Science.gov

Sample records for molecularly thin alkane

  1. Thermally driven smoothening of molecular thin films: Structural transitions in n-alkane layers studied in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithan, Linus; Meister, Eduard; Jin, Chenyu; Weber, Christopher; Zykov, Anton; Sauer, Katrein; Brütting, Wolfgang; Riegler, Hans; Opitz, Andreas; Kowarik, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    We use thermal annealing to improve smoothness and to increase the lateral size of crystalline islands of n-tetratetracontane (TTC, C44H90) films. With in situ x-ray diffraction, we find an optimum temperature range leading to improved texture and crystallinity while avoiding an irreversible phase transition that reduces crystallinity again. We employ real-time optical phase contrast microscopy with sub-nm height resolution to track the diffusion of TTC across monomolecular step edges which causes the unusual smoothing of a molecular thin film during annealing. We show that the lateral island sizes increase by more than one order of magnitude from 0.5 μm to 10 μm. This desirable behavior of 2d-Ostwald ripening and smoothing is in contrast to many other organic molecular films where annealing leads to dewetting, roughening, and a pronounced 3d morphology. We rationalize the smoothing behavior with the highly anisotropic attachment energies and low surface energies for TTC. The results are technically relevant for the use of TTC as passivation layer and as gate dielectric in organic field effect transistors.

  2. Thermally driven smoothening of molecular thin films: Structural transitions in n-alkane layers studied in real-time.

    PubMed

    Pithan, Linus; Meister, Eduard; Jin, Chenyu; Weber, Christopher; Zykov, Anton; Sauer, Katrein; Brütting, Wolfgang; Riegler, Hans; Opitz, Andreas; Kowarik, Stefan

    2015-10-28

    We use thermal annealing to improve smoothness and to increase the lateral size of crystalline islands of n-tetratetracontane (TTC, C44H90) films. With in situ x-ray diffraction, we find an optimum temperature range leading to improved texture and crystallinity while avoiding an irreversible phase transition that reduces crystallinity again. We employ real-time optical phase contrast microscopy with sub-nm height resolution to track the diffusion of TTC across monomolecular step edges which causes the unusual smoothing of a molecular thin film during annealing. We show that the lateral island sizes increase by more than one order of magnitude from 0.5 μm to 10 μm. This desirable behavior of 2d-Ostwald ripening and smoothing is in contrast to many other organic molecular films where annealing leads to dewetting, roughening, and a pronounced 3d morphology. We rationalize the smoothing behavior with the highly anisotropic attachment energies and low surface energies for TTC. The results are technically relevant for the use of TTC as passivation layer and as gate dielectric in organic field effect transistors. PMID:26520543

  3. Thermally driven smoothening of molecular thin films: Structural transitions in n-alkane layers studied in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Pithan, Linus; Weber, Christopher; Zykov, Anton; Sauer, Katrein; Opitz, Andreas; Kowarik, Stefan; Meister, Eduard; Brütting, Wolfgang; Jin, Chenyu; Riegler, Hans

    2015-10-28

    We use thermal annealing to improve smoothness and to increase the lateral size of crystalline islands of n-tetratetracontane (TTC, C{sub 44}H{sub 90}) films. With in situ x-ray diffraction, we find an optimum temperature range leading to improved texture and crystallinity while avoiding an irreversible phase transition that reduces crystallinity again. We employ real-time optical phase contrast microscopy with sub-nm height resolution to track the diffusion of TTC across monomolecular step edges which causes the unusual smoothing of a molecular thin film during annealing. We show that the lateral island sizes increase by more than one order of magnitude from 0.5 μm to 10 μm. This desirable behavior of 2d-Ostwald ripening and smoothing is in contrast to many other organic molecular films where annealing leads to dewetting, roughening, and a pronounced 3d morphology. We rationalize the smoothing behavior with the highly anisotropic attachment energies and low surface energies for TTC. The results are technically relevant for the use of TTC as passivation layer and as gate dielectric in organic field effect transistors.

