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Sample records for molecular motors design

  1. Molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, Jean François Desbiolles, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    How do we move? More precisely, what are the molecular mechanisms that can explain that our muscles, made of very small components can move at a osopic scale? To answer these questions we must introduce molecular motors. Those motors are proteins, or small protein assemblies that, in our cells, transform chemical energy into mechanical work. Then, like we could do for a oscopic motor, used in a car or in a fan, we are going to study the basic behavior of these molecular machines, present what are their energy sources, calculate their power, their yield. If molecular motors are crucial for our oscopic movements, we are going to see that they are also essential to cellular transport and that considering the activity of some enzymes as molecular motors bring some interesting new insights on their activity.

  2. Computational Design of a Family of Light-Driven Rotary Molecular Motors with Improved Quantum Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two new light-driven molecular rotary motors based on the N-alkylated indanylidene benzopyrrole frameworks are proposed and studied using quantum chemical calculations and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. These new motors perform pure axial rotation, and the photochemical steps of the rotary cycle are dominated by the fast bond-length-alternation motion that enables ultrafast access to the S1/S0 intersection. The new motors are predicted to display a quantum efficiency higher than that of the currently available synthetic all-hydrocarbon motors. Remarkably, the quantum efficiency is not governed by the topography (peaked versus sloped) of the minimum-energy conical intersection, whereas the S1 decay time depends on the topography as well as on the energy of the intersection relative to the S1 minimum. It is the axial chirality (helicity), rather than the point chirality, that controls the sense of rotation of the motor. PMID:26670164

  3. Nanotechnology Review: Molecular Electronics to Molecular Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approaches to the concepts of design and simulation of carbon nanotube based molecular electronic and mechanical devices will be presented. The concepts of nanotube based gears and motors will be discussed. The above is a non-technical review talk which covers long term precompetitive basic research in already published material that has been presented before many US scientific meeting audiences.

  4. From Computational Photobiology to the Design of Vibrationally Coherent Molecular Devices and Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    In the past multi-configurational quantum chemical computations coupled with molecular mechanics force fields have been employed to investigate spectroscopic, thermal and photochemical properties of visual pigments. Here we show how the same computational technology can nowadays be used to design, characterize and ultimately, prepare light-driven molecular switches which mimics the photophysics of the visual pigment bovine rhodopsin (Rh). When embedded in the protein cavity the chromophore of Rh undergoes an ultrafast and coherent photoisomerization. In order to design a synthetic chromophore displaying similar properties in common solvents, we recently focused on indanylidene-pyrroline (NAIP) systems. We found that these systems display light-induced ground state coherent vibrational motion similar to the one detected in Rh. Semi-classical trajectories provide a mechanistic description of the structural changes associated to the observed coherent motion which is shown to be ultimately due to periodic changes in the π-conjugation.

  5. Molecular motors: Dynein's gearbox.

    PubMed

    Cross, R A

    2004-05-01

    A new optical trapping study shows that the stepsize of cytoplasmic dynein varies according to the applied force, suggesting that this motor can change gear. Complementary biochemical kinetic work on yeast dynein mutants hints at the allosteric mechanisms involved. PMID:15120091

  6. Molecular motors and their functions in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors that hydrolyze ATP and use the derived energy to generate force are involved in a variety of diverse cellular functions. Genetic, biochemical, and cellular localization data have implicated motors in a variety of functions such as vesicle and organelle transport, cytoskeleton dynamics, morphogenesis, polarized growth, cell movements, spindle formation, chromosome movement, nuclear fusion, and signal transduction. In non-plant systems three families of molecular motors (kinesins, dyneins, and myosins) have been well characterized. These motors use microtubules (in the case of kinesines and dyneins) or actin filaments (in the case of myosins) as tracks to transport cargo materials intracellularly. During the last decade tremendous progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of various motors in animals. These studies are yielding interesting insights into the functions of molecular motors and the origin of different families of motors. Furthermore, the paradigm that motors bind cargo and move along cytoskeletal tracks does not explain the functions of some of the motors. Relatively little is known about the molecular motors and their roles in plants. In recent years, by using biochemical, cell biological, molecular, and genetic approaches a few molecular motors have been isolated and characterized from plants. These studies indicate that some of the motors in plants have novel features and regulatory mechanisms. The role of molecular motors in plant cell division, cell expansion, cytoplasmic streaming, cell-to-cell communication, membrane trafficking, and morphogenesis is beginning to be understood. Analyses of the Arabidopsis genome sequence database (51% of genome) with conserved motor domains of kinesin and myosin families indicates the presence of a large number (about 40) of molecular motors and the functions of many of these motors remain to be discovered. It is likely that many more motors with novel regulatory

  7. Ratchet models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Nicole

    2003-09-01

    Transport processes in and of cells are of major importance for the survival of the organism. Muscles have to be able to contract, chromosomes have to be moved to opposing ends of the cell during mitosis, and organelles, which are compartments enclosed by membranes, have to be transported along molecular tracks. Molecular motors are proteins whose main task is moving other molecules.For that purpose they transform the chemical energy released in the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical work. The motors of the cytoskeleton belong to the three super families myosin, kinesin and dynein. Their tracks are filaments of the cytoskeleton, namely actin and the microtubuli. Here, we examine stochastic models which are used for describing the movements of these linear molecular motors. The scale of the movements comprises the regime of single steps of a motor protein up to the directed walk along a filament. A single step bridges around 10 nm, depending on the protein, and takes about 10 ms, if there is enough ATP available. Our models comprise M states or conformations the motor can attain during its movement along a one-dimensional track. At K locations along the track transitions between the states are possible. The velocity of the protein depending on the transition rates between the single states can be determined analytically. We calculate this velocity for systems of up to four states and locations and are able to derive a number of rules which are helpful in estimating the behaviour of an arbitrary given system. Beyond that we have a look at decoupled subsystems, i.e., one or a couple of states which have no connection to the remaining system. With a certain probability a motor undergoes a cycle of conformational changes, with another probability an independent other cycle. Active elements in real transport processes by molecular motors will not be limited to the transitions between the states. In distorted networks or starting from the discrete Master equation of the

  8. Hybrid deorbit motor design feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Joseph H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the feasibility of using a hybrid rocket motor to deorbit the large booster stage of the proposed NLS. A hybrid motor was of interest because it could utilize the residual low pressure Gox from the boosters main engine Lox tank. The resulting study determines that the concept would be feasible and should be given further consideration. Also, a preliminary design for a deorbit motor was proposed which would weigh much less than an equivalent hypergolic system. The hybrid deorbit concept and design has the potential of yielding a simpler cost effective system that could also be applicable to future launch systems with similar missions.

  9. Hybrid deorbit motor design feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Joseph H.

    1993-06-01

    This paper addresses the feasibility of using a hybrid rocket motor to deorbit the large booster stage of the proposed NLS. A hybrid motor was of interest because it could utilize the residual low pressure Gox from the boosters main engine Lox tank. The resulting study determines that the concept would be feasible and should be given further consideration. Also, a preliminary design for a deorbit motor was proposed which would weigh much less than an equivalent hypergolic system. The hybrid deorbit concept and design has the potential of yielding a simpler cost effective system that could also be applicable to future launch systems with similar missions.

  10. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  11. Molecular Motors: Power Strokes Outperform Brownian Ratchets.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Jason A; Dill, Ken A

    2016-07-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy (typically from ATP hydrolysis) to directed motion and mechanical work. Their actions are often described in terms of "Power Stroke" (PS) and "Brownian Ratchet" (BR) mechanisms. Here, we use a transition-state model and stochastic thermodynamics to describe a range of mechanisms ranging from PS to BR. We incorporate this model into Hill's diagrammatic method to develop a comprehensive model of motor processivity that is simple but sufficiently general to capture the full range of behavior observed for molecular motors. We demonstrate that, under all conditions, PS motors are faster, more powerful, and more efficient at constant velocity than BR motors. We show that these differences are very large for simple motors but become inconsequential for complex motors with additional kinetic barrier steps. PMID:27136319

  12. Experimental thermodynamics of single molecular motor

    PubMed Central

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor is a nano-sized chemical engine that converts chemical free energy to mechanical motions. Hence, the energetics is as important as kinetics in order to understand its operation principle. We review experiments to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of a rotational F1-ATPase motor (F1-motor) at a single-molecule level. We show that the F1-motor achieves 100% thermo dynamic efficiency at the stalled state. Furthermore, the motor reduces the internal irreversible heat inside the motor to almost zero and achieves a highly-efficient free energy transduction close to 100% during rotations far from quasistatic process. We discuss the mechanism of how the F1-motor achieves such a high efficiency, which highlights the remarkable property of the nano-sized engine F1-motor. PMID:27493546

  13. Molecular Switches and Motors on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathem, Bala Krishna; Claridge, Shelley A.; Zheng, Yue Bing; Weiss, Paul S.

    2013-04-01

    Molecular switches and motors respond structurally, electronically, optically, and/or mechanically to external stimuli, testing and potentially enabling extreme miniaturization of optoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. The assembly of motors and switches on surfaces makes it possible both to measure the properties of individual molecules as they relate to their environment and to couple function between assembled molecules. In this review, we discuss recent progress in assembling molecular switches and motors on surfaces, measuring static and dynamic structures, understanding switching mechanisms, and constructing functional molecular materials and devices. As demonstrative examples, we choose a representative molecule from three commonly studied classes including molecular switches, photochromic molecules, and mechanically interlocked molecules. We conclude by offering perspectives on the future of molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

  14. Molecular motors in conservative and dissipative regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Carrasco, R.; Sancho, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of a rotatory molecular motor under a conservative torque regime. We show that conservative and dissipative regimes present a different observable phenomenology. Our approach starts with a preliminary deterministic calculation of the motor cycle, which is complemented with stochastic simulations of a Langevin equation under a flashing ratchet potential. Finally, by using parameter values obtained from independent experimental information, our theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data of the F1-ATPase motor of the Bacillus PS3.

  15. Space shuttle booster separation motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The separation characteristics of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRBs) are introduced along with the system level requirements for the booster separation motors (BSMs). These system requirements are then translated into specific motor requirements that control the design of the BSM. Each motor component is discussed including its geometry, material selection, and fabrication process. Also discussed is the propellant selection, grain design, and performance capabilities of the motor. The upcoming test program to develop and qualify the motor is outlined.

  16. Molecular Motors and Synaptic Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Proper synaptic function requires the seamless integration of the transport, assembly, and regulation of synaptic components and structures. Inasmuch as the synapse is often distant from the neuronal cell body, newly synthesized synaptic proteins, the precursors of synaptic vesicles, active zone compartments, channels and receptors, and mitochondria, must be transported along lengthy neuronal processes to participate in synaptogenesis. Neuronal transport is mediated by motor proteins that associate with their cargoes via adaptors (or receptors) and that travel along the cytoskeleton network within the neuronal processes. Thus, the identity of membranous protein cargoes and the specificity of motor-cargo interactions are critical for correctly targeting cargoes and properly assembling synapses in developing neurons and in remodeling synapses of mature neurons in response to neuronal activity. In this article, the authors review recent progress in characterizing microtubule- and actin-based motor proteins that are involved in delivering synaptic components and discuss potential mechanisms underlying the formation of motor- receptor-cargo complexes that contribute to synaptogenesis and activity-induced synaptic plasticity. PMID:19218232

  17. Molecular motors: forty years of interdisciplinary research

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.

    2011-01-01

    A mere forty years ago it was unclear what motor molecules exist in cells that could be responsible for the variety of nonmuscle cell movements, including the “saltatory cytoplasmic particle movements” apparent by light microscopy. One wondered whether nonmuscle cells might have a myosin-like molecule, well known to investigators of muscle. Now we know that there are more than a hundred different molecular motors in eukaryotic cells that drive numerous biological processes and organize the cell's dynamic city plan. Furthermore, in vitro motility assays, taken to the single-molecule level using techniques of physics, have allowed detailed characterization of the processes by which motor molecules transduce the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical movement. Molecular motor research is now at an exciting threshold of being able to enter into the realm of clinical applications. PMID:22039067

  18. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings--like wheels on an axle--demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system. PMID:26492009

  19. Unidirectional rotary motion in achiral molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Štacko, Peter; Visser, Johan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-11-01

    Control of the direction of motion is an essential feature of biological rotary motors and results from the intrinsic chirality of the amino acids from which the motors are made. In synthetic autonomous light-driven rotary motors, point chirality is transferred to helical chirality, and this governs their unidirectional rotation. However, achieving directional rotary motion in an achiral molecular system in an autonomous fashion remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we report an achiral molecular motor in which the presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon atom proved to be sufficient for exclusive autonomous disrotary motion of two appended rotor moieties. Isomerization around the two double bonds enables both rotors to move in the same direction with respect to their surroundings—like wheels on an axle—demonstrating that autonomous unidirectional rotary motion can be achieved in a symmetric system.

  20. Universal optimal working cycles of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Wang, Zhisong

    2011-04-01

    Molecular motors capable of directional track-walking or rotation are abundant in living cells, and inspire the emerging field of artificial nanomotors. Some biomotors can convert 90% of free energy from chemical fuels into usable mechanical work, and the same motors still maintain a speed sufficient for cellular functions. This study exposed a new regime of universal optimization that amounts to a thermodynamically best working regime for molecular motors but is unfamiliar in macroscopic engines. For the ideal case of zero energy dissipation, the universally optimized working cycle for molecular motors is infinitely slow like Carnot cycle for heat engines. But when a small amount of energy dissipation reduces energy efficiency linearly from 100%, the speed is recovered exponentially due to Boltzmann's law. Experimental data on a major biomotor (kinesin) suggest that the regime of universal optimization has been largely approached in living cells, underpinning the extreme efficiency-speed trade-off in biomotors. The universal optimization and its practical approachability are unique thermodynamic advantages of molecular systems over macroscopic engines in facilitating motor functions. The findings have important implications for the natural evolution of biomotors as well as the development of artificial counterparts. PMID:21359395

  1. Optimizing rotary processes in synthetic molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, Edzard M.; van der Molen, Sense Jan; Martens, Marco; Feringa, Ben L.

    2009-01-01

    We deal with the issue of quantifying and optimizing the rotation dynamics of synthetic molecular motors. For this purpose, the continuous four-stage rotation behavior of a typical light-activated molecular motor was measured in detail. All reaction constants were determined empirically. Next, we developed a Markov model that describes the full motor dynamics mathematically. We derived expressions for a set of characteristic quantities, i.e., the average rate of quarter rotations or “velocity,” V, the spread in the average number of quarter rotations, D, and the dimensionless Péclet number, Pe = V/D. Furthermore, we determined the rate of full, four-step rotations (Ωeff), from which we derived another dimensionless quantity, the “rotational excess,” r.e. This quantity, defined as the relative difference between total forward (Ω+) and backward (Ω−) full rotations, is a good measure of the unidirectionality of the rotation process. Our model provides a pragmatic tool to optimize motor performance. We demonstrate this by calculating V, D, Pe, Ωeff, and r.e. for different rates of thermal versus photochemical energy input. We find that for a given light intensity, an optimal temperature range exists in which the motor exhibits excellent efficiency and unidirectional behavior, above or below which motor performance decreases. PMID:19805100

  2. Optimizing rotary processes in synthetic molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Edzard M; van der Molen, Sense Jan; Martens, Marco; Feringa, Ben L

    2009-10-01

    We deal with the issue of quantifying and optimizing the rotation dynamics of synthetic molecular motors. For this purpose, the continuous four-stage rotation behavior of a typical light-activated molecular motor was measured in detail. All reaction constants were determined empirically. Next, we developed a Markov model that describes the full motor dynamics mathematically. We derived expressions for a set of characteristic quantities, i.e., the average rate of quarter rotations or "velocity," V, the spread in the average number of quarter rotations, D, and the dimensionless Péclet number, Pe = V/D. Furthermore, we determined the rate of full, four-step rotations (Omega(eff)), from which we derived another dimensionless quantity, the "rotational excess," r.e. This quantity, defined as the relative difference between total forward (Omega(+)) and backward (Omega(-)) full rotations, is a good measure of the unidirectionality of the rotation process. Our model provides a pragmatic tool to optimize motor performance. We demonstrate this by calculating V, D, Pe, Omega(eff), and r.e. for different rates of thermal versus photochemical energy input. We find that for a given light intensity, an optimal temperature range exists in which the motor exhibits excellent efficiency and unidirectional behavior, above or below which motor performance decreases. PMID:19805100

  3. Controlled Rotation and Manipulation of Individual Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersell, Heath; Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2015-03-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines, but the parallels between the two are frequently only superficial because many molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, chemically and light driven rotary molecular motors have been developed. For electrically driven motors, tunneling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) have been used to drive rotation in a simple rotor into a single direction and to move a wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a single standalone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction [1] by selective inelastic electron tunneling through different sub-units of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotator for controlled rotations, and a Ru atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation originates from saw-tooth-like rotational potentials, which are determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site. This project is supported by the US DOE, BES grant: DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  4. Cooperative cargo transport by several molecular motors

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    The transport of cargo particles that are pulled by several molecular motors in a cooperative manner is studied theoretically in this article. The transport properties depend primarily on the maximal number N of motor molecules that may pull simultaneously on the cargo particle. Because each motor must unbind from the filament after a finite number of steps but can also rebind to it again, the actual number of pulling motors is not constant but varies with time between zero and N. An increase in the maximal number N leads to a strong increase of the average walking distance (or run length) of the cargo particle. If the cargo is pulled by up to N kinesin motors, for example, the walking distance is estimated to be 5N–1/N micrometers, which implies that seven or eight kinesin molecules are sufficient to attain an average walking distance in the centimeter range. If the cargo particle is pulled against an external load force, this force is shared between the motors, which provides a nontrivial motor–motor coupling and a generic mechanism for nonlinear force–velocity relationships. With increasing load force, the probability distribution of the instantaneous velocity is shifted toward smaller values, becomes broader, and develops several peaks. Our theory is consistent with available experimental data and makes quantitative predictions that are accessible to systematic in vitro experiments. PMID:16287974

  5. Mechanoregulation of molecular motors in flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelha, Hermes

    2014-11-01

    Molecular motors are nano-biological machines responsible for exerting forces that drive movement in living organisms, from cargo transport to cell division and motility. Interestingly, despite the inherent complexity of many interacting motors, order and structure may arise naturally, as exemplified by the harmonic, self-organized undulatory motion of the flagellum. The real mechanisms behind this collective spontaneous oscillation are still unknown, and it is challenging task to measure experimentally the molecular motor dynamics within the flagellar structure in real time. In this talk we will explore different competing hypotheses that are capable of generating flagellar bending waves that ``resemble'' in-vitro observations, emphasizing the need for further mathematical analysis and model validation. It also highlight that this is a fertile and challenging area of inter-disciplinary research for applied mathematicians and demonstrates the importance of future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics of these motile cell appendages.

  6. Single-Molecule Studies of Rotary Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilizota, Teuta; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Berry, Richard M.

    Rotary molecular motors are protein complexes that transform chemical or electrochemical energy into mechanical work. There are five known rotary molecular motors in nature; the bacterial flagellar motor, and two motors in each of ATP-synthase and V-ATPase. Rotation of the flagellar motor drives a helical propeller that powers bacterial swimming. The function of the other rotary motors is to couple electrochemical ion gradients to synthesis or hydrolysis of ATP, and rotation is a detail of the coupling mechanism rather than the ultimate purpose of the motors. Much has been learned about the mechanism of the F1 part of ATP-synthase and the flagellar motor by measuring the rotation of single motors with a variety of techniques under a wide range of conditions. This chapter will review the structures of ATP-synthase and the flagellar motor, and what has been learned about their mechanisms using single molecule techniques.

  7. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  8. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Boon, N J; Hoyle, R B

    2012-08-28

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)] on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods. PMID:22938213

  9. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  10. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  11. Molecular motor driven transportation on microtubule loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Aurelien; Federici, Filippo; Kim, Kyongwan; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Hwang, Wonmuk; Teizer, Winfried

    2015-03-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin are naturally fitted for the transport of cargo. By offering an unlimited path, microtubule loops allow the study of kinesin motility on distances exceeding that offered by a single microtubule. Moreover, the periodicity of the path allows the comparisons of trajectories between laps. Here we study the motility of quantum dot labeled kinesin on microtubule loops. Motility of kinesins over multiple laps is observed and their trajectories are extracted from kymograph using a custom algorithm. Distribution of velocities at given locations do not vary randomly but show a correlation with the presence of obstacles. Possible mechanisms responsible for the long range transport are discussed in the context of available theories.

  12. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  13. Optical traps to study properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Rice, Sarah E; Rock, Ronald S; Purcell, Thomas J; Warrick, Hans M

    2011-11-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  14. Optical Traps to Study Properties of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Rice, Sarah E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Warrick, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  15. Design and characterization of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yener, Serra

    This thesis presents modeling and prototype fabrication and characterization of new types of piezoelectric ultrasonic micromotors. Our approach in designing these piezoelectric motors was: (i) to simplify the structure including the poling configuration of piezoelectric elements used in the stator and (ii) to reduce the number of components in order to decrease the cost and enhance the driving reliability. There are two different types of piezoelectric motors designed throughout this research. The first of these designs consists of a metal tube, on which two piezoelectric ceramic plates poled in thickness direction, were bonded. Two orthogonal bending modes of the hollow cylinder were superimposed resulting in a rotational vibration. Since the structure and poling configuration of the active piezoelectric elements used in the stator are simple, this motor structure is very suitable for miniaturization. Moreover, a single driving source can excite two bending modes at the same time, thus generate a wobble motion. Three types of prototypes are included in this design. The piezoelectric stator structure is the same for all. However, the dimensions of the motors are reduced by almost 50 percent. Starting with a 10 mm long stator, we reached to 4 mm in the last prototype. The initial diameter was 2.4 mm, which was reduced to 1.6 mm. In the final design, the rotor part of the motor was changed resulting in the reduction in the number of components. In terms of driving circuit, a single driving source was enough to run the motors and a conventional switching power supply type resonant L-C circuit was used. A simple motor structure with a simple driving circuit were combined successfully and fabricated inexpensively. The second design is a shear type piezoelectric linear motor. The behavior of a single rectangular piezoelectric shear plate was analyzed and after optimizing the dimensions and the mode characteristics, a prototype was fabricated. The prototype consists of

  16. Improve Motor Operation at Off-Design Voltages - Motor Tip Sheet #9

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Motors are designed to operate within +/- 10% of their nameplate rated voltages. When motors operate at conditions of over- or under-voltage, motor efficiency and other performance parameters are degraded.

  17. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  18. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  19. Helicases as molecular motors: An insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Tuteja, Renu

    2006-12-01

    Helicases are one of the smallest motors of biological system, which harness the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the opening of energetically stable duplex nucleic acids and thereby are involved in almost all aspect of nucleic acid metabolism including replication, repair, recombination, transcription, translation, and ribosome biogenesis. Basically, they break the hydrogen bonding between the duplex helix and translocate unidirectionally along the bound strand. Mostly all the helicases contain some conserved signature motifs, which act as an engine to power the unwinding. After the discovery of the first prokaryotic DNA helicase from Escherichia coli bacteria in 1976 and the first eukaryotic one from the lily plant in 1978, many more (>100) have been isolated. All the helicases share some common properties, including nucleic acid binding, NTP hydrolysis and unwinding of the duplex. Many helicases have been crystallized and their structures have revealed an underlying common structural fold for their function. The defects in helicases gene have also been reported to be responsible for variety of human genetic disorders, which can lead to cancer, premature aging or mental retardation. Recently, a new role of a helicase in abiotic stress signaling in plant has been discovered. Overall, helicases act as essential molecular tools for cellular machinery and help in maintaining the integrity of genome. Here an overview of helicases has been covered which includes history, biochemical assay, properties, classification, role in human disease and mechanism of unwinding and translocation.

  20. Dwell Time Symmetry in Random Walks and Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Wallin, Mats

    2007-01-01

    The statistics of steps and dwell times in reversible molecular motors differ from those of cycle completion in enzyme kinetics. The reason is that a step is only one of several transitions in the mechanochemical cycle. As a result, theoretical results for cycle completion in enzyme kinetics do not apply to stepping data. To allow correct parameter estimation, and to guide data analysis and experiment design, a theoretical treatment is needed that takes this observation into account. In this article, we model the distribution of dwell times and number of forward and backward steps using first passage processes, based on the assumption that forward and backward steps correspond to different directions of the same transition. We extend recent results for systems with a single cycle and consider the full dwell time distributions as well as models with multiple pathways, detectable substeps, and detachments. Our main results are a symmetry relation for the dwell time distributions in reversible motors, and a relation between certain relative step frequencies and the free energy per cycle. We demonstrate our results by analyzing recent stepping data for a bacterial flagellar motor, and discuss the implications for the efficiency and reversibility of the force-generating subunits. PMID:17369422

  1. Molecular motor traffic: From biological nanomachines to macroscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowsky, Reinhard; Chai, Yan; Klumpp, Stefan; Liepelt, Steffen; Müller, Melanie J. I.

    2006-12-01

    All cells of animals and plants contain complex transport systems based on molecular motors which walk along cytoskeletal filaments. These motors are rather small and have a size of 20-100 nm but are able to pull vesicles, organelles and other types of cargo over large distances, from micrometers up to meters. There are several families of motors: kinesins, dyneins, and myosins. Most of these motors have two heads which are used as legs and perform discrete steps along the filaments. Several aspects of the motor behavior will be discussed: motor cycles of two-headed motors; walks of single motors or cargo particles which consist of directed movements interrupted by random, diffusive motion; cargo transport through tube-like compartments; active diffusion of cargo particles in slab-like compartments; cooperative transport of cargo by several motors which may be uni- or bi-directional; and systems with many interacting motors that exhibit traffic jams, self-organized density and flux patterns, and traffic phase transitions far from equilibrium. It is necessary to understand these traffic phenomena in a quantitative manner in order to construct and optimize biomimetic transport systems based on motors and filaments with many possible applications in bioengineering, pharmacology, and medicine.

  2. Molecular motors: a traffic cop within?

    PubMed

    Welte, M A; Gross, S P

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular transport along microtubules is often bidirectional, employing multiple plus- and minus-end directed motors. How cells regulate such transport in time and space is a fundamental but unsolved question in cell biology. A recent paper presents a new modeling approach to predict how much of transport can be understood just from our knowledge of the motors involved. The model can generate strikingly complex patterns of motion, mimicking key aspects of cargo transport in vivo. Previous studies had inferred that plus-end motors on bidirectional cargoes are usually turned off when the minus-end motors are engaged (and vice versa). In the model, such motor coordination can arise from motors competing in a tug-of-war, without help from additional regulators. This new theoretical framework should stimulate much research that will help unravel whether regulation of intracellular transport is dominated by higher-order control mechanisms or is achieved simply by tuning basic properties of the motors themselves. PMID:19404428

  3. Molecular crowding creates traffic jams of kinesin motors on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Cécile; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Varga, Vladimír; Helbing, Dirk; Diez, Stefan; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crowdedness of the interior of cells, microtubule-based motor proteins are able to deliver cargoes rapidly and reliably throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that motor proteins may be adapted to operate in crowded environments by having molecular properties that prevent them from forming traffic jams. To test this hypothesis, we reconstituted high-density traffic of purified kinesin-8 motor protein, a highly processive motor with long end-residency time, along microtubules in a total internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy assay. We found that traffic jams, characterized by an abrupt increase in the density of motors with an associated abrupt decrease in motor speed, form even in the absence of other obstructing proteins. To determine the molecular properties that lead to jamming, we altered the concentration of motors, their processivity, and their rate of dissociation from microtubule ends. Traffic jams occurred when the motor density exceeded a critical value (density-induced jams) or when motor dissociation from the microtubule ends was so slow that it resulted in a pileup (bottleneck-induced jams). Through comparison of our experimental results with theoretical models and stochastic simulations, we characterized in detail under which conditions density- and bottleneck-induced traffic jams form or do not form. Our results indicate that transport kinesins, such as kinesin-1, may be evolutionarily adapted to avoid the formation of traffic jams by moving only with moderate processivity and dissociating rapidly from microtubule ends. PMID:22431622

  4. Crowding of Molecular Motors Determines Microtubule Depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Louis; Melbinger, Anna; Frey, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    The assembly and disassembly dynamics of microtubules (MTs) is tightly controlled by MT-associated proteins. Here, we investigate how plus-end-directed depolymerases of the kinesin-8 family regulate MT depolymerization dynamics. Using an individual-based model, we reproduce experimental findings. Moreover, crowding is identified as the key regulatory mechanism of depolymerization dynamics. Our analysis reveals two qualitatively distinct regimes. For motor densities above a particular threshold, a macroscopic traffic jam emerges at the plus-end and the MT dynamics become independent of the motor concentration. Below this threshold, microscopic traffic jams at the tip arise that cancel out the effect of the depolymerization kinetics such that the depolymerization speed is solely determined by the motor density. Because this density changes over the MT length, length-dependent regulation is possible. Remarkably, motor cooperativity affects only the end-residence time of depolymerases and not the depolymerization speed. PMID:22067158

  5. A Design Procedure for the Applications-Specific Electric Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akihiro; Isobe, Shin-Ichi; Morimoto, Masayuki; Kosaka, Takashi; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    A design procedure for the Applications-Specific Electric Motors (ASEM) is proposed. The proposed design procedure is relevant to the design of the permanent magnet synchronous motor which fulfills required typical operating points under the restrictions of dimensions and the power source conditions. The design procedure is composed of two stages, a rough design and an accurate design. A rough design finds a permissible area of the combination of motor constants which satisfy the given typical operating points under the given power source conditions. According to the obtained permissible area of motor constants, an accurate design achieves the detailed motor design determining the dimensions, the winding specifications and constituent materials. Among several designed motors, one with highest fitness from standpoints of high efficiency, manufacturability and cost is finally selected. The experimental studies show that the designed motor using the proposed procedure satisfies the requirements in the target application.

  6. Biophysical Studies of Membranes and Molecular Motors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Karel

    This thesis consists of several preprints and reprints (sections) organized in thematically disparate chapters. Each section is self-contained and therefore a bit of duplication has crept in, especially in Chapters 1 & 2. In keeping with contemporary scientific style, the prose is dense, dry, and humourless. In the first chapter I discuss optical trapping. A review of optical trapping is presented, particularly focusing on optical tweezers. An unexpected twist on conventional trapping wisdom is that, in the Rayleigh size regime, gold particles can be trapped much more strongly than latex particles. The ratio of trapping forces is equal to the ratio of particle polarizabilities. This demonstrates that gradient forces dominate all other radiation and thermal forces. In Chapter 2, the central part of the thesis, I present measurements of steps, forces, and other mechanochemical properties of the molecular motor kinesin using optical tweezers and laser interferometry. The kinesin step size measured ~8 nm, and the stall force was 5-6 pN. Comparisons of force-velocity curves at saturating and limiting ATP concentrations demonstrated that kinesin is a loosely coupled machine. The variance in displacement was smaller than expected for a stepper with exponentially distributed step times. This unexpected finding has interesting implications for kinesin kinetics and mechanochemistry. Chapter 3 deals with some attempts to derive structural information from measurements of time-dependent diffusion in a biological model system. Pulsed field gradient NMR can be used to measure the momentum space diffusion propagator of water molecules, M(k,t). We measured M(k,t) in well -characterized samples of packed red blood cells. At short times, the time-dependent diffusion coefficient decreased from its bulk value with a sqrt{t} behavior, and the coefficient of this term was used to obtain the cell surface-to-volume ratio, S/V. Using a new effective medium theory, the membrane permeability

  7. Design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoaki; Toyama, Shigeki; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    We present a mechanical design and implementation of spherical ultrasonic motor (SUSM) that is an actuator with multiple rotational degrees of freedom (multi-DOF). The motor is constructed of 3 annular stators and a spherical rotor and is much smaller and simpler than conventional multi-DOF mechanisms such as gimbals using servomotors. We designed a novel SUSM using experimental data from a single annular stator and a finite element method. The SUSM using a spherical rotor of diameter 20 mm without any reduction gear has demonstrated advantages of high responsiveness, good accuracy, and high torque at low speed. The dynamic implementation of SUSM was consistent with the driving model of SUSM based on a friction drive. PMID:19942537

  8. Fatigue failure and molecular machine design.

    PubMed

    Hess, Henry; Dumont, Emmanuel L P

    2011-06-20

    Sophisticated molecular machines have evolved in nature, and the first synthetic molecular machines have been demonstrated. With our increasing understanding of individual operating cycles, the question of how operation can be sustained over many cycles comes to the forefront. In the design of macroscale machines, performance and lifetime are opposing goals. Similarly, the natural evolution of biological nanomachines, such as myosin motor proteins, is likely constrained by lifetime requirements. Rather than bond rupture at high forces, bond fatigue under repeated small stresses may limit the mechanical performance of molecular machines. Here, the effect of cyclic stresses using single and double bonds as simple examples are discussed. Additionally, it is demonstrated that an increase in lifetime requires a reduction in mechanical load and that molecular engineering design features, such as polyvalent bonds capable of rebinding, can extend the bond lifetime dramatically. A universal scaling law for the force output of motors is extrapolated to the molecular scale to estimate the design space for molecular machines. PMID:21574250

  9. Differential expression of molecular motors in the motor cortex of sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    Pantelidou, Maria; Zographos, Spyros E; Lederer, Carsten W; Kyriakides, Theodore; Pfaffl, Michael W; Santama, Niovi

    2007-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective neurodegeneration of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are inadequately understood. Recent breakthroughs have implicated impaired axonal transport, mediated by molecular motors, as a key element for disease onset and progression. The current work identifies the expression of 15 kinesin-like motors in healthy human motor cortex, including three novel isoforms. Our comprehensive quantitative mRNA analysis in control and sporadic ALS (SALS) motor cortex specimens detects SALS-specific down-regulation of KIF1Bbeta and novel KIF3Abeta, two isoforms we show to be enriched in the brain, and also of SOD1, a key enzyme linked to familial ALS. This is accompanied by a marked reduction of KIF3Abeta protein levels. In the motor cortex KIF3Abeta localizes in cholinergic neurons, including upper motor neurons. No mutations causing splicing defects or altering protein-coding sequences were identified in the genes of the three proteins. The present study implicates two motor proteins as possible candidates in SALS pathology. PMID:17418584

  10. Designing the molecular future.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 25 years ago the first computer applications were conceived for the purpose of automated 'de novo' drug design, prominent pioneering tools being ALADDIN, CAVEAT, GENOA, and DYLOMMS. Many of these early concepts were enabled by innovative techniques for ligand-receptor interaction modeling like GRID, MCSS, DOCK, and CoMFA, which still provide the theoretical framework for several more recently developed molecular design algorithms. After a first wave of software tools and groundbreaking applications in the 1990s--expressly GROW, GrowMol, LEGEND, and LUDI representing some of the key players--we are currently witnessing a renewed strong interest in this field. Innovative ideas for both receptor and ligand-based drug design have recently been published. We here provide a personal perspective on the evolution of de novo design, highlighting some of the historic achievements as well as possible future developments of this exciting field of research, which combines multiple scientific disciplines and is, like few other areas in chemistry, subject to continuous enthusiastic discussion and compassionate dispute. PMID:22127731

  11. Molecular motors and the 2nd law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong

    2014-03-01

    Molecular motors from biology and nanotechnology often operate on chemical energy of fuel molecules in an isothermal environment, unlike macroscopic heat engines that draw energy from a heat flow between two temperatures. Nevertheless, isothermal molecular motors are still subject to the 2nd law of thermodynamics in a fundamental way: their directional motion must cost a finite amount of energy other than the environmental heat even though no work is done; otherwise the 2nd law would be violated. Hence the 2nd law requires a finite energy price for pure direction of molecular motors. But what is the lowest price of direction allowed by the 2nd law? And how does the 2nd law-decreed price of direction limit performance of molecular motors? In the talk, I shall present our theoretical study of the 2nd law-molecular motor link on basis of the accumulated biomotor phenomenology, and also introduce our experimental effort to develop biomimetic DNA bipedal nanomotors following the mechanistic guidelines out of the theoretical study. [Main contents of this talk are from references:] This work is partially supported by FRC grants R-144-000-259-112, R-144-000-290-112 and R-144-000-320-112.

  12. In control of the speed of rotation in molecular motors. Unexpected retardation of rotary motion.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Edzard M; Koumura, Nagatoshi; ter Wiel, Matthijs K J; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2002-12-21

    Surprisingly, a new motor with a tetrahydronaphthalene upper part rotates slower than the original molecular motor with a tetrahydrophenanthrene upper part despite decreased steric hindrance. PMID:12536767

  13. Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckermann, Martin J.; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Schmitt, Regina; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth HC; Forde, Nancy R.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul MG

    2015-05-01

    The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of ∼18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker’s momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet.

  14. Understanding molecular motor walking along a microtubule: a themosensitive asymmetric Brownian motor driven by bubble formation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Noriyoshi; Yasuoka, Kenji; Koishi, Takahiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2013-06-12

    The "asymmetric Brownian ratchet model", a variation of Feynman's ratchet and pawl system, is invoked to understand the kinesin walking behavior along a microtubule. The model system, consisting of a motor and a rail, can exhibit two distinct binding states, namely, the random Brownian state and the asymmetric potential state. When the system is transformed back and forth between the two states, the motor can be driven to "walk" in one direction. Previously, we suggested a fundamental mechanism, that is, bubble formation in a nanosized channel surrounded by hydrophobic atoms, to explain the transition between the two states. In this study, we propose a more realistic and viable switching method in our computer simulation of molecular motor walking. Specifically, we propose a thermosensitive polymer model with which the transition between the two states can be controlled by temperature pulses. Based on this new motor system, the stepping size and stepping time of the motor can be recorded. Remarkably, the "walking" behavior observed in the newly proposed model resembles that of the realistic motor protein. The bubble formation based motor not only can be highly efficient but also offers new insights into the physical mechanism of realistic biomolecule motors. PMID:23721590

  15. Kinesin molecular motor Eg5 functions during polypeptide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Kristen M.; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Woolford, John L.; Saunders, William S.

    2011-01-01

    The kinesin-related molecular motor Eg5 plays roles in cell division, promoting spindle assembly. We show that during interphase Eg5 is associated with ribosomes and is required for optimal nascent polypeptide synthesis. When Eg5 was inhibited, ribosomes no longer bound to microtubules in vitro, ribosome transit rates slowed, and polysomes accumulated in intact cells, suggesting defects in elongation or termination during polypeptide synthesis. These results demonstrate that the molecular motor Eg5 associates with ribosomes and enhances the efficiency of translation. PMID:21795388

  16. Collective transport of weakly interacting molecular motors with Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, Sameep; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2015-04-01

    Filament-based intracellular transport involves the collective action of molecular motor proteins. Experimental evidences suggest that microtubule (MT) filament bound motor proteins such as kinesins weakly interact among themselves during transport and with the surrounding cellular environment. Motivated by these observations we study a driven lattice gas model for collective unidirectional transport of molecular motors on open filament. This model incorporates short-range next-nearest-neighbour (NNN) interactions between the motors and couples the transport process on filament with surrounding cellular environment through adsorption-desorption Langmuir kinetics (LK) of the motors. We analyse this model within the framework of a mean-field (MF) theory in the limit of weak interactions between the motors. We point to the mapping of this model with the non-conserved version of the Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn (KLS) model. The system exhibits rich phase behavior with a variety of inhomogeneous phases including localized shocks in the bulk of the filament. We obtain the steady-state density and current profiles, analyse their variation as a function of the strength of interaction and construct the non-equilibrium MF phase diagram. We compare these MF results with Monte Carlo simulations and find that the MF analysis shows reasonably good agreement with simulation results as long as the motors are weakly interacting. For sufficently strong NNN interaction between the motors, the mean-field results deviate significantly, and for very strong NNN interaction in the absence of LK, the current in the lattice is determined solely by the NNN interaction parameter and it becomes independent of entry and exit rates of motors at the filament boundaries.

  17. Solid rocket motor nozzle flexseal design sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat, James R.

    1993-02-01

    On solid rocket motors, direction is controlled by controlling the thrust vector. To achieve this, the nozzle usually incorporates a flexseal that allows the nozzle to vector (or rotate) in any direction. The flexseal has a core of alternating layers of elastomer pads and metal or composite shims. Flexseal core design is an iterative process. An estimate of the flexseal core geometry is made. The core is then analyzed for performance characteristics such as stress, weight, and the torque required to vector the core. Based on a comparison between the requirements/constraints and analysis results, another estimate of the geometry is then made. Understanding the effects changes in the core geometry have on the performance characteristics greatly decreases the number of iterations and time required to optimize the design. This paper documents a study undertaken to better understand these effects and how sensitive performance characteristics are to core geometry changes.

  18. Control of rotor motion in a light-driven molecular motor: towards a molecular gearbox.

    PubMed

    Ter Wiel, Matthijs K J; van Delden, Richard A; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2005-11-21

    Controlled intramolecular movement and coupling of motor and rotor functions is exerted by this new molecular device. The rate of rotation of the rotor part of the molecule can be adjusted by alteration of the conformation of the motor part of the molecule. For all states of the motor part, different rates of rotation were measured for the rotor part. Conversion between the four propeller orientations was achieved by irradiation and heating. PMID:16267585

  19. Molecular motors one at a time: FIONA to the rescue.

    PubMed

    Kural, Comert; Balci, Hamza; Selvin, Paul R

    2005-11-30

    Processive molecular motors act as intracellular transporters of a broad range of cargoes varying from organelles to messenger RNAs. Due to the nanometre range movements and complex dynamics of these motors, highly specialized tools are required to study them, in particular at the single-molecule level. Such tools are what physicists are providing for understanding these biological systems. Fluorescence based real-time localization techniques, with 1 nm spatial resolution and down to 1 ms temporal resolution (FIONA: fluorescence imaging with one-nanometre accuracy), and their applications to a group of molecular motors (myosin V, myosin VI, kinesin, and dynein) are the topics of this paper. In addition to the well established in vitro studies, the recent applications of these techniques to the much more challenging, but also more informative, in vivo realm will be discussed. PMID:21690736

  20. Debris control design achievements of the booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stringent debris control requirements imposed on the design of the Space Shuttle booster separation motor are described along with the verification program implemented to ensure compliance with debris control objectives. The principal areas emphasized in the design and development of the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) relative to debris control were the propellant formulation and nozzle closures which protect the motors from aerodynamic heating and moisture. A description of the motor design requirements, the propellant formulation and verification program, and the nozzle closures design and verification are presented.

  1. Time-dependent motor properties of multipedal molecular spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Blab, Gerhard A.; Bromley, Elizabeth H. C.; Linke, Heiner; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic biomolecular walkers that use the asymmetry resulting from cleavage of their tracks to bias the direction of their stepping motion. Using Monte Carlo simulations that implement the Gillespie algorithm, we investigate the dependence of the biased motion of molecular spiders, along with binding time and processivity, on tunable experimental parameters, such as number of legs, span between the legs, and unbinding rate of a leg from a substrate site. We find that an increase in the number of legs increases the spiders’ processivity and binding time but not their mean velocity. However, we can increase the mean velocity of spiders with simultaneous tuning of the span and the unbinding rate of a spider leg from a substrate site. To study the efficiency of molecular spiders, we introduce a time-dependent expression for the thermodynamic efficiency of a molecular motor, allowing us to account for the behavior of spider populations as a function of time. Based on this definition, we find that spiders exhibit transient motor function over time scales of many hours and have a maximum efficiency on the order of 1%, weak compared to other types of molecular motors.

  2. Computer aided design of multi-phase switched reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, N. K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive computer-aided design (CAD) procedure of multiphase switched reluctance motor (SRM) is presented. Better approach for calculation of the outer dimensions, phase inductance, flux linkage and losses, and also a different concept for calculating the average torque of the motor are incorporated in the CAD program. The average torque is calculated based on the most effective 15° (for 8/6 SRM) of the static torque profile of the motor. A sample design of a 5hp SRM is presented in detail and the design is validated by conducting a two-dimensional finite element analysis of the motor.

  3. Biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samii, Laleh; Linke, Heiner; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2010-02-01

    Molecular spiders are synthetic molecular motors featuring multiple legs that each can interact with a substrate through binding and cleavage. Experimental studies suggest the motion of the spider in a matrix is biased toward uncleaved substrates and that spider properties such as processivity can be altered by changing the binding strength of the legs to substrate [R. Pei, S. K. Taylor, D. Stefanovic, S. Rudchenko, T. E. Mitchell, and M. N. Stojanovic, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 12693 (2006)]. We investigate the origin of biased motion and molecular motor properties of bipedal spiders using Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulations combine a realistic chemical kinetic model, hand-over-hand or inchworm modes of stepping, and the use of a one-dimensional track. We find that stronger binding to substrate, cleavage and spider detachment from the track are contributing mechanisms to population bias. We investigate the contributions of stepping mechanism to speed, randomness parameter, processivity, coupling, and efficiency, and comment on how these molecular motor properties can be altered by changing experimentally tunable kinetic parameters.

  4. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications. PMID:27401928

  5. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  6. Molecular motors in neuronal development, intracellular transport and diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Takemura, Reiko

    2004-10-01

    Molecular motors such as kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs), dynein superfamily proteins and myosin superfamily proteins have diverse and fundamental roles in many cellular processes, including neuronal development and the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases. During neuronal development, KIFs take significant roles in the regulation of axon-collateral branch extension, which is essential for brain wiring. Cytoplasmic dynein together with LIS1 takes pivotal roles in neocortical layer formation. In axons, anterograde transport is mediated by KIFs, whereas retrograde transport is mediated mainly by cytoplasmic dynein, and dysfunction of motors results in neurodegenerative diseases. In dendrites, the transport of NMDA and AMPA receptors is mediated by KIFs, and the motor has been shown to play a significant part in establishing learning and memory. PMID:15464889

  7. Molecular Motors and Efficient Motion in a Viscoelastic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Keith

    2005-11-01

    Molecular motors perform many critical functions for cells, including chromosome separation during mitosis, vesicle transport, and muscle contraction. In this talk, we will discuss the ways in which physics concepts and instrumentation are being used to determine the forces and efficiencies of two of these motors, kinesin and dynein, in cells. We will emphasize a) studies at Wake Forest University that focus on the force versus velocity curves (load curves) of kinesin in the neurites of live PC12 cells, and b) work at UNC-Chapel Hill that measures the forces developed by dynein motors within beating cilia on the outer surfaces of live lung cells during mucus transport. We will show how the viscoelastic properties of cytoplasm and mucus can be determined from the Brownian motion of vesicles and beads in these media.. We find that the load on these motors in vivo may exceed that in vitro by a factor of 1000, and that several motors can share the task of moving a single vesicle.

  8. Energy transfer in a molecular motor in the Kramers regime.

    PubMed

    Challis, K J; Jack, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of energy transfer in a molecular motor described in terms of overdamped Brownian motion on a multidimensional tilted periodic potential. The tilt represents a thermodynamic force driving the system out of equilibrium and, for nonseparable potentials, energy transfer occurs between degrees of freedom. For deep potential wells, the continuous theory transforms to a discrete master equation that is tractable analytically. We use this master equation to derive formal expressions for the hopping rates, drift and diffusion, and the efficiency and rate of energy transfer in terms of the thermodynamic force. These results span both strong and weak coupling between degrees of freedom, describe the near and far from equilibrium regimes, and are consistent with generalized detailed balance and the Onsager relations. We thereby derive a number of diverse results for molecular motors within a single theoretical framework. PMID:24229123

  9. Tracking a Molecular Motor with a Nanoscale Optical Encoder

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Charles E.; Cash, Kevin J.; Pfeil, Shawn H.; Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Lipman, Everett A.

    2010-01-01

    Optical encoders are commonly used in macroscopic machines to make precise measurements of distance and velocity by translating motion into a periodic signal. Here we show how Förster resonance energy transfer can be used to implement this technique at the single-molecule scale. We incorporate a series of acceptor dye molecules into self-assembling DNA, and the periodic signal resulting from unhindered motion of a donor-labeled molecular motor provides nanometer-scale resolution in milliseconds. PMID:20121107

  10. Optimal brushless DC motor design using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahideh, A.; Korakianitis, T.; Ruiz, P.; Keeble, T.; Rothman, M. T.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using a genetic algorithm. Characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. Electrical and mechanical requirements (i.e. voltage, torque and speed) and other limitations (e.g. upper and lower limits of the motor geometries) are cast into constraints of the optimization problem. One sample case is used to illustrate the design and optimization technique.

