmed our experimental results. This study is deemed useful for determining drug dosage. PMID:24125112

  12. Theoretical investigation of two model systems for molecular photoswitch functionality. I. 2-(4-nitropyrimidin-2-yl)ethenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woywod, Clemens; Csehi, András; Halász, Gábor J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Vibók, Ágnes

    2014-03-01

    The ground and five lowest-lying electronically excited singlet states of 2-(4-nitropyrimidin-2-yl)ethenol (NPE) have been studied theoretically using the complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF), Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) and second-order multi-configurational perturbation theory (CASPT2) methods. The molecule can be regarded as being composed of a frame and a crane component and is characterised by the existence of two planar minima of similar energy on the ground-state potential energy (PE) surface. This work explores the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) process in NPE. A hypothetical reaction coordinate has been constructed for NPE. State-averaged CASSCF and CASPT2 calculations of the six lowest-lying singlet states have been performed for the isomerisation. Adiabatic and simplified quasi-diabatic PE and transition dipole moment functions have been constructed. The computations indicate that there exist substantial barriers for the rotation process on the adiabatic PE surfaces of all the five excited states investigated. The six quasi-diabatic electronic states considered here decompose into two classes based on whether the electronic wave functions depend weakly or strongly on the nuclear displacement, subject to the effect of the torsion on relevant molecular orbitals.

  13. Investigating Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Mutation of the HER2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase through Computational Modeling and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Telesco, Shannon E.; Shih, Andrew; Liu, Yingting; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/ErbB2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the EGFR/ErbB family and is overexpressed in 20–30% of human breast cancers. Since there is a growing effort to develop pharmacological inhibitors of the HER2 kinase for the treatment of breast cancer, it is clinically valuable to rationalize how specific mutations impact the molecular mechanism of receptor activation. Although several crystal structures of the ErbB kinases have been solved, the precise mechanism of HER2 activation remains unknown, and it has been suggested that HER2 is unique in its requirement for phosphorylation of Y877, a key tyrosine residue located in the activation loop (A-loop). In our studies, discussed here, we have investigated the mechanisms that are important in HER2 kinase domain regulation and compared them with the other ErbB family members, namely EGFR and ErbB4, to determine the molecular basis for HER2’s unique mode of activation. We apply computational simulation techniques at the atomic level and at the electronic structure (quantum mechanical) level to elucidate details of the mechanisms governing the kinase domains of these ErbB members. Through analysis of our simulation results, we have discovered potential regulatory mechanisms common to EGFR, HER2, and ErbB4, including a tight coupling between the A-loop and catalytic loop that may contribute to alignment of residues required for catalysis in the active kinase. We further postulate an autoinhibitory mechanism whereby the inactive kinase is stabilized through sequestration of catalytic residues. In HER2, we also predict a role for phosphorylated Y877 in bridging a network of hydrogen bonds that fasten the A-loop in its active conformation, suggesting that HER2 may be unique among the ErbB members in requiring A-loop tyrosine phosphorylation for functionality. In EGFR, HER2, and ErbB4, we discuss the possible effects of activating mutations. Delineation of the activation

  14. Primary Genetic Investigation of a Hyperlipidemia Model: Molecular Characteristics and Variants of the Apolipoprotein E Gene in Mongolian Gerbil

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuehuan; Wu, Jiusheng; Shi, Qiaojuan; Guo, Honggang; Ying, Huazhong; Xu, Ningying

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to establish a novel Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) hyperlipidemia model and to investigate its susceptibility genetic basis. Two rodent (gerbil and rat) hyperlipidemia models were induced by feeding a high fat/high-cholesterol (HF/HC) diet. There were significant increases of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in gerbils within a 4-week modeling period. About 10–30% of >8-month-old individuals developed hyperlipidemia spontaneously. The apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene was cloned by merging a sequence of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and nested polymerase chain reaction products. The results revealed an open reading frame of 948 bp, encoding a protein of 298 amino acids. The gene without a 5′-UTR region in the first intron was highly homologous to human Apo-A-I and rat Apo-A-IV. The distribution of expression of the ApoE gene in liver, brain, heart, lung, kidney, and adrenal gland was detected by an ABC immunohistochemical procedure. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; C97T, G781T, and A1774T) were first found using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) in a closed population containing 444 animals. Correlation analysis confirmed that new SNPs , age, and gender were associated significantly (P < 0.05) with hyperlipidemia. PMID:25006576

  15. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale cavitation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-12-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the cavitation dynamics around intensely heated solid nanoparticles immersed in a model Lennard-Jones fluid. Specifically, we study the temporal evolution of vapor nanobubbles that form around the solid nanoparticles heated over ps time scale and provide a detail description of the following vapor formation and collapse. For 8 nm diameter nanoparticles we observe the formation of vapor bubbles when the liquid temperature 0.5-1 nm away from the nanoparticle surface reaches ˜90% of the critical temperature, which is consistent with the onset of spinodal decomposition. The peak heat flux from the hot solid to the surrounding liquid at the bubble formation threshold is ˜20 times higher than the corresponding steady state critical heat flux. Detailed analysis of the bubble dynamics indicates adiabatic formation followed by an isothermal final stage of growth and isothermal collapse.

  16. An investigation of G-quadruplex structural polymorphism in the human telomere using a combined approach of hydrodynamic bead modeling and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Le, Huy T; Dean, William L; Buscaglia, Robert; Chaires, Jonathan B; Trent, John O

    2014-05-22

    Guanine-rich oligonucleotides can adopt noncanonical tertiary structures known as G-quadruplexes, which can exist in different forms depending on experimental conditions. High-resolution structural methods, such as X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, have been of limited usefulness in resolving the inherent structural polymorphism associated with G-quadruplex formation. The lack of, or the ambiguous nature of, currently available high-resolution structural data, in turn, has severely hindered investigations into the nature of these structures and their interactions with small-molecule inhibitors. We have used molecular dynamics in conjunction with hydrodynamic bead modeling to study the structures of the human telomeric G-quadruplex-forming sequences at the atomic level. We demonstrated that molecular dynamics can reproduce experimental hydrodynamic measurements and thus can be a powerful tool in the structural study of existing G-quadruplex sequences or in the prediction of new G-quadruplex structures. PMID:24779348

  17. Synthesis, in vitro evaluation, and molecular modeling investigation of benzenesulfonimide peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Carrieri, Antonio; Verginelli, Fabio; Bruno, Isabella; Carbonara, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Alessandra; De Filippis, Barbara; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Florio, Rosalba; Fracchiolla, Giuseppe; Giampietro, Letizia; Giancristofaro, Antonella; Maccallini, Cristina; Cama, Alessandro; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-05-23

    Recent evidences suggest a moderate activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) could be favorable in metabolic diseases, reducing side effects given from full agonists. PPAR partial agonists and antagonists represent, to date, interesting tools to better elucidate biological processes modulated by these receptors. In this work are reported new benzenesulfonimide compounds able to block PPARα, synthesized and tested by transactivation assays and gene expression analysis. Some of these compounds showed a dose-dependent antagonistic behavior on PPARα, submicromolar potency, different profiles of selectivity versus PPARγ, and a repressive effect on CPT1A expression. Dockings and molecular dynamics on properly selected benzenesulfonimide derivatives furnished fresh insights into the molecular determinant most likely responsible for PPARα antagonism. PMID:26974385

  18. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods. PMID:27319209

  19. Testing the limits of sensitivity in a solid-state structural investigation by combined X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Claudiu

    2011-10-28

    A solid state structural investigation of ethoxzolamide is performed on microcrystalline powder by using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct space methods with information from (13)C((15)N) solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) and molecular modeling. Quantum chemical computations of the crystal were employed for geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations based on the Gauge Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method, whereas a systematic search in the conformational space was performed on the isolated molecule using a molecular mechanics (MM) approach. The applied methodology proved useful for: (i) removing ambiguities in the XRPD crystal structure determination process and further refining the derived structure solutions, and (ii) getting important insights into the relationship between the complex network of non-covalent interactions and the induced supra-molecular architectures/crystal packing patterns. It was found that ethoxzolamide provides an ideal case study for testing the accuracy with which this methodology allows to distinguish between various structural features emerging from the analysis of the powder diffraction data. PMID:21931906

  20. Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: molecular modeling and X-ray structure investigations.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, W; Friebe, W G; Leinert, H; Mertens, A; Poll, T; von der Saal, W; Zilch, H; Nuber, B; Ziegler, M L

    1993-03-19

    The structural features of a new class of non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (3) are presented. Comparison of the structural and electronic properties with those of TIBO (1) and Nevirapine (2) yields a common three-dimensional model. This model permits the improvement of the lead compound 3 by chemical modification (5,6). Additionally, two new types of inhibitors (4, 7) with similar biological activity can be derived from this model. The structure of the new compounds, including their absolute configuration, are determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:7681480

  1. Investigation of the bulk modulus of silica aerogel using molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro-Rangel, Carlos A; Gelb, Lev D

    2013-06-13

    Structural and mechanical properties of silica aerogels are studied using a flexible coarse-grained model and a variety of simulation techniques. The model, introduced in a previous study (J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 15792-15802), consists of spherical "primary" gel particles that interact through weak nonbonded forces and through microscopically motivated interparticle bonds that may break and form during the simulations. Aerogel models are prepared using a three-stage protocol consisting of separate simulations of gelation, aging, and a final relaxation during which no further bond formation is permitted. Models of varying particle size, density, and size dispersity are considered. These are characterized in terms of fractal dimensions and pore size distributions, and generally good agreement with experimental data is obtained for these metrics. The bulk moduli of these materials are studied in detail. Two different techniques for obtaining the bulk modulus are considered, fluctuation analysis and direct compression/expansion simulations. We find that the fluctuation result can be subject to systematic error due to coupling with the simulation barostat but, if performed carefully, yields results equivalent with those of compression/expansion experiments. The dependence of the bulk modulus on density follows a power law with an exponent between 3.00 and 3.15, in agreement with reported experimental results. The best correlate for the bulk modulus appears to be the volumetric bond density, on which there is also a power law dependence. Polydisperse models exhibit lower bulk moduli than comparable monodisperse models, which is due to lower bond densities in the polydisperse materials. PMID:23631801

  2. Investigation of molecular mechanisms of action of chelating drugs on protein-lipid model membranes by X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, N. N.; Zheludeva, S. I.; Koval'chuk, M. V.; Stepina, N. D.; Erko, A. I.; Yur'eva, E. A.

    2009-12-15

    Protein-lipid films based on the enzyme alkaline phosphatase were subjected to the action of chelating drugs, which are used for accelerating the removal of heavy metals from the human body, and the elemental composition of the resulting films was investigated. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements were performed at the Berlin Electron Storage Ring Company for Synchrotron Radiation (BESSY) in Germany. A comparative estimation of the protective effect of four drugs (EDTA, succimer, xydiphone, and mediphon) on membrane-bound enzymes damaged by lead ions was made. The changes in the elemental composition of the protein-lipid films caused by high doses of chelating drugs were investigated. It was shown that state-of-the-art X-ray techniques can, in principle, be used to develop new methods for the in vitro evaluation of the efficiency of drugs, providing differential data on their actions.

  3. Density functional investigation of intermolecular effects on {sup 13}C NMR chemical-shielding tensors modeled with molecular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Sean T.; Dybowski, Cecil; Iuliucci, Robbie J.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2014-10-28

    A quantum-chemical method for modeling solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance chemical-shift tensors by calculations on large symmetry-adapted clusters of molecules is demonstrated. Four hundred sixty five principal components of the {sup 13}C chemical-shielding tensors of 24 organic materials are analyzed. The comparison of calculations on isolated molecules with molecules in clusters demonstrates that intermolecular effects can be successfully modeled using a cluster that represents a local portion of the lattice structure, without the need to use periodic-boundary conditions (PBCs). The accuracy of calculations which model the solid state using a cluster rivals the accuracy of calculations which model the solid state using PBCs, provided the cluster preserves the symmetry properties of the crystalline space group. The size and symmetry conditions that the model cluster must satisfy to obtain significant agreement with experimental chemical-shift values are discussed. The symmetry constraints described in the paper provide a systematic approach for incorporating intermolecular effects into chemical-shielding calculations performed at a level of theory that is more advanced than the generalized gradient approximation. Specifically, NMR parameters are calculated using the hybrid exchange-correlation functional B3PW91, which is not available in periodic codes. Calculations on structures of four molecules refined with density plane waves yield chemical-shielding values that are essentially in agreement with calculations on clusters where only the hydrogen sites are optimized and are used to provide insight into the inherent sensitivity of chemical shielding to lattice structure, including the role of rovibrational effects.

  4. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  5. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  6. Molecular genetic investigations of root gravitropism and other complex growth behaviors using Arabidopsis and Brachypodium as models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Patrick; Barker, Richard; Miller, Nathan; Su, Shih-Hao; Su, Shih-Heng

    2016-07-01

    downward on vertical surfaces, or fully embedded in agar-containing medium. Brachypodium distachyon accessions differ in their gravisensitivity, kinetics of gravitropism and occurrence, periodicity and amplitude of tip oscillations. Mathematical models are being built to fit the data, and used to estimate growth, gravitropism and oscillation parameters for incorporation into Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) algorithms aimed at identifying contributing loci. This work was supported by grants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

  7. Investigating Evolutionary Questions Using Online Molecular Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puterbaugh, Mary N.; Burleigh, J. Gordon

    2001-01-01

    Recommends using online molecular databases as teaching tools to illustrate evolutionary questions and concepts while introducing students to public molecular databases. Provides activities in which students make molecular comparisons between species. (YDS)

  8. A Combination of Hand-Held Models and Computer Imaging Programs Helps Students Answer Oral Questions about Molecular Structure and Function: A Controlled Investigation of Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Michelle A.; Peck, Ronald F.; Colton, Shannon; Morris, Jennifer; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Kallio, Julie

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a controlled investigation to examine whether a combination of computer imagery and tactile tools helps introductory cell biology laboratory undergraduate students better learn about protein structure/function relationships as compared with computer imagery alone. In all five laboratory sections, students used the molecular imaging…

  9. Molecular modeling to investigate the binding of Congo red toward GNNQQNY protofibril and in silico virtual screening for the identification of new aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Elumalai, Pavadai; Chen, Wei-Hsi; Men, Lee-Chung; Liu, Kung-Tien

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the recognition between amyloid protofibrils and dye molecules at the molecular level is essential to improving instructive guides for designing novel molecular probes or new inhibitors. However, the atomic details of the binding between dyes and amyloid fibrils are still not fully understood. In this study, molecular docking, consensus scoring, molecular dynamics (MD), and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) analyses were integrated to investigate the binding between Congo red (CR) and the GNNQQNY protofibril from yeast prion protein Sup35 and to further evaluate their binding stabilities and affinities. Our results reveal that there are four CR binding sites located on GNNQQNY protofibril surface. These four CR binding sites adopt dual binding modes by which CR binding with its long axis parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the protofibril. In addition, CR was also found to bind to the edge of the protofibril via hydrophobic/aromatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, which is inferred as the possible inhibition mechanism to prevent the elongation of the protofibril from the addition of incoming peptides. Virtual screening from National Cancer Institute (NCI) database obtained three hit compounds with higher binding affinity than CR to the edge of the protofibril due to the fact that the central parts of these compounds are able to form additional hydrogen bonds with the protofibril. The results of the study could be useful for the development of new molecular probes or inhibitors for clinical applications. PMID:22836831

  10. Preparation, physicochemical analysis and molecular modeling investigation of 2,2‧-Bipyridine: β-Cyclodextrin inclusion complex in solution and solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, R.; Kothainayaki, S.; Sivakumar, K.

    2015-11-01

    Supramolecular interaction between 2,2‧-Bipyridine (BPY) and β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD) has been investigated in solution and solid state. Non-covalent interaction between BPY and β-CD was studied in solution using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Inclusion complex of BPY and β-CD was prepared in solid state by co-precipitation method and it was characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermal analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Binding constant values and 1:1 stoichiometry of the inclusion complex were calculated using Benesi-Hildebrand plots at 303 K. Using continuous variation method the 1:1 stoichiometry has been confirmed for BPY: β-CD complex. Thermodynamic parameter, ΔG of inclusion complex formation was determined and the negative value indicated that the inclusion process was an exergonic and spontaneous process. The most probable model of BPY: β-CD inclusion complex suggested by molecular docking studies was in good agreement with the results obtained by experimental methods.

  11. Combining NMR and molecular modelling in a drug delivery context: investigation of the multi-mode inclusion of a new NPY-5 antagonist bromobenzenesulfonamide into beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Sicoli, Giuseppe; Fríglola, Carmen; Aldana, Ignacio; Monge, Antonio; Paolino, Donatella; Guccione, Salvatore

    2004-01-15

    NMR spectroscopic and molecular modelling methods have been employed to describe the complexation of trans-N-4-[N'-(4-chlorobenzoyl)hydrazinocarbonyl]cyclohexylmethyl-4-bromobenzenesulfonamide, a new chemotype of NPY-5 antagonist, and beta-cyclodextrin, revealing the coexistence of two different kinds of 1:1 complexes where conformational changes of the guest compound with respect to the free state are also detected. PMID:14723963

  12. Molecular model generator toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    This report is a user manual for an ASCII file of Fortran source code which must be compiled before use. The software will assist in creating plastic models of molecules whose specifications are described in the Brookhaven Protein Databank. Other data files can be used if they are in the same format as the files in the databank. The output file is a program for a 3-D Systems Stereolithography Apparatus and the program is run on a SGI Indigo workstation.

  13. Interaction of vitamin B1 with bovine serum albumin investigation using vitamin B1-selective electrode: potentiometric and molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Khorsandi, Khatereh

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B1 or thiamin is one of the B vitamins. All B vitamins help the body to convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which produces energy. The B vitamins are necessary for healthy skin, eyes, hair, and liver. It also could help the nervous system function properly, and is necessary for brain functions. Drug interactions with protein can affect the distribution of the drug and eliminate the drug in living systems. In this study, the binding of thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1) to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was evaluated using a new proposed vitamin B1 (thiamine)-selective membrane electrode under various experimental conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, and protein concentration; in addition molecular modeling was applied as well. The binding isotherms plotted based on potentiometric data and analyzed using the Wyman binding potential concept. The apparent binding constant was determined and used for the calculation of intrinsic Gibbs free energy of binding. According to the electrochemical and molecular docking results, it can be concluded that the hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen binding are major interactions between BSA and vitamin B1. PMID:26372107

  14. Investigating the Conformational Structure and Potential Site Interactions of SOD Inhibitors on Ec-SOD in Marine Mud Crab Scylla serrata: A Molecular Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Sablok, Gaurav; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Chainy, G B N

    2016-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) act as a first line of the enzymatic antioxidant defense system to control cellular superoxide anion toxicity. Previously, several inhibitors have been widely identified and catalogued for inhibition of SOD activity; however, still the information about the mechanism of interaction and points toward the inhibitor interactions in structures of SODs in general and in extracellular (Ec)-SOD in particular is still in naive. In the present research, we present an insight to elucidate the molecular basis of interactions of SOD inhibitors with Ec-SOD in mud crab Scylla serrata using molecular modeling and docking approaches. Different inhibitors of SOD such as hydrogen peroxide [Formula: see text], potassium cyanide, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), [Formula: see text]-mercaptoethanol and dithiocarbamate were screened to understand the potential sites that may act as sites for cleavage or blocking in the protein. SOD-SDS and [Formula: see text] complex interactions indicate residues Pro72 and Asp102 of the predicted crab Ec-SOD as common targets. The GOLD result indicates that Pro72, Asp102 and Thr103 are commonly acting as the site of interaction in Ec-SOD of S. serrata with SOD inhibitors. For the first time, the results of this study provide an insight into the structural properties of Ec-SOD of S. serrata and define the possible involvements between the amino acids present in its active sites, i.e., in the regions from 70 to 84 and from 101 to 103 and different inhibitors. PMID:26286009

  15. Molecular Modeling of Cardiac Troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Edward P.

    The cardiac thin filament regulates interactions of actin and myosin, the force-generating elements of muscular contraction. Over the past several decades many details have been discovered regarding the structure and function of the cardiac thin filament and its components, including cardiac troponin (cTn). My hypothesis is that signal propagation occurs between distant ends of the cardiac troponin complex through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cTn and tropomyosin (Tm). I propose a model of the thin filament that encompasses known structures of cTn, Tm and actin to gain insight into cardiac troponin's allosteric regulation of thin filament dynamics. By performing molecular dynamics simulations of cTn in conjunction with overlapping Tm in two conditions, with and without calcium bound to site II of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), I found a combination of calcium-dependent changes in secondary structure and dynamics throughout the cTn-Tm complex. I then applied this model to investigate familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a disease of the sarcomere that is one of the most commonly occurring genetic causes of heart disease. Approximately 15% of known FHC-related mutations are found in cardiac troponin T (cTnT), most of which are in or flank the alpha-helical N-tail domain TNT1. TNT1 directly interacts with overlapping Tm coiled coils. Using this model I identified effects of TNT1 mutations that propagate to the cTn core where site II of cTnC, the regulatory site of calcium binding in the thin filament, is located. Specifically, I found that mutations in TNT1 alter the flexibility of TNT1 and that the flexibility of TNT1 is inversely proportional to the cooperativity of calcium activation of the thin filament. Further, I identified a pathway of propagation of structural and dynamic changes linking TNT1 to site II of cTnC. Mutation-induced changes at site II cTnC alter calcium coordination which corresponds to biophysical measurements of calcium

  16. Molecular investigations of flaxseed mucilage polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Roulard, Romain; Petit, Emmanuel; Mesnard, François; Rhazi, Larbi

    2016-05-01

    The molecular properties of flaxseed mucilage were determined using a multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector coupled on-line to size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Water and salt solution were tested as mobile phases. The SEC-MALLS method gave partial information and enabled molecular characterization of disaggregated mucilage molecules. Regardless of the eluent used, the observed Mw ranged from about 1.6 × 10(6) to more than 10 × 10(6) g/mol for mucilage polysaccharides. The AF4-MALLS system enabled a complete analysis of mucilage carbohydrate aggregates in water, in which two populations were satisfactorily separated. The molecular weight distribution (MWD) of molecules ranged from 1.5 × 10(6) to more than 4 × 10(8) g/mol. Experiments showed that the conformational structure of mucilage molecules was strongly influenced by ionic strength. Mucilage carbohydrates exhibited a spherical and compact structure in NaCl solution while they displayed a random-coil conformation in water. PMID:26851358

  17. Ubiquitin: molecular modeling and simulations.

    PubMed

    Ganoth, Assaf; Tsfadia, Yossi; Wiener, Reuven

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis and destruction of proteins are imperative for maintaining their cellular homeostasis. In the 1970s, Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko, and Irwin Rose discovered that certain proteins are tagged by ubiquitin before degradation, a discovery that awarded them the 2004 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Compelling data gathered during the last several decades show that ubiquitin plays a vital role not only in protein degradation but also in many cellular functions including DNA repair processes, cell cycle regulation, cell growth, immune system functionality, hormone-mediated signaling in plants, vesicular trafficking pathways, regulation of histone modification and viral budding. Due to the involvement of ubiquitin in such a large number of diverse cellular processes, flaws and impairments in the ubiquitin system were found to be linked to cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, genetic disorders, and immunological disorders. Hence, deciphering the dynamics and complexity of the ubiquitin system is of significant importance. In addition to experimental techniques, computational methodologies have been gaining increasing influence in protein research and are used to uncover the structure, stability, folding, mechanism of action and interactions of proteins. Notably, molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have become powerful tools that bridge the gap between structure and function while providing dynamic insights and illustrating essential mechanistic characteristics. In this study, we present an overview of molecular modeling and simulations of ubiquitin and the ubiquitin system, evaluate the status of the field, and offer our perspective on future progress in this area of research. PMID:24113788

  18. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasesha, S.; Raghunathan, Rajamani

    2007-11-29

    Here, we present an overview of methods of modeling Molecular Magnets in different length scales. First, we discuss a microscopic model to understand the nature of superexchange interaction in binuclear transition metal complexes of different geometry viz. A-B, A-B-A, B-A-B, linear A-B-A-B, and cyclic A-B-A-B systems. We obtain the quantum phase diagrams along various planes in the parameter space and identify the various model parameters which control the nature of superexchange in these systems. We also obtain contours of effective superexchange constants. In the next section we discuss the method of full symmetry adaptation in Valence Bond method to obtain the low-lying eigenstates of the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian of large systems. The third part of this article deals with the calculation of the magnetic anisotropy parameters (D{sub M} and E{sub M}) of Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs). We use the single ion anisotropy values to obtain D{sub M} and E{sub M} values of the SMM, using a perturbative approach. We first solve the unperturbed Hamiltonian which is a simple spin Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Then we introduce the perturbing term H{sub 1} consisting of the single ion anisotropy. We then solve for the molecular anisotropy parameters by equating two different ways for computing the matrix elements of the perturbation term, from knowledge of the spin-spin correlation functions and the direction of orientation of the single ion anisotropies.