  4. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study of the rheology of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.A.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D. |

    1996-05-01

    We examine the rheological properties of four different alkanes: n-decane, n-hexadecane, n-tetracosane, and squalane. Simulations of Couette flow are performed for a range of shear rates with 100 molecules in each case using a replicated data version of our code. Number of interaction sites ranges from 1000 to 3000. We have performed extremely long simulations required to obtain acceptable statistics at low shear rates. The alkanes show a transition from non-Newtonian to Newtonian behavior as the shear rate decreases to low values. 1 tab, 1 fig, 17 refs.

  5. Modeling the influence of alkane molecular structure on secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Aumont, Bernard; Camredon, Marie; Mouchel-Vallon, Camille; La, Stéphanie; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) emitted to the atmosphere are expected to be a substantial source of SOA. These emitted IVOC constitute a complex mixture including linear, branched and cyclic alkanes. The explicit gas-phase oxidation mechanisms are here generated for various linear and branched C10-C22 alkanes using the GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) and SOA formation is investigated for various homologous series. Simulation results show that both the size and the branching of the carbon skeleton are dominant factors driving the SOA yield. However, branching appears to be of secondary importance for the particle oxidation state and composition. The effect of alkane molecular structure on SOA yields appears to be consistent with recent laboratory observations. The simulated SOA composition shows, however, an unexpected major contribution from multifunctional organic nitrates. Most SOA contributors simulated for the oxidation of the various homologous series are far too reduced to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). On a carbon basis, the OOA yields never exceeded 10% regardless of carbon chain length, molecular structure or ageing time. This version of the model appears clearly unable to explain a large production of OOA from alkane precursors. PMID:24600999

  6. Molecular dynamics of adsorption and segregation from an Alkane mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, T.K.; Landman, U. )

    1993-09-03

    Adsorption and segregation of n-hexadecane molecules from an equal by weight mixture of n-hexadecane and n-hexane to an Au(001) surface at 315 kelvin are studied with the use of molecular dynamics simulations. Preferential adsorption of n-hexadecane at the solid-to-liquid interface together with subsequent layer-by-layer growth of an ordered, wetting interface were observed. The long chains penetrate and adsorb at the interfacial layer by means of a sequential segmental mechanism involving end-segment anchoring and displacive desorption of preadsorbed n-hexane molecules.

  7. Liquid-vapor equilibria and interfacial properties of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Amat, Miguel A; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2010-03-21

    A molecular dynamics study is presented to assess the performance of a united-atom model in the prediction of liquid-vapor interfacial properties for short-chain perfluoroalkanes and their alkane counterparts. In particular, the ability of this model to discriminate between the surface-energy values of these two types of compounds was investigated over a wide temperature range corresponding to the liquid-vapor region. Comparisons with available experimental data and surface-tension predictions given by other force-field parameterizations, including those based on the more computationally demanding all-atom method, were performed to gauge the viability of this model. It was found that the model used in this study captures qualitatively the expected behavior of surface energy between alkanes and perfluoroalkanes and yields values that are in excellent agreement with experimental data, especially in the high-temperature limit as the critical temperature is approached. PMID:20331313

  8. Liquid-vapor equilibria and interfacial properties of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes by molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat, Miguel A.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2010-03-01

    A molecular dynamics study is presented to assess the performance of a united-atom model in the prediction of liquid-vapor interfacial properties for short-chain perfluoroalkanes and their alkane counterparts. In particular, the ability of this model to discriminate between the surface-energy values of these two types of compounds was investigated over a wide temperature range corresponding to the liquid-vapor region. Comparisons with available experimental data and surface-tension predictions given by other force-field parameterizations, including those based on the more computationally demanding all-atom method, were performed to gauge the viability of this model. It was found that the model used in this study captures qualitatively the expected behavior of surface energy between alkanes and perfluoroalkanes and yields values that are in excellent agreement with experimental data, especially in the high-temperature limit as the critical temperature is approached.

