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Sample records for molecular motors design

  1. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  2. Computational Design of a Family of Light-Driven Rotary Molecular Motors with Improved Quantum Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two new light-driven molecular rotary motors based on the N-alkylated indanylidene benzopyrrole frameworks are proposed and studied using quantum chemical calculations and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. These new motors perform pure axial rotation, and the photochemical steps of the rotary cycle are dominated by the fast bond-length-alternation motion that enables ultrafast access to the S1/S0 intersection. The new motors are predicted to display a quantum efficiency higher than that of the currently available synthetic all-hydrocarbon motors. Remarkably, the quantum efficiency is not governed by the topography (peaked versus sloped) of the minimum-energy conical intersection, whereas the S1 decay time depends on the topography as well as on the energy of the intersection relative to the S1 minimum. It is the axial chirality (helicity), rather than the point chirality, that controls the sense of rotation of the motor. PMID:26670164

  3. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  4. From Computational Photobiology to the Design of Vibrationally Coherent Molecular Devices and Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    In the past multi-configurational quantum chemical computations coupled with molecular mechanics force fields have been employed to investigate spectroscopic, thermal and photochemical properties of visual pigments. Here we show how the same computational technology can nowadays be used to design, characterize and ultimately, prepare light-driven molecular switches which mimics the photophysics of the visual pigment bovine rhodopsin (Rh). When embedded in the protein cavity the chromophore of Rh undergoes an ultrafast and coherent photoisomerization. In order to design a synthetic chromophore displaying similar properties in common solvents, we recently focused on indanylidene-pyrroline (NAIP) systems. We found that these systems display light-induced ground state coherent vibrational motion similar to the one detected in Rh. Semi-classical trajectories provide a mechanistic description of the structural changes associated to the observed coherent motion which is shown to be ultimately due to periodic changes in the π-conjugation.

  5. Molecular motors: Dynein's gearbox.

    PubMed

    Cross, R A

    2004-05-01

    A new optical trapping study shows that the stepsize of cytoplasmic dynein varies according to the applied force, suggesting that this motor can change gear. Complementary biochemical kinetic work on yeast dynein mutants hints at the allosteric mechanisms involved. PMID:15120091

  6. Molecular motors and their functions in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors that hydrolyze ATP and use the derived energy to generate force are involved in a variety of diverse cellular functions. Genetic, biochemical, and cellular localization data have implicated motors in a variety of functions such as vesicle and organelle transport, cytoskeleton dynamics, morphogenesis, polarized growth, cell movements, spindle formation, chromosome movement, nuclear fusion, and signal transduction. In non-plant systems three families of molecular motors (kinesins, dyneins, and myosins) have been well characterized. These motors use microtubules (in the case of kinesines and dyneins) or actin filaments (in the case of myosins) as tracks to transport cargo materials intracellularly. During the last decade tremendous progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of various motors in animals. These studies are yielding interesting insights into the functions of molecular motors and the origin of different families of motors. Furthermore, the paradigm that motors bind cargo and move along cytoskeletal tracks does not explain the functions of some of the motors. Relatively little is known about the molecular motors and their roles in plants. In recent years, by using biochemical, cell biological, molecular, and genetic approaches a few molecular motors have been isolated and characterized from plants. These studies indicate that some of the motors in plants have novel features and regulatory mechanisms. The role of molecular motors in plant cell division, cell expansion, cytoplasmic streaming, cell-to-cell communication, membrane trafficking, and morphogenesis is beginning to be understood. Analyses of the Arabidopsis genome sequence database (51% of genome) with conserved motor domains of kinesin and myosin families indicates the presence of a large number (about 40) of molecular motors and the functions of many of these motors remain to be discovered. It is likely that many more motors with novel regulatory

  7. Ratchet models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Nicole

    2003-09-01

    Transport processes in and of cells are of major importance for the survival of the organism. Muscles have to be able to contract, chromosomes have to be moved to opposing ends of the cell during mitosis, and organelles, which are compartments enclosed by membranes, have to be transported along molecular tracks. Molecular motors are proteins whose main task is moving other molecules.For that purpose they transform the chemical energy released in the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical work. The motors of the cytoskeleton belong to the three super families myosin, kinesin and dynein. Their tracks are filaments of the cytoskeleton, namely actin and the microtubuli. Here, we examine stochastic models which are used for describing the movements of these linear molecular motors. The scale of the movements comprises the regime of single steps of a motor protein up to the directed walk along a filament. A single step bridges around 10 nm, depending on the protein, and takes about 10 ms, if there is enough ATP available. Our models comprise M states or conformations the motor can attain during its movement along a one-dimensional track. At K locations along the track transitions between the states are possible. The velocity of the protein depending on the transition rates between the single states can be determined analytically. We calculate this velocity for systems of up to four states and locations and are able to derive a number of rules which are helpful in estimating the behaviour of an arbitrary given system. Beyond that we have a look at decoupled subsystems, i.e., one or a couple of states which have no connection to the remaining system. With a certain probability a motor undergoes a cycle of conformational changes, with another probability an independent other cycle. Active elements in real transport processes by molecular motors will not be limited to the transitions between the states. In distorted networks or starting from the discrete Master equation of the

  8. Hybrid deorbit motor design feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Joseph H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the feasibility of using a hybrid rocket motor to deorbit the large booster stage of the proposed NLS. A hybrid motor was of interest because it could utilize the residual low pressure Gox from the boosters main engine Lox tank. The resulting study determines that the concept would be feasible and should be given further consideration. Also, a preliminary design for a deorbit motor was proposed which would weigh much less than an equivalent hypergolic system. The hybrid deorbit concept and design has the potential of yielding a simpler cost effective system that could also be applicable to future launch systems with similar missions.

  9. Hybrid deorbit motor design feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Joseph H.

    1993-06-01

    This paper addresses the feasibility of using a hybrid rocket motor to deorbit the large booster stage of the proposed NLS. A hybrid motor was of interest because it could utilize the residual low pressure Gox from the boosters main engine Lox tank. The resulting study determines that the concept would be feasible and should be given further consideration. Also, a preliminary design for a deorbit motor was proposed which would weigh much less than an equivalent hypergolic system. The hybrid deorbit concept and design has the potential of yielding a simpler cost effective system that could also be applicable to future launch systems with similar missions.

  10. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  11. Molecular Motors: Power Strokes Outperform Brownian Ratchets.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Jason A; Dill, Ken A

    2016-07-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy (typically from ATP hydrolysis) to directed motion and mechanical work. Their actions are often described in terms of "Power Stroke" (PS) and "Brownian Ratchet" (BR) mechanisms. Here, we use a transition-state model and stochastic thermodynamics to describe a range of mechanisms ranging from PS to BR. We incorporate this model into Hill's diagrammatic method to develop a comprehensive model of motor processivity that is simple but sufficiently general to capture the full range of behavior observed for molecular motors. We demonstrate that, under all conditions, PS motors are faster, more powerful, and more efficient at constant velocity than BR motors. We show that these differences are very large for simple motors but become inconsequential for complex motors with additional kinetic barrier steps. PMID:27136319

  12. Experimental thermodynamics of single molecular motor

    PubMed Central

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor is a nano-sized chemical engine that converts chemical free energy to mechanical motions. Hence, the energetics is as important as kinetics in order to understand its operation principle. We review experiments to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of a rotational F1-ATPase motor (F1-motor) at a single-molecule level. We show that the F1-motor achieves 100% thermo dynamic efficiency at the stalled state. Furthermore, the motor reduces the internal irreversible heat inside the motor to almost zero and achieves a highly-efficient free energy transduction close to 100% during rotations far from quasistatic process. We discuss the mechanism of how the F1-motor achieves such a high efficiency, which highlights the remarkable property of the nano-sized engine F1-motor. PMID:27493546

  13. Molecular Switches and Motors on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathem, Bala Krishna; Claridge, Shelley A.; Zheng, Yue Bing; Weiss, Paul S.

    2013-04-01

    Molecular switches and motors respond structurally, electronically, optically, and/or mechanically to external stimuli, testing and potentially enabling extreme miniaturization of optoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. The assembly of motors and switches on surfaces makes it possible both to measure the properties of individual molecules as they relate to their environment and to couple function between assembled molecules. In this review, we discuss recent progress in assembling molecular switches and motors on surfaces, measuring static and dynamic structures, understanding switching mechanisms, and constructing functional molecular materials and devices. As demonstrative examples, we choose a representative molecule from three commonly studied classes including molecular switches, photochromic molecules, and mechanically interlocked molecules. We conclude by offering perspectives on the future of molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

  14. Molecular motors in conservative and dissipative regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Carrasco, R.; Sancho, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of a rotatory molecular motor under a conservative torque regime. We show that conservative and dissipative regimes present a different observable phenomenology. Our approach starts with a preliminary deterministic calculation of the motor cycle, which is complemented with stochastic simulations of a Langevin equation under a flashing ratchet potential. Finally, by using parameter values obtained from independent experimental information, our theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data of the F1-ATPase motor of the Bacillus PS3.

  15. Molecular Motors and Synaptic Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Proper synaptic function requires the seamless integration of the transport, assembly, and regulation of synaptic components and structures. Inasmuch as the synapse is often distant from the neuronal cell body, newly synthesized synaptic proteins, the precursors of synaptic vesicles, active zone compartments, channels and receptors, and mitochondria, must be transported along lengthy neuronal processes to participate in synaptogenesis. Neuronal transport is mediated by motor proteins that associate with their cargoes via adaptors (or receptors) and that travel along the cytoskeleton network within the neuronal processes. Thus, the identity of membranous protein cargoes and the specificity of motor-cargo interactions are critical for correctly targeting cargoes and properly assembling synapses in developing neurons and in remodeling synapses of mature neurons in response to neuronal activity. In this article, the authors review recent progress in characterizing microtubule- and actin-based motor proteins that are involved in delivering synaptic components and discuss potential mechanisms underlying the formation of motor- receptor-cargo complexes that contribute to synaptogenesis and activity-induced synaptic plasticity. PMID:19218232

  16. Space shuttle booster separation motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The separation characteristics of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRBs) are introduced along with the system level requirements for the booster separation motors (BSMs). These system requirements are then translated into specific motor requirements that control the design of the BSM. Each motor component is discussed including its geometry, material selection, and fabrication process. Also discussed is the propellant selection, grain design, and performance capabilities of the motor. The upcoming test program to develop and qualify the motor is outlined.

  17. Molecular motors: forty years of interdisciplinary research

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.

    2011-01-01

    A mere forty years ago it was unclear what motor molecules exist in cells that could be responsible for the variety of nonmuscle cell movements, including the “saltatory cytoplasmic particle movements” apparent by light microscopy. One wondered whether nonmuscle cells might have a myosin-like molecule, well known to investigators of muscle. Now we know that there are more than a hundred different molecular motors in eukaryotic cells that drive numerous biological processes and organize the cell's dynamic city plan. Furthermore, in vitro motility assays, taken to the single-molecule level using techniques of physics, have allowed detailed characterization of the processes by which motor molecules transduce the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical movement. Molecular motor research is now at an exciting threshold of being able to enter into the realm of clinical applications. PMID:22039067

  18. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings—like wheels on an axle—demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  19. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings--like wheels on an axle--demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system. PMID:26492009

  20. Universal optimal working cycles of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Wang, Zhisong

    2011-04-01

    Molecular motors capable of directional track-walking or rotation are abundant in living cells, and inspire the emerging field of artificial nanomotors. Some biomotors can convert 90% of free energy from chemical fuels into usable mechanical work, and the same motors still maintain a speed sufficient for cellular functions. This study exposed a new regime of universal optimization that amounts to a thermodynamically best working regime for molecular motors but is unfamiliar in macroscopic engines. For the ideal case of zero energy dissipation, the universally optimized working cycle for molecular motors is infinitely slow like Carnot cycle for heat engines. But when a small amount of energy dissipation reduces energy efficiency linearly from 100%, the speed is recovered exponentially due to Boltzmann's law. Experimental data on a major biomotor (kinesin) suggest that the regime of universal optimization has been largely approached in living cells, underpinning the extreme efficiency-speed trade-off in biomotors. The universal optimization and its practical approachability are unique thermodynamic advantages of molecular systems over macroscopic engines in facilitating motor functions. The findings have important implications for the natural evolution of biomotors as well as the development of artificial counterparts. PMID:21359395

  1. Optimizing rotary processes in synthetic molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, Edzard M.; van der Molen, Sense Jan; Martens, Marco; Feringa, Ben L.

    2009-01-01

    We deal with the issue of quantifying and optimizing the rotation dynamics of synthetic molecular motors. For this purpose, the continuous four-stage rotation behavior of a typical light-activated molecular motor was measured in detail. All reaction constants were determined empirically. Next, we developed a Markov model that describes the full motor dynamics mathematically. We derived expressions for a set of characteristic quantities, i.e., the average rate of quarter rotations or “velocity,” V, the spread in the average number of quarter rotations, D, and the dimensionless Péclet number, Pe = V/D. Furthermore, we determined the rate of full, four-step rotations (Ωeff), from which we derived another dimensionless quantity, the “rotational excess,” r.e. This quantity, defined as the relative difference between total forward (Ω+) and backward (Ω−) full rotations, is a good measure of the unidirectionality of the rotation process. Our model provides a pragmatic tool to optimize motor performance. We demonstrate this by calculating V, D, Pe, Ωeff, and r.e. for different rates of thermal versus photochemical energy input. We find that for a given light intensity, an optimal temperature range exists in which the motor exhibits excellent efficiency and unidirectional behavior, above or below which motor performance decreases. PMID:19805100

  2. Optimizing rotary processes in synthetic molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Edzard M; van der Molen, Sense Jan; Martens, Marco; Feringa, Ben L

    2009-10-01

    We deal with the issue of quantifying and optimizing the rotation dynamics of synthetic molecular motors. For this purpose, the continuous four-stage rotation behavior of a typical light-activated molecular motor was measured in detail. All reaction constants were determined empirically. Next, we developed a Markov model that describes the full motor dynamics mathematically. We derived expressions for a set of characteristic quantities, i.e., the average rate of quarter rotations or "velocity," V, the spread in the average number of quarter rotations, D, and the dimensionless Péclet number, Pe = V/D. Furthermore, we determined the rate of full, four-step rotations (Omega(eff)), from which we derived another dimensionless quantity, the "rotational excess," r.e. This quantity, defined as the relative difference between total forward (Omega(+)) and backward (Omega(-)) full rotations, is a good measure of the unidirectionality of the rotation process. Our model provides a pragmatic tool to optimize motor performance. We demonstrate this by calculating V, D, Pe, Omega(eff), and r.e. for different rates of thermal versus photochemical energy input. We find that for a given light intensity, an optimal temperature range exists in which the motor exhibits excellent efficiency and unidirectional behavior, above or below which motor performance decreases. PMID:19805100

  3. Controlled Rotation and Manipulation of Individual Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersell, Heath; Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2015-03-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines, but the parallels between the two are frequently only superficial because many molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, chemically and light driven rotary molecular motors have been developed. For electrically driven motors, tunneling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) have been used to drive rotation in a simple rotor into a single direction and to move a wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a single standalone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction [1] by selective inelastic electron tunneling through different sub-units of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotator for controlled rotations, and a Ru atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation originates from saw-tooth-like rotational potentials, which are determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site. This project is supported by the US DOE, BES grant: DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  4. Cooperative cargo transport by several molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    The transport of cargo particles that are pulled by several molecular motors in a cooperative manner is studied theoretically in this article. The transport properties depend primarily on the maximal number N of motor molecules that may pull simultaneously on the cargo particle. Because each motor must unbind from the filament after a finite number of steps but can also rebind to it again, the actual number of pulling motors is not constant but varies with time between zero and N. An increase in the maximal number N leads to a strong increase of the average walking distance (or run length) of the cargo particle. If the cargo is pulled by up to N kinesin motors, for example, the walking distance is estimated to be 5N–1/N micrometers, which implies that seven or eight kinesin molecules are sufficient to attain an average walking distance in the centimeter range. If the cargo particle is pulled against an external load force, this force is shared between the motors, which provides a nontrivial motor–motor coupling and a generic mechanism for nonlinear force–velocity relationships. With increasing load force, the probability distribution of the instantaneous velocity is shifted toward smaller values, becomes broader, and develops several peaks. Our theory is consistent with available experimental data and makes quantitative predictions that are accessible to systematic in vitro experiments. PMID:16287974

  5. Mechanoregulation of molecular motors in flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelha, Hermes

    2014-11-01

    Molecular motors are nano-biological machines responsible for exerting forces that drive movement in living organisms, from cargo transport to cell division and motility. Interestingly, despite the inherent complexity of many interacting motors, order and structure may arise naturally, as exemplified by the harmonic, self-organized undulatory motion of the flagellum. The real mechanisms behind this collective spontaneous oscillation are still unknown, and it is challenging task to measure experimentally the molecular motor dynamics within the flagellar structure in real time. In this talk we will explore different competing hypotheses that are capable of generating flagellar bending waves that ``resemble'' in-vitro observations, emphasizing the need for further mathematical analysis and model validation. It also highlight that this is a fertile and challenging area of inter-disciplinary research for applied mathematicians and demonstrates the importance of future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics of these motile cell appendages.

  6. Single-Molecule Studies of Rotary Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilizota, Teuta; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Berry, Richard M.

    Rotary molecular motors are protein complexes that transform chemical or electrochemical energy into mechanical work. There are five known rotary molecular motors in nature; the bacterial flagellar motor, and two motors in each of ATP-synthase and V-ATPase. Rotation of the flagellar motor drives a helical propeller that powers bacterial swimming. The function of the other rotary motors is to couple electrochemical ion gradients to synthesis or hydrolysis of ATP, and rotation is a detail of the coupling mechanism rather than the ultimate purpose of the motors. Much has been learned about the mechanism of the F1 part of ATP-synthase and the flagellar motor by measuring the rotation of single motors with a variety of techniques under a wide range of conditions. This chapter will review the structures of ATP-synthase and the flagellar motor, and what has been learned about their mechanisms using single molecule techniques.

  7. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  8. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Boon, N J; Hoyle, R B

    2012-08-28

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)] on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods. PMID:22938213

  9. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  10. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  11. Molecular motor driven transportation on microtubule loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Aurelien; Federici, Filippo; Kim, Kyongwan; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Hwang, Wonmuk; Teizer, Winfried

    2015-03-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin are naturally fitted for the transport of cargo. By offering an unlimited path, microtubule loops allow the study of kinesin motility on distances exceeding that offered by a single microtubule. Moreover, the periodicity of the path allows the comparisons of trajectories between laps. Here we study the motility of quantum dot labeled kinesin on microtubule loops. Motility of kinesins over multiple laps is observed and their trajectories are extracted from kymograph using a custom algorithm. Distribution of velocities at given locations do not vary randomly but show a correlation with the presence of obstacles. Possible mechanisms responsible for the long range transport are discussed in the context of available theories.

  12. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  13. Optical Traps to Study Properties of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Rice, Sarah E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Warrick, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  14. Optical traps to study properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Rice, Sarah E; Rock, Ronald S; Purcell, Thomas J; Warrick, Hans M

    2011-11-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  15. Design and characterization of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yener, Serra

    This thesis presents modeling and prototype fabrication and characterization of new types of piezoelectric ultrasonic micromotors. Our approach in designing these piezoelectric motors was: (i) to simplify the structure including the poling configuration of piezoelectric elements used in the stator and (ii) to reduce the number of components in order to decrease the cost and enhance the driving reliability. There are two different types of piezoelectric motors designed throughout this research. The first of these designs consists of a metal tube, on which two piezoelectric ceramic plates poled in thickness direction, were bonded. Two orthogonal bending modes of the hollow cylinder were superimposed resulting in a rotational vibration. Since the structure and poling configuration of the active piezoelectric elements used in the stator are simple, this motor structure is very suitable for miniaturization. Moreover, a single driving source can excite two bending modes at the same time, thus generate a wobble motion. Three types of prototypes are included in this design. The piezoelectric stator structure is the same for all. However, the dimensions of the motors are reduced by almost 50 percent. Starting with a 10 mm long stator, we reached to 4 mm in the last prototype. The initial diameter was 2.4 mm, which was reduced to 1.6 mm. In the final design, the rotor part of the motor was changed resulting in the reduction in the number of components. In terms of driving circuit, a single driving source was enough to run the motors and a conventional switching power supply type resonant L-C circuit was used. A simple motor structure with a simple driving circuit were combined successfully and fabricated inexpensively. The second design is a shear type piezoelectric linear motor. The behavior of a single rectangular piezoelectric shear plate was analyzed and after optimizing the dimensions and the mode characteristics, a prototype was fabricated. The prototype consists of

  16. Improve Motor Operation at Off-Design Voltages - Motor Tip Sheet #9

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors are designed to operate within +/- 10% of their nameplate rated voltages. When motors operate at conditions of over- or under-voltage, motor efficiency and other performance parameters are degraded.