  20. New analogues of epiboxidine incorporating the 4,5-dihydroisoxazole nucleus: synthesis, binding affinity at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, and molecular modeling investigations.

    PubMed

    Dallanoce, Clelia; Magrone, Pietro; Bazza, Paola; Grazioso, Giovanni; Rizzi, Luca; Riganti, Loredana; Gotti, Cecilia; Clementi, Francesco; Frydenvang, Karla; De Amici, Marco

    2009-02-01

    A group of novel 4,5-dihydro-3-methylisoxazolyl derivatives, structurally related to epiboxidine (=(1R,4S,6S)-6-(3-methylisoxazol-5-yl)-7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane), was prepared via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of acetonitrile oxide to different olefins. Target compounds 1a and 1b, 2a and 2b, 3, 4, and 5 were tested for affinity at neuronal nicotinic heteromeric (alpha4beta2) and homomeric (alpha7) acetylcholine receptors. Notably, diastereoisomers 1a and 1b were characterized by a massive drop of the affinity at the alpha4beta2 subtypes (K(i) values spanning the range 4.3-126 microM), when compared with that of epiboxidine (K(i)=0.6 nM). Therefore, the replacement of the 3-methylisoxazole ring of epiboxidine with the 4,5-dihydro-3-methylisoxazole nucleus is detrimental for the affinity at alpha4beta2 receptors. A comparable lack of affinity/selectivity for the two nAChR subtypes under study was evidenced for the remaining epiboxidine-related dihydroisoxazole derivatives 2a and 2b, and 3-5. Diastereoisomers 1a and 1b, and spirocyclic derivative 3 were docked into molecular models of the receptor subtypes under study, and their binding mode was compared with that of reference ligands endowed with high binding affinity. PMID:19235154

  1. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  2. Simple model of a coherent molecular photocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Bélanger, Marc-André; Mayou, Didier; Nemati Aram, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    Electron transport in molecular electronic devices is often dominated by a coherent mechanism in which the wave function extends from the left contact over the molecule to the right contact. If the device is exposed to light, photon absorption in the molecule might occur, turning the device into a molecular photocell. The photon absorption promotes an electron to higher energy levels and thus modifies the electron transmission probability through the device. A model for such a molecular photocell is presented that minimizes the complexity of the problem while providing a non-trivial description of the device mechanism. In particular, the role of the molecule in the photocell is investigated. It is described within the Hückel method and the source-sink potential approach [F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144104 (2007)] is used to eliminate the contacts in favor of complex-valued potentials. Furthermore, the photons are explicitly incorporated into the model through a second-quantized field. This facilitates the description of the photon absorption process with a stationary state calculation, where eigenvalues and eigenvectors are determined. The model developed is applied to various generic molecular photocells.

  3. A dynamic structural model of expanded RNA CAG repeats: a refined X-ray structure and computational investigations using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Disney, Matthew D; Schatz, George C

    2013-03-01

    One class of functionally important RNA is repeating transcripts that cause disease through various mechanisms. For example, expanded CAG repeats can cause Huntington's and other disease through translation of toxic proteins. Herein, a crystal structure of r[5'UUGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, a model of CAG expanded transcripts, refined to 1.65 Å resolution is disclosed that shows both anti-anti and syn-anti orientations for 1 × 1 nucleotide AA internal loops. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using AMBER force field in explicit solvent were run for over 500 ns on the model systems r(5'GCGCAGCGC)2 (MS1) and r(5'CCGCAGCGG)2 (MS2). In these MD simulations, both anti-anti and syn-anti AA base pairs appear to be stable. While anti-anti AA base pairs were dynamic and sampled multiple anti-anti conformations, no syn-anti ↔ anti-anti transformations were observed. Umbrella sampling simulations were run on MS2, and a 2D free energy surface was created to extract transformation pathways. In addition, an explicit solvent MD simulation over 800 ns was run on r[5'GGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, which closely represents the refined crystal structure. One of the terminal AA base pairs (syn-anti conformation), transformed to anti-anti conformation. The pathway followed in this transformation was the one predicted by umbrella sampling simulations. Further analysis showed a binding pocket near AA base pairs in syn-anti conformations. Computational results combined with the refined crystal structure show that global minimum conformation of 1 × 1 nucleotide AA internal loops in r(CAG) repeats is anti-anti but can adopt syn-anti depending on the environment. These results are important to understand RNA dynamic-function relationships and to develop small molecules that target RNA dynamic ensembles. PMID:23441937

  4. A dynamic structural model of expanded RNA CAG repeats: A refined X-ray structure and computational investigations using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, Hajeung; Disney, Matthew D.; Schatz, George C.

    2013-01-01

    One class of functionally important RNA is repeating transcripts that cause disease through various mechanisms. For example, expanded r(CAG) repeats can cause Huntington’s and other disease through translation of toxic proteins. Herein, crystal structure of r[5ʹUUGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, a model of CAG expanded transcripts, refined to 1.65 Å resolution is disclosed that show both anti-anti and syn-anti orientations for 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using Amber force field in explicit solvent were run for over 500 ns on model systems r(5ʹGCGCAGCGC)2 (MS1) and r(5ʹCCGCAGCGG)2 (MS2). In these MD simulations, both anti-anti and syn-anti AA base pairs appear to be stable. While anti-anti AA base pairs were dynamic and sampled multiple anti-anti conformations, no syn-anti↔anti-anti transformations were observed. Umbrella sampling simulations were run on MS2, and a 2D free energy surface was created to extract transformation pathways. In addition, over 800 ns explicit solvent MD simulation was run on r[5ʹGGGC(CAG)3GUCC]2, which closely represents the refined crystal structure. One of the terminal AA base pairs (syn-anti conformation), transformed to anti-anti conformation. The pathway followed in this transformation was the one predicted by umbrella sampling simulations. Further analysis showed a binding pocket near AA base pairs in syn-anti conformations. Computational results combined with the refined crystal structure show that global minimum conformation of 1×1 nucleotide AA internal loops in r(CAG) repeats is anti-anti but can adopt syn-anti depending on the environment. These results are important to understand RNA dynamic-function relationships and develop small molecules that target RNA dynamic ensembles. PMID:23441937

  5. 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation and density functional theory investigation of the role of water in the aggregation of model asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    da Costa, L M; Hayaki, S; Stoyanov, S R; Gusarov, S; Tan, X; Gray, M R; Stryker, J M; Tykwinski, R; Carneiro, J Walkimar de M; Sato, H; Seidl, P R; Kovalenko, A

    2012-03-21

    We applied a multiscale modeling approach that involves the statistical-mechanical three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation (3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation) as well as density functional theory (DFT) of electronic structure to study the role of water in aggregation of the asphaltene model compound 4,4'-bis(2-pyren-1-yl-ethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (PBP) [X. Tan, H. Fenniri and M. R. Gray, Energy Fuels, 2008, 22, 715]. The solvation free energy and potential of mean force predicted by 3D-RISM-KH reveal favorable pathways for disaggregation of PBP dimers in pure versus water-saturated chloroform solvent. The water density distribution functions elucidate hydrogen bonding preferences and water bridge formation between PBP monomers. The ΔG(298) values of -5 to -7 kcal mol(-1) for transfer of water molecules in chloroform to a state interacting with PBP molecules are in agreement with experimental results. Geometry optimization and thermochemistry analysis of PBP dimers with and without water bridges using WB97Xd/6-31G(d,p) predict that both PBP dimerization and dimer stabilization by water bridges are spontaneous (ΔG(298) < 0). The (1)H NMR chemical shifts of PBP monomers and dimers predicted using the gauge-independent atomic orbital method and polarizable continuum model for solvation in chloroform are in an excellent agreement with the experimental results for dilute and concentrated PBP solutions in chloroform, respectively [X. Tan, H. Fenniri and M. R. Gray, Energy Fuels, 2009, 23, 3687]. The DFT calculations of PBP dimers with explicit water show that bridges containing 1-3 water molecules lead to stabilization of PBP dimers. Additional water molecules form hydrogen bonds with these bridges and de-shield the PBP protons, negating the effect of water on the (1)H(C3) NMR chemical shift of PBP, in agreement with experiment. The ΔG(298) results show that hydrogen bonding to water and water

  6. Extending students' practice of metacognitive regulation strategies in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory and investigation of Pb2+ binding to calmodulin with circular dichroism and molecular dynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia Navarro, Laura N.

    The following dissertation was composed of two projects in chemistry education and benchwork/computational biochemistry. The chemistry education research explored students' practice of metacognitive strategies while solving open-ended laboratory problems when engaged in an instructional environment, the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH), that was characterized as supporting metacognitive regulation strategy use. Through in-depth interviews with students, results demonstrated that students in the SWH environment, compared to non-SWH students, used metacognitive strategies to a greater degree and to a greater depth when solving open-ended laboratory problems. As students engaged in higher levels of metacognitive regulation, their elective use of peers became a prominent path for supporting the practice of metacognitive strategies. Students claimed that the structure of the SWH weekly laboratory experiments improved their ability to solve open-ended lab problems. This research not only provided a lens into students' descriptions of their regulation strategy practices in the laboratory, but it also supported that the way that a laboratory environment is arranged can affect these regulation strategy practices and their transfer to new situations. In the biochemical study on the binding of Pb2+ to calmodulin (CaM), data was acquired via circular dichroism (CD) and molecular dynamics modeling. CD signal data indicated a unique signal from Pb-CaM and a significantly smaller ratio theta208/theta222 for Pb-CaM than Ca-CaM. An analysis of secondary structure content indicated that alpha-helical structure decreased and random coil structure increased when CaM was saturated with Pb2+ compared to Ca2+ saturated CaM. A molecular dynamics simulation of Pb2+ binding to CaM showed that Pb2+ ions bound to sites outside of the known canonical binding sites including the linker region, and indicated change in secondary structure. These results support the theory of opportunistic binding

  7. Creep rupture of fiber bundles: A molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga, G.; Ballone, P.; Hansen, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The creep deformation and eventual breaking of polymeric samples under a constant tensile load F is investigated by molecular dynamics based on a particle representation of the fiber bundle model. The results of the virtual testing of fibrous samples consisting of 40 000 particles arranged on Nc=400 chains reproduce characteristic stages seen in the experimental investigations of creep in polymeric materials. A logarithmic plot of the bundle lifetime τ versus load F displays a marked curvature, ruling out a simple power-law dependence of τ on F . A power law τ ˜F-4 , however, is recovered at high load. We discuss the role of reversible bond breaking and formation on the eventual fate of the sample and simulate a different type of creep testing, imposing a constant stress rate on the sample up to its breaking point. Our simulations, relying on a coarse-grained representation of the polymer structure, introduce new features into the standard fiber bundle model, such as real-time dynamics, inertia, and entropy, and open the way to more detailed models, aiming at material science aspects of polymeric fibers, investigated within a sound statistical mechanics framework.

  8. Investigation of a Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agent in Cellular Model Systems: Feasibility for Use as a Smart Molecular Probe in Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca2+ may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of current fMRI techniques. Here we report an in vitro proof-of-principle study with a Ca2+-sensitive, Gd3+-based SCA in an attempt to validate its potential use as a functional in vivo marker. First, we quantified its relaxometric response in a complex 3D cell culture model. Subsequently, we examined potential changes in the functionality of primary glial cells following administration of this SCA. Monitoring intracellular Ca2+ showed that, despite a reduction in the Ca2+ level, transport of Ca2+ through the plasma membrane remained unaffected, while stimulation with ATP induced Ca2+-transients suggested normal cellular signaling in the presence of low millimolar SCA concentrations. SCAs merely lowered the intracellular Ca2+ level. Finally, we estimated the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) for an idealized in vivo fMRI experiment with SCA, for extracellular Ca2+ concentration level changes expected during intense neuronal activity which takes place upon repetitive stimulation. The values we obtained indicate changes in T1 of around 1–6%, sufficient to be robustly detectable using modern MRI methods in high field scanners. Our results encourage further attempts to develop even more potent SCAs and appropriate fMRI protocols. This would result in novel methods that allow monitoring of essential physiological processes at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:24712900

  9. Molecular Tools for Investigating the Gut Microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Christophe

    The “microbial world within us” (Zoetendal et al., 2006) is populated by a complex society of indigenous microorganisms that feature different “ethnic” populations. Those microbial cells thriving within us are estimated to outnumber human body cells by a factor of ten to one. Insights into the relation between the intestinal microbial community and its host have been gained through gnotobiology. Indeed, the influence of the gut microbiota upon human development, physiology, immunity, and nutrition has been inferred by comparing gnotoxenic and axenic murine models (Hooper et al., 1998, 2002, 2003; Hooper and Gordon, 2001).

  10. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structure of the isoquercitrin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornard, J. P.; Boudet, A. C.; Merlin, J. C.

    1999-09-01

    Isoquercitrin is a glycosilated flavonoid that has received a great deal of attention because of its numerous biological effects. We present a theoretical study on isoquercitrin using both empirical (Molecular Mechanics (MM), with MMX force field) and quantum chemical (AM1 semiempirical method) techniques. The most stable structures of the molecule obtained by MM calculations have been used as input data for the semiempirical treatment. The position and orientation of the glucose moiety with regard to the remainder of the molecule have been investigated. The flexibility of isoquercitrin principally lies in rotations around the inter-ring bond and the sugar link. In order to know the structural modifications generated by the substitution by a sugar, geometrical parameters of quercetin (aglycon) and isoquercitrin have been compared. The good accordance between theoretical and experimental electronic spectra permits to confirm the reliability of the structural model.

  11. Molecular modeling of fluoropropene refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Gabriele

    2012-05-17

    Different fluoropropenes are currently considered as refrigerants, either as pure compounds or as components in low GWP (global warming potential) refrigerant mixtures. Due to their limited commercial production, experimental data for the thermophysical properties of fluoropropenes and their mixtures are in general rare, which hampers the exploration of their performance in technical applications. In principle, molecular simulation can be used to predict the relevant properties of refrigerants and refrigerant blends, provided that adequate intermolecular potential functions ("force fields") are available. In our earlier work (Raabe, G.; Maginn, E. J., J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 10133-10142), we introduced a transferable force field for fluoropropenes comprising the compounds 3,3,3-trifluoro-1-propene (HFO-1243zf), 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234yf), and hexafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1216). In this paper, we provide an extension of the force field model to the trans- and cis-1,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234ze(E), HFO-1234ze) and the cis-1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1225ye(Z)) as well as revised simulation results for HFO-1216. We present Gibbs ensemble simulation results on the vapor pressures, saturated densities, and heats of vaporization of these compounds in comparison with experimental results. The simulation results show that the force field model enables reliable predictions of the properties of the different fluoropropenes and also reproduces well the differing vapor-liquid coexistence and vapor pressure curve of the cis- and trans-isomers of 1,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene, HFO-1234ze and HFO-1234ze(E). For these two isomers, we also present molecular dynamics simulation studies on their local structure. PMID:22519953

  12. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack on both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of the probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced in the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring the concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and measuring the infrared absorption spectra before and after the laser exposure. This investigation yielded results pertaining to both the methods and mechanisms of laser tissue welding. The combination of two-color infrared thermometry to obtain accurate surface temperatures free from emissivity bias and computer modeling illustrated the importance of including evaporation in the simulations, which effectively serves as an inherent cooling mechanism during laser irradiation. Moreover, the hydration state predicted by the model was useful in assessing the role of electrostatic versus covalent bonding in the fusion. These tools also helped elicit differences between dye- enhanced liquid solders and solid-matrix patches in laser-assisted tissue welding, demonstrating the significance of repeatable energy delivery. Surprisingly, covalent bonds

  13. Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding

    SciTech Connect

    Small, W., IV

    1998-06-01

    Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack oil both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub-surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of tile probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced In the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring tile concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and characterizing the Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR) spectra before and after the laser exposure.

  14. Molecular-dynamics investigation of the desensitization of detonable material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Betsy M.; Mattson, William; Trevino, Samuel F.

    1998-05-01

    A molecular-dynamics investigation of the effects of a diluent on the detonation of a model crystalline explosive is presented. The diluent, a heavy material that cannot exothermally react with any species of the system, is inserted into the crystalline explosive in two ways. The first series of simulations investigates the attenuation of the energy of a detonation wave in a pure explosive after it encounters a small layer of crystalline diluent that has been inserted into the lattice of the pure explosive. After the shock wave has traversed the diluent layer, it reenters the pure explosive. Unsupported detonation is not reestablished unless the energy of the detonation wave exceeds a threshold value. The second series of simulations investigates detonation of solid solutions of different concentrations of the explosive and diluent. For both types of simulations, the key to reestablishing or reaching unsupported detonation is the attainment of a critical number density behind the shock front. Once this critical density is reached, the explosive molecules make a transition to an atomic phase. This is the first step in the reaction mechanism that leads to the heat release that sustains the detonation. The reactive fragments formed from the atomization of the heteronuclear reactants subsequently combine with new partners, with homonuclear product formation exothermally favored. The results of detonation of the explosive-diluent crystals are consistent with those presented in an earlier study on detonation of pure explosive [B. M. Rice, W. Mattson, J. Grosh, and S. F. Trevino, Phys. Rev. E 53, 611 (1996)].

  15. Ratchet models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Nicole

    2003-09-01

    Transport processes in and of cells are of major importance for the survival of the organism. Muscles have to be able to contract, chromosomes have to be moved to opposing ends of the cell during mitosis, and organelles, which are compartments enclosed by membranes, have to be transported along molecular tracks. Molecular motors are proteins whose main task is moving other molecules.For that purpose they transform the chemical energy released in the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical work. The motors of the cytoskeleton belong to the three super families myosin, kinesin and dynein. Their tracks are filaments of the cytoskeleton, namely actin and the microtubuli. Here, we examine stochastic models which are used for describing the movements of these linear molecular motors. The scale of the movements comprises the regime of single steps of a motor protein up to the directed walk along a filament. A single step bridges around 10 nm, depending on the protein, and takes about 10 ms, if there is enough ATP available. Our models comprise M states or conformations the motor can attain during its movement along a one-dimensional track. At K locations along the track transitions between the states are possible. The velocity of the protein depending on the transition rates between the single states can be determined analytically. We calculate this velocity for systems of up to four states and locations and are able to derive a number of rules which are helpful in estimating the behaviour of an arbitrary given system. Beyond that we have a look at decoupled subsystems, i.e., one or a couple of states which have no connection to the remaining system. With a certain probability a motor undergoes a cycle of conformational changes, with another probability an independent other cycle. Active elements in real transport processes by molecular motors will not be limited to the transitions between the states. In distorted networks or starting from the discrete Master equation of the

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation investigations of atomic-scale wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yuchong; Falk, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Frictional running-in and material transfer in wear take place at the micro- and nano-scale but the fundamental physics remain poorly understood. Here we intend to investigate wear and running-in phenomena in silicon based materials, which are widely utilized in micro/nano electromechanical systems(MEMS/NEMS). We use an atomic force microscopy (AFM) model composed of a crystalline silicon tip and substrate coated with native oxide layers. Molecular dynamics simulation has been performed over a range of temperatures, external loads and slip rates. Results show that adhesive wear takes place across the interface in an atom-by-atom fashion which remodels the tip leading to a final steady state. We quantify the rate of material transfer as a function of the coverage of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) atoms, which has a pronounced change of the system's tribological and wear behaviors. A constitutive rate and state model is proposed to predict the evolution of frictional strength and wear. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. 0926111.