  9. Anomalous tunneling in carbon/alkane/TiO(2)/gold molecular electronic junctions: energy level alignment at the metal/semiconductor interface.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijun; McCreery, Richard L

    2009-02-01

    Carbon/TiO(2)/gold electronic junctions show slightly asymmetric electronic behavior, with higher current observed in current density (J)/voltage (V) curves when carbon is biased negative with respect to the gold top contact. When a approximately 1-nm-thick alkane film is deposited between the carbon and TiO(2), resulting in a carbon/alkane/TiO(2)/gold junction, the current increases significantly for negative bias and decreases for positive bias, thus creating a much less symmetric J/V response. Similar results were obtained when SiO(2) was substituted for the alkane layer, but Al(2)O(3) did not produce the effect. The observation that, by the addition of an insulating material between carbon and TiO(2), the junction becomes more conductive is unexpected and counterintuitive. Kelvin probe measurements revealed that while the apparent work function of the pyrolyzed photoresist film electrode is modulated by surface dipoles of different surface-bound molecular layers, the anomalous effect is independent of the direction of the surface dipole. We propose that by using a nanometer-thick film with a low dielectric constant as an insertion layer, most of the applied potential is dropped across this thin film, thus permitting alignment between the carbon Fermi level and the TiO(2) conduction band. Provided that the alkane layer is sufficiently thin, electrons can directly tunnel from carbon to the TiO(2) conduction band. Therefore, the electron injection barrier at the carbon/TiO(2) interface is effectively reduced by this energy-level alignment, resulting in an increased current when carbon is biased negative. The modulation of injection barriers by a low-kappa molecular layer should be generally applicable to a variety of materials used in micro- and nanoelectronic fabrication. PMID:20353235

  10. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-15

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  11. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  12. [Molecular topology study of gas chromatographic retention indices of alkane series].

    PubMed

    Nie, Changming; Dai, Yimin; Wen, Songnian; Li, Zhonghai

    2005-01-01

    The gas chromatographic retention indices can be used to qualify some organic compounds. A new topological index based on distance matrix and branch vertex of the atoms in a molecule is proposed by defining equilibrium electronegativity of atoms in the molecule and coloring atoms in the molecular graph with equilibrium electronegativity, which appears unique to the molecular structures and has excellent structural selectivity. The multivariate linear equations of gas chromatographic retention indices are as follows: I(Squalane) = 23.97842N1 - 3.86562N2 + 0.787379N3 + 42.33061, R = 0.9922, n = 70, S = 13.70405, F = 1396.601; I(SE-30) = 23.83937N1 - 3.5687N2 + 0.939876N3 + 22.11952, R = 0.9919, n = 37, S = 11.96088, F = 668.8781; where the N1, N2 and N3 are a group of topological indices; n, R, S and F are sample number, regression coefficient, residual standard deviation and F-statistic value, respectively. The calculated results by the formulae indicate that the average relative deviations between calculated values and experimental data of gas chromatographic retention indices of alkane series on both squalane (column temperature 50 degrees C) and SE-30 (column temperature 80 degrees C) were all 1.31% and the errors were within experimental deviations. The equations can express well the change rule of the relative gas chromatographic retention indices of alkane series. PMID:15881357

  13. Determination of molecular diffusion coefficient in n-alkane binary mixtures: empirical correlations.

    PubMed

    De Mezquia, D Alonso; Bou-Ali, M Mounir; Larrañaga, M; Madariaga, J A; Santamaría, C

    2012-03-01

    In this work we have measured the molecular diffusion coefficient of the n-alkane binary series nC(i)-nC(6), nC(i)-nC(10), and nC(i)-nC(12) at 298 K and 1 atm and a mass fraction of 0.5 by using the so-called sliding symmetric tubes technique. The results show that the diffusion coefficient at this concentration is proportional to the inverse viscosity of the mixture. In addition, we have also measured the diffusion coefficient of the systems nC(12)-nC(6), nC(12)-nC(7), and nC(12)-nC(8) as a function of concentration. From the data obtained, it is shown that the diffusion coefficient of the n-alkane binary mixtures at any concentration can be calculated from the molecular weight of the components and the dynamic viscosity of the corresponding mixture at 50% mass fraction. PMID:22263833

  14. Controlling Morphology and Molecular Packing of Alkane Substituted Phthalocyanine Blend Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Jurow, Matthew J.; Hageman, Brian A.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pabon, Cesar; Black, Charles T.