  17. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  18. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  19. Helicases as molecular motors: An insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tuteja, Renu

    2006-12-01

    Helicases are one of the smallest motors of biological system, which harness the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the opening of energetically stable duplex nucleic acids and thereby are involved in almost all aspect of nucleic acid metabolism including replication, repair, recombination, transcription, translation, and ribosome biogenesis. Basically, they break the hydrogen bonding between the duplex helix and translocate unidirectionally along the bound strand. Mostly all the helicases contain some conserved signature motifs, which act as an engine to power the unwinding. After the discovery of the first prokaryotic DNA helicase from Escherichia coli bacteria in 1976 and the first eukaryotic one from the lily plant in 1978, many more (>100) have been isolated. All the helicases share some common properties, including nucleic acid binding, NTP hydrolysis and unwinding of the duplex. Many helicases have been crystallized and their structures have revealed an underlying common structural fold for their function. The defects in helicases gene have also been reported to be responsible for variety of human genetic disorders, which can lead to cancer, premature aging or mental retardation. Recently, a new role of a helicase in abiotic stress signaling in plant has been discovered. Overall, helicases act as essential molecular tools for cellular machinery and help in maintaining the integrity of genome. Here an overview of helicases has been covered which includes history, biochemical assay, properties, classification, role in human disease and mechanism of unwinding and translocation.

  20. Dwell Time Symmetry in Random Walks and Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Wallin, Mats

    2007-01-01

    The statistics of steps and dwell times in reversible molecular motors differ from those of cycle completion in enzyme kinetics. The reason is that a step is only one of several transitions in the mechanochemical cycle. As a result, theoretical results for cycle completion in enzyme kinetics do not apply to stepping data. To allow correct parameter estimation, and to guide data analysis and experiment design, a theoretical treatment is needed that takes this observation into account. In this article, we model the distribution of dwell times and number of forward and backward steps using first passage processes, based on the assumption that forward and backward steps correspond to different directions of the same transition. We extend recent results for systems with a single cycle and consider the full dwell time distributions as well as models with multiple pathways, detectable substeps, and detachments. Our main results are a symmetry relation for the dwell time distributions in reversible motors, and a relation between certain relative step frequencies and the free energy per cycle. We demonstrate our results by analyzing recent stepping data for a bacterial flagellar motor, and discuss the implications for the efficiency and reversibility of the force-generating subunits. PMID:17369422

  1. Molecular motor traffic: From biological nanomachines to macroscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Chai, Yan; Klumpp, Stefan; Liepelt, Steffen; Müller, Melanie J. I.

    2006-12-01

    All cells of animals and plants contain complex transport systems based on molecular motors which walk along cytoskeletal filaments. These motors are rather small and have a size of 20-100 nm but are able to pull vesicles, organelles and other types of cargo over large distances, from micrometers up to meters. There are several families of motors: kinesins, dyneins, and myosins. Most of these motors have two heads which are used as legs and perform discrete steps along the filaments. Several aspects of the motor behavior will be discussed: motor cycles of two-headed motors; walks of single motors or cargo particles which consist of directed movements interrupted by random, diffusive motion; cargo transport through tube-like compartments; active diffusion of cargo particles in slab-like compartments; cooperative transport of cargo by several motors which may be uni- or bi-directional; and systems with many interacting motors that exhibit traffic jams, self-organized density and flux patterns, and traffic phase transitions far from equilibrium. It is necessary to understand these traffic phenomena in a quantitative manner in order to construct and optimize biomimetic transport systems based on motors and filaments with many possible applications in bioengineering, pharmacology, and medicine.

  2. Molecular motors: a traffic cop within?

    PubMed

    Welte, M A; Gross, S P

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular transport along microtubules is often bidirectional, employing multiple plus- and minus-end directed motors. How cells regulate such transport in time and space is a fundamental but unsolved question in cell biology. A recent paper presents a new modeling approach to predict how much of transport can be understood just from our knowledge of the motors involved. The model can generate strikingly complex patterns of motion, mimicking key aspects of cargo transport in vivo. Previous studies had inferred that plus-end motors on bidirectional cargoes are usually turned off when the minus-end motors are engaged (and vice versa). In the model, such motor coordination can arise from motors competing in a tug-of-war, without help from additional regulators. This new theoretical framework should stimulate much research that will help unravel whether regulation of intracellular transport is dominated by higher-order control mechanisms or is achieved simply by tuning basic properties of the motors themselves. PMID:19404428

  3. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends. PMID:22431622

  4. Crowding of Molecular Motors Determines Microtubule Depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Louis; Melbinger, Anna; Frey, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    The assembly and disassembly dynamics of microtubules (MTs) is tightly controlled by MT-associated proteins. Here, we investigate how plus-end-directed depolymerases of the kinesin-8 family regulate MT depolymerization dynamics. Using an individual-based model, we reproduce experimental findings. Moreover, crowding is identified as the key regulatory mechanism of depolymerization dynamics. Our analysis reveals two qualitatively distinct regimes. For motor densities above a particular threshold, a macroscopic traffic jam emerges at the plus-end and the MT dynamics become independent of the motor concentration. Below this threshold, microscopic traffic jams at the tip arise that cancel out the effect of the depolymerization kinetics such that the depolymerization speed is solely determined by the motor density. Because this density changes over the MT length, length-dependent regulation is possible. Remarkably, motor cooperativity affects only the end-residence time of depolymerases and not the depolymerization speed. PMID:22067158

  5. A Design Procedure for the Applications-Specific Electric Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akihiro; Isobe, Shin-Ichi; Morimoto, Masayuki; Kosaka, Takashi; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    A design procedure for the Applications-Specific Electric Motors (ASEM) is proposed. The proposed design procedure is relevant to the design of the permanent magnet synchronous motor which fulfills required typical operating points under the restrictions of dimensions and the power source conditions. The design procedure is composed of two stages, a rough design and an accurate design. A rough design finds a permissible area of the combination of motor constants which satisfy the given typical operating points under the given power source conditions. According to the obtained permissible area of motor constants, an accurate design achieves the detailed motor design determining the dimensions, the winding specifications and constituent materials. Among several designed motors, one with highest fitness from standpoints of high efficiency, manufacturability and cost is finally selected. The experimental studies show that the designed motor using the proposed procedure satisfies the requirements in the target application.

  6. Biophysical Studies of Membranes and Molecular Motors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Karel

    This thesis consists of several preprints and reprints (sections) organized in thematically disparate chapters. Each section is self-contained and therefore a bit of duplication has crept in, especially in Chapters 1 & 2. In keeping with contemporary scientific style, the prose is dense, dry, and humourless. In the first chapter I discuss optical trapping. A review of optical trapping is presented, particularly focusing on optical tweezers. An unexpected twist on conventional trapping wisdom is that, in the Rayleigh size regime, gold particles can be trapped much more strongly than latex particles. The ratio of trapping forces is equal to the ratio of particle polarizabilities. This demonstrates that gradient forces dominate all other radiation and thermal forces. In Chapter 2, the central part of the thesis, I present measurements of steps, forces, and other mechanochemical properties of the molecular motor kinesin using optical tweezers and laser interferometry. The kinesin step size measured ~8 nm, and the stall force was 5-6 pN. Comparisons of force-velocity curves at saturating and limiting ATP concentrations demonstrated that kinesin is a loosely coupled machine. The variance in displacement was smaller than expected for a stepper with exponentially distributed step times. This unexpected finding has interesting implications for kinesin kinetics and mechanochemistry. Chapter 3 deals with some attempts to derive structural information from measurements of time-dependent diffusion in a biological model system. Pulsed field gradient NMR can be used to measure the momentum space diffusion propagator of water molecules, M(k,t). We measured M(k,t) in well -characterized samples of packed red blood cells. At short times, the time-dependent diffusion coefficient decreased from its bulk value with a sqrt{t} behavior, and the coefficient of this term was used to obtain the cell surface-to-volume ratio, S/V. Using a new effective medium theory, the membrane permeability

  7. Design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoaki; Toyama, Shigeki; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    We present a mechanical design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor (SUSM) that is an actuator with multiple rotational degrees of freedom (multi-DOF). The motor is constructed of 3 annular stators and a spherical rotor and is much smaller and simpler than conventional multi-DOF mechanisms such as gimbals using servomotors. We designed a novel SUSM using experimental data from a single annular stator and a finite element method. The SUSM using a spherical rotor of diameter 20 mm without any reduction gear has demonstrated advantages of high responsiveness, good accuracy, and high torque at low speed. The dynamic implementation of SUSM was consistent with the driving model of SUSM based on a friction drive. PMID:19942537

  8. Fatigue failure and molecular machine design.

    PubMed

    Hess, Henry; Dumont, Emmanuel L P

    2011-06-20

    Sophisticated molecular machines have evolved in nature, and the first synthetic molecular machines have been demonstrated. With our increasing understanding of individual operating cycles, the question of how operation can be sustained over many cycles comes to the forefront. In the design of macroscale machines, performance and lifetime are opposing goals. Similarly, the natural evolution of biological nanomachines, such as myosin motor proteins, is likely constrained by lifetime requirements. Rather than bond rupture at high forces, bond fatigue under repeated small stresses may limit the mechanical performance of molecular machines. Here, the effect of cyclic stresses using single and double bonds as simple examples are discussed. Additionally, it is demonstrated that an increase in lifetime requires a reduction in mechanical load and that molecular engineering design features, such as polyvalent bonds capable of rebinding, can extend the bond lifetime dramatically. A universal scaling law for the force output of motors is extrapolated to the molecular scale to estimate the design space for molecular machines. PMID:21574250

  9. Designing the molecular future.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 25 years ago the first computer applications were conceived for the purpose of automated 'de novo' drug design, prominent pioneering tools being ALADDIN, CAVEAT, GENOA, and DYLOMMS. Many of these early concepts were enabled by innovative techniques for ligand-receptor interaction modeling like GRID, MCSS, DOCK, and CoMFA, which still provide the theoretical framework for several more recently developed molecular design algorithms. After a first wave of software tools and groundbreaking applications in the 1990s--expressly GROW, GrowMol, LEGEND, and LUDI representing some of the key players--we are currently witnessing a renewed strong interest in this field. Innovative ideas for both receptor and ligand-based drug design have recently been published. We here provide a personal perspective on the evolution of de novo design, highlighting some of the historic achievements as well as possible future developments of this exciting field of research, which combines multiple scientific disciplines and is, like few other areas in chemistry, subject to continuous enthusiastic discussion and compassionate dispute. PMID:22127731

  10. Differential expression of molecular motors in the motor cortex of sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    Pantelidou, Maria; Zographos, Spyros E; Lederer, Carsten W; Kyriakides, Theodore; Pfaffl, Michael W; Santama, Niovi

    2007-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective neurodegeneration of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are inadequately understood. Recent breakthroughs have implicated impaired axonal transport, mediated by molecular motors, as a key element for disease onset and progression. The current work identifies the expression of 15 kinesin-like motors in healthy human motor cortex, including three novel isoforms. Our comprehensive quantitative mRNA analysis in control and sporadic ALS (SALS) motor cortex specimens detects SALS-specific down-regulation of KIF1Bbeta and novel KIF3Abeta, two isoforms we show to be enriched in the brain, and also of SOD1, a key enzyme linked to familial ALS. This is accompanied by a marked reduction of KIF3Abeta protein levels. In the motor cortex KIF3Abeta localizes in cholinergic neurons, including upper motor neurons. No mutations causing splicing defects or altering protein-coding sequences were identified in the genes of the three proteins. The present study implicates two motor proteins as possible candidates in SALS pathology. PMID:17418584

  11. Molecular motors and the 2nd law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong

    2014-03-01

    Molecular motors from biology and nanotechnology often operate on chemical energy of fuel molecules in an isothermal environment, unlike macroscopic heat engines that draw energy from a heat flow between two temperatures. Nevertheless, isothermal molecular motors are still subject to the 2nd law of thermodynamics in a fundamental way: their directional motion must cost a finite amount of energy other than the environmental heat even though no work is done; otherwise the 2nd law would be violated. Hence the 2nd law requires a finite energy price for pure direction of molecular motors. But what is the lowest price of direction allowed by the 2nd law? And how does the 2nd law-decreed price of direction limit performance of molecular motors? In the talk, I shall present our theoretical study of the 2nd law-molecular motor link on basis of the accumulated biomotor phenomenology, and also introduce our experimental effort to develop biomimetic DNA bipedal nanomotors following the mechanistic guidelines out of the theoretical study. [Main contents of this talk are from references:] This work is partially supported by FRC grants R-144-000-259-112, R-144-000-290-112 and R-144-000-320-112.

  12. In control of the speed of rotation in molecular motors. Unexpected retardation of rotary motion.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Edzard M; Koumura, Nagatoshi; ter Wiel, Matthijs K J; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2002-12-21

    Surprisingly, a new motor with a tetrahydronaphthalene upper part rotates slower than the original molecular motor with a tetrahydrophenanthrene upper part despite decreased steric hindrance. PMID:12536767

  13. Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckermann, Martin J.; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Schmitt, Regina; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth HC; Forde, Nancy R.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul MG

    2015-05-01

    The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of ∼18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker’s momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet.

  14. Kinesin molecular motor Eg5 functions during polypeptide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Kristen M.; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Woolford, John L.; Saunders, William S.

    2011-01-01

    The kinesin-related molecular motor Eg5 plays roles in cell division, promoting spindle assembly. We show that during interphase Eg5 is associated with ribosomes and is required for optimal nascent polypeptide synthesis. When Eg5 was inhibited, ribosomes no longer bound to microtubules in vitro, ribosome transit rates slowed, and polysomes accumulated in intact cells, suggesting defects in elongation or termination during polypeptide synthesis. These results demonstrate that the molecular motor Eg5 associates with ribosomes and enhances the efficiency of translation. PMID:21795388

  15. Understanding molecular motor walking along a microtubule: a themosensitive asymmetric Brownian motor driven by bubble formation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Noriyoshi; Yasuoka, Kenji; Koishi, Takahiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2013-06-12

    The "asymmetric Brownian ratchet model", a variation of Feynman's ratchet and pawl system, is invoked to understand the kinesin walking behavior along a microtubule. The model system, consisting of a motor and a rail, can exhibit two distinct binding states, namely, the random Brownian state and the asymmetric potential state. When the system is transformed back and forth between the two states, the motor can be driven to "walk" in one direction. Previously, we suggested a fundamental mechanism, that is, bubble formation in a nanosized channel surrounded by hydrophobic atoms, to explain the transition between the two states. In this study, we propose a more realistic and viable switching method in our computer simulation of molecular motor walking. Specifically, we propose a thermosensitive polymer model with which the transition between the two states can be controlled by temperature pulses. Based on this new motor system, the stepping size and stepping time of the motor can be recorded. Remarkably, the "walking" behavior observed in the newly proposed model resembles that of the realistic motor protein. The bubble formation based motor not only can be highly efficient but also offers new insights into the physical mechanism of realistic biomolecule motors. PMID:23721590

  16. Collective transport of weakly interacting molecular motors with Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Sameep; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2015-04-01

    Filament-based intracellular transport involves the collective action of molecular motor proteins. Experimental evidences suggest that microtubule (MT) filament bound motor proteins such as kinesins weakly interact among themselves during transport and with the surrounding cellular environment. Motivated by these observations we study a driven lattice gas model for collective unidirectional transport of molecular motors on open filament. This model incorporates short-range next-nearest-neighbour (NNN) interactions between the motors and couples the transport process on filament with surrounding cellular environment through adsorption-desorption Langmuir kinetics (LK) of the motors. We analyse this model within the framework of a mean-field (MF) theory in the limit of weak interactions between the motors. We point to the mapping of this model with the non-conserved version of the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn (KLS) model. The system exhibits rich phase behavior with a variety of inhomogeneous phases including localized shocks in the bulk of the filament. We obtain the steady-state density and current profiles, analyse their variation as a function of the strength of interaction and construct the non-equilibrium MF phase diagram. We compare these MF results with Monte Carlo simulations and find that the MF analysis shows reasonably good agreement with simulation results as long as the motors are weakly interacting. For sufficently strong NNN interaction between the motors, the mean-field results deviate significantly, and for very strong NNN interaction in the absence of LK, the current in the lattice is determined solely by the NNN interaction parameter and it becomes independent of entry and exit rates of motors at the filament boundaries.

  17. Solid rocket motor nozzle flexseal design sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat, James R.

    1993-02-01

    On solid rocket motors, direction is controlled by controlling the thrust vector. To achieve this, the nozzle usually incorporates a flexseal that allows the nozzle to vector (or rotate) in any direction. The flexseal has a core of alternating layers of elastomer pads and metal or composite shims. Flexseal core design is an iterative process. An estimate of the flexseal core geometry is made. The core is then analyzed for performance characteristics such as stress, weight, and the torque required to vector the core. Based on a comparison between the requirements/constraints and analysis results, another estimate of the geometry is then made. Understanding the effects changes in the core geometry have on the performance characteristics greatly decreases the number of iterations and time required to optimize the design. This paper documents a study undertaken to better understand these effects and how sensitive performance characteristics are to core geometry changes.

  18. Control of rotor motion in a light-driven molecular motor: towards a molecular gearbox.

    PubMed

    Ter Wiel, Matthijs K J; van Delden, Richard A; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2005-11-21

    Controlled intramolecular movement and coupling of motor and rotor functions is exerted by this new molecular device. The rate of rotation of the rotor part of the molecule can be adjusted by alteration of the conformation of the motor part of the molecule. For all states of the motor part, different rates of rotation were measured for the rotor part. Conversion between the four propeller orientations was achieved by irradiation and heating. PMID:16267585

  19. Molecular motors one at a time: FIONA to the rescue.

    PubMed

    Kural, Comert; Balci, Hamza; Selvin, Paul R

    2005-11-30

    Processive molecular motors act as intracellular transporters of a broad range of cargoes varying from organelles to messenger RNAs. Due to the nanometre range movements and complex dynamics of these motors, highly specialized tools are required to study them, in particular at the single-molecule level. Such tools are what physicists are providing for understanding these biological systems. Fluorescence based real-time localization techniques, with 1 nm spatial resolution and down to 1 ms temporal resolution (FIONA: fluorescence imaging with one-nanometre accuracy), and their applications to a group of molecular motors (myosin V, myosin VI, kinesin, and dynein) are the topics of this paper. In addition to the well established in vitro studies, the recent applications of these techniques to the much more challenging, but also more informative, in vivo realm will be discussed. PMID:21690736

  20. Debris control design achievements of the booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stringent debris control requirements imposed on the design of the Space Shuttle booster separation motor are described along with the verification program implemented to ensure compliance with debris control objectives. The principal areas emphasized in the design and development of the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) relative to debris control were the propellant formulation and nozzle closures which protect the motors from aerodynamic heating and moisture. A description of the motor design requirements, the propellant formulation and verification program, and the nozzle closures design and verification are presented.

  1. Time-dependent motor properties of multipedal molecular spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic biomolecular walkers that use the asymmetry resulting from cleavage of their tracks to bias the direction of their stepping motion. Using Monte Carlo simulations that implement the Gillespie algorithm, we investigate the dependence of the biased motion of molecular spiders, along with binding time and processivity, on tunable experimental parameters, such as number of legs, span between the legs, and unbinding rate of a leg from a substrate site. We find that an increase in the number of legs increases the spiders’ processivity and binding time but not their mean velocity. However, we can increase the mean velocity of spiders with simultaneous tuning of the span and the unbinding rate of a spider leg from a substrate site. To study the efficiency of molecular spiders, we introduce a time-dependent expression for the thermodynamic efficiency of a molecular motor, allowing us to account for the behavior of spider populations as a function of time. Based on this definition, we find that spiders exhibit transient motor function over time scales of many hours and have a maximum efficiency on the order of 1%, weak compared to other types of molecular motors.