  11. Design, Synthesis, and Monitoring of Light-Activated Motorized Nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Pinn-Tsong

    Our group has developed a family of single molecules termed nanocars, which are aimed at performing controllable motion on surfaces. In this work, a series of light-activated motorized nanomachines incorporated with a MHz frequency light-activated unidirectional rotary motor were designed and synthesized. We hope the light-activated motor can serve as the powering unit for the nanomachines, and perform controllable translational motion on surfaces or in solution. A series of motorized nanovehicles intended for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging were designed and synthesized. A p-carborane-wheeled motorized nanocar was synthesized and monitored by STM. Single-molecule imaging was accomplished on a Cu(111) surface. However, further manipulations did lead to motor induced lateral motion. We attributed this result to the strong molecule-surface interactions between the p-carborane-wheeled nanocar and the Cu(111) surface and possible energy transfer between the rotary motor and the Cu(111) surface. To fine-tune the molecule-surface interactions, an adamantane-wheeled motorized nanocar and a three-wheel nanoroadster were designed and synthesized. In addition, the STM substrates will be varied and different combinations of molecule-surface interactions will be studied. As a complimentary imaging method to STM, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM) also provides single-molecule level resolution. Unlike STM experiment requires ultra-high vacuum and conductive substrate, SMFM experiment is conducted at ambient conditions and uses non-conductive substrate. This imaging method allows us to study another category of molecule-surface interactions. We plan to design a fluorescent motorized nanocar that is suitable for SMFM studies. However, both the motor and fluorophore are photochemically active molecules. In proximity, some undesired energy transfer or interference could occur. A cyanine 5- (cy5-) tagged motorized nanocar incorporated with the MHz motor was

  12. Microtubules and associated molecular motors in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Mouriño-Pérez, Rosa Reyna; Riquelme, Meritxell; Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Galván-Mendoza, José Iván

    2016-05-01

    The cytoskeleton provides structure, shape and movement to various cells. Microtubules (MTs) are tubular structures made of α and β-tubulin heterodimers organized in 13 protofilaments, forming a hollow cylinder. A vast group of MT-associated proteins determines the function, behavior and interaction of the MTs with other cellular components. Among these proteins, molecular motors such as the dynein-dynactin complex and kinesin superfamily play roles in MT organization and organelle transport. This article focuses on the MT cytoskeleton and associated molecular motors in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa In addition to reviewing current available information for this fungus and contrasting it with knowledge of other fungal species, we present new experimental results that support the role of dynein, dynactin and conventional kinesin in MT organization, dynamics and transport of subcellular structures (nuclei and secretory vesicles). In wild type hyphae of N. crassa, cytoplasmic MTs are arranged longitudinally along hyphae and display a helical curvature. They interlace with one another to form a network throughout the cytoplasm. N. crassa dynein and dynactin mutants have a scant and disorganized MT cytoskeleton, an erratic and reduced Spitzenkörper (Spk) and distorted hyphal morphology. In contrast, hyphae of mutants with defective conventional kinesin exhibit only minor disruptions in MT and Spk organization. Although nuclear positioning is affected in all mutants, the MT-associated motor proteins are not major contributors to nuclear movement during hyphal growth. Cytoplasmic bulk flow is the vehicle for nuclear displacement in growing hyphal regions of N. crassa Motors are involved in nuclei saltatory movements in both retrograde or anterograde direction. In the dynein and kinesin mutants, micro and macrovesicles can reach the Spk, although growth is slightly impaired and the Spk displays an erratic path. Hyphal growth requires MTs, and their associated

  13. Extracting Dwell Time Sequences from Processive Molecular Motor Data

    PubMed Central

    Milescu, Lorin S.; Yildiz, Ahmet; Selvin, Paul R.; Sachs, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Processive molecular motors, such as kinesin, myosin, or dynein, convert chemical energy into mechanical energy by hydrolyzing ATP. The mechanical energy is used for moving in discrete steps along the cytoskeleton and carrying a molecular load. Single-molecule recordings of motor position along a substrate polymer appear as a stochastic staircase. Recordings of other single molecules, such as F1-ATPase, RNA polymerase, or topoisomerase, have the same appearance. We present a maximum likelihood algorithm that extracts the dwell time sequence from noisy data, and estimates state transition probabilities and the distribution of the motor step size. The algorithm can handle models with uniform or alternating step sizes, and reversible or irreversible kinetics. A periodic Markov model describes the repetitive chemistry of the motor, and a Kalman filter allows one to include models with variable step size and to correct for baseline drift. The data are optimized recursively and globally over single or multiple data sets, making the results objective over the full scale of the data. Local binary algorithms, such as the t-test, do not represent the behavior of the whole data set. Our method is model-based, and allows rapid testing of different models by comparing the likelihood scores. From data obtained with current technology, steps as small as 8 nm can be resolved and analyzed with our method. The kinetic consequences of the extracted dwell sequence can be further analyzed in detail. We show results from analyzing simulated and experimental kinesin and myosin motor data. The algorithm is implemented in the free QuB software. PMID:16905607

  14. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  15. Macroscopic contraction of a gel induced by the integrated motion of light-driven molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Maaloum, Mounir; Rawiso, Michel; Kulic, Igor; Foy, Justin T.; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Making molecular machines that can be useful in the macroscopic world is a challenging long-term goal of nanoscience. Inspired by the protein machinery found in biological systems, and based on the theoretical understanding of the physics of motion at the nanoscale, organic chemists have developed a number of molecules that can produce work by contraction or rotation when triggered by various external chemical or physical stimuli. In particular, basic molecular switches that commute between at least two thermodynamic minima and more advanced molecular motors that behave as dissipative units working far from equilibrium when fuelled with external energy have been reported. However, despite recent progress, the ultimate challenge of coordinating individual molecular motors in a continuous mechanical process that can have a measurable effect at the macroscale has remained elusive. Here, we show that by integrating light-driven unidirectional molecular rotors as reticulating units in a polymer gel, it is possible to amplify their individual motions to achieve macroscopic contraction of the material. Our system uses the incoming light to operate under far-from-equilibrium conditions, and the work produced by the motor in the photostationary state is used to twist the entangled polymer chains up to the collapse of the gel. Our design could be a starting point to integrate nanomotors in metastable materials to store energy and eventually to convert it.

  16. Optogenetic Control of Molecular Motors and Organelle Distributions in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Liting; Che, Daphne; Zhang, Kai; Ong, Qunxiang; Guo, Shunling; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Intracellular transport and distribution of organelles play important roles in diverse cellular functions, including cell polarization, intracellular signaling, cell survival and apoptosis. Here we report an optogenetic strategy to control the transport and distribution of organelles by light. This is achieved by optically recruiting molecular motors onto organelles through the heterodimerization of Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) and its interacting partner CIB1. CRY2 and CIB1 dimerize within subseconds upon blue light exposure, which requires no exogenous ligands and low intensity of light. We demonstrate that mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lysosomes can be driven towards the cell periphery upon light-induced recruitment of kinesin, or towards the cell nucleus upon recruitment of dynein. Light-induced motor recruitment and organelle movements are repeatable, reversible and can be achieved at subcellular regions. This light-controlled organelle redistribution provides a new strategy for studying the causal roles of organelle transport and distribution in cellular functions in living cells. PMID:25963241

  17. Computationally Designed Molecularly Imprinted Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Dumitru; Lagowski, Jolanta; Faid, Karim

    2004-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for different molecular systems in order to predict the binding affinities, binding energies, binding distances and the active site groups between the simulated molecular systems and different bio-ligands (theophylline and its derivatives), which have been designed and minimized using molecular simulation techniques. The first simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and functional monomer, such as methacrylic acid and its derivatives. For each pair of molecular systems, (10 monomers with a ligand and 10 monomers without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between a ligand and the corresponding monomers. The analysis of the simulated functional monomers with ligands indicates that the functional group of monomers interacting with ligands tends to be either COOH or CH2=CH. The distances between the ligand and monomer, in the most stable cases as indicated above, are between 2.0-4.5 Å. The second simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and a polymer. The polymers were obtained from monomers that were simulated above. And similar to monomer study, for each pair of molecular systems, (polymer with a ligand and polymer without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between ligand and the corresponding polymer. The binding distance between the active site of a polymer and a ligand will also be discussed.

  18. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  19. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and gene regulation. Despite these advances, our understanding of flagellar assembly and rotational mechanisms remains incomplete, in part because of the limited structural information available regarding the intact rotor–stator complex and secretion apparatus. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has become a valuable imaging technique capable of visualizing the intact flagellar motor in cells at molecular resolution. Because the resolution that can be achieved by cryo-ET with large bacteria (such as E. coli and S. enterica) is limited, analysis of small-diameter bacteria (including Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni) can provide additional insights into the in situ structure of the flagellar motor and other cellular components. This review is focused on the application of cryo-ET, in combination with genetic and biophysical approaches, to the study of flagellar structures and its potential for improving the understanding of rotor–stator interactions, the rotational switching mechanism, and the secretion and assembly of flagellar components. PMID:24697492

  20. Synthesis of peptide-conjugated light-driven molecular motors and evaluation of their DNA-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Nagatsugi, Fumi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Maiko; Kuwahara, Shunsuke; Kusano, Shuhei; Chikuni, Tomoko; Hagihara, Shinya; Harada, Nobuyuki

    2013-05-01

    Synthetic light-driven molecular motors are molecular machines capable of rotation under photo-irradiation. In this paper, we report the synthesis of peptide-conjugated molecular motors and evaluate their DNA-binding properties. PMID:23324812

  1. Towards artificial molecular motor-based electroactive/photoactive biomimetic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tony Jun

    2007-04-01

    Artificial molecular motors have recently attracted considerable interest from the nanoscience and nanoengineering community. These molecular-scale systems utilize a 'bottom-up' technology centered around the design and manipulation of molecular assemblies, and are potentially capable of delivering efficient actuations at dramatically reduced length scales when compared to traditional microscale actuators. When stimulated by light, electricity, or chemical reagents, a group of artificial molecular motors called bistable rotaxanes - which are composed of mutually recognizable and intercommunicating ring and dumbbell-shaped components - experience relative internal motions of their components just like the moving parts of macroscopic machines. Bistable rotaxanes' ability to precisely and cooperatively control mechanical motions at the molecular level reveals the potential of engineering systems that operate with the same elegance, efficiency, and complexity as biological motors function within the human body. We are in a process of developing a new class of bistable rotaxane-based electroactive/photoactive biomimetic muscles with unprecedented performance (strain: 40-60%, operating frequency: up to 1 MHz, energy density: ~50 J/cm 3, multi-stimuli: chemical, electricity, light). As a substantial step towards this longterm objective, we have proven, for the first time, that rotaxanes are mechanically switchable in condensed phases on solid substrates. We have further developed a rotaxane-powered microcantilever actuator utilizing an integrated approach that combines "bottom-up" assembly of molecular functionality with "top-down" micro/nano fabrication. By harnessing the nanoscale mechanical motion from artificial molecular machines and eliciting a nanomechanical response in a microscale device, this system mimics natural skeletal muscle and provides a key component for the development of nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS).

  2. A motor canister designed for prolonged operation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, A.

    1971-01-01

    A special canister was designed to protest the dc motors used on the ISIS 1 antenna unit. The canister is provided with a pressure-monitoring device and has a special shaft seal that imparts minimum load to the motor output shaft. The development and flight testing of the canister are discussed. Problems that were encountered during fabrication and inspection and the problems caused by material/lubricant incompatibility and low temperature are also discussed.

  3. Robust Design of Motor PWM Control using Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wei

    A robust design method is developed for Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) motor speed control. A first principle model for DC permanent magnetic motor is used to build a Simulink model for simulation and analysis. Based on the simulation result, the main factors that contributed to the average speed variation are identified using Design of Experiment (DOE). A robust solution is derived to reduce the aver age speed control variation using Response Surface Method (RSM). The robustness of the new design is verified using the simulation model.

  4. Kinesin molecular motors: Transport pathways, receptors, and human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2001-06-01

    Kinesin molecular motor proteins are responsible for many of the major microtubule-dependent transport pathways in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identity of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. Kinesin-II recently was found to be required for transport in motile and nonmotile cilia and flagella where it is essential for proper left-right determination in mammalian development, sensory function in ciliated neurons, and opsin transport and viability in photoreceptors. Thus, these pathways and proteins may be prominent contributors to several human diseases including ciliary dyskinesias, situs inversus, and retinitis pigmentosa. Kinesin-I is needed to move many different types of cargoes in neuronal axons. Two candidates for receptor proteins that attach kinesin-I to vesicular cargoes were recently found. One candidate, sunday driver, is proposed to both link kinesin-I to an unknown vesicular cargo and to bind and organize the mitogen-activated protein kinase components of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling module. A second candidate, amyloid precursor protein, is proposed to link kinesin-I to a different, also unknown, class of axonal vesicles. The finding of a possible functional interaction between kinesin-I and amyloid precursor protein may implicate kinesin-I based transport in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Rotor Design of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor for Railway Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Minoru; Kondo, Keiichiro; Fujishima, Yasushi; Wakao, Shinji

    The permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is an efficient machine, which has found application over wide power and speed ranges. This paper presents the optimal rotor design of a PMSM for use on a railway vehicle. This design utilizes reluctance torque in order to develop higher torque at starting with low open circuit voltage at high speed.

  6. F(1)-ATPase: a prototypical rotary molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    F(1)-ATPase, the soluble portion of ATP synthase, has been shown to be a rotary molecular motor in which the central γ subunit rotates inside the cylinder made of α(3)β(3) subunits. The rotation is powered by ATP hydrolysis in three catalytic sites, and reverse rotation of the γ subunit by an external force leads to ATP synthesis in the catalytic sites. Here I look back how our lab became involved in the study of this marvelous rotary machine, and discuss some aspects of its rotary mechanism while confessing we are far from understanding. This article is a very personal essay, not a scientific review, for this otherwise viral machines book. PMID:22297508

  7. Design of a Mode Conversion Ultrasonic Motor for Position Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeLetty, Ronan; Bouchilloux, Philippe; Claeyssen, Frank; Lhermet, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    The many useful characteristics of ultrasonic motors, such as high holding torques, and high torque at low speeds, have made them the subject of increasing interest. In addition, several of their characteristics make them attractive for aerospace applications: they have a torque to weight ratio, and they require neither gearing mechanisms nor lubrication. Moreover, they create negligible magnetic fields, and conversely, they are not affected by external magnetic fields. Ultrasonic motors based on bolt-tightened structures offer simplicity and high stress capability. They use the inverse piezoelectric effect in the stator to produce vibrational energy, which is transferred to the rotor by friction. We designed a bolt-tightened ultrasonic motor using numerical modelling tools (finite element and electromechanical circuit analyses), creating an equivalent circuit model that takes into account the electromechanical energy conversion in the stator and the contact between the stator and the rotor. Analysis of the circuit gives insight into the behavior of the motor and allows its performance to be calculated. Two prototypes of the motor were built; their transient responses and other quantities, such as starting torque, were measured. In this paper, we discuss the numerical and the experimental results, and demonstrate the usefulness of numerical analysis in designing ultrasonic motors and estimating their performance.

  8. MOV motor and gearbox performance under design basis loads

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the results of valve testing sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The research objective was to evaluate the capabilities of specific actuator motor and gearbox assemblies under various design basis loading conditions. The testing was performed using the motor-operated valve load simulator, a test fixture that simulates the stem load profiles a valve actuator would experience when closing a valve against flow and pressure loadings. The authors tested five typical motors (four ac motors and one dc motor) with three gearbox assemblies at conditions a motor might experience in a power plant, including such off-normal conditions as operation at high temperature and reduced voltage. The authors also determined the efficiency of the actuator gearbox. The testing produced the following significant results: all five motors operated at or above their rated torque during tests at full voltage and ambient temperature; for all five motors (dc as well as ac), the actual torque loss due to voltage degradation was greater than the torque loss predicted using common methods; startup torques in locked rotor tests compared well with stall torques in dynamometer-type tests; the methods commonly used to predict torque losses due to elevated operating temperatures sometimes bounded the actual losses, but not in all cases; the greatest discrepancy involved the prediction for the dc motor; running efficiencies published by the manufacturer for actuator gearboxes were higher than the actual efficiencies determined from testing, in some instances, the published pullout efficiencies were also higher than the actual values; operation of the gearbox at elevated temperature did not affect the operating efficiency.

  9. Report on Toyota/Prius Motor Design and Manufacturing Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2004-07-28

    In today's hybrid vehicle market the Toyota Prius drive system is currently considered the leader in electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing innovations. It is significant that in today's marketplace Toyota is able to manufacture and sell the vehicle for a profit. This project's objective is to analyze and study the Prius drive system to understand the design and manufacturing mechanisms Toyota utilized to achieved their performance and cost goals. During the course of this research effort ORNL has dissected both the 2003 and 2004 Toyota/Prius drive motors. This study is focused primarily on motor design considerations and an assessment of manufacturing issues.

  10. Superspreading: mechanisms and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis E; Müller, Erich A; Craster, Richard V; Matar, Omar K

    2015-03-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Despite significant experimental efforts, the precise mechanisms underlying superspreading remain unknown to date. Here, we isolate these mechanisms by analyzing coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of surfactant molecules of varying molecular architecture and substrate affinity. We observe that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. This article also highlights and explores the differences between superspreading and conventional surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. PMID:25658859

  11. Intra-cellular traffic: bio-molecular motors on filamentary tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, D.; Basu, A.; Garai, A.; Greulich, P.; Nishinari, K.; Schadschneider, A.; Tripathi, T.

    2008-08-01

    Molecular motors are macromolecular complexes which use some form of input energy to perform mechanical work. The filamentary tracks, on which these motors move, are made of either proteins (e.g., microtubules) or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA). Often, many such motors move simultaneously on the same track and their collective properties have superficial similarities with vehicular traffic on highways. The models we have developed provide "unified" description: in the low-density limit, a model captures the transport properties of a single motor while, at higher densities the same model accounts for the collective spatio-temporal organization of interacting motors. By drawing analogy with vehicular traffic, we have introduced novel quantities for characterizing the nature of the spatio-temporal organization of molecular motors on their tracks. We show how the traffic-like intracellular collective phenomena depend on the mechano-chemistry of the corresponding individual motors.

  12. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors.

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, Z.; Karpeev, D.; Aranson, I. S.; Bates, P. W.; Michigan State Univ.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the 'computational bottlenecks' associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  13. Simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhiyuan; Karpeev, Dmitry; Aranson, Igor S.; Bates, Peter W.

    2008-05-01

    We perform Monte Carlo type simulation studies of self-organization of microtubules interacting with molecular motors. We model microtubules as stiff polar rods of equal length exhibiting anisotropic diffusion in the plane. The molecular motors are implicitly introduced by specifying certain probabilistic collision rules resulting in realignment of the rods. This approximation of the complicated microtubule-motor interaction by a simple instant collision allows us to bypass the “computational bottlenecks” associated with the details of the diffusion and the dynamics of motors and the reorientation of microtubules. Consequently, we are able to perform simulations of large ensembles of microtubules and motors on a very large time scale. This simple model reproduces all important phenomenology observed in in vitro experiments: Formation of vortices for low motor density and raylike asters and bundles for higher motor density.

  14. Design and Experimental Study on Spinning Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Heng; Jiang, Chunlan; Wang, Zaicheng

    The study on spinning solid rocket motor (SRM) which used as power plant of twice throwing structure of aerial submunition was introduced. This kind of SRM which with the structure of tangential multi-nozzle consists of a combustion chamber, propellant charge, 4 tangential nozzles, ignition device, etc. Grain design, structure design and prediction of interior ballistic performance were described, and problem which need mainly considered in design were analyzed comprehensively. Finally, in order to research working performance of the SRM, measure pressure-time curve and its speed, static test and dynamic test were conducted respectively. And then calculated values and experimental data were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the designed motor operates normally, and the stable performance of interior ballistic meet demands. And experimental results have the guidance meaning for the pre-research design of SRM.

  15. Mechanism of Cooperative Behavior in Systems of Slow and Fast Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Adam G.; Landahl, Eric C.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [1, 2]. Here we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behavior of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity ∼15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behavior depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors. PMID:19506764

  16. Motor Mania: Revving Up for Technological Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Wendy M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2008-01-01

    Students get very excited when confronted with problems that they find meaningful. Problem-based learning lets students solve problems using the strategies and tools that scientists use. While developing solutions via technological design and construction, students experience firsthand the relationship between science and technology. To capture…

  17. Computer-assisted design in perceptual-motor skills research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A categorization was made of independent variables previously found to be potent in simple perceptual-motor tasks. A computer was then used to generate hypothetical factorial designs. These were evaluated in terms of literature trends and pragmatic criteria. Potential side-effects of machine-assisted research strategy were discussed.

  18. Enantiopure Functional Molecular Motors Obtained by a Switchable Chiral-Resolution Process.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Gan, Jefri; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-17

    Molecular switches, rotors, and motors play an important role in the development of nano-machines and devices, as well as responsive and adaptive functional materials. For unidirectional rotors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes, their stereochemical homogeneity is of crucial importance. Herein, a method to obtain new and functionalizable overcrowded alkenes in enantiopure form is presented. The procedure involves a short synthesis of three steps and a solvent-switchable chiral resolution by using a readily available resolving agent. X-ray crystallography revealed the mode of binding of the motor with the resolving agent, as well as the absolute configuration of the motor. (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the dynamic behavior of this molecular motor. This method provides rapid access to ample amounts of enantiopure molecular motors, which will greatly facilitate the further development of responsive molecular systems based on chiral overcrowded alkenes. PMID:27072290

  19. Network Complexity and Parametric Simplicity for Cargo Transport by Two Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Corina; Berger, Florian; Liepelt, Steffen; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Cargo transport by two molecular motors is studied by constructing a chemomechanical network for the whole transport system and analyzing the cargo and motor trajectories generated by this network. The theoretical description starts from the different nucleotide states of a single motor supplemented by chemical and mechanical transitions between these states. As an instructive example, we focus on kinesin-1, for which a detailed single-motor network has been developed previously. This network incorporates the chemical transitions arising from ATP hydrolysis on both motor heads. In addition, both the chemical and the mechanical transition rates of a single kinesin motor were found to depend on the load force experienced by the motor. When two such motors are attached via their stalks to a cargo particle, they become elastically coupled. This coupling can be effectively described by an elastic spring between the two motors. The spring extension, which is given by the deviation of the actual spring length from its rest length, determines the mutual interaction force between the motors and, thus, affects all chemical and mechanical transition rates of both motors. As a result, cargo transport by two motors leads to a combined chemomechanical network, which is quite complex and contains a large number of motor cycles. However, apart from the single motor parameters, this complex network involves only two additional parameters: (i) the spring constant of the elastic coupling between the motors and (ii) the rebinding rate for an unbound motor. We show that these two parameters can be determined directly from cargo trajectories and/or trajectories of individual motors. Both types of trajectories are accessible to experiment and, thus, can be used to obtain a complete set of parameters for cargo transport by two motors.

  20. Stator design of a new type of spherical piezoelectric motor.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yung; Tsai, Yu-Ren; Hou, Bing-Kuan; Lin, Shuo-Chun; Lu, Cheng-Chin

    2010-10-01

    The stator design of a new type of spherical motor driven by piezoelectric actuators is developed. A curved piezoelectric actuator is designed to attach to the spherical surface. A series of the curved piezoelectric actuators is laid in a line around a spherical surface. By applying an appropriate voltage signal with phase difference on neighboring actuators, a traveling wave is generated on the hemispherical shell. Each set of curved piezoelectric actuators is designed to provide motion with a single degree-of-freedom (DOF). With two or three sets of the piezoelectric actuators constructed to be mutually perpendicular, the motor can provide 2-DOF or 3-DOF motion. Stator design and analysis and experiment for the 1-, 2-, and 3-DOF conditions are presented in this article. Analytical calculation and experiment results of several fundamental characteristics of the stator are in good agreement. Performance evaluation of rotation speed and torque of the stator and some implementation problems are also addressed. PMID:20889421

  1. Designing LC filters for AC-motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Gath, P.A.; Lucas, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents practical design guidelines for designing LC filters for AC-motor drive applications. A DC choke and an electrolytic capacitor bank on the DC bus filter the voltage and the current ripples and improve the input power factor. Capacitor and choke values are derived to optimize overall filter performance. Costs associated with the respective component values can then be obtained to analyze cost trade-offs between selected values. Helpful hints are also given.

  2. Design and construction of a novel rotary magnetostrictive motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanjia; Blatchley, Charles C.; Ibeh, Christopher C.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetostriction can be used to induce linear incremental motion, which is effective in giant magnetostrictive inchworm motors. Such motors possess the advantage of combining small step incremental motion with large force. However, continuous rotation may be preferred in practical applications. This paper describes a novel magnetostrictive rotary motor using terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9) material as the driving element. The motor is constructed of two giant magnetostrictive actuators with shell structured flexure-hinge and leaf springs. These two actuators are placed in a perpendicular position to minimize the coupling displacement of the two actuators. The principal design parameters of the actuators and strain amplifiers are optimally determined, and its static analysis is undertaken through finite element analysis software. The small movements of the magnetostrictive actuators are magnified by about three times using oval shell structured amplifiers. When two sinusoidal wave currents with 90° phase shift are applied to the magnetostrictive actuators, purely rotational movement can be produced as in the orbit of a Lissajous diagram in an oscillograph, and this movement is used to drive the rotor of the motor. A prototype has been constructed and tested.

  3. Design and Development of Molecular Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging, the visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular, subcellular level, or even molecular level in living subjects, has rapidly gained importance in the dawning era of personalized medicine. Molecular imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces molecular imaging probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular markers at different stages of diseases and disorders. As a key component of molecular imaging, molecular imaging probe must be able to specifically reach the target of interest in vivo while retaining long enough to be detected. A desirable molecular imaging probe with clinical translation potential is expected to have unique characteristics. Therefore, design and development of molecular imaging probe is frequently a challenging endeavor for medicinal chemists. This review summarizes the general principles of molecular imaging probe design and some fundamental strategies of molecular imaging probe development with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:20388106

  4. Coarse-Grained Structural Modeling of Molecular Motors Using Multibody Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Parker, David; Bryant, Zev; Delp, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental and computational approaches are needed to uncover the mechanisms by which molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical work. In this article, we describe methods and software to generate structurally realistic models of molecular motor conformations compatible with experimental data from different sources. Coarse-grained models of molecular structures are constructed by combining groups of atoms into a system of rigid bodies connected by joints. Contacts between rigid bodies enforce excluded volume constraints, and spring potentials model system elasticity. This simplified representation allows the conformations of complex molecular motors to be simulated interactively, providing a tool for hypothesis building and quantitative comparisons between models and experiments. In an example calculation, we have used the software to construct atomically detailed models of the myosin V molecular motor bound to its actin track. The software is available at www.simtk.org. PMID:20428469

  5. Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.

  6. How Molecular Motors Are Arranged on a Cargo Is Important for Vesicular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Robert P.; Jia, Zhiyuan; Gross, Steven P.; Yu, Clare C.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial organization of the cell depends upon intracellular trafficking of cargos hauled along microtubules and actin filaments by the molecular motor proteins kinesin, dynein, and myosin. Although much is known about how single motors function, there is significant evidence that cargos in vivo are carried by multiple motors. While some aspects of multiple motor function have received attention, how the cargo itself —and motor organization on the cargo—affects transport has not been considered. To address this, we have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of motors transporting a spherical cargo, subject to thermal fluctuations that produce both rotational and translational diffusion. We found that these fluctuations could exert a load on the motor(s), significantly decreasing the mean travel distance and velocity of large cargos, especially at large viscosities. In addition, the presence of the cargo could dramatically help the motor to bind productively to the microtubule: the relatively slow translational and rotational diffusion of moderately sized cargos gave the motors ample opportunity to bind to a microtubule before the motor/cargo ensemble diffuses out of range of that microtubule. For rapidly diffusing cargos, the probability of their binding to a microtubule was high if there were nearby microtubules that they could easily reach by translational diffusion. Our simulations found that one reason why motors may be approximately 100 nm long is to improve their ‘on’ rates when attached to comparably sized cargos. Finally, our results suggested that to efficiently regulate the number of active motors, motors should be clustered together rather than spread randomly over the surface of the cargo. While our simulation uses the specific parameters for kinesin, these effects result from generic properties of the motors, cargos, and filaments, so they should apply to other motors as well. PMID:21573204

  7. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Segmented and monolithic Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design concepts were evaluated with emphasis on joints and seals. Particular attention was directed to eliminating deficiencies in the SRM High Performance Motor (HPM). The selected conceptual design is described and discussed.

  8. Force and motion generation of molecular motors: A generic description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jülicher, Frank

    We review the properties of biological motor proteins which move along linear filaments that are polar and periodic. The physics of the operation of such motors can be described by simple stochastic models which are coupled to a chemical reaction. We analyze the essential features of force and motion generation and discuss the general properties of single motors in the framework of two-state models. Systems which contain large numbers of motors such as muscles and flagella motivate the study of many interacting motors within the framework of simple models. In this case, collective effects can lead to new types of behaviors such as dynamic instabilities of the steady states and oscillatory motion.

  9. Solid motor diagnostic instrumentation. [design of self-contained instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Arens, W. E.; Wuest, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    A review of typical surveillance and monitoring practices followed during the flight phases of representative solid-propellant upper stages and apogee motors was conducted to evaluate the need for improved flight diagnostic instrumentation on future spacecraft. The capabilities of the flight instrumentation package were limited to the detection of whether or not the solid motor was the cause of failure and to the identification of probable primary failure modes. Conceptual designs of self-contained flight instrumentation packages capable of meeting these reqirements were generated and their performance, typical cost, and unit characteristics determined. Comparisons of a continuous real time and a thresholded hybrid design were made on the basis of performance, mass, power, cost, and expected life. The results of this analysis substantiated the feasibility of a self-contained independent flight instrumentation module as well as the existence of performance margins by which to exploit growth option applications.

  10. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part V: design criteria.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-10-01

    Design criteria for the stable and durable operation of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) motor are discussed. The low electric conductivity and pyroelectricity of the lithium niobate (LN) stator used in the motor hindered the motor's stability. We demonstrated that the use of LN whose conductivity had been enhanced by chemical reduction counteracted the instability caused by contact electrification and meniscus adhesion. The severe failure of the stator surface limits the durability of the SAW motor. Owing to the chemical inertness of LN, the surface failure of the stator was caused by mechanical stresses resulting from the indentation and sliding of the projections placed at the slider surface. The as-fabricated sharp edges of the projections are the obvious cause of failure. Thus, if the projections are necessary, a procedure in which the edges are worn off before operation is the only feasible method to correct this problem. Nevertheless, the optimum geometry to prevent surface failure was deduced as flat plane. The flat plane geometry was useful if the contact pressure is sufficiently large to diminish the effect of the layer of squeezed air between the surfaces. PMID:18986876

  11. Dissipation in an electric field-driven synthetic rotary caltrop-based molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Corina; Crespi, Vincent

    2008-03-01

    A molecular caltrop has a three-legged base for attachment to a substrate and a vertical molecular shaft functionalized with a dipole-carrying molecular rotor at the upper end. The desired rotational motion of the rotor can generate dissipation when the motor is driven at frequencies which are close to the natural frequencies of soft vibrational modes in the structure or librational of the rotator about field direction. Classical molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the role of these resonances and investigate motor performance under external drive.

  12. Enhanced Diffusion of Molecular Motors in the Presence of Adenosine Triphosphate and External Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Ryota; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The diffusion of a molecular motor in the presence of a constant external force is considered on the basis of a simple theoretical model. The motor is represented by a Brownian particle moving in a series of parabolic potentials placed periodically on a line, and the potential is switched stochastically from one parabola to another by a chemical reaction, which corresponds to the hydrolysis or synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in motor proteins. It is found that the diffusion coefficient as a function of the force exhibits peaks. The mechanism of this diffusion enhancement and the possibility of observing it in F1-ATPase, a biological rotary motor, are discussed.

  13. Correlations and symmetry of interactions influence collective dynamics of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis-Garza, Daniel; Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-04-01

    Enzymatic molecules that actively support many cellular processes, including transport, cell division and cell motility, are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. Experimental studies indicate that they interact with each other and they frequently work together in large groups. To understand the mechanisms of collective behavior of motor proteins we study the effect of interactions in the transport of molecular motors along linear filaments. It is done by analyzing a recently introduced class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes that takes into account the intermolecular interactions via thermodynamically consistent approach. We develop a new theoretical method that allows us to compute analytically all dynamic properties of the system. Our analysis shows that correlations play important role in dynamics of interacting molecular motors. Surprisingly, we find that the correlations for repulsive interactions are weaker and more short-range than the correlations for the attractive interactions. In addition, it is shown that symmetry of interactions affect dynamic properties of molecular motors. The implications of these findings for motor proteins transport are discussed. Our theoretical predictions are tested by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations.

  14. Mechanism of cooperative behaviour in systems of slow and fast molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Adam G; Landahl, Eric C; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-06-28

    Two recent theoretical advances have described cargo transport by multiple identical motors and by multiple oppositely directed, but otherwise identical motors [M. J. Muller, S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105(12), 4609-4614; S. Klumpp and R. Lipowsky, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2005, 102(48), 17284-17289]. Here, we combine a similar theoretical approach with a simple experiment to describe the behaviour of a system comprised of slow and fast molecular motors having the same directionality. We observed the movement of microtubules by mixtures of slow and fast kinesin motors attached to a glass coverslip in a classic sliding filament assay. The motors are identical, except that the slow ones contain five point mutations that collectively reduce their velocity approximately 15-fold without compromising maximal ATPase activity. Our results indicate that a small fraction of fast motors are able to accelerate the dissociation of slow motors from microtubules. Because of this, a sharp, highly cooperative transition occurs from slow to fast microtubule movement as the relative number of fast motors in the assay is increased. Microtubules move at half-maximal velocity when only 15% of the motors in the assay are fast. Our model indicates that this behaviour depends primarily on the relative motor velocities and the asymmetry between their forward and backward dissociation forces. It weakly depends on the number of motors and their processivity. We predict that movement of cargoes bound to two types of motors having very different velocities will be dominated by one or the other motor. Therefore, cargoes can potentially undergo abrupt changes in movement in response to regulatory mechanisms acting on only a small fraction of motors. PMID:19506764

  15. Design optimization of axially laminated rotors for synchronous reluctance motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakao, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Ando, H.; Onuki, T.

    2000-05-01

    This article describes a design optimization of an axially laminated rotor of the synchronous reluctance motor, using the optimization method combined with the magnetic field analysis. The magnetic flux distribution in the synchronous reluctance motor is distorted due to the complicated rotor configuration and the influence of magnetic saturation, which results in a large number of local minimum solutions. Therefore, taking account of the magnetic saturation by the finite element method, the authors propose a novel optimization approach by coupling the stochastic search method with the deterministic one. In the optimization process a suitable objective function for the stability of machine performances is also proposed. Finally some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach are presented.

  16. Sunlight-powered kHz rotation of a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor

    PubMed Central

    Guentner, Manuel; Schildhauer, Monika; Thumser, Stefan; Mayer, Peter; Stephenson, David; Mayer, Peter J.; Dube, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Photodriven molecular motors are able to convert light energy into directional motion and hold great promise as miniaturized powering units for future nanomachines. In the current state of the art, considerable efforts have still to be made to increase the efficiency of energy transduction and devise systems that allow operation in ambient and non-damaging conditions with high rates of directional motions. The need for ultraviolet light to induce the motion of virtually all available light-driven motors especially hampers the broad applicability of these systems. We describe here a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor, which is powered exclusively by nondestructive visible light (up to 500 nm) and rotates completely directionally with kHz frequency at 20 °C. This is the fastest directional motion of a synthetic system driven by visible light to date permitting materials and biocompatible irradiation conditions to establish similarly high speeds as natural molecular motors. PMID:26411883

  17. Electric motor designs for attenuating torque disturbance in sensitive space mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, David B.; Fink, Richard A.

    2003-09-01

    When a motion control system introduces unwanted torque jitter and motion anomalies into sensitive space flight optical or positioning mechanisms, the pointing accuracy, positioning capability, or scanning resolution of the mission suffers. Special motion control technology must be employed to provide attenuation of the harmful torque disturbances. Brushless DC (BLDC) Motors with low torque disturbance characteristics have been successfully used on such notable missions as the Hubble Space Telescope when conventional approaches to motor design would not work. Motor designs for low disturbance mechanisms can include two and three phase sinusoidal BLDC motors, BLDC motors without iron teeth, and sometimes skewed or non-integral slot designs for motors commutated with Hall effect devices. The principal components of motor torque disturbance, successful BLDC motor designs for attenuating disturbances, and design trade-offs for optimum performance are examined.

  18. Pattern Formations in Polymer-Molecular Motor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Duggan, Cynthia; Käs, Josef

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies with the microtubule-kinesin system, organized patterns such as asters and rotating vortices have been seen (Nedelec et al, Nature 1997), which were of a dynamic nature and dependent on active motors. A similar system was constructed using actin and myosin, which displays similar patterns, however, with drastically different dynamics. These patterns arise independent of the initial amount of immediate use energy (in the form of ATP), assembling only upon the near exhaustion of available ATP. Further studies have clearly shown that in fact these patterns are not dependent upon the motor activity of the myosin but its propensity to serve as a cross-linking element in an actin network, with the motor activity serving to prevent the arising of order in the system. We believe the dynamic differences inherent between the two polymer-motor systems studied lies primarily in the structural nature of the motor complexes, with the kinesin complex ordering the system by pushing multiple filaments in a parallel direction, and the myosin complexes disordering the system by pushing filaments in an antiparallel manner.

  19. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M. D.

    2013-06-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

  20. Miniaturization Design Method and Performance Evaluation of Prototype Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor Optimally Designed by Thermomagnetic Field Coupling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Norihisa; Kitamura, Hideki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nakatsugawa, Junnosuke; Enomoto, Yuji

    This paper reports the results of the miniaturization design of a permanent-magnet synchronous motor, for which an optimal design technique based on thermomagnetic field coupling analysis is used. We derived the optimal solutions for various motor flatness ratios and determined the relationship between the motor size and the flatness ratio. For motors with different flatness ratios, we calculated the speed-torque characteristics by considering the voltage, temperature rise, and demagnetization limits and compared them. Moreover, we manufactured and tested the smallest designed motor. The measured temperature rises demonstrated the high accuracy of the proposed miniaturization design.

  1. Intrinsic irreversibility limits the efficiency of multidimensional molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, M. W.; Tumlin, C.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the efficiency limits of Brownian motors able to extract work from the temperature difference between reservoirs or from external thermodynamic forces. These systems can operate in a variety of modes, including as isothermal engines, heat engines, refrigerators, and heat pumps. We derive analytical results showing that certain classes of multidimensional Brownian motor, including the Smoluchowski-Feynman ratchet, are unable to attain perfect efficiency (Carnot efficiency for heat engines). This demonstrates the presence of intrinsic irreversibilities in their operating mechanism. We present numerical simulations showing that in some cases the loss process that limits efficiency is associated with vortices in the probability current.

  2. Design, Modeling and Performance Optimization of a Novel Rotary Piezoelectric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Khanh A.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    1997-01-01

    This work has demonstrated a proof of concept for a torsional inchworm type motor. The prototype motor has shown that piezoelectric stack actuators can be used for rotary inchworm motor. The discrete linear motion of piezoelectric stacks can be converted into rotary stepping motion. The stacks with its high force and displacement output are suitable actuators for use in piezoelectric motor. The designed motor is capable of delivering high torque and speed. Critical issues involving the design and operation of piezoelectric motors were studied. The tolerance between the contact shoes and the rotor has proved to be very critical to the performance of the motor. Based on the prototype motor, a waveform optimization scheme was proposed and implemented to improve the performance of the motor. The motor was successfully modeled in MATLAB. The model closely represents the behavior of the prototype motor. Using the motor model, the input waveforms were successfully optimized to improve the performance of the motor in term of speed, torque, power and precision. These optimized waveforms drastically improve the speed of the motor at different frequencies and loading conditions experimentally. The optimized waveforms also increase the level of precision of the motor. The use of the optimized waveform is a break-away from the traditional use of sinusoidal and square waves as the driving signals. This waveform optimization scheme can be applied to any inchworm motors to improve their performance. The prototype motor in this dissertation as a proof of concept was designed to be robust and large. Future motor can be designed much smaller and more efficient with lessons learned from the prototype motor.

  3. Ultra high resolution stepper motors design, development, performance and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moll, H.; Roeckl, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of stepper motors with steps in the 10 arc sec to 2 arc min range is described. Some of the problem areas, e.g. rotor suspension, tribology aspects and environmental conditions are covered. A summary of achieved test results and the employment in different mechanisms already developed and tested is presented to give some examples of the possible use of this interesting device. Adaptations to military and commercial requirements are proposed and show the wide range of possible applications.

  4. Interplay between crosslinkers and dynamic molecular motor-induced instabilities in the moderation of biopolymer organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Ziebert, Falko; Zimmermann, Walter; Käs, Josef

    2006-03-01

    Structure and function of biological cells rely on the highly-dynamic self-organization of protein filaments to an intracellular cytoskeleton responsive to mechanical and chemical stimuli. While dissolving these complex cellular structures through Brownian motion is inherently slow (tens of minutes), changes in the activity of the molecular motor myosin II cause rapid order-disorder transitions within 1-2 minutes in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin networks. When motor-induced filament sliding decreases, actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies triggered by a nonlinear instability. Modulation of static crosslinker concentrations allow for a wide phase space of order ranging from nematics to compact asters & dense packing of motor-filament clusters. The observed isothermal transitions between disorder and self-organization illustrate that molecular motors can substantially contribute to dynamic cellular organization.

  5. Solid rocket motor conceptual design - The development of a design optimization expert system with a hypertext user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegern, James B.

    1993-06-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) design prototypes can be rapidly formulated and evaluated by the use of advanced computer-based methodologies that apply expert system and artificial intelligence software to the SRM design optimization processes. The research program that was carried out, and is reported in this paper, was to formulate a computer-based SRM expert system for motor design and optimization, with the assistance of a hypertext software algorithm that provides a user-friendly interface. With this interface for parameter input, the design engineer can quickly obtain rocket motor designs that satisfy the performance mission of the SRM, as well as meet criteria for optimized (minimum) motor mass. The computer-based software has been designated as the Solid Rocket Motor Conceptual Design Optimization System (SRMCDOS). The main purpose of this SRM design system is to aid the SRM design engineer in making the best initial design selections and thereby reducing the overall 'design cycle time' of a project.

  6. Stepping and Crowding of Molecular Motors: Statistical Kinetics from an Exclusion Process Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ciandrini, Luca; Romano, M. Carmen; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerization (e.g., RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend contemporary statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of comoving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions. PMID:25185553

  7. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Yochelis, A; Ebrahim, S; Millis, B; Cui, R; Kachar, B; Naoz, M; Gov, N S

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  8. Self-organization of waves and pulse trains by molecular motors in cellular protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Yochelis, A.; Ebrahim, S.; Millis, B.; Cui, R.; Kachar, B.; Naoz, M.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Actin-based cellular protrusions are an ubiquitous feature of cells, performing a variety of critical functions ranging from cell-cell communication to cell motility. The formation and maintenance of these protrusions relies on the transport of proteins via myosin motors, to the protrusion tip. While tip-directed motion leads to accumulation of motors (and their molecular cargo) at the protrusion tip, it is observed that motors also form rearward moving, periodic and isolated aggregates. The origins and mechanisms of these aggregates, and whether they are important for the recycling of motors, remain open puzzles. Motivated by novel myosin-XV experiments, a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model is proposed. The model incorporates a non-linear cooperative interaction between motors, which converts them between an active and an inactive state. Specifically, the type of aggregate formed (traveling waves or pulse-trains) is linked to the kinetics of motors at the protrusion tip which is introduced by a boundary condition. These pattern selection mechanisms are found not only to qualitatively agree with empirical observations but open new vistas to the transport phenomena by molecular motors in general. PMID:26335545

  9. Properties of tug-of-war model for cargo transport by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2009-06-01

    Molecular motors are essential components for the biophysical functions of the cell. Current quantitative understanding of how multiple motors move along a single track is not complete, even though models and theories for a single motor mechanochemistry abound. Recently, Müller have developed a tug-of-war model to describe the bidirectional movement of the cargo [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 4609 (2008)]. They found that the tug-of-war model exhibits several qualitative different motility regimes, which depend on the precise value of single motor parameters, and they suggested that the sensitivity can be used by a cell to regulate its cargo traffic. In the present paper, we will carry out a detailed theoretical analysis of a special case of tug-of-war model: in which the numbers of the two different motor species which bound to the cargo tend to infinite. Through the analysis, all the stable, i.e., biophysically observable, steady states and their stability domains can be obtained. Depending on values of the several parameters, the tug-of-war model exhibits uni-, bi-, or tristability. The steady-state movement of the cargo, which is transported by two different molecular motor species, is determined by the initial numbers of the motors which bound to the track.

  10. Influence of molecular motors on the motion of particles in viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Sebastián

    2014-06-01

    We study theoretically and by numerical simulations the motion of particles driven by molecular motors in a viscoelastic medium representing the cell cytoplasm. For this, we consider a generalized Langevin equation coupled to a stochastic stepping dynamics for the motors that takes into account the action of each motor separately. In the absence of motors, the model produces subdiffusive motion of particles characterized by a power-law scaling of the mean square displacement versus the lag time as t^{α}, with 0<α<1, similar to that observed in cells. Our results show how the action of the motors can induce a transition to a superdiffusive regime at large lag times with the characteristics of those found in experiments reported in the literature. We also show that at small lag times, the motors can act as static crosslinkers that slow down the natural subdiffusive transport. An analysis of previously reported experimental data in the relevant time scales provides evidence of this phenomenon. Finally, we study the effect of a harmonic potential representing an optical trap, and we show a way to approach to a macroscopic description of the active transport in cells. This last point stresses the relevance of the molecular motors for generating not only directed motion to specific targets, but also fast diffusivelike random motion. PMID:25019814

  11. Automatic Evolution of Molecular Nanotechnology Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes strategies for automatically generating designs for analog circuits at the molecular level. Software maps out the edges and vertices of potential nanotechnology systems on graphs, then selects appropriate ones through evolutionary or genetic paradigms.

  12. Reversing the direction in a light-driven rotary molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Pollard, Michael M.; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-01-01

    Biological rotary motors can alter their mechanical function by changing the direction of rotary motion. Achieving a similar reversal of direction of rotation in artificial molecular motors presents a fundamental stereochemical challenge: how to change from clockwise to anticlockwise motion without compromising the autonomous unidirectional rotary behaviour of the system. A new molecular motor with multilevel control of rotary motion is reported here, in which the direction of light-powered rotation can be reversed by base-catalysed epimerization. The key steps are deprotonation and reprotonation of the photochemically generated less-stable isomers during the 360° unidirectional rotary cycle, with complete inversion of the configuration at the stereogenic centre. The ability to change directionality is an essential step towards mechanical molecular systems with adaptive functional behaviour.

  13. New mechanistic insight in the thermal helix inversion of second-generation molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Klok, Martin; Walko, Martin; Geertsema, Edzard M; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of dibenzocyclohepten-5-ylidene as part of a unidirectional light-driven molecular motor allows a more complete picture of the pathway of thermal helix inversion to be developed. The most stable conformation is similar to that found in related motors in that it has, overall, an anti-folded structure with the substituent at the stereogenic centre adopting an axial orientation. Photochemical cis/trans isomerisation at -40 degrees C results in the formation of an isomer in a syn-folded conformation with the methyl group in an axial orientation. This contrasts with previous studies on related molecular rotary motors. The conformation of the higher energy intermediate typically observed for this class of compound is the anti-folded conformation, in which the methyl group is in an equatorial orientation. This conformation is available through an energetically uphill upper half ring inversion of the observed photochemical product. However, this pathway competes with a second process that leads to the more stable anti-folded conformation in which the methyl group is oriented axially. It has been shown that the conformations and pathways available for second-generation molecular motors can be described by using similar overall geometries. Differences in the metastable high-energy species are attributable to the relative energy and position on the reaction coordinate of the transition states. Kinetic studies on these new molecular motors thus provide important insights into the conformational dynamics of the rotation cycle. PMID:18979464

  14. Ultra-fast force-clamp laser trapping of single molecular motors and DNA binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Monico, Carina; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-09-01

    Forces play a fundamental role in a wide array of biological processes, regulating enzymatic activity, kinetics of molecular bonds, and molecular motors mechanics. Single molecule force spectroscopy techniques have enabled the investigation of such processes, but they are inadequate to probe short-lived (millisecond and sub-millisecond) molecular complexes. We developed an ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy technique that uses a dual trap configuration to apply constant loads to a single intermittently interacting biological polymer and a binding protein. Our system displays a delay of only ˜10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. The force-clamp configuration in which our assay operates allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds. Moreover, conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors can be recorded with sub-nanometer accuracy and few tens of microseconds of temporal resolution. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  15. Physical aspects of the structure and function of helicases as rotary molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikin, S. A.

    2009-11-01

    Helicases were shown to have common physical properties with rotary molecular motors, such as F 0 F 1-ATP synthase and type I restriction-modification (RM) enzymes. The necessary conditions for action of molecular motors are chirality, the presence of the C 2 (or lower) symmetry axis within rather large atomic groups, and polarization properties. The estimates were made for the material parameters of helicases, which translocate DNA due to moving chiral kinks without DNA cleavage and are characterized by higher viscosity, low mobility, and smaller chiral kinetic coefficients than type II RM enzymes. This paper discusses the efficiency of helicases with opposite polarities that drive DNA translocation in opposite directions.

  16. Rotor compound concept for designing an industrial HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M.; Hosseina, M.; Sarrafan, K.; Darabi, A.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, producing power with smaller amount of losses become as a goal in our daily life. Today, large amount of energy waste in power networks all around the world. The main reason is “resistive electric equipments” of power networks. Since early 1980s, simultaneous with the development of high temperature superconductive (HTS) technology, superconductors gently attracted the mankind attentions. Using superconductive equipments instead of conventional resistive ones are result in salient electric loss reduction in power systems. Especially to reduce losses in power networks superconductive industrial rotating machines can potentially perform a significant role. In early recent century, first generation of HTS rotating machines was born. But unfortunately they have long way to penetrate the commercial markets yet. In HTS rotating machines the conventional copper made windings are replaced with the HTS superconductors. In this paper an industrial HTS synchronous motor with YBCO coated conductor field windings was designed. As a new approach, model was equipped with a compound rotor that includes both magnetic and non-magnetic materials. So, large amount of heavy iron made part was replaced by light non-magnetic material such as G-10 fiberglass. Furthermore, in this structure iron loss in rotor could be reduced to its lowest value. Also less weight and more air gap energy density were the additional advantages. Regarding zero electric loss production in field windings and less iron loss in rotor construction, this model potentially is more effective than the other iron made HTS motors.

  17. The analysis and design of brushless D.C. motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benarous, Maamar

    In modern computer systems electrical drives are used to rotate hard discs. These motors require special torque- speed characteristics. The speed of the hard disc must be constant in order for the unit to function correctly. One type of drive, which is used for hard discs is the brushless-DC-motor. This machine has permanent magnet excitation and a polyphase armature winding. It therefore takes the form of a synchronous machine, and in order to be brushless the armature winding is stationary and the excitation rotates. To run at adjustable speed a variable frequency supply is required. In the brushless D.C form the inverter output is phase locked to the rotor position, it is therefore electro-magnetically similar to the D.C machine where fixed brushes determine the frequency and phase of the current in the armature winding. In order to perform the phase lock action signals measuring the rotor position are needed. In one form of machine Hall effect probes detect the position of the rotor poles, in a second given that the rotor is in motion the induced back emf is used. Experimentally it is convenient to replace these magnet systems with a photo- transistor and rotating shutter system and this was the approach used in this thesis. The objective of this research is to investigate different aspects of this motor. The generation, measurement, and placement of signals is described and illustrated, and the design and construction of an inverter supply circuit is described. Both 2D and 3D finite element analysis is used in order to find the machine parameters as well as cogging torque analysis, using the concept of permanent magnet magnetisation characteristics. It is shown that the cogging can be reduced for certain types of magnetisation. The finite element analysis is taken further by connecting the drive circuit needed to run the machine into the finite element mesh, the machine parameters are defined using this method. The close agreement between the simulation and

  18. Bidirectional Transport by Molecular Motors: Enhanced Processivity and Response to External Forces

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Melanie J.I.; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is often mediated by two teams of molecular motors that pull on the same cargo and move in opposite directions along the filaments. We have recently shown theoretically that this bidirectional transport can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between the two motor teams. Here, we further develop our theory to investigate the experimentally accessible dynamic behavior of cargos transported by strong motors such as kinesin-1 or cytoplasmic dynein. By studying the run and binding times of such a cargo, we show that the properties of biological motors, such as the large ratio of stall/detachment force and the small ratio of superstall backward/forward velocity, are favorable for bidirectional cargo transport, leading to fast motion and enhanced diffusion. In addition, cargo processivity is shown to be strongly enhanced by transport via several molecular motors even if these motors are engaged in a tug-of-war. Finally, we study the motility of a bidirectional cargo under force. Frictional forces arising, e.g., from the viscous cytoplasm, lead to peaks in the velocity distribution, while external forces as exerted, e.g., by an optical trap, lead to hysteresis effects. Our results, in particular our explicit expressions for the cargo binding time and the distance of the peaks in the velocity relation under friction, are directly accessible to in vitro as well as in vivo experiments. PMID:20513405

  19. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  20. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS Molecular energy transducers of the living cell. Proton ATP synthase: a rotating molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, Yurii M.; Tikhonov, Alexander N.