  17. Teaching Molecular Geometry with the VSEPR Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    The first introduction to molecular geometry should be through the simple and easily understood VSEPR model, as the Valence Bond Theory and MO Theory suffer from limitations as far as understanding molecular geometry is concerned. The VSEPR model gives a perfectly satisfactory description of the bonding that follows directly from the Lewis model…

  18. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  19. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  20. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  1. Molecular Modeling of Estrogen Receptor Using Molecular Operating Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi; Luck, Linda A.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular modeling is pervasive in the pharmaceutical industry that employs many of our students from Biology, Chemistry and the interdisciplinary majors. To expose our students to this important aspect of their education we have incorporated a set of tutorials in our Biochemistry class. The present article describes one of our tutorials where…

  2. Investigating molecular dynamics-guided lead optimization of EGFR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lavecchia, Martin J; Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Borrell, José I; Cavasotto, Claudio N

    2016-02-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is part of an extended family of proteins that together control aspects of cell growth and development, and thus a validated target for drug discovery. We explore in this work the suitability of a molecular dynamics-based end-point binding free energy protocol to estimate the relative affinities of a virtual combinatorial library designed around the EGFR model inhibitor 6{1} as a tool to guide chemical synthesis toward the most promising compounds. To investigate the validity of this approach, selected analogs including some with better and worse predicted affinities relative to 6{1} were synthesized, and their biological activity determined. To understand the binding determinants of the different analogs, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals contributions, and water molecule bridging in the EGFR-analog complexes were analyzed. The experimental validation was in good qualitative agreement with our theoretical calculations, while also a 6-dibromophenyl-substituted compound with enhanced inhibitory effect on EGFR compared to the reference ligand was obtained. PMID:26810832

  3. The cognitive life of mechanical molecular models.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Mathieu

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical models of molecular structures as research tools has been central to the development of biochemistry and molecular biology. Intriguingly, it has received little attention from scholars of science. In this paper, I argue that these physical models are not mere three-dimensional representations but that they are in fact very special research tools: they are cognitive augmentations. Despite the fact that they are external props, these models serve as cognitive tools that augment and extend the modeler's cognitive capacities and performance in molecular modeling tasks. This cognitive enhancement is obtained because of the way the modeler interacts with these models, the models' materiality contributing to the solving of the molecule's structure. Furthermore, I argue that these material models and their component parts were designed, built and used specifically to serve as cognitive facilitators and cognitive augmentations. PMID:23910718

  4. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  5. Investigation of deformation mechanisms of staggered nanocomposites using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiazhagan, S.; Anup, S.

    2016-08-01

    Biological materials with nanostructure of regularly or stair-wise staggered arrangements of hard platelets reinforced in a soft protein matrix have superior mechanical properties. Applications of these nanostructures to ceramic matrix composites could enhance their toughness. Using molecular dynamics simulations, mechanical behaviour of the bio-inspired nanocomposites is studied. Regularly staggered model shows better flow behaviour compared to stair-wise staggered model due to the symmetrical crack propagation along the interface. Though higher stiffness and strength are obtained for stair-wise staggered models, rapid crack propagation reduces the toughness. Arresting this crack propagation could lead to superior mechanical properties in stair-wise staggered models.

  6. A Molecular Model for Chiral Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latinwo, Folarin; Stillinger, Frank; Debenedetti, Pablo

    In this work, we present a new class of molecular models for chiral phenomena in condensed matter systems. A key feature of these models is the ability of the four-site (tetramer) ``molecules'' to inter-convert between two distinct chiral forms (enantiomers). Given this feature, we use analytical theory and computer simulations to investigate the emergent chiral properties (including symmetry breaking) over a range of conditions. In particular, we consider the single-molecule level and condensed-phase behavior of our model system. Interestingly, we find that our liquid-phase predictions are in excellent agreement with recent experimental reports on chiral self-sorting in isotropic liquids. From this perspective, our model demonstrates accurate predictive capabilities, as well as a platform for understanding the microscopic origins of a variety of chiral phenomena. In a broader context, we anticipate that this class of models will be relevant to chirality-dominated areas such as the pharmaceutical industry and pre-biotic geochemistry.

  7. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  8. Informing Mechanistic Toxicology with Computational Molecular Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational molecular models of chemicals interacting with biomolecular targets provides toxicologists a valuable, affordable, and sustainable source of in silico molecular level information that augments, enriches, and complements in vitro and in vivo effo...

  9. Rheological investigation of highly filled polymers: Effect of molecular weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatkova, Eva; Hausnerova, Berenika; Hales, Andrew; Jiranek, Lukas; Vera, Juan Miguel Alcon

    2015-04-01

    The paper deals with rheological properties of highly filled polymers used in powder injection molding. Within the experimental framework seven PIM feedstocks based on superalloy Inconel 718 powder were prepared. Each feedstock contains the fixed amount of powder loading and the same composition of binder system consisting of three components: polyethylene glycol (PEG) differing in molecular weight, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and stearic acid (SA). The aim is to investigate the influence of PEG's molecular weight on the flow properties of feedstocks. Non-Newtonian indices, representing the shear rate sensitivity of the feedstocks, are obtained from a polynomial fit, and found to vary within measured shear rates range from 0.2 to 0.8. Temperature effect is considered via activation energies, showing decreasing trend with increasing of molecular weight of PEG (except of feedstock containing 1,500 g.mol-1 PEG).

  10. Break-junctions for investigating transport at the molecular scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Florian; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2014-11-01

    Break-junctions (BJs) enable a pair of atomic-sized electrodes to be created and the relative position between them to be controlled with sub-nanometer accuracy by mechanical means—a level of microscopic control that is not yet achievable by top-down fabrication. Locally, a BJ consists of a single-atom contact, an arrangement that is ideal not only to study various types of quantum point contacts, but also to investigate transport through an individual molecule that can bridge such a junction. In this topical review, we will provide a broad overview on the field of single-molecule electronics, in which BJs serve as the main tool of investigation. To correlate the molecular structure and transport properties to gain a fundamental understanding of the underlying transport mechanisms at the molecular scale, basic experiments that systematically cover all aspects of transport by rational chemical design and tailored experiments are needed. The variety of fascinating transport mechanisms and intrinsic molecular functionalities discovered in the past range from nonlinear transport over conductance switching to quantum interference effects observable even at room temperature. Beside discussing these results, we also look at novel directions and the most recent advances in molecular electronics investigating simultaneously electronic transport and also the mechanical and thermal properties of single-molecule junctions as well as the interaction between molecules and light. Finally, we will describe the requirements for a stepwise transition from fundamental BJ experiments towards technology-relevant architectures for future nanoelectronics applications based on ultimately-scaled molecular building blocks.

  11. Molecular modeling of conformational properties of oligodepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajing; King, Michael; Suggs, Laura; Ren, Pengyu

    2007-10-01

    A depsipeptide is a chemical structure consisting of both ester and amide bonds. Quantum mechanics calculations have been performed to investigate the conformational properties of a depsidipeptide in the gas and solution phases. Similar to an alanine dipeptide, the depsidipeptide exhibits a strong preference for the polyproline II (PPII) helical conformation. Meanwhile, due to the changes in the intramolecular interaction, the propensity for beta-sheets and alpha-helices diminishes while an unusual inclination for the (phi,psi) = (-150 degrees ,0 degrees ) conformation was observed. A molecular mechanics model has been developed for polydepsipeptides based on the quantum mechanical study. Both simulated annealing and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on oligodepsipeptide sequences with alternating depsi and natural residues in solution. Novel helical structures have been indicated from the simulations. When glycine is used as the alternating natural amino acid residue, the PPII conformation of a depsi residue stabilizes the peptide into a right-handed helical structure while the alpha-helical conformation of the depsi residue favors an overall left-handed helical structure. The free energy analysis indicates that both the left- and the right-handed helices are equally likely to exist. When charged lysine is introduced as the alternating natural residue, however, it is found that the depsipeptide sequence prefers an extended conformation as in PPII. Our results indicate that the depsipeptide is potentially useful in designing protein mimetics with controllable structure, function, and chemistry. PMID:17877396

  12. Molecular Modeling of Fluorescent SERCA Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Bengt; Autry, Joseph M; Thomas, David D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling and simulation are useful tools in structural biology, allowing the formulation of functional hypotheses and interpretation of spectroscopy experiments. Here, we describe a method to construct in silico models of a fluorescent fusion protein construct, where a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) is linked to the actuator domain of the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). This CFP-SERCA construct is a biosensor that can report on structural dynamics in the cytosolic headpiece of SERCA. Molecular modeling and FRET experiments allow us to generate new structural and mechanistic models that better describe the conformational landscape and regulation of SERCA. The methods described here can be applied to the creation of models for any fusion protein constructs and also describe the steps needed to simulate FRET results using molecular models. PMID:26695057

  13. FTIR investigation of non-volatile molecular nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorell, R.; Kunzmann, M. K.; Suhm, M. A.

    2000-10-01

    A new approach for the spectroscopic investigation of non-volatile molecular nanoparticles with diameters in the range between 10 and 100 nm is proposed. The nanoparticles are produced in an electrospray with subsequent solvent evaporation. The number size distribution of the generated aerosol is determined with a scanning mobility particle sizer. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is used to study the vibrational dynamics of the nanoparticles. As an example, we have investigated sucrose nanoparticles with six different diameters between 36 and 82 nm. From a comparison with different bulk phase spectra, we conclude that sucrose aerosols are formed in a solid amorphous state.

  14. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  15. Model of turbulent destruction of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakin, B. P.; Betelin, V. B.; Dushin, V. R.; Mikhalchenko, E. V.; Moiseenko, S. G.; Stamov, L. I.; Tyurenkova, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    We represent numerical simulation results of interaction process of supernova strong shock with interstellar molecular cloud in 3D. In the paper we neglect gravitation, heat conductivity and radiative losses. We analyze in detail processes of deformation and fragmentation of molecular cloud (MC). Formation of passed by and reflected shocks system, contraction and ablation of the matter is investigated in detail. The post-processor treatment and the results of calculations made it possible to find the following features of the molecular cloud matter - the vortexes formation, erosion and ablation.

  16. First Principles Quantitative Modeling of Molecular Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhanyu

    In this thesis, we report theoretical investigations of nonlinear and nonequilibrium quantum electronic transport properties of molecular transport junctions from atomistic first principles. The aim is to seek not only qualitative but also quantitative understanding of the corresponding experimental data. At present, the challenges to quantitative theoretical work in molecular electronics include two most important questions: (i) what is the proper atomic model for the experimental devices? (ii) how to accurately determine quantum transport properties without any phenomenological parameters? Our research is centered on these questions. We have systematically calculated atomic structures of the molecular transport junctions by performing total energy structural relaxation using density functional theory (DFT). Our quantum transport calculations were carried out by implementing DFT within the framework of Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). The calculated data are directly compared with the corresponding experimental measurements. Our general conclusion is that quantitative comparison with experimental data can be made if the device contacts are correctly determined. We calculated properties of nonequilibrium spin injection from Ni contacts to octane-thiolate films which form a molecular spintronic system. The first principles results allow us to establish a clear physical picture of how spins are injected from the Ni contacts through the Ni-molecule linkage to the molecule, why tunnel magnetoresistance is rapidly reduced by the applied bias in an asymmetric manner, and to what extent ab initio transport theory can make quantitative comparisons to the corresponding experimental data. We found that extremely careful sampling of the two-dimensional Brillouin zone of the Ni surface is crucial for accurate results in such a spintronic system. We investigated the role of contact formation and its resulting structures to quantum transport in several molecular

  17. Structural investigation of the 7-chloro-3-hydroxy-1H-quinazoline-2,4-dione scaffold to obtain AMPA and kainate receptor selective antagonists. Synthesis, pharmacological, and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Colotta, Vittoria; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Lenzi, Ombretta; Filacchioni, Guido; Costagli, Chiara; Galli, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Gratteri, Paola; Sgrignani, Jacopo; Deflorian, Francesca; Moro, Stefano

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, the study of new 7-chloro-3-hydroxy-1H-quinazoline-2,4-dione derivatives, designed as AMPA and kainate (KA) receptor antagonists, is reported. Some derivatives bear different carboxy-containing alkyl chains on the 3-hydroxy group, while various heterocyclic rings or amide moieties are present at the 6-position of other compounds. Binding data at Gly/NMDA, AMPA, and high-affinity KA receptors showed that the presence of the free 3-hydroxy group is of paramount importance for a good affinity at all three investigated receptors, while introduction of some 6-heterocyclic moieties yielded AMPA-selective antagonists. The most significant result was the finding of the 6-(2-carboxybenzoylamino)-3-hydroxy-1H-quinazolin-2,4-dione 12, which possesses good affinity for high-affinity and low-affinity KA receptors (Ki=0.62 microM and 1.6 microM, respectively), as well as good selectivity. To rationalize the trend of affinities of the reported derivatives, an intensive molecular modeling study was carried out by docking compounds to models of the Gly/NMDA, AMPA, and KA receptors. PMID:17004715

  18. [Evolution and systematics of nematodes based on molecular investigation].

    PubMed

    Okulewicz, Anna; Perec, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    Evolution and systematics of nematodes based on molecular investigation. The use of molecular phylogenetics to examine the interrelationships between animal parasites, free-living nematodes, and plant parasites versus traditional classification based on morphological-ecological characters was discussed and reviewed. Distinct differences were observed between parasitic nematodes and free-living ones. Within the former group, animal parasites turned out to be distinctly different from plant parasites. Using small subunit of ribosomal RNA gene sequence from a wide range of nematodes, there is a possibility to compare animal-parasitic, plant-parasitic and free-living taxa. Nowadays the parasitic nematodes expressed sequence tag (EST) project is currently generating sequence information to provide a new source of data to examine the evolutionary history of this taxonomic group. PMID:16859012

  19. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  20. Markov state models and molecular alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Christof; Nielsen, Adam; Weber, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Markov state models (MSMs) have attracted a considerable amount of attention with regard to modelling conformation changes and associated function of biomolecular systems. They have been used successfully, e.g. for peptides including time-resolved spectroscopic experiments, protein function and protein folding , DNA and RNA, and ligand-receptor interaction in drug design and more complicated multivalent scenarios. In this article, a novel reweighting scheme is introduced that allows to construct an MSM for certain molecular system out of an MSM for a similar system. This permits studying how molecular properties on long timescales differ between similar molecular systems without performing full molecular dynamics simulations for each system under consideration. The performance of the reweighting scheme is illustrated for simple test cases, including one where the main wells of the respective energy landscapes are located differently and an alchemical transformation of butane to pentane where the dimension of the state space is changed.

  1. Investigation of glassy state molecular motions in thermoset polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jianwei

    This dissertation presents the investigation of the glassy state molecular motions in isomeric thermoset epoxies by means of solid-state deuterium (2H) NMR spectroscopy technique. The network structure of crosslinked epoxies was altered through monomer isomerism; specifically, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) was cured with isomeric amine curatives, i.e., the meta-substituted diaminodiphenylsulfone (33DDS) and para-substituted diaminodiphenylsulfone (44DDS). The use of structural isomerism provided a path way for altering macroscopic material properties while maintaining identical chemical composition within the crosslinked networks. The effects of structural isomerism on the glassy state molecular motions were studied using solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy, which offers unrivaled power to monitor site-specific molecular motions. Three distinctive molecular groups on each isomeric network, i.e., the phenylene rings in the bisphenol A structure (BPA), the phenylene rings in the diaminodiphenylsulfone structure (DDS), and the hydroxypropoyl ether group (HPE) have been selectively deuterated for a comprehensive study of the structure-dynamics- property relationships in thermoset epoxies. Quadrupolar echo experiments and line shape simulations were employed as the main research approach to gain both qualitative and quantitative motional information of the epoxy networks in the glassy state. Quantitative information on the geometry and rate of the molecular motions allows the elucidation of the relationship between molecular motions and macro physical properties and the role of these motions in the mechanical relaxation. Specifically, it is revealed that both the BPA and HPE moieties in the isomeric networks have almost identical behaviors in the deep glassy state, which indicates that the molecular motions in the glassy state are localized, and the correlation length of the motions does not exceed the length of the DGEBA repeat unit. BPA ring motions contribute

  2. Adaptive modelling of structured molecular representations for toxicity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of modelling structure-toxicity relationships by direct treatment of the molecular structure (without using descriptors) through an adaptive model able to retain the appropriate structural information. With respect to traditional descriptor-based approaches, this provides a more general and flexible way to tackle prediction problems that is particularly suitable when little or no background knowledge is available. Our method employs a tree-structured molecular representation, which is processed by a recursive neural network (RNN). To explore the realization of RNN modelling in toxicological problems, we employed a data set containing growth impairment concentrations (IGC50) for Tetrahymena pyriformis.

  3. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  4. Animal Models of Depression: Molecular Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vaishnav; Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current understanding about the pathogenesis of altered mood, impaired concentration and neurovegetative symptoms in major depression has come from animal models. However, because of the unique and complex features of human depression, the generation of valid and insightful depression models has been less straightforward than modeling other disabling diseases like cancer or autoimmune conditions. Today’s popular depression models creatively merge ethologically valid behavioral assays with the latest technological advances in molecular biology and automated video-tracking. This chapter reviews depression assays involving acute stress (e.g., forced swim test), models consisting of prolonged physical or social stress (e.g., social defeat), models of secondary depression, genetic models, and experiments designed to elucidate the mechanisms of antidepressant action. These paradigms are critically evaluated in relation to their ease, validity and replicability, the molecular insights that they have provided, and their capacity to offer the next generation of therapeutics for depression. PMID:21225412

  5. Hierarchical Molecular Modelling with Ellipsoids

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    2004-03-29

    Protein and DNA structures are represented at varying levels of details using ellipsoidal RGBA textured splats. The splat texture at each level is generated by rendering its children in a hierarchical model, from a distribution of viewing directions, and averaging the result. For rendering, the ellipsoids to be used are chosen adaptively, depending on the distance to the viewpoint. This technique is applied to visualize DNA coiling around nucleosomes in chromosomes.

  6. MODELING MOLECULAR HYPERFINE LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, Eric; Rybicki, George

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we discuss two approximate methods previously suggested for modeling hyperfine spectral line emission for molecules whose collisional transition rates between hyperfine levels are unknown. Hyperfine structure is seen in the rotational spectra of many commonly observed molecules such as HCN, HNC, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and C{sup 17}O. The intensities of these spectral lines can be modeled by numerical techniques such as {Lambda}-iteration that alternately solve the equations of statistical equilibrium and the equation of radiative transfer. However, these calculations require knowledge of both the radiative and collisional rates for all transitions. For most commonly observed radio frequency spectral lines, only the net collisional rates between rotational levels are known. For such cases, two approximate methods have been suggested. The first method, hyperfine statistical equilibrium, distributes the hyperfine level populations according to their statistical weight, but allows the population of the rotational states to depart from local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The second method, the proportional method, approximates the collision rates between the hyperfine levels as fractions of the net rotational rates apportioned according to the statistical degeneracy of the final hyperfine levels. The second method is able to model non-LTE hyperfine emission. We compare simulations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} hyperfine lines made with approximate and more exact rates and find that satisfactory results are obtained.

  7. Nonlinear Optical Investigations of Vibrational Relaxation in Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decola, Philip Lawrence

    Experimental studies of four-wave mixing have been used to obtain novel spectroscopic information in molecular crystals. This work can be separated into singly resonant and multiresonant investigations. One effort was to exploit the frequency and time domain capabilities of singly resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to study vibrational dynamics in naphthalene and benzene single crystals at liquid Helium temperatures. To a large extent vibrational energy is chemical energy, so to understand the flow of vibrational energy in molecules and molecular aggregates can enhance our understanding of chemical reaction rates and pathways. Some of the salient results are: (1) the existence of motional narrowing in molecular crystals makes it possible for lifetime (T _1) broadening to dominate the linewidth of the vibrational transition even when the intrinsic disorder width is much larger than 1/T_1, (2) relaxation in molecular crystals can be surprisingly slow, ranging from subnanosecond to nanosecond, (3) substantial mode dependent contribution to relaxation from ^{13}C impurities in benzene, and (4) evidence of mode specific energy relaxation observed in a systematic study of benzene Raman active modes. The results obtained here are applied to the problems of understanding the contributions to residual low-temperature vibron linewidths and of developing simple mechanical intuitions to explain systematically the kinetic pathways for vibrational relaxation in molecular crystals. These results are discussed in light of the current theories of excitation dynamics in condensed phases. The other area of study was multiresonant nonlinear spectroscopic investigations of mixed organic crystals. The first multiresonant CARS and its Stokes analogue (CSRS) have been obtained in a mixed crystal of pentacene in benzoic acid allowing the simultaneous observation of ground and excited state Raman spectra. These spectra contain lines that are much sharper than expected

  8. Molecular Modeling of Water Interfaces: From Molecular Spectroscopy to Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-04-28

    Understanding aqueous interfaces at the molecular level is not only fundamentally important, but also highly relevant for a variety of disciplines. For instance, electrode-water interfaces are relevant for electrochemistry, as are mineral-water interfaces for geochemistry and air-water interfaces for environmental chemistry; water-lipid interfaces constitute the boundaries of the cell membrane, and are thus relevant for biochemistry. One of the major challenges in these fields is to link macroscopic properties such as interfacial reactivity, solubility, and permeability as well as macroscopic thermodynamic and spectroscopic observables to the structure, structural changes, and dynamics of molecules at these interfaces. Simulations, by themselves, or in conjunction with appropriate experiments, can provide such molecular-level insights into aqueous interfaces. In this contribution, we review the current state-of-the-art of three levels of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation: ab initio, force field, and coarse-grained. We discuss the advantages, the potential, and the limitations of each approach for studying aqueous interfaces, by assessing computations of the sum-frequency generation spectra and surface tension. The comparison of experimental and simulation data provides information on the challenges of future MD simulations, such as improving the force field models and the van der Waals corrections in ab initio MD simulations. Once good agreement between experimental observables and simulation can be established, the simulation can be used to provide insights into the processes at a level of detail that is generally inaccessible to experiments. As an example we discuss the mechanism of the evaporation of water. We finish by presenting an outlook outlining four future challenges for molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous interfacial systems. PMID:27010817

  9. Investigating Atmospheric Oxidation with Molecular Dynamics Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, W. G.; Case, A. S.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Earth's atmosphere constitute trace gas species emitted primarily from the biosphere, and are the subject of inquiry for a variety of air quality and climate studies. Reactions intiated (primarily) by the hydroxyl radical (OH) lead to a myriad of oxygenated species (OVOCs), which in turn are prone to further oxidation. Investigations of the role that VOC oxidation plays in tropospheric chemistry have brought to light two troubling scenarios: (1) VOCs are responsible in part for the production of two EPA-regulated pollutants---tropospheric ozone and organic aerosol---and (2) the mechanistic details of VOC oxidation remain convoluted and poorly understood. The latter issue hampers the implementation of near-explicit atmospheric simulations, and large discrepancies in OH reactivity exist between measurements and models at present. Such discrepancies underscore the need for a more thorough description of VOC oxidation. Time-of-flight measurements and ion-imaging techniques are viable options for resolving some of the mechanistic and energetic details of VOC oxidation. Molecular beam studies have the advantage of foregoing unwanted bimolecular reactions, allowing for the characterization of specific processes which must typically compete with the complex manifold of VOC oxidation pathways. The focus of this work is on the unimolecular channels of organic peroxy radical intermediates, which are necessarily generated during VOC oxidation. Such intermediates may isomerize and decompose into distinct chemical channels, enabling the unambiguous detection of each pathway. For instance, a (1 + 1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) scheme may be employed to detect carbon monoxide generated from a particular unimolecular process. A number of more subtle mechanistic details may be explored as well. By varying the mean free path of the peroxy radicals in a flow tube, the role of collisional quenching in these unimolecular

  10. Mathematical modeling of molecular diffusion through mucus

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The rate of molecular transport through the mucus gel can be an important determinant of efficacy for therapeutic agents delivered by oral, intranasal, intravaginal/rectal, and intraocular routes. Transport through mucus can be described by mathematical models based on principles of physical chemistry and known characteristics of the mucus gel, its constituents, and of the drug itself. In this paper, we review mathematical models of molecular diffusion in mucus, as well as the techniques commonly used to measure diffusion of solutes in the mucus gel, mucus gel mimics, and mucosal epithelia. PMID:19135488

  11. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  12. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  13. Mobile modeling in the molecular sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    The art of modeling in the molecular sciences is highly dependent on both the available computational technology, underlying data, and ability to collaborate. With the ever increasing market share of mobile devices, it is assumed by many that tablets will overtake laptops as the...