    2013-01-01

    Systematic changes in the exocyclic substiution of core phthalocyanine platform tune the absorption properties to yield commercially viable dyes that function as the primary light absorbers in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. Blends of these complementary phthalocyanines absorb a broader portion of the solar spectrum compared to a single dye, thereby increasing solar cell performance. We correlate grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering structural data with solar cell performance to elucidate the role of nanomorphology of active layers composed of blends of phthalocyanines and a fullerene derivative. A highly reproducible device architecture is used to assure accuracy and is relevant to films for solar windows in urban settings. We demonstrate that the number and structure of the exocyclic motifs dictate phase formation, hierarchical organization, and nanostructure, thus can be employed to tailor active layer morphology to enhance exciton dissociation and charge collection efficiencies in the photovoltaic devices. These studies reveal that disordered films make better solar cells, short alkanes increase the optical density of the active layer, and branched alkanes inhibit unproductive homogeneous molecular alignment. PMID:23589766

  15. Controlling Morphology and Molecular Packing of Alkane Substituted Phthalocyanine Blend Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jurow, Matthew J; Hageman, Brian A; Dimasi, Elaine; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pabon, Cesar; Black, Charles T; Drain, Charles Michael

    2013-02-01

    Systematic changes in the exocyclic substiution of core phthalocyanine platform tune the absorption properties to yield commercially viable dyes that function as the primary light absorbers in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. Blends of these complementary phthalocyanines absorb a broader portion of the solar spectrum compared to a single dye, thereby increasing solar cell performance. We correlate grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering structural data with solar cell performance to elucidate the role of nanomorphology of active layers composed of blends of phthalocyanines and a fullerene derivative. A highly reproducible device architecture is used to assure accuracy and is relevant to films for solar windows in urban settings. We demonstrate that the number and structure of the exocyclic motifs dictate phase formation, hierarchical organization, and nanostructure, thus can be employed to tailor active layer morphology to enhance exciton dissociation and charge collection efficiencies in the photovoltaic devices. These studies reveal that disordered films make better solar cells, short alkanes increase the optical density of the active layer, and branched alkanes inhibit unproductive homogeneous molecular alignment. PMID:23589766

  16. Semifluorinated Alkanes at the Air-Water Interface: Tailoring Structure and Rheology at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, Rene; Keller, Rabea; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vermant, Jan; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Semifluorinated alkanes form monolayers with interesting properties at the air-water interface due to their pronounced amphi-solvophobic nature and the stiffness of the fluorocarbons. In the present work, using a combination of structural and dynamic probes, we investigated how small molecular changes can be used to control the properties of such an interface, in particular its organization, rheology, and reversibility during compression-expansion cycles. Starting from a reference system perfluor(dodecyl)dodecane, we first retained the linear structure but changed the linkage groups between the alkyl chains and the fluorocarbons, by introducing either a phenyl group or two oxygens. Next, the molecular structure was changed from linear to branched, with four side chains (two fluorocarbons and two hydrocarbons) connected to extended aromatic cores. Neutron reflectivity at the air-water interface and scanning force microscopy on deposited films show how the changes in the molecular structure affect molecular arrangement relative to the interface. Rheological and compression-expansion measurements demonstrate the significant consequences of these changes in molecular structure and interactions on the interfacial properties. Remarkably, even with these simple molecules, a wide range of surface rheological behaviors can be engineered, from viscous over viscoelastic to brittle solids, for very similar values of the surface pressure. PMID:26978461

  17. Molecular evaporation and condensation of liquid [ital n]-alkane films

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, T.K.; Landman, U. )

    1994-08-01

    Energetic, structural, and dynamical properties of solid-to-liquid and liquid-to-vapor interfaces and molecular evaporation and condensation processes from high-temperature liquid [ital n]-C[sub 6]H[sub 14] and [ital n]-C[sub 16]H[sub 34] films were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. For hexadecane all evaporation events occurred via monomers while for hexane, evaporation of monomers as well as dimers were observed. For both alkane liquids the molecular evaporation mechanism is found to be sequential in nature, starting with an end segment of a molecule leaving the surface and subsequently the evaporation of the molecule occurs via sequential dragging'' of the rest of the molecule. The condensation coefficients of vapor molecules onto the liquid surface are estimated as [similar to]0.9 for hexane and [similar to]1 for hexadecane. Evaporation is accompanied by significant molecular conformational changes. In hot liquid [ital n]-C[sub 16]H[sub 34] the [ital trans] ([ital t]) and [ital gauch] ([ital g][sub +] and [ital g][sub [minus