    2010-12-01

    The free energy released upon the enzymatic hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the main source of energy for the functioning of the living cell and all multicellular organisms. The overwhelming majority of ATP molecules are formed by proton ATP synthases, which are the smallest macromolecular electric motors in Nature. This paper reviews the modern concepts of the molecular structure and functioning of the proton ATP synthase, and real-time biophysical experiments on the rotation of the 'rotor' of this macromolecular motor. Some mathematical models describing the operation of this nanosized macromolecular machine are described.

  1. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F1-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  2. Molecular motor powered nanotransportation guided by carbon nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Ramon-Azcon, J.; Kim, K.; Reaves, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Umetsu, M.; Kumagai, I.; Adschiri, T.; Shiku, H.; Matsue, T.; Hwang, W.; Teizer, W.

    2014-03-01

    Due to a decrease in the channel size of nanodevices, pressure-driven transport is increasingly limited by the fluid viscosity. This can be overcome by utilizing the motor protein kinesin that can walk processively along the microtubule filaments for active transport. However, using the kinesin-based transport system requires the ability to control the location and orientation of microtubules. We introduce functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) tracks, aligned by dielectrophoresis, to guide kinesin powered microtubule shuttles. In order to resist shear flow and the force exerted by an electric field, the MWNT are attached to the surface via a biotin/streptavidin link. The configuration of the aligned MWNT is investigated using scanning electron microscopy and the guiding performance of the MWNT tracks is studied using fluorescence microscopy.

  3. Force Generation by Molecular-Motor-Powered Microtubule Bundles; Implications for Neuronal Polarization and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Maximilian; Franze, Kristian; Zemel, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    The heavily cross-linked microtubule (MT) bundles found in neuronal processes play a central role in the initiation, growth and maturation of axons and dendrites; however, a quantitative understanding of their mechanical function is still lacking. We here developed computer simulations to investigate the dynamics of force generation in 1D bundles of MTs that are cross-linked and powered by molecular motors. The motion of filaments and the forces they exert are investigated as a function of the motor type (unipolar or bipolar), MT density and length, applied load, and motor connectivity. We demonstrate that only unipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-1) can provide the driving force for bundle expansion, while bipolar motors (e.g., kinesin-5) oppose it. The force generation capacity of the bundles is shown to depend sharply on the fraction of unipolar motors due to a percolation transition that must occur in the bundle. Scaling laws between bundle length, force, MT length and motor fraction are presented. In addition, we investigate the dynamics of growth in the presence of a constant influx of MTs. Beyond a short equilibration period, the bundles grow linearly in time. In this growth regime, the bundle extends as one mass forward with most filaments sliding with the growth velocity. The growth velocity is shown to be dictated by the inward flux of MTs, to inversely scale with the load and to be independent of the free velocity of the motors. These findings provide important molecular-level insights into the mechanical function of the MT cytoskeleton in normal axon growth and regeneration after injury. PMID:26617489

  4. Hydrodynamics and rheology of mixtures of biopolymers and molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Aphrodite

    I use tools and concepts from non-equilibrium statistical physics and polymer physics to describe the large-scale collective behavior of solutions of polar biofilaments and crosslinkers, in both quiescent and flowing solvents. I model the system as a polar liquid crystal with both excluded volume, and active interactions due to the crosslinkers. The role of mobile and stationary crosslinkers, which can induce filament alignment promoting polar or nematic order, in analogy with liquid crystalline phases, is taken into account. I start from a Smoluchowski equation for rigid filaments in solutions where pairwise crosslink-mediated interactions among the filaments yield translational and rotational currents. The large-scale properties of the system are described in terms of continuum equations for filament and motor densities, polarization and alignment tensor obtained by coarse-graining the Smoluchowski equation. The possible homogeneous states of the systems are obtained as stable solutions of the dynamical equations and are characterized in terms of experimentally accessible parameters. The activity of mobile crosslinkers, which cause exchange of forces and torques among the filaments, renders the homogeneous states unstable via filament bundling. Furthermore, I incorporate the coupling of the orientational order to flow into the hydrodynamic equations, and take into account the exchange of momentum between the filaments and the flowing solvent. Flow enhances the orientational order and suppresses orientational instability in the ordered states. This model allows for an estimate of the various parameters in the hydrodynamic equations in terms of physical properties of the crosslinkers. Introducing a unified microscopic model to describe the non-equilibrium system of polar biofilaments and motor proteins with experimentally accessible parameters is the central result of this work.

  5. Molecular Nanotechnology and Designs of Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Reviewing the status of current approaches and future projections, as already published in the scientific journals and books, the talk will summarize the direction in which computational and experimental molecular nanotechnologies are progressing. Examples of nanotechnological approach to the concepts of design and simulation of atomically precise materials in a variety of interdisciplinary areas will be presented. The concepts of hypothetical molecular machines and assemblers as explained in Drexler's and Merckle's already published work and Han et. al's WWW distributed molecular gears will be explained.

  6. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-04-16

    In this review, current structural understanding of the apicomplexan glideosome and actin regulation is described. Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective.

  7. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702

  8. Chemical designs of functional photoactive molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qifan; Luo, Zhouyang; Cai, Kang; Ma, Yuguo; Zhao, Dahui

    2014-06-21

    Molecular assemblies with well-defined structures capable of photo-induced electron transfer and charge transport or photochemical reactions are reviewed. Hierarchical supramolecular architectures, which assemble the modular units into specific spatial arrangements and facilitate them to work cooperatively, are vital for the achievement of photo-functions in these systems. The chemical design of molecular building blocks and noncovalent interactions exploited to realize supramolecular organizations are particularly discussed. Reviewing and recapitulating the chemical evolution traces of these accomplished systems will hopefully delineate certain fundamental design principles and guidelines useful for developing more advanced functions in the future. PMID:24492680

  9. Low processivity for DNA translocation by the ISWI molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Eastlund, Allen; Al-Ani, Gada; Fischer, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    The motor protein ISWI (Imitation SWItch) is the conserved catalytic ATPase domain of the ISWI family of chromatin remodelers. Members of the ISWI family are involved in regulating the structure of cellular chromatin during times of transcription, translation, and repair. Current models for the nucleosome repositioning activity of ISWI and other chromatin remodelers require the translocation of the remodeling protein along double-stranded DNA through an ATP-dependent mechanism. Here we report results from spectrofluorometric stopped-flow experiments which demonstrate that ISWI displays very low processivity for free DNA translocation. By combining these results with those from experiments monitoring the DNA stimulated ATPase activity of ISWI we further demonstrate that the DNA translocation by ISWI is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The calculated coupling efficiency of 0.067±0.018 ATP/ISWI/bp is seemingly quite low in comparison to similar DNA translocases and we present potential models to account for this. Nevertheless, the tight coupling of ATP hydrolysis to DNA translocation suggests that DNA translocation is not energetically rate limiting for nucleosome repositioning by ISWI. PMID:26116984

  10. Measuring the number and spacing of molecular motors propelling a gliding microtubule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallesen, Todd L.; Macosko, Jed C.; Holzwarth, G.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular motor gliding assay, in which a microtubule or other filament moves across a surface coated with motors, has provided much insight into how molecular motors work. The kinesin-microtubule system is also a strong candidate for the job of nanoparticle transporter in nanotechnology devices. In most cases, several motors transport each filament. Each motor serves both to bind the microtubule to a stationary surface and to propel the microtubule along the surface. By applying a uniform transverse force of 4-19 pN to a superparamagnetic bead attached to the trailing end of the microtubule, we have measured the distance d between binding points (motors). The average value of d was determined as a function of motor surface density σ. The measurements agree well with the scaling model of Duke, Holy, and Liebler, which predicts that ~σ-2/5 if 0.05⩽σ⩽20μm-2 [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.74.330 74, 330 (1995)]. The distribution of d fits an extension of the model. The radius of curvature of a microtubule bent at a binding point by the force of the magnetic bead was ≈1 μm, 5000-fold smaller than the radius of curvature of microtubules subjected only to thermal forces. This is evidence that at these points of high bending stress, generated by the force on the magnetic bead, the microtubule is in the more flexible state of a two-state model of microtubule bending proposed by Heussinger, Schüller, and Frey [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.81.021904 81, 021904 (2010)].

  11. Molecular Similarity in Computer-Aided Molecular Design.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, Edward E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The quantitative measurement of how similar one molecule is to another is investigated as a potential aid to molecular design. The work concentrates on the comparison of electronic properties of molecules, in particular electron density distribution, molecular electrostatic potential, molecular electric field and frontier orbital wavefunctions. A novel formula for molecular similarity has been devised and applied to these four properties. An approximate representation of valence electron density is used, based on the notion that charge distribution in a large molecule may be built from transferable contributions from its constituent functional groups. Each of these contributions consists of a series of first-order gaussian functions. The electrostatic potentials and electric fields used in the similarity calculations are computed from atom -centered partial charges. The frontier orbital wavefunction comparisons are performed using the extended Huckel method. The four measures of similarity are related to chemical and biological data and shown to have possible applications in the area of drug design.

  12. Memory, bias, and correlations in bidirectional transport of molecular-motor-driven cargoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2013-10-01

    Molecular motors are specialized proteins that perform active, directed transport of cellular cargoes on cytoskeletal filaments. In many cases, cargo motion powered by motor proteins is found to be bidirectional, and may be viewed as a biased random walk with fast unidirectional runs interspersed with slow tug-of-war states. The statistical properties of this walk are not known in detail, and here, we study memory and bias, as well as directional correlations between successive runs in bidirectional transport. We show, based on a study of the direction-reversal probabilities of the cargo using a purely stochastic (tug-of-war) model, that bidirectional motion of cellular cargoes is, in general, a correlated random walk. In particular, while the motion of a cargo driven by two oppositely pulling motors is a Markovian random walk, memory of direction appears when multiple motors haul the cargo in one or both directions. In the latter case, the Markovian nature of the underlying single-motor processes is hidden by internal transitions between degenerate run and pause states of the cargo. Interestingly, memory is found to be a nonmonotonic function of the number of motors. Stochastic numerical simulations of the tug-of-war model support our mathematical results and extend them to biologically relevant situations.

  13. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study. Volume 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The design studies task implements the primary objective of developing a Block II Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design offering improved flight safety and reliability. The SRM literature was reviewed. The Preliminary Development and Validation Plan is presented.

  14. The Design and its Verification of the Double Rotor Double Cage Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sumita; Deb, Nirmal K.; Biswas, Sujit K.

    2016-06-01

    The concept of a double rotor motor presented earlier and its equivalent circuit has been developed, showing a non-linear parameter content. The two rotors (which are recommended to be double cage type for development of high starting torque) can run with equal or unequal speed independently, depending on their individual loading. This paper presents the elaborate design procedure, step-by-step, for the double rotor double cage motor and verifies the designed data with that obtained from three separate tests (compared to two for conventional motor) on a prototype, such that optimum performance can be obtained from the motor.

  15. Design, manufacture, and test of coolant pump-motor assembly for Brayton power conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabacz, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of seven coolant circulating pump-motor assemblies are discussed. The pump-motor assembly is driven by the nominal 44.4-volt, 400-Hz, 3-phase output of a nominal 56-volt dc input inverter. The pump-motor assembly will be used to circulate Dow Corning 200 liquid coolant for use in a Brayton cycle space power system. The pump-motor assembly develops a nominal head of 70 psi at 3.7 gpm with an over-all efficiency of 26 percent. The design description, drawings, photographs, reliability results, and developmental and acceptance test results are included.

  16. Design of outer-rotor type multipolar SR motor for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Suzuki, Yosuke; Goto, Hiroki; Ichinokura, Osamu

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we design an outer-rotor type multipolar switched reluctance (SR) motor, and examine an application of the SR motor to an electric vehicle (EV). The design is based on a nonlinear magnetic circuit model proposed by the authors. Using the model, we can calculate dynamic characteristics of a SR motor accurately. Furthermore, by combining the nonlinear magnetic circuit model with a motor drive circuit and motion equation of an EV, we can predict dynamic characteristics such as the maximum speed, acceleration torque, and a battery current of the EV.

  17. Coordination of Molecular Motors: From in vitro Assays to Intracellular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary New technologies have emerged that enable the tracking of molecular motors and their cargos with very high resolution both in vitro and in live cells. Classic in vitro motility assays are being supplemented with assays of increasing complexity that more closely model the cellular environment. In cells, the introduction of probes such as quantum dots allows the high resolution tracking of both motors and vesicular cargos. The “bottom up” enhancement of in vitro assays and the “top down” analysis of motility inside cells are likely to converge over the next few years. Together, these studies are providing new insights into the coordination of motors during intracellular transport. PMID:20102789

  18. Analysis of persistence during intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, C.; Despósito, M. A.; Levi, V.; Bruno, L.

    2010-09-01

    The displacement of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time is characterized by different anomalous diffusion regimes. The transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, involves the action of ATP-consuming molecular motors. We investigate the motion of pigment organelles driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the turning angles (phi) of the obtained 2D trajectories as a function of the time lag, we determine the critical time of the transition between anticorrelated and directed motion as the time when the turning angles begin to concentrate around phi = 0. We relate this transition with the crossover from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior observed in a previous work [5]. We also assayed the properties of the trajectories in cells with inhibited myosin activity, and we can compare the results in the presence and absence of active motors.

  19. Visible-Light-Driven Photoisomerization and Increased Rotation Speed of a Molecular Motor Acting as a Ligand in a Ruthenium(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Wezenberg, Sander J; Chen, Kuang-Yen; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-09-21

    Toward the development of visible-light-driven molecular rotary motors, an overcrowded alkene-based ligand and the corresponding ruthenium(II) complex is presented. In our design, a 4,5-diazafluorenyl coordination motif is directly integrated into the motor function. The photochemical and thermal isomerization behavior has been studied by UV/Vis and NMR spectroscopy. Upon coordination to a Ru(II) bipyridine complex, the photoisomerization process can be driven by visible (λmax = 450 nm) instead of UV light and furthermore, a large increase of the speed of rotation is noted. DFT calculations point to a contraction of the diazafluorenyl lower half upon metal-coordination resulting in reduced steric hindrance in the "fjord region" of the molecule. Consequently, it is shown that metal-ligand interactions can play an important role in the adjustment of both photophysical and thermodynamic properties of molecular motors. PMID:26271465

  20. Transition to superdiffusive behavior in intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, L.; Levi, V.; Brunstein, M.; Despósito, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    Intracellular transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles, or large proteins, is a complex dynamical process that involves the interplay of adenosine triphosphate-consuming molecular motors, cytoskeleton filaments, and the viscoelastic cytoplasm. In this work we investigate the motion of pigment organelles (melanosomes) driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high-spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the obtained trajectories, we show that the melanosomes mean-square displacement undergoes a transition from a subdiffusive to a superdiffusive behavior. A stochastic theoretical model, which explicitly considers the collective action of the molecular motors, is introduced to generalize the interpretation of our data. Starting from a generalized Langevin equation, we derive an analytical expression for the mean square displacement, which also takes into account the experimental noise. By fitting theoretical expressions to experimental data we were able to discriminate the exponents that characterize the passive and active contributions to the dynamics and to estimate the “global” motor forces correctly. Then, our model gives a quantitative description of active transport in living cells with a reduced number of parameters.

  1. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B.; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Morais, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring, and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  2. Structural and Molecular Basis for Coordination in a Viral DNA Packaging Motor.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huzhang; Saha, Mitul; Reyes-Aldrete, Emilio; Sherman, Michael B; Woodson, Michael; Atz, Rockney; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Morais, Marc C

    2016-03-01

    Ring NTPases are a class of ubiquitous molecular motors involved in basic biological partitioning processes. dsDNA viruses encode ring ATPases that translocate their genomes to near-crystalline densities within pre-assembled viral capsids. Here, X-ray crystallography, cryoEM, and biochemical analyses of the dsDNA packaging motor in bacteriophage phi29 show how individual subunits are arranged in a pentameric ATPase ring and suggest how their activities are coordinated to translocate dsDNA. The resulting pseudo-atomic structure of the motor and accompanying functional analyses show how ATP is bound in the ATPase active site; identify two DNA contacts, including a potential DNA translocating loop; demonstrate that a trans-acting arginine finger is involved in coordinating hydrolysis around the ring; and suggest a functional coupling between the arginine finger and the DNA translocating loop. The ability to visualize the motor in action illuminates how the different motor components interact with each other and with their DNA substrate. PMID:26904950

  3. Physical aspects of the structure and function of helicases as rotary molecular motors

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A.

    2009-11-15

    Helicases were shown to have common physical properties with rotary molecular motors, such as F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and type I restriction-modification (RM) enzymes. The necessary conditions for action of molecular motors are chirality, the presence of the C{sub 2} (or lower) symmetry axis within rather large atomic groups, and polarization properties. The estimates were made for the material parameters of helicases, which translocate DNA due to moving chiral kinks without DNA cleavage and are characterized by higher viscosity, low mobility, and smaller chiral kinetic coefficients than type II RM enzymes. This paper discusses the efficiency of helicases with opposite polarities that drive DNA translocation in opposite directions.

  4. A system level model for preliminary design of a space propulsion solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Daniel M.

    Preliminary design of space propulsion solid rocket motors entails a combination of components and subsystems. Expert design tools exist to find near optimal performance of subsystems and components. Conversely, there is no system level preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors that is capable of synthesizing customer requirements into a high utility design for the customer. The preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors typically builds on existing designs and pursues feasible rather than the most favorable design. Classical optimization is an extremely challenging method when dealing with the complex behavior of an integrated system. The complexity and combinations of system configurations make the number of the design parameters that are traded off unreasonable when manual techniques are used. Existing multi-disciplinary optimization approaches generally address estimating ratios and correlations rather than utilizing mathematical models. The developed system level model utilizes the Genetic Algorithm to perform the necessary population searches to efficiently replace the human iterations required during a typical solid rocket motor preliminary design. This research augments, automates, and increases the fidelity of the existing preliminary design process for space propulsion solid rocket motors. The system level aspect of this preliminary design process, and the ability to synthesize space propulsion solid rocket motor requirements into a near optimal design, is achievable. The process of developing the motor performance estimate and the system level model of a space propulsion solid rocket motor is described in detail. The results of this research indicate that the model is valid for use and able to manage a very large number of variable inputs and constraints towards the pursuit of the best possible design.

  5. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter M.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by ‘magic’, these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study.

  6. How molecular motors extract order from chaos (a key issues review).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    Molecular motors are the workhorses of living cells. Seemingly by 'magic', these molecules are able to complete purposeful tasks while being immersed in a sea of thermal chaos. Here, we review the current understanding of how these machines work, present simple models based on thermal ratchets, discuss implications for statistical physics, and provide an overview of ongoing research in this important and fascinating field of study. PMID:26863000

  7. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  8. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Magnetic capture from blood rescues molecular motor function in diagnostic nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Introduction of effective point-of-care devices for use in medical diagnostics is part of strategies to combat accelerating health-care costs. Molecular motor driven nanodevices have unique potentials in this regard due to unprecedented level of miniaturization and independence of external pumps. However motor function has been found to be inhibited by body fluids. Results We report here that a unique procedure, combining separation steps that rely on antibody-antigen interactions, magnetic forces applied to magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) and the specificity of the actomyosin bond, can circumvent the deleterious effects of body fluids (e.g. blood serum). The procedure encompasses the following steps: (i) capture of analyte molecules from serum by MP-antibody conjugates, (ii) pelleting of MP-antibody-analyte complexes, using a magnetic field, followed by exchange of serum for optimized biological buffer, (iii) mixing of MP-antibody-analyte complexes with actin filaments conjugated with same polyclonal antibodies as the magnetic nanoparticles. This causes complex formation: MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin, and magnetic separation is used to enrich the complexes. Finally (iv) the complexes are introduced into a nanodevice for specific binding via actin filaments to surface adsorbed molecular motors (heavy meromyosin). The number of actin filaments bound to the motors in the latter step was significantly increased above the control value if protein analyte (50–60 nM) was present in serum (in step i) suggesting appreciable formation and enrichment of the MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin complexes. Furthermore, addition of ATP demonstrated maintained heavy meromyosin driven propulsion of actin filaments showing that the serum induced inhibition was alleviated. Detailed analysis of the procedure i-iv, using fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy identified main targets for future optimization. Conclusion The results demonstrate a promising approach for

  11. Design of a reluctance motor with increased efficiency and power factor for widespread industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, P.; Pieper, W.

    1981-09-01

    The motors were designed in the range of 0.6-4 kW with 4-pole windings. An increase of nominal power by approximately 100%, and an increase of quality factor by approximately 50% are reported. The efficiency is equal to asynchronous motors of the same IEC size.

  12. Design and evaluation of a computerized test for hand motor skills.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Chang, Cheng-Sian; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chiu, Ching-Tsun

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to design and develop a computerized test to measure junior high school students' motor skills, specifically their abilities in hand-eye motor coordination and hand motor skills, using the Wii Remote. The hand motor skills computerized test, which is based on the operational examinations in the General Aptitude Test Battery, examines hand and finger dexterity (i.e., motion, rotation, fabrication, and disassembly tests). 55 students participated in the experiment to assess the reliability and validity of the computerized test, which were supported. Information literacy and experience in the use of Wii devices did not affect the reliability. PMID:25068744

  13. Multi-Objective Optimal Design of Switch Reluctance Motors Using Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Mehran; Rashidi, Farzan

    In this paper a design methodology based on multi objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) is presented to design the switched reluctance motors with multiple conflicting objectives such as efficiency, power factor, full load torque, and full load current, specified dimension, weight of cooper and iron and also manufacturing cost. The optimally designed motor is compared with an industrial motor having the same ratings. Results verify that the proposed method gives better performance for the multi-objective optimization problems. The results of optimal design show the reduction in the specified dimension, weight and manufacturing cost, and the improvement in the power factor, full load torque, and efficiency of the motor.A major advantage of the method is its quite short response time in obtaining the optimal design.

  14. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R; Friedman, Thomas B

    2014-08-26

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin-specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end-directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼ 430 nm · s(-1) at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (k(cat) ∼ 6 s(-1)) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (k(det) = 6.2 s(-1)) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  15. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  16. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  17. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  18. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub. PMID:26558887

  19. Genetic algorithm based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, P. R.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2005-05-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) based design optimization of a permanent magnet brushless dc motor is presented in this paper. A 70 W, 350 rpm, ceiling fan motor with radial-filed configuration is designed by considering the efficiency as the objective function. Temperature-rise and motor weight are the constraints and the slot electric loading, magnet-fraction, slot-fraction, airgap, and airgap flux density are the design variables. The efficiency and the phase-inductance of the motor designed using the developed CAD program are improved by using the GA based optimization technique; from 84.75% and 5.55 mH to 86.06% and 2.4 mH, respectively.

  20. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force.

    PubMed

    Vu, Huong T; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-08-12

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F)-dependent velocity [P(v)] and run length [P(n)] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P(n) and P(v) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F, P(v) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v, which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps. PMID:27564000

  1. Molecular motor-induced instabilities and cross linkers determine biopolymer organization.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Ziebert, F.; Humphrey, D.; Duggan, C.; Steinbeck, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Kas, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Leipzig; Univ. of Texas at Austin; Univ. Bayreuth

    2007-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells rely on the active self-organization of protein filaments to form a responsive intracellular cytoskeleton. The necessity of motility and reaction to stimuli additionally requires pathways that quickly and reversibly change cytoskeletal organization. While thermally driven order-disorder transitions are, from the viewpoint of physics, the most obvious method for controlling states of organization, the timescales necessary for effective cellular dynamics would require temperatures exceeding the physiologically viable temperature range. We report a mechanism whereby the molecular motor myosin II can cause near-instantaneous order-disorder transitions in reconstituted cytoskeletal actin solutions. When motor-induced filament sliding diminishes, the actin network structure rapidly and reversibly self-organizes into various assemblies. Addition of stable cross linkers was found to alter the architectures of ordered assemblies. These isothermal transitions between dynamic disorder and self-assembled ordered states illustrate that the interplay between passive crosslinking and molecular motor activity plays a substantial role in dynamic cellular organization.

  2. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  3. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-01-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion. Images Scheme 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:8789082

  4. Design of motion adjusting system for space camera based on ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Jin, Guang; Gu, Song; Yan, Yong; Sun, Zhiyuan

    2011-08-01

    Drift angle is a transverse intersection angle of vector of image motion of the space camera. Adjusting the angle could reduce the influence on image quality. Ultrasonic motor (USM) is a new type of actuator using ultrasonic wave stimulated by piezoelectric ceramics. They have many advantages in comparison with conventional electromagnetic motors. In this paper, some improvement was designed for control system of drift adjusting mechanism. Based on ultrasonic motor T-60 was designed the drift adjusting system, which is composed of the drift adjusting mechanical frame, the ultrasonic motor, the driver of Ultrasonic Motor, the photoelectric encoder and the drift adjusting controller. The TMS320F28335 DSP was adopted as the calculation and control processor, photoelectric encoder was used as sensor of position closed loop system and the voltage driving circuit designed as generator of ultrasonic wave. It was built the mathematic model of drive circuit of the ultrasonic motor T-60 using matlab modules. In order to verify the validity of the drift adjusting system, was introduced the source of the disturbance, and made simulation analysis. It designed the control systems of motor drive for drift adjusting system with the improved PID control. The drift angle adjusting system has such advantages as the small space, simple configuration, high position control precision, fine repeatability, self locking property and low powers. It showed that the system could accomplish the mission of drift angle adjusting excellent.

  5. A.C. motors for high-performance drives: A design-based comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Vagati, A.; Fratta, A.; Franceschini, G.; Rosso, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Three AC motors are compared, for application in high-performance controlled drives: induction, brushless and synchronous reluctance motors. Their design is optimized, under common design assumptions. Then, the given stall-torques are compared to each other. In addition, the quadrature reactances are compared, as affecting overload and flux-weakening performances. Last, applicative considerations are given, thus defining the most suitable solution for each field.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  7. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Kristen M.; Bishop, Darryl L.; Saunders, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly. PMID:21760798

  8. Molecular motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs): structure, cargo and disease.

    PubMed

    Seog, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Dae-Ho; Lee, Sang-Kyoung

    2004-02-01

    Intracellular organelle transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell. Kinesins and kinesin-related proteins make up a large superfamily of molecular motors that transport cargoes such as vesicles, organelles (e.g. mitochondria, peroxisomes, lysosomes), protein complexes (e.g. elements of the cytoskeleton, virus particles), and mRNAs in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Until now, more than 45 kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) have been identified in the mouse and human genomes. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identities of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. This review focuses on the structure, the binding partners of kinesins and kinesin-based human diseases. PMID:14966333

  9. Thermal fluctuation statistics in a molecular motor described by a multidimensional master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, K. J.; Jack, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of thermal fluctuation statistics in a molecular motor. Energy transfer in the motor is described using a multidimensional discrete master equation with nearest-neighbor hopping. In this theory, energy transfer leads to statistical correlations between thermal fluctuations in different degrees of freedom. For long times, the energy transfer is a multivariate diffusion process with constant drift and diffusion. The fluctuations and drift align in the strong-coupling limit enabling a one-dimensional description along the coupled coordinate. We derive formal expressions for the probability distribution and simulate single trajectories of the system in the near- and far-from-equilibrium limits both for strong and weak coupling. Our results show that the hopping statistics provide an opportunity to distinguish different operating regimes.

  10. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  11. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Engineer Officer § 11.524 Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels... requirements for endorsements as DDE are: (1) For designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels of...

  12. Design Method of ILQ Robust Current Control System for Synchronous Reluctance Electrical Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Yoko; Takami, Hiroshi; Fujii, Takao

    In this paper, a robust current control system for a synchronous reluctance electrical motor by an ILQ (Inverse Linear Quadratic) design method is proposed newly. First, for performing simultaneously decouple and large region linearization of an d-q axes system in the synchronous reluctance electrical motor using nonlinear state feedback, it is derived that a linear current-voltage state equation linearized model by the d-q axes decouple of the synchronous reluctance electrical motor. Next, according to the ILQ design method, an optimum solution and an optimal condition that achieve the robust current control system for the synchronous reluctance electrical motor are analytically derived, then the robust current control system can be designed. Finally, in practical experiments, we compare the proposed method with the PI (Proportional Integral) control method, the creativity and the usefulness of the proposed method are confirmed by experimental results.

  13. Design of a Subscale Propellant Slag Evaluation Motor Using Two-Phase Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Dill, Richard A.; Purinton, David C.; Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1996-01-01

    Small pressure perturbations in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) are caused by the periodic expulsion of molten aluminum oxide slag from a pool that collects in the aft end of the motor around the submerged nozzle nose during the last half of motor operation. It is suspected that some motors produce more slag than others due to differences in aluminum oxide agglomerate particle sizes that may relate to subtle differences in propellant ingredient characteristics such as particle size distributions or processing variations. A subscale motor experiment was designed to determine the effect of propellant ingredient characteristics on the propensity for slag production. An existing 5 inch ballistic test motor was selected as the basic test vehicle. The standard converging/diverging nozzle was replaced with a submerged nose nozzle design to provide a positive trap for the slag that would increase the measured slag weights. Two-phase fluid dynamic analyses were performed to develop a nozzle nose design that maintained similitude in major flow field features with the full scale RSRM. The 5 inch motor was spun about its longitudinal axis to further enhance slag collection and retention. Two-phase flow analysis was used to select an appropriate spin rate along with other considerations, such as avoiding bum rate increases due to radial acceleration effects. Aluminum oxide particle distributions used in the flow analyses were measured in a quench bomb for RSRM type propellants with minor variations in ingredient characteristics. Detailed predictions for slag accumulation weights during motor bum compared favorably with slag weight data taken from defined zones in the subscale motor and nozzle. The use of two-phase flow analysis proved successful in gauging the viability of the experimental program during the planning phase and in guiding the design of the critical submerged nose nozzle.

  14. Design of single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lien-Kai; Tsai, Mi-Ching

    2016-05-01

    Most screw-thread-type ultrasonic motors are designed to be two-phase driven. This paper aims to present a novel single phase driven design that generates the required wobble motion, thus significantly simplifying the driving circuit of the ultrasonic motor. The proposed single-phase driven screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor works with two orthogonal bending modes generated by an asymmetric stator design. The novel stator design can improve the vibration displacement and further enhance the performance of the single phase driven motor. The vibration characteristics of the asymmetric stator structure were analyzed by ANSYS finite element analysis software. Based on the design and analysis processes, a prototype of the desired screw-thread-type ultrasonic motor was fabricated and tested. When the operating voltage is 200 Vpp, the obtained main characteristics of the proposed motor are as follows: the working frequency is between 28.3 and 29.5 kHz; the maximum no-load velocity is approximately 4.1 mm s-1; and the thrust force is 1.6 N.

  15. Design and testing of AMROC's 250,000 pound thrust hybrid motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, J. S.; Kniffen, R. J.; Lichatowich, J.

    1993-06-01

    The American Rocket Company is developing a 250,000 pound thrust liquid oxygen/polybutadiene hybrid rocket motor for use on future space launch vehicles. Designated the H-1800 hybrid motor, this commercial development effort is unique in that it is being funded solely by private investment. The first test of the motor, Development Motor number one (DM-01) was conducted in January 1993. This paper describes the development project that led to the test firing and the basic performance parameters of the motor. Test stand and data acquisition and control system features will be discussed. The test results will be presented and compared with performance predictions. Schedules for future testing and implementation of this hybrid booster will be described.

  16. Design of permanent magnets to chaoize doubly salient permanent magnet motors for electric compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, K. T.; Wang, Zheng

    2006-04-01

    This article proposes and implements a class of chaotic motors for electric compaction. The key is to develop a design approach for the permanent magnets (PMs) of doubly salient PM (DSPM) motors in such a way that chaotic motion can be naturally produced. The bifurcation diagram is employed to derive the threshold of chaoization in terms of PM flux, while the corresponding phase-plane trajectories are used to characterize the chaotic motion. A practical three-phase 12/8-pole DSPM motor is used for exemplification. The proposed chaotic motor is critically assessed for application to a vibratory soil compactor, which is proven to offer better compaction performance than its counterparts. Both computer simulation and experimental results are given to illustrate the proposed chaotic motor.

  17. Rotor resistance estimator design for indirect field-oriented induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhui; Wu, Zhong

    2006-11-01

    Exact information of the rotor resistance is the key to realize high-performance indirect field-oriented control of the induction motors. However, rotor resistance is time-varying when the motor works. Therefore, a new estimator of the rotor resistance is designed for the indirect field-oriented induction motors to attenuate the effect of the rotor resistance uncertainty. This estimator is derived from the steady-state procedure of the rotor flux using Lyapunov stability theory. Furthermore, this estimator is shown to be able to minimize the steady-state error the rotor flux and improve the control performance of the induction motor drive effectively. Compared with the previous studies, this estimator has a simple form and is easy to implement. Simulation results of a certain IFOC induction motor indicate that the estimator presented above is feasible.

  18. Quantification of the effects of molecular marker oxidation on source apportionment estimates for motor vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anirban A.; Wagstrom, Kristina M.; Adams, Peter J.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2011-06-01

    Molecular markers are individual organic compounds used in receptor models to apportion fine particulate matter to sources. These models currently assume that molecular markers are chemically stable; however, recent laboratory experiments suggest they may be significantly oxidized on atmospherically relevant time scales. To investigate the effects of photo-oxidation, we extended a 3-D chemical transport model (PMCAMx) to simulate norhopane concentrations over the eastern United States during July 2001. Norhopane is an important molecular marker for motor vehicle exhaust. We examined eight different simulation scenarios, using different combinations of reaction rates and source profiles. The simulations including norhopane oxidation better reproduced the observed spatial patterns of norhopane concentrations than the non-reactive cases. Chemical mass balance (CMB) analysis was performed using the PMCAMx-predicted motor vehicle norhopane and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations to quantify the bias caused by oxidation on source apportionment estimates. Norhopane oxidation caused CMB to underestimate total vehicle OC by 10-50%, with larger biases in rural areas. This underestimation was largely due to changes in the amount of OC apportioned to gasoline vehicles which was reduced by as much as 100%. The OC apportioned to diesel vehicle emissions was relatively insensitive to norhopane reaction. Therefore, oxidation can substantially alter CMB estimates regarding the relative importance of gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions.

  19. Automatic Molecular Design using Evolutionary Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Molecular nanotechnology is the precise, three-dimensional control of materials and devices at the atomic scale. An important part of nanotechnology is the design of molecules for specific purposes. This paper describes early results using genetic software techniques to automatically design molecules under the control of a fitness function. The fitness function must be capable of determining which of two arbitrary molecules is better for a specific task. The software begins by generating a population of random molecules. The population is then evolved towards greater fitness by randomly combining parts of the better individuals to create new molecules. These new molecules then replace some of the worst molecules in the population. The unique aspect of our approach is that we apply genetic crossover to molecules represented by graphs, i.e., sets of atoms and the bonds that connect them. We present evidence suggesting that crossover alone, operating on graphs, can evolve any possible molecule given an appropriate fitness function and a population containing both rings and chains. Prior work evolved strings or trees that were subsequently processed to generate molecular graphs. In principle, genetic graph software should be able to evolve other graph representable systems such as circuits, transportation networks, metabolic pathways, computer networks, etc.

  20. From lipid second messengers to molecular motors: microtubule-organizing center reorientation in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Morgan; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Summary In T lymphocytes, polarization of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) to the immunological synapse enables the directional secretion of cytokines, cytolytic factors, and other soluble molecules toward the antigen-presenting cell. This is likely to be crucial for maintaining the specificity of T-cell effector responses. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of MTOC reorientation in T cells, focusing first on the importance of diacylglycerol and protein kinase C isozymes and then on the molecular motor proteins that function downstream to drive MTOC movement. PMID:24117815

  1. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  2. Large-scale hybrid motor performance and designs for use in launch vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittie, K. J.; Estey, P.

    1993-11-01

    The American Rocket Company has developed two large-scale liquid oxygen/polybutadiene hybrid rocket motors at 334,000 N (75,000 lbf) and 1,112,000 N (250,000 lbf) thrust. These hybrid rocket motors or derivatives of these motors can be used as strap-on boosters to replace or upgrade the existing strap-on boosters for the fleet of U.S. launch vehicles and for the planned next generation launch vehicle. Hybrid rocket boosters offer a new solution for boost propulsion since hybrids solve many of the safety and environmental concerns facing solid rocket motor manufacture and operation, yet deliver performance comparable to liquid rocket engines with much less hardware and operational complexity. This paper presents motor performance data from AMROC's 334,000 N and 1,112,000 N thrust hybrid rocket motors. A description of these hybrid motors, their performance specifications, and the key enabling technologies that have been developed at AMROC is presented. The design and development approach for an 850K thrust hybrid motor is described.

  3. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel molecular motor, Leishmania myosin-XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Woodall, Katy A; Toseland, Christopher P; Hundschell, Christian; Veigel, Claudia

    2012-08-10

    The genome of the Leishmania parasite contains two classes of myosin. Myosin-XXI, seemingly the only myosin isoform expressed in the protozoan parasite, has been detected in both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the Leishmania life cycle. It has been suggested to perform a variety of functions, including roles in membrane anchorage, but also long-range directed movements of cargo. However, nothing is known about the biochemical or mechanical properties of this motor. Here we designed and expressed various myosin-XXI constructs using a baculovirus expression system. Both full-length (amino acids 1-1051) and minimal motor domain constructs (amino acids 1-800) featured actin-activated ATPase activity. Myosin-XXI was soluble when expressed either with or without calmodulin. In the presence of calcium (pCa 4.1) the full-length motor could bind a single calmodulin at its neck domain (probably amino acids 809-823). Calmodulin binding was required for motility but not for ATPase activity. Once bound, calmodulin remained stably attached independent of calcium concentration (pCa 3-7). In gliding filament assays, myosin-XXI moved actin filaments at ∼15 nm/s, insensitive to both salt (25-1000 mm KCl) and calcium concentrations (pCa 3-7). Calmodulin binding to the neck domain might be involved in regulating the motility of the myosin-XXI motor for its various cellular functions in the different stages of the Leishmania parasite life cycle. PMID:22718767

  4. Design of high precision motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Haoran; Bai, Baoping; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Yanan; Wang, Yi; Yu, Daoyin

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment. It was designed to guarantee the motor rotating at a relatively constant speed in load fluctuation conditions, which result from the bending and twisting of the flexible shaft which connects the probe to the motor. A hardware feedback circuit based on Frequency-To-Voltage Converter LM331 and Step-Down Voltage Regulator LM2576-ADJ was designed to ensure steady rotation of motor in load fluctuation conditions, and a D/A module offered by MCU was used to regulate the real-time rotary speed. The feedback response cycle is about 20 μs according to theoretical analysis. Experimental results show that the maximum error is +/-1 r/min under the normal running environment (300 ~1500 r/min) and load fluctuation conditions, which means the average instability is reduced to 0.11% as compared with that of the motor drive simply based on MCU which is 0.94%. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the motor driving system has high accuracy, fast response, excellent reliability and good versatility and portability, and can precisely guarantee the smooth movement of load-changing PMW (Pulse Width Modulation) motor, so as to ensure the imaging quality, and can effectively improve the efficiency and accuracy of the diagnosis.

  5. Specifically designed physical exercise programs improve children's motor abilities.

    PubMed

    Chiodera, P; Volta, E; Gobbi, G; Milioli, M A; Mirandola, P; Bonetti, A; Delsignore, R; Bernasconi, S; Anedda, A; Vitale, M

    2008-04-01

    Physical activity in schools is declining in many countries and inactivity in childhood has become a recognized risk factor. Data from a program of professionally guided physical exercise in primary school children were collected before and after the academic year of training. Four thousand five hundred children (6-10 years) were enrolled, and conditional and coordinative motor abilities (speed, trunk flexibility, long jumping, somersault, Harre circuit test) were measured. Anthropometric measurements were focused on body mass index (BMI), weight and height. Females never showed a significant variation of BMI, whereas males in the first and fourth grades showed significant differences. On the contrary, when considering the motor abilities studied, all the comparisons were highly significant. At the end of training, both males and females did better than at the beginning, and males were constantly faster than females. Our data, generated on a large number of children, show that professionally guided programs of physical education in the primary school lead to significant progresses in the development of conditional and coordinative abilities, without altering BMI values, thus not interfering with the balanced progression of body weight and height. PMID:17490452

  6. Statistical analysis of the motility of nano-objects propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, Raquel C.; Bakewell, David; Nicolau, Dan

    2008-02-01

    Motility assays are the tools of choice for the studies regarding the motility of protein molecular motors in vitro. Despite their wide usage, some simple, but fundamental issues still need to be specifically addressed in order to achieve the best and the most meaningful motility analyses. Several tracking methods used for the study of motility have been compared. By running different statistical analyses, the impact of space versus time resolution was also studied. It has been found that for a space resolution of 80 nm and 145 nm per pixel for kinesin-microtubule and actomyosin assays, respectively, the best time resolution was ~0.9 and ~10 frame per second, respectively. A rough relationship - Ratio A and Ratio M - between space and time resolutions and velocity for actin filaments and microtubules, respectively, was found. The motility parameters such as velocity, acceleration and deflection angle were statistically analysed in frequency distribution and time domain graphs for both motors assays. One of the aims of these analyses was to study if one or two populations were present in either assay. Particularly for actomyosin assays, electric fields varying from 0 to ~10000 Vm -1 were applied and the previous parameters and the angle between filaments motion and the electric field vector were also statistically analysed. It was observed that this angle was reduced by ~55º with ~5900 Vm -1. The overall behaviour of the motors was discussed bearing in mind both present and previous results and some physio-biological characteristics. Kinesin-microtubule and actomyosin (simple and electric fields) assays were compared. Some new experiments are suggested in order to accomplish a better understanding of these motors and optimise their role in the applications that depend on them.

  7. Totally asymmetric simple exclusion process simulations of molecular motor transport on random networks with asymmetric exit rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, D. V.; Miedema, D. M.; Nienhuis, B.; Schall, P.

    2015-11-01

    Using the totally asymmetric simple-exclusion-process and mean-field transport theory, we investigate the transport in closed random networks with simple crossing topology—two incoming, two outgoing segments, as a model for molecular motor motion along biopolymer networks. Inspired by in vitro observation of molecular motor motion, we model the motor behavior at the intersections by introducing different exit rates for the two outgoing segments. Our simulations of this simple network reveal surprisingly rich behavior of the transport current with respect to the global density and exit rate ratio. For asymmetric exit rates, we find a broad current plateau at intermediate motor densities resulting from the competition of two subnetwork populations. This current plateau leads to stabilization of transport properties within such networks.

  8. Mouse Myosin-19 Is a Plus-end-directed, High-duty Ratio Molecular Motor*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zekuan; Ma, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Ji, Huan-Hong; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Dan; Sun, Yujie; Li, Xiang-dong

    2014-01-01

    Class XIX myosin (Myo19) is a vertebrate-specific unconventional myosin, responsible for the transport of mitochondria. To characterize biochemical properties of Myo19, we prepared recombinant mouse Myo19-truncated constructs containing the motor domain and the IQ motifs using the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. We identified regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle/non-muscle myosin-2 as the light chain of Myo19. The actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding velocity of Myo19-truncated constructs were about one-third and one-sixth as those of myosin-5a, respectively. The apparent affinity of Myo19 to actin was about the same as that of myosin-5a. The RLCs bound to Myo19 could be phosphorylated by myosin light chain kinase, but this phosphorylation had little effect on the actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Using dual fluorescence-labeled actin filaments, we determined that Myo19 is a plus-end-directed molecular motor. We found that, similar to that of the high-duty ratio myosin, such as myosin-5a, ADP release rate was comparable with the maximal actin-activated ATPase activity of Myo19, indicating that ADP release is a rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle of acto-Myo19. ADP strongly inhibited the actin-activated ATPase activity and actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Based on the above results, we concluded that Myo19 is a high-duty ratio molecular motor moving to the plus-end of the actin filament. PMID:24825904

  9. Design and test of a four channel motor for electromechanical flight control actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    To provide a suitable electromagnetic torque summing approach to flight control system redundancy, a four channel motor capable of sustaining full performance after any two credible failures was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design consists of a single samarium cobalt permanent magnet rotor with four separate three phase windings arrayed in individual stator quadrants around the periphery. Trade studies established the sensitivities of weight and performance to such parameters as design speed, winding pattern, number of poles, magnet configuration, and strength. The motor electromagnetically sums the torque of the individual channels on a single rotor and eliminate complex mechanical gearing arrangements.

  10. A Controlled Single Subject Research Design Utilizing a Sensory Motor Intervention System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowden, Joey

    The study investigated and recorded changes in selected psychomotor skills of an 11-year old gifted male with severe motoric problems identified as dysgraphia. A pre-post test design using videotape evaluation recordings was employed to determine changes in psychomotor performance, and a rating scale was designed to establish baseline and…

  11. Design and performance analysis of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor with double vibrators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaopeng; Yang, Ming; Chen, Zhangqi; Xu, Liang; Meng, Fan; Ou, Wenchu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a rotary traveling wave ultrasonic motor, in which a vibrating stator and vibrating rotor are combined in one motor. The stator and rotor are designed as similar structures an elastic body and a piezoelectric ceramic ring. In exciting of the piezoelectric ceramics, the elastic body of the stator and rotor will generate respective traveling waves, which force each other forward in the contact zone. Based on the elliptical rule of particle motion and matching principle of vibration, the design rules of two vibrators are determined. The finite element method is used to design the sizes of vibrators to ensure that they operate in resonance, and the simulation is verified by measuring the vibration with an impedance analyzer. It is found out that to maintain an appropriate contact between the stator and rotor, two vibrators need to be designed with close resonance frequencies, different vibration amplitudes, and be driven by an identical driving frequency. To analyze this innovative contact mechanism, particle velocity synthesis theory and contact force analysis using Hertz contact model are carried out. Finally, a prototype is fabricated and tested to verify the theoretical results. The test results show that the output performance of the motor driven by the two vibrators is significantly improved compared to the motor driven by a sole stator or rotor, which confirms the validity of the double-vibrator motor concept. PMID:27336793

  12. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for national endorsement as designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... qualified member of the engine department or equivalent position; (2) For designated duty engineer of steam... engine department or equivalent position; and (3) For designated duty engineer of steam, motor, and/or... designated duty engineer (DDE) of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.524 Section...

  13. Molecular Motor Propelled Filaments Reveal Light-Guiding in Nanowire Arrays for Enhanced Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowire arrays offer significant potential for biosensing applications with optical read-out due to their high surface area and due to the unique optical properties of one-dimensional materials. A challenge for optical read-out of analyte-binding to the nanowires is the need to efficiently collect and detect light from a three-dimensional volume. Here we show that light from fluorophores attached along several μm long vertical Al2O3 coated gallium phosphide nanowires couples into the wires, is guided along them and emitted at the tip. This enables effective collection of light emitted by fluorescent analytes located at different focal planes along the nanowire. We unequivocally demonstrate the light-guiding effect using a novel method whereby the changes in emitted fluorescence intensity are observed when fluorescent cytoskeletal filaments are propelled by molecular motors along the wires. The findings are discussed in relation to nanobiosensor developments, other nanotechnological applications, and fundamental studies of motor function. PMID:24367994

  14. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA+ ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named ‘the ADP model’ and ‘the ATP model’, where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA+ ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  15. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA(+) ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named 'the ADP model' and 'the ATP model', where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA(+) ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  16. Design, modeling and control of a novel multi functional translational-rotary micro ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncdemir, Safakcan

    The major goal of this thesis was to design and develop an actuator, which is capable of producing translational and rotary output motions in a compact structure with simple driving conditions, for the needs of small-scale actuators for micro robotic systems. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors were selected as the target actuator schemes because of their unbeatable characteristics in the meso-scale range, which covers the structure sizes from hundred micrometers to ten millimeters and with operating ranges from few nanometers to centimeters. In order to meet the objectives and the design constraints, a number of key research tasks had to be undertaken. The design constraints and objectives were so stringent and entangled that none of the existing methods in literature could solve the research problems individually. Therefore, several unique methods were established to accomplish the research objectives. The methods produced novel solutions at every stage of design, development and modeling of the multi functional micro ultrasonic motor. Specifically, an ultrasonic motor utilizing slanted ceramics on a brass rod was designed. Because of the unique slanted ceramics design, longitudinal and torsional mode vibration modes could be obtained on the same structure. A ring shaped mobile element was loosely fitted on the metal rod stator. The mobile element moved in translational or rotational, depending on whether the vibration mode was longitudinal or torsional. A new ultrasonic motor drive method was required because none of the existing ultrasonic motor drive techniques were able to provide both output modes in a compact and cylindrical structure with the use of single drive source. By making use of rectangular wave drive signals, saw-tooth shaped displacement profile could be obtained at longitudinal and torsional resonance modes. Thus, inheriting the operating principle of smooth impact drive method, a new resonance type inertial drive was introduced. This new technique

  17. Optimization of brushless direct current motor design using an intelligent technique.

    PubMed

    Shabanian, Alireza; Tousiwas, Armin Amini Poustchi; Pourmandi, Massoud; Khormali, Aminollah; Ataei, Abdolhay

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for the optimal design of a slotless permanent magnet brushless DC (BLDC) motor with surface mounted magnets using an improved bee algorithm (IBA). The characteristics of the motor are expressed as functions of motor geometries. The objective function is a combination of losses, volume and cost to be minimized simultaneously. This method is based on the capability of swarm-based algorithms in finding the optimal solution. One sample case is used to illustrate the performance of the design approach and optimization technique. The IBA has a better performance and speed of convergence compared with bee algorithm (BA). Simulation results show that the proposed method has a very high/efficient performance. PMID:25841938

  18. Reaction-diffusion-advection approach to spatially localized treadmilling aggregates of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Bar-On, Tomer; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional myosins belong to a class of molecular motors that walk processively inside cellular protrusions towards the tips, on top of actin filament. Surprisingly, in addition, they also form retrograde moving self-organized aggregates. The qualitative properties of these aggregates are recapitulated by a mass conserving reaction-diffusion-advection model and admit two distinct families of modes: traveling waves and pulse trains. Unlike the traveling waves that are generated by a linear instability, pulses are nonlinear structures that propagate on top of linearly stable uniform backgrounds. Asymptotic analysis of isolated pulses via a simplified reaction-diffusion-advection variant on large periodic domains, allows to draw qualitative trends for pulse properties, such as the amplitude, width, and propagation speed. The results agree well with numerical integrations and are related to available empirical observations.