  2. Computer aided design of multi-phase switched reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, N. K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive computer-aided design (CAD) procedure of multiphase switched reluctance motor (SRM) is presented. Better approach for calculation of the outer dimensions, phase inductance, flux linkage and losses, and also a different concept for calculating the average torque of the motor are incorporated in the CAD program. The average torque is calculated based on the most effective 15° (for 8/6 SRM) of the static torque profile of the motor. A sample design of a 5hp SRM is presented in detail and the design is validated by conducting a two-dimensional finite element analysis of the motor.

  3. Biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Linke, Heiner; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2010-02-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic molecular motors featuring multiple legs that each can interact with a substrate through binding and cleavage. Experimental studies suggest the motion of the spider in a matrix is biased toward uncleaved substrates and that spider properties such as processivity can be altered by changing the binding strength of the legs to substrate [R. Pei, S. K. Taylor, D. Stefanovic, S. Rudchenko, T. E. Mitchell, and M. N. Stojanovic, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 12693 (2006)]. We investigate the origin of biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders using Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulations combine a realistic chemical kinetic model, hand-over-hand or inchworm modes of stepping, and the use of a one-dimensional track. We find that stronger binding to substrate, cleavage and spider detachment from the track are contributing mechanisms to population bias. We investigate the contributions of stepping mechanism to speed, randomness parameter, processivity, coupling, and efficiency, and comment on how these molecular motor properties can be altered by changing experimentally tunable kinetic parameters.

  4. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications. PMID:27401928

  5. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  6. Molecular motors in neuronal development, intracellular transport and diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Takemura, Reiko

    2004-10-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs), dynein superfamily proteins and myosin superfamily proteins have diverse and fundamental roles in many cellular processes, including neuronal development and the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases. During neuronal development, KIFs take significant roles in the regulation of axon-collateral branch extension, which is essential for brain wiring. Cytoplasmic dynein together with LIS1 takes pivotal roles in neocortical layer formation. In axons, anterograde transport is mediated by KIFs, whereas retrograde transport is mediated mainly by cytoplasmic dynein, and dysfunction of motors results in neurodegenerative diseases. In dendrites, the transport of NMDA and AMPA receptors is mediated by KIFs, and the motor has been shown to play a significant part in establishing learning and memory. PMID:15464889

  7. Molecular Motors and Efficient Motion in a Viscoelastic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Keith

    2005-11-01

    Molecular motors perform many critical functions for cells, including chromosome separation during mitosis, vesicle transport, and muscle contraction. In this talk, we will discuss the ways in which physics concepts and instrumentation are being used to determine the forces and efficiencies of two of these motors, kinesin and dynein, in cells. We will emphasize a) studies at Wake Forest University that focus on the force versus velocity curves (load curves) of kinesin in the neurites of live PC12 cells, and b) work at UNC-Chapel Hill that measures the forces developed by dynein motors within beating cilia on the outer surfaces of live lung cells during mucus transport. We will show how the viscoelastic properties of cytoplasm and mucus can be determined from the Brownian motion of vesicles and beads in these media.. We find that the load on these motors in vivo may exceed that in vitro by a factor of 1000, and that several motors can share the task of moving a single vesicle.

  8. Energy transfer in a molecular motor in the Kramers regime.

    PubMed

    Challis, K J; Jack, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of energy transfer in a molecular motor described in terms of overdamped Brownian motion on a multidimensional tilted periodic potential. The tilt represents a thermodynamic force driving the system out of equilibrium and, for nonseparable potentials, energy transfer occurs between degrees of freedom. For deep potential wells, the continuous theory transforms to a discrete master equation that is tractable analytically. We use this master equation to derive formal expressions for the hopping rates, drift and diffusion, and the efficiency and rate of energy transfer in terms of the thermodynamic force. These results span both strong and weak coupling between degrees of freedom, describe the near and far from equilibrium regimes, and are consistent with generalized detailed balance and the Onsager relations. We thereby derive a number of diverse results for molecular motors within a single theoretical framework. PMID:24229123

  9. Tracking a Molecular Motor with a Nanoscale Optical Encoder

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Charles E.; Cash, Kevin J.; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Lipman, Everett A.

    2010-01-01

    Optical encoders are commonly used in macroscopic machines to make precise measurements of distance and velocity by translating motion into a periodic signal. Here we show how Förster resonance energy transfer can be used to implement this technique at the single-molecule scale. We incorporate a series of acceptor dye molecules into self-assembling DNA, and the periodic signal resulting from unhindered motion of a donor-labeled molecular motor provides nanometer-scale resolution in milliseconds. PMID:20121107

  10. Optimal brushless DC motor design using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahideh, A.; Korakianitis, T.; Ruiz, P.; Keeble, T.; Rothman, M. T.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using a genetic algorithm. Characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. Electrical and mechanical requirements (i.e. voltage, torque and speed) and other limitations (e.g. upper and lower limits of the motor geometries) are cast into constraints of the optimization problem. One sample case is used to illustrate the design and optimization technique.

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Monitoring of Light-Activated Motorized Nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Pinn-Tsong

    Our group has developed a family of single molecules termed nanocars, which are aimed at performing controllable motion on surfaces. In this work, a series of light-activated motorized nanomachines incorporated with a MHz frequency light-activated unidirectional rotary motor were designed and synthesized. We hope the light-activated motor can serve as the powering unit for the nanomachines, and perform controllable translational motion on surfaces or in solution. A series of motorized nanovehicles intended for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging were designed and synthesized. A p-carborane-wheeled motorized nanocar was synthesized and monitored by STM. Single-molecule imaging was accomplished on a Cu(111) surface. However, further manipulations did lead to motor induced lateral motion. We attributed this result to the strong molecule-surface interactions between the p-carborane-wheeled nanocar and the Cu(111) surface and possible energy transfer between the rotary motor and the Cu(111) surface. To fine-tune the molecule-surface interactions, an adamantane-wheeled motorized nanocar and a three-wheel nanoroadster were designed and synthesized. In addition, the STM substrates will be varied and different combinations of molecule-surface interactions will be studied. As a complimentary imaging method to STM, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM) also provides single-molecule level resolution. Unlike STM experiment requires ultra-high vacuum and conductive substrate, SMFM experiment is conducted at ambient conditions and uses non-conductive substrate. This imaging method allows us to study another category of molecule-surface interactions. We plan to design a fluorescent motorized nanocar that is suitable for SMFM studies. However, both the motor and fluorophore are photochemically active molecules. In proximity, some undesired energy transfer or interference could occur. A cyanine 5- (cy5-) tagged motorized nanocar incorporated with the MHz motor was

  12. Extracting Dwell Time Sequences from Processive Molecular Motor Data

    PubMed Central

    Milescu, Lorin S.; Yildiz, Ahmet; Selvin, Paul R.; Sachs, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Processive molecular motors, such as kinesin, myosin, or dynein, convert chemical energy into mechanical energy by hydrolyzing ATP. The mechanical energy is used for moving in discrete steps along the cytoskeleton and carrying a molecular load. Single-molecule recordings of motor position along a substrate polymer appear as a stochastic staircase. Recordings of other single molecules, such as F1-ATPase, RNA polymerase, or topoisomerase, have the same appearance. We present a maximum likelihood algorithm that extracts the dwell time sequence from noisy data, and estimates state transition probabilities and the distribution of the motor step size. The algorithm can handle models with uniform or alternating step sizes, and reversible or irreversible kinetics. A periodic Markov model describes the repetitive chemistry of the motor, and a Kalman filter allows one to include models with variable step size and to correct for baseline drift. The data are optimized recursively and globally over single or multiple data sets, making the results objective over the full scale of the data. Local binary algorithms, such as the t-test, do not represent the behavior of the whole data set. Our method is model-based, and allows rapid testing of different models by comparing the likelihood scores. From data obtained with current technology, steps as small as 8 nm can be resolved and analyzed with our method. The kinetic consequences of the extracted dwell sequence can be further analyzed in detail. We show results from analyzing simulated and experimental kinesin and myosin motor data. The algorithm is implemented in the free QuB software. PMID:16905607

  13. Microtubules and associated molecular motors in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa Reyna; Riquelme, Meritxell; Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Galván-Mendoza, José Iván

    2016-05-01

    The cytoskeleton provides structure, shape and movement to various cells. Microtubules (MTs) are tubular structures made of α and β-tubulin heterodimers organized in 13 protofilaments, forming a hollow cylinder. A vast group of MT-associated proteins determines the function, behavior and interaction of the MTs with other cellular components. Among these proteins, molecular motors such as the dynein-dynactin complex and kinesin superfamily play roles in MT organization and organelle transport. This article focuses on the MT cytoskeleton and associated molecular motors in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa In addition to reviewing current available information for this fungus and contrasting it with knowledge of other fungal species, we present new experimental results that support the role of dynein, dynactin and conventional kinesin in MT organization, dynamics and transport of subcellular structures (nuclei and secretory vesicles). In wild type hyphae of N. crassa, cytoplasmic MTs are arranged longitudinally along hyphae and display a helical curvature. They interlace with one another to form a network throughout the cytoplasm. N. crassa dynein and dynactin mutants have a scant and disorganized MT cytoskeleton, an erratic and reduced Spitzenkörper (Spk) and distorted hyphal morphology. In contrast, hyphae of mutants with defective conventional kinesin exhibit only minor disruptions in MT and Spk organization. Although nuclear positioning is affected in all mutants, the MT-associated motor proteins are not major contributors to nuclear movement during hyphal growth. Cytoplasmic bulk flow is the vehicle for nuclear displacement in growing hyphal regions of N. crassa Motors are involved in nuclei saltatory movements in both retrograde or anterograde direction. In the dynein and kinesin mutants, micro and macrovesicles can reach the Spk, although growth is slightly impaired and the Spk displays an erratic path. Hyphal growth requires MTs, and their associated

  14. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  15. Macroscopic contraction of a gel induced by the integrated motion of light-driven molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Maaloum, Mounir; Rawiso, Michel; Kulic, Igor; Foy, Justin T.; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Making molecular machines that can be useful in the macroscopic world is a challenging long-term goal of nanoscience. Inspired by the protein machinery found in biological systems, and based on the theoretical understanding of the physics of motion at the nanoscale, organic chemists have developed a number of molecules that can produce work by contraction or rotation when triggered by various external chemical or physical stimuli. In particular, basic molecular switches that commute between at least two thermodynamic minima and more advanced molecular motors that behave as dissipative units working far from equilibrium when fuelled with external energy have been reported. However, despite recent progress, the ultimate challenge of coordinating individual molecular motors in a continuous mechanical process that can have a measurable effect at the macroscale has remained elusive. Here, we show that by integrating light-driven unidirectional molecular rotors as reticulating units in a polymer gel, it is possible to amplify their individual motions to achieve macroscopic contraction of the material. Our system uses the incoming light to operate under far-from-equilibrium conditions, and the work produced by the motor in the photostationary state is used to twist the entangled polymer chains up to the collapse of the gel. Our design could be a starting point to integrate nanomotors in metastable materials to store energy and eventually to convert it.

  16. Optogenetic Control of Molecular Motors and Organelle Distributions in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Liting; Che, Daphne; Zhang, Kai; Ong, Qunxiang; Guo, Shunling; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Intracellular transport and distribution of organelles play important roles in diverse cellular functions, including cell polarization, intracellular signaling, cell survival and apoptosis. Here we report an optogenetic strategy to control the transport and distribution of organelles by light. This is achieved by optically recruiting molecular motors onto organelles through the heterodimerization of Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) and its interacting partner CIB1. CRY2 and CIB1 dimerize within subseconds upon blue light exposure, which requires no exogenous ligands and low intensity of light. We demonstrate that mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes can be driven towards the cell periphery upon light-induced recruitment of kinesin, or towards the cell nucleus upon recruitment of dynein. Light-induced motor recruitment and organelle movements are repeatable, reversible and can be achieved at subcellular regions. This light-controlled organelle redistribution provides a new strategy for studying the causal roles of organelle transport and distribution in cellular functions in living cells. PMID:25963241

  17. Computationally Designed Molecularly Imprinted Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Dumitru; Lagowski, Jolanta; Faid, Karim

    2004-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for different molecular systems in order to predict the binding affinities, binding energies, binding distances and the active site groups between the simulated molecular systems and different bio-ligands (theophylline and its derivatives), which have been designed and minimized using molecular simulation techniques. The first simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and functional monomer, such as methacrylic acid and its derivatives. For each pair of molecular systems, (10 monomers with a ligand and 10 monomers without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between a ligand and the corresponding monomers. The analysis of the simulated functional monomers with ligands indicates that the functional group of monomers interacting with ligands tends to be either COOH or CH2=CH. The distances between the ligand and monomer, in the most stable cases as indicated above, are between 2.0-4.5 Å. The second simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and a polymer. The polymers were obtained from monomers that were simulated above. And similar to monomer study, for each pair of molecular systems, (polymer with a ligand and polymer without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between ligand and the corresponding polymer. The binding distance between the active site of a polymer and a ligand will also be discussed.

  18. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  19. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and gene regulation. Despite these advances, our understanding of flagellar assembly and rotational mechanisms remains incomplete, in part because of the limited structural information available regarding the intact rotor–stator complex and secretion apparatus. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has become a valuable imaging technique capable of visualizing the intact flagellar motor in cells at molecular resolution. Because the resolution that can be achieved by cryo-ET with large bacteria (such as E. coli and S. enterica) is limited, analysis of small-diameter bacteria (including Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni) can provide additional insights into the in situ structure of the flagellar motor and other cellular components. This review is focused on the application of cryo-ET, in combination with genetic and biophysical approaches, to the study of flagellar structures and its potential for improving the understanding of rotor–stator interactions, the rotational switching mechanism, and the secretion and assembly of flagellar components. PMID:24697492

  20. Synthesis of peptide-conjugated light-driven molecular motors and evaluation of their DNA-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Nagatsugi, Fumi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Maiko; Kuwahara, Shunsuke; Kusano, Shuhei; Chikuni, Tomoko; Hagihara, Shinya; Harada, Nobuyuki

    2013-05-01

    Synthetic light-driven molecular motors are molecular machines capable of rotation under photo-irradiation. In this paper, we report the synthesis of peptide-conjugated molecular motors and evaluate their DNA-binding properties. PMID:23324812

  1. Towards artificial molecular motor-based electroactive/photoactive biomimetic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tony Jun

    2007-04-01

    Artificial molecular motors have recently attracted considerable interest from the nanoscience and nanoengineering community. These molecular-scale systems utilize a 'bottom-up' technology centered around the design and manipulation of molecular assemblies, and are potentially capable of delivering efficient actuations at dramatically reduced length scales when compared to traditional microscale actuators. When stimulated by light, electricity, or chemical reagents, a group of artificial molecular motors called bistable rotaxanes - which are composed of mutually recognizable and intercommunicating ring and dumbbell-shaped components - experience relative internal motions of their components just like the moving parts of macroscopic machines. Bistable rotaxanes' ability to precisely and cooperatively control mechanical motions at the molecular level reveals the potential of engineering systems that operate with the same elegance, efficiency, and complexity as biological motors function within the human body. We are in a process of developing a new class of bistable rotaxane-based electroactive/photoactive biomimetic muscles with unprecedented performance (strain: 40-60%, operating frequency: up to 1 MHz, energy density: ~50 J/cm 3, multi-stimuli: chemical, electricity, light). As a substantial step towards this longterm objective, we have proven, for the first time, that rotaxanes are mechanically switchable in condensed phases on solid substrates. We have further developed a rotaxane-powered microcantilever actuator utilizing an integrated approach that combines "bottom-up" assembly of molecular functionality with "top-down" micro/nano fabrication. By harnessing the nanoscale mechanical motion from artificial molecular machines and eliciting a nanomechanical response in a microscale device, this system mimics natural skeletal muscle and provides a key component for the development of nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS).

  2. A motor canister designed for prolonged operation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, A.

    1971-01-01

    A special canister was designed to protest the dc motors used on the ISIS 1 antenna unit. The canister is provided with a pressure-monitoring device and has a special shaft seal that imparts minimum load to the motor output shaft. The development and flight testing of the canister are discussed. Problems that were encountered during fabrication and inspection and the problems caused by material/lubricant incompatibility and low temperature are also discussed.

  3. Robust Design of Motor PWM Control using Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wei

    A robust design method is developed for Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) motor speed control. A first principle model for DC permanent magnetic motor is used to build a Simulink model for simulation and analysis. Based on the simulation result, the main factors that contributed to the average speed variation are identified using Design of Experiment (DOE). A robust solution is derived to reduce the aver age speed control variation using Response Surface Method (RSM). The robustness of the new design is verified using the simulation model.

  4. Kinesin molecular motors: Transport pathways, receptors, and human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2001-06-01

    Kinesin molecular motor proteins are responsible for many of the major microtubule-dependent transport pathways in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identity of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. Kinesin-II recently was found to be required for transport in motile and nonmotile cilia and flagella where it is essential for proper left-right determination in mammalian development, sensory function in ciliated neurons, and opsin transport and viability in photoreceptors. Thus, these pathways and proteins may be prominent contributors to several human diseases including ciliary dyskinesias, situs inversus, and retinitis pigmentosa. Kinesin-I is needed to move many different types of cargoes in neuronal axons. Two candidates for receptor proteins that attach kinesin-I to vesicular cargoes were recently found. One candidate, sunday driver, is proposed to both link kinesin-I to an unknown vesicular cargo and to bind and organize the mitogen-activated protein kinase components of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling module. A second candidate, amyloid precursor protein, is proposed to link kinesin-I to a different, also unknown, class of axonal vesicles. The finding of a possible functional interaction between kinesin-I and amyloid precursor protein may implicate kinesin-I based transport in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Rotor Design of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor for Railway Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Minoru; Kondo, Keiichiro; Fujishima, Yasushi; Wakao, Shinji

    The permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is an efficient machine, which has found application over wide power and speed ranges. This paper presents the optimal rotor design of a PMSM for use on a railway vehicle. This design utilizes reluctance torque in order to develop higher torque at starting with low open circuit voltage at high speed.

  6. F(1)-ATPase: a prototypical rotary molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    F(1)-ATPase, the soluble portion of ATP synthase, has been shown to be a rotary molecular motor in which the central γ subunit rotates inside the cylinder made of α(3)β(3) subunits. The rotation is powered by ATP hydrolysis in three catalytic sites, and reverse rotation of the γ subunit by an external force leads to ATP synthesis in the catalytic sites. Here I look back how our lab became involved in the study of this marvelous rotary machine, and discuss some aspects of its rotary mechanism while confessing we are far from understanding. This article is a very personal essay, not a scientific review, for this otherwise viral machines book. PMID:22297508

  7. Design of a Mode Conversion Ultrasonic Motor for Position Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeLetty, Ronan; Bouchilloux, Philippe; Claeyssen, Frank; Lhermet, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    The many useful characteristics of ultrasonic motors, such as high holding torques, and high torque at low speeds, have made them the subject of increasing interest. In addition, several of their characteristics make them attractive for aerospace applications: they have a torque to weight ratio, and they require neither gearing mechanisms nor lubrication. Moreover, they create negligible magnetic fields, and conversely, they are not affected by external magnetic fields. Ultrasonic motors based on bolt-tightened structures offer simplicity and high stress capability. They use the inverse piezoelectric effect in the stator to produce vibrational energy, which is transferred to the rotor by friction. We designed a bolt-tightened ultrasonic motor using numerical modelling tools (finite element and electromechanical circuit analyses), creating an equivalent circuit model that takes into account the electromechanical energy conversion in the stator and the contact between the stator and the rotor. Analysis of the circuit gives insight into the behavior of the motor and allows its performance to be calculated. Two prototypes of the motor were built; their transient responses and other quantities, such as starting torque, were measured. In this paper, we discuss the numerical and the experimental results, and demonstrate the usefulness of numerical analysis in designing ultrasonic motors and estimating their performance.