  18. Molecular screening for alkane hydroxylase genes in Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains.

    PubMed

    Smits, T H; Röthlisberger, M; Witholt, B; van Beilen, J B

    1999-08-01

    We have developed highly degenerate oligonucleotides for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genes related to the Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1 and Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 alkane hydroxylases, based on a number of highly conserved sequence motifs. In all Gram-negative and in two out of three Gram-positive strains able to grow on medium- (C6-C11) or long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C16), PCR products of the expected size were obtained. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced and found to encode peptides with 43.2-93.8% sequence identity to the corresponding fragment of the P. oleovorans GPo1 alkane hydroxylase. Strains that were unable to grow on n-alkanes did not yield PCR products with homology to alkane hydroxylase genes. The alkane hydroxylase genes of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus EB104 and Pseudomonas putida P1 were cloned using the PCR products as probes. The two genes allow an alkane hydroxylase-negative mutant of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 and an Escherichia coli recombinant containing all P. oleovorans alk genes except alkB, respectively, to grow on n-alkanes, showing that the cloned genes do indeed encode alkane hydroxylases. PMID:11207749

  19. Quantitative vapor-phase IR intensities and DFT computations to predict absolute IR spectra based on molecular structure: I. Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Yavelak, Veronica; Oates, R. P.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

    2013-11-01

    Recently recorded quantitative IR spectra of a variety of gas-phase alkanes are shown to have integrated intensities in both the C3H stretching and C3H bending regions that depend linearly on the molecular size, i.e. the number of C3H bonds. This result is well predicted from CH4 to C15H32 by density functional theory (DFT) computations of IR spectra using Becke's three parameter functional (B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)). Using the experimental data, a simple model predicting the absolute IR band intensities of alkanes based only on structural formula is proposed: For the C3H stretching band envelope centered near 2930 cm-1 this is given by (km/mol) CH_str=(34±1)×CH-(41±23) where CH is number of C3H bonds in the alkane. The linearity is explained in terms of coordinated motion of methylene groups rather than the summed intensities of autonomous -CH2-units. The effect of alkyl chain length on the intensity of a C3H bending mode is explored and interpreted in terms of conformer distribution. The relative intensity contribution of a methyl mode compared to the total C3H stretch intensity is shown to be linear in the number of methyl groups in the alkane, and can be used to predict quantitative spectra a priori based on structure alone.

  20. Alkane-Metal Interfacial Structure and Elastic Properties by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sebeck, Katherine; Shao, Chen; Kieffer, John

    2016-07-01

    The structure of amorphous materials near the interface with an ordered substrate can be affected by various characteristics of the adjoining phases, such as the lattice spacing of the adherent surface, polymer chain length, and adhesive strength. To discern the influence of each of these factors, four FCC metal lattices are examined for three chain lengths of n-alkane and van der Waals interfacial interactions are controlled by adjusting the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential parameters. The role of interaction strength is investigated for a single chain length and substrate combination. Four nanoconfined systems are also analyzed in terms of their mechanical strength. A strong layering effect is observed near the interface for all systems. The distinctiveness of polymer layering, i.e., the maximum density and spatial extent, exhibits a logarithmic dependence on the interaction strength between polymer and substrate. Congruency with the substrate lattice parameter further enhances this effect. Moreover, the elastic modulus of the alkane phase as a function of layer thickness indicates that the effects of ordering within the structure extend beyond the immediately obvious interfacial region. PMID:27282363

  1. Added Alkane Allows Thermal Thinning of Supramolecular Columns by Forming Superlattice-An X-ray and Neutron Study.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ming-Huei; Chaiprapa, Jitrin; Zeng, Xiangbing; Liu, Yongsong; Cseh, Liliana; Mehl, Georg H; Ungar, Goran

    2016-05-11

    We report a columnar superlattice formed by blends of dendron-like Li 3,4,5-tris(n-alkoxy)benzoates with n-alkanes. Without the alkane, the wedge-shaped molecules form liquid crystal columns with 3 dendrons in a supramolecular disk. The same structure exists in the blend, but on heating one dendron is expelled from the disks in every third column and is replaced by the alkane. This superlattice of unequal columns is confirmed by complementary X-ray and neutron diffraction studies. Lateral thermal expansion of dendrons normally leads to the expulsion of excess molecules from the column, reducing the column diameter. However, in the already narrow columns of pure Li salt, expulsion of one of only three dendrons in a disk is not viable. The added alkane facilitates the expulsion, as it replaces the missing dendron. Replacing the alkane with a functional compound can potentially lead to active nanoarrays with relatively large periodicity by using only small molecules. PMID:27101731