  14. Molecular simulation and modeling of complex I.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-07-01

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations play an important role in the functional characterization of complex I. With its large size and complicated function, linking quinone reduction to proton pumping across a membrane, complex I poses unique modeling challenges. Nonetheless, simulations have already helped in the identification of possible proton transfer pathways. Simulations have also shed light on the coupling between electron and proton transfer, thus pointing the way in the search for the mechanistic principles underlying the proton pump. In addition to reviewing what has already been achieved in complex I modeling, we aim here to identify pressing issues and to provide guidance for future research to harness the power of modeling in the functional characterization of complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26780586

  15. Modelling refractive index changes due to molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    There are a large number of sensing techniques which use optical changes to monitor interactions between molecules. In the absence of fluorophores or other labels, the basic signal transduction mechanism relies on refractive index changes arising from the interactions of the molecules involved. A quantitative model incorporating molecular transport, reaction kinetics and optical mixing is presented which reveals important insights concerning the optimal detection of molecular interactions optically. Although conceptually simple, a comprehensive model such as this has not been reported anywhere. Specifically, we investigate the pros and cons of detecting molecular interactions in free solution relative to detecting molecular interactions on surfaces using surface bound receptor molecules such as antibodies. The model reveals that the refractive index change produced in surface based sensors is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that from interactions in free solution. On the other hand, the model also reveals that it is indeed possible to distinguish specific molecular interactions from non-specific ones based on free-solution bulk refractometry without any washing step necessary in surface based sensors. However, the refractive index change for free solution interactions predicted by the model is smaller than 10-7 RIU, even for large proteins such as IgG in sufficiently high concentrations. This value is smaller than the typical 10-6 RIU detection limit of most state of the art optical sensing techniques therefore requiring techniques with substantially higher index sensitivity such as Back Scattering Interferometry.

  16. The role of molecular modeling in bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Deyu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Shih, Amy Y.; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Freddolino, Peter L.; Arkhipov, Anton; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Molecular modeling is advocated here as a key methodology for research and development in bionanotechnology. Molecular modeling provides nanoscale images at atomic and even electronic resolution, predicts the nanoscale interaction of yet unfamiliar combinations of biological and inorganic materials, and can evaluate strategies for redesigning biopolymers for nanotechnological uses. The methodology is illustrated in this paper through three case studies. The first involves the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes as biomedical sensors where a computationally efficient, yet accurate description of the influence of biomolecules on nanotube electronic properties and a description of nanotube - biomolecule interactions were developed; this development furnishes the ability to test nanotube electronic properties in realistic biological environments. The second case study involves the use of nanopores manufactured into electronic nanodevices based on silicon compounds for single molecule electrical recording, in particular, for DNA sequencing. Here, modeling combining classical molecular dynamics, material science, and device physics, describes the interaction of biopolymers, e.g., DNA, with silicon nitrate and silicon oxide pores, furnishes accurate dynamic images of pore translocation processes, and predicts signals. The third case study involves the development of nanoscale lipid bilayers for the study of embedded membrane proteins and cholesterol. Molecular modeling tested scaffold proteins, redesigned lipoproteins found in mammalian plasma that hold the discoidal membranes in shape, and predicted the assembly as well as final structure of the nanodiscs. In entirely new technological areas like bionanotechnology qualitative concepts, pictures, and suggestions are sorely needed; these three case studies document that molecular modeling can serve a critical role in this respect, even though it may still fall short on quantitative precision. PMID:16582464

  17. The role of molecular modeling in bionanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Shih, Amy Y.; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Freddolino, Peter L.; Arkhipov, Anton; Schulten, Klaus

    2006-03-01

    Molecular modeling is advocated here as a key methodology for research and development in bionanotechnology. Molecular modeling provides nanoscale images at atomic and even electronic resolution, predicts the nanoscale interaction of unfamiliar combinations of biological and inorganic materials, and evaluates strategies for redesigning biopolymers for nanotechnological uses. The methodology is illustrated in this paper through reviewing three case studies. The first one involves the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes as biomedical sensors where a computationally efficient, yet accurate, description of the influence of biomolecules on nanotube electronic properties through nanotube-biomolecule interactions was developed; this development furnishes the ability to test nanotube electronic properties in realistic biological environments. The second case study involves the use of nanopores manufactured into electronic nanodevices based on silicon compounds for single molecule electrical recording, in particular, for DNA sequencing. Here, modeling combining classical molecular dynamics, material science and device physics, described the interaction of biopolymers, e.g., DNA, with silicon nitrate and silicon oxide pores, furnished accurate dynamic images of pore translocation processes, and predicted signals. The third case study involves the development of nanoscale lipid bilayers for the study of embedded membrane proteins and cholesterol. Molecular modeling tested scaffold proteins, redesigned apolipoproteins found in mammalian plasma that hold the discoidal membranes in the proper shape, and predicted the assembly as well as final structure of the nanodiscs. In entirely new technological areas such as bionanotechnology, qualitative concepts, pictures and suggestions are sorely needed; these three case studies document that molecular modeling can serve a critical role in this respect, even though it may still fall short on quantitative precision.

  18. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  19. Molecular Modeling of Solid Fluid Phase Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Monson

    2007-12-20

    This report gives a summary of the achievements under DOE contract No. DOE/ER/14150 during the period September 1, 1990 to December 31, 2007. This project was concerned with the molecular modeling of solid-fluid equilibrium. The focus was on understanding how solid-fluid and solid-solid phase behavior are related to molecular structure, and the research program made a seminal contribution in this area. The project led to 34 journal articles, including a comprehensive review article published in Advances in Chemical Physics. The DOE funding supported the work of 5 Ph.D. students, 2 M.S. students and 5 postdoctoral researchers.

  20. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzy Bernholc

    2011-02-03

    will some day reach a miniaturization limit, forcing designers of Si-based electronics to pursue increased performance by other means. Any other alternative approach would have the unenviable task of matching the ability of Si technology to pack more than a billion interconnected and addressable devices on a chip the size of a thumbnail. Nevertheless, the prospects of developing alternative approaches to fabricate electronic devices have spurred an ever-increasing pace of fundamental research. One of the promising possibilities is molecular electronics (ME), self-assembled molecular-based electronic systems composed of single-molecule devices in ultra dense, ultra fast molecular-sized components. This project focused on developing accurate, reliable theoretical modeling capabilities for describing molecular electronics devices. The participants in the project are given in Table 1. The primary outcomes of this fundamental computational science grant are publications in the open scientific literature. As listed below, 62 papers have been published from this project. In addition, the research has also been the subject of more than 100 invited talks at conferences, including several plenary or keynote lectures. Many of the goals of the original proposal were completed. Specifically, the multi-disciplinary group developed a unique set of capabilities and tools for investigating electron transport in fabricated and self-assembled nanostructures at multiple length and time scales.

  1. Molecular dynamics investigations of PRODAN in a DLPC bilayer.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, William K; Vequi-Suplicy, Cíntia C; Coutinho, Kaline; Stassen, Hubert

    2012-03-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been performed to identify preferred positions of the fluorescent probe PRODAN in a fully hydrated DLPC bilayer in the fluid phase. In addition to the intramolecular charge-transfer first vertical excited state, we considered different charge distributions for the electronic ground state of the PRODAN molecule by distinct atomic charge models corresponding to the probe molecule in vacuum as well as polarized in a weak and a strong dielectric solvent (cyclohexane and water). Independent on the charge distribution model of PRODAN, we observed a preferential orientation of this molecule in the bilayer with the dimethylamino group pointing toward the membrane's center and the carbonyl oxygen toward the membrane's interface. However, changing the charge distribution model of PRODAN, independent of its initial position in the equilibrated DLPC membrane, we observed different preferential positions. For the ground state representation without polarization and the in-cyclohexane polarization, the probe maintains its position close to the membrane's center. Considering the in-water polarization model, the probe approaches more of the polar headgroup region of the bilayer, with a strong structural correlation with the choline group, exposing its oxygen atom to water molecules. PRODAN's representation of the first vertical excited state with the in-water polarization also approaches the polar region of the membrane with the oxygen atom exposed to the bilayer's hydration shell. However, this model presents a stronger structural correlation with the phosphate groups than the ground state. Therefore, we conclude that the orientation of the PRODAN molecule inside the DLPC membrane is well-defined, but its position is very sensitive to the effect of the medium polarization included here by different models for the atomic charge distribution of the probe. PMID:22329741

  2. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E.; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  3. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms. PMID:26828313

  4. Spectroscopic investigations, molecular interactions, and molecular docking studies on the potential inhibitor "thiophene-2-carboxylicacid"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, T.; Balachandran, V.; Perumal, S.

    2015-04-01

    Thiophene derivatives have been focused in the past decades due to their remarkable biological and pharmacological activities. In connection with that the conformational stability, spectroscopic characterization, molecular (inter- and intra-) interactions, and molecular docking studies on thiophene-2-carboxylicacid have been performed in this work by experimental FT-IR and theoretical quantum chemical computations. Experimentally recorded FT-IR spectrum in the region 4000-400 cm-1 has been compared with the scaled theoretical spectrum and the spectral peaks have been assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution results obtained from MOLVIB program package. The conformational stability of monomer and dimer conformers has been examined. The presence of inter- and intramolecular interactions in the monomer and dimer conformers have been explained by natural bond orbital analysis. The UV-Vis spectra of the sample in different solvents have been simulated and solvent effects were predicted by polarisable continuum model with TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. To test the biological activity of the sample, molecular docking (ligand-protein) simulations have been performed using SWISSDOCK web server. The full fitness (FF) score and binding affinity values revealed that thiophene-2-carboxylicacid can act as potential inhibitor against inflammation.

  5. Molecular models and simulations of layered materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Heinz, Hendrik; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-11-01

    The micro- to nano-sized nature of layered materials, particularly characteristic of naturally occurring clay minerals, limits our ability to fully interrogate their atomic dispositions and crystal structures. The low symmetry, multicomponent compositions, defects, and disorder phenomena of clays and related phases necessitate the use of molecular models and modern simulation methods. Computational chemistry tools based on classical force fields and quantum-chemical methods of electronic structure calculations provide a practical approach to evaluate structure and dynamics of the materials on an atomic scale. Combined with classical energy minimization, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo techniques, quantum methods provide accurate models of layered materials such as clay minerals, layered double hydroxides, and clay-polymer nanocomposites.

  6. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  7. Applications of molecular modeling in coal research

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Faulon, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years, molecular modeling has been applied to study various characteristics of coal molecular structures. Powerful workstations coupled with molecular force-field-based software packages have been used to study coal and coal-related molecules. Early work involved determination of the minimum-energy three-dimensional conformations of various published coal structures (Given, Wiser, Solomon and Shinn), and the dominant role of van der Waals and hydrogen bonding forces in defining the energy-minimized structures. These studies have been extended to explore various physical properties of coal structures, including density, microporosity, surface area, and fractal dimension. Other studies have related structural characteristics to cross-link density and have explored small molecule interactions with coal. Finally, recent studies using a structural elucidation (molecular builder) technique have constructed statistically diverse coal structures based on quantitative and qualitative data on coal and its decomposition products. This technique is also being applied to study coalification processes based on postulated coalification chemistry.

  8. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  9. Molecular model for hydrated biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Erika Tiemi; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; de Carvalho, Luis Felipe das Chagas e Silva; Almeida, Janete Dias; Martinho, Herculano

    2015-06-01

    A density-functional microscopic model for soft tissues (STmod) is presented. The model was based on a prototype molecular structure from experimentally resolved type I collagen peptide residues and water clusters treated in periodic boundary conditions. We obtained the optimized geometry, binding and coupling energies, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies. The results concerning the stability of the confined water clusters, the water-water, and water-collagen interactions were successfully correlated to some important experimental trends of normal and inflammatory tissues. PMID:26172825

  10. Investigation of synthetic molecular recognition for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; McMasters, Sun; Sooter, Letha J.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2007-04-01

    A fundamental understanding of the factors which influence binding performance is critical to any technology or methodology relying on molecular recognition of a specific target species. For the Army, there is a growing need for a basic understanding of these interactions with traditional recognition elements (e.g., antibodies) in non-traditional environmental conditions, such as with new and emerging threats. There is a similar need for building a base of knowledge on non-traditional affinity ligands that are biomimetic or biosynthetic in nature. In this paper, specific research at the Army Research Laboratory towards the development, evaluation and use of synthetic affinity ligands for sensing applications is discussed. This includes the results of our investigations of aptamer-based affinity ligands targeting Campylobacter jejuni. Using capillary electrophoretic techniques, the relative binding affinities of the aptamer ligands towards the target pathogen as well as the degree of cross-reactivity with other food borne-pathogens (i.e., Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium) were evaluated. Current progress towards the development of synthetic affinity ligands for sensing applications will also be discussed.

  11. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  12. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  13. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  14. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  15. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  16. Computational investigation of stoichiometric effects, binding site heterogeneities, and selectivities of molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Terracina, Jacob J; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sharfstein, Susan T

    2016-06-01

    A series of quantum mechanical (QM) computational optimizations of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) systems were used to determine optimal monomer-to-target ratios. Imidazole- and xanthine-derived target molecules were studied. The investigation included both small-scale models (3-7 molecules) and larger-scale models (15-35 molecules). The optimal ratios differed between the small and larger scales. For the larger models containing multiple targets, binding-site surface area analysis was used to quantify the heterogeneity of these sites. The more fully surrounded sites had greater binding energies. No discretization of binding modes was seen, furthering arguments for continuous affinity distribution models. Molecular mechanical (MM) docking was then used to measure the selectivities of the QM-optimized binding sites. Selectivity was also shown to improve as binding sites become more fully encased by the monomers. For internal sites, docking consistently showed selectivity favoring the molecules that had been imprinted via QM geometry optimizations. The computationally imprinted sites were shown to exhibit size-, shape-, and polarity-based selectivity. Here we present a novel approach to investigate the selectivity and heterogeneity of imprinted polymer binding sites, by applying the rapid orientation screening of MM docking to the highly accurate QM-optimized geometries. Modeling schemes were designed such that no computing clusters or other specialized modeling equipment would be required. Improving the in silico analysis of MIP system properties will ultimately allow for the production of more sensitive and selective polymers. PMID:27207254

  17. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for ({sup 3}H)NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections.

  18. Effect of molecular models on viscosity and thermal conductivity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Andrew B.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of molecular models on viscosity and thermal conductivity calculations is investigated. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for rarefied gas flows is used to simulate Couette and Fourier flows as a means of obtaining the transport coefficients. Experimental measurements for argon (Ar) provide a baseline for comparison over a wide temperature range of 100-1,500 K. The variable hard sphere (VHS), variable soft sphere (VSS), and Lennard-Jones (L-J) molecular models have been implemented into a parallel version of Bird's one-dimensional DSMC code, DSMC1, and the model parameters have been recalibrated to the current experimental data set. While the VHS and VSS models only consider the short-range, repulsive forces, the L-J model also includes constributions from the long-range, dispersion forces. Theoretical results for viscosity and thermal conductivity indicate the L-J model is more accurate than the VSS model; with maximum errors of 1.4% and 3.0% in the range 300-1,500 K for L-J and VSS models, respectively. The range of validity of the VSS model is extended to 1,650 K through appropriate choices for the model parameters.

  19. Modelling Molecular Emission from Young Embedded Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsono, D.; Visser, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L.; Bruderer, S.; Brinch, C. Hogerheijde, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks play an important role in the formation of stars and planets. Recent observations and models have placed strong constraints on the later stages of their evolution (the T Tauri or Herbig Ae/Be phase), when an envelope is no longer present. However, little is known of the disk structure and evolution during the embedded phase of star formation. With Herschel and the VLT, and soon ALMA, we will be able to detect and characterize the early stages of disk formation. Sophisticated modeling including both physical and chemical structure of the system would be needed to interpret the high quality of data. We present a two-dimensional, semi-analytical model of disk formation as also used in Visser et al. (2009) and Visser and Dullemond (2010). The dust temperature is determined using a three-dimensional dust continuum radiative transfer code (RADMC-3D). Molecular abundances are calculated by following freeze-out and evaporation from the pre-stellar core up to the formation of the circumstellar disk. Synthetic spectra of CO and H2O within the wavelength ranges observable with Herschel and VLT-CRIRES are then produced at a series of time steps, tracing the different stages of disk formation. We also present simulated ALMA images. We discuss the evolution of the molecular emission and the possibility of identifying the presence of embedded disks.

  20. Many-Body Models for Molecular Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, A.; Carretta, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Pavarini, E.

    2013-04-01

    We present a flexible and effective ab initio scheme to build many-body models for molecular nanomagnets, and to calculate magnetic exchange couplings and zero-field splittings. It is based on using localized Foster-Boys orbitals as a one-electron basis. We apply this scheme to three paradigmatic systems, the antiferromagnetic rings Cr8 and Cr7Ni, and the single-molecule magnet Fe4. In all cases we identify the essential magnetic interactions and find excellent agreement with experiments.

  1. Modeling the Molecular Gas in NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnard, R.; Greve, T. R.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Graciá Carpio, J.; Fuente, A.; Tacconi, L.; Neri, R.; Usero, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first observations of H13CN (1-0), H13CO+(1-0), and SiO (2-1)in NGC 6240, obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Combining a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code with Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) modeling, and with additional data from the literature, we simultaneously fit three gas phases and six molecular species to constrain the physical condition of the molecular gas, including mass-luminosity conversion factors. We find ˜ {10}10{M}⊙ of dense molecular gas in cold, dense clouds ({T}{{k}}˜ 10 K, {n}{{{H}}2}˜ {10}6 cm-3) with a volume filling factor \\lt 0.002, embedded in a shock heated molecular medium ({T}{{k}}˜ 2000 K, {n}{{{H}}2}˜ {10}3.6 cm-3), both surrounded by an extended diffuse phase ({T}{{k}}˜ 200 K, {n}{{{H}}2}˜ {10}2.5 cm-3). We derive a global {α }{{CO}}={1.5}1.17.1 with gas masses {{log}}10≤ft(M/[{M}⊙ ]\\right)={10.1}10.010.8, dominated by the dense gas. We also find {α }{{HCN}}={32}1389, which traces the cold, dense gas. The [12C]/[13C] ratio is only slightly elevated ({98}65230), contrary to the very high [CO]/[13CO] ratio (300-500) reported in the literature. However, we find very high [HCN]/[H13CN] and [HCO+]/[H13CO+] abundance ratios ({300}200500) which we attribute to isotope fractionation in the cold, dense clouds.

  2. Molecular-dynamics simulations of void collapse in shocked model-molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintmire, J. W.; Robertson, D. H.; White, C. T.

    1994-06-01

    We have carried out a series of molecular-dynamics simulations on a model three-dimensional molecular solid to study the dynamics of shock-induced collapse of void defects. Molecular-dynamics methods were used for a model system of identical particles arranged as diatomic molecules aligned with the center of mass of each molecule at fcc lattice sites, using a \\{111\\} layering for the two-dimensional boundary conditions. The diatoms were internally coupled via a harmonic potential; all other interactions were modeled with Morse potentials between all particles other than the immediate diatomic partner. Using this model, we have investigated the effect of a cylindrical void at right angles to the direction of layering (and impact). Depending on the strength of the incident shock wave, the void is found to collapse either smoothly and symmetrically (like a balloon gradually losing air), or asymmetrically and turbulently. In the latter case, we note the transient formation (for periods of several hundreds of femtoseconds) of ``hot spots'' at the void location both in terms of the local effective temperature and the vibrational energies of the diatoms.