  8. MOV motor and gearbox performance under design basis loads

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the results of valve testing sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The research objective was to evaluate the capabilities of specific actuator motor and gearbox assemblies under various design basis loading conditions. The testing was performed using the motor-operated valve load simulator, a test fixture that simulates the stem load profiles a valve actuator would experience when closing a valve against flow and pressure loadings. The authors tested five typical motors (four ac motors and one dc motor) with three gearbox assemblies at conditions a motor might experience in a power plant, including such off-normal conditions as operation at high temperature and reduced voltage. The authors also determined the efficiency of the actuator gearbox. The testing produced the following significant results: all five motors operated at or above their rated torque during tests at full voltage and ambient temperature; for all five motors (dc as well as ac), the actual torque loss due to voltage degradation was greater than the torque loss predicted using common methods; startup torques in locked rotor tests compared well with stall torques in dynamometer-type tests; the methods commonly used to predict torque losses due to elevated operating temperatures sometimes bounded the actual losses, but not in all cases; the greatest discrepancy involved the prediction for the dc motor; running efficiencies published by the manufacturer for actuator gearboxes were higher than the actual efficiencies determined from testing, in some instances, the published pullout efficiencies were also higher than the actual values; operation of the gearbox at elevated temperature did not affect the operating efficiency.

  9. Report on Toyota/Prius Motor Design and Manufacturing Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2004-07-28

    In today's hybrid vehicle market the Toyota Prius drive system is currently considered the leader in electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing innovations. It is significant that in today's marketplace Toyota is able to manufacture and sell the vehicle for a profit. This project's objective is to analyze and study the Prius drive system to understand the design and manufacturing mechanisms Toyota utilized to achieved their performance and cost goals. During the course of this research effort ORNL has dissected both the 2003 and 2004 Toyota/Prius drive motors. This study is focused primarily on motor design considerations and an assessment of manufacturing issues.

  10. Superspreading: mechanisms and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis E; Müller, Erich A; Craster, Richard V; Matar, Omar K

    2015-03-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Despite significant experimental efforts, the precise mechanisms underlying superspreading remain unknown to date. Here, we isolate these mechanisms by analyzing coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of surfactant molecules of varying molecular architecture and substrate affinity. We observe that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. This article also highlights and explores the differences between superspreading and conventional surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. PMID:25658859

  11. Intra-cellular traffic: bio-molecular motors on filamentary tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, D.; Basu, A.; Garai, A.; Greulich, P.; Nishinari, K.; Schadschneider, A.; Tripathi, T.

    2008-08-01

    Molecular motors are macromolecular complexes which use some form of input energy to perform mechanical work. The filamentary tracks, on which these motors move, are made of either proteins (e.g., microtubules) or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA). Often, many such motors move simultaneously on the same track and their collective properties have superficial similarities with vehicular traffic on highways. The models we have developed provide "unified" description: in the low-density limit, a model captures the transport properties of a single motor while, at higher densities the same model accounts for the collective spatio-temporal organization of interacting motors. By drawing analogy with vehicular traffic, we have introduced novel quantities for characterizing the nature of the spatio-temporal organization of molecular motors on their tracks. We show how the traffic-like intracellular collective phenomena depend on the mechano-chemistry of the corresponding individual motors.

  12. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, Z.; Karpeev, D.; Aranson, I. S.; Bates, P. W.; Michigan State Univ.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the 'computational bottlenecks' associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  13. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhiyuan; Karpeev, Dmitry; Aranson, Igor S.; Bates, Peter W.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the “computational bottlenecks” associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  14. Design and Experimental Study on Spinning Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Heng; Jiang, Chunlan; Wang, Zaicheng

    The study on spinning solid rocket motor (SRM) which used as power plant of twice throwing structure of aerial submunition was introduced. This kind of SRM which with the structure of tangential multi-nozzle consists of a combustion chamber, propellant charge, 4 tangential nozzles, ignition device, etc. Grain design, structure design and prediction of interior ballistic performance were described, and problem which need mainly considered in design were analyzed comprehensively. Finally, in order to research working performance of the SRM, measure pressure-time curve and its speed, static test and dynamic test were conducted respectively. And then calculated values and experimental data were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the designed motor operates normally, and the stable performance of interior ballistic meet demands. And experimental results have the guidance meaning for the pre-research design of SRM.

  15. Mechanism of Cooperative Behavior in Systems of Slow and Fast Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Adam G.; Landahl, Eric C.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [1, 2]. Here we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behavior of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity ∼15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behavior depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors. PMID:19506764

  16. Motor Mania: Revving Up for Technological Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Wendy M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2008-01-01

    Students get very excited when confronted with problems that they find meaningful. Problem-based learning lets students solve problems using the strategies and tools that scientists use. While developing solutions via technological design and construction, students experience firsthand the relationship between science and technology. To capture…

  17. Computer-assisted design in perceptual-motor skills research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A categorization was made of independent variables previously found to be potent in simple perceptual-motor tasks. A computer was then used to generate hypothetical factorial designs. These were evaluated in terms of literature trends and pragmatic criteria. Potential side-effects of machine-assisted research strategy were discussed.

  18. Enantiopure Functional Molecular Motors Obtained by a Switchable Chiral-Resolution Process.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Gan, Jefri; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-17

    Molecular switches, rotors, and motors play an important role in the development of nano-machines and devices, as well as responsive and adaptive functional materials. For unidirectional rotors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes, their stereochemical homogeneity is of crucial importance. Herein, a method to obtain new and functionalizable overcrowded alkenes in enantiopure form is presented. The procedure involves a short synthesis of three steps and a solvent-switchable chiral resolution by using a readily available resolving agent. X-ray crystallography revealed the mode of binding of the motor with the resolving agent, as well as the absolute configuration of the motor. (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the dynamic behavior of this molecular motor. This method provides rapid access to ample amounts of enantiopure molecular motors, which will greatly facilitate the further development of responsive molecular systems based on chiral overcrowded alkenes. PMID:27072290

  19. Network Complexity and Parametric Simplicity for Cargo Transport by Two Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Corina; Berger, Florian; Liepelt, Steffen; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Cargo transport by two molecular motors is studied by constructing a chemomechanical network for the whole transport system and analyzing the cargo and motor trajectories generated by this network. The theoretical description starts from the different nucleotide states of a single motor supplemented by chemical and mechanical transitions between these states. As an instructive example, we focus on kinesin-1, for which a detailed single-motor network has been developed previously. This network incorporates the chemical transitions arising from ATP hydrolysis on both motor heads. In addition, both the chemical and the mechanical transition rates of a single kinesin motor were found to depend on the load force experienced by the motor. When two such motors are attached via their stalks to a cargo particle, they become elastically coupled. This coupling can be effectively described by an elastic spring between the two motors. The spring extension, which is given by the deviation of the actual spring length from its rest length, determines the mutual interaction force between the motors and, thus, affects all chemical and mechanical transition rates of both motors. As a result, cargo transport by two motors leads to a combined chemomechanical network, which is quite complex and contains a large number of motor cycles. However, apart from the single motor parameters, this complex network involves only two additional parameters: (i) the spring constant of the elastic coupling between the motors and (ii) the rebinding rate for an unbound motor. We show that these two parameters can be determined directly from cargo trajectories and/or trajectories of individual motors. Both types of trajectories are accessible to experiment and, thus, can be used to obtain a complete set of parameters for cargo transport by two motors.

  20. Stator design of a new type of spherical piezoelectric motor.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yung; Tsai, Yu-Ren; Hou, Bing-Kuan; Lin, Shuo-Chun; Lu, Cheng-Chin

    2010-10-01

    The stator design of a new type of spherical motor driven by piezoelectric actuators is developed. A curved piezoelectric actuator is designed to attach to the spherical surface. A series of the curved piezoelectric actuators is laid in a line around a spherical surface. By applying an appropriate voltage signal with phase difference on neighboring actuators, a traveling wave is generated on the hemispherical shell. Each set of curved piezoelectric actuators is designed to provide motion with a single degree-of-freedom (DOF). With two or three sets of the piezoelectric actuators constructed to be mutually perpendicular, the motor can provide 2-DOF or 3-DOF motion. Stator design and analysis and experiment for the 1-, 2-, and 3-DOF conditions are presented in this article. Analytical calculation and experiment results of several fundamental characteristics of the stator are in good agreement. Performance evaluation of rotation speed and torque of the stator and some implementation problems are also addressed. PMID:20889421

  1. Designing LC filters for AC-motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Gath, P.A.; Lucas, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents practical design guidelines for designing LC filters for AC-motor drive applications. A DC choke and an electrolytic capacitor bank on the DC bus filter the voltage and the current ripples and improve the input power factor. Capacitor and choke values are derived to optimize overall filter performance. Costs associated with the respective component values can then be obtained to analyze cost trade-offs between selected values. Helpful hints are also given.

  2. Design and construction of a novel rotary magnetostrictive motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanjia; Blatchley, Charles C.; Ibeh, Christopher C.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetostriction can be used to induce linear incremental motion, which is effective in giant magnetostrictive inchworm motors. Such motors possess the advantage of combining small step incremental motion with large force. However, continuous rotation may be preferred in practical applications. This paper describes a novel magnetostrictive rotary motor using terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9) material as the driving element. The motor is constructed of two giant magnetostrictive actuators with shell structured flexure-hinge and leaf springs. These two actuators are placed in a perpendicular position to minimize the coupling displacement of the two actuators. The principal design parameters of the actuators and strain amplifiers are optimally determined, and its static analysis is undertaken through finite element analysis software. The small movements of the magnetostrictive actuators are magnified by about three times using oval shell structured amplifiers. When two sinusoidal wave currents with 90° phase shift are applied to the magnetostrictive actuators, purely rotational movement can be produced as in the orbit of a Lissajous diagram in an oscillograph, and this movement is used to drive the rotor of the motor. A prototype has been constructed and tested.

  3. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  4. Coarse-Grained Structural Modeling of Molecular Motors Using Multibody Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Parker, David; Bryant, Zev; Delp, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental and computational approaches are needed to uncover the mechanisms by which molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical work. In this article, we describe methods and software to generate structurally realistic models of molecular motor conformations compatible with experimental data from different sources. Coarse-grained models of molecular structures are constructed by combining groups of atoms into a system of rigid bodies connected by joints. Contacts between rigid bodies enforce excluded volume constraints, and spring potentials model system elasticity. This simplified representation allows the conformations of complex molecular motors to be simulated interactively, providing a tool for hypothesis building and quantitative comparisons between models and experiments. In an example calculation, we have used the software to construct atomically detailed models of the myosin V molecular motor bound to its actin track. The software is available at www.simtk.org. PMID:20428469

  5. Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.

  6. How Molecular Motors Are Arranged on a Cargo Is Important for Vesicular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Robert P.; Jia, Zhiyuan; Gross, Steven P.; Yu, Clare C.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial organization of the cell depends upon intracellular trafficking of cargos hauled along microtubules and actin filaments by the molecular motor proteins kinesin, dynein, and myosin. Although much is known about how single motors function, there is significant evidence that cargos in vivo are carried by multiple motors. While some aspects of multiple motor function have received attention, how the cargo itself —and motor organization on the cargo—affects transport has not been considered. To address this, we have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of motors transporting a spherical cargo, subject to thermal fluctuations that produce both rotational and translational diffusion. We found that these fluctuations could exert a load on the motor(s), significantly decreasing the mean travel distance and velocity of large cargos, especially at large viscosities. In addition, the presence of the cargo could dramatically help the motor to bind productively to the microtubule: the relatively slow translational and rotational diffusion of moderately sized cargos gave the motors ample opportunity to bind to a microtubule before the motor/cargo ensemble diffuses out of range of that microtubule. For rapidly diffusing cargos, the probability of their binding to a microtubule was high if there were nearby microtubules that they could easily reach by translational diffusion. Our simulations found that one reason why motors may be approximately 100 nm long is to improve their ‘on’ rates when attached to comparably sized cargos. Finally, our results suggested that to efficiently regulate the number of active motors, motors should be clustered together rather than spread randomly over the surface of the cargo. While our simulation uses the specific parameters for kinesin, these effects result from generic properties of the motors, cargos, and filaments, so they should apply to other motors as well. PMID:21573204

  7. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Segmented and monolithic Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design concepts were evaluated with emphasis on joints and seals. Particular attention was directed to eliminating deficiencies in the SRM High Performance Motor (HPM). The selected conceptual design is described and discussed.

  8. Force and motion generation of molecular motors: A generic description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jülicher, Frank

    We review the properties of biological motor proteins which move along linear filaments that are polar and periodic. The physics of the operation of such motors can be described by simple stochastic models which are coupled to a chemical reaction. We analyze the essential features of force and motion generation and discuss the general properties of single motors in the framework of two-state models. Systems which contain large numbers of motors such as muscles and flagella motivate the study of many interacting motors within the framework of simple models. In this case, collective effects can lead to new types of behaviors such as dynamic instabilities of the steady states and oscillatory motion.

  9. Solid motor diagnostic instrumentation. [design of self-contained instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Arens, W. E.; Wuest, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    A review of typical surveillance and monitoring practices followed during the flight phases of representative solid-propellant upper stages and apogee motors was conducted to evaluate the need for improved flight diagnostic instrumentation on future spacecraft. The capabilities of the flight instrumentation package were limited to the detection of whether or not the solid motor was the cause of failure and to the identification of probable primary failure modes. Conceptual designs of self-contained flight instrumentation packages capable of meeting these reqirements were generated and their performance, typical cost, and unit characteristics determined. Comparisons of a continuous real time and a thresholded hybrid design were made on the basis of performance, mass, power, cost, and expected life. The results of this analysis substantiated the feasibility of a self-contained independent flight instrumentation module as well as the existence of performance margins by which to exploit growth option applications.

  10. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part V: design criteria.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-10-01

    Design criteria for the stable and durable operation of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) motor are discussed. The low electric conductivity and pyroelectricity of the lithium niobate (LN) stator used in the motor hindered the motor's stability. We demonstrated that the use of LN whose conductivity had been enhanced by chemical reduction counteracted the instability caused by contact electrification and meniscus adhesion. The severe failure of the stator surface limits the durability of the SAW motor. Owing to the chemical inertness of LN, the surface failure of the stator was caused by mechanical stresses resulting from the indentation and sliding of the projections placed at the slider surface. The as-fabricated sharp edges of the projections are the obvious cause of failure. Thus, if the projections are necessary, a procedure in which the edges are worn off before operation is the only feasible method to correct this problem. Nevertheless, the optimum geometry to prevent surface failure was deduced as flat plane. The flat plane geometry was useful if the contact pressure is sufficiently large to diminish the effect of the layer of squeezed air between the surfaces. PMID:18986876

  11. Dissipation in an electric field-driven synthetic rotary caltrop-based molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Corina; Crespi, Vincent

    2008-03-01

    A molecular caltrop has a three-legged base for attachment to a substrate and a vertical molecular shaft functionalized with a dipole-carrying molecular rotor at the upper end. The desired rotational motion of the rotor can generate dissipation when the motor is driven at frequencies which are close to the natural frequencies of soft vibrational modes in the structure or librational of the rotator about field direction. Classical molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the role of these resonances and investigate motor performance under external drive.

  12. Enhanced Diffusion of Molecular Motors in the Presence of Adenosine Triphosphate and External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Ryota; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The diffusion of a molecular motor in the presence of a constant external force is considered on the basis of a simple theoretical model. The motor is represented by a Brownian particle moving in a series of parabolic potentials placed periodically on a line, and the potential is switched stochastically from one parabola to another by a chemical reaction, which corresponds to the hydrolysis or synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins. It is found that the diffusion coefficient as a function of the force exhibits peaks. The mechanism of this diffusion enhancement and the possibility of observing it in F1-ATPase, a biological rotary motor, are discussed.

  13. Correlations and symmetry of interactions influence collective dynamics of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis-Garza, Daniel; Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatic molecules that actively support many cellular processes, including transport, cell division and cell motility, are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. Experimental studies indicate that they interact with each other and they frequently work together in large groups. To understand the mechanisms of collective behavior of motor proteins we study the effect of interactions in the transport of molecular motors along linear filaments. It is done by analyzing a recently introduced class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes that takes into account the intermolecular interactions via thermodynamically consistent approach. We develop a new theoretical method that allows us to compute analytically all dynamic properties of the system. Our analysis shows that correlations play important role in dynamics of interacting molecular motors. Surprisingly, we find that the correlations for repulsive interactions are weaker and more short-range than the correlations for the attractive interactions. In addition, it is shown that symmetry of interactions affect dynamic properties of molecular motors. The implications of these findings for motor proteins transport are discussed. Our theoretical predictions are tested by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations.

  14. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors. PMID:19506764

  15. Design optimization of axially laminated rotors for synchronous reluctance motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakao, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Ando, H.; Onuki, T.

    2000-05-01

    This article describes a design optimization of an axially laminated rotor of the synchronous reluctance motor, using the optimization method combined with the magnetic field analysis. The magnetic flux distribution in the synchronous reluctance motor is distorted due to the complicated rotor configuration and the influence of magnetic saturation, which results in a large number of local minimum solutions. Therefore, taking account of the magnetic saturation by the finite element method, the authors propose a novel optimization approach by coupling the stochastic search method with the deterministic one. In the optimization process a suitable objective function for the stability of machine performances is also proposed. Finally some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach are presented.

  16. Sunlight-powered kHz rotation of a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor

    PubMed Central

    Guentner, Manuel; Schildhauer, Monika; Thumser, Stefan; Mayer, Peter; Stephenson, David; Mayer, Peter J.; Dube, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Photodriven molecular motors are able to convert light energy into directional motion and hold great promise as miniaturized powering units for future nanomachines. In the current state of the art, considerable efforts have still to be made to increase the efficiency of energy transduction and devise systems that allow operation in ambient and non-damaging conditions with high rates of directional motions. The need for ultraviolet light to induce the motion of virtually all available light-driven motors especially hampers the broad applicability of these systems. We describe here a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor, which is powered exclusively by nondestructive visible light (up to 500 nm) and rotates completely directionally with kHz frequency at 20 °C. This is the fastest directional motion of a synthetic system driven by visible light to date permitting materials and biocompatible irradiation conditions to establish similarly high speeds as natural molecular motors. PMID:26411883

  17. Electric motor designs for attenuating torque disturbance in sensitive space mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, David B.; Fink, Richard A.

    2003-09-01

    When a motion control system introduces unwanted torque jitter and motion anomalies into sensitive space flight optical or positioning mechanisms, the pointing accuracy, positioning capability, or scanning resolution of the mission suffers. Special motion control technology must be employed to provide attenuation of the harmful torque disturbances. Brushless DC (BLDC) Motors with low torque disturbance characteristics have been successfully used on such notable missions as the Hubble Space Telescope when conventional approaches to motor design would not work. Motor designs for low disturbance mechanisms can include two and three phase sinusoidal BLDC motors, BLDC motors without iron teeth, and sometimes skewed or non-integral slot designs for motors commutated with Hall effect devices. The principal components of motor torque disturbance, successful BLDC motor designs for attenuating disturbances, and design trade-offs for optimum performance are examined.

  18. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M. D.

    2013-06-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

  19. Pattern Formations in Polymer-Molecular Motor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Duggan, Cynthia; Käs, Josef

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies with the microtubule-kinesin system, organized patterns such as asters and rotating vortices have been seen (Nedelec et al, Nature 1997), which were of a dynamic nature and dependent on active motors. A similar system was constructed using actin and myosin, which displays similar patterns, however, with drastically different dynamics. These patterns arise independent of the initial amount of immediate use energy (in the form of ATP), assembling only upon the near exhaustion of available ATP. Further studies have clearly shown that in fact these patterns are not dependent upon the motor activity of the myosin but its propensity to serve as a cross-linking element in an actin network, with the motor activity serving to prevent the arising of order in the system. We believe the dynamic differences inherent between the two polymer-motor systems studied lies primarily in the structural nature of the motor complexes, with the kinesin complex ordering the system by pushing multiple filaments in a parallel direction, and the myosin complexes disordering the system by pushing filaments in an antiparallel manner.