  19. Prediction of induction motor line current spectra from design data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldemir, Hanifi

    The thesis concentrates on the estimation of the magnitude and frequency of the spectral components of line current that may be used for sensorless speed detection. The prediction method uses a mixture of permeance-mmf, finite element and reluctance mesh techniques to establish the air gap magnetic field. This traditional type of approach is chosen to maintain a visible link between cause and effect so enhancing understanding. The approach is enhanced by the use of slot permanence effects calculated by finite element techniques where saturation due to the current carrying conductors in the slots is incorporated. This is essential for closed slots. Further enhancements include examining slot permeance effects over one or more poles so that the influence of the spatial distribution of slot currents, and slot top saturation can be incorporated. The harmonic chain equivalent circuit is extensively modified to provide a vehicle for predicting the correct saturation conditions in a skewed machine and the correct winding currents for the field solutions. Rotor pole aliasing is introduced to explain the large number of independent speed harmonic terms found experimentally. Special equivalent circuits are introduced to enable these current harmonic to be predicted. A thorough experimental validation is then conducted of the model using a 30 kW experimental machine with adjustable eccentricity with rotors of different slotting form, slot number and skew to determine their effect on the speed dependent harmonic components. Very good agreement is demonstrated. Finally, the improved prediction model is used to provide information on the significance of saturation, skew, slot number and rotor eccentricity on the level of speed dependent harmonic signals. All of this information helps formulate important rules to assist in the choice of motors for satisfactory operation with sensorless speed control of drives using RSH. This in itself is an important extension to the knowledge

  20. Design and construction of a wheel-directly-coupled axial-flux PM motor prototype for EVs

    SciTech Connect

    Caricchi, F.; Crescimbini, F.; Fedeli, E.; Noioa, G.

    1994-12-31

    In electric vehicle (EV) motor drives, the use of a low-speed motor coupled directly to the wheel axle allows a reduction of the vehicle weight and an improvement in the drive efficiency. Slotless axial-flux PM motors are particularly suited for such an application, since they can be designed for high torque-to-weight ratio and efficiency. This paper deals with a 16 poles axial-flux PM motor prototype which is used in the propulsion drive of an electrical scooter. The motor prototype has 45 Nm peak torque, 6.8 kg active materials weight, and is coupled directly to the scooter rear wheel. The paper discusses design and construction of the motor prototype, and reports experimental results achieved from laboratory tests. Finally, details concerning the arrangement of the scooter motor drive are given. 6 refs.

  1. Molecular motor KIF1C is not essential for mouse survival and motor-dependent retrograde Golgi apparatus-to-endoplasmic reticulum transport.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuo; Takei, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yosuke; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Nakata, Takao; Noda, Yasuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2002-02-01

    KIF1C is a new member of the kinesin superfamily of proteins (KIFs), which act as microtubule-based molecular motors involved in intracellular transport. We cloned full-length mouse kif1C cDNA, which turned out to have a high homology to a mitochondrial motor KIF1Balpha and to be expressed ubiquitously. To investigate the in vivo significance of KIF1C, we generated kif1C(-/-) mice by knocking in the beta-galactosidase gene into the motor domain of kif1C gene. On staining of LacZ, we detected its expression in the heart, liver, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Unexpectedly, kif1C(-/-) mice were viable and showed no obvious abnormalities. Because immunocytochemistry showed partial colocalization of KIF1C with the Golgi marker protein, we compared the organelle distribution in primary lung fibroblasts from kif1C(+/+) and kif1C(-/-) mice. We found that there was no significant difference in the distribution of the Golgi apparatus or in the transport from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) facilitated by brefeldin A between the two cells. This retrograde membrane transport was further confirmed to be normal by time-lapse analysis. Consequently, KIF1C is dispensable for the motor-dependent retrograde transport from the Golgi apparatus to the ER. PMID:11784862

  2. Electric motor/controller design tradeoffs for noise, weight, and efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, N.L.; Brown, G.W.

    1994-12-31

    It is common for an AUV [Autonomous Underwater Vehicle] designer to be put in the position of a subsystem hardware integrator. In the case of electric motors and controllers this may be more by necessity than choice because a suitable subsystems supplier cannot be found. As a result, motors and controllers are purchased from various manufacturers who may optimize the design of each part but hold system performance secondary in importance. Unlike hydraulics, an electric motor/controller system presents significant opportunities to improve noise, weight, and efficiency. But, these opportunities can best be recognized by a single source who not only understands the technology but has the ability to implement them in the development and manufacture of the product. An analysis is presented which explains the various design considerations of noise, weight and efficiency of electric motors and controllers for submersible AUV`s. In concert with the design considerations, their interrelationships are discussed as to how they affect each other in the overall optimization of the system. In conclusion, a matrix is created which shows how the resultant system parameters of noise, weight, and efficiency may be ``traded off`` to tailor the best overall system for the application. 1 ref.

  3. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  4. The Utilization of Sensori-motor Experiences for Introducing Young Pupils to Molecular Motion: A Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Does a sensori-motor experience help a physics student understand the movement of molecules in solids, liquids, and gases? Students aged 9-10 were given either traditional demonstrations of solids, liquids, and gases and the variation of molecular motion with temperature (iconic presentation), or they were involved in physical activities as they…

  5. Controlled Directional Motions of Molecular Vehicles, Rotors, and Motors: From Metallic to Silicon Surfaces, a Strategy to Operate at Higher Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chérioux, Frédéric; Galangau, Olivier; Palmino, Frank; Rapenne, Gwénaël

    2016-06-17

    In the last decade, many nanomachines with controlled molecular motions have been studied, mainly on metallic surfaces, which are easy to obtain very clean, and are stable over months. However, the studies of mechanical properties of nanomachines are mainly performed at very low temperatures, usually between 5 and 80 K, which prevents any kind of applications. In this Minireview, we will present our strategy to operate at higher temperatures, in particular through the use of semiconducting silicon surfaces. We also review our best achievements in the field through some examples of rotating molecular machines that have been designed, synthesized, and studied in our groups. On metallic surfaces, the nanovehicles are molecules with two or four triptycenes as wheels and the molecular motor is built around a ruthenium organometallic center with a piano-stool geometry and peripheric ferrocenyl groups. On semiconducting silicon surfaces, vehicles are also made from triptycene fragments and the rotor is a pentaphenylbenzene molecule. PMID:26604073

  6. The Molecular Basis of Frictional Loads in the In Vitro Motility Assay with Applications to the Study of the Loaded Mechanochemistry of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical movement, generating forces necessary to accomplish an array of cellular functions. Since molecular motors generate force, they typically work under loaded conditions where the motor mechanochemistry is altered by the presence of a load. Several biophysical techniques have been developed to study the loaded behavior and force generating capabilities of molecular motors yet most of these techniques require specialized equipment. The frictional loading assay is a modification to the in vitro motility assay that can be performed on a standard epifluorescence microscope, permitting the high-throughput measurement of the loaded mechanochemistry of molecular motors. Here, we describe a model for the molecular basis of the frictional loading assay by modeling the load as a series of either elastic or viscoelastic elements. The model, which calculates the frictional loads imposed by different binding proteins, permits the measurement of isotonic kinetics, force-velocity relationships, and power curves in the motility assay. We show computationally and experimentally that the frictional load imposed by alpha-actinin, the most widely employed actin binding protein in frictional loading experiments, behaves as a viscoelastic rather than purely elastic load. As a test of the model, we examined the frictional loading behavior of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin under normal and fatigue-like conditions using alpha-actinin as a load. We found that, consistent with fiber studies, fatigue-like conditions cause reductions in myosin isometric force, unloaded sliding velocity, maximal power output, and shift the load at which peak power output occurs. PMID:20191566

  7. Advantages of switched reluctance motor applications to EV and HEV: Design and control issues

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, K.M.; Fahimi, B.; Suresh, G.; Rajarathnam, A.V.; Ehsani, M.

    2000-02-01

    Land vehicles need their drivetrain to operate entirely in constant power in order to meet their operational constraints, such as initial acceleration and gradability, with minimum power rating. The internal combustion engine (ICE) is inappropriate for producing this torque-speed profile. Therefore, multiple gear transmission is necessary with the ICE in a vehicle. Some electric machines, if designed and controlled appropriately, are capable of producing an extended constant power range. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of the switched reluctance motor (SRM) for electric vehicle and hybrid electric vehicle applications. This investigation will be carried out in two steps. The first step involves the machine design and the finite-element analysis to obtain the static characteristic of the motor. In the second step, the finite-element field solutions are used in the development of a nonlinear model to investigate the dynamic performance of the designed motor. Several 8-6 and 6-4 SRM geometries will be investigated. Effects of different stator and rotor pole widths and pole heights on the steady state as well as on the dynamic performance of the motor will be studied. The air gap for each motor will be made as small as manufacturally possible. The aspects of performance to be compared for each design motor are: (1) the range of the constant power operation; (2) drive efficiency in this extended constant power range; (3) the power factor in this operational range; and (4) the short time overload capability. The first performance index defines the rated power of the motor. The longer the constant power range, the lower is the power rating for the same vehicle performance. In the high-speed operation of the SRM, there will be considerable phase overlapping. Hence, thicker back iron than usual might be needed to prevent the back iron from saturating. However, since flux peaking of each phase occurs at different rotor positions, the phase

  8. Optimum Design of Thrust Air Bearing for Hard Disk Drive Spindle Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Danial; Namba, Tadashi; Ochiai, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Hiromu

    This paper describes the application of geometry optimization method proposed by Hashimoto to the design of air lubricated thrust bearings used for HDD spindle motors. The optimization is carried out to maximize the dynamic stiffness of air films because the low stiffness is a serious problem of thrust air bearings in the actual application to HDD spindle motor. The optimized dynamic stiffnesses are obtained by changing the allowable film thickness, which is corresponding to the tolerance of bearings. The results obtained show that the optimized thrust air bearings have the comparable stiffness to the oil lubricated thrust bearings and it is verified theoretically that this type of thrust air bearing can be used for HDD spindle motors.

  9. Effect of design variables on irreversible magnet demagnetization in brushless dc motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Heoung; Lee, Ju

    2005-05-01

    The large demagnetizing currents in brushless dc (BLdc) motor are generated by the short-circuited stator windings and the fault of a drive circuit. So, irreversible magnet demagnetization occurs due to the external demagnetizing field by these currents. In this paper, we deal with the effect of design variables on irreversible magnet demagnetization in BLdc motor through the modeling approach using a two-dimensional finite-element method (2D FEM). The nonlinear analysis of a permanent magnet is added to 2D FEM to consider irreversible demagnetization. As a result, it is shown that magnet thickness, teeth surface width, and rotor back yoke thickness are the most important geometrical dimensions of BLdc motor in terms of irreversible magnet demagnetization.

  10. Designed self-assembly of molecular necklaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Min; Kim, Soo-Young; Heo, Jungseok; Whang, Dongmok; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Kim, Kimoon

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports an efficient strategy to synthesize molecular necklaces, in which a number of small rings are threaded onto a large ring, utilizing the principles of self-assembly and coordination chemistry. Our strategy involves (1) threading a molecular "bead" with a short "string" to make a pseudorotaxane and then (2) linking the pseudorotaxanes with a metal complex with two cis labile ligands acting as an "angle connector" to form a cyclic product (molecular necklace). A 4- or 3-pyridylmethyl group is attached to each end of 1,4-diaminobutane or 1,5-diaminopentane to produce the short "strings" (C4N4(2+), C4N3(2+), C5N4(2+), and C5N3(2+)), which then react with a cucurbituril (CB) "bead" to form stable pseudorotaxanes (PR44(2+), PR43(2+), PR54(2+), and PR53(2+), respectively). The reaction of the pseudorotaxanes with Pt(en)(NO(3))(2) (en = ethylenediamine) produces a molecular necklace [4]MN, in which three molecular "beads" are threaded on a triangular framework, and/or a molecular necklace [5]MN, in which four molecular "beads" are threaded on a square framework. Under refluxing conditions, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) yields exclusively [4]MN (MN44T or MN54T, respectively), whereas that with PR43(2+) or PR53(2+) produces exclusively [5]MN (MN43S or MN53S, respectively). The products have been characterized by various methods including X-ray crystallography. At lower temperatures, on the other hand, the reaction with PR44(2+) or PR54(2+) affords both [4]MN and [5]MN. The supermolecules reported here are the first series of molecular necklaces obtained as thermodynamic products. The overall structures of the molecular necklaces are strongly influenced by the structures of pseudorotaxane building blocks, which is discussed in detail on the basis of the X-ray crystal structures. The temperature dependence of the product distribution observed in this self-assembly process is also discussed. PMID:11878967

  11. Design and testing of piezo motors for non-magnetic and/or fine positioning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, M. F.; Le Letty, R.; Seiler, R.; Coste, P.

    2005-07-01

    Piezoelectric motors offer several outstanding characteristics that may be very interesting for new scientific instruments in space applications. Piezo motors use a combination of electro-mechanical and frictional forces for generating a progressive motion; they are well suited for positioning applications because they exhibit a large force at rest without any power supply, and they often do not require any reduction gear. They are increasingly used in optical applications. Using piezo motors in space applications may become more and more relevant because of the continuous trend towards adaptive optics in future scientific payloads. In general, piezoelectric actuators are more and more used in space. Piezoelectric motors exhibit a number of advantages compared to conventional electromagnetic (stepping) motors, e.g. superior force/mass ratio, improved direct drive capability, no power supply to maintain a position, feasibility of a fully non-magnetic motor design. In this context, two complementary concepts have been designed and evaluated in the frame of ESA funded research and development activities: a resonant concept, called Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA), a quasi-static concept, called Rotary Piezo Motor for High Precision Pointing (RPMHPP). The developed Rotary Piezo Actuator (RPA) is based on a Ultrasonic Piezo Drive (UPD) unit that drives a friction ring on the rotor part supported by a ball bearing assembly. This new motorization principle offers excellent motion dynamics and positioning accuracy combined with a high un-powered torque at standstill, and it does not rely on any magnetic features. A rotary piezo motor compliant with the requirements of a reference space application has been designed and tested. The technology remains challenging to be mastered, since the interdisciplinary aspects of the concept include, among others, drive electronics and controller design, piezo-electricity, contact mechanics and tribology. The conceptual design has lead to a

  12. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  13. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  14. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  15. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  16. 36 CFR 212.57 - Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and..., Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Designation of... applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible....

  17. Design, analysis, fabrication and test of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The motor case used in the solid propellant booster for the Space Shuttle is unique in many respects, most of which are indigenous to size and special design requirements. The evolution of the case design from initial requirements to finished product is discussed, with increased emphasis of reuse capability, special design features, fracture mechanics and corrosion control. Case fabrication history and the resulting procedure are briefly reviewed with respect to material development, processing techniques and special problem areas. Case assembly, behavior and performance during the DM-1 static firing are reviewed, with appropriate comments and conclusions.

  18. Biorefinery: a design tool for molecular gelators.

    PubMed

    John, George; Shankar, Balachandran Vijai; Jadhav, Swapnil R; Vemula, Praveen Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Molecular gels, the macroscopic products of a nanoscale bottom-up strategy, have emerged as a promising functional soft material. The prospects of tailoring the architecture of gelator molecules have led to the formation of unique, highly tunable gels for a wide spectrum of applications from medicine to electronics. Biorefinery is a concept that integrates the processes of converting biomass/renewable feedstock and the associated infrastructure used to produce chemicals and materials, which is analogous to petroleum-based refinery. The current review assimilates the successful efforts to demonstrate the prospects of the biorefinery concept for developing new amphiphiles as molecular gelators. Amphiphiles based on naturally available raw materials such as amygdalin, vitamin C, cardanol, arjunolic acid, and trehalose that possess specific functionality were synthesized using biocatalysis and/or chemical synthesis. The hydrogels and organogels obtained from such amphiphiles were conceptually demonstrated for diverse applications including drug-delivery systems and the templated synthesis of hybrid materials. PMID:20465204

  19. Molecular Design for Cryogenic Magnetic Coolants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The area of molecular magnetic coolants has developed rapidly in recent years. A large number of competitive candidates have been reported, with the cooling performances chasing each other. In this account, four explicit strategies, namely, increasing ground-state spin, reducing magnetic anisotropy, weakening magnetic interactions, and lowering the molecular weight, are proposed from the theoretical viewpoint towards improving the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). According to this guidance, these successful strategies are discussed to pursue excellent magnetic coolants. This is accompanied by a discussion of the representative examples reported by our group. The magnetic entropy change increases from one compound to another, which in the most pronounced cases is suggestive of being the largest MCE in magnetic coolants. PMID:26929130

  20. Design, manufacture and test of the composite case for ERINT-1 solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mard, Francis

    1993-06-01

    SEP is in charge since 1989 of the ERINT-1 motor case and nozzle. The stringent missile weight and volume requirements coupled with the specification to provide an aerodynamically stable configuration over a very large Mach number range led to the need to develop a high-performance composite motor case. Development of this SRM case presented a variety of technical challenges that were solved by an original design: (1) integral skirts, high bending stiffness, and bending loads are required; (2) high temperature composite stiffness and loads are required up to 160 C; (3) integral fin lugs attachments high aerodynamic loading is required on fin lugs; (4) enclosed fore dome; and (5) aft-pinned joint: a large rear opening is required to cast the propellant. Structural testing in ultimate conditions confirmed the soundness of the design. Positive safety margins were demonstrated on both internal pressure and mechanical loads requirements.

  1. Design optimization of a permanent magnet synchronous motor by the response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Y.; Wakao, S.; Yamashita, A.; Katsuta, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Kondo, M.

    2002-05-01

    This article proposes an effective computational approach to design optimization of an outer-rotor type permanent magnet synchronous motor. As usual, because of the complicated rotor configuration and the complex magnetic saturation effects, it is difficult to design the lightweight permanent magnet synchronous motor structure that makes good use of reluctance torque within an acceptable CPU time. In this article, we adopt the finite element method as a magnetic field analysis method and the genetic algorithms as a search method. Furthermore, the response surface methodology, which enables us to evaluate the objective physical quantities in a much shorter time, is introduced into the above methods in the proposed approach. This optimization approach results in an overall increase in the optimization speed, that is, substantial CPU time reduction in comparison with the case of a conventional one. Some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach are also presented.

  2. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Ryan M.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Pereira, Fred A.; Raphael, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- an C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity. PMID:21651892

  3. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Ryan M; Silberg, Jonathan J; Pereira, Fred A; Raphael, Robert M

    2011-06-24

    Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- and C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity. PMID:21651892

  4. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, Dan V.; Lard, Mercy; Korten, Till; van Delft, Falco C. M. J. M.; Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; Månsson, Alf; Diez, Stefan; Linke, Heiner; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2016-01-01

    The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology. PMID:26903637

  5. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, Dan V; Lard, Mercy; Korten, Till; van Delft, Falco C M J M; Persson, Malin; Bengtsson, Elina; Månsson, Alf; Diez, Stefan; Linke, Heiner; Nicolau, Dan V

    2016-03-01

    The combinatorial nature of many important mathematical problems, including nondeterministic-polynomial-time (NP)-complete problems, places a severe limitation on the problem size that can be solved with conventional, sequentially operating electronic computers. There have been significant efforts in conceiving parallel-computation approaches in the past, for example: DNA computation, quantum computation, and microfluidics-based computation. However, these approaches have not proven, so far, to be scalable and practical from a fabrication and operational perspective. Here, we report the foundations of an alternative parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. Exploring the network in a parallel fashion using a large number of independent, molecular-motor-propelled agents then solves the mathematical problem. This approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power consumption and heat dissipation. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of such a device by solving, in a parallel fashion, the small instance {2, 5, 9} of the subset sum problem, which is a benchmark NP-complete problem. Finally, we discuss the technical advances necessary to make our system scalable with presently available technology. PMID:26903637

  6. Physics of transport and traffic phenomena in biology: from molecular motors and cells to organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2005-12-01

    Traffic-like collective movements are observed at almost all levels of biological systems. Molecular motor proteins like, for example, kinesin and dynein, which are the vehicles of almost all intra-cellular transport in eukaryotic cells, sometimes encounter traffic jam that manifests as a disease of the organism. Similarly, traffic jam of collagenase MMP-1, which moves on the collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, has also been observed in recent experiments. Novel efforts have been made to utilize some uni-cellular organisms as “micro-transporters”. Traffic-like movements of social insects like ants and termites on trails are, perhaps, more familiar in our everyday life. Experimental, theoretical and computational investigations in the last few years have led to a deeper understanding of the generic or common physical principles involved in these phenomena. In this review we critically examine the current status of our understanding, expose the limitations of the existing methods, mention open challenging questions and speculate on the possible future directions of research in this interdisciplinary area where physics meets not only chemistry and biology but also (nano-)technology.

  7. Molecular Thermodynamics for Chemical Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses that aspect of thermodynamics which is particularly important in chemical process design: the calculation of the equilibrium properties of fluid mixtures, especially as required in phase-separation operations. (MLH)

  8. Covalent Immobilization of Microtubules on Glass Surfaces for Molecular Motor Force Measurements and Other Single-Molecule Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Rigid attachment of microtubules (MTs) to glass cover slip surfaces is a prerequisite for a variety of microscopy experiments in which MTs are used as substrates for MT-associated proteins, such as the molecular motors kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. We present an MT-surface coupling protocol in which aminosilanized glass is formylated using the cross-linker glutaraldehyde, fluorescence-labeled MTs are covalently attached, and the surface is passivated with highly pure beta-casein. The technique presented here yields rigid MT immobilization while simultaneously blocking the remaining glass surface against nonspecific binding by polystyrene optical trapping microspheres. This surface chemistry is straightforward and relatively cheap and uses a minimum of specialized equipment or hazardous reagents. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of optical tweezers experiments with MT-associated molecular motors and may also be useful in other assays requiring surface-immobilized proteins. PMID:24633798

  9. Synchronization of elastically coupled processive molecular motors and regulation of cargo transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Felix; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The collective work of motor proteins plays an important role in cellular transport processes. Since measuring intermotor coupling and hence a comparison to theoretical predictions is difficult, we introduce the synchronization as an alternative observable for motor cooperativity. This synchronization can be determined from the ratio of the mean times of motor resting and stepping. Results from a multistate Markov chain model and Brownian dynamics simulations, describing the elastically coupled motors, coincide well. Our model can explain the experimentally observed effect of strongly increased transport velocities and powers by the synchronization and coupling of myosin V and kinesin I.

  10. Actuating Mechanism and Design of a Cylindrical Traveling Wave Ultrasonic Motor Using Cantilever Type Composite Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic motors (USM) are based on the concept of driving the rotor by a mechanical vibration excited on the stator via piezoelectric effect. USM exhibit merits such as simple structure, quick response, quiet operation, self-locking when power off, nonelectromagnetic radiation and higher position accuracy. Principal Findings A cylindrical type traveling wave ultrasonic motor using cantilever type composite transducer was proposed in this paper. There are two cantilevers on the outside surface of cylinder, four longitudinal PZT ceramics are set between the cantilevers, and four bending PZT ceramics are set on each outside surface of cantilevers. Two degenerate flexural vibration modes spatially and temporally orthogonal to each other in the cylinder are excited by the composite transducer. In this new design, a single transducer can excite a flexural traveling wave in the cylinder. Thus, elliptical motions are achieved on the teeth. The actuating mechanism of proposed motor was analyzed. The stator was designed with FEM. The two vibration modes of stator were degenerated. Transient analysis was developed to gain the vibration characteristic of stator, and results indicate the motion trajectories of nodes on the teeth are nearly ellipses. Conclusions The study results verify the feasibility of the proposed design. The wave excited in the cylinder isn't an ideal traveling wave, and the vibration amplitudes are inconsistent. The distortion of traveling wave is generated by the deformation of bending vibration mode of cylinder, which is caused by the coupling effect between the cylinder and transducer. Analysis results also prove that the objective motions of nodes on the teeth are three-dimensional vibrations. But, the vibration in axial direction is minute compared with the vibrations in circumferential and radial direction. The results of this paper can guide the development of this new type of motor. PMID:20368809

  11. Design trends and trade-offs for sensorless operation of switched reluctance motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, T.; Husain, I.; Elbuluk, M.

    1995-12-31

    The aligned to unaligned phase inductance ratio and the number of stator and rotor poles strongly affect the resolution of indirect rotor position sensing methods for switched reluctance motor (SRM) drives. A higher inductance ratio increases the resolution, while higher number of phases increases the available sampling window for indirect position sensing. However, these requirements are conflicting design criteria for an SRM. In this paper, the design considerations and trade-offs for sensorless SRM drives are analyzed by computer simulations. The existing indirect position sensing methods and their applicability for various SRM drives are also discussed.

  12. Motor imaginary-based brain-machine interface design using programmable logic controllers for the disabled.

    PubMed

    Jeyabalan, Vickneswaran; Samraj, Andrews; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2010-10-01

    Aiming at the implementation of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) for the aid of disabled people, this paper presents a system design for real-time communication between the BMI and programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to control an electrical actuator that could be used in devices to help the disabled. Motor imaginary signals extracted from the brain’s motor cortex using an electroencephalogram (EEG) were used as a control signal. The EEG signals were pre-processed by means of adaptive recursive band-pass filtrations (ARBF) and classified using simplified fuzzy adaptive resonance theory mapping (ARTMAP) in which the classified signals are then translated into control signals used for machine control via the PLC. A real-time test system was designed using MATLAB for signal processing, KEP-Ware V4 OLE for process control (OPC), a wireless local area network router, an Omron Sysmac CPM1 PLC and a 5 V/0.3A motor. This paper explains the signal processing techniques, the PLC's hardware configuration, OPC configuration and real-time data exchange between MATLAB and PLC using the MATLAB OPC toolbox. The test results indicate that the function of exchanging real-time data can be attained between the BMI and PLC through OPC server and proves that it is an effective and feasible method to be applied to devices such as wheelchairs or electronic equipment. PMID:20336561

  13. Passivity-based current controller design for a permanent-magnet synchronous motor.

    PubMed

    Achour, A Y; Mendil, B; Bacha, S; Munteanu, I

    2009-07-01

    The control of a permanent-magnet synchronous motor is a nontrivial issue in AC drives, because of its nonlinear dynamics and time-varying parameters. Within this paper, a new passivity-based controller designed to force the motor to track time-varying speed and torque trajectories is presented. Its design avoids the use of the Euler-Lagrange model and destructuring since it uses a flux-based dq modelling, independent of the rotor angular position. This dq model is obtained through the three-phase abc model of the motor, using a Park transform. The proposed control law does not compensate the model's workless force terms which appear in the machine's dq model, as they have no effect on the system's energy balance and they do not influence the system's stability properties. Another feature is that the cancellation of the plant's primary dynamics and nonlinearities is not done by exact zeroing, but by imposing a desired damped transient. The effectiveness of the proposed control is illustrated by numerical simulation results. PMID:19426970

  14. A curved ultrasonic actuator optimized for spherical motors: design and experiments.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Edouard; Lozada, José; Hafez, Moustapha

    2014-08-01

    Multi-degree-of-freedom angular actuators are commonly used in numerous mechatronic areas such as omnidirectional robots, robot articulations or inertially stabilized platforms. The conventional method to design these devices consists in placing multiple actuators in parallel or series using gimbals which are bulky and difficult to miniaturize. Motors using a spherical rotor are interesting for miniature multidegree-of-freedom actuators. In this paper, a new actuator is proposed. It is based on a curved piezoelectric element which has its inner contact surface adapted to the diameter of the rotor. This adaptation allows to build spherical motors with a fully constrained rotor and without a need for additional guiding system. The work presents a design methodology based on modal finite element analysis. A methodology for mode selection is proposed and a sensitivity analysis of the final geometry to uncertainties and added masses is discussed. Finally, experimental results that validate the actuator concept on a single degree-of-freedom ultrasonic motor set-up are presented. PMID:24726138

  15. Coupled Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics and Trajectory Modeling for Higher Fidelity Launch Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ables, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Multi-stage launch vehicles with solid rocket motors (SRMs) face design optimization challenges, especially when the mission scope changes frequently. Significant performance benefits can be realized if the solid rocket motors are optimized to the changing requirements. While SRMs represent a fixed performance at launch, rapid design iterations enable flexibility at design time, yielding significant performance gains. The streamlining and integration of SRM design and analysis can be achieved with improved analysis tools. While powerful and versatile, the Solid Performance Program (SPP) is not conducive to rapid design iteration. Performing a design iteration with SPP and a trajectory solver is a labor intensive process. To enable a better workflow, SPP, the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and the interfaces between them have been improved and automated, and a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. The GUI enables real-time visual feedback of grain and nozzle design inputs, enforces parameter dependencies, removes redundancies, and simplifies manipulation of SPP and POST's numerous options. Automating the analysis also simplifies batch analyses and trade studies. Finally, the GUI provides post-processing, visualization, and comparison of results. Wrapping legacy high-fidelity analysis codes with modern software provides the improved interface necessary to enable rapid coupled SRM ballistics and vehicle trajectory analysis. Low cost trade studies demonstrate the sensitivities of flight performance metrics to propulsion characteristics. Incorporating high fidelity analysis from SPP into vehicle design reduces performance margins and improves reliability. By flying an SRM designed with the same assumptions as the rest of the vehicle, accurate comparisons can be made between competing architectures. In summary, this flexible workflow is a critical component to designing a versatile launch vehicle model that can accommodate a volatile

  16. Design of a superconducting linear synchronous motor with YBCO coil magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Tang, Junjie; Zhang, Ya

    2015-09-01

    The forces of the flat single-sided linear motor with four superconducting coils on the excitation system were presented by experimental method. The influences of the coil height and number of turns on the forces were investigated by the simulation method. Although the maximum thrust increased monotonically with the value of turns, the corresponding increment of the thrust decreased with the value of turns. The thrust reaches a certain saturation value with increasing the height of the superconducting coil. Continuing to increase the height of the coil could lead to an increase of the normal force. The superconducting linear motor is finally designed with the capability to generate thrust of 1 kN/m.

  17. Selective cell-surface labeling of the molecular motor protein prestin

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Ryan M.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Pereira, Fred A.; Raphael, Robert M.

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Trafficking to the plasma membrane is required for prestin function. {yields} Biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) was fused to prestin through a transmembrane domain. {yields} BAP-prestin can be metabolically labeled with biotin in HEK293 cells. {yields} Biotin-BAP-prestin allows for selective imaging of fully trafficked prestin. {yields} The biotin-BAP-prestin displays voltage-sensitive activity. -- Abstract: Prestin, a multipass transmembrane protein whose N- and C-termini are localized to the cytoplasm, must be trafficked to the plasma membrane to fulfill its cellular function as a molecular motor. One challenge in studying prestin sequence-function relationships within living cells is separating the effects of amino acid substitutions on prestin trafficking, plasma membrane localization and function. To develop an approach for directly assessing prestin levels at the plasma membrane, we have investigated whether fusion of prestin to a single pass transmembrane protein results in a functional fusion protein with a surface-exposed N-terminal tag that can be detected in living cells. We find that fusion of the biotin-acceptor peptide (BAP) and transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) to the N-terminus of prestin-GFP yields a membrane protein that can be metabolically-labeled with biotin, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and selectively detected at the plasma membrane using fluorescently-tagged streptavidin. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a surface detectable tag and a single-pass transmembrane domain to prestin does not disrupt its voltage-sensitive activity.

  18. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. PMID:25681694

  19. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  20. Web Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmsen, Tinri; Bisseling, Ton; Hartog, Rob

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is a certain proficiency level in experimental design. Currently students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, in lectures and in the laboratory. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the design of experimental approaches. This…

  1. MOLECULAR THERMODYNAMICS IN THE DESIGN OF SUBSTITUTE SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of physical properties and fluid behavior from molecular thermodynamics can lead to better decision making in the design of substitute solvents and can greatly reduce the expense and time required to find substitutes compared to designing solvents by experiment. this pape...

  2. Lightweight structural design of a bolted case joint for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the structural design of a bolted joint with a static face seal which can be used to join Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments. Results from numerous finite element parametric studies indicate that the bolted joint meets the design requirement of preventing joint opening at the O-ring locations during SRM pressurization. A final design recommended for further development has the following parameters: 180 1-inch-diameter studs, stud center line offset of .5 inches radially inward from the shell wall center line, flange thickness of 0.75 inches, bearing plate thickness of 0.25 inches, studs prestressed to 70 percent of ultimate load, and the intermediate alcove. The design has a mass penalty of 1096 lbm, which is 164 lbm greater than the currently proposed capture tang redesign.

  3. Lightweight structural design of a bolted case joint for the space shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    The structural design of a bolted joint with a static face seal which can be used to join Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments is given. Results from numerous finite element parametric studies indicate that the bolted joint meets the design requirement of preventing joint opening at the O-ring locations during SRM pressurization. A final design recommended for further development has the following parameters: 180 one-in.-diam. studs, stud centerline offset of 0.5 in radially inward from the shell wall center line, flange thickness of 0.75 in, bearing plate thickness of 0.25 in, studs prestressed to 70 percent of ultimate load, and the intermediate alcove. The design has a mass penalty of 1096 lbm, which is 164 lbm greater than the currently proposed capture tang redesign.

  4. Intrinsic Hardware Evolution for the Design and Reconfiguration of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a second generation Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA2). The performance of an evolved controller is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller. It is shown that hardware evolution is able to create a compact design that provides good performance, while using considerably less functional electronic components than the conventional design. Additionally, the use of hardware evolution to provide fault tolerance by reconfiguring the design is explored. Experimental results are presented showing that significant recovery of capability can be made in the face of damaging induced faults.

  5. The Effect of Propellant Variables on Slag in Subscale Spin Motors. Part 1; Design and Qualification of a Slag Discrimination Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, F. M.; Beus, R. W.; May, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The formation, collection, and expulsion of aluminum oxide slag is known to affect the performance of many solid rocket motor systems. Slag expulsion, in particular, is believed to be capable of causing pressure and thrust perturbations. Propellant combustion studies, performed and documented by many investigators, have shown that variations in propellant raw materials and processing affect the nature of alumina droplets at the burning propellant surface, and hence, may affect the quantity of slag retained in the motor chamber, available for expulsion. Thiokol has completed an experimental and analytical evaluation to determine the effects of several material and process variables on Space SHuttle propellant and its propensity to 'slag'. This paper describes the test article, a small scale spin motor with special nozzle, designed and qualified as a slag discriminating tool for use in the evaluation.

  6. Analysis and Design Considerations of a High-Power Density, Dual Air Gap, Axial-Field Brushless, Permanent Magnet Motor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chahee Peter

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, brush dc motors have been the dominant drive system because they provide easily controlled motor speed over a wide range, rapid acceleration and deceleration, convenient control of position, and lower product cost. Despite these capabilities, the brush dc motor configuration does not satisfy the design requirements for the U.S. Navy's underwater propulsion applications. Technical advances in rare-earth permanent magnet materials, in high-power semiconductor transistor technology, and in various rotor position-sensing devices have made using brushless permanent magnet motors a viable alternative. This research investigates brushless permanent magnet motor technology, studying the merits of dual-air gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor configuration in terms of power density, efficiency, and noise/vibration levels. Because the design objectives for underwater motor applications include high-power density, high-performance, and low-noise/vibration, the traditional, simplified equivalent circuit analysis methods to assist in meeting these goals were inadequate. This study presents the development and verification of detailed finite element analysis (FEA) models and lumped parameter circuit models that can calculate back electromotive force waveforms, inductance, cogging torque, energized torque, and eddy current power losses. It is the first thorough quantification of dual air-gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor parameters and performance characteristics. The new methodology introduced in this research not only facilitates the design process of an axial field, brushless, permanent magnet motor but reinforces the idea that the high-power density, high-efficiency, and low-noise/vibration motor is attainable.

  7. MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Keith P. Johnston

    2009-04-06

    The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

  8. Mechanical Operation and Intersubunit Coordination of Ring-Shaped Molecular Motors: Insights from Single-Molecule Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shixin; Chistol, Gheorghe; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Ring NTPases represent a large and diverse group of proteins that couple their nucleotide hydrolysis activity to a mechanical task involving force generation and some type of transport process in the cell. Because of their shape, these enzymes often operate as gates that separate distinct cellular compartments to control and regulate the passage of chemical species across them. In this manner, ions and small molecules are moved across membranes, biopolymer substrates are segregated between cells or moved into confined spaces, double-stranded nucleic acids are separated into single strands to provide access to the genetic information, and polypeptides are unfolded and processed for recycling. Here we review the recent advances in the characterization of these motors using single-molecule manipulation and detection approaches. We describe the various mechanisms by which ring motors convert chemical energy to mechanical force or torque and coordinate the activities of individual subunits that constitute the ring. We also examine how single-molecule studies have contributed to a better understanding of the structural elements involved in motor-substrate interaction, mechanochemical coupling, and intersubunit coordination. Finally, we discuss how these molecular motors tailor their operation—often through regulation by other cofactors—to suit their unique biological functions. PMID:24806916

  9. Design and construction of shaft-driving type piezoceramic ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuh-Liang; Mou, Shann-Chyi; Ouyang, Minsun

    2004-10-01

    A new approach in design of shaft-driving type piezoceramic ultrasonic motor is proposed. The stator of motor consisted of a commercial available buzzer disk in which a piezoceramic membrane is adhered to a metal sheet. The wave propagation on the metal sheet was generated by extended-shrunk force from piezoceramic oscillation. Driving energy came from the vibration modes by mechanical-electrical oscillation of the metal sheet in corresponding to converse piezoelectric effect using a single-phase AC voltage power. Where the relative elliptic motion was occurred between the bearing seat and rotor in order to kinematical delivery, the rotor being driven was connected directly on the bearing seat to transmit the dynamic power with frictional contact force. In analysis of dynamic features, the system transfer function of admittance and equivalent circuit was obtained. The rotating speed of the prototype motor could be reached as high as 2000 rpm on the driving condition of 72 kHz, +/-10 V(pp), and 0.2 A. The maximum torque was less than 0.003 Nm. It could be utilized in the driver of CD, or the cooling fan in the computer CPU. PMID:15358527

  10. A Neural Network-Based Optimal Spatial Filter Design Method for Motor Imagery Classification

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Ayhan; Olmez, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel spatial filter design method is introduced. Spatial filtering is an important processing step for feature extraction in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces. This paper introduces a new motor imagery signal classification method combined with spatial filter optimization. We simultaneously train the spatial filter and the classifier using a neural network approach. The proposed spatial filter network (SFN) is composed of two layers: a spatial filtering layer and a classifier layer. These two layers are linked to each other with non-linear mapping functions. The proposed method addresses two shortcomings of the common spatial patterns (CSP) algorithm. First, CSP aims to maximize the between-classes variance while ignoring the minimization of within-classes variances. Consequently, the features obtained using the CSP method may have large within-classes variances. Second, the maximizing optimization function of CSP increases the classification accuracy indirectly because an independent classifier is used after the CSP method. With SFN, we aimed to maximize the between-classes variance while minimizing within-classes variances and simultaneously optimizing the spatial filter and the classifier. To classify motor imagery EEG signals, we modified the well-known feed-forward structure and derived forward and backward equations that correspond to the proposed structure. We tested our algorithm on simple toy data. Then, we compared the SFN with conventional CSP and its multi-class version, called one-versus-rest CSP, on two data sets from BCI competition III. The evaluation results demonstrate that SFN is a good alternative for classifying motor imagery EEG signals with increased classification accuracy. PMID:25933101

  11. A neural network-based optimal spatial filter design method for motor imagery classification.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Ayhan; Olmez, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel spatial filter design method is introduced. Spatial filtering is an important processing step for feature extraction in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces. This paper introduces a new motor imagery signal classification method combined with spatial filter optimization. We simultaneously train the spatial filter and the classifier using a neural network approach. The proposed spatial filter network (SFN) is composed of two layers: a spatial filtering layer and a classifier layer. These two layers are linked to each other with non-linear mapping functions. The proposed method addresses two shortcomings of the common spatial patterns (CSP) algorithm. First, CSP aims to maximize the between-classes variance while ignoring the minimization of within-classes variances. Consequently, the features obtained using the CSP method may have large within-classes variances. Second, the maximizing optimization function of CSP increases the classification accuracy indirectly because an independent classifier is used after the CSP method. With SFN, we aimed to maximize the between-classes variance while minimizing within-classes variances and simultaneously optimizing the spatial filter and the classifier. To classify motor imagery EEG signals, we modified the well-known feed-forward structure and derived forward and backward equations that correspond to the proposed structure. We tested our algorithm on simple toy data. Then, we compared the SFN with conventional CSP and its multi-class version, called one-versus-rest CSP, on two data sets from BCI competition III. The evaluation results demonstrate that SFN is a good alternative for classifying motor imagery EEG signals with increased classification accuracy. PMID:25933101

  12. Metamodels for New Designs of Outer-Rotor Brushless Synchronous Electric Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirba, J.; Lavrinovicha, L.

    2014-04-01

    The authors consider the possibilities to synthesise metamodels for the analysis and optimisation of brushless synchronous motors. The metamodels are presented for new designs of the outer-rotor permanent magnet synchronous motor and the outer-rotor reluctance motor. The metamodels are synthesised based on the results obtained by the numerical calculations of magnetic field taking into account magnetic saturation. Analysis of the results for the motor magnetic field and tests of the metamodels at the selected and intermediate points shows that these can be synthesised with acceptable accuracy using numerical calculations instead of expensive real experiments. Rakstā ir apskatītas metamodeļu iegūšanas iespējas to izmantošanai bezkontaktu sinhrono dzinēju analīzē un optimizācijā. Ir iegūti metamodeļi sinhronam dzinējam ar pastāvīgajiem magnētiem un reaktīvam dzinējam ar ārējo rotoru. Sintezēto metamodeļu iegūšanai izmantoti elektrisko dzinēju magnētiskā lauka skaitlisko aprēķinu rezultāti, ievērojot magnētiskās ķēdes piesātinājumu. Metamodeļu pārbaude aprēķinu un starppunktos parādīja, ka to iegūšanai dārgo reālo eksperimentu vietā var izmantot magnētiskā lauka aprēķinu rezultātus.

  13. The role of the cytoskeleton and molecular motors in endosomal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Granger, Elizabeth; McNee, Gavin; Allan, Victoria; Woodman, Philip

    2014-07-01

    The endocytic pathway is essential for processes that define how cells interact with their environment, including receptor signalling, cell adhesion and migration, pathogen entry, membrane protein turnover and nutrient uptake. The spatial organisation of endocytic trafficking requires motor proteins that tether membranes or transport them along the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Microtubules, actin filaments and motor proteins also provide force to deform and assist in the scission of membranes, thereby facilitating endosomal sorting and the generation of transport intermediates. PMID:24727350

  14. The role of the cytoskeleton and molecular motors in endosomal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Elizabeth; McNee, Gavin; Allan, Victoria; Woodman, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is essential for processes that define how cells interact with their environment, including receptor signalling, cell adhesion and migration, pathogen entry, membrane protein turnover and nutrient uptake. The spatial organisation of endocytic trafficking requires motor proteins that tether membranes or transport them along the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Microtubules, actin filaments and motor proteins also provide force to deform and assist in the scission of membranes, thereby facilitating endosomal sorting and the generation of transport intermediates. PMID:24727350

  15. Fuzzy Auto-adjust PID Controller Design of Brushless DC Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanxi, Wang; Yali, Yu; Guosheng, Zhang; Xiaoliang, Sheng

    Using conventional PID control method, to guarantee the rapidity and small overshoot dynamic and static performance of the BLDCM (brushless DC motor) system is out of the question. The control method to combine fuzzy control with PID control was fit the multivariable strong coupling nonlinear characteristic of BLDCM system. Matlab/Simulink simulation model had been built. The result of computer simulation shows that, compared with the conventional PID controller, the dynamic and static performance of fuzzy auto-adjust PID controller are put forward to optimize. The research work of this paper has profound significance for high precision controller design.

  16. Application of molecular modeling to analysis of inhibition of kinesin motor proteins of the BimC subfamily by monastrol and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Bevan, David R; Garst, James F; Osborne, Caroline K; Sims, Angela M

    2005-11-01

    Application of molecular modeling approaches has potential to contribute to rational drug design. These approaches may be especially useful when attempting to elucidate the structural features associated with novel drug targets. In this study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics were applied to studies of inhibition of the human motor protein denoted HsEg5 and other homologues in the BimC subfamily. These proteins are essential for mitosis, so compounds that inhibit their activity may have potential as anticancer therapeutics. The discovery of a small-molecule cell-permeable inhibitor, monastrol, has stimulated research in this area. Interestingly, monastrol is reported to inhibit the human and Xenopus forms of Eg5, but not those from Drosophila and Aspergillus. In this study, homology modeling was used to generate models of the Xenopus, Drosophila, and Aspergillus homologues, using the crystal structure of the human protein in complex with monastrol as a template. A series of known inhibitors was docked into each of the homologues, and the differences in binding energies were consistent with reported experimental data. Molecular dynamics revealed significant changes in the structure of the Aspergillus homologue that may contribute to its relative insensitivity to monastrol and related compounds. PMID:17191952

  17. Distal hereditary motor neuropathy with vocal cord paresis: from difficulty in choral singing to a molecular genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Gillian; Barwick, Katy E S; Hartley, Louise; McEntagart, Meriel; Crosby, Andrew H; Llewelyn, Gareth; Morris, Huw R

    2016-06-01

    Patients presenting with distal weakness can be a diagnostic challenge; the eventual diagnosis often depends upon accurate clinical phenotyping. We present a mother and daughter with a rare form of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7 in whom the diagnosis became apparent by initial difficulty in singing, from early vocal cord dysfunction. This rare neuropathy has now been identified in two apparently unrelated families in Wales. This family's clinical presentation is typical of distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 7, and they have the common truncating mutation in the SLC5A7 gene. Advances in genetic analysis of these rare conditions broaden our understanding of their potential molecular mechanisms and may allow more directed therapy. PMID:26786006

  18. A robust variable sampling time BLDC motor control design based upon μ-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chung-Wen; Yen, Jia-Yush

    2013-01-01

    The variable sampling rate system is encountered in many applications. When the speed information is derived from the position marks along the trajectory, one would have a speed dependent sampling rate system. The conventional fixed or multisampling rate system theory may not work in these cases because the system dynamics include the uncertainties which resulted from the variable sampling rate. This paper derived a convenient expression for the speed dependent sampling rate system. The varying sampling rate effect is then translated into multiplicative uncertainties to the system. The design then uses the popular μ-synthesis process to achieve a robust performance controller design. The implementation on a BLDC motor demonstrates the effectiveness of the design approach. PMID:24327804

  19. A Robust Variable Sampling Time BLDC Motor Control Design Based upon μ-Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jia-Yush

    2013-01-01

    The variable sampling rate system is encountered in many applications. When the speed information is derived from the position marks along the trajectory, one would have a speed dependent sampling rate system. The conventional fixed or multisampling rate system theory may not work in these cases because the system dynamics include the uncertainties which resulted from the variable sampling rate. This paper derived a convenient expression for the speed dependent sampling rate system. The varying sampling rate effect is then translated into multiplicative uncertainties to the system. The design then uses the popular μ-synthesis process to achieve a robust performance controller design. The implementation on a BLDC motor demonstrates the effectiveness of the design approach. PMID:24327804

  20. Design and Evaluation of a Stand-Up Motorized Prone Cart

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Jeffrey J; Malassigné, Pascal; Nelson, Audrey L; Jensen, Robert P; Amato, Margaret; Palacios, Polly L

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Prone carts are used for mobility by individuals with spinal cord injury in whom seated mobility (wheelchair) is contraindicated due to ischial or sacral pressure ulcers. Currently available prone carts are uncomfortable, subjecting the user to neck and shoulder strain, and make social interaction and performing activities of daily living difficult. A better design of prone carts is needed. In addition, standing devices have shown some medical benefits. The objective was to design and evaluate an improved prone cart that facilitates standing. Design: Engineering development project with user feedback through questionnaire. Users selected by convenience sampling. Methods: A marketing survey was performed of nurse managers of spinal cord injury units. Then 2 prototype carts were designed and built. These carts are able to tilt up to 45° and have a joystick-controlled motor for propulsion and other design features, including a workspace storage shelf and rearview mirrors. The carts were evaluated by both patients and caregivers at 2 Veteran's Administration hospitals. Outcome Measures: Questionnaire of subjects, both patients and caregivers, who used the cart. Findings: Both patients and caregivers liked the carts and the ability to assume a nonhorizontal body angle. The major complaint about the cart was that it seemed too long when it came to making turns. Conclusion: This prone cart design is an improvement over the standard, flat variety. However, further design changes will be necessary. This study provided valuable information that will be useful in the next-generation prone cart design project. PMID:17385270

  1. Molecular rectifiers: a new design based on asymmetric anchoring moieties.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Colin; Ratner, Mark A

    2015-03-11

    The quest for a molecular rectifier is among the major challenges of molecular electronics. We introduce three simple rules to design an efficient rectifying molecule and demonstrate its functioning at the theoretical level, relying on the NEGF-DFT technique. The design rules notably require both the introduction of asymmetric anchoring moieties and a decoupling bridge. They lead to a new rectification mechanism based on the compression and control of the HOMO/LUMO gap by the electrode Fermi levels, arising from a pinning effect. Significant rectification ratios up to 2 orders of magnitude are theoretically predicted as the mechanism opposes resonant to nonresonant tunneling. PMID:25706442

  2. Design theory and performance of cryogenic molecular adsorption refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, W. H.; Woltman, A. W.; Masson, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-cycle operation of molecular adsorption refrigeration systems (MARS) has been demonstrated by using thermally cycled zeolites to adsorb and desorb various gases under pressures of 20-60 atm. This paper develops three aspects of the design theory: the physical theory of molecular adsorption of small molecules such as A, N2, N2O and NH3, the design relations for closed-cycle flow for three or more compressors, and the coefficient of performance. This work is intended to demonstrate nonmechanical gas compression for various cryogenic gases than can compete with mechanical systems with a different mix of advantages and disadvantages.