  2. QSPR models based on molecular mechanics and quantum chemical calculations. 1. Construction of Boltzmann-averaged descriptors for alkanes, alcohols, diols, ethers and cyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Dyekjaer, Jane; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Jónsdóttir, Svava

    2002-09-01

    Values for nine descriptors for QSPR (quantitative structure-property relationships) modeling of physical properties of 96 alkanes, alcohols, ethers, diols, triols and cyclic alkanes and alcohols in conjunction with the program Codessa are presented. The descriptors are Boltzmann-averaged by selection of the most relevant conformers out of a set of possible molecular conformers generated by a systematic scheme presented in this paper. Six of these descriptors are calculated with molecular mechanics and three with quantum chemical methods. Especially interesting descriptors are the relative van der Waals energies and the molecular polarizabilities, which correlate very well with boiling points. Five more simple descriptors that only depend on the molecular constitutional formula are also discussed briefly. PMID:12415333

  3. Characterization of sorbent properties of soil organic matter and carbonaceous geosorbents using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Endo; Peter Grathwohl; Stefan B. Haderlein; Torsten C. Schmidt

    2009-01-15

    Nonspecific interactions and modes (i.e., adsorption vs absorption) of sorption by noncondensed, amorphous organic phases (here termed organic matter; OM) in soils and by rigid, aromatic, and condensed phases (termed carbonaceous geosorbents; CGs) were investigated using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes. Sorption isotherms of and cyclooctane from water for seven CGs (charcoal, lignite coke, activated carbon, graphite, partially oxidized graphite, diesel soot, bituminous coal), four sorbents with a predominance of OM (lignite, peat, two sapric soils), and two soils containing OM and high amounts of CGs were measured in batch systems. The peat and the sapric soils showed extensively linear sorption, while the CGs exhibited highly nonlinear and strong (K{sub oc} values being up to 105 times those for the OM-rich materials at low concentrations) sorption for the alkanes studied, showing that enhanced sorption by CGs can occur to completely apolar sorbates that do not undergo any specific interaction. The n-octane-to-cyclooctane sorption coefficient ratios for adsorption to CGs were {ge}1, being distinctly different from those for absorption to the OM-rich materials. The measured sorption isotherms and the CG compositions in the soils determined by quantitative petrography analysis suggest, however, that CGs occurring in soils may be far less effective sorbents than the reference CGs used in the sorption experiments at least for nonspecifically interacting sorbates, probably because of competitive sorption and/or pore blocking by natural OM. The presented approaches and results offer a basis for interpreting sorption data for other organic compounds, as nonspecific interactions and sorption modes are relevant for any compound. 47 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A molecular dynamics study of the effect of thermal boundary conductance on thermal transport of ideal crystal of n-alkanes with different number of carbon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zeng, Yi; Khodadadi, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    Phase change materials such as n-alkanes that exhibit desirable characteristics such as high latent heat, chemical stability, and negligible supercooling are widely used in thermal energy storage applications. However, n-alkanes have the drawback of low thermal conductivity values. The low thermal conductivity of n-alkanes is linked to formation of randomly oriented nano-domains of molecules in their solid structure that is responsible for excessive phonon scattering at the grain boundaries. Thus, understanding the thermal boundary conductance at the grain boundaries can be crucial for improving the effectiveness of thermal storage systems. The concept of the ideal crystal is proposed in this paper, which describes a simplified model such that all the nano-domains of long-chain n-alkanes are artificially aligned perfectly in one direction. In order to study thermal transport of the ideal crystal of long-chain n-alkanes, four (4) systems (C20H42, C24H50, C26H54, and C30H62) are investigated by the molecular dynamics simulations. Thermal boundary conductance between the layers of ideal crystals is determined using both non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. Both NEMD and EMD simulations exhibit no significant change in thermal conductance with the molecular length. However, the values obtained from the EMD simulations are less than the values from NEMD simulations with the ratio being nearly three (3) in most cases. This difference is due to the nature of EMD simulations where all the phonons are assumed to be in equilibrium at the interface. Thermal conductivity of the n-alkanes in three structures including liquid, solid, and ideal crystal is investigated utilizing NEMD simulations. Our results exhibit a very slight rise in thermal conductivity values as the number of carbon atoms of the chain increases. The key understanding is that thermal transport can be significantly altered by how the molecules and the