  20. Miniaturization Design Method and Performance Evaluation of Prototype Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor Optimally Designed by Thermomagnetic Field Coupling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Norihisa; Kitamura, Hideki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nakatsugawa, Junnosuke; Enomoto, Yuji

    This paper reports the results of the miniaturization design of a permanent-magnet synchronous motor, for which an optimal design technique based on thermomagnetic field coupling analysis is used. We derived the optimal solutions for various motor flatness ratios and determined the relationship between the motor size and the flatness ratio. For motors with different flatness ratios, we calculated the speed-torque characteristics by considering the voltage, temperature rise, and demagnetization limits and compared them. Moreover, we manufactured and tested the smallest designed motor. The measured temperature rises demonstrated the high accuracy of the proposed miniaturization design.

  1. Intrinsic irreversibility limits the efficiency of multidimensional molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, M. W.; Tumlin, C.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the efficiency limits of Brownian motors able to extract work from the temperature difference between reservoirs or from external thermodynamic forces. These systems can operate in a variety of modes, including as isothermal engines, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps. We derive analytical results showing that certain classes of multidimensional Brownian motor, including the Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchet, are unable to attain perfect efficiency (Carnot efficiency for heat engines). This demonstrates the presence of intrinsic irreversibilities in their operating mechanism. We present numerical simulations showing that in some cases the loss process that limits efficiency is associated with vortices in the probability current.

  2. Design, Modeling and Performance Optimization of a Novel Rotary Piezoelectric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Khanh A.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    1997-01-01

    This work has demonstrated a proof of concept for a torsional inchworm type motor. The prototype motor has shown that piezoelectric stack actuators can be used for rotary inchworm motor. The discrete linear motion of piezoelectric stacks can be converted into rotary stepping motion. The stacks with its high force and displacement output are suitable actuators for use in piezoelectric motor. The designed motor is capable of delivering high torque and speed. Critical issues involving the design and operation of piezoelectric motors were studied. The tolerance between the contact shoes and the rotor has proved to be very critical to the performance of the motor. Based on the prototype motor, a waveform optimization scheme was proposed and implemented to improve the performance of the motor. The motor was successfully modeled in MATLAB. The model closely represents the behavior of the prototype motor. Using the motor model, the input waveforms were successfully optimized to improve the performance of the motor in term of speed, torque, power and precision. These optimized waveforms drastically improve the speed of the motor at different frequencies and loading conditions experimentally. The optimized waveforms also increase the level of precision of the motor. The use of the optimized waveform is a break-away from the traditional use of sinusoidal and square waves as the driving signals. This waveform optimization scheme can be applied to any inchworm motors to improve their performance. The prototype motor in this dissertation as a proof of concept was designed to be robust and large. Future motor can be designed much smaller and more efficient with lessons learned from the prototype motor.

  3. Ultra high resolution stepper motors design, development, performance and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moll, H.; Roeckl, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of stepper motors with steps in the 10 arc sec to 2 arc min range is described. Some of the problem areas, e.g. rotor suspension, tribology aspects and environmental conditions are covered. A summary of achieved test results and the employment in different mechanisms already developed and tested is presented to give some examples of the possible use of this interesting device. Adaptations to military and commercial requirements are proposed and show the wide range of possible applications.

  4. Interplay between crosslinkers and dynamic molecular motor-induced instabilities in the moderation of biopolymer organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Ziebert, Falko; Zimmermann, Walter; Käs, Josef

    2006-03-01

    Structure and function of biological cells rely on the highly-dynamic self-organization of protein filaments to an intracellular cytoskeleton responsive to mechanical and chemical stimuli. While dissolving these complex cellular structures through Brownian motion is inherently slow (tens of minutes), changes in the activity of the molecular motor myosin II cause rapid order-disorder transitions within 1-2 minutes in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin networks. When motor-induced filament sliding decreases, actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies triggered by a nonlinear instability. Modulation of static crosslinker concentrations allow for a wide phase space of order ranging from nematics to compact asters & dense packing of motor-filament clusters. The observed isothermal transitions between disorder and self-organization illustrate that molecular motors can substantially contribute to dynamic cellular organization.

  5. Solid rocket motor conceptual design - The development of a design optimization expert system with a hypertext user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegern, James B.

    1993-06-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) design prototypes can be rapidly formulated and evaluated by the use of advanced computer-based methodologies that apply expert system and artificial intelligence software to the SRM design optimization processes. The research program that was carried out, and is reported in this paper, was to formulate a computer-based SRM expert system for motor design and optimization, with the assistance of a hypertext software algorithm that provides a user-friendly interface. With this interface for parameter input, the design engineer can quickly obtain rocket motor designs that satisfy the performance mission of the SRM, as well as meet criteria for optimized (minimum) motor mass. The computer-based software has been designated as the Solid Rocket Motor Conceptual Design Optimization System (SRMCDOS). The main purpose of this SRM design system is to aid the SRM design engineer in making the best initial design selections and thereby reducing the overall 'design cycle time' of a project.

  6. Stepping and Crowding of Molecular Motors: Statistical Kinetics from an Exclusion Process Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ciandrini, Luca; Romano, M. Carmen; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerization (e.g., RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend contemporary statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of comoving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions. PMID:25185553

  7. Influence of molecular motors on the motion of particles in viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Sebastián

    2014-06-01

    We study theoretically and by numerical simulations the motion of particles driven by molecular motors in a viscoelastic medium representing the cell cytoplasm. For this, we consider a generalized Langevin equation coupled to a stochastic stepping dynamics for the motors that takes into account the action of each motor separately. In the absence of motors, the model produces subdiffusive motion of particles characterized by a power-law scaling of the mean square displacement versus the lag time as t^{α}, with 0<α<1, similar to that observed in cells. Our results show how the action of the motors can induce a transition to a superdiffusive regime at large lag times with the characteristics of those found in experiments reported in the literature. We also show that at small lag times, the motors can act as static crosslinkers that slow down the natural subdiffusive transport. An analysis of previously reported experimental data in the relevant time scales provides evidence of this phenomenon. Finally, we study the effect of a harmonic potential representing an optical trap, and we show a way to approach to a macroscopic description of the active transport in cells. This last point stresses the relevance of the molecular motors for generating not only directed motion to specific targets, but also fast diffusivelike random motion. PMID:25019814

  8. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Yochelis, A; Ebrahim, S; Millis, B; Cui, R; Kachar, B; Naoz, M; Gov, N S

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  9. Properties of tug-of-war model for cargo transport by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2009-06-01

    Molecular motors are essential components for the biophysical functions of the cell. Current quantitative understanding of how multiple motors move along a single track is not complete, even though models and theories for a single motor mechanochemistry abound. Recently, Müller have developed a tug-of-war model to describe the bidirectional movement of the cargo [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 4609 (2008)]. They found that the tug-of-war model exhibits several qualitative different motility regimes, which depend on the precise value of single motor parameters, and they suggested that the sensitivity can be used by a cell to regulate its cargo traffic. In the present paper, we will carry out a detailed theoretical analysis of a special case of tug-of-war model: in which the numbers of the two different motor species which bound to the cargo tend to infinite. Through the analysis, all the stable, i.e., biophysically observable, steady states and their stability domains can be obtained. Depending on values of the several parameters, the tug-of-war model exhibits uni-, bi-, or tristability. The steady-state movement of the cargo, which is transported by two different molecular motor species, is determined by the initial numbers of the motors which bound to the track.

  10. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Yochelis, A.; Ebrahim, S.; Millis, B.; Cui, R.; Kachar, B.; Naoz, M.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  11. Automatic Evolution of Molecular Nanotechnology Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes strategies for automatically generating designs for analog circuits at the molecular level. Software maps out the edges and vertices of potential nanotechnology systems on graphs, then selects appropriate ones through evolutionary or genetic paradigms.

  12. Reversing the direction in a light-driven rotary molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Pollard, Michael M.; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-01-01

    Biological rotary motors can alter their mechanical function by changing the direction of rotary motion. Achieving a similar reversal of direction of rotation in artificial molecular motors presents a fundamental stereochemical challenge: how to change from clockwise to anticlockwise motion without compromising the autonomous unidirectional rotary behaviour of the system. A new molecular motor with multilevel control of rotary motion is reported here, in which the direction of light-powered rotation can be reversed by base-catalysed epimerization. The key steps are deprotonation and reprotonation of the photochemically generated less-stable isomers during the 360° unidirectional rotary cycle, with complete inversion of the configuration at the stereogenic centre. The ability to change directionality is an essential step towards mechanical molecular systems with adaptive functional behaviour.

  13. New mechanistic insight in the thermal helix inversion of second-generation molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Klok, Martin; Walko, Martin; Geertsema, Edzard M; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of dibenzocyclohepten-5-ylidene as part of a unidirectional light-driven molecular motor allows a more complete picture of the pathway of thermal helix inversion to be developed. The most stable conformation is similar to that found in related motors in that it has, overall, an anti-folded structure with the substituent at the stereogenic centre adopting an axial orientation. Photochemical cis/trans isomerisation at -40 degrees C results in the formation of an isomer in a syn-folded conformation with the methyl group in an axial orientation. This contrasts with previous studies on related molecular rotary motors. The conformation of the higher energy intermediate typically observed for this class of compound is the anti-folded conformation, in which the methyl group is in an equatorial orientation. This conformation is available through an energetically uphill upper half ring inversion of the observed photochemical product. However, this pathway competes with a second process that leads to the more stable anti-folded conformation in which the methyl group is oriented axially. It has been shown that the conformations and pathways available for second-generation molecular motors can be described by using similar overall geometries. Differences in the metastable high-energy species are attributable to the relative energy and position on the reaction coordinate of the transition states. Kinetic studies on these new molecular motors thus provide important insights into the conformational dynamics of the rotation cycle. PMID:18979464

  14. Ultra-fast force-clamp laser trapping of single molecular motors and DNA binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-09-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  15. Physical aspects of the structure and function of helicases as rotary molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikin, S. A.

    2009-11-01

    Helicases were shown to have common physical properties with rotary molecular motors, such as F 0 F 1-ATP synthase and type I restriction-modification (RM) enzymes. The necessary conditions for action of molecular motors are chirality, the presence of the C 2 (or lower) symmetry axis within rather large atomic groups, and polarization properties. The estimates were made for the material parameters of helicases, which translocate DNA due to moving chiral kinks without DNA cleavage and are characterized by higher viscosity, low mobility, and smaller chiral kinetic coefficients than type II RM enzymes. This paper discusses the efficiency of helicases with opposite polarities that drive DNA translocation in opposite directions.

  16. Rotor compound concept for designing an industrial HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M.; Hosseina, M.; Sarrafan, K.; Darabi, A.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, producing power with smaller amount of losses become as a goal in our daily life. Today, large amount of energy waste in power networks all around the world. The main reason is “resistive electric equipments” of power networks. Since early 1980s, simultaneous with the development of high temperature superconductive (HTS) technology, superconductors gently attracted the mankind attentions. Using superconductive equipments instead of conventional resistive ones are result in salient electric loss reduction in power systems. Especially to reduce losses in power networks superconductive industrial rotating machines can potentially perform a significant role. In early recent century, first generation of HTS rotating machines was born. But unfortunately they have long way to penetrate the commercial markets yet. In HTS rotating machines the conventional copper made windings are replaced with the HTS superconductors. In this paper an industrial HTS synchronous motor with YBCO coated conductor field windings was designed. As a new approach, model was equipped with a compound rotor that includes both magnetic and non-magnetic materials. So, large amount of heavy iron made part was replaced by light non-magnetic material such as G-10 fiberglass. Furthermore, in this structure iron loss in rotor could be reduced to its lowest value. Also less weight and more air gap energy density were the additional advantages. Regarding zero electric loss production in field windings and less iron loss in rotor construction, this model potentially is more effective than the other iron made HTS motors.

  17. The analysis and design of brushless D.C. motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benarous, Maamar

    In modern computer systems electrical drives are used to rotate hard discs. These motors require special torque- speed characteristics. The speed of the hard disc must be constant in order for the unit to function correctly. One type of drive, which is used for hard discs is the brushless-DC-motor. This machine has permanent magnet excitation and a polyphase armature winding. It therefore takes the form of a synchronous machine, and in order to be brushless the armature winding is stationary and the excitation rotates. To run at adjustable speed a variable frequency supply is required. In the brushless D.C form the inverter output is phase locked to the rotor position, it is therefore electro-magnetically similar to the D.C machine where fixed brushes determine the frequency and phase of the current in the armature winding. In order to perform the phase lock action signals measuring the rotor position are needed. In one form of machine Hall effect probes detect the position of the rotor poles, in a second given that the rotor is in motion the induced back emf is used. Experimentally it is convenient to replace these magnet systems with a photo- transistor and rotating shutter system and this was the approach used in this thesis. The objective of this research is to investigate different aspects of this motor. The generation, measurement, and placement of signals is described and illustrated, and the design and construction of an inverter supply circuit is described. Both 2D and 3D finite element analysis is used in order to find the machine parameters as well as cogging torque analysis, using the concept of permanent magnet magnetisation characteristics. It is shown that the cogging can be reduced for certain types of magnetisation. The finite element analysis is taken further by connecting the drive circuit needed to run the machine into the finite element mesh, the machine parameters are defined using this method. The close agreement between the simulation and

  18. Bidirectional Transport by Molecular Motors: Enhanced Processivity and Response to External Forces

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Melanie J.I.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is often mediated by two teams of molecular motors that pull on the same cargo and move in opposite directions along the filaments. We have recently shown theoretically that this bidirectional transport can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between the two motor teams. Here, we further develop our theory to investigate the experimentally accessible dynamic behavior of cargos transported by strong motors such as kinesin-1 or cytoplasmic dynein. By studying the run and binding times of such a cargo, we show that the properties of biological motors, such as the large ratio of stall/detachment force and the small ratio of superstall backward/forward velocity, are favorable for bidirectional cargo transport, leading to fast motion and enhanced diffusion. In addition, cargo processivity is shown to be strongly enhanced by transport via several molecular motors even if these motors are engaged in a tug-of-war. Finally, we study the motility of a bidirectional cargo under force. Frictional forces arising, e.g., from the viscous cytoplasm, lead to peaks in the velocity distribution, while external forces as exerted, e.g., by an optical trap, lead to hysteresis effects. Our results, in particular our explicit expressions for the cargo binding time and the distance of the peaks in the velocity relation under friction, are directly accessible to in vitro as well as in vivo experiments. PMID:20513405

  19. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  20. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS Molecular energy transducers of the living cell. Proton ATP synthase: a rotating molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, Yurii M.; Tikhonov, Alexander N.

    2010-12-01

    The free energy released upon the enzymatic hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the main source of energy for the functioning of the living cell and all multicellular organisms. The overwhelming majority of ATP molecules are formed by proton ATP synthases, which are the smallest macromolecular electric motors in Nature. This paper reviews the modern concepts of the molecular structure and functioning of the proton ATP synthase, and real-time biophysical experiments on the rotation of the 'rotor' of this macromolecular motor. Some mathematical models describing the operation of this nanosized macromolecular machine are described.

  1. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F1-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  2. Molecular motor powered nanotransportation guided by carbon nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Ramon-Azcon, J.; Kim, K.; Reaves, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Umetsu, M.; Kumagai, I.; Adschiri, T.; Shiku, H.; Matsue, T.; Hwang, W.; Teizer, W.

    2014-03-01

    Due to a decrease in the channel size of nanodevices, pressure-driven transport is increasingly limited by the fluid viscosity. This can be overcome by utilizing the motor protein kinesin that can walk processively along the microtubule filaments for active transport. However, using the kinesin-based transport system requires the ability to control the location and orientation of microtubules. We introduce functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) tracks, aligned by dielectrophoresis, to guide kinesin powered microtubule shuttles. In order to resist shear flow and the force exerted by an electric field, the MWNT are attached to the surface via a biotin/streptavidin link. The configuration of the aligned MWNT is investigated using scanning electron microscopy and the guiding performance of the MWNT tracks is studied using fluorescence microscopy.

  3. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury. PMID:26617489

  4. Hydrodynamics and rheology of mixtures of biopolymers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Aphrodite

    I use tools and concepts from non-equilibrium statistical physics and polymer physics to describe the large-scale collective behavior of solutions of polar biofilaments and crosslinkers, in both quiescent and flowing solvents. I model the system as a polar liquid crystal with both excluded volume, and active interactions due to the crosslinkers. The role of mobile and stationary crosslinkers, which can induce filament alignment promoting polar or nematic order, in analogy with liquid crystalline phases, is taken into account. I start from a Smoluchowski equation for rigid filaments in solutions where pairwise crosslink-mediated interactions among the filaments yield translational and rotational currents. The large-scale properties of the system are described in terms of continuum equations for filament and motor densities, polarization and alignment tensor obtained by coarse-graining the Smoluchowski equation. The possible homogeneous states of the systems are obtained as stable solutions of the dynamical equations and are characterized in terms of experimentally accessible parameters. The activity of mobile crosslinkers, which cause exchange of forces and torques among the filaments, renders the homogeneous states unstable via filament bundling. Furthermore, I incorporate the coupling of the orientational order to flow into the hydrodynamic equations, and take into account the exchange of momentum between the filaments and the flowing solvent. Flow enhances the orientational order and suppresses orientational instability in the ordered states. This model allows for an estimate of the various parameters in the hydrodynamic equations in terms of physical properties of the crosslinkers. Introducing a unified microscopic model to describe the non-equilibrium system of polar biofilaments and motor proteins with experimentally accessible parameters is the central result of this work.

  5. Molecular Nanotechnology and Designs of Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in the scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental molecular nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approach to the concepts of design and simulation of atomically precise materials in a variety of interdisciplinary areas will be presented. The concepts of hypothetical molecular machines and assemblers as explained in Drexler's and Merckle's already published work and Han et. al's WWW distributed molecular gears will be explained.

  6. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-04-16

    In this review, current structural understanding of the apicomplexan glideosome and actin regulation is described. Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective.

  7. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702

  8. Chemical designs of functional photoactive molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qifan; Luo, Zhouyang; Cai, Kang; Ma, Yuguo; Zhao, Dahui

    2014-06-21

    Molecular assemblies with well-defined structures capable of photo-induced electron transfer and charge transport or photochemical reactions are reviewed. Hierarchical supramolecular architectures, which assemble the modular units into specific spatial arrangements and facilitate them to work cooperatively, are vital for the achievement of photo-functions in these systems. The chemical design of molecular building blocks and noncovalent interactions exploited to realize supramolecular organizations are particularly discussed. Reviewing and recapitulating the chemical evolution traces of these accomplished systems will hopefully delineate certain fundamental design principles and guidelines useful for developing more advanced functions in the future. PMID:24492680

  9. Low processivity for DNA translocation by the ISWI molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Eastlund, Allen; Al-Ani, Gada; Fischer, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    The motor protein ISWI (Imitation SWItch) is the conserved catalytic ATPase domain of the ISWI family of chromatin remodelers. Members of the ISWI family are involved in regulating the structure of cellular chromatin during times of transcription, translation, and repair. Current models for the nucleosome repositioning activity of ISWI and other chromatin remodelers require the translocation of the remodeling protein along double-stranded DNA through an ATP-dependent mechanism. Here we report results from spectrofluorometric stopped-flow experiments which demonstrate that ISWI displays very low processivity for free DNA translocation. By combining these results with those from experiments monitoring the DNA stimulated ATPase activity of ISWI we further demonstrate that the DNA translocation by ISWI is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The calculated coupling efficiency of 0.067±0.018 ATP/ISWI/bp is seemingly quite low in comparison to similar DNA translocases and we present potential models to account for this. Nevertheless, the tight coupling of ATP hydrolysis to DNA translocation suggests that DNA translocation is not energetically rate limiting for nucleosome repositioning by ISWI. PMID:26116984

  10. Molecular Similarity in Computer-Aided Molecular Design.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, Edward E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The quantitative measurement of how similar one molecule is to another is investigated as a potential aid to molecular design. The work concentrates on the comparison of electronic properties of molecules, in particular electron density distribution, molecular electrostatic potential, molecular electric field and frontier orbital wavefunctions. A novel formula for molecular similarity has been devised and applied to these four properties. An approximate representation of valence electron density is used, based on the notion that charge distribution in a large molecule may be built from transferable contributions from its constituent functional groups. Each of these contributions consists of a series of first-order gaussian functions. The electrostatic potentials and electric fields used in the similarity calculations are computed from atom -centered partial charges. The frontier orbital wavefunction comparisons are performed using the extended Huckel method. The four measures of similarity are related to chemical and biological data and shown to have possible applications in the area of drug design.