  3. Development of Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor for an alternative axial flow blood pump design.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2006-05-01

    A Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed to provide delivery of both motoring torque and levitation force for an alternative axial flow blood pump design with an enclosed impeller. The axial flow pumps currently available introduce electromagnetic coupling from the motor's stator to the impeller by means of permanent magnets (PMs) embedded in the tips of the pump's blades. This design has distinct disadvantages, for example, pumping efficiency and electromagnetic coupling transmission are compromised by the constrained or poor geometry of the blades and limited pole width of the PMs, respectively. In this research, a Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed. It is composed of (i) an eight-pole PM hollow-cylindrical rotor assembly supposedly to house and enclose the impeller of an axial flow blood pump, and (ii) a six-pole stator with two sets of copper wire and different winding configurations to provide the motoring torque and levitating force for the rotor assembly. MATLAB's xPC Target interface hardware was used as the rapid prototyping tool for the development of the controller for the self-bearing motor. Experimental results on a free/simply supported rotor assembly validated the design feasibility and control algorithm effectiveness in providing both the motoring torque and levitation force for the rotor. When levitated, a maximum orbital displacement of 0.3 mm corresponding to 1050 rpm of the rotor was measured by two eddy current probes placed in the orthogonal direction. This design has the advantage of eliminating the trade-off between motoring torques, levitating force, and pumping efficiency of previous studies. It also indicated the benefits of enclosed-impeller design as having good dynamic response, linearity, and better reliability. The nonmechanical contact feature between rotating and stationary parts will further reduce hemolysis and thromboembolitic tendencies in a typical blood pump application. PMID:16683951

  4. Design Theory of a Variable Characteristic Motor Using Compound Magnetomotive Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takashi; Akatsu, Kan; Shigeta, Tomoaki; Nakano, Masaki; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Arimitsu, Minoru

    The permanent magnet synchronous motor offers the possibility of obtaining higher efficiency in a smaller motor size. However, it is difficult to vary the range of high motor efficiency because of its constant magnetomotive force (MMF) level. This paper proposes a variable characteristic motor that embodies a new concept of the compound magnetomotive forces (CMMF) motor. The motor uses a special magnet arrangement that has the MMF of components with different number of pole pairs. The application of compound current control to this motor makes it possible to vary the motor speed and torque (N-T) characteristics. This paper describes the derivation of the theoretical equations for this CMMF motor. It also presents the results of FEA and experiments conducted with the prototype motor to demonstrate the validity of the CMMF concept.

  5. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Sub-Scale Rocket Engine/Motor Design, Development & Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Seaford, Mark; Kovarik, Brian; Dufrene, Aaron; Solly, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    ATA-002 Technical Team has successfully designed, developed, tested and assessed the SLS Pathfinder propulsion systems for the Main Base Heating Test Program. Major Outcomes of the Pathfinder Test Program: Reach 90% of full-scale chamber pressure Achieved all engine/motor design parameter requirements Reach steady plume flow behavior in less than 35 msec Steady chamber pressure for 60 to 100 msec during engine/motor operation Similar model engine/motor performance to full-scale SLS system Mitigated nozzle throat and combustor thermal erosion Test data shows good agreement with numerical prediction codes Next phase of the ATA-002 Test Program Design & development of the SLS OML for the Main Base Heating Test Tweak BSRM design to optimize performance Tweak CS-REM design to increase robustness MSFC Aerosciences and CUBRC have the capability to develop sub-scale propulsion systems to meet desired performance requirements for short-duration testing.

  6. Designing π-stacked molecular structures to control heat transport through molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiršanskas, Gediminas; Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma C.; Flensberg, Karsten; Leijnse, Martin

    2014-12-08

    We propose and analyze a way of using π stacking to design molecular junctions that either enhance or suppress a phononic heat current, but at the same time remain conductors for an electric current. Such functionality is highly desirable in thermoelectric energy converters, as well as in other electronic components where heat dissipation should be minimized or maximized. We suggest a molecular design consisting of two masses coupled to each other with one mass coupled to each lead. By having a small coupling (spring constant) between the masses, it is possible to either reduce or perhaps more surprisingly enhance the phonon conductance. We investigate a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use first principle calculations to extract model parameters for a number of specific molecular realizations, confirming that our proposal can indeed be realized using standard molecular building blocks.

  7. Matching Analysis among Design Paremeters of Solid Motor with Fin Slots Grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenyong

    2002-01-01

    propulsion system because of the advantages such as: shorter overall length, larger burning surface area, nearly constant burning surface area over certain time periods, etc. The flame-spreading rates in the fin-slot regions are significantly lower than those of a typical circular bore region. Flame-spreading processes in fin-slot has the potential influence on the behavior of the overall ignition transient. many design limits. Flame-spreading processes in fin-slot is related to propellant property and structural dimension of fin slots. The setting up of initial chamber pressure has a relationship with the proportion of initial burning surface of slots, propellant burning rate and the igniter flow. Pressurization rates and ignition lag interval are restricted by propellant property, structural dimension of slots, and nozzle closure opening pressure. match relation among design limits of the test motor such as propellant burning rate, igniter flow, nozzle closure opening pressure and proportion of initial burning surface of slots is analysed by using the empirical formula and the calculation model of the ignition pressurization of solid motors with fin slots grain. The results show that propellant property, nozzle closure opening pressure and structural dimension of fin slots have an important effect on the ignition transients, and igniter flow has little effect on it. other different structural dimension of fin slots.

  8. Design of voice coil motor dynamic focusing unit for a laser scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Moon G.; Kim, Gaeun; Lee, Chan-Woo; Lee, Soo-Hun; Jeon, Yongho

    2014-04-15

    Laser scanning systems have been used for material processing tasks such as welding, cutting, marking, and drilling. However, applications have been limited by the small range of motion and slow speed of the focusing unit, which carries the focusing optics. To overcome these limitations, a dynamic focusing system with a long travel range and high speed is needed. In this study, a dynamic focusing unit for a laser scanning system with a voice coil motor (VCM) mechanism is proposed to enable fast speed and a wide focusing range. The VCM has finer precision and higher speed than conventional step motors and a longer travel range than earlier lead zirconium titanate actuators. The system has a hollow configuration to provide a laser beam path. This also makes it compact and transmission-free and gives it low inertia. The VCM's magnetics are modeled using a permeance model. Its design parameters are determined by optimization using the Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno method and a sequential quadratic programming algorithm. After the VCM is designed, the dynamic focusing unit is fabricated and assembled. The permeance model is verified by a magnetic finite element method simulation tool, Maxwell 2D and 3D, and by measurement data from a gauss meter. The performance is verified experimentally. The results show a resolution of 0.2 μm and travel range of 16 mm. These are better than those of conventional focusing systems; therefore, this focusing unit can be applied to laser scanning systems for good machining capability.

  9. Design of voice coil motor dynamic focusing unit for a laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon G; Kim, Gaeun; Lee, Chan-Woo; Lee, Soo-Hun; Jeon, Yongho

    2014-04-01

    Laser scanning systems have been used for material processing tasks such as welding, cutting, marking, and drilling. However, applications have been limited by the small range of motion and slow speed of the focusing unit, which carries the focusing optics. To overcome these limitations, a dynamic focusing system with a long travel range and high speed is needed. In this study, a dynamic focusing unit for a laser scanning system with a voice coil motor (VCM) mechanism is proposed to enable fast speed and a wide focusing range. The VCM has finer precision and higher speed than conventional step motors and a longer travel range than earlier lead zirconium titanate actuators. The system has a hollow configuration to provide a laser beam path. This also makes it compact and transmission-free and gives it low inertia. The VCM's magnetics are modeled using a permeance model. Its design parameters are determined by optimization using the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method and a sequential quadratic programming algorithm. After the VCM is designed, the dynamic focusing unit is fabricated and assembled. The permeance model is verified by a magnetic finite element method simulation tool, Maxwell 2D and 3D, and by measurement data from a gauss meter. The performance is verified experimentally. The results show a resolution of 0.2 μm and travel range of 16 mm. These are better than those of conventional focusing systems; therefore, this focusing unit can be applied to laser scanning systems for good machining capability. PMID:24784656

  10. Analysis and design of energy recovery snubbers for switched reluctance motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Gharpure, V.S.; Krishnan, R.; Lee, S.

    1994-12-31

    Snubber studies for switched reluctance motor (SRM) drives are nonexistent even though the power converter topologies are unique and do not fall under the category of inverter topologies applicable to AC motor drives. The importance of the snubbers does not come into the picture until either the power rating of the converter is high and in the multi-kW range or the switching frequency requirement is in the 20 kHz range. Such requirements are coming to the fore in many product development applications such as extruders, general purpose drives, integral starter generators for aircraft, electric vehicles, high speed spindles and centrifuges, etc. This paper is concerned with extending the Undeland snubber configuration to the two-switches per phase power converter topology of the SRM drive including the energy recovery feature. The energy recovery snubbers are then analyzed in terms of the various modes of operation encountered in the converter. A design procedure for the energy recovery snubbers is developed. The design procedure and the operation of the proposed snubber configuration in the SRM drive are experimentally verified with a laboratory prototype SRM drive. The impact of the proposed snubber on the power converter efficiency and its comparison with conventional snubber based systems, such as RCDs, is evaluated to assess the advantages of the proposed energy recovery snubber. 10 refs.

  11. Lattice enumeration for inverse molecular design using the signature descriptor.

    PubMed

    Martin, Shawn

    2012-07-23

    We describe an inverse quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) framework developed for the design of molecular structures with desired properties. This framework uses chemical fragments encoded with a molecular descriptor known as a signature. It solves a system of linear constrained Diophantine equations to reorganize the fragments into novel molecular structures. The method has been previously applied to problems in drug and materials design but has inherent computational limitations due to the necessity of solving the Diophantine constraints. We propose a new approach to overcome these limitations using the Fincke-Pohst algorithm for lattice enumeration. We benchmark the new approach against previous results on LFA-1/ICAM-1 inhibitory peptides, linear homopolymers, and hydrofluoroether foam blowing agents. Software implementing the new approach is available at www.cs.otago.ac.nz/homepages/smartin. PMID:22657105

  12. On the possibility to accelerate the thermal isomerizations of overcrowded alkene-based rotary molecular motors with electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents.

    PubMed

    Oruganti, Baswanth; Durbeej, Bo

    2016-09-01

    We employ computational methods to investigate the possibility of using electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents to reduce the free-energy barriers of the thermal isomerizations that limit the rotational frequencies achievable by synthetic overcrowded alkene-based molecular motors. Choosing as reference systems one of the fastest motors known to date and two variants thereof, we consider six new motors obtained by introducing electron-donating methoxy and dimethylamino or electron-withdrawing nitro and cyano substituents in conjugation with the central olefinic bond connecting the two (stator and rotator) motor halves. Performing density functional theory calculations, we then show that electron-donating (but not electron-withdrawing) groups at the stator are able to reduce the already small barriers of the reference motors by up to 18 kJ mol(-1). This result outlines a possible strategy for improving the rotational frequencies of motors of this kind. Furthermore, exploring the origin of the catalytic effect, it is found that electron-donating groups exert a favorable steric influence on the thermal isomerizations, which is not manifested by electron-withdrawing groups. This finding suggests a new mechanism for controlling the critical steric interactions of these motors. Graphical Abstract The introduction of electron-donating groups in one of the fastest rotary molecular motors known to date is found to reduce the free-energy barriers of the thermal steps that limit the rotational frequencies by up to 18 kJ mol(-1). PMID:27553304

  13. Novel tubular switched reluctance motor with double excitation windings: Design, modeling, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Li, Wei; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, I.-Ming

    2015-12-01

    The space utilization of linear switched reluctance machine is relatively low, which unavoidably constrains the improvement of system output performance. The objective of this paper is to propose a novel tubular linear switched reluctance motor with double excitation windings. The employment of double excitation helps to increase the electromagnetic force of the system. Furthermore, the installation of windings on both stator and mover can make the structure more compact and increase the system force density. The design concept and operating principle are presented. Following that, the major structure parameters of the system are determined. Subsequently, electromagnetic force and reluctance are formulated analytically based on equivalent magnetic circuits, and the result is validated with numerical computation. Then, a research prototype is developed, and experiments are conducted on the system output performance. It shows that the proposed design of electric linear machine can achieve higher thrust force compared with conventional linear switched reluctance machines.

  14. Novel tubular switched reluctance motor with double excitation windings: Design, modeling, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Li, Wei; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, I-Ming

    2015-12-01

    The space utilization of linear switched reluctance machine is relatively low, which unavoidably constrains the improvement of system output performance. The objective of this paper is to propose a novel tubular linear switched reluctance motor with double excitation windings. The employment of double excitation helps to increase the electromagnetic force of the system. Furthermore, the installation of windings on both stator and mover can make the structure more compact and increase the system force density. The design concept and operating principle are presented. Following that, the major structure parameters of the system are determined. Subsequently, electromagnetic force and reluctance are formulated analytically based on equivalent magnetic circuits, and the result is validated with numerical computation. Then, a research prototype is developed, and experiments are conducted on the system output performance. It shows that the proposed design of electric linear machine can achieve higher thrust force compared with conventional linear switched reluctance machines. PMID:26724063

  15. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Highway Systems Designation... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2348 National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. (a) On March 15, 1996 the Governor of Utah submitted a revised...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Highway Systems Designation... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2348 National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. (a) On March 15, 1996 the Governor of Utah submitted a revised...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Highway Systems Designation... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Utah § 52.2348 National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. (a) On March 15, 1996 the Governor of Utah submitted a revised...

  18. Forced desorption of semiflexible polymers, adsorbed and driven by molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Chaudhuri, Debasish

    2016-02-21

    We formulate and characterize a model to describe the dynamics of semiflexible polymers in the presence of activity due to motor proteins attached irreversibly to a substrate, and a transverse pulling force acting on one end of the filament. The stochastic binding-unbinding of the motor proteins and their ability to move along the polymer generate active forces. As the pulling force reaches a threshold value, the polymer eventually desorbs from the substrate. Performing underdamped Langevin dynamics simulation of the polymer, and with stochastic motor activity, we obtain desorption phase diagrams. The correlation time for fluctuations in the desorbed fraction increases as one approaches complete desorption, captured quantitatively by a power law spectral density. We present theoretical analysis of the phase diagram using mean field approximations in the weakly bending limit of the polymer and performing linear stability analysis. This predicts an increase in the desorption force with the polymer bending rigidity, active velocity and processivity of the motor proteins to capture the main features of the simulation results. PMID:26750537

  19. Phylogenetic information and experimental design in molecular systematics.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, N

    1998-01-01

    Despite the widespread perception that evolutionary inference from molecular sequences is a statistical problem, there has been very little attention paid to questions of experimental design. Previous consideration of this topic has led to little more than an empirical folklore regarding the choice of suitable genes for analysis, and to dispute over the best choice of taxa for inclusion in data sets. I introduce what I believe are new methods that permit the quantification of phylogenetic information in a sequence alignment. The methods use likelihood calculations based on Markov-process models of nucleotide substitution allied with phylogenetic trees, and allow a general approach to optimal experimental design. Two examples are given, illustrating realistic problems in experimental design in molecular phylogenetics and suggesting more general conclusions about the choice of genomic regions, sequence lengths and taxa for evolutionary studies. PMID:9787470

  20. Design and Applications of Bispecific Heterodimers: Molecular Imaging and beyond

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-based molecular imaging probes have been designed with high affinity and specificity for monitoring biological process and responses. Single-target recognition by traditional probes can limit their applicability for disease detection and therapy because synergistic action between disease mediators and different receptors is often involved in disease progression. Consequently, probes that can recognize multiple targets should demonstrate higher targeting efficacy and specificity than their monospecific peers. This concept has been validated by multiple bispecific heterodimer-based imaging probes that have demonstrated promising results in several animal models. This review summarizes the design strategies for bispecific peptide- and antibody-based heterodimers and their applications in molecular targeting and imaging. The design and application of bispecific heterodimer-conjugated nanomaterials are also discussed. PMID:24738564

  1. Engineering molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak

    2016-04-01

    Biological molecular motors use chemical energy, mostly in the form of ATP hydrolysis, and convert it to mechanical energy. Correlated thermal fluctuations are essential for the function of a molecular machine and it is the hydrolysis of ATP that modifies the correlated fluctuations of the system. Correlations are consequences of the molecular architecture of the protein. The idea that synthetic molecular machines may be constructed by designing the proper molecular architecture is challenging. In their paper, Sarkar et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043006) propose a synthetic molecular motor based on the coarse grained elastic network model of proteins and show by numerical simulations that motor function is realized, ranging from deterministic to thermal, depending on temperature. This work opens up a new range of possibilities of molecular architecture based engine design.

  2. Quasi-steady state reduction of molecular motor-based models of directed intermittent search.

    PubMed

    Newby, Jay M; Bressloff, Paul C

    2010-10-01

    We present a quasi-steady state reduction of a linear reaction-hyperbolic master equation describing the directed intermittent search for a hidden target by a motor-driven particle moving on a one-dimensional filament track. The particle is injected at one end of the track and randomly switches between stationary search phases and mobile nonsearch phases that are biased in the anterograde direction. There is a finite possibility that the particle fails to find the target due to an absorbing boundary at the other end of the track. Such a scenario is exemplified by the motor-driven transport of vesicular cargo to synaptic targets located on the axon or dendrites of a neuron. The reduced model is described by a scalar Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, which has an additional inhomogeneous decay term that takes into account absorption by the target. The FP equation is used to compute the probability of finding the hidden target (hitting probability) and the corresponding conditional mean first passage time (MFPT) in terms of the effective drift velocity V, diffusivity D, and target absorption rate λ of the random search. The quasi-steady state reduction determines V, D, and λ in terms of the various biophysical parameters of the underlying motor transport model. We first apply our analysis to a simple 3-state model and show that our quasi-steady state reduction yields results that are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the full system under physiologically reasonable conditions. We then consider a more complex multiple motor model of bidirectional transport, in which opposing motors compete in a "tug-of-war", and use this to explore how ATP concentration might regulate the delivery of cargo to synaptic targets. PMID:20169417

  3. Motor Starters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The power factor controller (PFC) was invented by a NASA engineer. It matches voltage with a motor's actual need by sensing shifts in the relationship between voltage and current flow. With the device, power can be trimmed as much as 65%. Intellinet adopted this technology and designed "soft start" and "load-responsive" control modes to start engines gradually and recycle voltage without reducing motor speed. Other features are lower motor heat and faster fault identification.

  4. Torque, chemistry and efficiency in molecular motors: a study of the rotary-chemical coupling in F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shayantani; Bora, Ram Prasad; Warshel, Arieh

    2015-11-01

    Detailed understanding of the action of biological molecular machines must overcome the challenge of gaining a clear knowledge of the corresponding free-energy landscape. An example for this is the elucidation of the nature of converting chemical energy to torque and work in the rotary molecular motor of F1-ATPase. A major part of the challenge involves understanding the rotary-chemical coupling from a non-phenomenological structure/energy description. Here we focused on using a coarse-grained model of F1-ATPase to generate a structure-based free-energy landscape of the rotary-chemical process of the whole system. In particular, we concentrated on exploring the possible impact of the position of the catalytic dwell on the efficiency and torque generation of the molecular machine. It was found that the experimentally observed torque can be reproduced with landscapes that have different positions for the catalytic dwell on the rotary-chemical surface. Thus, although the catalysis is undeniably required for torque generation, the experimentally observed position of the catalytic dwell at 80° might not have a clear advantage for the force generation by F1-ATPase. This further implies that the rotary-chemical couplings in these biological motors are quite robust and their efficiencies do not depend explicitly on the position of the catalytic dwells. Rather, the specific positioning of the dwells with respect to the rotational angle is a characteristic arising due to the structural construct of the molecular machine and might not bear any clear connection to the thermodynamic efficiency for the system. PMID:26537397

  5. Design, implementation and validation of a motorized wedge filter for a telecobalt machine (Bhabhatron-II).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kar, D C; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    A universal wedge filter of 15W × 20 cm(2) and 60° nominal wedge angle is designed and placed between the collimating jaws and penumbra trimmers inside the treatment head. A pneumatically driven actuating mechanism toggles the wedge between the wedge IN position and wedge OUT position. The effective wedge angles were determined using an analytical formula. An accumulated wedge profile at a depth of 10 cm which was measured using a 2D profiler and dose values at depths of 10 cm and 20 cm for the same experimental setup were used as input parameters in the formula used for determining effective wedge angles. The relationship between the wedge beam weight and effective wedge angle was established. The planned wedge angles were compared with the measured wedge angles and the differences are found to be less than 2° throughout the range of field sizes. Planned doses for various field sizes and wedge angles were measured for verification and the differences were found to be less than 1.8%. This study established that the relationship between the beam weights and effective wedge angles implemented for the motorized wedge filter of medical linacs is not directly applicable for the motorized wedge filter of Telecobalt. PMID:21486704

  6. Design and control of the phase current of a brushless dc motor to eliminate cogging torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, G. H.; Lee, C. J.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a design and control method of the phase current to reduce the torque ripple of a brushless dc (BLDC) motor by eliminating cogging torque. The cogging torque is the main source of torque ripple and consequently of speed error, and it is also the excitation source to generate the vibration and noise of a motor. This research proposes a modified current wave form, which is composed of main and auxiliary currents. The former is the conventional current to generate the commutating torque. The latter generates the torque with the same magnitude and opposite sign of the corresponding cogging torque at the given position in order to eliminate the cogging torque. Time-stepping finite element method simulation considering pulse-width-modulation switching method has been performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, and it shows that this proposed method reduces torque ripple by 36%. A digital-signal-processor-based controller is also developed to implement the proposed method, and it shows that this proposed method reduces the speed ripple significantly.

  7. Testing a structural model for viral DNA packaging motor function by optical tweezers measurements, site directed mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicholas A.; Migliori, Amy D.; Arya, Gaurav; Rao, Venigalla B.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2013-09-01

    Many double-stranded DNA viruses employ a molecular motor to package DNA into preformed capsid shells. Based on structures of phage T4 motor proteins determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, Rao, Rossmann and coworkers recently proposed a structural model for motor function. They proposed that DNA is ratcheted by a large conformational change driven by electrostatic interactions between charged residues at an interface between two globular domains of the motor protein. We have conducted experiments to test this model by studying the effect on packaging under applied load of site-directed changes altering these residues. We observe significant impairment of packaging activity including reductions in packaging rate, percent time packaging, and time active under high load. We show that these measured impairments correlate well with alterations in free energies associated with the conformational change predicted by molecular dynamics simulations.

  8. Design And Construction Of A Miniaturized Motor Controller For Interplanetary Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofgren, Henrik; Lijemark, Tomas; Lamoureux, Enrique; Bruhn, Fredrik; Hagstrom, Maria; Hall, Karin; Ljunggren, Anders; Habinc, Sandi; Gruener, Gabriel; Rusconi, Andrea; Boyes, Ben; Wagenbach, Susanne; Poulakis, Pantelis; Kohler, Johan

    2011-10-01

    ÅAC Microtec AB is leading an international consortium developing a Motion Control Chip (MCC) for the European Space Agency (ESA) under a TRP contract. The team consists of the prime ÅAC (Sweden), Aeroflex Gaisler (Sweden), Centre Suisse d'Electroniqueet de Microtechnique (CSEM, Switzerland), Selex Galileo Italy), Astrium (UK) and DLR Institute of Space Systems (Germany). In order to improve performance of rovers and robotic arms, one solution is to place the controller physically as close as possible to the motors. This reduces the harness and hence saves weight, decreases thermal leakage from the main system body and simplifies the final assembly. Nevertheless, with this approach the constraints on the electronics become more stringent: the assembly has to survive a very wide temperature range as well as vibrations and possibly dust, and at the same time it should be as small and light as possible. To cope with these design constraints, the Motion Control Chip (MCC) is based on stacked ceramic substrate technology in a Multi Chip Module (MCM), on which active components are assembled as bare dies. This approach was chosen in favor of special large ASIC development to reduce cost and make the design more flexible. By choosing a MCM solution, the design will allow both FPGA and ASICs to be used. FPGAs are used initially to lower the prototyping cost and later be replaced with ASICs as the packaging technology is qualified for the extreme environments of ISS, Mars and Moon. The manufacturing of the first iteration of miniaturized MCC modules is ongoing and initial functional tests have been executed. The results are currently being evaluated and when this is finalized the full test campaign including environmental tests will planned in detail. The tests are assumed to be finalized during the spring of 2011. Aeroflex Gaisler is the official ESA maintainer of the RTEMS port for the LEON3 processor and has been providing support to several developments. CSEM is

  9. Design of a linear synchronous motor with high temperature superconductor materials in the armature and in the field excitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, J. M.; Neves, M. V.; McCulloch, M. D.; Rodrigues, A. L.

    2006-06-01

    The high diamagnetism observed in high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials lead to applications involving levitation such as the linear synchronous motor (LSM). Certain features taken into account in conventional LSM design cannot be applied in the HTS case, due to these materials characteristics, such as BSCCO stiffness, when used as armature windings. Also other design features, e.g. slot skewing, which reduces the space harmonics of the air gap magnetic flux density, thus influencing motor performance, plays an important role in final cost. These and other aspects such as the thrust force or the effect of motor control through an inverter are examined in this paper, where the analytical and numerical methodologies involved in the design optimisation of a LSM demonstrator with premagnetised YBCO pellets in the field excitation system and BSCCO armature windings are described. Simulation results are also included.

  10. Why Do Fine Motor Skills Predict Mathematics? Construct Validity of the Design Copying Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murrah, William M.; Chen, Wei-Bing; Cameron, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent educational studies have found evidence that measures of fine motor skills are predictive of educational outcomes. However, the precise nature of fine motor skills has received little attention in these studies. With evidence mounting that fine motor skills are an important indicator of school readiness, investigating the nature of this…

  11. Driving modes for designing the cornering response of fully electric vehicles with multiple motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Leonardo; Sorniotti, Aldo; Gruber, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Fully electric vehicles with multiple drivetrains allow a significant variation of the steady-state and transient cornering responses through the individual control of the electric motor drives. As a consequence, alternative driving modes can be created that provide the driver the option to select the preferred dynamic vehicle behavior. This article presents a torque-vectoring control structure based on the combination of feedforward and feedback contributions for the continuous control of vehicle yaw rate. The controller is specifically developed to be easily implementable on real-world vehicles. A novel model-based procedure for the definition of the control objectives is described in detail, together with the automated tuning process of the algorithm. The implemented control functions are demonstrated with experimental vehicle tests. The results show the possibilities of torque-vectoring control in designing the vehicle understeer characteristic.

  12. Coupling mechanical forces to electrical signaling: molecular motors and the intracellular transport of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-04-01

    Proper localization of various ion channels is fundamental to neuronal functions, including postsynaptic potential plasticity, dendritic integration, action potential initiation and propagation, and neurotransmitter release. Microtubule-based forward transport mediated by kinesin motors plays a key role in placing ion channel proteins to correct subcellular compartments. PDZ- and coiled-coil-domain proteins function as adaptor proteins linking ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors to various kinesin motors, respectively. Recent studies show that several voltage-gated ion channel/transporter proteins directly bind to kinesins during forward transport. Three major regulatory mechanisms underlying intracellular transport of ion channels are also revealed. These studies contribute to understanding how mechanical forces are coupled to electrical signaling and illuminating pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22910031

  13. Molecular classification of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by unsupervised clustering of gene expression in motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Aronica, Eleonora; Baas, Frank; Iyer, Anand; ten Asbroek, Anneloor L M A; Morello, Giovanna; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2015-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease, caused by the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Although 10% of ALS cases are familial (FALS), the majority are sporadic (SALS) and probably associated to a multifactorial etiology. Currently there is no cure or prevention for ALS. A prerequisite to formulating therapeutic strategies is gaining understanding of its etio-pathogenic mechanisms. In this study we analyzed whole-genome expression profiles of 41 motor cortex samples of control (10) and sporadic ALS (31) patients. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was able to separate control from SALS patients. In addition, SALS patients were subdivided in two different groups that were associated to different deregulated pathways and genes, some of which were previously associated to familiar ALS. These experiments are the first to highlight the genomic heterogeneity of sporadic ALS and reveal new clues to its pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25500340

  14. Coupling Mechanical Forces to Electrical Signaling: Molecular Motors and the Intracellular Transport of Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Proper localization of various ion channels is fundamental to neuronal functions, including postsynaptic potential plasticity, dendritic integration, action potential initiation and propagation, and neurotransmitter release. Microtubule-based forward transport mediated by kinesin motors plays a key role in placing ion channel proteins to correct subcellular compartments. PDZ- and coiled-coil-domain proteins function as adaptor proteins linking ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors to various kinesin motors, respectively. Recent studies show that several voltage-gated ion channel/transporter proteins directly bind to kinesins during forward transport. Three major regulatory mechanisms underlying intracellular transport of ion channels are also revealed. These studies contribute to understanding how mechanical forces are coupled to electrical signaling and illuminating pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22910031

  15. Virtual Screening and Molecular Design Based on Hierarchical Qsar Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, Victor E.; Artemenko, A. G.; Muratov, Eugene N.; Polischuk, P. G.; Ognichenko, L. N.; Liahovsky, A. V.; Hromov, A. I.; Varlamova, E. V.

    This chapter is devoted to the hierarchical QSAR technology (HiT QSAR) based on simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) and its application to different QSAR/QSPR tasks. The essence of this technology is a sequential solution (with the use of the information obtained on the previous steps) of the QSAR paradigm by a series of enhanced models based on molecular structure description (in a specific order from 1D to 4D). Actually, it's a system of permanently improved solutions. Different approaches for domain applicability estimation are implemented in HiT QSAR. In the SiRMS approach every molecule is represented as a system of different simplexes (tetratomic fragments with fixed composition, structure, chirality, and symmetry). The level of simplex descriptors detailed increases consecutively from the 1D to 4D representation of the molecular structure. The advantages of the approach presented are an ability to solve QSAR/QSPR tasks for mixtures of compounds, the absence of the "molecular alignment" problem, consideration of different physical-chemical properties of atoms (e.g., charge, lipophilicity), and the high adequacy and good interpretability of obtained models and clear ways for molecular design. The efficiency of HiT QSAR was demonstrated by its comparison with the most popular modern QSAR approaches on two representative examination sets. The examples of successful application of the HiT QSAR for various QSAR/QSPR investigations on the different levels (1D-4D) of the molecular structure description are also highlighted. The reliability of developed QSAR models as the predictive virtual screening tools and their ability to serve as the basis of directed drug design was validated by subsequent synthetic, biological, etc. experiments. The HiT QSAR is realized as the suite of computer programs termed the "HiT QSAR" software that so includes powerful statistical capabilities and a number of useful utilities.

  16. Nanofabrication and Detection of Molecular Shuttles powered by Kinesin Motor Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Daniel; Domyoung, Kim; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Teizer, Winfried

    2011-03-01

    The intracellular cargo delivery performed by kinesin motor proteins can be biomimetically employed to engineer tailor-made artificial nanotransport systems. Kinesin (expressed on an Escherichia coli system) and microtubules (obtained from the polymerization of tubulin proteins) were prepared and characterized. We report recent results and explore the aim of the construction of Nanoelectromechanical Systems and their potential applications, e.g. as drug delivery systems. This work was supported by the WPI Program.

  17. Streptococcal M protein: molecular design and biological behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Fischetti, V A

    1989-01-01

    M protein is a major virulence determinant for the group A streptococcus by virtue of its ability to allow the organism to resist phagocytosis. Common in eucaryotes, the fibrillar coiled-coil design for the M molecule may prove to be a common motif for surface proteins in gram-positive organisms. This type of structure offers the organism several distinct advantages, ranging from antigenic variation to multiple functional domains. The close resemblance of this molecular design to that of certain mammalian proteins could help explain on a molecular level the formation of epitopes responsible for serological cross-reactions between microbial and mammalian proteins. Many of the approaches described in the elucidation of the M-protein structure may be applied for characterizing similar molecules in other microbial systems. Images PMID:2670192

  18. PM Motor Parametric Design Analyses for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Application: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2004-08-11

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Vehicle Technologies has a strong interest in making rapid progress in permanent magnet (PM) machine development. The program is directing various technology development projects that will advance the technology and lead to request for proposals (RFP) for manufacturer prototypes. This aggressive approach is possible because the technology is clearly within reach and the approach is deemed essential, based on strong market demand, escalating fuel prices, and competitive considerations. In response, this study began parallel development paths that included a literature search/review, development and utilization of multiple parametric models to determine the effects of design parameters, verification of the modeling methodology, development of an interior PM (IPM) machine baseline design, development of alternative machine baseline designs, and cost analyses for several candidate machines. This interim progress report summarizes the results of these activities as of June 2004. This report provides background and summary information for recent machine parametric studies and testing programs that demonstrate both the potential capabilities and technical limitations of brushless PM machines (axial gap and radial gap), the IPM machine, the surface-mount PM machines (interior or exterior rotor), induction machines, and switched reluctance machines. The FreedomCAR program, while acknowledging the progress made by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Delphi, Delco-Remy International, and others in these programs, has redirected efforts toward a ''short path'' to a marketable and competitive PM motor for hybrid electric vehicle traction applications. The program has developed a set of performance targets for the type of traction machine desired. The short-path approach entails a comprehensive design effort focusing on the IPM machine and meeting the performance targets. The selection of the

  19. Designing Molecular Printboards: A Photolithographic Platform for Recodable Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Abt, Doris; Schmidt, Bernhard V K J; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Quick, Alexander S; Danilov, Denis; Kostina, Nina Yu; Bruns, Michael; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Wegener, Martin; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-09-14

    A light induced strategy for the design of β-cyclodextrin (CD) based supramolecular devices is introduced, presenting a novel tool to fabricate multifunctional biointerfaces. Precision photolithography of a modified β-CD was established on a light sensitive tetrazole surface immobilized on a bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) anchor layer via various shadow masks, as well as via direct laser writing (DLW), in order to craft any desired printboard design. Interfacial molecular recognition provided by light generated cavitate domains was demonstrated via spatially resolved encoding, erasing, and recoding of distinct supramolecular guest patterns. Thus, the light directed shaping of receptor monolayers introduces a powerful path to control supramolecular assemblies on various surfaces. PMID:26235994

  20. The effects of various magnetic materials on lamination design for stator-rotor diecasting of induction motors for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elkasabgy, N.M.; Di Pietro, C.

    1994-05-15

    In this paper the authors describe a novel technique to model induction motors with a diecast stator and rotor and to examine the effects of various magnetic materials on the electrical performance of the motor. For electric vehicle applications, a high volume production operation of the electric motor requires the motor to be small and inexpensive. The expensive labor and material used to manufacture the motor encouraged the researchers to find new methods and techniques to reduce the cost and improve the performance. Diecast rotor and stator windings reduce motor cost and size. For diecasting induction motors, the motor laminations should be designed to optimize the electromagnetic field distribution over the cross section and along the axial direction. The magnetic material used for the laminations should also reduce losses and improve the overall efficiency. A 100 hp four-pole induction motor was modeled with finite elements, and the field distribution, the magnetic flux density, and the mechanical performance of the motor were computed using nonlinear magnetostatic and complex steady-state eddy current techniques. The difference in the electrical and mechanical performance of the motor were evaluated for copper and aluminum diecasting. The results show that copper diecasting of the rotor and the stator of the induction motor with magnetic material properties and identified slotting shape is the way to achieve better motor performance and low cost operation. 5 refs.

  1. Ensemble velocity of non-processive molecular motors with multiple chemical states

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    We study the ensemble velocity of non-processive motor proteins, described with multiple chemical states. In particular, we discuss the velocity as a function of ATP concentration. Even a simple model which neglects the strain dependence of transition rates, reverse transition rates and nonlinearities in the elasticity can show interesting functional dependencies, which deviate significantly from the frequently assumed Michaelis–Menten form. We discuss how the order of events in the duty cycle can be inferred from the measured dependence. The model also predicts the possibility of velocity reversal at a certain ATP concentration if the duty cycle contains several conformational changes of opposite directionalities. PMID:25485083

  2. The design and experiment of a novel ultrasonic motor based on the combination of bending modes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jipeng; Liu, Yingxiang; Liu, Junkao; Xu, Dongmei; Chen, Weishan

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new-type linear ultrasonic motor which takes advantage of the combination of two orthogonal bending vibration modes. The proposed ultrasonic motor consists of eight pieces of PZT ceramic plates and a metal beam that includes two cone-shaped horns and a cylindrical driving foot. The finite element analyses were finished to verify the working principle of the proposed motor. The mode shapes of the motor were obtained by modal analysis; the elliptical trajectories of nodes on the driving foot were obtained by time-domain analysis. Based on the analyses, a prototype of the proposed motor was fabricated and measured. The mechanical output characteristics were obtained by experiments. The maximal velocity of the proposed motor is 735mm/s and the maximal thrust is 1.1N. PMID:27400216

  3. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.524...

  4. 46 CFR 11.524 - Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service requirements for designated duty engineer of steam and/or motor vessels. 11.524 Section 11.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.524...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. 52.2348 Section 52.2348 Protection of... and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. (a) On March 15, 1996 the Governor of Utah submitted a revised...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2348 - National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Highway Systems Designation Act Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. 52.2348 Section 52.2348 Protection of... and Maintenance (I/M) Programs. (a) On March 15, 1996 the Governor of Utah submitted a revised...

  7. Intensification of the Learning Process: Gross Motor Performance Scale. A Series of Reports Designed for Classroom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucks County Public Schools, Doylestown, PA.

    The Gross Motor Performance Screening Test was designed to aid the classroom teacher in obtaining specific information about the child's physical abilities. The test includes items which have been found to measure the various factors of physical fitness. It also includes items to measure skills important to the child and adult. Included also are…

  8. Improved Design of Motors for Increased Efficiency in Residential Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Pragasen Pillay

    2008-12-31

    non-sinusoidal excitations. A permanent magnet synchronous motor has been designed with the use of the engineering formula with Flux2D. There was acceptable agreement between predictions and measurements. This was further tested on an induction motor with toroid results.

  9. Molecular design concept for x-ray laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Boyer, K.

    1992-12-10

    The goal of this program is the construction of an x-ray laser in the kilovolt regime. Recent experimental results indicate that a new technique for the generation of strong amplification of x-ray wavelengths is feasible. It involves the combination of (1) a new ultrahigh brightness subpicosecond laser technology and (2) a recently discovered unique mode of strong-field interaction, particularly applicable to molecules. A concept of molecular x-ray design emerges from the considerations which matches the mode of excitation to the structure of the molecular system. The molecular approach enables the combination of very highly electronically excited conditions with an environment characteristic of dense cold matter, a general situation exceptionally conducive to x-ray amplification. Both high efficiency and wavelength tunability are intrinsic features of this method. Recent results discussed in this report are revealing important characteristics of the molecular strong-field coupling pertinent to this goal. A continued program of research is proposed to evaluate this method for the production of x-ray amplification in the kilovolt region.

  10. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry based Molecular Histology of Human Spinal Cord Tissue and Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Malmberg, Per; Lindberg, Olle R.; Fletcher, John S.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is a powerful method for imaging biological samples with high spatial resolution. Whole section ToF SIMS scans and multivariate data analysis have been performed on human spinal cord in order to delineate anatomical regions of interest based on their chemical distribution pattern. ToF SIMS analysis of thoracic spinal cord sections was performed at 5µm resolution within 2 hours. Multivariate image analysis by means of principal component analysis and maximum auto correlation factor analysis resulted in detection of more than 400 m/z peaks that were found to be significantly changed. Here, the results show characteristic biochemical distributions that are well in line with major histological regions, including grey and white matter. As an approach for iterative segmentation, we further evaluated previously outlined regions of interest as identified by multivariate image analysis. Here, further discrimination of the grey matter into ventral, lateral and dorsal neuroanatomical regions was observed. TOF SIMS imaging has been carried out at submicron resolution obtaining localization and characterization of spinal motor neurons based on their chemical fingerprint, including neurotransmitter precursors that serve as molecular indicators for motor neuron integrity. Thus, TOF SIMS can be used as an approach for chemical histology and pathology. SIMS holds immense potential for investigating the subcellular mechanisms underlying spinal cord related diseases including chronic pain and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:23947367

  11. Molecular design and screening of energetic nitramine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Devi, Alka; Deswal, Sonal; Dharavath, Srinivas; Ghule, Vikas D

    2015-11-01

    Six nitramines (N1-6) were designed with all possible arrangements of N-NO2 groups on a cyclic skeleton and structural optimization was performed using the density functional theory (DFT). We observed that all nitramines have high positive heats of formation proportionate to the number of N-NO2 groups in their molecular structure. Among the designed nitramines, N5 and N6 have crystal densities of 1.77 and 1.81 g cm(-3), respectively, which lead to reasonable respective detonation velocities (D = 8.70 and 9.07 km s(-1)) and detonation pressures (P = 33.23 and 36.57 GPa) comparable to those of RDX. To understand the relationship between sensitivity and molecular structure, bond dissociation energies, impact sensitivities (h 50), free space in crystal lattice, imbalance between the positive and negative surface potentials and heats of detonation (Q) were investigated. The comparable performance of N5 and N6 with RDX highlights the potential application of these nitramine derivatives as high energy materials and also supports the advantage of N-N bonds in the backbone and substitution of N-NO2 groups. Graphical Abstract Electrostatic potential on the 0.001 electron/bohr(3) molecular surface of N6. PMID:26518690

  12. Accelerated test methods for predicting the life of motor materials exposed to refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Phase 1, Conceptual design: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II; Ferguson, A.

    1993-08-18

    The federally mandated phase-out of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants requires screening tests for motor materials compatibility with alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. In the current phase of the program, ARTI is supporting tests of promising candidate refrigeration/lubricant systems in key refrigeration component systems such as bearings and hermetic motor insulation systems to screen for more subtle detrimental effects and allow estimates of motor-compressor life. This report covers: mechanisms of failure of hermetic motor insulation, current methods for estimation of life of hermetic motors, and conceptual design of improved stator simulator device for testing of alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures.

  13. Development of an assistive motorized hip orthosis: kinematics analysis and mechanical design.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jeremy; Bouri, Mohamed; Ortlieb, Amalric; Bleuler, Hannes; Clavel, Reymond

    2013-06-01

    With the increase of life expectancy, a higher number of elderly need assistance to maintain their mobility and their independance. The hip joint is crucial for walking and is problematic for a large number of aged people. In this paper we present a novel design of a motorized hip orthosis to assist elderly people while walking, stair climbing and during the sit-to-stand transistions. The kinematics was developed based on biomechanics considerations. To be able to achieve a large assistance rate, velocity and torques of the hip joint were studied from the literature. In order to fit with these requirements, an amplification mechanism inspired by excavators was developed and implemented. Comfort considerations were also taken into account and a custom interface was designed with the collaboration of a professional orthopaedic technician. First tests with the prototype showed that the workspace is sufficient for walking, for stair climbing as well as for sit-to-stand transitions. The assistance rate can go up to 30% for a 70 kg subject during walking at a cadence of 100 steps/min. The comfort is guaranteed despite the important weight (4.3 kg) of this first prototype. PMID:24187310

  14. Dual-Position-Controller Design for the Linear-Motor-Driven Motion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Yong; Horng, Rong-Hwang; Shih, Yi-Ti; Lee, An-Chen

    This work develops a dual-controller composed of a macroscopic controller (MAC) and a microscopic controller (MIC) for improving motion precision of a linear-motor-driven motion system. Based on the macroscopic model in which Coulomb friction model is considered, the MAC is designed. In the presliding region however, the MIC design is based on the lineralized microscopic model. Furthermore, a switching algorithm is developed for bumpless transfer in shifting control action between two controllers. Thus, when the table of motion stage moves to the desired position, the control action can be smoothly switched from the MAC to the MIC. The whole system with the proposed dual-controller has the advantage that it serves as a long stroke (coarse stage) and a short stroke (fine stage) to achieve high precision motion control. The experimental results reveal that it totally takes 2.59 seconds to reach the 1000μm target position with the accuracy of one BLU (basic length unit; sensor resolution), 20nm the result has over 29% improvement when compared with the result using single MAC. In addition, good nanometer-scale tracking performance with the accuracy of one BLU, 20nm, can be obtained by using the MIC.

  15. Design of a novel phase-decoupling permanent magnet brushless ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei; Chau, K. T.; Jiang, J. Z.; Fan, Ying

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents a phase-decoupling permanent magnet brushless ac motor which can offer better controllability, faster response, and smoother torque than its counterparts. The key is due to its different motor configuration and simple scalar control. The motor configuration is so unique that it inherently offers the features of phase decoupling, flux focusing, and flux shaping, hence achieving independent phase control, fast response, and smooth torque. The scalar control is fundamentally different from the complicated vector control. It can achieve direct torque control through independent control of the phase currents. The proposed motor is prototyped and experimentally verified.

  16. PM Motor Parametric Design Analyses for a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Application

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2004-10-11

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Vehicle Technologies office has a strong interest in making rapid progress in permanent magnet (PM) machine development. The DOE FreedomCAR program is directing various technology development projects that will advance the technology and hopefully lead to a near-term request for proposals (RFP) for a to-be-determined level of initial production. This aggressive approach is possible because the technology is clearly within reach and the approach is deemed essential, based on strong market demand, escalating fuel prices, and competitive considerations. In response, this study began parallel development paths that included a literature search/review, development and utilization of multiple parametric models, verification of the modeling methodology, development of an interior PM (IPM) machine baseline design, development of alternative machine baseline designs, and cost analyses for several candidate machines. This report summarizes the results of these activities as of September 2004. This report provides background and summary information for recent machine parametric studies and testing programs that demonstrate both the potential capabilities and technical limitations of brushless PM machines (axial gap and radial gap), the IPM machine, the surface-mount PM machines (interior or exterior rotor), induction machines, and switched-reluctance machines. The FreedomCAR program, while acknowledging the progress made by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Delphi, Delco-Remy International, and others in these programs, has redirected efforts toward a ''short path'' to a marketable and competitive PM motor for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) traction applications. The program has developed a set of performance targets for the type of traction machine desired. The short-path approach entails a comprehensive design effort focusing on the IPM machine and meeting the performance targets

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Drug Design Using a Molecular Hybridization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Melo, Thais Regina Ferreira; Vizioli, Ednir Oliveira; dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Chung, Man Chin

    2011-01-01

    The design of new drugs with better physiochemical properties, adequate absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, effective pharmacologic potency and lacking toxicity remains is a challenge. Inflammation is the initial trigger of several different diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, cancer; and disorders such as obesity and sexual dysfunction. Although inflammation is not the direct cause of these disorders, inflammatory processes often increase related pain and suffering. New anti-inflammatory drugs developed using molecular hybridization techniques to obtain multiple-ligand drugs can act at one or multiple targets, allowing for synergic action and minimizing toxicity. This work is a review of new anti-inflammatory drugs developed using the molecular modification approach.

  18. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25108281

  19. Design of the automatic motor Ke measurement system using the system on programming chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Sheng-Chan; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Liu, Yen-Chih; An, Nia-Chun; Tsai, Hsiu-An

    2013-01-01

    The induced electromotive force of traditional motor measurement usually uses another motor to connect the tested motor with the drive shaft to measure its speed and obtain Ke value of induced electromotive force of the tested motor. If the tested motor is not suitable for connection to the connect coupling because of the shape or volume of the rotor, it is difficult to measure the Ke values of the tested motor. So some scholars have proposed two-phase motor which drives the three-phase motor, and gain the measurement method of Ke from the third phase in a few years ago. The mainly way is using the digital logic circuits to redefine the truth table by entering the signals to the motor driver chip from the three Hall sensors. So it can still maintain a positive torque above 0 even if used the two-phase driver and the motor can be rotated by the two-phase driver. But the drawback is that it can only be measured the fixed Ke value at the same phase. And it has to redefine the truth table to measure the values of the other two phase. This paper provides a new measurement method that made the motor speed accelerate to the measured speed at the beginning and measuring the value of third phases while the rotation is maintained by the other two-phase. The advantage is that it can change the phase of measurement, so it can easily measure the Ke value. And the most of digital components which including processor, keyboard decoder and frequency counter etc can be achieved in FPGA by using SOPC method. It can significantly reduce the complexity of circuit and increase system reliability degree.

  20. Length regulation of microtubules by molecular motors: exact solution and density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Chikashi; Lück, Alexander; Santen, Ludger

    2015-06-01

    In this work we study a microtubule (MT) model, whose length is regulated by the action of processive kinesin motors. We treat the case of infinite processivity, i.e. particle exchange in the bulk is neglected. The exact results can be obtained for model parameters which correspond to a finite length of the MT. In contrast to the model with particle exchange we find that the lengths of the MT are exponentially distributed in this parameter regime. The remaining parameter space of the model, which corresponds to diverging MT lengths, is analyzed by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations and a macroscopic approach. For divergent MTs we find a complex structure of the phase diagram in terms of shapes of the density profile.