  5. Molecular theory of liquid crystal thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Shihong

    A molecular theory has been developed to describe the isotropic-nematic transitoon of model nematogens in bulk and in thin films. The surfaces of thin films can be hard surfaces or coated with surfactant monolayers. The theory only includes hard body interactions between all molecule species: solvent, nematogens and surfactants. We have studied the influence of the separation between confining walls, concentration of nematogens, as well as the surface anchoring and areal density of surfactant at the interface upon the phases of nematogens. We have explained the possible existence of planar degenerate phase through entropic pictures and have confirmed close to the bulk isotropic-nematic transition point, the order of the phases of nematogens from isotropic to nematic then back to isotropic when varying the areal density of surfactant monolayers at interfaces. From the results obtained, we believe that we have captured the main competing interactions between surfactants and nematogens and our molecular level theory is capable of describing these two interactions of different natures. Our results can provide a guideline for molecular design of biosensors. We have modeled the molecular systems with as much simplification as possible while retaining the main features. The thesis is arranged into introduction, results on bulk, thin films confined between hard walls and between surfactant monolayers.

  6. Molecular simulations of the n -alkane liquid-vapor interface: interfacial properties and their long range corrections.

    PubMed

    Ibergay, C; Ghoufi, A; Goujon, F; Ungerer, P; Boutin, A; Rousseau, B; Malfreyt, P

    2007-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to study the interfacial properties of the liquid-vapor interface of alkanes. We highlight the chemical equilibrium of the liquid-vapor interface by calculating a local chemical potential including the appropriate long-range corrections profiles. We extend the "test-area" (TA) technique developed by Gloor [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 134703 (2005)] on Lennard-Jones and square-well fluids to molecular systems. We establish both operational expressions of the TA approach for the calculation of the surface tension profile and the corresponding long-range corrections by underlining the approximations used. We compare the results between the different operational expressions of the surface tension and focus on the truncation procedures to explain the difference between the different techniques using either the potential or force equations. We make the results of surface tension identical between the different methods by using consistent potential and force equations. In the case of a relatively small cutoff, we propose to show that the Irving-Kirkwood definition and TA methods lead to the same value of the surface tension under condition that appropriate long-range corrections be included in the calculation. We end this paper by calculation of the entropy change profile and a comparison with experiments. PMID:17677073

  7. Detailed molecular dynamics simulation of the self-diffusion of n-alkane and cis-1,4 polyisoprene oligomer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmandaris, V. A.; Doxastakis, M.; Mavrantzas, V. G.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented for the self-diffusion properties of monodisperse n-alkanes and cis-1,4 polyisoprene (PI) oligomer melts, as obtained through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulations have been conducted in the NVT statistical ensemble on model systems thoroughly pre-equilibrated through an efficient Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. Results for the self-diffusion coefficient D as a function of molecular weight M support a scaling law of the form D˜Mb, with b strongly depending on temperature T, for both the n-alkanes and the cis-1,4 PI melts. The simulation results have been fitted to an expression for D involving elements of Rouse dynamics and Cohen-Turnbull-Bueche chain-end (excess free volume) effects, proposed recently by von Meerwall et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 4299 (1998)]. Using a geometric analysis involving tessellation of space in Delaunay tetrahedra developed by Greenfield and Theodorou [Macromolecules 26, 5461 (1993)], we have also calculated the excess chain-end free volume of the alkane and cis-1,4 PI melts. Calculated self-diffusivities and apparent activation energies for the two different polymers as a function of their molecular weight M are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements of von Meerwall et al. (1998).