  3. On the coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent molecular mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Kosaly, George

    1987-01-01

    The general coalescence-dispersion (C/D) closure provides phenomenological modeling of turbulent molecular mixing. The models of Curl and Dopazo and O'Brien appear as two limiting C/D models that bracket the range of results one can obtain by various models. This finding is used to investigate the sensitivtiy of the results to the choice of the model. Inert scalar mixing is found to be less model-sensitive than mixing accompanied by chemical reaction. Infinitely fast chemistry approximation is used to relate the C/D approach to Toor's earlier results. Pure mixing and infinite rate chemistry calculations are compared to study further a recent result of Hsieh and O'Brien who found that higher concentration moments are not sensitive to chemistry.

  4. Molecular model and ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation of coal vitrinite pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Zhu, Yan-ming; Wang, Geoff; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Vitrinite in coal, the mainly generating methane maceral, plays an important role in hydrocarbon generation of coal. This study aims at obtaining products formation mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis, and hence determining the chemical bond, molecular liquefaction activity, and reactions mechanism of methane and C2-4 during pyrolysis. The ReaxFF molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out at temperature of 1500 K in order to investigate the mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis. Initially, a minimum energy conformational structure model was constrained by a combination of elemental and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) literature data. The model analysis shows the chemical and physical parameters of vitrinite pyrolysis are broadly consistent with the experimental data. Based on the molecular model, ReaxFF MD simulations further provide information of unimolecule such as bond length, and chemical shift, and hence the total population and energy of main products. Molecules bond and pyrolysis fragments, based on active bond analyzed, revealed pyrolysis products of single vitrinite molecule with aliphatic C-C bond, especially ring and chain aliphatic as liquefaction activity. The molecular cell whose density is 0.9 g/cm(3) with lowest energy accords with the experimental density 1.33 g/cm(3). The content of main products after pyrolysis, classifying as CH4, H2O, and H2, was changed along with the increasing temperature. The gas molecule, fragments and generation pathways of CO2, H2, CH4, and C2H6 were also elucidated. These results show agreement with experimental observations, implying that MD simulation can provide reasonable explanation for the reaction processes involved in coal vitrinite pyrolysis. Thus the mechanism of coal hydrocarbon generation was revealed at the molecular level. PMID:26149754

  5. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H+), alkali metal cations (M+), calcium ions (Ca2+), and hydronium ions (H3O+) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C9H7NS2), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M+ + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M+ = H+, Li+, Na+, or K+. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from -0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  6. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-07

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H{sup +}), alkali metal cations (M{sup +}), calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}), and hydronium ions (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C{sub 9}H{sub 7}NS{sub 2}), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M{sup +} + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M{sup +} = H{sup +}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, or K{sup +}. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from −0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  7. A molecular investigation of adsorption onto mineral pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninness, Brian J.

    Pigment suspensions are important in several processes such as ceramics, paints, inks, and coatings. In the wet state, pigments are combined with a variety of chemical species such as polymers, surfactants, and polyelectrolytes which produce a complex colloidal system. The adsorption, desorption, and redistribution of these species at the pigment-aqueous solution interface can have an impact on the behavior in both the wet state or its final dried state. The goal of this work is to establish a molecular picture of the adsorption properties of these pigmented systems. A novel in situ infrared technique has been developed which allows the detection of adsorbed surface species on pigment particles in an aqueous environment. The technique involves the use of a polymeric binder to anchor the colloidal pigment particles to the surface of an internal reflection element (IRE). The binder only weakly perturbs about 25% of the reactive surface sites (hydroxyl groups) on silica. The reaction of succinic anhydride with an aminosilanized silica surface has been quantified using this technique. The adsorption dynamics of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) at the TiO2-aqueous solution interface has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and electrokinetic analysis. At low bulk concentrations, C16TAB is shown to adsorb as isolated islands with a "defective" bilayer structure. Anionic probe molecules are shown to effectively "tune" the adsorbed surfactant microstructure. The results indicate that the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer, and not the amount of adsorbed surfactant, dictates the subsequent adsorption behavior of the system. Atomic Layer Deposition is used to deposit a TiO2 layer onto the surfaces of silica and kaolin pigments. The process involves the cyclic reaction sequence of the vapors of TiCl4 and H2O. Three complete deposition cycles are needed before the surfaces

  8. A Molecular Communications Model for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Femminella, Mauro; Reali, Gianluca; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers the scenario of a targeted drug delivery system, which consists of deploying a number of biological nanomachines close to a biological target (e.g., a tumor), able to deliver drug molecules in the diseased area. Suitably located transmitters are designed to release a continuous flow of drug molecules in the surrounding environment, where they diffuse and reach the target. These molecules are received when they chemically react with compliant receptors deployed on the receiver surface. In these conditions, if the release rate is relatively high and the drug absorption time is significant, congestion may happen, essentially at the receiver site. This phenomenon limits the drug absorption rate and makes the signal transmission ineffective, with an undesired diffusion of drug molecules elsewhere in the body. The original contribution of this paper consists of a theoretical analysis of the causes of congestion in diffusion-based molecular communications. For this purpose, it is proposed a reception model consisting of a set of pure loss queuing systems. The proposed model exhibits an excellent agreement with the results of a simulation campaign made by using the Biological and Nano-Scale communication simulator version 2 (BiNS2), a well-known simulator for molecular communications, whose reliability has been assessed through in vitro experiments. The obtained results can be used in rate control algorithms to optimally determine the optimal release rate of molecules in drug delivery applications. PMID:26529770

  9. Molecular modeling of human alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Olubiyi, Olujide; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Strodel, Birgit; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase, which is expressed in the human intestine and hydrolyses sphingomyelin, is a component of the plasma and the lysosomal membranes. Hydrolase of sphingomyelin generates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate that have regulatory effects on vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The enzyme belongs to the Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase family and it differs in structural similarity with acidic and neutral sphingomyelinase. In the present study we modeled alkaline sphingomyelinase using homology modeling based on the structure of Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase from Xanthomonas axonopodis with which it shares 34% identity. Homology modeling was performed using Modeller9v7. We found that Cys78 and Cys394 form a disulphide bond. Further analysis shows that Ser76 may be important for the function of this enzyme, which is supported by the findings of Wu et al. (2005), that S76F abolishes the activity completely. We found that the residues bound to Zn(2+) are conserved and geometrically similar with the template. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out for the modeled protein to observe the effect of Zinc metal ions. It was observed that the metal ion has little effect with regard to the stability but induces increased fluctuations in the protein. These analyses showed that Zinc ions play an important role in stabilizing the secondary structure and in maintaining the compactness of the active site. PMID:21544170

  10. USE OF MOLECULAR MODELING TO DETERMINE THE INTERACTION AND COMPETITION OF GASES WITHIN COAL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey D. Evanseck; Jeffry D. Madura; Jonathan P. Mathews

    2004-05-14

    We have utilized computational molecular modeling to generate a state-of-the-art large scale structural representation of a bituminous coal of lower bituminous rank. This structure(s) has been used to investigate the molecular forces between the bituminous coal structure (or idealized pores) and the molecular species CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. We have created a new force field for these simulations and are currently carrying out molecular dynamics simulations. An initial step performed is to help define the issues with sequestration utilizing the molecular modeling approach. Once defined advanced molecular modeling techniques can be utilized in investigating sorbent and host behavior.

  11. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic analysis, thermodynamic parameters and molecular modeling studies of (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Zarife Sibel; Kantar, Günay Kaya; Şaşmaz, Selami; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the molecular characteristic and structural parameters that govern the chemical behavior of a new (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate compound and to compare predictions made from theory with experimental observations. The title compound, (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate, (I), (C16H14O6), has been synthesized. The compound has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopies and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Optimized molecular structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been investigated by B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method using density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results show that the predicted geometry can well reproduce structural parameters. In addition, global chemical reactivity descriptors, molecular electrostatic potential map (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), Mulliken population method and natural population analysis (NPA) and thermodynamic properties have also been studied. The energetic behavior of title compound has been examined in solvent media using polarizable continuum model (PCM).

  12. Molecular Investigations into the Mechanics of a Muscle Anchoring Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bodmer, Nicholas K.; Theisen, Kelly E.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2015-01-01

    The titin-telethonin complex, essential for anchoring filaments in the Z-disk of the sarcomere, is composed of immunoglobulin domains. Surprisingly, atomic force microscopy experiments showed that it resists forces much higher than the typical immunoglobulin domain and that the force distribution is unusually broad. To investigate the origin of this behavior, we developed a multiscale simulation approach, combining minimalist and atomistic models (SOP-AT). By following the mechanical response of the complex on experimental timescales, we found that the mechanical stability of titin-telethonin is modulated primarily by the strength of contacts between telethonin and the two titin chains, and secondarily by the timescales of conformational excursions inside telethonin and the pulled titin domains. Importantly, the conformational transitions executed by telethonin in simulations support its proposed role in mechanosensing. Our SOP-AT computational approach thus provides a powerful tool for the exploration of the link between conformational diversity and the broadness of the mechanical response, which can be applied to other multidomain complexes. PMID:25954889

  13. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  14. Some Reflections on the Use and Abuse of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Quentin R.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the historical applications of molecular models and the controversies which they produced. The author discusses types of molecular models from the van't Hoff and Kekule models to the more recently developed ones. He presents a new model which was constructed to overcome the disadvantages of (1) falling apart, (2) inaccurate angles, (3)…

  15. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  16. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  17. Bioinformatics and molecular modeling in glycobiology

    PubMed Central

    Schloissnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    The field of glycobiology is concerned with the study of the structure, properties, and biological functions of the family of biomolecules called carbohydrates. Bioinformatics for glycobiology is a particularly challenging field, because carbohydrates exhibit a high structural diversity and their chains are often branched. Significant improvements in experimental analytical methods over recent years have led to a tremendous increase in the amount of carbohydrate structure data generated. Consequently, the availability of databases and tools to store, retrieve and analyze these data in an efficient way is of fundamental importance to progress in glycobiology. In this review, the various graphical representations and sequence formats of carbohydrates are introduced, and an overview of newly developed databases, the latest developments in sequence alignment and data mining, and tools to support experimental glycan analysis are presented. Finally, the field of structural glycoinformatics and molecular modeling of carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and protein–carbohydrate interaction are reviewed. PMID:20364395

  18. Human Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibitors: A Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Pinto, B. Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is an important enzyme in fermentative glycolysis, generating most energy for cancer cells that rely on anaerobic respiration even under normal oxygen concentrations. This renders LDHA a promising molecular target for the treatment of various cancers. Several efforts have been made recently to develop LDHA inhibitors with nanomolar inhibition and cellular activity, some of which have been studied in complex with the enzyme by X-ray crystallography. In this work, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) study of the binding interactions of selected ligands with human LDHA. Conventional MD simulations demonstrate different binding dynamics of inhibitors with similar binding affinities, whereas steered MD simulations yield discrimination of selected LDHA inhibitors with qualitative correlation between the in silico unbinding difficulty and the experimental binding strength. Further, our results have been used to clarify ambiguities in the binding modes of two well-known LDHA inhibitors. PMID:24466056

  19. Ab initio computational investigation of physisorption of molecular hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Vilaplana, A

    2005-06-01

    Using relatively approximated methods, physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a mechanism to develop hydrogen storage systems has been only partially investigated in literature. Here, we use ab initio molecular-orbital theory, at benchmark quality level, to provide a more complete description about the mentioned mechanism. Physisorption inside and outside achiral-armchair and zigzag-SWCNTs, in the range of diameters from about 6 A-chiral vectors (5,5) and (8,0)-to more than 30 A-chiral vectors (30,30) and (40,0)-was examined. Perpendicular, longitudinal, and transversal configurations, with the hydrogen molecule centered on an aromatic ring, were taken into account. SWCNTs were modeled as curved coronenelike (C24H12) graphene sheets. Local modeling strategies, using more complete basis sets for the adsorbate and for the nearest atoms to the adsorbate than for the lion's share of the substrate, at the Moller-Plesset second-order correlation level, were selected for numerical treatment. Basis-set superposition errors were corrected by means of the counterpoise method of Bois and Bernardi. It was found that physisorption of molecular hydrogen on SWCNTs would depend mainly on the diameter being virtually independent of the chirality. Lowest physisorption energies, up to 20% less than that on planar graphene, would be reached outside nanotubes in the range of diameters of 6-10 A. For hydrogen storage purposes, highest physisorption energies, up to 40% greater than that on planar graphene, but not more, would be reached inside nanotubes in the relatively narrow range of diameters of 10-20 A. Finally, for diameters from 20 A onwards physisorption of molecular hydrogen on SWCNTs would be in the range of +/-10% of that on planar graphene. To our knowledge, this would be the most complete and realistic theoretical investigation of the target physisorption mechanism to date. PMID:15974779

  20. Investigation of the hybrid molecular probe for intracellular studies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Karen; Medley, Colin D.; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression in vivo is essential to the advancement of biological studies, medical diagnostics, and drug discovery. Adding to major efforts in developing molecular probes for mRNA monitoring, we have recently developed an alternative tool, the hybrid molecular probe (HMP). To optimize the probe, a series of experiments were performed to study the properties of HMP hybridization kinetics and stability. The results demonstrated the potential of the HMP as a prospective tool for use in both hybridization studies and in vitro and in vivo analyses. The HMP has shown no tendency to produce false positive signals, which is a major concern for living cell studies. Moreover, HMP has shown the ability to detect the mRNA expression of different genes inside single cells from both basal and stimulated genes. As an effective alternative to conventional molecular probes, the proven sensitivity, simplicity, and stability of HMPs show promise for their use in monitoring mRNA expression in living cells. PMID:18421445

  1. Polymorphism and disorder in caffeine: Dielectric investigation of molecular mobilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, M.; Decroix, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Using dielectric relaxation data we have characterized the molecular mobilities of caffeine both in phase I (stable and metastable) and in phase II. In phase I effects of sublimation and phase transformation kinetics were carefully considered. In plane rotational motions were followed on a wide temperature range. A noticeable antiferroelectric short range order developing at the approach of the glass-like transition is characterized. Condition for occurrence of a critical-like behaviour is discussed. At high temperature the emergence of an additional ultra slow relaxation process is highlighted. Possible molecular mechanisms are proposed for both processes. In phase II the existence of a less intense relaxation process is confirmed. Close similarity with the main process developing in phase I hints at a common origin of the dipolar motions. Careful consideration of recent structure determinations leads to suggest that this process is associated to similar molecular in plane rotations but developing at the surface of crystalline samples. Lower cooperativity at the surface is reflected in the smaller activation entropy of the relaxation.

  2. Investigations of physical model of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, Kirill G.; Kisselev, Gennady L.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    1996-12-01

    Physical model of a biological tissue for comparison with earlier created mathematical model of a biological tissue and researches of distribution photosensitizer in a depth was created and investigated. Mathematical model is based on granulated representation of optical medium. The model of a biological tissue was created on the basis of enough thin layers of a special material. For fluorescence excitation laser sources with a various wavelength were used. For investigation of scattering and fluorescent signal laser- fiber spectrum-analyzer LESA-5 was applied. Water solution of aluminum phthalocyanine and oil solution of zinc phthalocyanine were used for receiving of fluorescent signal. Created samples have certain absorbing and fluorescent properties. Scattering properties of samples are close to scattering properties of real human skin. By virtue of layered structure the model permits to simulate as a biological tissue without photosensitizer accumulation in it, as tissue with photosensitizer accumulation with certain distribution in a depth. Dependence of fields distribution on a surface was investigated at change of parameters of a model. Essential changes of distribution on a surface depending on the characteristics of model was revealed. The space and angular characteristics was investigated also. The investigations with physical model correspond to predicted results of theoretical model.

  3. Molecular dynamics investigation of the effect of copper nanoparticle on the solid contact between friction surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chengzhi; Bai, Minli; Lv, Jizu; Liu, Hao; Li, Xiaojie

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of copper (Cu) nanoparticles on the solid contact between friction surfaces by applying a molecular dynamics method to reveal the mechanisms responsible for the favorable friction properties of nanoparticles. Two models were built, which were named model A (without Cu) and model B (with Cu), respectively. The differences in the mechanical properties between these two models were compared. The simulation results demonstrated that the improvement in friction properties by Cu nanoparticles was more obvious at low velocity than at high velocity. At low velocity, a Cu nano-film was formed on the friction surface, which accommodated the velocity gradient and plastic deformation. Due to the good lubrication effect of the nano-film, the plastic deformation, defect structures and friction force of model B were improved compared with model A. Under high velocity conditions, a transfer layer appeared adjacent to the interface in both models. Because of this, the friction forces of the two models decreased with increased velocity. The fluid mechanics theory was used to explain why the friction force in model B was lower than that in model A at high velocity. The effect of the load on friction properties was also analyzed and the results showed that the mechanisms of anti-wear and friction reduction by Cu nanoparticles under a low load were the same as those under a high load.

  4. Molecular dynamics modeling and characterization of graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rezwanur

    The current work focuses on the characterization of graphene based nanocomposites using molecular dynamic simulation and multiscale modeling approaches. Both graphene-epoxy and graphene-cellulose nanocomposites were considered in this study. A hierarchical multiscale modeling approach has been proposed using peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, the mechanical properties of crosslinked graphene/epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposites were investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The influence of graphene's weight concentration, aspect ratio and dispersion on stress-strain response and elastic properties were studied. The results show significant improvement in Young's modulus and shear modulus for the G-Ep system in comparison to the neat epoxy resin. It appears that the RDF, molecular energy and aspect ratios are influenced by both graphene concentrations and aspect ratios. The graphene concentrations in the range of 1-3% are seen to improve Young's modulus and shorter graphenes are observed to be more effective than larger ones. In addition, the dispersed graphene system is more promising in enhancing in-plane elastic modulus than the agglomerated graphene system. The cohesive and pullout forces versus displacements data were plotted under normal and shear modes in order to characterize interfacial properties. The cohesive force is significantly improved by attaching the graphene with a chemical bond at the graphene-epoxy interface. In the second part of the work, cellulose was considered to study the mechanical properties of graphene-cellulose bionanocomposite. Similar to graphene-epoxy systems, the effect of graphene dispersion and agglomeration were studied in the stress-strain plots of graphene-cellulose system. A pcff forcefield was used to define intermolecular and intramolecular interactions. The effect of graphene's aspect ratio and weight concentration on the structural property of each unitcell was

  5. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  6. Molecular Docking Screens Using Comparative Models of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hao; Irwin, John J.; Webb, Benjamin M.; Klebe, Gerhard; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sali, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    Two orders of magnitude more protein sequences can be modeled by comparative modeling than have been determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Investigators have nevertheless been cautious about using comparative models for ligand discovery because of concerns about model errors. We suggest how to exploit comparative models for molecular screens, based on docking against a wide range of crystallographic structures and comparative models with known ligands. To account for the variation in the ligand-binding pocket as it binds different ligands, we calculate “consensus” enrichment by ranking each library compound by its best docking score against all available comparative models and/or modeling templates. For the majority of the targets, the consensus enrichment for multiple models was better or comparable to that of the holo and apo X-ray structures. Even for single models, the models are significantly more enriching than the template structure if the template is paralogous and shares more than 25% sequence identity with the target. PMID:19845314

  7. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  8. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Weinan E

    2012-03-29

    The main bottleneck in modeling transport in molecular devices is to develop the correct formulation of the problem and efficient algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure and dynamics using, for example, the time-dependent density functional theory. We have divided this task into several steps. The first step is to developing the right mathematical formulation and numerical algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure using density functional theory. The second step is to study time-dependent density functional theory, particularly the far-field boundary conditions. The third step is to study electronic transport in molecular devices. We are now at the end of the first step. Under DOE support, we have made subtantial progress in developing linear scaling and sub-linear scaling algorithms for electronic structure analysis. Although there has been a huge amount of effort in the past on developing linear scaling algorithms, most of the algorithms developed suffer from the lack of robustness and controllable accuracy. We have made the following progress: (1) We have analyzed thoroughly the localization properties of the wave-functions. We have developed a clear understanding of the physical as well as mathematical origin of the decay properties. One important conclusion is that even for metals, one can choose wavefunctions that decay faster than any algebraic power. (2) We have developed algorithms that make use of these localization properties. Our algorithms are based on non-orthogonal formulations of the density functional theory. Our key contribution is to add a localization step into the algorithm. The addition of this localization step makes the algorithm quite robust and much more accurate. Moreover, we can control the accuracy of these algorithms by changing the numerical parameters. (3) We have considerably improved the Fermi operator expansion (FOE) approach. Through pole expansion, we have developed the optimal scaling FOE algorithm.

  9. Modelling spin Hamiltonian parameters of molecular nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tulika; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-07-12

    Molecular nanomagnets encompass a wide range of coordination complexes possessing several potential applications. A formidable challenge in realizing these potential applications lies in controlling the magnetic properties of these clusters. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian (SH) parameters describe the magnetic properties of these clusters, and viable ways to control these SH parameters are highly desirable. Computational tools play a proactive role in this area, where SH parameters such as isotropic exchange interaction (J), anisotropic exchange interaction (Jx, Jy, Jz), double exchange interaction (B), zero-field splitting parameters (D, E) and g-tensors can be computed reliably using X-ray structures. In this feature article, we have attempted to provide a holistic view of the modelling of these SH parameters of molecular magnets. The determination of J includes various class of molecules, from di- and polynuclear Mn complexes to the {3d-Gd}, {Gd-Gd} and {Gd-2p} class of complexes. The estimation of anisotropic exchange coupling includes the exchange between an isotropic metal ion and an orbitally degenerate 3d/4d/5d metal ion. The double-exchange section contains some illustrative examples of mixed valance systems, and the section on the estimation of zfs parameters covers some mononuclear transition metal complexes possessing very large axial zfs parameters. The section on the computation of g-anisotropy exclusively covers studies on mononuclear Dy(III) and Er(III) single-ion magnets. The examples depicted in this article clearly illustrate that computational tools not only aid in interpreting and rationalizing the observed magnetic properties but possess the potential to predict new generation MNMs. PMID:27366794

  10. Ab initio investigation of benzene clusters: Molecular tailoring approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevi, A. Subha; Rahalkar, Anuja P.; Gadre, Shridhar R.; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2010-10-01

    An exhaustive study on the clusters of benzene (Bz)n, n =2-8, at MP2/6-31++G∗∗ level of theory is reported. The relative strengths of CH-π and π-π interactions in these aggregates are examined, which eventually govern the pattern of cluster formation. A linear scaling method, viz., molecular tailoring approach (MTA), is efficiently employed for studying the energetics and growth patterns of benzene clusters consisting up to eight benzene (Bz) units. Accuracy of MTA-based calculations is appraised by performing the corresponding standard calculations wherever possible, i.e., up to tetramers. For benzene tetramers, the error introduced in energy is of the order of 0.1 mH (˜0.06 kcal/mol). Although for higher clusters the error may build up, further corrections based on many-body interaction energy analysis substantially reduce the error in the MTA-estimate. This is demonstrated for a prototypical case of benzene hexamer. A systematic way of building up a cluster of n monomers (n-mer) which employs molecular electrostatic potential of an (n -1)-mer is illustrated. The trends obtained using MTA method are essentially identical to those of the standard methods in terms of structure and energy. In summary, this study clearly brings out the possibility of effecting such large calculations, which are not possible conventionally, by the use of MTA without a significant loss of accuracy.