  1. Design and characterization of a microelectromechanical system electro-thermal linear motor with interlock mechanism for micro manipulators.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tengjiang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Xiuyuan; Zhao, You; Bai, Yingwei

    2016-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a novel electro-thermal linear motor for micro manipulators is presented in this paper. The V-shape electro-thermal actuator arrays, micro lever, micro spring, and slider are introduced. In moving operation, the linear motor can move nearly 1 mm displacement with 100 μm each step while keeping the applied voltage as low as 17 V. In holding operation, the motor can stay in one particular position without consuming energy and no creep deformation is found. Actuation force of 12.7 mN indicates the high force generation capability of the device. Experiments of lifetime show that the device can wear over two million cycles of operation. A silicon-on-insulator wafer is introduced to fabricate a high aspect ratio structure and the chip size is 8.5 mm × 8.5 mm × 0.5 mm. PMID:27036807

  2. Design and characterization of a microelectromechanical system electro-thermal linear motor with interlock mechanism for micro manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tengjiang; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Xiuyuan; Zhao, You; Bai, Yingwei

    2016-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a novel electro-thermal linear motor for micro manipulators is presented in this paper. The V-shape electro-thermal actuator arrays, micro lever, micro spring, and slider are introduced. In moving operation, the linear motor can move nearly 1 mm displacement with 100 μm each step while keeping the applied voltage as low as 17 V. In holding operation, the motor can stay in one particular position without consuming energy and no creep deformation is found. Actuation force of 12.7 mN indicates the high force generation capability of the device. Experiments of lifetime show that the device can wear over two million cycles of operation. A silicon-on-insulator wafer is introduced to fabricate a high aspect ratio structure and the chip size is 8.5 mm × 8.5 mm × 0.5 mm.

  3. Design of a spoke-type permanent-magnet motor with optimal winding configuration for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Guohai; Gong, Wensheng; Qu, Li; Zhao, Wenxiang; Shen, Yue

    2012-04-01

    The spoke-type motor has higher torque density than the conventional one resulting from its structure for concentrating flux from permanent magnets (PMs). However, this motor suffers from the serious distortion of back electromotive force (EMF). This paper proposes a cost-effective approach to design a spoke-type motor with lower harmonics of back-EMF for electric vehicle. The key is to superimpose the coil-EMF of one phase in such a way that the harmonics of the phase-EMF can be canceled, resulting in essentially sinusoidal waveforms. By using finite element method (FEM), an optimal coil-EMF vectors distribution for minimum harmonics of the phase-EMF is obtained and verified. In addition, the co-simulation technology is adopted to verify that the torque ripple under the optimal winding configuration can be significantly suppressed.

  4. An introduction to the design and fabrication progress of a megawatt class 2G HTS motor for the ship propulsion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Heejong; Kim, Yeong-Chun; Park, Heui-Joo; Yu, In-Keun; Park, Minwon

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the design and fabrication progress of a megawatt class 2G high temperature superconductor (HTS) motor for the ship propulsion application at Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction. The purpose of this 2G HTS propulsion motor is to launch the business area for marine applications such as surface ship, submarine, merchant ship etc. The principles and interpretation of the magnetic field for 2G HTS motor and permanent magnet type motors are similar on the basis of 3D design and production. The most important component of an HTS motor is the rotor, which is composed of HTS coil, non-ferrous metal, torque disk, damper, and hollow shaft. A HTS rotor using hastelloy-based 2G HTS coils was designed and built. Open-circuit and short-circuit characteristics of the superconducting motor were investigated and compared with the analysis results at reduced excitation to verify the design. Preliminary testing of a 2G HTS motor has been conducted at a few hundred kilowatts as per the design. Through these results, we anticipate that most of the design criteria can be satisfied. However, we have faced several issues during the testing of the motor and these issues need to be resolved in order to take the design further.

  5. Molecular design for growth of supramolecular membranes with hierarchical structure.

    PubMed

    Zha, R Helen; Velichko, Yuri S; Bitton, Ronit; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-02-01

    Membranes with hierarchical structure exist in biological systems, and bio-inspired building blocks have been used to grow synthetic analogues in the laboratory through self-assembly. The formation of these synthetic membranes is initiated at the interface of two aqueous solutions, one containing cationic peptide amphiphiles (PA) and the other containing the anionic biopolymer hyaluronic acid (HA). The membrane growth process starts within milliseconds of interface formation and continues over much longer timescales to generate robust membranes with supramolecular PA-HA nanofibers oriented orthogonal to the interface. Computer simulation indicates that formation of these hierarchically structured membranes requires strong interactions between molecular components at early time points in order to generate a diffusion barrier between both solutions. Experimental studies using structurally designed PAs confirm simulation results by showing that only PAs with high ζ potential are able to yield hierarchically structured membranes. Furthermore, the chemical structure of such PAs must incorporate residues that form β-sheets, which facilitates self-assembly of long nanofibers. In contrast, PAs that form low aspect ratio nanostructures interact weakly with HA and yield membranes that exhibit non-fibrous fingering protrusions. Furthermore, experimental results show that increasing HA molecular weight decreases the growth rate of orthogonal nanofibers. This result is supported by simulation results suggesting that the thickness of the interfacial contact layer generated immediately after initiation of self-assembly increases with polymer molecular weight. PMID:26649980

  6. A machine learning approach to computer-aided molecular design.

    PubMed

    Bolis, G; Di Pace, L; Fabrocini, F

    1991-12-01

    Preliminary results of a machine learning application concerning computer-aided molecular design applied to drug discovery are presented. The artificial intelligence techniques of machine learning use a sample of active and inactive compounds, which is viewed as a set of positive and negative examples, to allow the induction of a molecular model characterizing the interaction between the compounds and a target molecule. The algorithm is based on a twofold phase. In the first one--the specialization step--the program identifies a number of active/inactive pairs of compounds which appear to be the most useful in order to make the learning process as effective as possible and generates a dictionary of molecular fragments, deemed to be responsible for the activity of the compounds. In the second phase--the generalization step--the fragments thus generated are combined and generalized in order to select the most plausible hypothesis with respect to the sample of compounds. A knowledge base concerning physical and chemical properties is utilized during the inductive process. PMID:1818094

  7. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    PubMed Central

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure–property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials. PMID:26323335

  8. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials. PMID:26323335

  9. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-09-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials.

  10. Design and function of molecular and bioelectronics devices.

    PubMed

    Krstic, Predrag; Forzani, Erica; Tao, Nongjian; Korkin, Anatoli

    2007-10-24

    Further rapid progress of electronics, in particular the increase of computer power and breakthroughs in sensor technology for industrial, medical diagnostics and environmental applications, strongly depends on the scaling of electronic devices, ultimately to the size of molecules. Design of controllable molecular-scale devices may resolve the problem of energy dissipation at the nanoscale and take advantage of molecular self-assembly in the so-called bottom-up approach. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of molecular-scale devices that are relevant to future electronics and sensor technology. Papers contained in this special issue are selected from the symposium Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics: From Atoms to Materials to Devices to System Architecture (12-16 March, 2007, Phoenix, Arizona, USA), as well as from original and novel scientific contributions of invited world-renown researchers. It addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements in the fields of molecular and bioelectronics, chemical and biosensors at the molecular level, including carbon nanotubes, novel nanostructures, as well as related research areas and industrial applications. The conference series Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics was launched as a truly interdisciplinary forum to bridge scientists and engineers to work across boundaries in the design of future information technologies, from atoms to materials to devices to system architecture. Following the first two successful meetings in Moscow, Russia (NGCM2002) and Krakow, Poland (NGCM2004), the third Nano and Giga Forum (NGC2007) was held in 2007 hosted by Arizona State University. Besides this special issue of Nanotechnology, two other collections (in the journal Solid State Electronics and the tutorial book in the series Nanostructure Science and Technology Springer) have published additional selected and invited papers

  11. EDITORIAL: Design and function of molecular and bioelectronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag; Forzani, Erica; Tao, Nongjian; Korkin, Anatoli

    2007-10-01

    Further rapid progress of electronics, in particular the increase of computer power and breakthroughs in sensor technology for industrial, medical diagnostics and environmental applications, strongly depends on the scaling of electronic devices, ultimately to the size of molecules. Design of controllable molecular-scale devices may resolve the problem of energy dissipation at the nanoscale and take advantage of molecular self-assembly in the so-called bottom-up approach. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of molecular-scale devices that are relevant to future electronics and sensor technology. Papers contained in this special issue are selected from the symposium Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics: From Atoms to Materials to Devices to System Architecture (12-16 March, 2007, Phoenix, Arizona, USA), as well as from original and novel scientific contributions of invited world-renown researchers. It addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements in the fields of molecular and bioelectronics, chemical and biosensors at the molecular level, including carbon nanotubes, novel nanostructures, as well as related research areas and industrial applications. The conference series Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics was launched as a truly interdisciplinary forum to bridge scientists and engineers to work across boundaries in the design of future information technologies, from atoms to materials to devices to system architecture. Following the first two successful meetings in Moscow, Russia (NGCM2002) and Krakow, Poland (NGCM2004), the third Nano and Giga Forum (NGC2007) was held in 2007 hosted by Arizona State University. Besides this special issue of Nanotechnology, two other collections (in the journal Solid State Electronics and the tutorial book in the series Nanostructure Science and Technology Springer) have published additional selected and invited papers

  12. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  13. An investigation of motor learning during side-step cutting, design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Of all athletic knee injuries an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture results in the longest time loss from sport. Regardless of the therapy chosen, conservative or reconstructive, athletes are often forced to reduce their level of physical activity and their involvement in sport. Moreover, a recent review reported prevalences of osteoarthritis ranging from 0% to 13% for patients with isolated ACL-deficient (ACL-D) knees and respectively 21% to 48% in patients with combined injuries. The need for ACL injury prevention is clear. The identification of risk factors and the development of prevention strategies may therefore have widespread health and economic implications. The focus of this investigation is to assess the role of implicit and explicit motor learning in optimising the performance of a side-step-cutting task. Methods/design A randomized controlled laboratory study will be conducted. Healthy basketball players, females and males, 18 years and older, with no previous lower extremity injuries, playing at the highest recreational level will be included. Subjects will receive a dynamic feedback intervention. Kinematic and kinetic data of the hip, knee and ankle and EMG activity of the quadriceps, hamstrings and gastrocnemius will be recorded. Discussion Female athletes have a significantly higher risk of sustaining an ACL injury than male athletes. Poor biomechanical and neuromuscular control of the lower limb is suggested to be a primary risk factor of an ACL injury mechanism in females. This randomized controlled trial has been designed to investigate whether individual feedback on task performance appears to be an effective intervention method. Results and principles found in this study will be applied to future ACL injury prevention programs, which should maybe more focus on individual injury predisposition. Trial registration Trial registration number NTR2250. PMID:20942920

  14. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Progress report, [July 1, 1992--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have evidence for at least nine myosin-like genes in Arbidopsis, six of which have been cloned by a PCR-based method from genomic DNA, two have been isolated by genomic DNA cloning, and four have been identified by cDNA cloning. Most of our attention has been focused on the four myosin genes for which we have cDNA clones, and these cDNAs have now been sequenced to completion. Each of these myosins is similar in overall structure, with each containing the characteristic myosin head (motor) domain, which possesses ATP- and actin-binding motifs, a series of IQ repeats, which may be involved in calmodulin binding, a domain with a high probability of forming an alpha-helical coiled-coil secondary structure, which may allow the polypeptides to form dimers, and a variable tail domain, which may serve to define the specific cellular component that each myosin interacts with. One of these myosin genes, called MYA1, displays structural similarity to class of myosins that includes the yeast MYO2, mouse Dilute, and chicken p190 proteins, and this group of myosins is thought to play a role in intracellular trafficking of organelles. Because MYA1 is similar to this interesting class of myosins, we have chosen to conduct detailed studies of MYA1.

  15. Myosin Vc Is a Molecular Motor That Functions in Secretory Granule Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Damon T.; Weigert, Roberto; Grode, Kyle D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2009-01-01

    Class V myosins are actin-based motor proteins that have critical functions in organelle trafficking. Of the three class V myosins expressed in mammals, relatively little is known about Myo5c except that it is abundant in exocrine tissues. Here we use MCF-7 cells to identify the organelles that Myo5c associates with, image the dynamics of Myo5c in living cells, and test the functions of Myo5c. Endogenous Myo5c localizes to two distinct compartments: small puncta and slender tubules. Myo5c often exhibits a highly polarized distribution toward the leading edge in migrating cells and is clearly distinct from the Myo5a or Myo5b compartments. Imaging with GFP-Myo5c reveals that Myo5c puncta move slowly (∼30 nm/s) and microtubule independently, whereas tubules move rapidly (∼440 nm/s) and microtubule dependently. Myo5c puncta colocalize with secretory granule markers such as chromogranin A and Rab27b, whereas Myo5c tubules are labeled by Rab8a. TIRF imaging indicates that the granules can be triggered to undergo secretion. To test if Myo5c functions in granule trafficking, we used the Myo5c tail as a dominant negative and found that it dramatically perturbs the distribution of granule markers. These results provide the first live-cell imaging of Myo5c and indicate that Myo5c functions in secretory granule trafficking. PMID:19741097

  16. A computational molecular design framework for crosslinked polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Eslick, J C; Ye, Q; Park, J; Topp, E M; Spencer, P; Camarda, K V

    2009-05-21

    Crosslinked polymers are important in a very wide range of applications including dental restorative materials. However, currently used polymeric materials experience limited durability in the clinical oral environment. Researchers in the dental polymer field have generally used a time-consuming experimental trial-and-error approach to the design of new materials. The application of computational molecular design (CMD) to crosslinked polymer networks has the potential to facilitate development of improved polymethacrylate dental materials. CMD uses quantitative structure property relations (QSPRs) and optimization techniques to design molecules possessing desired properties. This paper describes a mathematical framework which provides tools necessary for the application of CMD to crosslinked polymer systems. The novel parts of the system include the data structures used, which allow for simple calculation of structural descriptors, and the formulation of the optimization problem. A heuristic optimization method, Tabu Search, is used to determine candidate monomers. Use of a heuristic optimization algorithm makes the system more independent of the types of QSPRs used, and more efficient when applied to combinatorial problems. A software package has been created which provides polymer researchers access to the design framework. A complete example of the methodology is provided for polymethacrylate dental materials. PMID:23904665

  17. Engineering of a novel Ca{sup 2+}-regulated kinesin molecular motor using a calmodulin dimer linker

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Hideki; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Engineered kinesin-M13 and calmodulin involving single cysteine were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaM mutant was cross-linked to dimer by bifunctional thiol reactive reagent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinesin-M13 was dimerized via CaM dimer in the presence of calcium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Function of the engineered kinesin was regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin dimer linker. -- Abstract: The kinesin-microtubule system holds great promise as a molecular shuttle device within biochips. However, one current barrier is that such shuttles do not have 'on-off' control of their movement. Here we report the development of a novel molecular motor powered by an accelerator and brake system, using a kinesin monomer and a calmodulin (CaM) dimer. The kinesin monomer, K355, was fused with a CaM target peptide (M13 peptide) at the C-terminal part of the neck region (K355-M13). We also prepared CaM dimers using CaM mutants (Q3C), (R86C), or (A147C) and crosslinkers that react with cysteine residues. Following induction of K355-M13 dimerization with CaM dimers, we measured K355-M13 motility and found that it can be reversibly regulated in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. We also found that velocities of K355-M13 varied depending on the type and crosslink position of the CaM dimer used; crosslink length also had a moderate effect on motility. These results suggest Ca{sup 2+}-dependent dimerization of K355-M13 could be used as a novel molecular shuttle, equipped with an accelerator and brake system, for biochip applications.

  18. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  19. Molecular Mapping of Movement-Associated Areas in the Avian Brain: A Motor Theory for Vocal Learning Origin

    PubMed Central

    Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Rivas, Miriam; Zapka, Manuela; Horita, Haruhito; Hara, Erina; Wada, Kazuhiro; Mouritsen, Henrik; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2008-01-01

    Vocal learning is a critical behavioral substrate for spoken human language. It is a rare trait found in three distantly related groups of birds-songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. These avian groups have remarkably similar systems of cerebral vocal nuclei for the control of learned vocalizations that are not found in their more closely related vocal non-learning relatives. These findings led to the hypothesis that brain pathways for vocal learning in different groups evolved independently from a common ancestor but under pre-existing constraints. Here, we suggest one constraint, a pre-existing system for movement control. Using behavioral molecular mapping, we discovered that in songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds, all cerebral vocal learning nuclei are adjacent to discrete brain areas active during limb and body movements. Similar to the relationships between vocal nuclei activation and singing, activation in the adjacent areas correlated with the amount of movement performed and was independent of auditory and visual input. These same movement-associated brain areas were also present in female songbirds that do not learn vocalizations and have atrophied cerebral vocal nuclei, and in ring doves that are vocal non-learners and do not have cerebral vocal nuclei. A compilation of previous neural tracing experiments in songbirds suggests that the movement-associated areas are connected in a network that is in parallel with the adjacent vocal learning system. This study is the first global mapping that we are aware for movement-associated areas of the avian cerebrum and it indicates that brain systems that control vocal learning in distantly related birds are directly adjacent to brain systems involved in movement control. Based upon these findings, we propose a motor theory for the origin of vocal learning, this being that the brain areas specialized for vocal learning in vocal learners evolved as a specialization of a pre-existing motor pathway that controls

  20. Motor phenotypes and molecular networks associated with germline deficiency of Ciz1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Vemula, Satya R; Xue, Yi; Khan, Mohammad M; Kuruvilla, Korah P; Marquez-Lona, Esther M; Cobb, Madison R; LeDoux, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    A missense mutation in CIZ1 (c.790A>G, p.S264G) was linked to autosomal dominant cervical dystonia in a large multiplex Caucasian pedigree (OMIM614860, DYT23). CIZ1 is a p21((Cip1/Waf1)) -interacting zinc finger protein, widely expressed in neural and extra-neural tissues, and plays a role in DNA synthesis at the G1/S cell-cycle checkpoint. The role of CIZ1 in the nervous system and relative contributions of gain- or loss- of function to the pathogenesis of CIZ1-associated dystonia remain indefinite. Using relative quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR, cerebellum showed the highest expression levels of Ciz1 in adult mouse brain, over two fold higher than liver, and higher than striatum, midbrain and cerebral cortex. Overall, neural expression of Ciz1 increased with postnatal age. A Ciz1 gene-trap knock-out (KO) mouse model (Ciz1(-/-)) was generated to examine the functional role(s) of CIZ1 in the sensorimotor nervous system and contributions of CIZ1 to cell-cycle control in the mammalian brain. Ciz1 transcripts were absent in Ciz1(-/-) mice and reduced by approximately 50% in Ciz1(+/-) mice. Ciz1(-/-) mice were fertile but smaller than wild-type (WT) littermates. Ciz1(-/-) mice did not manifest dystonia, but exhibited mild motoric abnormalities on balance, open-field activity, and gait. To determine the effects of germline KO of Ciz1 on whole-genome gene expression in adult brain, total RNA from mouse cerebellum was harvested from 6 10-month old Ciz1(-/-) mice and 6 age- and gender- matched WT littermates for whole-genome gene expression analysis. Based on whole-genome gene-expression analyses, genes involved in cellular movement, cell development, cellular growth, cellular morphology and cell-to-cell signaling and interaction were up-regulated in Ciz1(-/-) mice. The top up-regulated pathways were metabolic and cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions. Down-regulated genes were involved in cell cycle, cellular development, cell death and survival, gene expression

  1. Rationally designed molecular beacons for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Yang, Ronghua; Shi, Muling; Wu, Cuichen; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Yinhui; Li, Jishan; Tan, Weihong

    2015-05-21

    Nucleic acids hold promise as biomolecules for future applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. Their well-defined structures and compositions afford unique chemical properties and biological functions. Moreover, the specificity of hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick interactions allows the construction of nucleic acid sequences with multiple functions. In particular, the development of nucleic acid probes as essential molecular engineering tools will make a significant contribution to advancements in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy. The molecular beacon (MB), first conceptualized by Tyagi and Kramer in 1996, is an excellent example of a double-stranded nucleic acid (dsDNA) probe. Although inactive in the absence of a target, dsDNA probes can report the presence of a specific target through hybridization or a specific recognition-triggered change in conformation. MB probes are typically fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides that range from 25 to 35 nucleotides (nt) in length, and their structure can be divided into three components: stem, loop and reporter. The intrinsic merit of MBs depends on predictable design, reproducibility of synthesis, simplicity of modification, and built-in signal transduction. Using resonance energy transfer (RET) for signal transduction, MBs are further endowed with increased sensitivity, rapid response and universality, making them ideal for chemical sensing, environmental monitoring and biological imaging, in contrast to other nucleic acid probes. Furthermore, integrating MBs with targeting ligands or molecular drugs can substantially support their in vivo applications in theranositics. In this review, we survey advances in bioanalytical and biomedical applications of rationally designed MBs, as they have evolved through the collaborative efforts of many researchers. We first discuss improvements to the three components of MBs: stem, loop and reporter. The current applications of MBs in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy will then

  2. Environmental Design Shapes Perceptual-motor Exploration, Learning, and Transfer in Climbing

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Ludovic; Boulanger, Jérémie; Orth, Dominic; Davids, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how environmental design shapes perceptual-motor exploration, when meta-stable regions of performance are created. Here, we examined how creating meta-stable regions of performance could destabilize pre-existing skills, favoring greater exploration of performance environments, exemplified in this study by climbing surfaces. In this investigation we manipulated hold orientations on an indoor climbing wall to examine how nine climbers explored, learned, and transferred various trunk-rolling motion patterns and hand grasping movements. The learning protocol consisted of four sessions, in which climbers randomly ascended three different routes, as fluently as possible. All three routes were 10.3 m in height and composed of 20 hand-holds at the same locations on an artificial climbing wall; only hold orientations were altered: (i) a horizontal-edge route was designed to afford horizontal hold grasping, (ii) a vertical-edge route afforded vertical hold grasping, and (iii), a double-edge route was designed to afford both horizontal and vertical hold grasping. As a meta-stable condition of performance invite an individual to both exploit his pre-existing behavioral repertoire (i.e., horizontal hold grasping pattern and trunk face to the wall) and explore new behaviors (i.e., vertical hold grasping and trunk side to the wall), it was hypothesized that the double-edge route characterized a meta-stable region of performance. Data were collected from inertial measurement units located on the neck and hip of each climber, allowing us to compute rolling motion referenced to the artificial climbing wall. Information on ascent duration, the number of exploratory and performatory movements for locating hand-holds, and hip path was also observed in video footage from a frontal camera worn by participants. Climbing fluency was assessed by calculating geometric index of entropy. Results showed that the meta-stable condition of performance may have afforded

  3. Design and analysis of new fault-tolerant permanent magnet motors for four-wheel-driving electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guohai; Gong, Wensheng; Chen, Qian; Jian, Linni; Shen, Yue; Zhao, Wenxiang

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, a novel in-wheel permanent-magnet (PM) motor for four-wheel-driving electrical vehicles is proposed. It adopts an outer-rotor topology, which can help generate a large drive torque, in order to achieve prominent dynamic performance of the vehicle. Moreover, by adopting single-layer concentrated-windings, fault-tolerant teeth, and the optimal combination of slot and pole numbers, the proposed motor inherently offers negligible electromagnetic coupling between different phase windings, hence, it possesses a fault-tolerant characteristic. Meanwhile, the phase back electromotive force waveforms can be designed to be sinusoidal by employing PMs with a trapezoidal shape, eccentric armature teeth, and unequal tooth widths. The electromagnetic performance is comprehensively investigated and the optimal design is conducted by using the finite-element method.

  4. Comparing simulated emission from molecular clouds using experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremi, Miayan; Flynn, Mallory; Loeppky, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik; Offner, Stella

    2014-03-10

    We propose a new approach to comparing simulated observations that enables us to determine the significance of the underlying physical effects. We utilize the methodology of experimental design, a subfield of statistical analysis, to establish a framework for comparing simulated position-position-velocity data cubes to each other. We propose three similarity metrics based on methods described in the literature: principal component analysis, the spectral correlation function, and the Cramer multi-variate two-sample similarity statistic. Using these metrics, we intercompare a suite of mock observational data of molecular clouds generated from magnetohydrodynamic simulations with varying physical conditions. Using this framework, we show that all three metrics are sensitive to changing Mach number and temperature in the simulation sets, but cannot detect changes in magnetic field strength and initial velocity spectrum. We highlight the shortcomings of one-factor-at-a-time designs commonly used in astrophysics and propose fractional factorial designs as a means to rigorously examine the effects of changing physical properties while minimizing the investment of computational resources.

  5. M(o)TOR of aging: MTOR as a universal molecular hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-07-01

    A recent ground-breaking publication described hypothalamus-driven programmatic aging. As a Russian proverb goes "everything new is well-forgotten old". In 1958, Dilman proposed that aging and its related diseases are programmed by the hypothalamus. This theory, supported by beautiful experiments, remained unnoticed just to be re-discovered recently. Yet, it does not explain all manifestations of aging. And would organism age without hypothalamus? Do sensing pathways such as MTOR (mechanistic Target of Rapamycin) and IKK-beta play a role of a "molecular hypothalamus" in every cell? Are hypothalamus-driven alterations simply a part of quasi-programmed aging manifested by hyperfunction and secondary signal-resistance? Here are some answers. PMID:23872658

  6. Electromagnetic probes of molecular motors in the electron transport chains of mitochondria and chloroplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. H., Jr.; Nawarathna, D.; Vajrala, V.; Gardner, J.; Widger, W. R.

    2005-12-01

    We report on measurements of harmonics generated by whole cells, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in response to applied sinusoidal electric fields. The frequency- and amplitude-dependence of the induced harmonics exhibit features that correlate with physiological processes. Budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) cells produce numerous harmonics, the amplitudes of which depend strongly on frequency. When the second or third harmonic amplitude is plotted vs. applied frequency, we observe two peaks, around 3 kHz and 12 kHz, which are suppressed by respiratory inhibitors. We observe similar peaks when measuring the harmonic response of B. indicas, a relative of the mitochondrial ancestor. In uncoupled mitochondria, in which most of the electron transport chain is active but the ATP-synthase molecular turbine is inactive, only one (lower frequency) of the two peaks is present. Finally, we find that harmonics generated by chloroplasts depend dramatically on incident light, and vanish in the absence of light.

  7. Taking a molecular motor for a spin: helicase mechanism studied by spin labeling and PELDOR.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Schiemann, Olav; Naismith, James H; White, Malcolm F

    2016-01-29

    The complex molecular motions central to the functions of helicases have long attracted attention. Protein crystallography has provided transformative insights into these dynamic conformational changes, however important questions about the true nature of helicase configurations during the catalytic cycle remain. Using pulsed EPR (PELDOR or DEER) to measure interdomain distances in solution, we have examined two representative helicases: PcrA from superfamily 1 and XPD from superfamily 2. The data show that PcrA is a dynamic structure with domain movements that correlate with particular functional states, confirming and extending the information gleaned from crystal structures and other techniques. XPD in contrast is shown to be a rigid protein with almost no conformational changes resulting from nucleotide or DNA binding, which is well described by static crystal structures. Our results highlight the complimentary nature of PELDOR to crystallography and the power of its precision in understanding the conformational changes relevant to helicase function. PMID:26657627

  8. Taking a molecular motor for a spin: helicase mechanism studied by spin labeling and PELDOR

    PubMed Central

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Schiemann, Olav; Naismith, James H.; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    The complex molecular motions central to the functions of helicases have long attracted attention. Protein crystallography has provided transformative insights into these dynamic conformational changes, however important questions about the true nature of helicase configurations during the catalytic cycle remain. Using pulsed EPR (PELDOR or DEER) to measure interdomain distances in solution, we have examined two representative helicases: PcrA from superfamily 1 and XPD from superfamily 2. The data show that PcrA is a dynamic structure with domain movements that correlate with particular functional states, confirming and extending the information gleaned from crystal structures and other techniques. XPD in contrast is shown to be a rigid protein with almost no conformational changes resulting from nucleotide or DNA binding, which is well described by static crystal structures. Our results highlight the complimentary nature of PELDOR to crystallography and the power of its precision in understanding the conformational changes relevant to helicase function. PMID:26657627

  9. Design strategies for the molecular level synthesis of supported catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Staci L; Marks, Tobin J; Stair, Peter C

    2012-02-21

    Supported catalysts, metal or oxide catalytic centers constructed on an underlying solid phase, are making an increasingly important contribution to heterogeneous catalysis. For example, in industry, supported catalysts are employed in selective oxidation, selective reduction, and polymerization reactions. Supported structures increase the thermal stability, dispersion, and surface area of the catalyst relative to the neat catalytic material. However, structural and mechanistic characterization of these catalysts presents a formidable challenge because traditional preparations typically afford complex mixtures of structures whose individual components cannot be isolated. As a result, the characterization of supported catalysts requires a combination of advanced spectroscopies for their characterization, unlike homogeneous catalysts, which have relatively uniform structures and can often be characterized using standard methods. Moreover, these advanced spectroscopic techniques only provide ensemble averages and therefore do not isolate the catalytic function of individual components within the mixture. New synthetic approaches are required to more controllably tailor supported catalyst structures. In this Account, we review advances in supported catalyst synthesis and characterization developed in our laboratories at Northwestern University. We first present an overview of traditional synthetic methods with a focus on supported vanadium oxide catalysts. We next describe approaches for the design and synthesis of supported polymerization and hydrogenation catalysts, using anchoring techniques which provide molecular catalyst structures with exceptional activity and high percentages of catalytically significant sites. We then highlight similar approaches for preparing supported metal oxide catalysts using atomic layer deposition and organometallic grafting. Throughout this Account, we describe the use of incisive spectroscopic techniques, including high

  10. Dynamic model tracking design for low inertia, high speed permanent magnet ac motors.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P; Kadirkamanathan, V

    2004-01-01

    Permanent magnet ac (PMAC) motors have existed in various configurations for many years. The advent of rare-earth magnets and their associated highly elevated levels of magnetic flux makes the permanent magnet motor attractive for many high performance applications from computer disk drives to all electric racing cars. The use of batteries as a prime storage element carries a cost penalty in terms of the unladen weight of the vehicle. Minimizing this cost function requires the minimum electric motor size and weight to be specified, while still retaining acceptable levels of output torque. This tradeoff can be achieved by applying a technique known as flux weakening which will be investigated in this paper. The technique allows the speed range of a PMAC motor to be greatly increased, giving a constant power range of more than 4:1. A dynamic model reference controller is presented which has advantages in ease of implementation, and is particularly suited to dynamic low inertia applications such as clutchless gear changing in high performance electric vehicles. The benefits of this approach are to maximize the torque speed envelope of the motor, particularly advantageous when considering low inertia operation. The controller is examined experimentally, confirming the predicted performance. PMID:15000141

  11. Elasticity of a semiflexible filament with a discontinuous tension due to a cross-link or a molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the stretching elasticity of a wormlike chain with a tension discontinuity resulting from a Hookean spring connecting its backbone to a fixed point. The elasticity of isolated semiflexible filaments has been the subject in a significant body of literature, primarily because of its relevance to the mechanics of biological matter. In real systems, however, these filaments are usually part of supramolecular structures involving cross-linkers or molecular motors, which cause tension discontinuities. Our model is intended as a minimal structural element incorporating such a discontinuity. We obtain analytical results in the weakly bending limit of the filament, concerning its force-extension relation and the response of the two parts in which the filament is divided by the spring. For a small tension discontinuity, the linear response of the filament extension to this discontinuity strongly depends on the external tension. For large external tension f , the spring force contributes a subdominant correction ˜1 /f3 /2 to the well-known ˜1 /√{f } -dependence of the end-to-end extension.

  12. Nonlinear electromagnetic responses of active molecular motors in live cells and organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawarathna, Dharmakirthi; Gardner, Jeffrey; Cardenas, Gustavo; Warmflash, David; Miller, John; Widger, William; Claycomb, James

    2006-03-01

    The response of biological cells to an oscillatory electric field contains both linear and nonlinear (eg. induced harmonic) components. At low frequencies (about 10Hz), harmonic generation by budding yeast cells is observed. These induced harmonics are sensitive to sodium metavanadate, an inhibitor, and glucose, a substrate, respectively, of P-type ATPase membrane pumps. At higher frequencies, two peaks, around 3kHz and 12kHz, are observed in the frequency-dependent harmonic responses. These are sensitive to potassium cyanide, a respiratory inhibitor that blocks cytochrome c oxidase, an enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. We have also measured the response of uncoupled mitochondria extracted from bovine heart cells, for which a second harmonic sensitive to pericidin A and carboxin is detected at applied frequencies of 3-4kHz. Finally, in coupled mouse mitochondria, an ADP sensitive peak (12-15kHz) is observed, likely due to the F0 domain of ATP synthase, which acts as a molecular turbine.

  13. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-01-01

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents. PMID:23235326

  14. Design of direct drive robot using indigenously developed d.c. torque motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athani, Vithal V.

    The range of high-performance torque motors, which were indigenously developed for use in multistage satellite launch vehicles, is described. The main features that set dc torque motors apart from dc servomotors are: high peak torque, power, and current over short periods of operation, low speed of operation, obviating the need for gearing, high torque/inertia and torque/weight ratios, and high figure of merit = torque/sq rt watt ratio. The dc torque motors are eminently suited to high-performance applications requiring high torque at low speed of operation, such as aircraft and missile control surface actuation, control of multistage satellite launch vehicles, certain computer peripherals like magnetic tape transports and hard disk drives, and robotics, CNC systems, and machine tool control.

  15. The Importance of Visual Feedback Design in BCIs; from Embodiment to Motor Imagery Learning.

    PubMed

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been developed and implemented in many areas as a new communication channel between the human brain and external devices. Despite their rapid growth and broad popularity, the inaccurate performance and cost of user-training are yet the main issues that prevent their application out of the research and clinical environment. We previously introduced a BCI system for the control of a very humanlike android that could raise a sense of embodiment and agency in the operators only by imagining a movement (motor imagery) and watching the robot perform it. Also using the same setup, we further discovered that the positive bias of subjects' performance both increased their sensation of embodiment and improved their motor imagery skills in a short period. In this work, we studied the shared mechanism between the experience of embodiment and motor imagery. We compared the trend of motor imagery learning when two groups of subjects BCI-operated different looking robots, a very humanlike android's hands and a pair of metallic gripper. Although our experiments did not show a significant change of learning between the two groups immediately during one session, the android group revealed better motor imagery skills in the follow up session when both groups repeated the task using the non-humanlike gripper. This result shows that motor imagery skills learnt during the BCI-operation of humanlike hands are more robust to time and visual feedback changes. We discuss the role of embodiment and mirror neuron system in such outcome and propose the application of androids for efficient BCI training. PMID:27598310

  16. Design considerations of electromagnetic force in a direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. S.; Tsai, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of electromagnetic force associated with the width of stator teeth, width of rotor back iron, and slot opening for a ten-pole nine-slot direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor is presented. The study calculates the amplitude of the electromagnetic force on the rotating rotor by using the finite-element method. The results show that the amplitude of electromagnetic force, which may cause the noise and vibration of motors, changes with the variation of these above mentioned three factors. The relationship between the considerations of output torque and the minimization of noise and vibration is also established in this paper.

  17. Initial design of 12S-10P outer-rotor field excitation flux switching motor with different rotor width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Syed Muhammad Naufal bin Syed; Sulaiman, Erwan bin; Husin, Zhafir Aizat; Khan, Faisal; Mazlan, Mohamed Mubin Aizat

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes an initial design of 12 slot, 10 pole outer-rotor field-excitation flux switching motor (FEFSM) with two different rotor width based from 2 different formula to design the rotor width. Hence, initial design include the three coil test to determine the U, W, V-phase, the flux strengthening and weakening, flux at various armature coil and field-excitation coil current, and finally the torque at various JA and JE. As for the materials, the stator and rotor consists of steel sheets made of electromagnetic steels, copper for armature coils and field excitation coils as the only field for magnetic flux source. There will be some design specification and restriction on outer-rotor FEFSM based on 2D-Finite Element Analysis will be applied to design the proposed machine.

  18. Design comparison of single phase outer and inner-rotor hybrid excitation flux switching motor for hybrid electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mohamed Mubin Aizat; Sulaiman, Erwan; Husin, Zhafir Aizat; Othman, Syed Muhammad Naufal Syed; Khan, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    In hybrid excitation machines (HEMs), there are two main flux sources which are permanent magnet (PM) and field excitation coil (FEC). These HEMs have better features when compared with the interior permanent magnet synchronous machines (IPMSM) used in conventional hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Since all flux sources including PM, FEC and armature coils are located on the stator core, the rotor becomes a single piece structure similar with switch reluctance machine (SRM). The combined flux generated by PM and FEC established more excitation fluxes that are required to produce much higher torque of the motor. In addition, variable DC FEC can control the flux capabilities of the motor, thus the machine can be applied for high-speed motor drive system. In this paper, the comparisons of single-phase 8S-4P outer and inner rotor hybrid excitation flux switching machine (HEFSM) are presented. Initially, design procedures of the HEFSM including parts drawing, materials and conditions setting, and properties setting are explained. Flux comparisons analysis is performed to investigate the flux capabilities at various current densities. Then the flux linkages of PM with DC FEC of various DC FEC current densities are examined. Finally torque performances are analyzed at various armature and FEC current densities for both designs. As a result, the outer-rotor HEFSM has higher flux linkage of PM with DC FEC and higher average torque of approximately 10% when compared with inner-rotor HEFSM.

  19. Design and assembly of an ultra-light motorized microdrive for chronic neural recordings in small animals.

    PubMed

    Otchy, Timothy M; Ölveczky, Bence P

    2012-01-01

    The ability to chronically record from populations of neurons in freely behaving animals has proven an invaluable tool for dissecting the function of neural circuits underlying a variety of natural behaviors, including navigation(1) , decision making (2,3), and the generation of complex motor sequences(4,5,6). Advances in precision machining has allowed for the fabrication of light-weight devices suitable for chronic recordings in small animals, such as mice and songbirds. The ability to adjust the electrode position with small remotely controlled motors has further increased the recording yield in various behavioral contexts by reducing animal handling.(6,7) Here we describe a protocol to build an ultra-light motorized microdrive for long-term chronic recordings in small animals. Our design evolved from an earlier published version(7), and has been adapted for ease-of use and cost-effectiveness to be more practical and accessible to a wide array of researchers. This proven design (8,9,10,11) allows for fine, remote positioning of electrodes over a range of ~ 5 mm and weighs less than 750 mg when fully assembled. We present the complete protocol for how to build and assemble these drives, including 3D CAD drawings for all custom microdrive components. PMID:23169237

  20. Design and Assembly of an Ultra-light Motorized Microdrive for Chronic Neural Recordings in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Otchy, Timothy M.; Ӧlveczky, Bence P.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to chronically record from populations of neurons in freely behaving animals has proven an invaluable tool for dissecting the function of neural circuits underlying a variety of natural behaviors, including navigation1 , decision making 2,3, and the generation of complex motor sequences4,5,6. Advances in precision machining has allowed for the fabrication of light-weight devices suitable for chronic recordings in small animals, such as mice and songbirds. The ability to adjust the electrode position with small remotely controlled motors has further increased the recording yield in various behavioral contexts by reducing animal handling.6,7 Here we describe a protocol to build an ultra-light motorized microdrive for long-term chronic recordings in small animals. Our design evolved from an earlier published version7, and has been adapted for ease-of use and cost-effectiveness to be more practical and accessible to a wide array of researchers. This proven design 8,9,10,11 allows for fine, remote positioning of electrodes over a range of ~ 5 mm and weighs less than 750 mg when fully assembled. We present the complete protocol for how to build and assemble these drives, including 3D CAD drawings for all custom microdrive components. PMID:23169237

  1. Design of optimal collimation for dedicated molecular breast imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a functional imaging technique that uses specialized small field-of-view gamma cameras to detect the preferential uptake of a radiotracer in breast lesions. MBI has potential to be a useful adjunct method to screening mammography for the detection of occult breast cancer. However, a current limitation of MBI is the high radiation dose (a factor of 7–10 times that of screening mammography) associated with current technology. The purpose of this study was to optimize the gamma camera collimation with the aim of improving sensitivity while retaining adequate resolution for the detection of sub-10-mm lesions. Square-hole collimators with holes matched to the pixilated cadmium zinc telluride detector elements of the MBI system were designed. Data from MBI patient studies and parameters of existing dual-head MBI systems were used to guide the range of desired collimator resolutions, source-to-collimator distances, pixel sizes, and collimator materials that were examined. General equations describing collimator performance for a conventional gamma camera were used in the design process along with several important adjustments to account for the specialized imaging geometry of the MBI system. Both theoretical calculations and a Monte Carlo model were used to measure the geometric efficiency (or sensitivity) and resolution of each designed collimator. Results showed that through optimal collimation, collimator sensitivity could be improved by factors of 1.5–3.2, while maintaining a collimator resolution of either ≤5 or ≤7.5 mm at a distance of 3 cm from the collimator face. These gains in collimator sensitivity permit an inversely proportional drop in the required dose to perform MBI. PMID:19378745

  2. Design of optimal collimation for dedicated molecular breast imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; O'Connor, Michael K.

    2009-03-15

    Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a functional imaging technique that uses specialized small field-of-view gamma cameras to detect the preferential uptake of a radiotracer in breast lesions. MBI has potential to be a useful adjunct method to screening mammography for the detection of occult breast cancer. However, a current limitation of MBI is the high radiation dose (a factor of 7-10 times that of screening mammography) associated with current technology. The purpose of this study was to optimize the gamma camera collimation with the aim of improving sensitivity while retaining adequate resolution for the detection of sub-10-mm lesions. Square-hole collimators with holes matched to the pixilated cadmium zinc telluride detector elements of the MBI system were designed. Data from MBI patient studies and parameters of existing dual-head MBI systems were used to guide the range of desired collimator resolutions, source-to-collimator distances, pixel sizes, and collimator materials that were examined. General equations describing collimator performance for a conventional gamma camera were used in the design process along with several important adjustments to account for the specialized imaging geometry of the MBI system. Both theoretical calculations and a Monte Carlo model were used to measure the geometric efficiency (or sensitivity) and resolution of each designed collimator. Results showed that through optimal collimation, collimator sensitivity could be improved by factors of 1.5-3.2, while maintaining a collimator resolution of either {<=}5 or {<=}7.5 mm at a distance of 3 cm from the collimator face. These gains in collimator sensitivity permit an inversely proportional drop in the required dose to perform MBI.

  3. Advanced Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Knoth, Edward A; Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Schumaker, Edward J

    2012-12-14

    vProject Summary Transportation energy usage is predicted to increase substantially by 2020. Hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powered vehicles are destined to become more prominent as fuel prices rise with the demand. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle platforms are both dependent on high performance electric motors. Electric motors for transportation duty will require sizeable low-speed torque to accelerate the vehicle. As motor speed increases, the torque requirement decreases which results in a nearly constant power motor output. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are well suited for this duty. , , These rotor geometries are configured in straight lines and semi circular arc shapes. These designs are of limited configurations because of the lack of availability of permanent magnets of any other shapes at present. We propose to fabricate rotors via a novel processing approach where we start with magnet powders and compact them into a net shape rotor in a single step. Using this approach, widely different rotor designs can be implemented for efficiency. The current limitation on magnet shape and thickness will be eliminated. This is accomplished by co-filling magnet and soft iron powders at specified locations in intricate shapes using specially designed dies and automatic powder filling station. The process fundamentals for accomplishing occurred under a previous Applied Technology Program titled, Motors and Generators for the 21st Century. New efficient motor designs that are not currently possible (or cost prohibitive) can be accomplished by this approach. Such an approach to motor fabrication opens up a new dimension in motor design. Feasibility Results We were able to optimize a IPMSM rotor to take advantage of the powder co-filling and DMC compaction processing methods. The minimum low speed torque requirement of 5 N-m can be met through an optimized design with magnet material having a Br capability of 0.2 T. This level of magnetic performance can

  4. Structural design of an in-line bolted joint for the space shuttle solid rocket motor case segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Stein, Peter A.; Bush, Harold G.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a structural design study of an in-line bolted joint concept which can be used to assemble Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) case segments are presented. Numerous parametric studies are performed to characterize the in-line bolted joint behavior as major design variables are altered, with the primary objective always being to keep the inside of the joint (where the O-rings are located) closed during the SRM firing. The resulting design has 180 1-inch studs, an eccentricity of -0.5 inch, a flange thickness of 3/4 inch, a bearing plate thickness of 1/4 inch, and the studs are subjected to a preload which is 70% of ultimate. The mass penalty per case segment joint for the in-line design is 346 lbm more than the weight penalty for the proposed capture tang fix.

  5. Molecular and Cellular Designs of Insect Taste Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Kunio; Morita, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    The insect gustatory receptors (GRs) are members of a large G-protein coupled receptor family distantly related to the insect olfactory receptors. They are phylogenetically different from taste receptors of most other animals. GRs are often coexpressed with other GRs in single receptor neurons. Taste receptors other than GRs are also expressed in some neurons. Recent molecular studies in the fruitfly Drosophila revealed that the insect taste receptor system not only covers a wide ligand spectrum of sugars, bitter substances or salts that are common to mammals but also includes reception of pheromone and somatosensory stimulants. However, the central mechanism to perceive and discriminate taste information is not yet elucidated. Analysis of the primary projection of taste neurons to the brain shows that the projection profiles depend basically on the peripheral locations of the neurons as well as the GRs that they express. These results suggest that both peripheral and central design principles of insect taste perception are different from those of olfactory perception. PMID:20617187

  6. Molecular Modeling and Design of Arylthioindole Derivatives as Tubulin Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Si-yan; Miao, Ti-fang; Chen, Jin-can; Lu, Hai-liang; Zheng, Kang-cheng

    2009-10-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) and docking studies of a series of arylthioindole derivatives as tubulin inhibitors against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 have been carried out. An optimal 3D-QSAR model from the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) for training set with significant statistical quality (R2 = 0.898) and predictive ability (q2 = 0.654) was established. The same model was further applied to predict pIC50 values of the compounds in test set, and the resulting predictive correlation coefficient R2(pred) reaches 0.816, further showing that this CoMFA model has high predictive ability. Moreover, the appropriate binding orientations and conformations of these compounds interacting with tubulin are located by docking study, and it is very interesting to find the consistency between the CoMFA field distribution and the 3D topology structure of active site of tubulin. Based on CoMFA along with docking results, some important factors improving the activities of these compounds were discussed in detail and were summarized as follows: the substituents R3-R5 (on the phenyl ring) with higher electronegativity, the substituent R6 with higher electropositivity and bigger bulk, the substituent R7 with smaller bulk, and so on. In addition, five new compounds with higher activities have been designed. Such results can offer useful theoretical references for experimental works.

  7. Strategy for Molecular Design of Photochromic Diarylethenes Having Thermal Functionality.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daichi; Kobatake, Seiya

    2016-08-01

    Thermal reactivities of photochromic diarylethene closed-ring isomers can be controlled by the introduction of substituents at the reactive positions. Diarylethenes having bulky alkyl groups undergo thermal cycloreversion reactions. When bulky alkoxy groups are introduced, the diarylethenes have both thermal cycloreversion reactivities and low photocycloreversion quantum yields. Such photochromic compounds can be applied to thermally reusable photoresponsive-image recordings. The thermal cycloreversion reactivity of the closed-ring isomers can be evaluated using specific steric substituent constants and be correlated with the parameters. By introduction of trimethylsilyl or methoxymethyl groups at the reactive positions, the diarylethene closed-ring isomers undergo thermal irreversible reactions to produce by-products at high temperatures. These diarylethenes may be useful for secret-image recordings. Furthermore, thiophene-S,S-dioxidized diarylethenes having secondary alkyl groups at the reactive positions undergo thermal by-product formation reactions, in addition to the photostability of the colored closed-ring isomers. Such materials may be used for light-starting thermosensors. The thermal by-product formation reactivity can be evaluated by the specific substituent constants and theoretical calculations of quantum chemistry. These results supply the strategy for the molecular design of the photochromic diarylethenes having thermal functionality. PMID:27321920

  8. Molecular design strategy toward diarylethenes that photoswitch with visible light.

    PubMed

    Fukaminato, Tuyoshi; Hirose, Takashi; Doi, Takao; Hazama, Masaki; Matsuda, Kenji; Irie, Masahiro

    2014-12-10

    Photoactive molecules that reversibly switch upon visible light irradiation are one of the most attractive targets for biological as well as imaging applications. One possible approach to prepare such photoswitches is to extend π-conjugation length of molecules and shift the absorption bands to longer wavelengths. Although several attempts have been demonstrated based on this approach for diarylethene (DAE) photoswitches, photoreactivity of the DAE derivatives is dramatically suppressed when the conjugation length is extended by connecting aromatic dyes at the side positions of aryl groups in the DAE unit. In this study, we successfully prepared a visible-light reactive DAE derivative by introducing an aromatic dye at the reactive carbon atom of the DAE unit, optimizing orbital level of each component, and controlling the mutual orientation of the aromatic dye and the DAE unit. The DAE derivative (3) undergoes a photocyclization reaction upon irradiation with 560 nm light and the closed-isomer converts to the open-ring isomer upon irradiation with 405 nm light. The high photoconversion yields (>90%) were achieved for both photocyclization and photocycloreversion reactions. The photoreactivity induced by visible light irradiation and the molecular design strategy were discussed based on theoretical calculations. PMID:25390547

  9. fMRI as a molecular imaging procedure for the functional reorganization of motor systems in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    LAZARIDOU, ASIMINA; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; KHANCHICEH, AZADEH; SINGHAL, ANEESH; MOSKOWITZ, MICHAEL; ROSEN, BRUCE; TZIKA, ARIA

    2013-01-01

    Previous brain imaging studies suggest that stroke alters functional connectivity in motor execution networks. Moreover, current understanding of brain plasticity has led to new approaches in stroke rehabilitation. Recent studies showed a significant role of effective coupling of neuronal activity in the SMA (supplementary motor area) and M1 (primary motor cortex) network for motor outcome in patients after stroke. After a subcortical stroke, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during movement reveals cortical reorganization that is associated with the recovery of function. The aim of the present study was to explore connectivity alterations within the motor-related areas combining motor fMRI with a novel MR-compatible hand-induced robotic device (MR_CHIROD) training. Patients completed training at home and underwent serial MR evaluation at baseline and after 8 weeks of training. Training at home consisted of squeezing a gel exercise ball with the paretic hand at ~75% of maximum strength for 1 h/day, 3 days/week. The fMRI analysis revealed alterations in M1, SMA, PMC (premotor cortex) and Cer (cerebellum) in both stroke patients and healthy controls after the training. Findings of the present study suggest that enhancement of SMA activity could benefit M1 dysfunction in stroke survivors. These results also indicate that connectivity alterations between motor areas might assist the counterbalance of a functionally abnormal M1 in chronic stroke survivors and possibly other patients with motor dysfunction. PMID:23900349

  10. Design and development of split-parallel through-the road retrofit hybrid electric vehicle with in-wheel motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, S. A.; Syaifuddin Mohd, M.; Maharun, M.; Bakar, N. S. A.; Idris, S.; Samsudin, S. H.; Firmansyah; Adz, J. J.; Misbahulmunir, M.; Abidin, E. Z. Z.; Syafiq Mohd, M.; Saad, N.; Aziz, A. R. A.