  11. Measuring the number and spacing of molecular motors propelling a gliding microtubule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallesen, Todd L.; Macosko, Jed C.; Holzwarth, G.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular motor gliding assay, in which a microtubule or other filament moves across a surface coated with motors, has provided much insight into how molecular motors work. The kinesin-microtubule system is also a strong candidate for the job of nanoparticle transporter in nanotechnology devices. In most cases, several motors transport each filament. Each motor serves both to bind the microtubule to a stationary surface and to propel the microtubule along the surface. By applying a uniform transverse force of 4-19 pN to a superparamagnetic bead attached to the trailing end of the microtubule, we have measured the distance d between binding points (motors). The average value of d was determined as a function of motor surface density σ. The measurements agree well with the scaling model of Duke, Holy, and Liebler, which predicts that ~σ-2/5 if 0.05⩽σ⩽20μm-2 [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.74.330 74, 330 (1995)]. The distribution of d fits an extension of the model. The radius of curvature of a microtubule bent at a binding point by the force of the magnetic bead was ≈1 μm, 5000-fold smaller than the radius of curvature of microtubules subjected only to thermal forces. This is evidence that at these points of high bending stress, generated by the force on the magnetic bead, the microtubule is in the more flexible state of a two-state model of microtubule bending proposed by Heussinger, Schüller, and Frey [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.81.021904 81, 021904 (2010)].

  12. Memory, bias, and correlations in bidirectional transport of molecular-motor-driven cargoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-10-01

    Molecular motors are specialized proteins that perform active, directed transport of cellular cargoes on cytoskeletal filaments. In many cases, cargo motion powered by motor proteins is found to be bidirectional, and may be viewed as a biased random walk with fast unidirectional runs interspersed with slow tug-of-war states. The statistical properties of this walk are not known in detail, and here, we study memory and bias, as well as directional correlations between successive runs in bidirectional transport. We show, based on a study of the direction-reversal probabilities of the cargo using a purely stochastic (tug-of-war) model, that bidirectional motion of cellular cargoes is, in general, a correlated random walk. In particular, while the motion of a cargo driven by two oppositely pulling motors is a Markovian random walk, memory of direction appears when multiple motors haul the cargo in one or both directions. In the latter case, the Markovian nature of the underlying single-motor processes is hidden by internal transitions between degenerate run and pause states of the cargo. Interestingly, memory is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the number of motors. Stochastic numerical simulations of the tug-of-war model support our mathematical results and extend them to biologically relevant situations.

  13. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study. Volume 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The design studies task implements the primary objective of developing a Block II Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design offering improved flight safety and reliability. The SRM literature was reviewed. The Preliminary Development and Validation Plan is presented.

  14. The Design and its Verification of the Double Rotor Double Cage Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumita; Deb, Nirmal K.; Biswas, Sujit K.

    2016-06-01

    The concept of a double rotor motor presented earlier and its equivalent circuit has been developed, showing a non-linear parameter content. The two rotors (which are recommended to be double cage type for development of high starting torque) can run with equal or unequal speed independently, depending on their individual loading. This paper presents the elaborate design procedure, step-by-step, for the double rotor double cage motor and verifies the designed data with that obtained from three separate tests (compared to two for conventional motor) on a prototype, such that optimum performance can be obtained from the motor.

  15. Design, manufacture, and test of coolant pump-motor assembly for Brayton power conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabacz, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of seven coolant circulating pump-motor assemblies are discussed. The pump-motor assembly is driven by the nominal 44.4-volt, 400-Hz, 3-phase output of a nominal 56-volt dc input inverter. The pump-motor assembly will be used to circulate Dow Corning 200 liquid coolant for use in a Brayton cycle space power system. The pump-motor assembly develops a nominal head of 70 psi at 3.7 gpm with an over-all efficiency of 26 percent. The design description, drawings, photographs, reliability results, and developmental and acceptance test results are included.

  16. Design of outer-rotor type multipolar SR motor for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Suzuki, Yosuke; Goto, Hiroki; Ichinokura, Osamu

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we design an outer-rotor type multipolar switched reluctance (SR) motor, and examine an application of the SR motor to an electric vehicle (EV). The design is based on a nonlinear magnetic circuit model proposed by the authors. Using the model, we can calculate dynamic characteristics of a SR motor accurately. Furthermore, by combining the nonlinear magnetic circuit model with a motor drive circuit and motion equation of an EV, we can predict dynamic characteristics such as the maximum speed, acceleration torque, and a battery current of the EV.

  17. Analysis of persistence during intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, C.; Despósito, M. A.; Levi, V.; Bruno, L.

    2010-09-01

    The displacement of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time is characterized by different anomalous diffusion regimes. The transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, involves the action of ATP-consuming molecular motors. We investigate the motion of pigment organelles driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the turning angles (phi) of the obtained 2D trajectories as a function of the time lag, we determine the critical time of the transition between anticorrelated and directed motion as the time when the turning angles begin to concentrate around phi = 0. We relate this transition with the crossover from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior observed in a previous work [5]. We also assayed the properties of the trajectories in cells with inhibited myosin activity, and we can compare the results in the presence and absence of active motors.

  18. Coordination of Molecular Motors: From in vitro Assays to Intracellular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary New technologies have emerged that enable the tracking of molecular motors and their cargos with very high resolution both in vitro and in live cells. Classic in vitro motility assays are being supplemented with assays of increasing complexity that more closely model the cellular environment. In cells, the introduction of probes such as quantum dots allows the high resolution tracking of both motors and vesicular cargos. The “bottom up” enhancement of in vitro assays and the “top down” analysis of motility inside cells are likely to converge over the next few years. Together, these studies are providing new insights into the coordination of motors during intracellular transport. PMID:20102789

  19. Visible-Light-Driven Photoisomerization and Increased Rotation Speed of a Molecular Motor Acting as a Ligand in a Ruthenium(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Wezenberg, Sander J; Chen, Kuang-Yen; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-09-21

    Toward the development of visible-light-driven molecular rotary motors, an overcrowded alkene-based ligand and the corresponding ruthenium(II) complex is presented. In our design, a 4,5-diazafluorenyl coordination motif is directly integrated into the motor function. The photochemical and thermal isomerization behavior has been studied by UV/Vis and NMR spectroscopy. Upon coordination to a Ru(II) bipyridine complex, the photoisomerization process can be driven by visible (λmax = 450 nm) instead of UV light and furthermore, a large increase of the speed of rotation is noted. DFT calculations point to a contraction of the diazafluorenyl lower half upon metal-coordination resulting in reduced steric hindrance in the "fjord region" of the molecule. Consequently, it is shown that metal-ligand interactions can play an important role in the adjustment of both photophysical and thermodynamic properties of molecular motors. PMID:26271465

  20. Transition to superdiffusive behavior in intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, L.; Levi, V.; Brunstein, M.; Despósito, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Intracellular transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles, or large proteins, is a complex dynamical process that involves the interplay of adenosine triphosphate-consuming molecular motors, cytoskeleton filaments, and the viscoelastic cytoplasm. In this work we investigate the motion of pigment organelles (melanosomes) driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high-spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the obtained trajectories, we show that the melanosomes mean-square displacement undergoes a transition from a subdiffusive to a superdiffusive behavior. A stochastic theoretical model, which explicitly considers the collective action of the molecular motors, is introduced to generalize the interpretation of our data. Starting from a generalized Langevin equation, we derive an analytical expression for the mean square displacement, which also takes into account the experimental noise. By fitting theoretical expressions to experimental data we were able to discriminate the exponents that characterize the passive and active contributions to the dynamics and to estimate the “global” motor forces correctly. Then, our model gives a quantitative description of active transport in living cells with a reduced number of parameters.

  1. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B.; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Morais, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring, and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  2. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huzhang; Saha, Mitul; Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Morais, Marc C

    2016-03-01

    Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  3. Physical aspects of the structure and function of helicases as rotary molecular motors

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A.

    2009-11-15

    Helicases were shown to have common physical properties with rotary molecular motors, such as F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and type I restriction-modification (RM) enzymes. The necessary conditions for action of molecular motors are chirality, the presence of the C{sub 2} (or lower) symmetry axis within rather large atomic groups, and polarization properties. The estimates were made for the material parameters of helicases, which translocate DNA due to moving chiral kinks without DNA cleavage and are characterized by higher viscosity, low mobility, and smaller chiral kinetic coefficients than type II RM enzymes. This paper discusses the efficiency of helicases with opposite polarities that drive DNA translocation in opposite directions.

  4. A system level model for preliminary design of a space propulsion solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Daniel M.

    Preliminary design of space propulsion solid rocket motors entails a combination of components and subsystems. Expert design tools exist to find near optimal performance of subsystems and components. Conversely, there is no system level preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors that is capable of synthesizing customer requirements into a high utility design for the customer. The preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors typically builds on existing designs and pursues feasible rather than the most favorable design. Classical optimization is an extremely challenging method when dealing with the complex behavior of an integrated system. The complexity and combinations of system configurations make the number of the design parameters that are traded off unreasonable when manual techniques are used. Existing multi-disciplinary optimization approaches generally address estimating ratios and correlations rather than utilizing mathematical models. The developed system level model utilizes the Genetic Algorithm to perform the necessary population searches to efficiently replace the human iterations required during a typical solid rocket motor preliminary design. This research augments, automates, and increases the fidelity of the existing preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors. The system level aspect of this preliminary design process, and the ability to synthesize space propulsion solid rocket motor requirements into a near optimal design, is achievable. The process of developing the motor performance estimate and the system level model of a space propulsion solid rocket motor is described in detail. The results of this research indicate that the model is valid for use and able to manage a very large number of variable inputs and constraints towards the pursuit of the best possible design.

  5. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter M.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by ‘magic’, these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study.

  6. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by 'magic', these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study. PMID:26863000

  7. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  8. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Magnetic capture from blood rescues molecular motor function in diagnostic nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Introduction of effective point-of-care devices for use in medical diagnostics is part of strategies to combat accelerating health-care costs. Molecular motor driven nanodevices have unique potentials in this regard due to unprecedented level of miniaturization and independence of external pumps. However motor function has been found to be inhibited by body fluids. Results We report here that a unique procedure, combining separation steps that rely on antibody-antigen interactions, magnetic forces applied to magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) and the specificity of the actomyosin bond, can circumvent the deleterious effects of body fluids (e.g. blood serum). The procedure encompasses the following steps: (i) capture of analyte molecules from serum by MP-antibody conjugates, (ii) pelleting of MP-antibody-analyte complexes, using a magnetic field, followed by exchange of serum for optimized biological buffer, (iii) mixing of MP-antibody-analyte complexes with actin filaments conjugated with same polyclonal antibodies as the magnetic nanoparticles. This causes complex formation: MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin, and magnetic separation is used to enrich the complexes. Finally (iv) the complexes are introduced into a nanodevice for specific binding via actin filaments to surface adsorbed molecular motors (heavy meromyosin). The number of actin filaments bound to the motors in the latter step was significantly increased above the control value if protein analyte (50–60 nM) was present in serum (in step i) suggesting appreciable formation and enrichment of the MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin complexes. Furthermore, addition of ATP demonstrated maintained heavy meromyosin driven propulsion of actin filaments showing that the serum induced inhibition was alleviated. Detailed analysis of the procedure i-iv, using fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy identified main targets for future optimization. Conclusion The results demonstrate a promising approach for

  11. Design of a reluctance motor with increased efficiency and power factor for widespread industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, P.; Pieper, W.

    1981-09-01

    The motors were designed in the range of 0.6-4 kW with 4-pole windings. An increase of nominal power by approximately 100%, and an increase of quality factor by approximately 50% are reported. The efficiency is equal to asynchronous motors of the same IEC size.

  12. Design and evaluation of a computerized test for hand motor skills.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Chang, Cheng-Sian; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chiu, Ching-Tsun

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to design and develop a computerized test to measure junior high school students' motor skills, specifically their abilities in hand-eye motor coordination and hand motor skills, using the Wii Remote. The hand motor skills computerized test, which is based on the operational examinations in the General Aptitude Test Battery, examines hand and finger dexterity (i.e., motion, rotation, fabrication, and disassembly tests). 55 students participated in the experiment to assess the reliability and validity of the computerized test, which were supported. Information literacy and experience in the use of Wii devices did not affect the reliability. PMID:25068744

  13. Multi-Objective Optimal Design of Switch Reluctance Motors Using Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Mehran; Rashidi, Farzan

    In this paper a design methodology based on multi objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) is presented to design the switched reluctance motors with multiple conflicting objectives such as efficiency, power factor, full load torque, and full load current, specified dimension, weight of cooper and iron and also manufacturing cost. The optimally designed motor is compared with an industrial motor having the same ratings. Results verify that the proposed method gives better performance for the multi-objective optimization problems. The results of optimal design show the reduction in the specified dimension, weight and manufacturing cost, and the improvement in the power factor, full load torque, and efficiency of the motor.A major advantage of the method is its quite short response time in obtaining the optimal design.

  14. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R; Friedman, Thomas B

    2014-08-26

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin-specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end-directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼ 430 nm · s(-1) at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (k(cat) ∼ 6 s(-1)) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (k(det) = 6.2 s(-1)) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  15. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  16. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  17. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  18. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub. PMID:26558887

  19. Genetic algorithm based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, P. R.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor is presented in this paper. A 70 W, 350 rpm, ceiling fan motor with radial-filed configuration is designed by considering the efficiency as the objective function. Temperature-rise and motor weight are the constraints and the slot electric loading, magnet-fraction, slot-fraction, airgap, and airgap flux density are the design variables. The efficiency and the phase-inductance of the motor designed using the developed CAD program are improved by using the GA based optimization technique; from 84.75% and 5.55 mH to 86.06% and 2.4 mH, respectively.

  20. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  1. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-01-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion. Images Scheme 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:8789082

  2. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps. PMID:27564000

  3. Molecular motor-induced instabilities and cross linkers determine biopolymer organization.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Kas, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Leipzig; Univ. of Texas at Austin; Univ. Bayreuth

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization.

  4. Design of motion adjusting system for space camera based on ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Jin, Guang; Gu, Song; Yan, Yong; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2011-08-01

    Drift angle is a transverse intersection angle of vector of image motion of the space camera. Adjusting the angle could reduce the influence on image quality. Ultrasonic motor (USM) is a new type of actuator using ultrasonic wave stimulated by piezoelectric ceramics. They have many advantages in comparison with conventional electromagnetic motors. In this paper, some improvement was designed for control system of drift adjusting mechanism. Based on ultrasonic motor T-60 was designed the drift adjusting system, which is composed of the drift adjusting mechanical frame, the ultrasonic motor, the driver of Ultrasonic Motor, the photoelectric encoder and the drift adjusting controller. The TMS320F28335 DSP was adopted as the calculation and control processor, photoelectric encoder was used as sensor of position closed loop system and the voltage driving circuit designed as generator of ultrasonic wave. It was built the mathematic model of drive circuit of the ultrasonic motor T-60 using matlab modules. In order to verify the validity of the drift adjusting system, was introduced the source of the disturbance, and made simulation analysis. It designed the control systems of motor drive for drift adjusting system with the improved PID control. The drift angle adjusting system has such advantages as the small space, simple configuration, high position control precision, fine repeatability, self locking property and low powers. It showed that the system could accomplish the mission of drift angle adjusting excellent.

  5. A.C. motors for high-performance drives: A design-based comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Vagati, A.; Fratta, A.; Franceschini, G.; Rosso, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Three AC motors are compared, for application in high-performance controlled drives: induction, brushless and synchronous reluctance motors. Their design is optimized, under common design assumptions. Then, the given stall-torques are compared to each other. In addition, the quadrature reactances are compared, as affecting overload and flux-weakening performances. Last, applicative considerations are given, thus defining the most suitable solution for each field.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  7. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Kristen M.; Bishop, Darryl L.; Saunders, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly. PMID:21760798

  8. Thermal fluctuation statistics in a molecular motor described by a multidimensional master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, K. J.; Jack, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of thermal fluctuation statistics in a molecular motor. Energy transfer in the motor is described using a multidimensional discrete master equation with nearest-neighbor hopping. In this theory, energy transfer leads to statistical correlations between thermal fluctuations in different degrees of freedom. For long times, the energy transfer is a multivariate diffusion process with constant drift and diffusion. The fluctuations and drift align in the strong-coupling limit enabling a one-dimensional description along the coupled coordinate. We derive formal expressions for the probability distribution and simulate single trajectories of the system in the near- and far-from-equilibrium limits both for strong and weak coupling. Our results show that the hopping statistics provide an opportunity to distinguish different operating regimes.

  9. Molecular motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs): structure, cargo and disease.

    PubMed

    Seog, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Dae-Ho; Lee, Sang-Kyoung

    2004-02-01

    Intracellular organelle transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell. Kinesins and kinesin-related proteins make up a large superfamily of molecular motors that transport cargoes such as vesicles, organelles (e.g. mitochondria, peroxisomes, lysosomes), protein complexes (e.g. elements of the cytoskeleton, virus particles), and mRNAs in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Until now, more than 45 kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) have been identified in the mouse and human genomes. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identities of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. This review focuses on the structure, the binding partners of kinesins and kinesin-based human diseases. PMID:14966333

  10. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  11. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  12. Design Method of ILQ Robust Current Control System for Synchronous Reluctance Electrical Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Yoko; Takami, Hiroshi; Fujii, Takao

    In this paper, a robust current control system for a synchronous reluctance electrical motor by an ILQ (Inverse Linear Quadratic) design method is proposed newly. First, for performing simultaneously decouple and large region linearization of an d-q axes system in the synchronous reluctance electrical motor using nonlinear state feedback, it is derived that a linear current-voltage state equation linearized model by the d-q axes decouple of the synchronous reluctance electrical motor. Next, according to the ILQ design method, an optimum solution and an optimal condition that achieve the robust current control system for the synchronous reluctance electrical motor are analytically derived, then the robust current control system can be designed. Finally, in practical experiments, we compare the proposed method with the PI (Proportional Integral) control method, the creativity and the usefulness of the proposed method are confirmed by experimental results.

  13. Design of a Subscale Propellant Slag Evaluation Motor Using Two-Phase Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Dill, Richard A.; Purinton, David C.; Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1996-01-01

    Small pressure perturbations in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) are caused by the periodic expulsion of molten aluminum oxide slag from a pool that collects in the aft end of the motor around the submerged nozzle nose during the last half of motor operation. It is suspected that some motors produce more slag than others due to differences in aluminum oxide agglomerate particle sizes that may relate to subtle differences in propellant ingredient characteristics such as particle size distributions or processing variations. A subscale motor experiment was designed to determine the effect of propellant ingredient characteristics on the propensity for slag production. An existing 5 inch ballistic test motor was selected as the basic test vehicle. The standard converging/diverging nozzle was replaced with a submerged nose nozzle design to provide a positive trap for the slag that would increase the measured slag weights. Two-phase fluid dynamic analyses were performed to develop a nozzle nose design that maintained similitude in major flow field features with the full scale RSRM. The 5 inch motor was spun about its longitudinal axis to further enhance slag collection and retention. Two-phase flow analysis was used to select an appropriate spin rate along with other considerations, such as avoiding bum rate increases due to radial acceleration effects. Aluminum oxide particle distributions used in the flow analyses were measured in a quench bomb for RSRM type propellants with minor variations in ingredient characteristics. Detailed predictions for slag accumulation weights during motor bum compared favorably with slag weight data taken from defined zones in the subscale motor and nozzle. The use of two-phase flow analysis proved successful in gauging the viability of the experimental program during the planning phase and in guiding the design of the critical submerged nose nozzle.

  14. Design of single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lien-Kai; Tsai, Mi-Ching

    2016-05-01

    Most screw-thread-type ultrasonic motors are designed to be two-phase driven. This paper aims to present a novel single phase driven design that generates the required wobble motion, thus significantly simplifying the driving circuit of the ultrasonic motor. The proposed single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor works with two orthogonal bending modes generated by an asymmetric stator design. The novel stator design can improve the vibration displacement and further enhance the performance of the single phase driven motor. The vibration characteristics of the asymmetric stator structure were analyzed by ANSYS finite element analysis software. Based on the design and analysis processes, a prototype of the desired screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor was fabricated and tested. When the operating voltage is 200 Vpp, the obtained main characteristics of the proposed motor are as follows: the working frequency is between 28.3 and 29.5 kHz; the maximum no-load velocity is approximately 4.1 mm s-1; and the thrust force is 1.6 N.