  11. Final Report for Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2013-08-28

    In collaboration with researchers at Vanderbilt University, North Carolina State University, Princeton and Oakridge National Laboratory we developed multiscale modeling and simulation methods capable of modeling the synthesis, assembly, and operation of molecular electronics devices. Our role in this project included the development of coarse-grained molecular and mesoscale models and simulation methods capable of simulating the assembly of millions of organic conducting molecules and other molecular components into nanowires, crossbars, and other organized patterns.

  12. Investigation of restricted baby Skyrme models

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.

    2010-04-15

    A restriction of the baby Skyrme model consisting of the quartic and potential terms only is investigated in detail for a wide range of potentials. Further, its properties are compared with those of the corresponding full baby Skyrme models. We find that topological (charge) as well as geometrical (nucleus/shell shape) features of baby Skyrmions are captured already by the soliton solutions of the restricted model. Further, we find a coincidence between the compact or noncompact nature of solitons in the restricted model, on the one hand, and the existence or nonexistence of multi-Skyrmions in the full baby Skyrme model, on the other hand.

  13. Differences in the central nervous system distribution and pharmacology of the mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine-6 receptor compared with rat and human receptors investigated by radioligand binding, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Warren D; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Blaney, Frank E; Calver, Andrew R; Aloj, Lucia; Price, Gary W; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2003-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for a role of 5-hydroxytrypta-mine-6 (5-HT6) receptors in cognitive function. In the rat and human brain, 5-HT6 receptors are widely expressed and highly enriched in the basal ganglia. However, in the mouse brain, only very low levels of 5-HT6 receptor mRNA and receptor protein, measured by TaqMan reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and selective radioligand binding, could be detected, with no evidence of enrichment in the basal ganglia. The mouse receptor was cloned and transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to characterize its pharmacological profile. Despite significant sequence homology between human, rat, and mouse 5-HT6 receptors, the pharmacological profile of the mouse receptor was significantly different from the rat and human receptors. Four amino acid residues, conserved in rat and human and divergent in mouse receptors, were identified, and various mutant receptors were generated and their pharmacologies studied. Residues 188 (tyrosine in mouse, phenylalanine in rat and human) in transmembrane region 5 and 290 (serine in mouse, asparagine in rat and human) in transmembrane region 6 were identified as key amino acids responsible for the different pharmacological profiles. Molecular modeling of the receptor and docking of selective and nonselective compounds was undertaken to elucidate the ligand receptor interactions. The binding pocket was predicted to be different in the mouse compared with rat and human 5-HT6 receptors, and the models were in excellent agreement with the observed mutation results and have been used extensively in the design of further selective 5-HT6 antagonists. PMID:14645659

  14. A molecular dynamics investigation of surface reconstruction on magnetite (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Wasserman, E.; Felmy, A. R.

    1999-07-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations using analytical potential functions with polarizable oxygen ions have been used to identify a novel mode of reconstruction on the half-occupied tetrahedral layer termination of the magnetite (Fe 3O 4) (001) surface. In the proposed reconstruction, the twofold coordinated iron ion in the top monolayer rotates downward to occupy a vacant half-octahedral site in the plane of the second-layer iron ions. At the same time, half of the tetrahedral iron ions in the third iron layer are pushed upward to occupy an adjacent octahedral vacancy at the level of the second-layer iron ions. The other half of the third-layer iron ions remain roughly in their original positions. The proposed reconstruction is consistent with recent low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. It also provides a compelling interpretation for the arrangement of atoms suggested by high-resolution scanning-tunneling microscopy studies.

  15. Alternative Radioligands for Investigating the Molecular Pharmacology of Melatonin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Legros, Céline; Brasseur, Chantal; Delagrange, Philippe; Ducrot, Pierre; Nosjean, Olivier; Boutin, Jean A

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin exerts a variety of physiologic activities that are mainly relayed through the melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 Low expressions of these receptors in tissues have led to widespread experimental use of the agonist 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin as a substitute for melatonin. We describe three iodinated ligands: 2-(2-[(2-iodo-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-4,5-dimethoxy phenyl) (DIV880) and (2-iodo-N-2-[5-methoxy-2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridine-3-yl])acetamide (S70254), which are specific ligands at MT2 receptors, and N-[2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]iodoacetamide (SD6), an analog of 2-[(125)I]-iodomelatonin with slightly different characteristics. Here, we further characterized these new ligands with regards to their molecular pharmacology. We performed binding experiments, saturation assays, association/dissociation rate measurements, and autoradiography using sheep and rat tissues and recombinant cell lines. Our results showed that [(125)I]-S70254 is receptor, and can be used with both cells and tissue. This radioligand can be used in autoradiography. Similarly, DIV880, a partial agonist [43% of melatonin on guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assay], selective for MT2, can be used as a tool to selectively describe the pharmacology of this receptor in tissue samples. The molecular pharmacology of both human melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2, using a series of 24 ligands at these receptors and the new radioligands, did not lead to noticeable variations in the profiles. For the first time, we described radiolabeled tools that are specific for one of the melatonin receptors (MT2). These tools are amenable to binding experiments and to autoradiography using sheep or rat tissues. These specific tools will permit better understanding of the role and implication in physiopathologic processes of the melatonin receptors. PMID:26759496

  16. Molecular investigation into outbreak of HIV in a Scottish prison.

    PubMed Central

    Yirrell, D. L.; Robertson, P.; Goldberg, D. J.; McMenamin, J.; Cameron, S.; Leigh Brown, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To support already established epidemiological links between inmates of Glenochil prison positive for HIV infection by using molecular techniques and thus provide evidence of the extent of acquisition during a recent outbreak of the disease resulting from needle sharing. To identify possible sources of the outbreak, and to demonstrate the ability of the methodology to make further links beyond the original outbreak. DESIGN: Viral sequences obtained from the blood of HIV positive prisoners previously identified by standard epidemiological methods were compared with each other and with sequences from other Scottish patients. SETTING: Glenochil prison for men, central Scotland. SUBJECTS: Adult inmates and their possible contacts. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analysis of viral sequences in two different genomic regions showed that 13 of the 14 HIV positive prisoners had been infected from a common source. Previous research had shown that six of these had acquired their infection in Glenochil; molecular evidence suggests that more than double this number were infected while incarcerated. Virus from two long term HIV positive patients who were in the prison at the time of the outbreak but who were not identified in the original or subsequent surveys was sufficiently different to make it unlikely that they were the source. A viral sequence from heterosexual transmission from one inmate showed the ability of these techniques to follow the infection through different routes of infection. CONCLUSION: The number of prisoners infected with HIV during the 1993 outbreak within Glenochil prison was more than twice that previously shown. This shows the potential for the spread of bloodborne diseases within prisons by injecting drugs. PMID:9167560

  17. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: setup and analysis.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The last in a set of units by the same authors, this unit addresses some important remaining questions about molecular modeling of nucleic acids. The unit describes how to choose an appropriate molecular mechanics force field; how to set up and equilibrate the system for accurate simulation of a nucleic acid in an explicit solvent by molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulation; and how to analyze molecular dynamics trajectories. PMID:25606980

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the molecular structures of the amylin fibril models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weixin; Su, Haibin; Zhang, John Z H; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-12-01

    The structural characterization of amyloid fibers is one of the most investigated areas in structural biology. Recently, protofibril models for amylin, i.e., the 37-residue human islet amyloid polypeptide or hIAPP were suggested by two groups based on NMR (Biochemistry 2007, 46, 13505-13522) and X-ray (Protein Sci. 2008, 17, 1467-1474) techniques. However, there are significant differences in the two models which maybe originate from the polymorphic nature of amylin fibrils. To obtain further insights into the packing and stability features of the different models, we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations on them. Our analysis showed that even pairs of β-sheets composed of a limited number of β-strands are stable in the 100-ns simulations, which suggests that steric zipper interactions at a β-sheet-β-sheet interface strongly contribute to the stability of these amyloid aggregates. For both models, outer strands are more flexible, which might coincide with the dynamical requirement that outer strands act as growing sites facilitating conformational changes of new incoming chains. Moreover, simulation results showed that the X-ray models are structurally more compact than the NMR models and have more intimate patterns, which lead to more rigid amyloid models. As a result, the X-ray models are energetically more stable than the NMR models. Further modeling analyses verify the most likely amylin fibril model among both NMR and X-ray models. Upon further study of the force-induced dissociation of a single chain from the protofibrils, the binding energy and the mechanical stability of the fibril models are revealed. On these bases, it is possible to reconcile the crystallographic and the NMR data on the basic amylin fiber unit. PMID:23145779

  19. Libraries of Extremely Localized Molecular Orbitals. 1. Model Molecules Approximation and Molecular Orbitals Transferability.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Benjamin; Guillot, Benoît; Ruiz-Lopez, Manuel F; Genoni, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Despite more and more remarkable computational ab initio results are nowadays continuously obtained for large macromolecular systems, the development of new linear-scaling techniques is still an open and stimulating field of research in theoretical chemistry. In this family of methods, an important role is occupied by those strategies based on the observation that molecules are generally constituted by recurrent functional units with well-defined intrinsic features. In this context, we propose to exploit the notion of extremely localized molecular orbitals (ELMOs) that, due to their strict localization on small molecular fragments (e.g., atoms, bonds, or functional groups), are in principle transferable from one molecule to another. Accordingly, the construction of orbital libraries to almost instantaneously build up approximate wave functions and electron densities of very large systems becomes conceivable. In this work, the ELMOs transferability is further investigated in detail and, furthermore, suitable rules to construct model molecules for the computation of ELMOs to be stored in future databanks are also defined. The obtained results confirm the reliable transferability of the ELMOs and show that electron densities obtained from the transfer of extremely localized molecular orbitals are very close to the corresponding Hartree-Fock ones. These observations prompt us to construct new ELMOs databases that could represent an alternative/complement to the already popular pseudoatoms databanks both for determining electron densities and for refining crystallographic structures of very large molecules. PMID:26799516

  20. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of themore » substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  1. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  2. Novel Genetic and Molecular Tools for the Investigation and Control of Dengue Virus Transmission by Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander W E; Clem, Rollie J; Passarelli, A Lorena

    2014-03-01

    Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue virus (DENV) throughout the tropical world. This anthropophilic mosquito species needs to be persistently infected with DENV before it can transmit the virus through its saliva to a new vertebrate host. In the mosquito, DENV is confronted with several innate immune pathways, among which RNA interference is considered the most important. The Ae. aegypti genome project opened the doors for advanced molecular studies on pathogen-vector interactions including genetic manipulation of the vector for basic research and vector control purposes. Thus, Ae. aegypti has become the primary model for studying vector competence for arboviruses at the molecular level. Here, we present recent findings regarding DENV-mosquito interactions, emphasizing how innate immune responses modulate DENV infections in Ae. aegypti. We also describe the latest advancements in genetic manipulation of Ae. aegypti and discuss how this technology can be used to investigate vector transmission of DENV at the molecular level and to control transmission of the virus in the field. PMID:24693489

  3. Psychometric precision in phenotype definition is a useful step in molecular genetic investigation of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Xu, M K; Gaysina, D; Barnett, J H; Scoriels, L; van de Lagemaat, L N; Wong, A; Richards, M; Croudace, T J; Jones, P B

    2015-01-01

    Affective disorders are highly heritable, but few genetic risk variants have been consistently replicated in molecular genetic association studies. The common method of defining psychiatric phenotypes in molecular genetic research is either a summation of symptom scores or binary threshold score representing the risk of diagnosis. Psychometric latent variable methods can improve the precision of psychiatric phenotypes, especially when the data structure is not straightforward. Using data from the British 1946 birth cohort, we compared summary scores with psychometric modeling based on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) scale for affective symptoms in an association analysis of 27 candidate genes (249 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)). The psychometric method utilized a bi-factor model that partitioned the phenotype variances into five orthogonal latent variable factors, in accordance with the multidimensional data structure of the GHQ-28 involving somatic, social, anxiety and depression domains. Results showed that, compared with the summation approach, the affective symptoms defined by the bi-factor psychometric model had a higher number of associated SNPs of larger effect sizes. These results suggest that psychometrically defined mental health phenotypes can reflect the dimensions of complex phenotypes better than summation scores, and therefore offer a useful approach in genetic association investigations. PMID:26125156

  4. Model calculations for diffuse molecular clouds. [interstellar hydrogen cloud model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Langer, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A steady state isobaric cloud model is developed. The pressure, thermal, electrical, and chemical balance equations are solved simultaneously with a simple one dimensional approximation to the equation of radiative transfer appropriate to diffuse clouds. Cooling is mainly by CII fine structure transitions, and a variety of heating mechanisms are considered. Particular attention is given to the abundance variation of H2. Inhomogeneous density distributions are obtained because of the attenuation of the interstellar UV field and the conversion from atomic to molecular hyrodgen. The effects of changing the model parameters are described and the applicability of the model to OAO-3 observations is discussed. Good qualitative agreement with the fractional H2 abundance determinations has been obtained. The observed kinetic temperatures near 80 K can also be achieved by grain photoelectron heating. The problem of the electron density is solved taking special account of the various hydrogen ions as well as heavier ones.

  5. Applying Machine Trust Models to Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Marika; Venter, Hein; Eloff, Jan; Olivier, Martin

    Digital forensics involves the identification, preservation, analysis and presentation of electronic evidence for use in legal proceedings. In the presence of contradictory evidence, forensic investigators need a means to determine which evidence can be trusted. This is particularly true in a trust model environment where computerised agents may make trust-based decisions that influence interactions within the system. This paper focuses on the analysis of evidence in trust-based environments and the determination of the degree to which evidence can be trusted. The trust model proposed in this work may be implemented in a tool for conducting trust-based forensic investigations. The model takes into account the trust environment and parameters that influence interactions in a computer network being investigated. Also, it allows for crimes to be reenacted to create more substantial evidentiary proof.

  6. Molecular self-assembly for biological investigations and nanoscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheunkar, Sarawut

    Small, diffusible molecules when recognized by their binding partners, such as proteins and antibodies, trigger enzymatic activity, cell communication, and immune response. Progress in analytical methods enabling detection, characterization, and visualization of biological dynamics at the molecular level will advance our exploration of complex biological systems. In this dissertation, analytical platforms were fabricated to capture membrane-associated receptors, which are essential proteins in cell signaling pathways. The neurotransmitter serotonin and its biological precursor were immobilized on gold substrates coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and their reactive derivatives. The SAM-coated substrates present the biologically selective affinity of immobilized molecules to target native membrane-associated receptors. These substrates were also tested for biospecificity using antibodies. In addition, small-molecule-functionalized platforms, expressing neurotransmitter pharmacophores, were employed to examine kinetic interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors and their associated neurotransmitters. The binding interactions were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance equipped with liquid-flow injection. The interaction kinetics of G-protein-coupled serotonin 1A receptor and 5-hydroxytyptophan-functionalized surfaces were studied in a real-time, label-free environment. Key binding parameters, such as equilibrium dissociation constants, binding rate constants, and dissociative half-life, were extracted. These parameters are critical for understanding and comparing biomolecular interactions in modern biomedical research. By integrating self-assembly, surface functionalization, and nanofabrication, small-molecule microarrays were created for high-throughput screening. A hybrid soft-lithography, called microcontact insertion printing, was used to pattern small molecules at the dilute scales necessary for highly

  7. NACA Model Investigations of Seaplanes in Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, John B

    1955-01-01

    The models, apparatus, and instrumentation developed for investigations of the rough-water characteristics of seaplanes in the Langley tanks are described briefly. The results of several investigations to improve these characteristics are combined and summarized. The large effect of waves in take-off resistance is illustrated. The general relationship of the measured quantities of importance to wave length and height are also illustrated.

  8. Diagnostic utility of molecular investigation in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Benini, Stefania; Cocchi, Stefania; Gamberi, Gabriella; Magagnoli, Giovanna; Vogel, Daniela; Ghinelli, Cristina; Righi, Alberto; Picci, Piero; Alberghini, Marco; Gambarotti, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is characterized by the reciprocal chromosomal translocation t(9;22) and the resultant fused gene EWS RNA-binding protein 1 and nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 3 (EWSR1-NR4A3). A second cytogenetic rearrangement t(9;17) involves the genes NR4A3 and TAF 15 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor (TAF15). Less frequent fusion transcript variants of the NR4A3 gene, transcription factor 12 (TCF12)-NR4A3 and TRK-fused gene (TFG)-NR4A3, are associated with t(9;15) and t(9;3) respectively. The samples from 42 patients with extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma were examined for the presence of EWSR1-NR4A3, TAF15-NR4A3, TCF12-NR4A3, and TFG-NR4A3 fusion transcripts by using RT-PCR. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to analyze the status of EWSR1 and NR4A3 genes. The fusion transcripts were detected in 34 of 42 samples (81%); the presence of an EWSR1 or NR4A3 gene rearrangements were detected in 8 of 42 samples (19%) which had tested negative for all fusion transcripts detected by RT-PCR. Of the 34 samples evaluable for fusion transcripts, 23 yielded positive results for EWSR1-NR4A3, 10 for TAF15-NR4A3, and 1 for TCF12-NR4A3. The combination of RT-PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization on frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue is a sensitive and specific method for molecular detection of recurrent translocations and is an important ancillary method to establish the diagnosis of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. PMID:24508382

  9. Molecular and immunodiagnostic investigations on bovine neosporosis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Gottstein, B; Hentrich, B; Wyss, R; Thür, B; Busato, A; Stärk, K D; Müller, N

    1998-04-01

    Neospora caninum has gained considerable attention through its role in the aetiology of bovine abortion. Due to its close phylogenetic relationship with Toxoplasma gondii, respective unequivocal differential diagnosis deserves special consideration. In order to evaluate the diagnostic performance of molecular and immunodiagnostic techniques and to provide insights into the epidemiological significance of bovine neosporosis in Switzerland, we conducted a study on 83 cases of bovine abortion: of these, 24 (29%) foetal brains were positive by Neospora-PCR, six of these foetuses were simultaneously seropositive in Neospora-IFAT and/or somatic antigen-ELISA. Conversely, four (5%) foetal brains were considered positive by Toxoplasma-PCR, two of which were also seropositive in the Toxoplasma-P30-ELISA and/or direct agglutination test. The seroprevalence in 1689 cattle sera obtained from 113 diary farms was 11.5% (95% confidence interval: 9.2-13.8) by Neospora-somatic antigen-ELISA were and 10.7% (95% confidence interval: 8.3-12.6) by Toxoplasma-P30-ELISA. From the same samples, 1.1%, less than statistically expected, were positive in both ELISA. Within selected groups of cow-calf farms, the seroprevalence determined using the Neospora-somatic antigen-ELISA was 14% (95% confidence interval 5.0-23.0) for dams and 15% (95% confidence interval: 3.0-28.0) for offspring calves. Seroprevalences determined by Toxoplasma-P30-ELISA were 8% (95% confidence interval: 4.0-12.0) for dams and 3% (95% confidence interval: 0.3-6.0) for calves. None of the sera gave a positive reaction in both ELISA. Our data indicated that prenatal neosporosis appears as an important cause of bovine abortion in Switzerland. PMID:9602392

  10. Copromicroscopic and molecular investigations on intestinal parasites in kenneled dogs.

    PubMed

    Simonato, Giulia; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Cassini, Rudi; Traversa, Donato; Beraldo, Paola; Tessarin, Cinzia; Pietrobelli, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal parasites are common in dogs worldwide, and their importance has recently increased for a renewed awareness on the public health relevance that some of them have. In this study, the prevalence of helminths and protozoa was evaluated by microscopy in 318 canine faecal samples collected from eight rescue shelters in the North-eastern Italy; 285 of them were also submitted to the molecular characterization of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. isolates. An analysis was performed to evaluate the prevalence rates in relation to canine individual data, shelter provenance and anthelmintic treatments. Overall, 52.5% (167/318) of faecal samples were positive for at least one parasite. Trichuris vulpis showed the highest overall prevalence rate (29.2%), followed by G. duodenalis (15.1%), Toxocara canis (9.7%), ancylostomatids (8.2%) and Cystoisospora (5.7%). The prevalence of G. duodenalis, evaluated by real-time PCR, was 57.9% (165/285), and 79 isolates were characterized by nested PCR on the β-giardin gene. The assemblages found were mainly the host-specific genotypes C and D, while only one assemblage was identified as the human-specific genotype B1. Isolates of Cryptosporidium spp., recorded in 3/285 (1.1%) stool samples, were Cryptosporidium parvum based on the characterization of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene. Although the results describe a relatively limited risk of dog-originating zoonoses, there is the need to improve the quality of shelter practices towards better health managements for safe pet-adoption campaigns and a minimization of the environmental faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites. PMID:25687526

  11. Cellular and molecular investigations of the adhesion and mechanics of Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskhan, Asma Omar

    adhesion and mechanics are correlated. To test this hypothesis, nonadhesive and adhesive models of contact mechanics were used to estimate Young's moduli. Our results indicated that the nonadhesive model of contact mechanics estimated 18 % more rigid bacterial cells. Our results thus point to the importance of considering molecular details when investigating bacterial adhesion and mechanics.