    2015-12-01

    One configuration of the hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is the split-axle parallel hybrid, in which an internal combustion engine (ICE) and an electric motor provide propulsion power to different axles. A particular sub-type of the split-parallel hybrid does not have the electric motor installed on board the vehicle; instead, two electric motors are placed in the hubs of the non-driven wheels, called ‘hub motor’ or ‘in-wheel motor’ (IWM). Since propulsion power from the ICE and IWM is coupled through the vehicle itself, its wheels and the road on which it moves, this particular configuration is termed ‘through-the-road’ (TTR) hybrid. TTR configuration enables existing ICE-powered vehicles to be retrofitted into an HEV with minimal physical modification. This work describes design of a retrofit- conversion TTR-IWM hybrid vehicle - its sub-systems and development work. Operating modes and power flow of the TTR hybrid, its torque coupling and resultant traction profiles are initially discussed.

  11. The design of a stepper motor control-based high-precision varifocal imaging optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bai

    2012-11-01

    This study, while introducing the theories and makeup of conventional cam varifocal system, indicates the two faults stemming from their inherent mechanism and potentiometer-based focal-length measurement: 1) inability to stop optic axis vibration and 2) considerable error in real-time output of focal-length value. As a result, a stepper motor, instead of cam mechanism, was employed to control mirrors of variofocus and mirrors of compensation in moving accurately along straight-ling rails so that continuous focal-length variation and surface image positioning were accomplished; a linear encoder was substituted for potentiometer in realizing real-time output of focal-length value and also in closed-loop control of stepper motor. Compared with the cam mechanism, this system provides 90% less vibration and 80% more positioning precision, thereby basically solving the problems of the cam system and enabling the high-precision angular measurement.

  12. Design of an axial flux PM motor using magnetic and thermal equivalent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, Romain-Bernard; Glises, Raynal; Espanet, Christophe; Saint Ellier, Emeline; Dubas, Frédéric; Chamagne, Didier

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new generation of electric motors (7.5-15 kW) for automotive powertrains. The target is a full electric direct drive vehicle, for the particular application to heavy quadricycles. An original axial flux PM structure is proposed due to the simplicity of its manufacturing. However it leads to a 3D structure, difficult to study. The paper deals with analytical models that can be used to achieve the analysis and the sizing of the motor. The electromagnetic behavior is modeled using a simple magnetic equivalent network and the thermal behavior is analyzed with a thermal network. Finally, the analytical results are compared to those experimentally obtained and it proves the interest of the proposed structure: the construction is simple and the performances are satisfying.

  13. Design and evaluation of a crystalline hybrid of molecular conductors and molecular rotors.

    PubMed

    Lemouchi, Cyprien; Mézière, Cécile; Zorina, Leokadiya; Simonov, Sergey; Rodríguez-Fortea, Antonio; Canadell, Enric; Wzietek, Pawel; Auban-Senzier, Pascale; Pasquier, Claude; Giamarchi, Thierry; Garcia-Garibay, Miguel A; Batail, Patrick

    2012-05-01

    Combining recent concepts from the fields of molecular conductivity and molecular machinery we set out to design a crystalline molecular conductor that also possesses a molecular rotor. We report on the structures, electronic and physical properties, and dynamics of two solids with a common 1,4-bis(carboxyethynyl)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane (BABCO) functional rotor. One, [nBu(4)N(+)](2)[BABCO][BABCO(-)](2), is a colorless insulator where the dicarboxylic acid cocrystallizes with two of its monoanionic conjugated bases. The other is self-assembled by electrocrystallization in the form of black, shiny needles, with highly conducting molecular slabs of (EDT-TTF-CONH(2))(2)(+) (EDT-TTF = ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene) and anionic [BABCO(-)] rotors. Using variable-temperature (5-300 K) proton spin-lattice relaxation, (1)H T(1)(-1), we were able to assign two types of Brownian rotators in [nBu(4)N(+)](2)[BABCO][BABCO(-)](2). We showed that neutral BABCO groups have a rotational frequency of 120 GHz at 300 K with a rotational barrier of 2.03 kcal mol(-1). Rotors on the BABCO(-) sites experience stochastic 32 GHz jumps at the same temperature over a rotational barrier of 2.72 kcal mol(-1). In contrast, the BABCO(-) rotors within the highly conducting crystals of (EDT-TTF-CONH(2))(2)(+)[BABCO(-)] are essentially "braked" at room temperature. Notably, these crystals possess a conductivity of 5 S cm(-1) at 1 bar, which increases rapidly with pressure up to 50 S cm(-1) at 11.5 kbar. Two regimes with different activation energies E(a) for the resistivity (180 K above 50 and 400 K below) are observed at ambient pressure; a metallic state is stabilized at ca. 8 kbar, and an insulating ground state remains below 50 K at all pressures. We discuss two likely channels by which the motion of the rotors might become slowed down in the highly conducting solid. One is defined as a low-velocity viscous regime inherent to a noncovalent, physical coupling induced by the cooperativity between

  14. Application of Two-Phase CFD to the Design and Analysis of a Subscale Motor Experiment to Evaluate Propellant Slag Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Dill, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    The redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) Pressure Perturbation Investigation Team concluded that the cause of recent pressure spikes during both static and flight motor burns was the expulsion of molten aluminum oxide slag from a pool which collects in the aft end of the motor around the submerged nozzle nose during the last half of motor operation. It is suspected that some motors produce more slag than others due to differences in aluminum oxide agglomerate particle sizes which may relate to subtle differences in propellant ingredient characteristics such as particle size distribution, contaminants, or processing variations. In order to determine the effect of suspect propellant ingredient characteristics on the propensity for slag production in a real motor environment, a subscale motor experiment was designed. An existing 5 inch ballistic test motor was selected as the basic test vehicle due to low cost and quick turn around times. The standard converging/diverging nozzle was replaced with a submerged nozzle nose design to provide a positive trap for the slag which would increase both the quantity and repeatability of measured slag weights. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to assess a variety of submerged nose configurations to identify the design which possessed the best capability to reliably collect slag. CFD also was used to assure that the final selected nozzle design would result in flow field characteristics such as dividing streamline location, nose attach point, and separated flow structure which would have similtude with the RSRM submerged nozzle nose flow field. It also was decided to spin the 5 inch motor about its longitudinal axis to further enhance slag collection quantities. Again, CFD was used to select an appropriate spin rate along with other considerations, including the avoidance of burn rate enhancement from radial acceleration effects.

  15. Optimal Design of Rotary-Type Voice Coil Motor Using Multisegmented Magnet Array for Small Form Factor Optical Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2007-05-01

    For a small form factor optical disk drive (SFFODD), a high-performance actuator satisfying the requirements for small size, high speed, and low-power consumption simultaneously is required. In this paper, we propose a rotary-type voice coil motor (VCM) using a multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) for the SFFODD. The VCM is designed to move the entire system including miniaturized optical components, which are necessary in reading and writing data. To increase the actuating force of the VCM, the MSMA, a novel magnetic circuit, is adopted because it can provide a higher flux density than a conventional magnet array in the rotary-type VCM. To obtain the best performance from the VCM in the limit of actuator size, design optimization is performed. The manufactured actuator with optimally designed parameters is described and the potential performance of track seeking is evaluated and presented.

  16. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  17. Applications of molecular modeling to the design and characterization of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, G. A.; Faulon, J. L.; Pohl, P. I.; Shelnutt, J. A.

    A variety of new molecular modeling tools are now available for studying molecular structures and molecular interactions, for building molecular structures from simple components using analytical data, and for studying the relationship of molecular structure to the energy of bonding and nonbonding interactions. These are proving quite valuable in characterizing molecular structures and intermolecular interactions and in designing new molecules. This paper describes the application of molecular modeling techniques to a variety of materials problems, including the probable molecular structures of coals, lignins, and hybrid inorganic-organic systems (silsesquioxanes), the intercalation of small gas molecules in fullerene crystals, the diffusion of gas molecules through membranes, and the design, structure, and function of biomimetic and nanocluster catalysts.

  18. Molecular Motor MYO1C, Acetyltransferase KAT6B and Osteogenetic Transcription Factor RUNX2 Expression in Human Masseter Muscle Contributes to Development of Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Desh, Heather; Gray, S Lauren; Horton, Michael J; Raoul, Gwenael; Rowlerson, Anthea M; Ferri, Joel; Vieira, Alexandre R; Sciote, James J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type I myosins are molecular motors necessary for glucose transport in the cytoplasm and initiation of transcription in the nucleus. Two of these, MYO1H and MYO1C, are paralogs which may be important in the development of malocclusion. The objective of this study was to investigate their gene expression in the masseter muscle of malocclusion subjects. Two functionally related proteins known to contribute to malocclusion were also investigated: KAT6B (a chromatin remodeling epigenetic enzyme which is activated by MYO1C) and RUNX2 (a transcription factor regulating osteogenesis which is activated by KAT6B). Design Masseter muscle samples and malocclusion classifications were obtained from orthognathic surgery subjects. Muscle was sectioned and immunostained to determine fiber type properties. RNA was isolated from the remaining sample to determine expression levels for the four genes by TaqMan® RT-PCR. Fiber type properties, gene expression quantities and malocclusion classification were compared. Results There were very significant associations (P<0.0000001) between MYO1C and KAT6B expressions. There were also significant associations (P<0.005) between RUNX2 expression and masseter muscle type II fiber properties. Very few significant associations were identified between MYO1C and masseter muscle fiber type properties. Conclusions The relationship between MYO1C and KAT6B suggests that the two are interacting in chromatin remodeling for gene expression. This is the nuclear myosin1 (NM1) function of MYO1C. A surprising finding is the relationship between RUNX2 and type II masseter muscle fibers, since RUNX2 expression in mature muscle was previously unknown. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in adult masseter muscle. PMID:24698832

  19. Molecular motor efficiency is maximized in the presence of both power-stroke and rectification through feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R. K.; Parrondo, J. M. R.; Linke, H.; Johansson, J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a model for a feedback-controlled ratchet consisting of a Brownian particle and a moving, finite barrier that is shifted by an external agent depending on the position of the particle. By modifying the value of a single parameter of the feedback protocol, the model can act either as a pure rectifier, a power-stroke (PS) motor, or a combination of both. Interestingly, in certain situations the motor reaches a maximum efficiency for an intermediate value of that parameter, i.e., for a combination of the information ratchet and the PS mechanisms. We relate our results to the biological motors kinesin, myosin II, and myosin V, finding that these motors operate in a regime of length scales and forces where the efficiency is maximized for a combination of rectification and PS mechanisms.

  20. "Fan-Tip-Drive" High-Power-Density, Permanent Magnet Electric Motor and Test Rig Designed for a Nonpolluting Aircraft Propulsion Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.

    2004-01-01

    A scaled blade-tip-drive test rig was designed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig is a scaled version of a direct-current brushless motor that would be located in the shroud of a thrust fan. This geometry is very attractive since the allowable speed of the armature is approximately the speed of the blade tips (Mach 1 or 1100 ft/s). The magnetic pressure generated in the motor acts over a large area and, thus, produces a large force or torque. This large force multiplied by the large velocity results in a high-power-density motor.

  1. Theoretical principles for designing long stator/linear motors with iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Rolf

    Elements for dimensioning synchronous linear motors for rail transportation are presented. A calculation analytic method was developed, which is based on the introduction of the specific magnetic conductance function, which takes into account the influence of stator and excitation windings. Electromotive and inertia forces were estimated with the stator current function and the magnetic air gap flux density and the results were verified using the finite element method for solving Maxwell equations. The short circuit currents in the stator winding were evaluated by means of calculated inductivities. Some perturbations, such as sliding and oscillation forces were calculated. Some results were validated on the TRANSRAPID test vehicle.

  2. Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gellman, Andrew John; Sholl, David S.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Zaera, Francisco

    2013-04-28

    Understanding and controlling selectivity is one of the key challenges in heterogeneous catalysis. Among problems in catalytic selectivity enantioselectivity is perhaps the most the most challenging. The primary goal of the project on “Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts” is to understand the origins of enantioselectivity on chiral heterogeneous surfaces and catalysts. The efforts of the project team include preparation of chiral surfaces, characterization of chiral surfaces, experimental detection of enantioselectivity on such surfaces and computational modeling of the interactions of chiral probe molecules with chiral surfaces. Over the course of the project period the team of PI’s has made some of the most detailed and insightful studies of enantioselective chemistry on chiral surfaces. This includes the measurement of fundamental interactions and reaction mechanisms of chiral molecules on chiral surfaces and leads all the way to rationale design and synthesis of chiral surfaces and materials for enantioselective surface chemistry. The PI’s have designed and prepared new materials for enantioselective adsorption and catalysis. Naturally Chiral Surfaces • Completion of a systematic study of the enantiospecific desorption kinetics of R-3-methylcyclohexanone (R-3-MCHO) on 9 achiral and 7 enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces with orientations that span the stereographic triangle. • Discovery of super-enantioselective tartaric acid (TA) and aspartic acid (Asp) decomposition as a result of a surface explosion mechanism on Cu(643)R&S. Systematic study of super-enantiospecific TA and Asp decomposition on five enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces. • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-propylene oxide (PO) from Cu(100) imprinted with {3,1,17} facets by L-lysine adsorption. Templated Chiral Surfaces • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-PO from Pt(111) and Pd(111

  3. Effect of verbal encoding and motor memory on test performance in the Rey Visual Design Learning Test.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, P; Maathuis, I; Matzner, M

    2011-01-01

    This study offers new evidence for the validity of the interpretation of the Rey Visual Design Learning Test (RVDLT) test score. The RVDLT is a design memory test that requires constructive output (drawings of memorized test items) in the recall phase. We mainly focused on response processes and tested the effect of a verbal and a motor memory strategy on test performance. Strategies were only explained and participants (12- to 15-year-olds) were stimulated to use them in a subsequent test session. In the verbal encoding condition, participants were instructed to name the test items of the RVDLT. In the copy condition, participants copied test items with an empty pen concurrent with test item presentation (rehearsal of motor sequences). Test performances were compared to a control group. No significant difference in RVDLT test score was detected between the verbal encoding group and the control group. However, the copy group scored significantly lower than the other two groups. Results are discussed in light of the validity of the test interpretation. PMID:21390901

  4. Smart motor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D.; Schmitt, D.

    1984-01-01

    Current spacecraft design relies upon microprocessor control; however, motors usually require extensive additional electronic circuitry to interface with these microprocessor controls. An improved control technique that allows a smart brushless motor to connect directly to a microprocessor control system is described. An actuator with smart motors receives a spacecraft command directly and responds in a closed loop control mode. In fact, two or more smart motors can be controlled for synchronous operation.

  5. The Design of Molecular Hosts, Guests, and Their Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cram, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origins, definitions, tools, and principles of host-guest chemistry. Gives examples of chiral recognition in complexation, of partial transacylase mimics, of caviplexes, and of a synthetic molecular cell. (Author/RT)

  6. The Effect of Rapid Liquid-Phase Reactions on Injector Design and Combustion in Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elverum, Gerard W., Jr.; Staudhammer, Peter

    1959-01-01

    Data are presented indicating the rates and magnitudes of energy released by the liquid-phase reactions of various propellant combinations. The data show that this energy release can contribute significantly to the rate of vaporization of the incoming propellants and thus aid the combustion process. Nevertheless, very low performances were obtained in rocket motors with conventional impinging-jet injectors when highly reactive systems such as N104-N2H4, were employed. A possible explanation for this low performance is that the initial reactions of such systems are so rapid that liquid-phase mixing is inhibited. Evidence for such an effect is presented in a series of color photographs of open flames using various injector elements. Based on these studies, some requirements are suggested for injector elements using highly reactive propellants. Experimental results are presented of motor tests using injector elements in which some of these requirements are met through the use of a set of concentric tubes. These tests, carried out at thrust levels of 40 to 800 lb per element, demonstrated combustion efficiencies of up to 98% based on equilibrium characteristic velocity values. Results are also presented for tests made with impinging-jet and splash-plate injectors for comparison.

  7. Design single-motor AC drive for energy savings in centrifugal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This article is an evaluation of a single- motor with AC drive that saves energy with increased efficiency and reliability in a wide variety of pump, fan, compressor, and other centrifugal applications. Drives deliver adjustable speed for adjustable flow and will satisfy a number of particular objectives. A principal benefit of the drive is its efficiency. The drives also offer regenerative capability without modification, built-in memory for first-fault indication, and easy troubleshooting with comprehensive self-diagnostics. The drive controls flow in centrifugal applications by adjusting the pumps or fan speed. This provides energy savings over conventional flow control systems. Slip devices, also used to produce variable speed in centrifugal equipment, vary the ''slip'' between the constant-speed motor shaft and the pump or fan shaft. The speed which is not transmitted is dissipated as heat within the slip device itself. The drives are available from stock (100-250 hp) for immediate energy savings on both new and retrofit spplications, with a number of standard features: a remote operator control station provides start-stop and speed selection; acceleration/deceleration are separately adjustable over a range of 2.5 to 35 seconds with 5- to 70-second range available using simple jumper selection; and a coast-to-rest is also available using simple jumper selection. The drive can be operated automatically from an ungrounded 4-20 mA process control signal.

  8. A Novel Data System for Verification of Internal Parameters of Motor Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Doug; Saint Jean, Paul; Everton, Randy; Uresk, Bonnie

    2003-01-01

    Three major obstacles have limited the amount of information that can be obtained from inside an operating solid rocket motor. The first is a safety issue due to the presence of live propellant interacting with classical, electrical instrumentation. The second is a pressure vessel feed through risk arising from bringing a large number of wires through the rocket motor wall safely. The third is an attachment/protection issue associated with connecting gages to live propellant. Thiokol has developed a highly miniaturized, networked, electrically isolated data system that has safely delivered information from classical, electrical instrumentation (even on the burning propellant surface) to the outside world. This system requires only four wires to deliver 80 channels of data at 2300 samples/second/channel. The feed through leak path risk is massively reduced from the current situation where each gage requires at least three pressure vessel wire penetrations. The external electrical isolation of the system is better than that of the propellant itself. This paper describes the new system.

  9. Pigment granule translocation in red ovarian chromatophores from the palaemonid shrimp Macrobrachium olfersi (Weigmann, 1836): functional roles for the cytoskeleton and its molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Milograna, Sarah Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Márcia Regina; Baqui, Munira Muhammad Abdel; McNamara, John Campbell

    2014-12-01

    The binding of red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH) to membrane receptors in crustacean chromatophores triggers Ca²⁺/cGMP signaling cascades that activate cytoskeletal motors, driving pigment granule translocation. We investigate the distributions of microfilaments and microtubules and their associated molecular motors, myosin and dynein, by confocal and transmission electron microscopy, evaluating a functional role for the cytoskeleton in pigment translocation using inhibitors of polymer turnover and motor activity in vitro. Microtubules occupy the chromatophore cell extensions whether the pigment granules are aggregated or dispersed. The inhibition of microtubule turnover by taxol induces pigment aggregation and inhibits re-dispersion. Phalloidin-FITC actin labeling, together with tannic acid fixation and ultrastructural analysis, reveals that microfilaments form networks associated with the pigment granules. Actin polymerization induced by jasplaquinolide strongly inhibits RPCH-induced aggregation, causes spontaneous pigment dispersion, and inhibits pigment re-dispersion. Inhibition of actin polymerization by latrunculin-A completely impedes pigment aggregation and re-dispersion. Confocal immunocytochemistry shows that non-muscle myosin II (NMMII) co-localizes mainly with pigment granules while blebbistatin inhibition of NMMII strongly reduces the RPCH response, also inducing spontaneous pigment dispersion. Myosin II and dynein also co-localize with the pigment granules. Inhibition of dynein ATPase by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine induces aggregation, inhibits RPCH-triggered aggregation, and inhibits re-dispersion. Granule aggregation and dispersion depend mainly on microfilament integrity although microtubules may be involved. Both cytoskeletal polymers are functional only when subunit turnover is active. Myosin and dynein may be the molecular motors that drive pigment aggregation. These mechanisms of granule translocation in crustacean

  10. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  11. Design and testing of a coaxial linear magnetic spring with integral linear motor. [for spacecraft energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of a coaxial linear magnetic spring which incorporates a linear motor to control axial motion and overcome system damping is presented, and the results of static and dynamic tests are reported. The system has nominal stiffness 25,000 N/m and is designed to oscillate a 900-g component over a 4.6-mm stroke in a Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerator being developed for long-service (5-10-yr) space applications (Stolfi et al., 1983). Mosaics of 10 radially magnetized high-coercivity SmCO5 segments enclosed in Ti cans are employed, and the device is found to have quality factor 70-100, corresponding to energy-storage efficiency 91-94 percent. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs are provided.

  12. Molecular-beam gas-sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. S.; Knuth, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system for rocket motor combustion chamber sampling is described. The history of the sampling system is reviewed. The problems associated with rocket motor combustion chamber sampling are reported. Several design equations are presented. The results of the experiments include the effects of cooling water flow rates, the optimum separation gap between the end plate and sampling nozzle, and preliminary data on compositions in a rocket motor combustion chamber.

  13. An improved molecular design of obtaining NLO active molecular glasses using triphenyl moieties as amorphous phase formation enhancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traskovskis, Kaspars; Mihailovs, Igors; Tokmakovs, Andrejs; Kokars, Valdis; Rutkis, Martins

    2012-06-01

    New molecular design of obtaining molecular glasses has been developed by linking triphenylmethyl moieties to chromophore core by flexible C-C bridge. Compounds capable of forming stable amorphous phase with good optical quality have been acquired with increased chemical and thermal sustainability compared to the previously reported design. NLO activity of compounds has been measured after corona discharge polling. Compared to previously synthesized trityloxy fragment containing compounds increase of d33 coefficient by up to 17 times was achieved for the same chromophore core containing compounds.

  14. Applications of molecular modeling to the design and characterization of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Faulon, J.L.; Pohl, P.I.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A variety of new molecular modeling tools are now available for studying molecular structures and molecular interactions, for building molecular structures from simple components using analytical data, and for studying the relationship of molecular structure to the energy of bonding and non-bonding interactions. These are proving quite valuable in characterizing molecular structures and intermolecular interactions and in designing new molecules. This paper describes the application of molecular modeling techniques to a variety of materials problems, including the probable modecular structures of coals, lignins, and hybrid inorganic-organic-organic systems (silsesquioxanes), the intercalation of small gas molecules in fullerene crystals, the diffusion of gas molecules through membranes, and the design, structure and function of biomimetic and nanocluster catalysts.

  15. Elements in nucleotide sensing and hydrolysis of the AAA+ disaggregation machine ClpB: a structure-based mechanistic dissection of a molecular motor

    SciTech Connect

    Zeymer, Cathleen Barends, Thomas R. M.; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution crystal structures together with mutational analysis and transient kinetics experiments were utilized to understand nucleotide sensing and the regulation of the ATPase cycle in an AAA+ molecular motor. ATPases of the AAA+ superfamily are large oligomeric molecular machines that remodel their substrates by converting the energy from ATP hydrolysis into mechanical force. This study focuses on the molecular chaperone ClpB, the bacterial homologue of Hsp104, which reactivates aggregated proteins under cellular stress conditions. Based on high-resolution crystal structures in different nucleotide states, mutational analysis and nucleotide-binding kinetics experiments, the ATPase cycle of the C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2), one of the motor subunits of this AAA+ disaggregation machine, is dissected mechanistically. The results provide insights into nucleotide sensing, explaining how the conserved sensor 2 motif contributes to the discrimination between ADP and ATP binding. Furthermore, the role of a conserved active-site arginine (Arg621), which controls binding of the essential Mg{sup 2+} ion, is described. Finally, a hypothesis is presented as to how the ATPase activity is regulated by a conformational switch that involves the essential Walker A lysine. In the proposed model, an unusual side-chain conformation of this highly conserved residue stabilizes a catalytically inactive state, thereby avoiding unnecessary ATP hydrolysis.

  16. Low molecular weight species of TDP-43 generated by abnormal splicing form inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and result in motor neuron death.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shangxi; Sanelli, Teresa; Chiang, Helen; Sun, Yulong; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Robertson, Janice

    2015-07-01

    The presence of lower molecular weight species comprising the C-terminal region of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a characteristic of TDP-43 proteinopathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Here, we have identified a novel splice variant of TDP-43 that is upregulated in ALS and generates a 35-kDa N-terminally truncated species through use of an alternate translation initiation codon (ATG(Met85)), denoted here as Met(85)-TDP-35. Met(85)-TDP-35 expressed ectopically in human neuroblastoma cells exhibited reduced solubility, cytoplasmic distribution, and aggregation. Furthermore, Met(85)-TDP-35 sequestered full-length TDP-43 from the nucleus to form cytoplasmic aggregates. Expression of Met(85)-TDP-35 in primary motor neurons resulted in the formation of Met(85)-TDP-35-positive cytoplasmic aggregates and motor neuron death. A neo-epitope antibody specific for Met(85)-TDP-35 labeled the 35-kDa lower molecular weight species on immunoblots of urea-soluble extracts from ALS-FTLD disease-affected tissues and co-labeled TDP-43-positive inclusions in ALS spinal cord sections, confirming the physiological relevance of this species. These results show that the 35-kDa low molecular weight species in ALS-FTLD can be generated from an abnormal splicing event and use of a downstream initiation codon and may represent a mechanism by which TDP-43 elicits its pathogenicity. PMID:25788357

  17. Algebraic dual-energy magnetic analysis with application to variable reluctance motor design

    SciTech Connect

    Tolikas, M.; Lang, J.H.; Kirtley, J.L. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The dual-energy method has been successfully employed in the calculation of static resistances, capacitances and inductances, yielding fast and accurate solutions. Two different directions can be followed in applying the method, one is the more widely known method of tubes and slices, the other is the algebraic approach and is explored further in this paper. The present literature on the algebraic dual-energy method involves trivial examples with boundaries, boundary conditions and source distributions that are easily handled. However, the geometry of the variable reluctance motor at the unaligned position, the dominating curvatures characterizing its electromagnetic field distribution and the presence of a large number of boundary conditions arising at the steel boundaries, provide a challenging exercise in the application, behavior and effectiveness of the dual-energy method in a realistic framework.

  18. Optimum design criteria for a synchronous reluctance motor with concentrated winding using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Seong-June; Jeon, Su-Jin

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents an optimization procedure using response surface methodology (RSM) to determine design parameters for reducing torque ripple. The RSM has been achieved to use the experimental design method in combination with finite element method and well adapted to make analytical model for a complex problem considering a lot of interaction of design variables.

  19. A reconsideration of the link between the energetics of water and of ATP hydrolysis energy in the power strokes of molecular motors in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Widdas, Wilfred F

    2008-09-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick's work, energetics were revised by Joule's experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration. PMID:19325829

  20. A Reconsideration of the Link between the Energetics of Water and of ATP Hydrolysis Energy in the Power Strokes of Molecular Motors in Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Widdas, Wilfred F.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick’s work, energetics were revised by Joule’s experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the First Law of Thermodynamics. The link between the energetics of water and ATP hydrolysis in molecular motors is recommended for reconsideration. PMID:19325829

  1. Design of Linear DC Motor Two-degree-of-freedom Positioning System using Model Reference type Sliding Mode Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urushihara, Shiro; Kamano, Takuya; Yura, Satoshi; Yasuno, Takashi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    One of fundamental problems in the factory automation is how to obtain linear motion. Linear motors produce directly the linear motion force without a motion-transform mechanism. Linear d.c. motors (LDMs) have excellent performance and controllability. However, the dynamics of small-sized LDMs is adversely affected by the dead-band due to the friction between brushes and commutators. In this paper, it is described that the design of the two-degree-of-freedom positioning system with a LDM using model reference type sliding mode controller (SMC). The proposed positioning system consists of a fixed gain feedforward controller and a SMC used as a feedback controller. The objective of the SMC is to repress the influence of nonlinear characteristics (the dead-band and parameter variations etc.). The tracking performance can be improved as the fixed gain feedforward controller makes a dynamic inverse system in the feedforward path. The effectiveness of the proposed system for improvement of the tracking performance is demonstrated by experimental results.

  2. Optimized efficiency and figure of merit for a tight-coupling molecular motor: their bounds and phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Mulugeta; Nuru, Tadle

    2014-03-01

    We consider a model translational motor that consumes one fuel molecule against a given amount of load at the same physiological temperature. Taking the chemical step to be tightlly coupled to the mechanical step, we derive thermodynamic quantities such as input and output power as well as power efficiency. Using optimization criteria of energy utilization, we determine the motor's optimized efficiency as well as its figure of merit. Bounds and phase daigrams of these quantities are studied. International Science Program, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

  3. Design and Fabrication of a 200N Thrust Rocket Motor Based on NH4ClO4+Al+HTPB as Solid Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Mastura Ab; Ali, Wan Khairuddin Wan

    2010-06-01

    The development of rocket motor using potassium nitrate, carbon and sulphur mixture has successfully been developed by researchers and students from UTM and recently a new combination for solid propellant is being created. The new solid propellant will combine a composition of Ammonium perchlorate, NH4ClO4 with aluminium, Al and Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene, HTPB as the binder. It is the aim of this research to design and fabricate a new rocket motor that will produce a thrust of 200N by using this new solid propellant. A static test is done to obtain the thrust produced by the rocket motor and analyses by observation and also calculation will be done. The experiment for the rocket motor is successful but the thrust did not achieve its required thrust.

  4. Design study and performance analysis of 12S-14P field excitation flux switching motor for hybrid electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husin, Zhafir Aizat; Sulaiman, Erwan; Khan, Faisal; Mazlan, Mohamed Mubin Aizat; Othman, Syed Muhammad Naufal Syed

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a new structure of 12slot-14pole field excitation flux switching motor (FEFSM) as an alternative candidate of non-Permanent Magnet (PM) machine for HEV drives. Design study, performance analysis and optimization of field excitation flux switching machine with non-rare-earth magnet for hybrid electric vehicle drive applications is done. The stator of projected machine consists of iron core made of electromagnetic steels, armature coils and field excitation coils as the only field mmf source. The rotor is consisted of only stack of iron and hence, it is reliable and appropriate for high speed operation. The design target is a machine with the maximum torque, power and power density, more than 210Nm, 123kW and 3.5kW/kg, respectively, which competes with interior permanent magnet synchronous machine used in existing hybrid electric vehicle. Some design feasibility studies on FEFSM based on 2D-FEA and deterministic optimization method will be applied to design the proposed machine.

  5. A Real-World Perspective on Molecular Design.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Bernd; Guba, Wolfgang; Hert, Jérôme; Banner, David; Bissantz, Caterina; Ceccarelli, Simona; Haap, Wolfgang; Körner, Matthias; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lerner, Christian; Mattei, Patrizio; Neidhart, Werner; Pinard, Emmanuel; Rudolph, Markus G; Schulz-Gasch, Tanja; Woltering, Thomas; Stahl, Martin

    2016-05-12

    We present a series of small molecule drug discovery case studies where computational methods were prospectively employed to impact Roche research projects, with the aim of highlighting those methods that provide real added value. Our brief accounts encompass a broad range of methods and techniques applied to a variety of enzymes and receptors. Most of these are based on judicious application of knowledge about molecular conformations and interactions: filling of lipophilic pockets to gain affinity or selectivity, addition of polar substituents, scaffold hopping, transfer of SAR, conformation analysis, and molecular overlays. A case study of sequence-driven focused screening is presented to illustrate how appropriate preprocessing of information enables effective exploitation of prior knowledge. We conclude that qualitative statements enabling chemists to focus on promising regions of chemical space are often more impactful than quantitative prediction. PMID:26878596

  6. Recent advances in the molecular design of synthetic vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lyn H.

    2015-12-01

    Vaccines have typically been prepared using whole organisms. These are normally either attenuated bacteria or viruses that are live but have been altered to reduce their virulence, or pathogens that have been inactivated and effectively killed through exposure to heat or formaldehyde. However, using whole organisms to elicit an immune response introduces the potential for infections arising from a reversion to a virulent form in live pathogens, unproductive reactions to vaccine components or batch-to-batch variability. Synthetic vaccines, in which a molecular antigen is conjugated to a carrier protein, offer the opportunity to circumvent these problems. This Perspective will highlight the progress that has been achieved in developing synthetic vaccines using a variety of molecular antigens. In particular, the different approaches used to develop conjugate vaccines using peptide/proteins, carbohydrates and other small molecule haptens as antigens are compared.

  7. Rational Design of Molecular Ferroelectric Materials and Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ducharme, Stephen

    2012-09-25

    The purpose of this project was to gain insight into the properties of molecular ferroelectrics through the detailed study of oligomer analogs of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). By focusing on interactions at both the molecular level and the nanoscale level, we expect to gain improved understanding about the fundamental mechanism of ferroelectricity and its key properties. The research consisted of three complementary components: 1) Rational synthesis of VDF oligomers by Prof. Takacs' group; 2) Detailed structural and electrical studies of thin by Prof. Ducharme's Group; and 3) First-principles computational studies by DOE Lab Partner Dr. Serge Nakhman-son at Argonne National Laboratory. The main results of the work was a detailed understanding of the relationships between the molecular interactions and macroscopic phenomenology of fer-roelectricity VDF oligomers. This is valuable information supporting the development of im-proved electromechanical materials for, e.g., sonar, ultrasonic imaging, artificial muscles, and compliant actuators. Other potential applications include nonvolatile ferroelectric memories, heat-sensing imaging arrays, photovoltaic devices, and functional biomimetic materials. The pro-ject contributed to the training and professional development of undergraduate students and graduate students, post-doctoral assistants, and a high-school teacher. Project personnel took part in several outreach and education activities each year.

  8. Designing bistable [2]rotaxanes for molecular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Dichtel, William R; Heath, James R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2007-06-15

    The development of molecular electronic components has been accelerated by the promise of increased circuit densities and reduced power consumption. Bistable rotaxanes have been assembled into nanowire crossbar devices, where they may be switched between low- and high-conductivity states, forming the basis for a molecular memory. These memory devices have been scaled to densities of 10(11) bits cm(-2), the 2020 node for memory of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. Investigations of the kinetics and thermodynamics associated with the electromechanical switching processes of several bistable [2]rotaxane derivatives in solution, self-assembled monolayers on gold, polymer electrolyte gels and in molecular switch tunnel junction devices are consistent with a single, universal switching mechanism whose speed is dependent largely on the environment, as well as on the structure of the switching molecule. X-ray reflectometry studies of the bistable rotaxanes assembled into Langmuir monolayers also lend support to an oxidatively driven mechanical switching process. Structural information obtained from Fourier transform reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy of rotaxane monolayers taken before and after evaporation of a Ti top electrode confirmed that the functionality responsible for switching is not affected by the metal deposition process. All the considerable experimental data, taken together with detailed computational work, support the hypothesis that the tunnelling current hysteresis, which forms the basis of memory operation, is a direct result of the electromechanical switching of the bistable rotaxanes. PMID:17430812

  9. Design and testing of digitally manufactured paraffin Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulley, Jonathan M.

    This research investigates the application of additive manufacturing techniques for fabricating hybrid rocket fuel grains composed of porous Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene impregnated with paraffin wax. The digitally manufactured ABS substrate provides mechanical support for the paraffin fuel material and serves as an additional fuel component. The embedded paraffin provides an enhanced fuel regression rate while having no detrimental effect on the thermodynamic burn properties of the fuel grain. Multiple fuel grains with various ABS-to-Paraffin mass ratios were fabricated and burned with nitrous oxide. Analytical predictions for end-to-end motor performance and fuel regression are compared against static test results. Baseline fuel grain regression calculations use an enthalpy balance energy analysis with the material and thermodynamic properties based on the mean paraffin/ABS mass fractions within the fuel grain. In support of these analytical comparisons, a novel method for propagating the fuel port burn surface was developed. In this modeling approach the fuel cross section grid is modeled as an image with white pixels representing the fuel and black pixels representing empty or burned grid cells.

  10. A novel Morse code-inspired method for multiclass motor imagery brain-computer interface (BCI) design.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Yu, Yang; Liu, Yadong; Hu, Dewen

    2015-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow disabled individuals to control external devices voluntarily, helping us to restore lost motor functions. However, the number of control commands available in MI-based BCIs remains limited, limiting the usability of BCI systems in control applications involving multiple degrees of freedom (DOF), such as control of a robot arm. To address this problem, we developed a novel Morse code-inspired method for MI-based BCI design to increase the number of output commands. Using this method, brain activities are modulated by sequences of MI (sMI) tasks, which are constructed by alternately imagining movements of the left or right hand or no motion. The codes of the sMI task was detected from EEG signals and mapped to special commands. According to permutation theory, an sMI task with N-length allows 2 × (2(N)-1) possible commands with the left and right MI tasks under self-paced conditions. To verify its feasibility, the new method was used to construct a six-class BCI system to control the arm of a humanoid robot. Four subjects participated in our experiment and the averaged accuracy of the six-class sMI tasks was 89.4%. The Cohen's kappa coefficient and the throughput of our BCI paradigm are 0.88 ± 0.060 and 23.5bits per minute (bpm), respectively. Furthermore, all of the subjects could operate an actual three-joint robot arm to grasp an object in around 49.1s using our approach. These promising results suggest that the Morse code-inspired method could be used in the design of BCIs for multi-DOF control. PMID:26340647

  11. Design Considerations and Experimental Verification of a Rail Brake Armature Based on Linear Induction Motor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yasuaki; Kashiwagi, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Sasakawa, Takashi; Fujii, Nobuo

    This paper describes the design considerations and experimental verification of an LIM rail brake armature. In order to generate power and maximize the braking force density despite the limited area between the armature and the rail and the limited space available for installation, we studied a design method that is suitable for designing an LIM rail brake armature; we considered adoption of a ring winding structure. To examine the validity of the proposed design method, we developed a prototype ring winding armature for the rail brakes and examined its electromagnetic characteristics in a dynamic test system with roller rigs. By repeating various tests, we confirmed that unnecessary magnetic field components, which were expected to be present under high speed running condition or when a ring winding armature was used, were not present. Further, the necessary magnetic field component and braking force attained the desired values. These studies have helped us to develop a basic design method that is suitable for designing the LIM rail brake armatures.

  12. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Sub-Scale Rocket Engine/Motor Design, Development and Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Seaford, Mark; Kovarik, Brian; Dufrene, Aaron; Solly, Nathan; Kirchner, Robert; Engel, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) base heating test is broken down into two test programs: (1) Pathfinder and (2) Main Test. The Pathfinder Test Program focuses on the design, development, hot-fire test and performance analyses of the 2% sub-scale SLS core-stage and booster element propulsion systems. The core-stage propulsion system is composed of four gaseous oxygen/hydrogen RS-25D model engines and the booster element is composed of two aluminum-based model solid rocket motors (SRMs). The first section of the paper discusses the motivation and test facility specifications for the test program. The second section briefly investigates the internal flow path of the design. The third section briefly shows the performance of the model RS-25D engines and SRMs for the conducted short duration hot-fire tests. Good agreement is observed based on design prediction analysis and test data. This program is a challenging research and development effort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle.

  13. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  14. Comparisons between designs for single-sided linear electric motors: Homopolar synchronous and induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nondahl, T. A.; Richter, E.

    1980-09-01

    A design study of two types of single sided (with a passive rail) linear electric machine designs, namely homopolar linear synchronous machines (LSM's) and linear induction machines (LIM's), is described. It is assumed the machines provide tractive effort for several types of light rail vehicles and locomotives. These vehicles are wheel supported and require tractive powers ranging from 200 kW to 3735 kW and top speeds ranging from 112 km/hr to 400 km/hr. All designs are made according to specified magnetic and thermal criteria. The LSM advantages are a higher power factor, much greater restoring forces for track misalignments, and less track heating. The LIM advantages are no need to synchronize the excitation frequency precisely to vehicle speed, simpler machine construction, and a more easily anchored track structure. The relative weights of the two machine types vary with excitation frequency and speed; low frequencies and low speeds favor the LSM.

  15. Directed molecular evolution to design advanced red fluorescent proteins

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Fedor V; Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have become indispensable imaging tools for biomedical research. continuing progress in fluorescence imaging, however, requires probes with additional colors and properties optimized for emerging techniques. Here we summarize strategies for development of red-shifted fluorescent proteins. We discuss possibilities for knowledge-based rational design based on the photochemistry of fluorescent proteins and the position of the chromophore in protein structure. We consider advances in library design by mutagenesis, protein expression systems and instrumentation for high-throughput screening that should yield improved fluorescent proteins for advanced imaging applications. PMID:22127219

  16. Molecular Design for Tuning Work Functions of Transparent Conducting Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Koldemir, Unsal; Braid, Jennifer L; Morgenstern, Amanda; Eberhart, Mark; Collins, Reuben T; Olson, Dana C; Sellinger, Alan

    2015-06-18

    In this Perspective, we provide a brief background on the use of aromatic phosphonic acid modifiers for tuning work functions of transparent conducting oxides, for example, zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium tin oxide (ITO). We then introduce our preliminary results in this area using conjugated phosphonic acid molecules, having a substantially larger range of dipole moments than their unconjugated analogues, leading to the tuning of ZnO and ITO electrodes over a 2 eV range as derived from Kelvin probe measurements. We have found that these work function changes are directly correlated to the magnitude and the direction of the computationally derived molecular dipole of the conjugated phosphonic acids, leading to the predictive power of computation to drive the synthesis of new and improved phosphonic acid ligands. PMID:26266603

  17. Molecular Designs for Enhancement of Polarity in Ferroelectric Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Ryo; Nakaya, Manabu; Ohmagari, Hitomi; Nakamura, Masaaki; Ohta, Kazuchika; Lindoy, Leonard F.; Hayami, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    The racemic oxovanadium(IV) salmmen complexes, [VO((rac)-(4-X-salmmen))] (X = C12C10C5 (1), C16 (2), and C18 (3); salmmen = N,N‧-monomethylenebis-salicylideneimine) with “banana shaped” molecular structures were synthesized, and their ferroelectric properties were investigated. These complexes exhibit well-defined hysteresis loops in their viscous phases, moreover, 1 also displays liquid crystal behaviour. We observed a synergetic effect influenced by three structural aspects; the methyl substituents on the ethylene backbone, the banana shaped structure and the square pyramidal metal cores all play an important role in generating the observed ferroelectricity, pointing the way to a useful strategy for the creation of advanced ferroelectric soft materials.

  18. Molecular Designs for Enhancement of Polarity in Ferroelectric Soft Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Ryo; Nakaya, Manabu; Ohmagari, Hitomi; Nakamura, Masaaki; Ohta, Kazuchika; Lindoy, Leonard F.; Hayami, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The racemic oxovanadium(IV) salmmen complexes, [VO((rac)-(4-X-salmmen))] (X = C12C10C5 (1), C16 (2), and C18 (3); salmmen = N,N′-monomethylenebis-salicylideneimine) with “banana shaped” molecular structures were synthesized, and their ferroelectric properties were investigated. These complexes exhibit well-defined hysteresis loops in their viscous phases, moreover, 1 also displays liquid crystal behaviour. We observed a synergetic effect influenced by three structural aspects; the methyl substituents on the ethylene backbone, the banana shaped structure and the square pyramidal metal cores all play an important role in generating the observed ferroelectricity, pointing the way to a useful strategy for the creation of advanced ferroelectric soft materials. PMID:26568045

  19. A Method for Extracting Sensory Motor Skills and Designing a Training System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyo, Daisuke; Ohara, Atushi; Shida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Toshiyuki; Otomo, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Two years ago, the rapid retirement of the "baby boomer artisans" in vast numbers threatened to erode the competitiveness of Japanese manufacturers (i.e., the 2007 problem). This study proposes a practical process for extracting skills and designing a training system, to accelerate the learning of skills in production fields by younger…

  20. Highway Aesthetics: The Design of Motor Vehicles. Teaching Art with Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the design of highway vehicles as one means for students to learn about forms of three-dimensional art. Focuses on the Corvette, mass-produced cars like the Chrysler Concorde, the modern semi-trailer, and an antique 1931 Dusenberg Model J Murphy Aluminum Top Coupe. (CMK)

  1. Molecular design of aminopolynitroazole-based high-energy materials.

    PubMed

    Ghule, Vikas D; Srinivas, Dharavath; Sarangapani, Radhakrishnan; Jadhav, Pandurang M; Tewari, Surya P

    2012-07-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) was employed to calculate the energetic properties of several aminopolynitroazoles. The calculations were performed to study the effect of amino and nitro substituents on the heats of formation, densities, detonation performances, thermal stabilities, and sensitivity characteristics of azoles. DFT-B3LYP, DFT-B3PW91, and MP2 methods utilizing the basis sets 6-31 G* and 6-311 G (2df, 3p) were adopted to predict HOFs via designed isodesmic reactions. All of the designed aminopolynitroazoles had heats of formation of >220 kJ mol(-1). The crystal densities of the aminopolynitroazoles were predicted with the cvff force field. All of the energetic azoles had densities of >1.83 g/cm(3). The detonation velocities and pressures were evaluated using the Kamlet-Jacobs equations, utilizing the predicted densities and heats of formation. It was found that aminopolynitroazoles have a detonation velocity of about 9.1 km/s and detonation pressure of 36 GPa. The bond dissociation energies for the C-NO(2) and N-NO(2) bonds were analyzed to investigate the stabilities of the designed molecules. The charge on the nitro group was used to assess impact sensitivity in the present study. The results obtained imply that the designed molecules are stable and are expected to be candidates for high-energy materials (HEMs). PMID:22160794

  2. Technical report analysis and design: Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 1, supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis and design effort was conducted as part of the study of solid rocket motor for a space shuttle booster. The 156-inch-diameter, parallel burn solid rocket motor was selected as its baseline because it is transportable and is the most cost-effective, reliable system that has been developed and demonstrated. The basic approach was to concentrate on the selected baseline design, and to draw from the baseline sufficient data to describe the alternate approaches also studied. The following conclusions were reached with respect to technical feasibility of the use of solid rocket booster motors for the space shuttle vehicle: (1) The 156-inch, parallel-burn baseline SRM design meets NASA's study requirements while incorporating conservative safety factors. (2) The solid rocket motor booster represents a cost-effective approach. (3) Baseline costs are conservative and are based on a demonstrated design. (4) Recovery and reuse are feasible and offer substantial cost savings. (5) Abort can be accomplished successfully. (6) Ecological effects are acceptable.

  3. Parametric electric motor study

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Stahura, D.

    1995-04-30

    Technology for the axial gap motor was developed by DOE with an investment of approximately $15 million. This development effort is for motor technologies of high power density and high efficiency. Such motors that are also small and light-weight are not available on the commercial market because high-power motors have typically been used in large industrial applications where small size and light weight are not requirements. AC Delco has been developing motors since 1918 and is interested in leveraging its research and development dollars to produce an array of motor systems for vehicles and to develop a future line of propulsion products. The DOE focus of the study was applied to machining applications. The most attractive feature of this motor is the axial air gap, which may make possible the removal of the motor`s stationary component from a total enclosure of the remainder of the machine if the power characteristics are adequate. The objectives of this project were to evaluate alternative electric drive systems for machine tools and automotive electric drive systems and to select a best machine type for each of those applications. A major challenge of this project was to produce a small, light-weight, highly efficient motor at a cost-effective price. The project developed machine and machine drive systems and design criteria for the range of applications. The final results included the creation of a baseline for developing electric vehicle powertrain system designs, conventional vehicle engine support system designs, and advanced machine tool configurations. In addition, an axial gap permanent magnet motor was built and tested, and gave, said one engineer involved, a sterling performance. This effort will commercialize advanced motor technology and extend knowledge and design capability in the most efficient electric machine design known today.

  4. Nanobiological studies on drug design using molecular mechanic method

    PubMed Central

    Ghaheh, Hooria Seyedhosseini; Mousavi, Maryam; Araghi, Mahmood; Rasoolzadeh, Reza; Hosseini, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Influenza H1N1 is very important worldwide and point mutations that occur in the virus gene are a threat for the World Health Organization (WHO) and druggists, since they could make this virus resistant to the existing antibiotics. Influenza epidemics cause severe respiratory illness in 30 to 50 million people and kill 250,000 to 500,000 people worldwide every year. Nowadays, drug design is not done through trial and error because of its cost and waste of time; therefore bioinformatics studies is essential for designing drugs. Materials and Methods: This paper, infolds a study on binding site of Neuraminidase (NA) enzyme, (that is very important in drug design) in 310K temperature and different dielectrics, for the best drug design. Information of NA enzyme was extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB) and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) websites. The new sequences of N1 were downloaded from the NCBI influenza virus sequence database. Drug binding sites were assimilated and homologized modeling using Argus lab 4.0, HyperChem 6.0 and Chem. D3 softwares. Their stability was assessed in different dielectrics and temperatures. Result: Measurements of potential energy (Kcal/mol) of binding sites of NA in different dielectrics and 310K temperature revealed that at time step size = 0 pSec drug binding sites have maximum energy level and at time step size = 100 pSec have maximum stability and minimum energy. Conclusions: Drug binding sites are more dependent on dielectric constants rather than on temperature and the optimum dielectric constant is 39/78. PMID:26605248

  5. Designer Dirac fermions and topological phases in molecular graphene.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Kenjiro K; Mar, Warren; Ko, Wonhee; Guinea, Francisco; Manoharan, Hari C

    2012-03-15

    The observation of massless Dirac fermions in monolayer graphene has generated a new area of science and technology seeking to harness charge carriers that behave relativistically within solid-state materials. Both massless and massive Dirac fermions have been studied and proposed in a growing class of Dirac materials that includes bilayer graphene, surface states of topological insulators and iron-based high-temperature superconductors. Because the accessibility of this physics is predicated on the synthesis of new materials, the quest for Dirac quasi-particles has expanded to artificial systems such as lattices comprising ultracold atoms. Here we report the emergence of Dirac fermions in a fully tunable condensed-matter system-molecular graphene-assembled by atomic manipulation of carbon monoxide molecules over a conventional two-dimensional electron system at a copper surface. Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we embed the symmetries underlying the two-dimensional Dirac equation into electron lattices, and then visualize and shape the resulting ground states. These experiments show the existence within the system of linearly dispersing, massless quasi-particles accompanied by a density of states characteristic of graphene. We then tune the quantum tunnelling between lattice sites locally to adjust the phase accrual of propagating electrons. Spatial texturing of lattice distortions produces atomically sharp p-n and p-n-p junction devices with two-dimensional control of Dirac fermion density and the power to endow Dirac particles with mass. Moreover, we apply scalar and vector potentials locally and globally to engender topologically distinct ground states and, ultimately, embedded gauge fields, wherein Dirac electrons react to 'pseudo' electric and magnetic fields present in their reference frame but absent from the laboratory frame. We demonstrate that Landau levels created by these gauge fields can be taken to the

  6. Soluble synthetic multiporphyrin arrays. 1. Molecular design and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.W.; Johnson T.E.; Lindsey, J.S.