  15. Quantification of the effects of molecular marker oxidation on source apportionment estimates for motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anirban A.; Wagstrom, Kristina M.; Adams, Peter J.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2011-06-01

    Molecular markers are individual organic compounds used in receptor models to apportion fine particulate matter to sources. These models currently assume that molecular markers are chemically stable; however, recent laboratory experiments suggest they may be significantly oxidized on atmospherically relevant time scales. To investigate the effects of photo-oxidation, we extended a 3-D chemical transport model (PMCAMx) to simulate norhopane concentrations over the eastern United States during July 2001. Norhopane is an important molecular marker for motor vehicle exhaust. We examined eight different simulation scenarios, using different combinations of reaction rates and source profiles. The simulations including norhopane oxidation better reproduced the observed spatial patterns of norhopane concentrations than the non-reactive cases. Chemical mass balance (CMB) analysis was performed using the PMCAMx-predicted motor vehicle norhopane and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations to quantify the bias caused by oxidation on source apportionment estimates. Norhopane oxidation caused CMB to underestimate total vehicle OC by 10-50%, with larger biases in rural areas. This underestimation was largely due to changes in the amount of OC apportioned to gasoline vehicles which was reduced by as much as 100%. The OC apportioned to diesel vehicle emissions was relatively insensitive to norhopane reaction. Therefore, oxidation can substantially alter CMB estimates regarding the relative importance of gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions.

  16. Rotor resistance estimator design for indirect field-oriented induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhui; Wu, Zhong

    2006-11-01

    Exact information of the rotor resistance is the key to realize high-performance indirect field-oriented control of the induction motors. However, rotor resistance is time-varying when the motor works. Therefore, a new estimator of the rotor resistance is designed for the indirect field-oriented induction motors to attenuate the effect of the rotor resistance uncertainty. This estimator is derived from the steady-state procedure of the rotor flux using Lyapunov stability theory. Furthermore, this estimator is shown to be able to minimize the steady-state error the rotor flux and improve the control performance of the induction motor drive effectively. Compared with the previous studies, this estimator has a simple form and is easy to implement. Simulation results of a certain IFOC induction motor indicate that the estimator presented above is feasible.

  17. Design of permanent magnets to chaoize doubly salient permanent magnet motors for electric compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, K. T.; Wang, Zheng

    2006-04-01

    This article proposes and implements a class of chaotic motors for electric compaction. The key is to develop a design approach for the permanent magnets (PMs) of doubly salient PM (DSPM) motors in such a way that chaotic motion can be naturally produced. The bifurcation diagram is employed to derive the threshold of chaoization in terms of PM flux, while the corresponding phase-plane trajectories are used to characterize the chaotic motion. A practical three-phase 12/8-pole DSPM motor is used for exemplification. The proposed chaotic motor is critically assessed for application to a vibratory soil compactor, which is proven to offer better compaction performance than its counterparts. Both computer simulation and experimental results are given to illustrate the proposed chaotic motor.

  18. Design and testing of AMROC's 250,000 pound thrust hybrid motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, J. S.; Kniffen, R. J.; Lichatowich, J.

    1993-06-01

    The American Rocket Company is developing a 250,000 pound thrust liquid oxygen/polybutadiene hybrid rocket motor for use on future space launch vehicles. Designated the H-1800 hybrid motor, this commercial development effort is unique in that it is being funded solely by private investment. The first test of the motor, Development Motor number one (DM-01) was conducted in January 1993. This paper describes the development project that led to the test firing and the basic performance parameters of the motor. Test stand and data acquisition and control system features will be discussed. The test results will be presented and compared with performance predictions. Schedules for future testing and implementation of this hybrid booster will be described.

  19. Automatic Molecular Design using Evolutionary Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Molecular nanotechnology is the precise, three-dimensional control of materials and devices at the atomic scale. An important part of nanotechnology is the design of molecules for specific purposes. This paper describes early results using genetic software techniques to automatically design molecules under the control of a fitness function. The fitness function must be capable of determining which of two arbitrary molecules is better for a specific task. The software begins by generating a population of random molecules. The population is then evolved towards greater fitness by randomly combining parts of the better individuals to create new molecules. These new molecules then replace some of the worst molecules in the population. The unique aspect of our approach is that we apply genetic crossover to molecules represented by graphs, i.e., sets of atoms and the bonds that connect them. We present evidence suggesting that crossover alone, operating on graphs, can evolve any possible molecule given an appropriate fitness function and a population containing both rings and chains. Prior work evolved strings or trees that were subsequently processed to generate molecular graphs. In principle, genetic graph software should be able to evolve other graph representable systems such as circuits, transportation networks, metabolic pathways, computer networks, etc.

  20. From lipid second messengers to molecular motors: microtubule-organizing center reorientation in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Morgan; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Summary In T lymphocytes, polarization of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) to the immunological synapse enables the directional secretion of cytokines, cytolytic factors, and other soluble molecules toward the antigen-presenting cell. This is likely to be crucial for maintaining the specificity of T-cell effector responses. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of MTOC reorientation in T cells, focusing first on the importance of diacylglycerol and protein kinase C isozymes and then on the molecular motor proteins that function downstream to drive MTOC movement. PMID:24117815

  1. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  2. Large-scale hybrid motor performance and designs for use in launch vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittie, K. J.; Estey, P.

    1993-11-01

    The American Rocket Company has developed two large-scale liquid oxygen/polybutadiene hybrid rocket motors at 334,000 N (75,000 lbf) and 1,112,000 N (250,000 lbf) thrust. These hybrid rocket motors or derivatives of these motors can be used as strap-on boosters to replace or upgrade the existing strap-on boosters for the fleet of U.S. launch vehicles and for the planned next generation launch vehicle. Hybrid rocket boosters offer a new solution for boost propulsion since hybrids solve many of the safety and environmental concerns facing solid rocket motor manufacture and operation, yet deliver performance comparable to liquid rocket engines with much less hardware and operational complexity. This paper presents motor performance data from AMROC's 334,000 N and 1,112,000 N thrust hybrid rocket motors. A description of these hybrid motors, their performance specifications, and the key enabling technologies that have been developed at AMROC is presented. The design and development approach for an 850K thrust hybrid motor is described.

  3. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel molecular motor, Leishmania myosin-XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Woodall, Katy A; Toseland, Christopher P; Hundschell, Christian; Veigel, Claudia

    2012-08-10

    The genome of the Leishmania parasite contains two classes of myosin. Myosin-XXI, seemingly the only myosin isoform expressed in the protozoan parasite, has been detected in both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the Leishmania life cycle. It has been suggested to perform a variety of functions, including roles in membrane anchorage, but also long-range directed movements of cargo. However, nothing is known about the biochemical or mechanical properties of this motor. Here we designed and expressed various myosin-XXI constructs using a baculovirus expression system. Both full-length (amino acids 1-1051) and minimal motor domain constructs (amino acids 1-800) featured actin-activated ATPase activity. Myosin-XXI was soluble when expressed either with or without calmodulin. In the presence of calcium (pCa 4.1) the full-length motor could bind a single calmodulin at its neck domain (probably amino acids 809-823). Calmodulin binding was required for motility but not for ATPase activity. Once bound, calmodulin remained stably attached independent of calcium concentration (pCa 3-7). In gliding filament assays, myosin-XXI moved actin filaments at ∼15 nm/s, insensitive to both salt (25-1000 mm KCl) and calcium concentrations (pCa 3-7). Calmodulin binding to the neck domain might be involved in regulating the motility of the myosin-XXI motor for its various cellular functions in the different stages of the Leishmania parasite life cycle. PMID:22718767

  4. Design of high precision motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Haoran; Bai, Baoping; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Yanan; Wang, Yi; Yu, Daoyin

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment. It was designed to guarantee the motor rotating at a relatively constant speed in load fluctuation conditions, which result from the bending and twisting of the flexible shaft which connects the probe to the motor. A hardware feedback circuit based on Frequency-To-Voltage Converter LM331 and Step-Down Voltage Regulator LM2576-ADJ was designed to ensure steady rotation of motor in load fluctuation conditions, and a D/A module offered by MCU was used to regulate the real-time rotary speed. The feedback response cycle is about 20 μs according to theoretical analysis. Experimental results show that the maximum error is +/-1 r/min under the normal running environment (300 ~1500 r/min) and load fluctuation conditions, which means the average instability is reduced to 0.11% as compared with that of the motor drive simply based on MCU which is 0.94%. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the motor driving system has high accuracy, fast response, excellent reliability and good versatility and portability, and can precisely guarantee the smooth movement of load-changing PMW (Pulse Width Modulation) motor, so as to ensure the imaging quality, and can effectively improve the efficiency and accuracy of the diagnosis.

  5. Specifically designed physical exercise programs improve children's motor abilities.

    PubMed

    Chiodera, P; Volta, E; Gobbi, G; Milioli, M A; Mirandola, P; Bonetti, A; Delsignore, R; Bernasconi, S; Anedda, A; Vitale, M

    2008-04-01

    Physical activity in schools is declining in many countries and inactivity in childhood has become a recognized risk factor. Data from a program of professionally guided physical exercise in primary school children were collected before and after the academic year of training. Four thousand five hundred children (6-10 years) were enrolled, and conditional and coordinative motor abilities (speed, trunk flexibility, long jumping, somersault, Harre circuit test) were measured. Anthropometric measurements were focused on body mass index (BMI), weight and height. Females never showed a significant variation of BMI, whereas males in the first and fourth grades showed significant differences. On the contrary, when considering the motor abilities studied, all the comparisons were highly significant. At the end of training, both males and females did better than at the beginning, and males were constantly faster than females. Our data, generated on a large number of children, show that professionally guided programs of physical education in the primary school lead to significant progresses in the development of conditional and coordinative abilities, without altering BMI values, thus not interfering with the balanced progression of body weight and height. PMID:17490452

  6. Statistical analysis of the motility of nano-objects propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, Raquel C.; Bakewell, David; Nicolau, Dan

    2008-02-01

    Motility assays are the tools of choice for the studies regarding the motility of protein molecular motors in vitro. Despite their wide usage, some simple, but fundamental issues still need to be specifically addressed in order to achieve the best and the most meaningful motility analyses. Several tracking methods used for the study of motility have been compared. By running different statistical analyses, the impact of space versus time resolution was also studied. It has been found that for a space resolution of 80 nm and 145 nm per pixel for kinesin-microtubule and actomyosin assays, respectively, the best time resolution was ~0.9 and ~10 frame per second, respectively. A rough relationship - Ratio A and Ratio M - between space and time resolutions and velocity for actin filaments and microtubules, respectively, was found. The motility parameters such as velocity, acceleration and deflection angle were statistically analysed in frequency distribution and time domain graphs for both motors assays. One of the aims of these analyses was to study if one or two populations were present in either assay. Particularly for actomyosin assays, electric fields varying from 0 to ~10000 Vm -1 were applied and the previous parameters and the angle between filaments motion and the electric field vector were also statistically analysed. It was observed that this angle was reduced by ~55º with ~5900 Vm -1. The overall behaviour of the motors was discussed bearing in mind both present and previous results and some physio-biological characteristics. Kinesin-microtubule and actomyosin (simple and electric fields) assays were compared. Some new experiments are suggested in order to accomplish a better understanding of these motors and optimise their role in the applications that depend on them.

  7. Totally asymmetric simple exclusion process simulations of molecular motor transport on random networks with asymmetric exit rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, D. V.; Miedema, D. M.; Nienhuis, B.; Schall, P.

    2015-11-01

    Using the totally asymmetric simple-exclusion-process and mean-field transport theory, we investigate the transport in closed random networks with simple crossing topology—two incoming, two outgoing segments, as a model for molecular motor motion along biopolymer networks. Inspired by in vitro observation of molecular motor motion, we model the motor behavior at the intersections by introducing different exit rates for the two outgoing segments. Our simulations of this simple network reveal surprisingly rich behavior of the transport current with respect to the global density and exit rate ratio. For asymmetric exit rates, we find a broad current plateau at intermediate motor densities resulting from the competition of two subnetwork populations. This current plateau leads to stabilization of transport properties within such networks.

  8. Mouse Myosin-19 Is a Plus-end-directed, High-duty Ratio Molecular Motor*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zekuan; Ma, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Ji, Huan-Hong; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Dan; Sun, Yujie; Li, Xiang-dong

    2014-01-01

    Class XIX myosin (Myo19) is a vertebrate-specific unconventional myosin, responsible for the transport of mitochondria. To characterize biochemical properties of Myo19, we prepared recombinant mouse Myo19-truncated constructs containing the motor domain and the IQ motifs using the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. We identified regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle/non-muscle myosin-2 as the light chain of Myo19. The actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding velocity of Myo19-truncated constructs were about one-third and one-sixth as those of myosin-5a, respectively. The apparent affinity of Myo19 to actin was about the same as that of myosin-5a. The RLCs bound to Myo19 could be phosphorylated by myosin light chain kinase, but this phosphorylation had little effect on the actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Using dual fluorescence-labeled actin filaments, we determined that Myo19 is a plus-end-directed molecular motor. We found that, similar to that of the high-duty ratio myosin, such as myosin-5a, ADP release rate was comparable with the maximal actin-activated ATPase activity of Myo19, indicating that ADP release is a rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle of acto-Myo19. ADP strongly inhibited the actin-activated ATPase activity and actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Based on the above results, we concluded that Myo19 is a high-duty ratio molecular motor moving to the plus-end of the actin filament. PMID:24825904

  9. Design and test of a four channel motor for electromechanical flight control actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    To provide a suitable electromagnetic torque summing approach to flight control system redundancy, a four channel motor capable of sustaining full performance after any two credible failures was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design consists of a single samarium cobalt permanent magnet rotor with four separate three phase windings arrayed in individual stator quadrants around the periphery. Trade studies established the sensitivities of weight and performance to such parameters as design speed, winding pattern, number of poles, magnet configuration, and strength. The motor electromagnetically sums the torque of the individual channels on a single rotor and eliminate complex mechanical gearing arrangements.

  10. A Controlled Single Subject Research Design Utilizing a Sensory Motor Intervention System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowden, Joey

    The study investigated and recorded changes in selected psychomotor skills of an 11-year old gifted male with severe motoric problems identified as dysgraphia. A pre-post test design using videotape evaluation recordings was employed to determine changes in psychomotor performance, and a rating scale was designed to establish baseline and…

  11. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept. PMID:27336793

  12. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for national endorsement as designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... qualified member of the engine department or equivalent position; (2) For designated duty engineer of steam... engine department or equivalent position; and (3) For designated duty engineer of steam, motor, and/or... designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.524 Section...

  13. Molecular Motor Propelled Filaments Reveal Light-Guiding in Nanowire Arrays for Enhanced Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowire arrays offer significant potential for biosensing applications with optical read-out due to their high surface area and due to the unique optical properties of one-dimensional materials. A challenge for optical read-out of analyte-binding to the nanowires is the need to efficiently collect and detect light from a three-dimensional volume. Here we show that light from fluorophores attached along several μm long vertical Al2O3 coated gallium phosphide nanowires couples into the wires, is guided along them and emitted at the tip. This enables effective collection of light emitted by fluorescent analytes located at different focal planes along the nanowire. We unequivocally demonstrate the light-guiding effect using a novel method whereby the changes in emitted fluorescence intensity are observed when fluorescent cytoskeletal filaments are propelled by molecular motors along the wires. The findings are discussed in relation to nanobiosensor developments, other nanotechnological applications, and fundamental studies of motor function. PMID:24367994

  14. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA+ ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named ‘the ADP model’ and ‘the ATP model’, where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA+ ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  15. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA(+) ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named 'the ADP model' and 'the ATP model', where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA(+) ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  16. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  17. Optimization of brushless direct current motor design using an intelligent technique.

    PubMed

    Shabanian, Alireza; Tousiwas, Armin Amini Poustchi; Pourmandi, Massoud; Khormali, Aminollah; Ataei, Abdolhay

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using an improved bee algorithm (IBA). The characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. This method is based on the capability of swarm-based algorithms in finding the optimal solution. One sample case is used to illustrate the performance of the design approach and optimization technique. The IBA has a better performance and speed of convergence compared with bee algorithm (BA). Simulation results show that the proposed method has a very high/efficient performance. PMID:25841938

  18. Design, modeling and control of a novel multi functional translational-rotary micro ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncdemir, Safakcan

    The major goal of this thesis was to design and develop an actuator, which is capable of producing translational and rotary output motions in a compact structure with simple driving conditions, for the needs of small-scale actuators for micro robotic systems. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors were selected as the target actuator schemes because of their unbeatable characteristics in the meso-scale range, which covers the structure sizes from hundred micrometers to ten millimeters and with operating ranges from few nanometers to centimeters. In order to meet the objectives and the design constraints, a number of key research tasks had to be undertaken. The design constraints and objectives were so stringent and entangled that none of the existing methods in literature could solve the research problems individually. Therefore, several unique methods were established to accomplish the research objectives. The methods produced novel solutions at every stage of design, development and modeling of the multi functional micro ultrasonic motor. Specifically, an ultrasonic motor utilizing slanted ceramics on a brass rod was designed. Because of the unique slanted ceramics design, longitudinal and torsional mode vibration modes could be obtained on the same structure. A ring shaped mobile element was loosely fitted on the metal rod stator. The mobile element moved in translational or rotational, depending on whether the vibration mode was longitudinal or torsional. A new ultrasonic motor drive method was required because none of the existing ultrasonic motor drive techniques were able to provide both output modes in a compact and cylindrical structure with the use of single drive source. By making use of rectangular wave drive signals, saw-tooth shaped displacement profile could be obtained at longitudinal and torsional resonance modes. Thus, inheriting the operating principle of smooth impact drive method, a new resonance type inertial drive was introduced. This new technique

  19. Prediction of induction motor line current spectra from design data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldemir, Hanifi

    The thesis concentrates on the estimation of the magnitude and frequency of the spectral components of line current that may be used for sensorless speed detection. The prediction method uses a mixture of permeance-mmf, finite element and reluctance mesh techniques to establish the air gap magnetic field. This traditional type of approach is chosen to maintain a visible link between cause and effect so enhancing understanding. The approach is enhanced by the use of slot permanence effects calculated by finite element techniques where saturation due to the current carrying conductors in the slots is incorporated. This is essential for closed slots. Further enhancements include examining slot permeance effects over one or more poles so that the influence of the spatial distribution of slot currents, and slot top saturation can be incorporated. The harmonic chain equivalent circuit is extensively modified to provide a vehicle for predicting the correct saturation conditions in a skewed machine and the correct winding currents for the field solutions. Rotor pole aliasing is introduced to explain the large number of independent speed harmonic terms found experimentally. Special equivalent circuits are introduced to enable these current harmonic to be predicted. A thorough experimental validation is then conducted of the model using a 30 kW experimental machine with adjustable eccentricity with rotors of different slotting form, slot number and skew to determine their effect on the speed dependent harmonic components. Very good agreement is demonstrated. Finally, the improved prediction model is used to provide information on the significance of saturation, skew, slot number and rotor eccentricity on the level of speed dependent harmonic signals. All of this information helps formulate important rules to assist in the choice of motors for satisfactory operation with sensorless speed control of drives using RSH. This in itself is an important extension to the knowledge

  20. Design and construction of a wheel-directly-coupled axial-flux PM motor prototype for EVs

    SciTech Connect

    Caricchi, F.; Crescimbini, F.; Fedeli, E.; Noioa, G.

    1994-12-31

    In electric vehicle (EV) motor drives, the use of a low-speed motor coupled directly to the wheel axle allows a reduction of the vehicle weight and an improvement in the drive efficiency. Slotless axial-flux PM motors are particularly suited for such an application, since they can be designed for high torque-to-weight ratio and efficiency. This paper deals with a 16 poles axial-flux PM motor prototype which is used in the propulsion drive of an electrical scooter. The motor prototype has 45 Nm peak torque, 6.8 kg active materials weight, and is coupled directly to the scooter rear wheel. The paper discusses design and construction of the motor prototype, and reports experimental results achieved from laboratory tests. Finally, details concerning the arrangement of the scooter motor drive are given. 6 refs.