  12. Physics Beyond the Standard Model from Molecular Hydrogen Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, Wim; Salumbides, Edcel John; Bagdonaite, Julija

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of molecular hydrogen can be measured in the laboratory to very high precision using advanced laser and molecular beam techniques, as well as frequency-comb based calibration [1,2]. The quantum level structure of this smallest neutral molecule can now be calculated to very high precision, based on a very accurate (10-15 precision) Born-Oppenheimer potential [3] and including subtle non-adiabatic, relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects [4]. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a test of QED, and in fact of the Standard Model of Physics, since the weak, strong and gravitational forces have a negligible effect. Even fifth forces beyond the Standard Model can be searched for [5]. Astronomical observation of molecular hydrogen spectra, using the largest telescopes on Earth and in space, may reveal possible variations of fundamental constants on a cosmological time scale [6]. A study has been performed at a 'look-back' time of 12.5 billion years [7]. In addition the possible dependence of a fundamental constant on a gravitational field has been investigated from observation of molecular hydrogen in the photospheres of white dwarfs [8]. The latter involves a test of the Einsteins equivalence principle. [1] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 143005 (2011). [2] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [3] K. Pachucki, Phys. Rev. A82, 032509 (2010). [4] J. Komasa et al., J. Chem. Theory Comp. 7, 3105 (2011). [5] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013). [6] F. van Weerdenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). [7] J. Badonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015). [8] J. Bagdonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 123002 (2014).

  13. Digital Learning Material for Model Building in Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Janssen, Fred; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2005-01-01

    Building models to describe processes forms an essential part of molecular biology research. However, in molecular biology curricula little attention is generally being paid to the development of this skill. In order to provide students the opportunity to improve their model building skills, we decided to develop a number of digital cases about…

  14. Modeling propagation of coherent optical pulses through molecular vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Eberly, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of modeling the mutual coupling of coherent molecular response and coherent optical pulses during propagation are described. The propagation is treated numerically, with particular emphasis on both continuum and discrete behavior associated with the quasicontinuum model.

  15. Model results for graphene electrodes in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Carlo; Italo Trioni, Mario; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Lukose Sebastian, Kizhakeyil; Sánchez Portal, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is a material with a high potential for nanoelectronic applications as transparent conductive electrode. In view of a graphene-based electronics, a possible way to bridge graphene electrodes is by molecular linkers either organic molecules or graphene-derived systems such as graphene nanoribbons (GNR). In the present work, we investigated the electronic and conductive properties of such junctions for two different devices. First we modeled a photochromic switch based on diarylethene molecules, which can be activated/deactivated by light. We found a large on/off current ratio, which can be improved by modifying the functional groups of the molecule. We then investigated the properties of graphene/GNR/graphene junctions, showing that their conductive properties can be tailored by changing the length and width of the GNR. The calculations have been carried out by using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory.

  16. Investigation of Molecular Structure of Porous Epoxy Thermosets via Swelling and Glass Transition Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Majid; Ghorpade, Kaustubh; Raman, Vijay; Palmese, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Many of the excellent properties of highly crosslinked polymers are due to their molecular structures. In this study, network structures of three epoxy systems, Epon828-PACM, Epon836-PACM, and Epon1001F-PACM were investigated via equilibrium swelling theory. Each systems separately cured in presence of an inert solvent, THF, ranging from 0 to 92% by volume fraction of solvent. Experimental results showed that the conventional swelling theory is valid for specimens polymerized in moderate dilute environments, i.e. up to around 60% solvent by vol. whereas in extremely dilute environments, i.e. above 60%, the computed Mc values are exponentially increasing. This drastic increase in Mc was investigated by Tg measurement of the polymer phase (on supercritically dried specimens). The measured Mc could not predict the corresponding Tg values according to Fox equation. Due to the highly porous nature of the resulting thermosets after supercritical drying, a modifying factor, based on the probability of finding elastic chains in a porous network, was incorporated in the conventional swelling model (Bray-Merrill equation). It was shown that the adjusted Mc values of each thermoset and the corresponding Tgs are acceptably match via the well-known Fox equation. The modified Mc values indicate that, polymer networks produced in presence of miscible inert phases have relatively uniform molecular weight between crosslinks, irrespective of the amount of that inert phase.

  17. Cloning Yeast Actin cDNA Leads to an Investigative Approach for the Molecular Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Michael W.; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the…

  18. Application of Molecular Modeling to Urokinase Inhibitors Development

    PubMed Central

    Sulimov, V. B.; Katkova, E. V.; Oferkin, I. V.; Sulimov, A. V.; Romanov, A. N.; Roschin, A. I.; Beloglazova, I. B.; Plekhanova, O. S.; Tkachuk, V. A.; Sadovnichiy, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the regulation of diverse physiologic and pathologic processes. Experimental research has shown that elevated uPA expression is associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and shortened survival in patients, whereas suppression of proteolytic activity of uPA leads to evident decrease of metastasis. Therefore, uPA has been considered as a promising molecular target for development of anticancer drugs. The present study sets out to develop the new selective uPA inhibitors using computer-aided structural based drug design methods. Investigation involves the following stages: computer modeling of the protein active site, development and validation of computer molecular modeling methods: docking (SOL program), postprocessing (DISCORE program), direct generalized docking (FLM program), and the application of the quantum chemical calculations (MOPAC package), search of uPA inhibitors among molecules from databases of ready-made compounds to find new uPA inhibitors, and design of new chemical structures and their optimization and experimental examination. On the basis of known uPA inhibitors and modeling results, 18 new compounds have been designed, calculated using programs mentioned above, synthesized, and tested in vitro. Eight of them display inhibitory activity and two of them display activity about 10 μM. PMID:24967388

  19. Modeling Complex Workflow in Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Gomah, Mohamed E.; Turley, James P.; Lu, Huimin; Jones, Dan

    2010-01-01

    One of the hurdles to achieving personalized medicine has been implementing the laboratory processes for performing and reporting complex molecular tests. The rapidly changing test rosters and complex analysis platforms in molecular diagnostics have meant that many clinical laboratories still use labor-intensive manual processing and testing without the level of automation seen in high-volume chemistry and hematology testing. We provide here a discussion of design requirements and the results of implementation of a suite of lab management tools that incorporate the many elements required for use of molecular diagnostics in personalized medicine, particularly in cancer. These applications provide the functionality required for sample accessioning and tracking, material generation, and testing that are particular to the evolving needs of individualized molecular diagnostics. On implementation, the applications described here resulted in improvements in the turn-around time for reporting of more complex molecular test sets, and significant changes in the workflow. Therefore, careful mapping of workflow can permit design of software applications that simplify even the complex demands of specialized molecular testing. By incorporating design features for order review, software tools can permit a more personalized approach to sample handling and test selection without compromising efficiency. PMID:20007844

  20. Excited states of ribosome translocation revealed through integrative molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Paul C.; Ahmed, Aqeel; Yu, Yanan; Hennelly, Scott P.; Tama, Florence; Spahn, Christian M. T.; Onuchic, José N.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic nature of biomolecules leads to significant challenges when characterizing the structural properties associated with function. While X-ray crystallography and imaging techniques (such as cryo-electron microscopy) can reveal the structural details of stable molecular complexes, strategies must be developed to characterize configurations that exhibit only marginal stability (such as intermediates) or configurations that do not correspond to minima on the energy landscape (such as transition-state ensembles). Here, we present a methodology (MDfit) that utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to generate configurations of excited states that are consistent with available biophysical and biochemical measurements. To demonstrate the approach, we present a sequence of configurations that are suggested to be associated with transfer RNA (tRNA) movement through the ribosome (translocation). The models were constructed by combining information from X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and biochemical data. These models provide a structural framework for translocation that may be further investigated experimentally and theoretically to determine the precise energetic character of each configuration and the transition dynamics between them. PMID:22080606

  1. Excited states of ribosome translocation revealed through integrative molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Ahmed, Aqeel; Yu, Yanan; Hennelly, Scott P; Tama, Florence; Spahn, Christian M T; Onuchic, José N; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2011-11-22

    The dynamic nature of biomolecules leads to significant challenges when characterizing the structural properties associated with function. While X-ray crystallography and imaging techniques (such as cryo-electron microscopy) can reveal the structural details of stable molecular complexes, strategies must be developed to characterize configurations that exhibit only marginal stability (such as intermediates) or configurations that do not correspond to minima on the energy landscape (such as transition-state ensembles). Here, we present a methodology (MDfit) that utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to generate configurations of excited states that are consistent with available biophysical and biochemical measurements. To demonstrate the approach, we present a sequence of configurations that are suggested to be associated with transfer RNA (tRNA) movement through the ribosome (translocation). The models were constructed by combining information from X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and biochemical data. These models provide a structural framework for translocation that may be further investigated experimentally and theoretically to determine the precise energetic character of each configuration and the transition dynamics between them. PMID:22080606

  2. Beyond Standard Molecular Dynamics: Investigating the Molecular Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Receptors with Enhanced Molecular Dynamics Methods

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological processes mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) take place on timescales that are not conveniently accessible to standard molecular dynamics (MD) approaches, notwithstanding the current availability of specialized parallel computer architectures, and efficient simulation algorithms. Enhanced MD-based methods have started to assume an important role in the study of the rugged energy landscape of GPCRs by providing mechanistic details of complex receptor processes such as ligand recognition, activation, and oligomerization. We provide here an overview of these methods in their most recent application to the field. PMID:24158803

  3. The investigation of solid-solid phase transformation at CuAlNi alloy using molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanc, Sefa; Ahmet Celik, Fatih; Ozgen, Soner

    2013-12-01

    In this study the thermodynamic and structural properties of a CuAlNi model alloy (3A) system were investigated using a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The interactions between atoms were modelled by the Sutton-Chen embedded atom method (SCEAM) based on many-body interactions. It was observed that at the end of thermal process the thermo-elastic phase transformation occurred in the model alloy system. In order to analyse the structures obtained from MD simulation, techniques such as thermodynamic parameters and radial distribution function (RDF) were used. The local atomic order in the model alloy was analysed using Honeycutt-Andersen (HA) method.

  4. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  5. Network-Based Models in Molecular Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Andreas

    Biological systems are characterized by a large number of diverse interactions. Interaction maps have been used to abstract those interactions at all biological scales ranging from food webs at the ecosystem level down to protein interaction networks at the molecular scale.

  6. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Modeling Coming Of Age

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John E.; Hardy, David J.; Ufimtsev, Ivan S.

    2010-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have traditionally been used in molecular modeling solely for visualization of molecular structures and animation of trajectories resulting from molecular dynamics simulations. Modern GPUs have evolved into fully programmable, massively parallel co-processors that can now be exploited to accelerate many scientific computations, typically providing about one order of magnitude speedup over CPU code and in special cases providing speedups of two orders of magnitude. This paper surveys the development of molecular modeling algorithms that leverage GPU computing, the advances already made and remaining issues to be resolved, and the continuing evolution of GPU technology that promises to become even more useful to molecular modeling. Hardware acceleration with commodity GPUs is expected to benefit the overall computational biology community by bringing teraflops performance to desktop workstations and in some cases potentially changing what were formerly batch-mode computational jobs into interactive tasks. PMID:20675161

  7. Investigation and Modeling of Cranberry Weather Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Paul Joseph

    Cranberry bog weather conditions and weather-related stress were investigated for development of crop yield prediction models and models to predict daily weather conditions in the bog. Field investigations and data gathering were completed at the Rutgers University Blueberry/Cranberry Research Center experimental bogs in Chatsworth, New Jersey. Study indicated that although cranberries generally exhibit little or no stomatal response to changing atmospheric conditions, the evaluation of weather-related stress could be accomplished via use of micrometeorological data. Definition of weather -related stress was made by establishing critical thresholds of the frequencies of occurrence, and magnitudes of, temperature and precipitation in the bog based on values determined by a review of the literature and a grower questionnaire. Stress frequencies were correlated with cranberry yield to develop predictive models based on the previous season's yield, prior season data, prior and current season data, current season data; and prior and current season data through July 31 of the current season. The predictive ability of the prior season models was best and could be used in crop planning and production. Further examination of bog micrometeorological data permitted the isolation of those weather conditions conducive to cranberry scald and allowed for the institution of a pilot scald advisory program during the 1991 season. The micrometeorological data from the bog was also used to develop models to predict daily canopy temperature and precipitation, based on upper air data, for grower use. Models were developed for each month for maximum and minimum temperatures and for precipitation and generally performed well. The modeling of bog weather conditions is an important first step toward daily prediction of cranberry weather-related stress.

  8. Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry at Humboldt State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paselk, Richard A.; Zoellner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a molecular modeling and computational chemistry (MM&CC) facility for undergraduate instruction and research at Humboldt State University. This facility complex allows the introduction of MM&CC throughout the chemistry curriculum with tailored experiments in general, organic, and inorganic courses as well as a new molecular modeling…

  9. Biophysical Investigations with MARCKS-ED: Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Its Curvature Sensing Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Armando J.; Espinoza, Arianna; Yin, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Curved membranes are a common and important attribute in cells. Protein and peptide curvature sensors are known to activate signaling pathways, initiate vesicle budding, trigger membrane fusion, and facilitate molecular transport across cell membranes. Nonetheless, there is little understanding how these proteins and peptides achieve preferential binding of different membrane curvatures. The current study is to elucidate specific factors required for curvature sensing. As a model system, we employed a recently identified peptide curvature sensor, MARCKS-ED, derived from the effector domain of the myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate protein, for these biophysical investigations. An atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suggested an important role played by the insertion of the Phe residues within MARCKS-ED. To test these observations from our computational simulations, we performed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies to determine the insertion depth of MARCKS-ED into differently curved membrane bilayers. Next, studies with varied lipid compositions revealed their influence on curvature sensing by MARCKS-ED, suggesting contributions from membrane fluidity, rigidity, as well as various lipid structures. Finally, we demonstrated that the curvature sensing by MARCKS-ED is configuration independent. In summary, our studies have shed further light to the understanding of how MARCKS-ED differentiates between membrane curvatures, which may be generally applicable to protein curvature sensing behavior. PMID:25195712

  10. The interaction between 4-aminoantipyrine and bovine serum albumin: multiple spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yue; Liu, Rutao; Li, Chao; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Pengjun

    2011-06-15

    4-Aminoantipyrine (AAP) is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, in biochemical experiments and in environmental monitoring. AAP as an aromatic pollutant in the environment poses a great threat to human health. To evaluate the toxicity of AAP at the protein level, the effects of AAP on bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. After the inner filter effect was eliminated, the experimental results showed that AAP effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA via static quenching. The number of binding sites, the binding constant, the thermodynamic parameters and binding subdomain were measured, and indicated that AAP could spontaneously bind with BSA on subdomain IIIA through electrostatic forces. Molecular docking results revealed that AAP interacted with the Glu 488 and Glu 502 residues of BSA. Furthermore, the conformation of BSA was demonstrably changed in the presence of AAP. The skeletal structure of BSA loosened, exposing internal hydrophobic aromatic ring amino acids and peptide strands to the solution. PMID:21497437

  11. Conformational Changes in Acetylcholine Binding Protein Investigated by Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad Hosseini Naveh, Zeynab; Malliavin, Therese E.; Maragliano, Luca; Cottone, Grazia; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies available on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, a complete account of the mechanistic aspects of their gating transition in response to ligand binding still remains elusive. As a first step toward dissecting the transition mechanism by accelerated sampling techniques, we study the ligand-induced conformational changes of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a widely accepted model for the full receptor extracellular domain. Using unbiased Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (TAMD) simulations we investigate the AChBP transition between the apo and the agonist-bound state. In long standard MD simulations, both conformations of the native protein are stable, while the agonist-bound structure evolves toward the apo one if the orientation of few key sidechains in the orthosteric cavity is modified. Conversely, TAMD simulations initiated from the native conformations are able to produce the spontaneous transition. With respect to the modified conformations, TAMD accelerates the transition by at least a factor 10. The analysis of some specific residue-residue interactions points out that the transition mechanism is based on the disruption/formation of few key hydrogen bonds. Finally, while early events of ligand dissociation are observed already in standard MD, TAMD accelerates the ligand detachment and, at the highest TAMD effective temperature, it is able to produce a complete dissociation path in one AChBP subunit. PMID:24551117

  12. Nanoindentation of virus capsids in a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Robbins, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    A molecular-level model is used to study the mechanical response of empty cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsids. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the Cα atoms. Nanoindentation by a large tip is modeled as compression between parallel plates. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation for CCMV are qualitatively consistent with continuum models and experiments, showing an elastic region followed by an irreversible drop in force. The mechanical response of CPMV has not been studied, but the molecular model predicts an order of magnitude higher stiffness and a much shorter elastic region than for CCMV. These large changes result from small structural changes that increase the number of bonds by only 30% and would be difficult to capture in continuum models. Direct comparison of local deformations in continuum and molecular models of CCMV shows that the molecular model undergoes a gradual symmetry breaking rotation and accommodates more strain near the walls than the continuum model. The irreversible drop in force at small separations is associated with rupturing nearly all of the bonds between capsid proteins in the molecular model, while a buckling transition is observed in continuum models.

  13. Nanoindentation of virus capsids in a molecular model.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Marek; Robbins, Mark O

    2010-01-01

    A molecular-level model is used to study the mechanical response of empty cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsids. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the C(alpha) atoms. Nanoindentation by a large tip is modeled as compression between parallel plates. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation for CCMV are qualitatively consistent with continuum models and experiments, showing an elastic region followed by an irreversible drop in force. The mechanical response of CPMV has not been studied, but the molecular model predicts an order of magnitude higher stiffness and a much shorter elastic region than for CCMV. These large changes result from small structural changes that increase the number of bonds by only 30% and would be difficult to capture in continuum models. Direct comparison of local deformations in continuum and molecular models of CCMV shows that the molecular model undergoes a gradual symmetry breaking rotation and accommodates more strain near the walls than the continuum model. The irreversible drop in force at small separations is associated with rupturing nearly all of the bonds between capsid proteins in the molecular model, while a buckling transition is observed in continuum models. PMID:20078182

  14. Molecular thermodynamic modeling of droplet-type microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Livia A; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2012-01-24

    Microemulsions are nanoheterogeneous, thermodynamically stable, spontaneously forming mixtures of oil and water by means of surfactants, with or without cosurfactants. The pledge to use small volumes of amphiphile molecules compared to large amounts of bulk phase modifiers in a variety of chemical and industrial processes, from enhanced oil recovery to biotechnology, fosters continuous investigation and an improved understanding of these systems. In this work, we develop a molecular thermodynamic theory for droplet-type microemulsions, both water-in-oil and oil-in-water, and provide the theoretical formulation for three-component microemulsions. Our thermodynamic model, which is based on a direct minimization of the Gibbs free energy of the total system, predicts the structural and compositional features of microemulsions. The predictions are compared with experimental data for droplet size in water-alkane-didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide systems. PMID:22149425

  15. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  16. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  17. Growth mechanism, electronic spectral investigation and molecular orbital studies of L-prolinium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Sun, Xin; Xu, Xijin; Sun, Ping

    2015-11-01

    By using atomic force microscopy, birth and spread has proved to be the primary growth mechanism for L-prolinium phosphate (LPP). The phenomenon of newly formed islands expanding to the edge of the preceding terrace was observed. The optimized molecular structure and the molecular properties were calculated by density functional theory method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to demonstrate the various inter and intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of LPP leading to high NLO activity. Molecular electrostatic potential, frontier molecular orbital analysis and thermodynamic properties were investigated to get a better insight of the molecular properties. Global and local reactivity descriptors were computed to predict the reactivity and reactive sites on the molecules. Non-linear optical (NLO) properties such as the total dipole moment (μ) and first order hyperopolarizability (β) were also calculated to predict NLO behavior. PMID:26067937

  18. Determination of structure parameters in molecular tunnelling ionisation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in a molecular tunnelling ionisation model (the so-called MO-ADK model) for 23 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behaviour are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. We show that the orientation-dependent ionisation rate reflects the shape of the ionising orbitals in general. The influences of the Stark shifts of the energy levels on the orientation-dependent ionisation rates of the polar molecules are studied. We also examine the angle-dependent ionisation rates (or probabilities) based on the MO-ADK model by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation calculations and with recent experimental measurements.

  19. Constructing Molecular Models with Low-Cost Toy Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pun-hon; Wong, Siu-ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2012-01-01

    In teaching the science of the nano world, ball-and-stick molecular models are frequently used as 3D representations of molecules. Unlike a chemical formula, a molecular model allows us to visualise the 3D shape of the molecule and the relative positions of its atoms, the bonds between atoms and why a pair of mirror isomers with the same atoms,…

  20. A dynamic styrofoam-ball model for simulating molecular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Se-yuen; Cheung, Derek

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a simple styrofoam-ball model that can be used for simulating molecular motion in all three states. As the foam balls are driven by a vibrator that is in turn driven by a signal generator, the frequency and the amplitude of vibration can be adjusted independently. Thus, the model is appropriate for simulating molecular motion in the liquid state, which is a combination of vibration and meandering motion.