    1996-11-13

    A set of porphyrin building blocks has been developed for the construction of light-harvesting model compounds and related molecular photonic devices. The porphyrins are facially encumbered to enhance solubility in organic solvents, are employed in a defined metalation state (free base (Fb) or zinc chelate), and bear peripheral functional groups such as iodo or ethyne for joining the porphyrins via covalent bonds. The coupling of an iodophenylporphyrin and an ethynylphenylporphyrin via mild Pd-mediated reactions (2-4 mM of each porphyrin in toluene/triethylamine (5:1) with Pd{sup 2}(dba){sup 3} and AsPh{sup 3} at 35 {degree}C for 2 h) yields the corresponding diphenylethyne-linked multiporphyrin array in 70-80% yield. The arrays are easily purified by a sequence of flash silica chromatography, preparative size exclusion chromatography, and gravity elution silica chromatography. These multiporphyrin arrays have sufficient solubility ({approx}5 mM) for routine handling in organic solvents such as toluene, CH{sup 2}Cl{sup 2}, or CHCl{sup 3}, and can be examined spectroscopically (1-10 {mu}M) in diverse solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide, and castor oil. This building block approach should make diverse multiporphyrin arrays readily available. 53 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. [Strategy of molecular drug design: hits, leads and drug candidates].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zong-ru

    2008-09-01

    Hits, leads and drug candidates constitute three millstones in the course of drug discovery and development. The definition of drug candidates is a critical point in the value chain of drug innovation, which not only differentiates the research and development stages, but more importantly, determines the perspective and destiny of the pre-clinical and clinical studies. All outcomes from the development stage are actually attributed to the chemical structure of candidates. The quality of candidates, however, is restricted by the drug-likeness of lead compounds, which in turn is decided by the characteristics of hits. The hit-to-lead is to provide a promising and druggable structure for further development, whereas the optimization of lead compounds is a process to transform an active compound into a drug, which in essence is molecular manipulation in multi-dimensional space related to pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, physico-chemical, and safety properties. This review discusses the strategic principles in hit discovery, lead identification and optimization, as well as drug candidate definition with practical examples. PMID:19048779

  8. Thin-disk piezoceramic ultrasonic motor. Part I: design and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuh Liang; Yen, Chi Yung; Ouyang, Minsun

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain the knowledge and experience in the design of thin-disk piezoceramic-driving ultrasonic actuator dedicated. In this paper, the design and construction of an innovative ultrasonic actuator is developed as a stator, which is a composite structure consisting of piezoceramic (PZT) membrane bonded on a metal sheet. Such a concentric PZT structure possesses the electrical and mechanical coupling characteristics in flexural wave. The driving ability of the actuator comes from the mechanical vibration of extension and shrinkage of a metal sheet due to the converse piezoelectric effect, corresponding to the frequency of a single-phase AC power. By applying the constraints on the specific geometry positions on the metal sheet, the various behaviors of flexural waves have been at the different directions. The rotor is impelled by the actuator with rotational speeds of 600 rpm in maximum using a friction-contact mechanism. Very high actuating and braking abilities are obtained. This simple and inexpensive structure of actuator demonstrates that the mechanical design of actuator and rotor could be done separately and flexibly according to the requirements for various applications. And, its running accuracy and positioning precision are described in Part II.A closed loop servo positioning control i.e. sliding mode control (SMC) is used to compensate automatically for nonlinearly mechanical behaviors such as dry friction, ultrasonic vibrating, slip-stick phenomena. Additionally, SMC scheme has been successfully applied to position tracking to prove the excellent robust performance in noise rejection. PMID:12853080

  9. Design of a ZVS PWM inverter for a brushless DC motor in an EMA application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. Brett; Nelms, R. M.; Shepherd, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently investigating the use of electromechanical actuators for use in space transportation applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 Vdc. This paper will discuss the design and implementation of a zero-voltage-switched PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) inverter which operates from a 270 Vdc source at currents up to 100 A.

  10. Design of a ZVS PWM inverter for a brushless DC motor in an EMA application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. Brett; Nelms, R. M.; Shepherd, Michael T.

    The Component Development Division of the Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently investigating the use of electromechanical actuators for use in space transportation applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC). These high power servomechanisms will require rugged, reliable, and compact power electronic modules capable of modulating several hundred amperes of current at up to 270 Vdc. This paper will discuss the design and implementation of a zero-voltage-switched PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) inverter which operates from a 270 Vdc source at currents up to 100 A.

  11. 30 CFR 18.34 - Motors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.34 Motors. Explosion-proof electric motor assemblies intended for use in approved equipment in underground...) Small motors (alternating- and direct-current). Motors having internal free volume not exceeding...

  12. The role of molecular motors in the mechanics of active gels and the effects of inertia, hydrodynamic interaction and compressibility in passive microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Andres Cordoba

    The mechanical properties of soft biological materials are essential to their physiological function and cannot easily be duplicated by synthetic materials. The study of the mechanical properties of biological materials has lead to the development of new rheological characterization techniques. In the technique called passive microbead rheology, the positional autocorrelation function of a micron-sized bead embedded in a viscoelastic fluid is used to infer the dynamic modulus of the fluid. Single particle microrheology is limited to fluids were the microstructure is much smaller than the size of the probe bead. To overcome this limitation in two-bead microrheology the cross-correlated thermal motion of pairs of tracer particles is used to determine the dynamic modulus. Here we present a time-domain data analysis methodology and generalized Brownian dynamics simulations to examine the effects of inertia, hydrodynamic interaction, compressibility and non-conservative forces in passive microrheology. A type of biological material that has proven specially challenging to characterize are active gels. They are formed by semiflexible polymer filaments driven by motor proteins that convert chemical energy from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to mechanical work and motion. Active gels perform essential functions in living tissue. Here we introduce a single-chain mean-field model to describe the mechanical properties of active gels. We model the semiflexible filaments as bead-spring chains and the molecular motors are accounted for by using a mean-field approach. The level of description of the model includes the end-to-end length and attachment state of the filaments, and the motor-generated forces, as stochastic state variables which evolve according to a proposed differential Chapman-Kolmogorov equation. The model allows accounting for physics that are not available in models that have been postulated on coarser levels of description. Moreover it allows

  13. Molecular Entropy, Thermal Efficiency, and Designing of Working Fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Zhiyou

    2012-06-01

    A shortage of fossil energy sources boosts the utilization of renewable energy. Among numerous novel techniques, recovering energy from low-grade heat sources through power generation via organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) is one of the focuses. Properties of working fluids are crucial for the ORC's performance. Many studies have been done to select proper working fluids or to design new working fluids. However, no researcher has systematically investigated the relationship between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. This paper has investigated the interrelations of molecular structures, molecular entropies, and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. By calculating thermal efficiencies and molecular entropies, we find that the molecular entropy is the most appropriate thermophysical property of a working fluid to determine how much energy can be converted into work and how much cannot in a system. Generally speaking, working fluids with low entropies will generally have high thermal efficiency for an ideal ORC. Based on this understanding, the direct interrelations of molecular structures and entropies provide an explicit interrelation between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies, and thus provide an insightful direction for molecular design of novel working fluids for ORCs.

  14. Molecular designs for controlling the local environments around metal ions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah A; Borovik, A S

    2015-08-18

    The functions of metal complexes are directly linked to the local environment in which they are housed; modifications to the local environment (or secondary coordination sphere) are known to produce changes in key properties of the metal centers that can affect reactivity. Noncovalent interactions are the most common and influential forces that regulate the properties of secondary coordination spheres, which leads to complexities in structure that are often difficult to achieve in synthetic systems. Using key architectural features from the active sites of metalloproteins as inspiration, we have developed molecular systems that enforce intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) around a metal center via incorporation of H-bond donors and acceptors into rigid ligand scaffolds. We have utilized these molecular species to probe mechanistic aspects of biological dioxygen activation and water oxidation. This Account describes the stabilization and characterization of unusual M-oxo and heterobimetallic complexes. These types of species have been implicated in a range of oxidative processes in biology but are often difficult to study because of their inherent reactivity. Our H-bonding ligand systems allowed us to prepare an Fe(III)-oxo species directly from the activation of O2 that was subsequently oxidized to form a monomeric Fe(IV)-oxo species with an S = 2 spin state, similar to those species proposed as key intermediates in non-heme monooxygenases. We also demonstrated that a single Mn(III)-oxo center that was prepared from water could be converted to a high-spin Mn(V)-oxo species via stepwise oxidation, a process that mimics the oxidative charging of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II. Current mechanisms for photosynthetic O-O bond formation invoke a Mn(IV)-oxyl species rather than the isoelectronic Mn(V)-oxo system as the key oxidant based on computational studies. However, there is no experimental information to support the existence of a Mn

  15. Neonicotinoid insecticides: highlights of a symposium on strategic molecular designs.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2011-04-13

    Neonicotinoids are the newest of the five major classes of insecticides (the others are chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compounds, methylcarbamates, and pyrethroids), and they make up approximately one-fourth of the world insecticide market. Nithiazine was the lead compound from Shell Development Co. in California later optimized by Shinzo Kagabu of Nihon Tokushu Noyaku Seizo to increase the potency and photostability, resulting in imidacloprid and thiacloprid. These discoveries are the basis for the International Award for Research in Agrochemicals of the American Chemical Society presented in 2010 to Professor Shinzo Kagabu. Five other neonicotinoids were added by others for the current set of seven commercial compounds. This symposium considers the progress in discovery and development of novel chemotype nicotinic insecticides with enhanced effectiveness, unique biological properties, and maximal safety. Chemorational approaches considered include physicochemical properties, metabolic activation and detoxification, and chemical and structural biology aspects potentially facilitating receptor structure-guided insecticide design. PMID:21077684

  16. Molecular Design of Near-IR Harvesting Unsymmetrical Squaraine Dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sanghoon; Mor, Gopal K.; Paulose, Maggie; Varghese, Oomman K.; Baik, Chul; Grimes, Craig A.

    2010-08-17

    The functionalized unsymmetrical benzothiazole squaraine organic sensitizers 5-carboxy-2-({3-[(3-hexylbenzothiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)methyl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxo-2-cyclobuten-1-ylidene}methyl)-1-hexyl-3,3-dimethyl-3H-indolium (hereafter named as SK-11) and 5-carboxy-2-({3-[(3-hexyl-5-methoxybenzothiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)methyl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxo-2-cyclobuten-1-ylidene}methyl)-1-hexyl-3,3-dimethyl-3H-indolium (coded as SK-12) are designed and developed to observe an intense and wider absorption band in the red/NIR wavelength region. DFT/TDDFT calculations have been performed on the two unsymmetrical squaraine sensitizers to gain insight into their electronic and optical properties. The utility of these dyes in solid state dye sensitized solar cells (SS-DSSCs) is demonstrated.

  17. Design and Fabrication of Molecular Assemblies of Conductive Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Josephine Ho-Wah

    Two new methods of fabricating multilayer Langmuir -Blodgett (LB) thin films of electrically conductive polyaniline and a novel method of constructing molecular assemblies of polyaniline via the spontaneous adsorption (SA) technique were developed. Quantitative transmission/reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, polarized ultraviolet -visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to examine the structure and composition of multilayer thin films. In the structural study of LB films fabricated from 3-octadecyl pyrrole (3-ODP), 3-octadecanoyl pyrrole (3-ODOP) and polypyrrole/3-ODOP (PPY/3-ODOP), the level of order and orientation were found to be affected by the intermolecular and intramolecular interactions between molecules. For the manipulation of polyaniline using the LB technique, stable and easily transferrable LB monolayers were formed at the air-water interface by mixing polyaniline in its emeraldine-base form (PANb) with two processing aids. Films fabricated from the PANb/StA mixture were found to be phase separated with domains of polyaniline and stearic acid while those from the PANb/PI blend were found to be miscible. Both polyaniline LB films were rendered conductive by doping with 1 M HCl or HCl vapor. Multilayer polyaniline films were also constructed via a SA process. The multilayer buildup of doped polyaniline and sulfonated polystyrene (PANi/SPS) is facilitated by the electrostatic attraction between the delocalized positive -charged defects along the PANi backbone and the negative charges present in the ionizable pendant sulfonic acid groups of the SPS. Uniform multilayer thin films with thicknesses between 20 A and 100 A were constructed on different surfaces with complex topologies. Conductivities in the level of 0.1-1 S/cm were achieved by doping the multilayer PANi/SPS films with 1 M HCl. This level of conductivity was achieved by films with as few as 4 layers of PANi/SPS, that is, films with thicknesses of about

  18. Final Report, "Molecular Design of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Catalytic Processes"

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Francisco Zaera

    2007-08-09

    The main goal of this project had been to use model systems to correlate selectivities in partial oxidation catalysis with the presence of specific sites on the surface of the catalyst. Extensive work was performed this year on characterizing oxygen-treated nickel surfaces by chemical means. Specifically, the surface chemistry of ammonia coadsorbed with atomic oxygen on Ni(110) single-crystal surfaces was studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was determined that at intermediate oxygen coverages direct ammonia adsorption on nickel sites is suppressed, but a new high-temperature reaction regime is generated at 400 K where NHx surface fragments are rehydrogenated concurrently with the production of water and molecular hydrogen. The extensive isotope scrambling and hydrogen transfer seen from nitrogen- to oxygen-containing surface intermediates, and the optimum yields seen for this 400 K state at intermediate oxygen coverages, strongly suggest the direct interaction of the adsorbed ammonia with oxygen atoms at the end of the –Ni–O- rows that form upon reconstruction of the surface. Hydrogen transfer between ammonia and oxygen appears to take place directly via hydrogen bonding, and to be reversible but biased towards water formation. An equilibrium is reached between the produced water and the reacting surface oxygen and hydrogen. The strong influence of the OH surface groups on the thermal chemistry of the adsorbed ammonia was interpreted in terms of the adsorbing geometry of the OH groups on the surface, and of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed OH and NH3 species. In terms of alcohol reactivity, the adsorption of 2-iodoethanol, a precursor for the preparation of 2-hydroxyethyl and oxametallacycle surface species, was found to lead to two configurations involving either just the iodine atom or both iodine and hydroxyl ends of the molecule. A complex chemical behavior starts around 140 K with the

  19. Conformational flexibility in designing peptides for immunology: the molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Stavrakoudis, Athanassios

    2010-09-01

    Computational modeling techniques and computer simulations have become a routine in biological sciences and have gained great attention from researchers. Molecular dynamics simulation is a valuable tool towards an understanding of the complex structure of biological systems, especially in the study of the flexibility of the biological molecules such as peptides or proteins. Peptides play a very important role in human physiology and control many of the processes involved in the immune system response. Designing new and optimal peptide vaccines is one of the hottest challenges of the 21(st) century science and it brings together researchers from different fields. Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be a helpful tool assisting laboratory work, saving financial sources and opening possibilities for exploring properties of the molecular systems that are hardly accessible by conventional experimental methods. Present review is dedicated to the recent contributions in applications of molecular dynamics simulations in peptide design for immunological purposes, such as B or T cell epitopes. PMID:20412039

  20. Structural design and molecular evolution of a cytokine receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F

    1990-01-01

    A family of cytokine receptors comprising molecules specific for a diverse group of hematopoietic factors and growth hormones has been principally defined by a striking homology of binding domains. This work proposes that the approximately 200-residue binding segment of the canonical cytokine receptor is composed of two discrete folding domains that share a significant sequence and structural resemblance. Analogous motifs are found in tandem approximately 100-amino acid domains in the extracellular segments of a receptor family formed by the interferon-alpha/beta and -gamma receptors and tissue factor, a membrane tether for a coagulation protease. Domains from the receptor supergroup reveal clear evolutionary links to fibronectin type III structures, approximately 90-amino acid modules that are typically found in cell surface molecules with adhesive functions. Predictive structural analysis of the shared receptor and fibronectin domains locates seven beta-strands in conserved regions of the chain; these strands are modeled to fold into antiparallel beta-sandwiches with a topology that is similar to immunoglobulin constant domains. These findings have strong implications for understanding the evolutionary emergence of an important class of regulatory molecules from primitive adhesive modules. In addition, the resulting double-barrel design of the receptors and the spatial clustering of conserved residues suggest a likely binding site for cytokine ligands. Images PMID:2169613

  1. Molecular Design of Benzodithiophene-Based Organic Photovoltaic Materials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huifeng; Ye, Long; Zhang, Hao; Li, Sunsun; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2016-06-22

    Advances in the design and application of highly efficient conjugated polymers and small molecules over the past years have enabled the rapid progress in the development of organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology as a promising alternative to conventional solar cells. Among the numerous OPV materials, benzodithiophene (BDT)-based polymers and small molecules have come to the fore in achieving outstanding power conversion efficiency (PCE) and breaking 10% efficiency barrier in the single junction OPV devices. Remarkably, the OPV device featured by BDT-based polymer has recently demonstrated an impressive PCE of 11.21%, indicating the great potential of this class of materials in commercial photovoltaic applications. In this review, we offered an overview of the organic photovoltaic materials based on BDT from the aspects of backbones, functional groups, alkyl chains, and device performance, trying to provide a guideline about the structure-performance relationship. We believe more exciting BDT-based photovoltaic materials and devices will be developed in the near future. PMID:27251307

  2. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert; Shin Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also

  3. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Bennett, N. Robert; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors’ assembly were also

  4. Maximizing the dielectric response of molecular thin films via quantum chemical design.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Henry M; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-12-23

    Developing high-capacitance organic gate dielectrics is critical for advances in electronic circuitry based on unconventional semiconductors. While high-dielectric constant molecular substances are known, the mechanism of dielectric response and the fundamental chemical design principles are not well understood. Using a plane-wave density functional theory formalism, we show that it is possible to map the atomic-scale dielectric profiles of molecule-based materials while capturing important bulk characteristics. For molecular films, this approach reveals how basic materials properties such as surface coverage density, molecular tilt angle, and π-system planarity can dramatically influence dielectric response. Additionally, relatively modest molecular backbone and substituent variations can be employed to substantially enhance film dielectric response. For dense surface coverages and proper molecular alignment, conjugated hydrocarbon chains can achieve dielectric constants of >8.0, more than 3 times that of analogous saturated chains, ∼2.5. However, this conjugation-related dielectric enhancement depends on proper molecular orientation and planarization, with enhancements up to 60% for proper molecular alignment with the applied field and an additional 30% for conformations such as coplanarity in extended π-systems. Conjugation length is not the only determinant of dielectric response, and appended polarizable high-Z substituents can increase molecular film response more than 2-fold, affording estimated capacitances of >9.0 μF/cm2. However, in large π-systems, polar substituent effects are substantially attenuated. PMID:25415650

  5. Development of design information for molecular-sieve type regenerative CO2-removal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. M.; Ruder, J. M.; Dunn, V. B.; Hwang, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytic studies were conducted with molecular sieve sorbents to provide basic design information, and to develop a system design technique for regenerable CO2-removal systems for manned spacecraft. Single sorbate equilibrium data were obtained over a wide range of conditions for CO2, water, nitrogen, and oxygen on several molecular sieve and silica gel sorbents. The coadsorption of CO2 with water preloads, and with oxygen and nitrogen was experimentally evaluated. Mass-transfer, and some limited heat-transfer performance evaluations were accomplished under representative operating conditions, including the coadsorption of CO2 and water. CO2-removal system performance prediction capability was derived.

  6. Chemistry: No turning back for motorized molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayden, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Two molecular motors have been developed that use chemical energy to drive rotational motion in a single direction. The findings bring the prospect of devices powered by such motors a tantalizing step closer. See Letter p.235

  7. Magnetically Coupled Adjustable Speed Motor Drives - Motor Tip Sheet #13

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Alternating current electric motors rotate at a nearly constant speed that is determined by motor design and line frequency. Energy savings of 50% or more may be available when fixed speed systems are modified to allow the motor speed to match variable load requirements of a centrifugal fan or pump.

  8. Optimal control strategy design based on dynamic programming for a dual-motor coupling-propulsion system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Chengning; Han, Guangwei; Wang, Qinghui

    2014-01-01

    A dual-motor coupling-propulsion electric bus (DMCPEB) is modeled, and its optimal control strategy is studied in this paper. The necessary dynamic features of energy loss for subsystems is modeled. Dynamic programming (DP) technique is applied to find the optimal control strategy including upshift threshold, downshift threshold, and power split ratio between the main motor and auxiliary motor. Improved control rules are extracted from the DP-based control solution, forming near-optimal control strategies. Simulation results demonstrate that a significant improvement in reducing energy loss due to the dual-motor coupling-propulsion system (DMCPS) running is realized without increasing the frequency of the mode switch. PMID:25540814

  9. Optimal Control Strategy Design Based on Dynamic Programming for a Dual-Motor Coupling-Propulsion System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Chengning; Han, Guangwei; Wang, Qinghui

    2014-01-01

    A dual-motor coupling-propulsion electric bus (DMCPEB) is modeled, and its optimal control strategy is studied in this paper. The necessary dynamic features of energy loss for subsystems is modeled. Dynamic programming (DP) technique is applied to find the optimal control strategy including upshift threshold, downshift threshold, and power split ratio between the main motor and auxiliary motor. Improved control rules are extracted from the DP-based control solution, forming near-optimal control strategies. Simulation results demonstrate that a significant improvement in reducing energy loss due to the dual-motor coupling-propulsion system (DMCPS) running is realized without increasing the frequency of the mode switch. PMID:25540814

  10. The Botulinum Toxin as a Therapeutic Agent: Molecular Structure and Mechanism of Action in Motor and Sensory Systems.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Dhaliwal, Harkiran Preet; Kukreja, Roshan Vijay; Singh, Bal Ram

    2016-02-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) produced by Clostridium botulinum is the most potent molecule known to mankind. Higher potency of BoNT is attributed to several factors, including structural and functional uniqueness, target specificity, and longevity. Although BoNT is an extremely toxic molecule, it is now increasingly used for the treatment of disorders related to muscle hyperactivity and glandular hyperactivity. Weakening of muscles due to peripheral action of BoNT produces a therapeutic effect. Depending on the target tissue, BoNT can block the cholinergic neuromuscular or cholinergic autonomic innervation of exocrine glands and smooth muscles. In recent observations of the analgesic properties of BoNT, the toxin modifies the sensory feedback loop to the central nervous system. Differential effects of BoNT in excitatory and inhibitory neurons provide a unique therapeutic tool. In this review the authors briefly summarize the structure and mechanism of actions of BoNT on motor and sensory neurons to explain its therapeutic effects and future potential. PMID:26866491

  11. Second generation light-driven molecular motors. Unidirectional rotation controlled by a single stereogenic center with near-perfect photoequilibria and acceleration of the speed of rotation by structural modification.

    PubMed

    Koumura, Nagatoshi; Geertsema, Edzard M; van Gelder, Marc B; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Ben L

    2002-05-01

    Nine new molecular motors, consisting of a 2,3-dihydro-2-methylnaphtho[2,1-b]thiopyran or 2,3-dihydro-3-methylphenanthrene upper part and a (thio)xanthene, 10,10-dimethylanthracene, or dibenzocycloheptene lower part, connected by a central double bond, were synthesized. A single stereogenic center, bearing a methyl substituent, is present in each of the motors. MOPAC93-AM1 calculations, NMR studies, and X-ray analysis revealed that these compounds have stable isomers with pseudoaxial orientation of the methyl substituent and less-stable isomers with pseudoequatorial orientation of the methyl substituent. The photochemical and thermal isomerization processes of the motors were studied by NMR and CD spectroscopy. The new molecular motors all show two cis-trans isomerizations upon irradiation, each followed by a thermal helix inversion, resulting in a 360 degrees rotation around the central double bond of the upper part with respect to the lower part. The direction of rotation is controlled by a single stereogenic center created by the methyl substituent at the upper part. The speed of rotation, governed by the two thermal steps, was adjusted to a great extent by structural modifications, with half-lives for the thermal isomerization steps ranging from t(1/2)(theta) 233-0.67 h. The photochemical conversions of two new motors proceeded with near-perfect photoequilibria of 1:99. PMID:11982368

  12. Computational design of intrinsic molecular rectifiers based on asymmetric functionalization of N-phenylbenzamide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ding, Wendu; Koepf, Matthieu; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Batra, Arunabh; Venkataraman, Latha; Negre, Christian F. A.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-11-03

    Here, we report a systematic computational search of molecular frameworks for intrinsic rectification of electron transport. The screening of molecular rectifiers includes 52 molecules and conformers spanning over 9 series of structural motifs. N-Phenylbenzamide is found to be a promising framework with both suitable conductance and rectification properties. A targeted screening performed on 30 additional derivatives and conformers of N-phenylbenzamide yielded enhanced rectification based on asymmetric functionalization. We demonstrate that electron-donating substituent groups that maintain an asymmetric distribution of charge in the dominant transport channel (e.g., HOMO) enhance rectification by raising the channel closer to the Fermi level. These findingsmore » are particularly valuable for the design of molecular assemblies that could ensure directionality of electron transport in a wide range of applications, from molecular electronics to catalytic reactions.« less

  13. Computational design of intrinsic molecular rectifiers based on asymmetric functionalization of N-phenylbenzamide

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Wendu; Koepf, Matthieu; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Batra, Arunabh; Venkataraman, Latha; Negre, Christian F. A.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-11-03

    Here, we report a systematic computational search of molecular frameworks for intrinsic rectification of electron transport. The screening of molecular rectifiers includes 52 molecules and conformers spanning over 9 series of structural motifs. N-Phenylbenzamide is found to be a promising framework with both suitable conductance and rectification properties. A targeted screening performed on 30 additional derivatives and conformers of N-phenylbenzamide yielded enhanced rectification based on asymmetric functionalization. We demonstrate that electron-donating substituent groups that maintain an asymmetric distribution of charge in the dominant transport channel (e.g., HOMO) enhance rectification by raising the channel closer to the Fermi level. These findings are particularly valuable for the design of molecular assemblies that could ensure directionality of electron transport in a wide range of applications, from molecular electronics to catalytic reactions.

  14. Booster separation motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, testing, evaluation and flight qualification of the space shuttle booster separation motor is discussed. Delivery of flight hardware to support the research and development flights of the space shuttle is discussed.

  15. Molecular, Physiological, and Motor Performance Defects in DMSXL Mice Carrying >1,000 CTG Repeats from the Human DM1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Aline; Medja, Fadia; Nicole, Annie; Vignaud, Alban; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Ferry, Arnaud; Decostre, Valérie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Baraibar, Martin; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Puymirat, Jack; Bassez, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3′UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro–RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice). After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice). Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing), were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances). We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic therapeutic

  16. A New Type of Motor: Pneumatic Step Motor

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Kavoussi, Louis

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of pneumatic motor, a pneumatic step motor (PneuStep). Directional rotary motion of discrete displacement is achieved by sequentially pressurizing the three ports of the motor. Pulsed pressure waves are generated by a remote pneumatic distributor. The motor assembly includes a motor, gearhead, and incremental position encoder in a compact, central bore construction. A special electronic driver is used to control the new motor with electric stepper indexers and standard motion control cards. The motor accepts open-loop step operation as well as closed-loop control with position feedback from the enclosed sensor. A special control feature is implemented to adapt classic control algorithms to the new motor, and is experimentally validated. The speed performance of the motor degrades with the length of the pneumatic hoses between the distributor and motor. Experimental results are presented to reveal this behavior and set the expectation level. Nevertheless, the stepper achieves easily controllable precise motion unlike other pneumatic motors. The motor was designed to be compatible with magnetic resonance medical imaging equipment, for actuating an image-guided intervention robot, for medical applications. For this reason, the motors were entirely made of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, and rubbers. Encoding was performed with fiber optics, so that the motors are electricity free, exclusively using pressure and light. PneuStep is readily applicable to other pneumatic or hydraulic precision-motion applications. PMID:21528106

  17. A New Type of Motor: Pneumatic Step Motor.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Kavoussi, Louis

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a new type of pneumatic motor, a pneumatic step motor (PneuStep). Directional rotary motion of discrete displacement is achieved by sequentially pressurizing the three ports of the motor. Pulsed pressure waves are generated by a remote pneumatic distributor. The motor assembly includes a motor, gearhead, and incremental position encoder in a compact, central bore construction. A special electronic driver is used to control the new motor with electric stepper indexers and standard motion control cards. The motor accepts open-loop step operation as well as closed-loop control with position feedback from the enclosed sensor. A special control feature is implemented to adapt classic control algorithms to the new motor, and is experimentally validated. The speed performance of the motor degrades with the length of the pneumatic hoses between the distributor and motor. Experimental results are presented to reveal this behavior and set the expectation level. Nevertheless, the stepper achieves easily controllable precise motion unlike other pneumatic motors. The motor was designed to be compatible with magnetic resonance medical imaging equipment, for actuating an image-guided intervention robot, for medical applications. For this reason, the motors were entirely made of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, and rubbers. Encoding was performed with fiber optics, so that the motors are electricity free, exclusively using pressure and light. PneuStep is readily applicable to other pneumatic or hydraulic precision-motion applications. PMID:21528106

  18. Molecular docking as a popular tool in drug design, an in silico travel.

    PubMed

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Blossey, Ralf; Lensink, Marc F

    2016-01-01

    New molecular modeling approaches, driven by rapidly improving computational platforms, have allowed many success stories for the use of computer-assisted drug design in the discovery of new mechanism-or structure-based drugs. In this overview, we highlight three aspects of the use of molecular docking. First, we discuss the combination of molecular and quantum mechanics to investigate an unusual enzymatic mechanism of a flavoprotein. Second, we present recent advances in anti-infectious agents' synthesis driven by structural insights. At the end, we focus on larger biological complexes made by protein-protein interactions and discuss their relevance in drug design. This review provides information on how these large systems, even in the presence of the solvent, can be investigated with the outlook of drug discovery. PMID:27390530

  19. Molecular docking as a popular tool in drug design, an in silico travel

    PubMed Central

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Blossey, Ralf; Lensink, Marc F

    2016-01-01

    New molecular modeling approaches, driven by rapidly improving computational platforms, have allowed many success stories for the use of computer-assisted drug design in the discovery of new mechanism-or structure-based drugs. In this overview, we highlight three aspects of the use of molecular docking. First, we discuss the combination of molecular and quantum mechanics to investigate an unusual enzymatic mechanism of a flavoprotein. Second, we present recent advances in anti-infectious agents’ synthesis driven by structural insights. At the end, we focus on larger biological complexes made by protein–protein interactions and discuss their relevance in drug design. This review provides information on how these large systems, even in the presence of the solvent, can be investigated with the outlook of drug discovery. PMID:27390530

  20. Closed-Loop Motor-Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Delcher, Ray C.; Huston, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic motor-speed control circuit designed to operate in electrically noisy environment. Includes optoelectronic pick-up device, placed inside motor housing to provide speed feedback signal. Automatically maintains speed motor at commanded value. Measures speed of motor in terms of frequency of pulses of infrared light chopped by fan blades of motor. Difference between measured and commanded speeds serves as control signal for external amplifier driving motor. Major advantage of circuit is low cost.

  1. The Autophagy Receptor TAX1BP1 and the Molecular Motor Myosin VI Are Required for Clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium by Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tumbarello, David A; Manna, Paul T; Allen, Mark; Bycroft, Mark; Arden, Susan D; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy plays a key role during Salmonella infection, by eliminating these pathogens following escape into the cytosol. In this process, selective autophagy receptors, including the myosin VI adaptor proteins optineurin and NDP52, have been shown to recognize cytosolic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that myosin VI and TAX1BP1 are recruited to ubiquitylated Salmonella and play a key role in xenophagy. The absence of TAX1BP1 causes an accumulation of ubiquitin-positive Salmonella, whereas loss of myosin VI leads to an increase in ubiquitylated and LC3-positive bacteria. Our structural studies demonstrate that the ubiquitin-binding site of TAX1BP1 overlaps with the myosin VI binding site and point mutations in the TAX1BP1 zinc finger domains that affect ubiquitin binding also ablate binding to myosin VI. This mutually exclusive binding and the association of TAX1BP1 with LC3 on the outer limiting membrane of autophagosomes may suggest a molecular mechanism for recruitment of this motor to autophagosomes. The predominant role of TAX1BP1, a paralogue of NDP52, in xenophagy is supported by our evolutionary analysis, which demonstrates that functionally intact NDP52 is missing in Xenopus and mice, whereas TAX1BP1 is expressed in all vertebrates analysed. In summary, this work highlights the importance of TAX1BP1 as a novel autophagy receptor in myosin VI-mediated xenophagy. Our study identifies essential new machinery for the autophagy-dependent clearance of Salmonella typhimurium and suggests modulation of myosin VI motor activity as a potential therapeutic target in cellular immunity. PMID:26451915

  2. The Autophagy Receptor TAX1BP1 and the Molecular Motor Myosin VI Are Required for Clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tumbarello, David A.; Manna, Paul T.; Allen, Mark; Bycroft, Mark; Arden, Susan D.; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays a key role during Salmonella infection, by eliminating these pathogens following escape into the cytosol. In this process, selective autophagy receptors, including the myosin VI adaptor proteins optineurin and NDP52, have been shown to recognize cytosolic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that myosin VI and TAX1BP1 are recruited to ubiquitylated Salmonella and play a key role in xenophagy. The absence of TAX1BP1 causes an accumulation of ubiquitin-positive Salmonella, whereas loss of myosin VI leads to an increase in ubiquitylated and LC3-positive bacteria. Our structural studies demonstrate that the ubiquitin-binding site of TAX1BP1 overlaps with the myosin VI binding site and point mutations in the TAX1BP1 zinc finger domains that affect ubiquitin binding also ablate binding to myosin VI. This mutually exclusive binding and the association of TAX1BP1 with LC3 on the outer limiting membrane of autophagosomes may suggest a molecular mechanism for recruitment of this motor to autophagosomes. The predominant role of TAX1BP1, a paralogue of NDP52, in xenophagy is supported by our evolutionary analysis, which demonstrates that functionally intact NDP52 is missing in Xenopus and mice, whereas TAX1BP1 is expressed in all vertebrates analysed. In summary, this work highlights the importance of TAX1BP1 as a novel autophagy receptor in myosin VI-mediated xenophagy. Our study identifies essential new machinery for the autophagy-dependent clearance of Salmonella typhimurium and suggests modulation of myosin VI motor activity as a potential therapeutic target in cellular immunity. PMID:26451915

  3. Giant Atomic and Molecular Models and Other Lecture Demonstration Devices Designed for Concrete Operational Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1983-01-01

    Describes the design, construction, and use of oversize lecture-demonstration atomic/molecular models. These models appeal to both concrete and formal operational students. Also describes construction and use of an "spdf" sandwich board and an experiment using attribute blocks. (JN)

  4. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  5. Web-Supported Chemistry Education: Design of an Online Tutorial for Learning Molecular Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Ali; Harwood, William S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes our use of the ADDIE protocol to design and develop an interactive tutorial for students learning molecular symmetry operations and point groups. The tutorial provides a 3-D environment where students can examine molecules, structures, and symmetry elements. Most such tutorials are connected to courses or instructors in…

  6. Spiranic BODIPYs: a ground-breaking design to improve the energy transfer in molecular cassettes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Gartzia-Rivero, Leire; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Ortiz, María J; Bañuelos, Jorge; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; de la Moya, Santiago

    2014-10-28

    Boosted excitation energy transfer in spiranic O-BODIPY/polyarene cassettes, when compared with the parent non-spiranic (flexible) system, is highlighted as a proof for the ability of a new structural design to improve the energy transfer in molecular cassettes. PMID:25207836

  7. Rational peptide design for functional materials via molecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Karthikan

    Supra-molecular self-assembly of rationally designed peptides is a promising approach to construct functional materials. This thesis specifically focuses on hydrogels, an important class of materials with potential for applications in tissue engineering, drug delivery and micro-fluidic systems. The objective is to design short peptides that would specifically adopt a stimulus dependent conformation that is strongly amenable to self-assembly resulting in material formation. With this concept the rational design of a 20 amino acid peptide (MAX1) that folds into an amphiphilic beta-hairpin structure and then self-assembles to form a rigid hydrogel under alkaline conditions is presented. The molecular level conformation of MAX1 was characterized using circular dichroism and FTIR spectroscopies. The mesoscale structure of the hydrogel assessed using confocal and transmission electron micron microscopies and neutron scattering techniques shows that peptide self-assembly results in the formation of fibrils that are homogeneously 3 nm in diameter. The mechanical properties of the hydrogel probed using oscillatory rheology shows that MAX1 forms a stiff hydrogel. Since the self-assembly process is coupled to the intra-molecularly folded state of the peptide, stimulus responsiveness can be specifically engineered into the sequence by rational design. This was demonstrated in the design of peptides that form hydrogels in response to a specific stimulus such as temperature, pH or ionic strength. The significance of peptide design in the context of self-assembly and its relationship to the nanostructure was studied by designing a series of peptides derived from MAX1. Evolving from these studies is an understanding of the relationship between molecular level peptide structure and the nanoscale supra-molecular morphology. Based on this, it has been shown that alternate morphologies distinct from those observed with the gel forming peptides, such as non-twisting laminates or tube

  8. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  9. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT XIX, LEARNING ABOUT CRANKING MOTORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATING PRINCIPLES OF CRANKING MOTORS USED ON DIESEL POWERED EQUIPMENT, TOPICS ARE (1) CRANKING MOTORS. (2) MOTOR PINCIPLES, (3) CRANKING MOTOR CIRCUITS, (4) TYPES OF CRANKING MOTOR DRIVES, AND (5) CRANKING MOTOR SOLENOID CIRCUITS. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A…

  10. Computer-Aided Molecular Design of Bis-phosphine Oxide Lanthanide Extractants.

    PubMed

    McCann, Billy W; Silva, Nuwan De; Windus, Theresa L; Gordon, Mark S; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Hay, Benjamin P

    2016-06-20

    Computer-aided molecular design and high-throughput screening of viable host architectures can significantly reduce the efforts in the design of novel ligands for efficient extraction of rare earth elements. This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of bis-phosphine oxide host architectures that are structurally organized for complexation of trivalent lanthanides. Molecule building software, HostDesigner, was interfaced with molecular mechanics software, PCModel, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential R2(O)P-link-P(O)R2 ligand geometries. The molecular mechanics ranking of ligand structures is consistent with both the solution-phase free energies of complexation obtained with density functional theory and the performance of known bis-phosphine oxide extractants. For the case where the link is -CH2-, evaluation of the ligand geometry provides the first characterization of a steric origin for the "anomalous aryl strengthening" effect. The design approach has identified a number of novel bis-phosphine oxide ligands that are better organized for lanthanide complexation than previously studied examples. PMID:26883005

  11. Metal-organic Frameworks as A Tunable Platform for Designing Functional Molecular Materials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Liu, Demin

    2013-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as coordination polymers, represent an interesting class of crystalline molecular materials that are synthesized by combining metal-connecting points and bridging ligands. The modular nature of and mild conditions for MOF synthesis have permitted the rational structural design of numerous MOFs and the incorporation of various functionalities via constituent building blocks. The resulting designer MOFs have shown promise for applications in a number of areas, including gas storage/separation, nonlinear optics/ferroelectricity, catalysis, energy conversion/storage, chemical sensing, biomedical imaging, and drug delivery. The structure-property relationships of MOFs can also be readily established by taking advantage of the knowledge of their detailed atomic structures, which enables fine-tuning of their functionalities for desired applications. Through the combination of molecular synthesis and crystal engineering MOFs thus present an unprecedented opportunity for the rational and precise design of functional materials. PMID:23944646

  12. An autonomous chemically fuelled small-molecule motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Miriam R.; Solà, Jordi; Carlone, Armando; Goldup, Stephen M.; Lebrasseur, Nathalie; Leigh, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular machines are among the most complex of all functional molecules and lie at the heart of nearly every biological process. A number of synthetic small-molecule machines have been developed, including molecular muscles, synthesizers, pumps, walkers, transporters and light-driven and electrically driven rotary motors. However, although biological molecular motors are powered by chemical gradients or the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), so far there are no synthetic small-molecule motors that can operate autonomously using chemical energy (that is, the components move with net directionality as long as a chemical fuel is present). Here we describe a system in which a small molecular ring (macrocycle) is continuously transported directionally around a cyclic molecular track when powered by irreversible reactions of a chemical fuel, 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride. Key to the design is that the rate of reaction of this fuel with reactive sites on the cyclic track is faster when the macrocycle is far from the reactive site than when it is near to it. We find that a bulky pyridine-based catalyst promotes carbonate-forming reactions that ratchet the displacement of the macrocycle away from the reactive sites on the track. Under reaction conditions where both attachment and cleavage of the 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl groups occur through different processes, and the cleavage reaction occurs at a rate independent of macrocycle location, net directional rotation of the molecular motor continues for as long as unreacted fuel remains. We anticipate that autonomous chemically fuelled molecular motors will find application as engines in molecular nanotechnology.

  13. An autonomous chemically fuelled small-molecule motor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Miriam R; Solà, Jordi; Carlone, Armando; Goldup, Stephen M; Lebrasseur, Nathalie; Leigh, David A

    2016-06-01

    Molecular machines are among the most complex of all functional molecules and lie at the heart of nearly every biological process. A number of synthetic small-molecule machines have been developed, including molecular muscles, synthesizers, pumps, walkers, transporters and light-driven and electrically driven rotary motors. However, although biological molecular motors are powered by chemical gradients or the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), so far there are no synthetic small-molecule motors that can operate autonomously using chemical energy (that is, the components move with net directionality as long as a chemical fuel is present). Here we describe a system in which a small molecular ring (macrocycle) is continuously transported directionally around a cyclic molecular track when powered by irreversible reactions of a chemical fuel, 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride. Key to the design is that the rate of reaction of this fuel with reactive sites on the cyclic track is faster when the macrocycle is far from the reactive site than when it is near to it. We find that a bulky pyridine-based catalyst promotes carbonate-forming reactions that ratchet the displacement of the macrocycle away from the reactive sites on the track. Under reaction conditions where both attachment and cleavage of the 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl groups occur through different processes, and the cleavage reaction occurs at a rate independent of macrocycle location, net directional rotation of the molecular motor continues for as long as unreacted fuel remains. We anticipate that autonomous chemically fuelled molecular motors will find application as engines in molecular nanotechnology. PMID:27279219

  14. Design Molecular Recognition Materials for Chiral Sensors, Separtations and Catalytic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, S.; Nenoff, T.M.; Provencio, P.; Qiu, Y.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Thoma, S.G.; Zhang, J.

    1998-11-01

    The goal is the development of materials that are highly sensitive and selective for chid chemicals and biochemical (such as insecticides, herbicides, proteins, and nerve agents) to be used as sensors, catalysts and separations membranes. Molecular modeling methods are being used to tailor chiral molecular recognition sites with high affinity and selectivity for specified agents. The work focuses on both silicate and non-silicate materials modified with chirally-pure fictional groups for the catalysis or separations of enantiomerically-pure molecules. Surfactant and quaternary amine templating is being used to synthesize porous frameworks, containing mesopores of 30 to 100 angstroms. Computer molecukw modeling methods are being used in the design of these materials, especially in the chid surface- modi~ing agents. Molecular modeling is also being used to predict the catalytic and separations selectivities of the modified mesoporous materials. The ability to design and synthesize tailored asymmetric molecular recognition sites for sensor coatings allows a broader range of chemicals to be sensed with the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. Initial experiments target the selective sensing of small molecule gases and non-toxic model neural compounds. Further efforts will address designing sensors that greatly extend the variety of resolvable chemical species and forming a predictive, model-based method for developing advanced sensors.

  15. Flywheel Size Design Considerations and Experimental Verification Using a 50-kW System for Voltage Sag Compensator with Flywheel Induction Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shuhei; Cheng, Miao-Miao; Sumitani, Hideo; Shimada, Ryuichi

    Flywheel energy storage systems can be used as uninterrupted power supply system because they are environmentally friendly and have high durability. The use of a simple voltage sag compensator with a low-speed heavy flywheel and a low-cost squirrel-cage induction motor/generator is proposed. First, the ability of the proposed system to maintain the load voltage at 100% when the grid is under voltage sag is experimentally-validated. Next, design guides of the flywheel stored energy are discussed. Experimental verification of a 50-kW class system are carried out, and the results show good agreement with the developed design guides.

  16. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR BEAM SURFACE SCATTERING APPARATUS FOR VELOCITY AND ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ceyer, S. T.; Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1980-11-01

    A molecular beam surface scattering apparatus designed for the study of corrosion and catalyticsurfacereactions is described. The apparatus incorporates two molecular or atomic beams aimed at a surface characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), a rotatable, differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a versatile manipulator. Angular distributions and energy distributions as a funcion of angle and independent of the surface residence time can be measured. Typical data for the oxidation of deuterium to D{sub 2}O on a Pt(lll) crystal surface are presented.

  17. Electronic structure of covalently linked zinc bacteriochlorin molecular arrays: insights into molecular design for NIR light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kushal; González-Delgado, Jessica M; Blew, James H; Jakubikova, Elena

    2014-10-23

    Pigment-based molecular arrays, especially those based on porphyrins, have been extensively studied as viable components of artificial light harvesting devices. Unlike porphyrins, bacteriochlorins absorb strongly in the NIR, yet little is known of the applicability of covalently linked bacteriochlorin-based arrays in this arena. To lay the foundation for future studies of excited state properties of such arrays, we present a systematic study of the ground state electronic structure of zinc bacteriochlorin (ZnBC) molecular arrays with various linkers and linker attachment sites (meso vs β) employing density functional theory in combination with the energy-based fragmentation (EBF) method, and the EBF with molecular orbitals (EBF-MO) method. We find that the level of steric hindrance between the ZnBC and the linker is directly correlated with the amount of ground sate electronic interactions between the ZnBCs. Low steric hindrance between the ZnBC and the linker found in alkyne-linked arrays results in strongly interacting arrays that are characterized by a decrease in the HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, large orbital energy dispersion in the frontier region, and low ZnBC-linker rotational barriers. In contrast, sterically hindered linkers, such as aryl-based linkers, result in weakly interacting arrays characterized by increased orbital energy degeneracy in the frontier region and high ZnBC-linker rotational barriers. For all linkers studied, the level of steric hindrance decreases when the ZnBCs are linked at the β position. Hence, ZnBC arrays that exhibit strong, weak, or intermediate ground-state electronic interactions can be realized by adjusting the level of steric hindrance with a judicious choice of the linker type and linker attachment site. Such tuning may be essential for design of light harvesting arrays with desired spectral properties. PMID:25237715

  18. Organizing motor imageries.

    PubMed

    Hanakawa, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few decades, motor imagery has attracted the attention of researchers as a prototypical example of 'embodied cognition' and also as a basis for neuro-rehabilitation and brain-machine interfaces. The current definition of motor imagery is widely accepted, but it is important to note that various abilities rather than a single cognitive entity are dealt with under a single term. Here, motor imagery has been characterized based on four factors: (1) motor control, (2) explicitness, (3) sensory modalities, and (4) agency. Sorting out these factors characterizing motor imagery may explain some discrepancies and variability in the findings from previous studies and will help to optimize a study design in accordance with the purpose of each study in the future. PMID:26602980

  19. Reducing aquatic hazards of industrial chemicals: probabilistic assessment of sustainable molecular design guidelines.

    PubMed

    Connors, Kristin A; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina M; Kostal, Jakub; Anastas, Paul; Zimmerman, Julie B; Brooks, Bryan W

    2014-08-01

    Basic toxicological information is lacking for the majority of industrial chemicals. In addition to increasing empirical toxicity data through additional testing, prospective computational approaches to drug development aim to serve as a rational basis for the design of chemicals with reduced toxicity. Recent work has resulted in the derivation of a "rule of 2," wherein chemicals with an octanol-water partition coefficient (log P) less than 2 and a difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital (ΔE) greater than 9 (log P<2 and ΔE >9 eV) are predicted to be 4 to 5 times less likely to elicit acute or chronic toxicity to model aquatic organisms. The present study examines potential reduction of aquatic toxicity hazards from industrial chemicals if these 2 molecular design guidelines were employed. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches were used to model the likelihood of encountering industrial chemicals exceeding toxicological categories of concern both with and without the rule of 2. Modeling predicted that utilization of these molecular design guidelines for log P and ΔE would appreciably decrease the number of chemicals that would be designated to be of "high" and "very high" concern for acute and chronic toxicity to standard model aquatic organisms and end points as defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. For example, 14.5% of chemicals were categorized as having high and very high acute toxicity to the fathead minnow model, whereas only 3.3% of chemicals conforming to the design guidelines were predicted to be in these categories. Considerations of specific chemical classes (e.g., aldehydes), chemical attributes (e.g., ionization), and adverse outcome pathways in representative species (e.g., receptor-mediated responses) could be used to derive future property guidelines for broader classes of contaminants. PMID:24839109

  20. The Interrelationship of Helicase and Nuclease Domains during DNA Translocation by the Molecular Motor EcoR124I

    PubMed Central

    Šišáková, Eva; Weiserová, Marie; Dekker, Cees; Seidel, Ralf; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The type I restriction–modification enzyme EcoR124I comprises three subunits with the stoichiometry HsdR2/HsdM2/HsdS1. The HsdR subunits are archetypical examples of the fusion between nuclease and helicase domains into a single polypeptide, a linkage that is found in a great many other DNA processing enzymes. To explore the interrelationship between these physically linked domains, we examined the DNA translocation properties of EcoR124I complexes in which the HsdR subunits had been mutated in the RecB-like nuclease motif II or III. We found that nuclease mutations can have multiple effects on DNA translocation despite being distinct from the helicase domain. In addition to reductions in DNA cleavage activity, we also observed decreased translocation and ATPase rates, different enzyme populations with different characteristic translocation rates, a tendency to stall during initiation and altered HsdR turnover dynamics. The significance of these observations to our understanding of domain interactions in molecular machines is discussed. PMID:18952104