  1. Molecular motor KIF1C is not essential for mouse survival and motor-dependent retrograde Golgi apparatus-to-endoplasmic reticulum transport.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Takei, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yosuke; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Nakata, Takao; Noda, Yasuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2002-02-01

    KIF1C is a new member of the kinesin superfamily of proteins (KIFs), which act as microtubule-based molecular motors involved in intracellular transport. We cloned full-length mouse kif1C cDNA, which turned out to have a high homology to a mitochondrial motor KIF1Balpha and to be expressed ubiquitously. To investigate the in vivo significance of KIF1C, we generated kif1C(-/-) mice by knocking in the beta-galactosidase gene into the motor domain of kif1C gene. On staining of LacZ, we detected its expression in the heart, liver, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Unexpectedly, kif1C(-/-) mice were viable and showed no obvious abnormalities. Because immunocytochemistry showed partial colocalization of KIF1C with the Golgi marker protein, we compared the organelle distribution in primary lung fibroblasts from kif1C(+/+) and kif1C(-/-) mice. We found that there was no significant difference in the distribution of the Golgi apparatus or in the transport from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) facilitated by brefeldin A between the two cells. This retrograde membrane transport was further confirmed to be normal by time-lapse analysis. Consequently, KIF1C is dispensable for the motor-dependent retrograde transport from the Golgi apparatus to the ER. PMID:11784862

  2. Electric motor/controller design tradeoffs for noise, weight, and efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, N.L.; Brown, G.W.

    1994-12-31

    It is common for an AUV [Autonomous Underwater Vehicle] designer to be put in the position of a subsystem hardware integrator. In the case of electric motors and controllers this may be more by necessity than choice because a suitable subsystems supplier cannot be found. As a result, motors and controllers are purchased from various manufacturers who may optimize the design of each part but hold system performance secondary in importance. Unlike hydraulics, an electric motor/controller system presents significant opportunities to improve noise, weight, and efficiency. But, these opportunities can best be recognized by a single source who not only understands the technology but has the ability to implement them in the development and manufacture of the product. An analysis is presented which explains the various design considerations of noise, weight and efficiency of electric motors and controllers for submersible AUV`s. In concert with the design considerations, their interrelationships are discussed as to how they affect each other in the overall optimization of the system. In conclusion, a matrix is created which shows how the resultant system parameters of noise, weight, and efficiency may be ``traded off`` to tailor the best overall system for the application. 1 ref.

  3. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  4. The Utilization of Sensori-motor Experiences for Introducing Young Pupils to Molecular Motion: A Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Does a sensori-motor experience help a physics student understand the movement of molecules in solids, liquids, and gases? Students aged 9-10 were given either traditional demonstrations of solids, liquids, and gases and the variation of molecular motion with temperature (iconic presentation), or they were involved in physical activities as they…

  5. Controlled Directional Motions of Molecular Vehicles, Rotors, and Motors: From Metallic to Silicon Surfaces, a Strategy to Operate at Higher Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chérioux, Frédéric; Galangau, Olivier; Palmino, Frank; Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2016-06-17

    In the last decade, many nanomachines with controlled molecular motions have been studied, mainly on metallic surfaces, which are easy to obtain very clean, and are stable over months. However, the studies of mechanical properties of nanomachines are mainly performed at very low temperatures, usually between 5 and 80 K, which prevents any kind of applications. In this Minireview, we will present our strategy to operate at higher temperatures, in particular through the use of semiconducting silicon surfaces. We also review our best achievements in the field through some examples of rotating molecular machines that have been designed, synthesized, and studied in our groups. On metallic surfaces, the nanovehicles are molecules with two or four triptycenes as wheels and the molecular motor is built around a ruthenium organometallic center with a piano-stool geometry and peripheric ferrocenyl groups. On semiconducting silicon surfaces, vehicles are also made from triptycene fragments and the rotor is a pentaphenylbenzene molecule. PMID:26604073

  6. The Molecular Basis of Frictional Loads in the In Vitro Motility Assay with Applications to the Study of the Loaded Mechanochemistry of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical movement, generating forces necessary to accomplish an array of cellular functions. Since molecular motors generate force, they typically work under loaded conditions where the motor mechanochemistry is altered by the presence of a load. Several biophysical techniques have been developed to study the loaded behavior and force generating capabilities of molecular motors yet most of these techniques require specialized equipment. The frictional loading assay is a modification to the in vitro motility assay that can be performed on a standard epifluorescence microscope, permitting the high-throughput measurement of the loaded mechanochemistry of molecular motors. Here, we describe a model for the molecular basis of the frictional loading assay by modeling the load as a series of either elastic or viscoelastic elements. The model, which calculates the frictional loads imposed by different binding proteins, permits the measurement of isotonic kinetics, force-velocity relationships, and power curves in the motility assay. We show computationally and experimentally that the frictional load imposed by alpha-actinin, the most widely employed actin binding protein in frictional loading experiments, behaves as a viscoelastic rather than purely elastic load. As a test of the model, we examined the frictional loading behavior of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin under normal and fatigue-like conditions using alpha-actinin as a load. We found that, consistent with fiber studies, fatigue-like conditions cause reductions in myosin isometric force, unloaded sliding velocity, maximal power output, and shift the load at which peak power output occurs. PMID:20191566

  7. Advantages of switched reluctance motor applications to EV and HEV: Design and control issues

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, K.M.; Fahimi, B.; Suresh, G.; Rajarathnam, A.V.; Ehsani, M.

    2000-02-01

    Land vehicles need their drivetrain to operate entirely in constant power in order to meet their operational constraints, such as initial acceleration and gradability, with minimum power rating. The internal combustion engine (ICE) is inappropriate for producing this torque-speed profile. Therefore, multiple gear transmission is necessary with the ICE in a vehicle. Some electric machines, if designed and controlled appropriately, are capable of producing an extended constant power range. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of the switched reluctance motor (SRM) for electric vehicle and hybrid electric vehicle applications. This investigation will be carried out in two steps. The first step involves the machine design and the finite-element analysis to obtain the static characteristic of the motor. In the second step, the finite-element field solutions are used in the development of a nonlinear model to investigate the dynamic performance of the designed motor. Several 8-6 and 6-4 SRM geometries will be investigated. Effects of different stator and rotor pole widths and pole heights on the steady state as well as on the dynamic performance of the motor will be studied. The air gap for each motor will be made as small as manufacturally possible. The aspects of performance to be compared for each design motor are: (1) the range of the constant power operation; (2) drive efficiency in this extended constant power range; (3) the power factor in this operational range; and (4) the short time overload capability. The first performance index defines the rated power of the motor. The longer the constant power range, the lower is the power rating for the same vehicle performance. In the high-speed operation of the SRM, there will be considerable phase overlapping. Hence, thicker back iron than usual might be needed to prevent the back iron from saturating. However, since flux peaking of each phase occurs at different rotor positions, the phase

  8. Effect of design variables on irreversible magnet demagnetization in brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Heoung; Lee, Ju

    2005-05-01

    The large demagnetizing currents in brushless dc (BLdc) motor are generated by the short-circuited stator windings and the fault of a drive circuit. So, irreversible magnet demagnetization occurs due to the external demagnetizing field by these currents. In this paper, we deal with the effect of design variables on irreversible magnet demagnetization in BLdc motor through the modeling approach using a two-dimensional finite-element method (2D FEM). The nonlinear analysis of a permanent magnet is added to 2D FEM to consider irreversible demagnetization. As a result, it is shown that magnet thickness, teeth surface width, and rotor back yoke thickness are the most important geometrical dimensions of BLdc motor in terms of irreversible magnet demagnetization.

  9. Optimum Design of Thrust Air Bearing for Hard Disk Drive Spindle Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Danial; Namba, Tadashi; Ochiai, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Hiromu

    This paper describes the application of geometry optimization method proposed by Hashimoto to the design of air lubricated thrust bearings used for HDD spindle motors. The optimization is carried out to maximize the dynamic stiffness of air films because the low stiffness is a serious problem of thrust air bearings in the actual application to HDD spindle motor. The optimized dynamic stiffnesses are obtained by changing the allowable film thickness, which is corresponding to the tolerance of bearings. The results obtained show that the optimized thrust air bearings have the comparable stiffness to the oil lubricated thrust bearings and it is verified theoretically that this type of thrust air bearing can be used for HDD spindle motors.

  10. Designed self-assembly of molecular necklaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Min; Kim, Soo-Young; Heo, Jungseok; Whang, Dongmok; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Kim, Kimoon

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports an efficient strategy to synthesize molecular necklaces, in which a number of small rings are threaded onto a large ring, utilizing the principles of self-assembly and coordination chemistry. Our strategy involves (1) threading a molecular "bead" with a short "string" to make a pseudorotaxane and then (2) linking the pseudorotaxanes with a metal complex with two cis labile ligands acting as an "angle connector" to form a cyclic product (molecular necklace). A 4- or 3-pyridylmethyl group is attached to each end of 1,4-diaminobutane or 1,5-diaminopentane to produce the short "strings" (C4N4(2+), C4N3(2+), C5N4(2+), and C5N3(2+)), which then react with a cucurbituril (CB) "bead" to form stable pseudorotaxanes (PR44(2+), PR43(2+), PR54(2+), and PR53(2+), respectively). The reaction of the pseudorotaxanes with Pt(en)(NO(3))(2) (en = ethylenediamine) produces a molecular necklace [4]MN, in which three molecular "beads" are threaded on a triangular framework, and/or a molecular necklace [5]MN, in which four molecular "beads" are threaded on a square framework. Under refluxing conditions, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) yields exclusively [4]MN (MN44T or MN54T, respectively), whereas that with PR43(2+) or PR53(2+) produces exclusively [5]MN (MN43S or MN53S, respectively). The products have been characterized by various methods including X-ray crystallography. At lower temperatures, on the other hand, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) affords both [4]MN and [5]MN. The supermolecules reported here are the first series of molecular necklaces obtained as thermodynamic products. The overall structures of the molecular necklaces are strongly influenced by the structures of pseudorotaxane building blocks, which is discussed in detail on the basis of the X-ray crystal structures. The temperature dependence of the product distribution observed in this self-assembly process is also discussed. PMID:11878967

  11. Design and testing of piezo motors for non-magnetic and/or fine positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, M. F.; Le Letty, R.; Seiler, R.; Coste, P.

    2005-07-01

    Piezoelectric motors offer several outstanding characteristics that may be very interesting for new scientific instruments in space applications. Piezo motors use a combination of electro-mechanical and frictional forces for generating a progressive motion; they are well suited for positioning applications because they exhibit a large force at rest without any power supply, and they often do not require any reduction gear. They are increasingly used in optical applications. Using piezo motors in space applications may become more and more relevant because of the continuous trend towards adaptive optics in future scientific payloads. In general, piezoelectric actuators are more and more used in space. Piezoelectric motors exhibit a number of advantages compared to conventional electromagnetic (stepping) motors, e.g. superior force/mass ratio, improved direct drive capability, no power supply to maintain a position, feasibility of a fully non-magnetic motor design. In this context, two complementary concepts have been designed and evaluated in the frame of ESA funded research and development activities: a resonant concept, called Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA), a quasi-static concept, called Rotary Piezo Motor for High Precision Pointing (RPMHPP). The developed Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA) is based on a Ultrasonic Piezo Drive (UPD) unit that drives a friction ring on the rotor part supported by a ball bearing assembly. This new motorization principle offers excellent motion dynamics and positioning accuracy combined with a high un-powered torque at standstill, and it does not rely on any magnetic features. A rotary piezo motor compliant with the requirements of a reference space application has been designed and tested. The technology remains challenging to be mastered, since the interdisciplinary aspects of the concept include, among others, drive electronics and controller design, piezo-electricity, contact mechanics and tribology. The conceptual design has lead to a

  12. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  13. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  14. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  15. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  16. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  17. Design, analysis, fabrication and test of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The motor case used in the solid propellant booster for the Space Shuttle is unique in many respects, most of which are indigenous to size and special design requirements. The evolution of the case design from initial requirements to finished product is discussed, with increased emphasis of reuse capability, special design features, fracture mechanics and corrosion control. Case fabrication history and the resulting procedure are briefly reviewed with respect to material development, processing techniques and special problem areas. Case assembly, behavior and performance during the DM-1 static firing are reviewed, with appropriate comments and conclusions.

  18. Biorefinery: a design tool for molecular gelators.

    PubMed

    John, George; Shankar, Balachandran Vijai; Jadhav, Swapnil R; Vemula, Praveen Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Molecular gels, the macroscopic products of a nanoscale bottom-up strategy, have emerged as a promising functional soft material. The prospects of tailoring the architecture of gelator molecules have led to the formation of unique, highly tunable gels for a wide spectrum of applications from medicine to electronics. Biorefinery is a concept that integrates the processes of converting biomass/renewable feedstock and the associated infrastructure used to produce chemicals and materials, which is analogous to petroleum-based refinery. The current review assimilates the successful efforts to demonstrate the prospects of the biorefinery concept for developing new amphiphiles as molecular gelators. Amphiphiles based on naturally available raw materials such as amygdalin, vitamin C, cardanol, arjunolic acid, and trehalose that possess specific functionality were synthesized using biocatalysis and/or chemical synthesis. The hydrogels and organogels obtained from such amphiphiles were conceptually demonstrated for diverse applications including drug-delivery systems and the templated synthesis of hybrid materials. PMID:20465204

  19. Molecular Design for Cryogenic Magnetic Coolants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The area of molecular magnetic coolants has developed rapidly in recent years. A large number of competitive candidates have been reported, with the cooling performances chasing each other. In this account, four explicit strategies, namely, increasing ground-state spin, reducing magnetic anisotropy, weakening magnetic interactions, and lowering the molecular weight, are proposed from the theoretical viewpoint towards improving the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). According to this guidance, these successful strategies are discussed to pursue excellent magnetic coolants. This is accompanied by a discussion of the representative examples reported by our group. The magnetic entropy change increases from one compound to another, which in the most pronounced cases is suggestive of being the largest MCE in magnetic coolants. PMID:26929130

  20. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Ryan M.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Pereira, Fred A.; Raphael, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- an C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity. PMID:21651892

  1. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Ryan M; Silberg, Jonathan J; Pereira, Fred A; Raphael, Robert M

    2011-06-24

    Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- and C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity. PMID:21651892

  2. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Dan V.; Lard, Mercy; Korten, Till; van Delft, Falco C. M. J. M.; Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; Månsson, Alf; Diez, Stefan; Linke, Heiner; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2016-01-01

    The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology. PMID:26903637

  3. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, Dan V; Lard, Mercy; Korten, Till; van Delft, Falco C M J M; Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; Månsson, Alf; Diez, Stefan; Linke, Heiner; Nicolau, Dan V

    2016-03-01

    The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology. PMID:26903637

  4. Physics of transport and traffic phenomena in biology: from molecular motors and cells to organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2005-12-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukaryotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Novel efforts have been made to utilize some uni-cellular organisms as “micro-transporters”. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In this review we critically examine the current status of our understanding, expose the limitations of the existing methods, mention open challenging questions and speculate on the possible future directions of research in this interdisciplinary area where physics meets not only chemistry and biology but also (nano-)technology.

  5. Design, manufacture and test of the composite case for ERINT-1 solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mard, Francis

    1993-06-01

    SEP is in charge since 1989 of the ERINT-1 motor case and nozzle. The stringent missile weight and volume requirements coupled with the specification to provide an aerodynamically stable configuration over a very large Mach number range led to the need to develop a high-performance composite motor case. Development of this SRM case presented a variety of technical challenges that were solved by an original design: (1) integral skirts, high bending stiffness, and bending loads are required; (2) high temperature composite stiffness and loads are required up to 160 C; (3) integral fin lugs attachments high aerodynamic loading is required on fin lugs; (4) enclosed fore dome; and (5) aft-pinned joint: a large rear opening is required to cast the propellant. Structural testing in ultimate conditions confirmed the soundness of the design. Positive safety margins were demonstrated on both internal pressure and mechanical loads requirements.

  6. Design optimization of a permanent magnet synchronous motor by the response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Y.; Wakao, S.; Yamashita, A.; Katsuta, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Kondo, M.

    2002-05-01

    This article proposes an effective computational approach to design optimization of an outer-rotor type permanent magnet synchronous motor. As usual, because of the complicated rotor configuration and the complex magnetic saturation effects, it is difficult to design the lightweight permanent magnet synchronous motor structure that makes good use of reluctance torque within an acceptable CPU time. In this article, we adopt the finite element method as a magnetic field analysis method and the genetic algorithms as a search method. Furthermore, the response surface methodology, which enables us to evaluate the objective physical quantities in a much shorter time, is introduced into the above methods in the proposed approach. This optimization approach results in an overall increase in the optimization speed, that is, substantial CPU time reduction in comparison with the case of a conventional one. Some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach are also presented.

  7. Molecular Thermodynamics for Chemical Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses that aspect of thermodynamics which is particularly important in chemical process design: the calculation of the equilibrium properties of fluid mixtures, especially as required in phase-separation operations. (MLH)

  8. Covalent Immobilization of Microtubules on Glass Surfaces for Molecular Motor Force Measurements and Other Single-Molecule Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Rigid attachment of microtubules (MTs) to glass cover slip surfaces is a prerequisite for a variety of microscopy experiments in which MTs are used as substrates for MT-associated proteins, such as the molecular motors kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. We present an MT-surface coupling protocol in which aminosilanized glass is formylated using the cross-linker glutaraldehyde, fluorescence-labeled MTs are covalently attached, and the surface is passivated with highly pure beta-casein. The technique presented here yields rigid MT immobilization while simultaneously blocking the remaining glass surface against nonspecific binding by polystyrene optical trapping microspheres. This surface chemistry is straightforward and relatively cheap and uses a minimum of specialized equipment or hazardous reagents. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of optical tweezers experiments with MT-associated molecular motors and may also be useful in other assays requiring surface-immobilized proteins. PMID:24633798

  9. Synchronization of elastically coupled processive molecular motors and regulation of cargo transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The collective work of motor proteins plays an important role in cellular transport processes. Since measuring intermotor coupling and hence a comparison to theoretical predictions is difficult, we introduce the synchronization as an alternative observable for motor cooperativity. This synchronization can be determined from the ratio of the mean times of motor resting and stepping. Results from a multistate Markov chain model and Brownian dynamics simulations, describing the elastically coupled motors, coincide well. Our model can explain the experimentally observed effect of strongly increased transport velocities and powers by the synchronization and coupling of myosin V and kinesin I.

  10. Actuating Mechanism and Design of a Cylindrical Traveling Wave Ultrasonic Motor Using Cantilever Type Composite Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic motors (USM) are based on the concept of driving the rotor by a mechanical vibration excited on the stator via piezoelectric effect. USM exhibit merits such as simple structure, quick response, quiet operation, self-locking when power off, nonelectromagnetic radiation and higher position accuracy. Principal Findings A cylindrical type traveling wave ultrasonic motor using cantilever type composite transducer was proposed in this paper. There are two cantilevers on the outside surface of cylinder, four longitudinal PZT ceramics are set between the cantilevers, and four bending PZT ceramics are set on each outside surface of cantilevers. Two degenerate flexural vibration modes spatially and temporally orthogonal to each other in the cylinder are excited by the composite transducer. In this new design, a single transducer can excite a flexural traveling wave in the cylinder. Thus, elliptical motions are achieved on the teeth. The actuating mechanism of proposed motor was analyzed. The stator was designed with FEM. The two vibration modes of stator were degenerated. Transient analysis was developed to gain the vibration characteristic of stator, and results indicate the motion trajectories of nodes on the teeth are nearly ellipses. Conclusions The study results verify the feasibility of the proposed design. The wave excited in the cylinder isn't an ideal traveling wave, and the vibration amplitudes are inconsistent. The distortion of traveling wave is generated by the deformation of bending vibration mode of cylinder, which is caused by the coupling effect between the cylinder and transducer. Analysis results also prove that the objective motions of nodes on the teeth are three-dimensional vibrations. But, the vibration in axial direction is minute compared with the vibrations in circumferential and radial direction. The results of this paper can guide the development of this new type of motor. PMID:20368809