  1. An Investigation of Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamic Simulation on Imidazopyridines as B-Raf Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huiding; Li, Yupeng; Yu, Fang; Xie, Xiaoguang; Qiu, Kaixiong; Fu, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    In the recent cancer treatment, B-Raf kinase is one of key targets. Nowadays, a group of imidazopyridines as B-Raf kinase inhibitors have been reported. In order to investigate the interaction between this group of inhibitors and B-Raf kinase, molecular docking, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and binding free energy (ΔGbind) calculation were performed in this work. Molecular docking was carried out to identify the key residues in the binding site, and MD simulations were performed to determine the detail binding mode. The results obtained from MD simulation reveal that the binding site is stable during the MD simulations, and some hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in MD simulations are different from H-bonds in the docking mode. Based on the obtained MD trajectories, ΔGbind was computed by using Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA), and the obtained energies are consistent with the activities. An energetic analysis reveals that both electrostatic and van der Waals contributions are important to ΔGbind, and the unfavorable polar solvation contribution results in the instability of the inhibitor with the lowest activity. These results are expected to understand the binding between B-Raf and imidazopyridines and provide some useful information to design potential B-Raf inhibitors. PMID:26580609

  2. An Investigation of Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamic Simulation on Imidazopyridines as B-Raf Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huiding; Li, Yupeng; Yu, Fang; Xie, Xiaoguang; Qiu, Kaixiong; Fu, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    In the recent cancer treatment, B-Raf kinase is one of key targets. Nowadays, a group of imidazopyridines as B-Raf kinase inhibitors have been reported. In order to investigate the interaction between this group of inhibitors and B-Raf kinase, molecular docking, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation and binding free energy (ΔGbind) calculation were performed in this work. Molecular docking was carried out to identify the key residues in the binding site, and MD simulations were performed to determine the detail binding mode. The results obtained from MD simulation reveal that the binding site is stable during the MD simulations, and some hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in MD simulations are different from H-bonds in the docking mode. Based on the obtained MD trajectories, ΔGbind was computed by using Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA), and the obtained energies are consistent with the activities. An energetic analysis reveals that both electrostatic and van der Waals contributions are important to ΔGbind, and the unfavorable polar solvation contribution results in the instability of the inhibitor with the lowest activity. These results are expected to understand the binding between B-Raf and imidazopyridines and provide some useful information to design potential B-Raf inhibitors. PMID:26580609

  3. A Cooperative Molecular Modeling Exercise--The Hypersurface as Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Christopher J.; Kormos, Bethany L.; Winget, Paul; Audette, Vanessa M.; Beebe, Jeremy M.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Burdick, W. Russ; Cochran, Eric W.; Eklov, Brian L.; Giese, Timothy J.; Jun, Yongseok; Kesavan, Lakshmi S. D.; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Minyaev, Mickail E.; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Salsbury, Jonathon S.; Stubbs, John M.; Surek, Jack T.; Thompson, Jason D.; Voelz, Vincent A.; Wick, Collin D.; Zhang, Ling

    2001-09-01

    A molecular modeling exercise and an associated exam that have both competitive and cooperative learning aspects are described. Collaborative efforts are facilitated by Web-based information management. The exercise/exam is appropriate for use in undergraduate or graduate quantum chemistry or molecular modeling courses that have access to modest computational resources. Students develop a molecular potential energy surface, identify multiple minima and transition-state structures, repeat the process at two or more levels of theory, and then analyze the data looking for interesting chemical or computational phenomena.

  4. Free volume model for molecular weights of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Eftekhari, A.

    1992-01-01

    A free volume model has been developed for determining molecular weights of linear polymers. It is based on the size of free volume cells in two geometries of poly(arylene ether ketone)s. Free volume cell sizes in test samples were measured using positron lifetime spectroscopy. The molecular weights computed from free volume cell sizes are in good agreement with the values measured by gel permeation chromatography, with a low angle laser light scattering photometer as the detector. The model has been further tested on two atactic polystyrene samples, where it predicted the ratio of their molecular weights with reasonable accuracy.

  5. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  6. A co-axially configured submillimeter spectrometer and investigations of hydrogen bound molecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElmurry, Blake Anthony

    The development of a co-axially configured submillimeter spectrometer is reported. The spectrometer has been constructed to observe molecular complexes that exhibit non-covalent interactions with energies much less than that of a traditional covalent bond. The structure of molecular complexes such as those formed between a rare gas and a hydrogen halide, Rg:HX where Rg is a rare gas (Rg=Ne, Ar and Kr) and HX (X=F, Cl, Br and I) can be determined directly and accurately. The center of mass interaction distance, RCM, as well as the angle of the hydrogen halide is determined, along with direct evaluation of the intermolecular vibrations as well as accurate isomerization energies between the hydrogen bound and van der Waals forms. The accuracy of the frequency determination of rovibrational transitions using the submillimeter spectrometer is also evaluated by direct comparison with the state-of-the-art pulsed nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, and this accuracy is estimated to be less than 1 kHz at 300 GHz. The tunneling or geared bending vibration of a dimer of hydrogen bromide or hydrogen iodide has been investigated. The selection rules, nuclear statistics and intensity alternation for transitions observed in these dimmers, which is a consequence of interchanging two identical nuclei in the low frequency geared bending vibration of the molecular complex, are reported. Furthermore, the rotation and quadrupole coupling constants are used to determine a vibrationally averaged structure of the complex. The energy of the low frequency bending vibration can then be compared with ab initio based potential energy surfaces. A study of the multiple isomeric forms of the molecular complex OC:HI is also presented. Multiple isotopic substitutions are used to determine the relevant ground state structures and data reported evidence for an anomalous isotope effect supporting a ground state isotopic isomerization effect. All spectroscopic data that has been reported

  7. Investigation of Interference Models for RFID Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linchao; Ferrero, Renato; Gandino, Filippo; Rebaudengo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The reader-to-reader collision in an RFID system is a challenging problem for communications technology. In order to model the interference between RFID readers, different interference models have been proposed, mainly based on two approaches: single and additive interference. The former only considers the interference from one reader within a certain range, whereas the latter takes into account the sum of all of the simultaneous interferences in order to emulate a more realistic behavior. Although the difference between the two approaches has been theoretically analyzed in previous research, their effects on the estimated performance of the reader-to-reader anti-collision protocols have not yet been investigated. In this paper, the influence of the interference model on the anti-collision protocols is studied by simulating a representative state-of-the-art protocol. The results presented in this paper highlight that the use of additive models, although more computationally intensive, is mandatory to improve the performance of anti-collision protocols. PMID:26861326

  8. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  9. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Alexander A; Mayerle, Julia; Christochowitz, Sandra; Weiss, Frank U; Sendler, Matthias; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  10. Molecular modeling of responsive polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J; Szleifer, Igal

    2010-06-29

    In this perspective, we have shown three different cases of responsive polymers at surfaces where the properties of the surface can be varied in response to cues from the bulk solution or in the presence of an external field. The most important conclusion in all three cases is that the chemical reaction equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are strongly coupled, and it is imperative to consider the global and local changes that occur to the surface structure and properties due to this coupling. In particular acid-base and redox equilibrium are very different in polymer-modified surfaces than in the corresponding bulk solutions. Moreover, the definition of ‘‘apparent redox potentials’’ and ‘‘apparent pKa’’results from the averaging over highly inhomogeneous values,and, therefore, they do not necessarily represent the state of the layer and the local values and their variation are very important for the design of functional surfaces. The very large variation on chemical equilibrium results from the optimization of all the interactions. The picture that emerges is that trying to deduce what the final state of the system is by looking at the individual optimization of each contribution leads to qualitative incorrect assumptions and only the minimization of the complete free energy leads to the proper behavior in these complex systems.In the cases where domain formation is possible in grafted weak polyacid layers charge regulation may lead to regimes of coexistence between aggregates with relatively low fraction of charged polymer segments surrounded by highly stretched chains that have a relatively high fraction of charged groups.Therefore, one can control the state of charge, local electrostatic potential and local pH in all three dimensions with im-portant gradients on length scales of nanometers. For hydrophobic redox polymers we show how the application of an electrode potential can lead to changes in the structure

  11. Molecular dynamics investigation of hexagonal boron nitride sputtering and sputtered particle characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Brandon D.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2016-08-01

    The sputtering of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by impacts of energetic xenon ions is investigated using a molecular dynamics (MD) model. The model is implemented within an open-source MD framework that utilizes graphics processing units to accelerate its calculations, allowing the sputtering process to be studied in much greater detail than has been feasible in the past. Integrated sputter yields are computed over a range of ion energies from 20 eV to 300 eV, and incidence angles from 0° to 75°. Sputtering of boron is shown to occur at energies as low as 40 eV at normal incidence, and sputtering of nitrogen at as low as 30 eV at normal incidence, suggesting a threshold energy between 20 eV and 40 eV. The sputter yields at 0° incidence are compared to existing experimental data and are shown to agree well over the range of ion energies investigated. The semi-empirical Bohdansky curve and an empirical exponential function are fit to the data at normal incidence, and the threshold energy for sputtering is calculated from the Bohdansky curve fit as 35 ± 2 eV. These results are shown to compare well with experimental observations that the threshold energy lies between 20 eV and 40 eV. It is demonstrated that h-BN sputters predominantly as atomic boron and diatomic nitrogen, and the velocity distribution function (VDF) of sputtered boron atoms is investigated. The calculated VDFs are found to reproduce the Sigmund-Thompson distribution predicted by Sigmund's linear cascade theory of sputtering. The average surface binding energy computed from Sigmund-Thompson curve fits is found to be 4.5 eV for ion energies of 100 eV and greater. This compares well to the value of 4.8 eV determined from independent experiments.

  12. Quantitative and logic modelling of gene and molecular networks

    PubMed Central

    Le Novère, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Behaviours of complex biomolecular systems are often irreducible to the elementary properties of their individual components. Explanatory and predictive mathematical models are therefore useful for fully understanding and precisely engineering cellular functions. The development and analyses of these models require their adaptation to the problems that need to be solved and the type and amount of available genetic or molecular data. Quantitative and logic modelling are among the main methods currently used to model molecular and gene networks. Each approach comes with inherent advantages and weaknesses. Recent developments show that hybrid approaches will become essential for further progress in synthetic biology and in the development of virtual organisms. PMID:25645874

  13. Molecular Modeling and Structural Analysis of Arylesterase of Ancylostoma Duodenale

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subhamay; Panda, Santamay; Kumari, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worm infection of humans is one of the most commonly prevalent helminth infection that has imposed great impact on society and public health in the developing world. The two species of hookworm, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus may be primarily responsible for causing parasitic infections in human beings. The highly prevalent areas for Ancylostoma duodenale infections are mainly India, Middle East, Australia, northern Africa and other parts of the world. The serum arylesterases/paraoxonases are family of enzymes that is involved in the hydrolysis of a number of organophosphorus insecticides to the nontoxic products. The participation of the enzymes in the breakdown of a variety of organophosphate substrates that is generally made up of paraoxon and numerous aromatic carboxylic acid esters (e.g., phenyl acetate), and hence combats the toxic effect of organophosphates. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale giving special importance to structure generation, validation of the generated models, distribution of secondary structural elements and positive charge distribution over the structure. By the implementation of comparative modeling approach we propose the first molecular model structure of arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale.

  14. A Novel Network Model for Molecular Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Ying-Wooi; Bose, Swetha; Denvir, James; Guo, Nancy Lan

    2015-01-01

    Network-based genome-wide association studies (NWAS) utilize the molecular interactions between genes and functional pathways in biomarker identification. This study presents a novel network-based methodology for identifying prognostic gene signatures to predict cancer recurrence. The methodology contains the following steps: 1) Constructing genome-wide coexpression networks for different disease states (metastatic vs. non-metastatic). Prediction logic is used to induct valid implication relations between each pair of gene expression profiles in terms of formal logic rules. 2) Identifying differential components associated with specific disease states from the genome-wide coexpression networks. 3) Dissecting network modules that are tightly connected with major disease signal hallmarks from the disease specific differential components. 4) Identifying most significant genes/probes associated with clinical outcome from the pathway connected network modules. Using this methodology, a 14-gene prognostic signature was identified for accurate patient stratification in early stage lung cancer. PMID:26005718

  15. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  16. Investigating the dopaminergic synapse in vivo. II. Molecular imaging studies in small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Larisch, Rolf; Beu, Markus; Antke, Christina; Kley, Konstantin; Forutan, Farhad; Wirrwar, Andreas; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic synaptic function may be assessed either at the presynaptic terminal or at the postsynaptic binding sites using molecular in vivo imaging methods. Apart from the density of binding sites, parameters such as alterations in dopamine synthesis, dopamine storage or dopamine release can be quantified either by application of specific radiotracers or by assessing the competition between the exogenous radioligand and endogenous dopamine. The performance of animal studies allows the induction of specific short-term or long-term synaptic conditions via pharmacological challenges or infliction of neurotoxic lesions. Therefore, small laboratory animals such as rats and mice have become invaluable models for a variety of human disorders. This article gives an overview of those small animal studies which have been performed so far on dopaminergic neurotransmission using in vivo imaging methods, with a special focus on the relevance of findings within the functional entity of the dopaminergic synapse. Taken together, in vivo investigations on animal models of Parkinson's disease showed decreases of dopamine storage, dopamine release and dopamine transporter binding, no alterations of dopamine synthesis and DA release, and either increases or no alterations of D2 receptor binding, while in vivo investigations of animal models of Huntington's disease. showed decreases of DAT and D1 receptor binding. For D2 receptor binding, both decreases and increases have been reported, dependent on the radioligand employed. Substances of abuse, such as alcohol, amphetamine and methylphenidate, led to an increase of dopamine release in striatal regions. This held for the acute application of substances to both healthy animals and animal models of drug abuse. Findings also showed that chronic application of cocaine induced long-term reductions of both D1 and D2 receptor binding, which disappeared after several weeks of withdrawal. Finally, preliminary results yielded the first

  17. Integrative molecular characterization of head and neck cancer cell model genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Ivy F.L.; Garnis, Cathie

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell lines are invaluable model systems for the investigation of cancer. Knowledge of the molecular alterations that exist within cell models is required to define the mechanisms governing cellular phenotypes. Methods Five tongue squamous cell carcinomas cell lines and one submaxillary salivary gland epidermoid carcinoma cell line were analyzed for copy number and mRNA expression by tiling-path DNA microarrays and Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligoarrays, respectively. Results Integrative analysis of genetic and expression alterations revealed the molecular landscape of each cell line. Molecular results for individual cell lines and across all samples have been summarized and made available for easy reference. Conclusion Our integrative genomic analyses have defined the DNA and RNA alterations for each individual line. These data will be useful to anyone modelling oral cancer behaviour, providing a molecular context that will be useful for deciphering cell phenotypes. PMID:20014447

  18. Apnoeic oxygenation in pregnancy: a modelling investigation.

    PubMed

    Pillai, A; Chikhani, M; Hardman, J G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that nasal oxygen delivery can prolong the time to desaturation during apnoea in the non-pregnant population. We investigated the benefits of apnoeic oxygenation during rapid sequence induction in the obstetric population using computational modelling. We used the Nottingham Physiology Simulator, and pre-oxygenated seven models of pregnancy for 3 min using Fi O2 1.0, before inducing apnoea. We found that increasing Fi O2 at the open glottis increased the time to desaturation, extending the time taken for Sa O2 to reach 40% from 4.5 min to 58 min in the average parturient model (not in labour). Our study suggests that a small increase in time to desaturation could be achieved at Fi O2 0.4-0.6, which could be delivered by standard nasal cannulae. The greatest increases in time to desaturation were seen at Fi O2 1.0, which could be delivered by high-flow nasal cannulae under ideal conditions. PMID:27440389

  19. Temperature Effect on Micelle Formation: Molecular Thermodynamic Model Revisited.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Lukanov, Boris; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Temperature affects the aggregation of macromolecules such as surfactants, polymers, and proteins in aqueous solutions. The effect on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is often nonmonotonic. In this work, the effect of temperature on the micellization of ionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solutions is studied using a molecular thermodynamic model. Previous studies based on this technique have predicted monotonic behavior for ionic surfactants. Our investigation shows that the choice of tail transfer energy to describe the hydrophobic effect between the surfactant tails and the polar solvent molecules plays a key role in the predicted CMC. We modify the tail transfer energy by taking into account the effect of the surfactant head on the neighboring methylene group. The modification improves the description of the CMC and the predicted micellar size for aqueous solutions of sodium n-alkyl sulfate, dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), and n-alkyl polyoxyethylene. The new tail transfer energy describes the nonmonotonic behavior of CMC versus temperature. In the DTAB-water system, we redefine the head size by including the methylene group, next to the nitrogen, in the head. The change in the head size along with our modified tail transfer energy improves the CMC and aggregation size prediction significantly. Tail transfer is a dominant energy contribution in micellar and microemulsion systems. It also promotes the adsorption of surfactants at fluid-fluid interfaces and affects the formation of adsorbed layer at fluid-solid interfaces. Our proposed modifications have direct applications in the thermodynamic modeling of the effect of temperature on molecular aggregation, both in the bulk and at the interfaces. PMID:26854650

  20. Molecular Modeling on the PC (by Matthew F. Schlecht)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Reviewed Frank

    2000-06-01

    "Computeraided molecular modeling doesn't exist for its own sake, but to contribute to scientific endeavor, and enable the scientist to work smarter." This is the last sentence of Schlecht's preface and it says something very important about contemporary scientific research in the academic and industrial venues. Owing to the accelerating improvement in computer technology (hardware and software) and its widespread availability, molecular modeling has become a reliable and important tool in chemical research. Consequently, experimentalists have incorporated molecular modeling techniques in their research, and partnerships with computational chemists have become common. This is a wellorganized and thorough monograph that devotes its attention to one type of molecular modeling, molecular mechanics, and one molecular modeling software package, PCMODEL. Schlecht targets two reader-user groups, the novice and the journeyman modeler, and articulates three goals. He wants to provide the novice with an introduction to molecular mechanics, and after that with some practical examples of the use of empirical force field calculations. His third goal is to provide the journeyman modeler with a reference work that will aid "further study and practice". These are potentially conflicting goals, but Schlecht is, in my opinion, successful because of the way his book is organized. A comprehensive treatment such as this one is not meant to be read from cover to cover, because it is both an exposition of basic principles and a user's manual. Therefore, the novice and the experienced modeler will undoubtedly use this book in different ways. For example, a novice modeler might be advised to read the Preface and Chapter 1, which together provide a broad introduction to the historical development and goals of molecular mechanics. From there the novice could go to Chapter 5 and read section 5.1 on the components of the molecular mechanics force field, which is presented in 22 pages with

  1. Generalized Mixture Models for Molecular Phylogenetic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jason; Sullivan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing availability of multigene sequence data during the past decade has enabled phylogeny estimation at phylogenomic scales. However, dealing with evolutionary process heterogeneity across the genome becomes increasingly challenging. Here we develop a mixture model approach that uses reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation to permit as many distinct models as the data require. Each additional model considered may be a fully parametrized general time-reversible model or any of its special cases. Furthermore, we expand the usual proposal mechanisms for topology changes to permit hard polytomies (i.e., zero-length internal branches). This new approach is implemented in the Crux software toolkit. We demonstrate the feasibility of using reversible jump MCMC on mixture models by reexamining a well-known 44-taxon mammalian data set comprising 22 concatenated genes. We are able to reproduce the results of the original analysis (with respect to bipartition support) when we make identical assumptions, but when we allow for polytomies and/or use data-driven mixture model estimation, we infer much lower bipartition support values for several key bipartitions. PMID:21873377

  2. Size-dependent elastic properties of crystalline polymers via a molecular mechanics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Guo, Wanlin; Zhang, Zhiliang; Rabczuk, Timon

    2011-12-01

    An analytical molecular mechanics model is developed to obtain the size-dependent elastic properties of crystalline polyethylene. An effective "stick-spiral" model is adopted in the polymer chain. Explicit equations are derived from the Lennard-Jones potential function for the van der Waals force between any two polymer chains. By using the derived formulas, the nine size-dependent elastic constants are investigated systematically. The present analytical results are in reasonable agreement with those from present united-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The established analytical model provides an efficient route for mechanical characterization of crystalline polymers and related materials toward nanoelectromechanical applications.

  3. A Molecular Model for Lithium's Bioactive Form.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Katharine T; Giulian, Gary G; Li, Gong; Kao, Joseph P Y; Marino, John P

    2016-07-26

    Lithium carbonate, a drug for the treatment of bipolar disorder, provides mood stability to mitigate recurrent episodes of mania and/or depression. Despite its long-term and widespread use, the mechanism by which lithium acts to elicit these psychological changes has remained unknown. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, in this study we characterized the association of lithium with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and identified a bimetallic (Mg·Li) ATP complex. Lithium's affinity to form this complex was found to be relatively high (Kd ∼1.6 mM) compared with other monovalent cations and relevant, considering lithium dosing and physiological concentrations of Mg(2+) and ATP. The ATP·Mg·Li complex reveals, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that lithium can associate with magnesium-bound phosphate sites and then act to modulate purine receptor activity in neuronal cells, suggesting a molecular mode for in vivo lithium action. PMID:27463132

  4. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  5. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  6. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Electrostatics and Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as means to sample conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. From this discussion, the major limitations with modeling, in general, were highlighted. These are the difficult issues in sampling conformational space effectively—the multiple minima or conformational sampling problems—and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:18428877

  7. The Electron-Pair Repulsion Model for Molecular Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Describes how the electron-pair repulsion model qualitatively explains the size and shape of molecular orbitals. Briefly discusses trigonal bipyramidal molecules, three-center bonds, and transition elements. Describes cluster compounds and finishes with a discussion of the exceptions to the model and effects of ligand-ligand repulsions. (RR)

  8. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song-Feng, Zhao; Fang, Huang; Guo-Li, Wang; Xiao-Xin, Zhou

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov–Popov–Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  9. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Huang, Fang; Wang, Guo-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  10. Application of molecular modeling to polymer grafted nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiga, Shashishekar P.

    Polymer chains undergo conformational transitions in response to a change in solvent quality of their environment, making them strong candidates to be used in smart nanometer-scale devices. In the present work molecular modeling is used to explore grafted polymer structures with various functionalities. The first part of this research focuses on two examples of selective transport through nanopores modified with polymer brush structures. The first is the investigation of solvent flow through nanopores grafted with linear chains. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to demonstrate how a stretch-collapse transition in grafted polymer chains can be used to control solvent flow rate through a nanopore in response to environmental stimuli. A continuum fluid dynamics method based on porous layer model for describing flow through the smart nanopore is described and its accuracy is analyzed by comparing with the results from MD simulations. The continuum method is then applied to determine regulation of water permeation in response to pH through a poly(L-glutamic acid) grafted nanoporous membrane. A second example is use of a rod-coil transition in "bottle brush" molecules that are grafted to the inside of a nanopore to size select macromolecules as they diffuse through the functionalized nanopores. These stimuli-responsive nanopores have a variety of potential applications including molecular sorting, smart drug delivery, and ultrafiltration, as well as controlled chemical release. Tethered polymers play an important role in biological structures as well. In the second part of the research, application of atomistic simulations to characterize the effect of phosphorylation on neurofilament structure is presented. Neurofilaments are intermediate filaments that regulate axonal diameter through their long, flexible side arms extending from the central core. Their functionality is imparted by polymer brush like structure that causes steric repulsion between the