  8. Examination of surface nucleation during the growth of long alkane crystals by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Alexander; Rutledge, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    Crystal growth from the melt of n-pentacontane (C50) was studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a validated united atom model. By quenching below the melting temperature of C50 (370 K), propagation of the crystal growth front into the C50 melt from a crystalline polyethylene surface was observed. By tracking the location of the midpoint in the orientational order parameter profile between the crystal and melt, crystal growth rates between 0.015-0.040 m/s were observed, for quench depths of 10 to 70 K below the melting point. In this work, surface nucleation is identified with the formation of 2D clusters of crystalline sites within layers parallel to the propagating growth front, by analogy to the formation of 3D clusters in primary, homogeneous nucleation. These surface nucleation events were tracked over several layers and numerous simulations, and a mean first passage time analysis was employed to estimate critical nucleus sizes, induction times and rates for surface nucleation. Based on new insights provided by the detailed molecular trajectories obtained from simulation, the classical theory proposed by Lauritzen and Hoffman is re-examined.

  9. Preface: Thin films of molecular organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraxedas, J.

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to thin films of molecular organic materials and its aim is to assemble numerous different aspects of this topic in order to reach a wide scientific audience. Under the term 'thin films', structures with thicknesses spanning from one monolayer or less up to several micrometers are included. In order to narrow down this relaxed definition (how thin is thin?) I suggest joining the stream that makes a distinction according to the length scale involved, separating nanometer-thick films from micrometer-thick films. While the physical properties of micrometer-thick films tend to mimic those of bulk materials, in the low nanometer regime new structures (e.g., crystallographic and substrate-induced phases) and properties are found. However, one has to bear in mind that some properties of micrometer-thick films are really confined to the film/substrate interface (e.g. charge injection), and are thus of nanometer nature. Supported in this dimensionality framework, this issue covers the most ideal and model 0D case, a single molecule on a surface, through to the more application-oriented 3D case, placing special emphasis on the fascinating 2D domain that is monolayer assembly. Thus, many aspects will be reviewed, such as single molecules, self-organization, monolayer regime, chirality, growth, physical properties and applications. This issue has been intentionally restricted to small molecules, thus leaving out polymers and biomolecules, because for small molecules it is easier to establish structure--property relationships. Traditionally, the preparation of thin films of molecular organic materials has been considered as a secondary, lower-ranked part of the more general field of this class of materials. The coating of diverse surfaces such as silicon, inorganic and organic single crystals, chemically modified substrates, polymers, etc., with interesting molecules was driven by the potential applications of such molecular materials

  10. Optical Properties of Thin Film Molecular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Shumway, Dean A.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thin films composed of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric are being considered for use as solar selective coatings for a variety of space power applications. By controlling the degree of molecular mixing, the solar selective coatings can be tailored to have the combined properties of high solar absorptance, alpha, and low infrared emittance, epsilon. On orbit, these combined properties would simultaneously maximize the amount of solar energy captured by the coating and minimize the amount of thermal energy radiated. Mini-satellites equipped with solar collectors coated with these cermet coatings may utilize the captured heat energy to power a heat engine to generate electricity, or to power a thermal bus that directs heat to remote regions of the spacecraft. Early work in this area identified the theoretical boundary conditions needed to operate a Carnot cycle in space, including the need for a solar concentrator, a solar selective coating at the heat inlet of the engine, and a radiator. A solar concentrator that can concentrate sunlight by a factor of 100 is ideal. At lower values, the temperature of the solar absorbing surface becomes too low for efficient heat engine operation, and at higher values, cavity type heat receivers become attractive. In designing the solar selective coating, the wavelength region yielding high solar absorptance must be separated from the wavelength region yielding low infrared emittance by establishing a sharp transition in optical properties. In particular, a sharp transition in reflectance is desired in the infrared to achieve the desired optical performance. For a heat engine operating at 450C, a sharp transition at 1.8 micrometers is desired. The radiator completes the heat flow through the Carnot cycle. Additional work has been done supporting the use of molecular mixtures for terrestrial applications. Sputter deposition provides a means to apply coatings to the tubes that carry a working fluid at the focus of trough

  11. Porous Organic Cage Thin Films and Molecular-Sieving Membranes.

    PubMed

    Song, Qilei; Jiang, Shan; Hasell, Tom; Liu, Ming; Sun, Shijing; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sivaniah, Easan; Cooper, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Porous organic cage molecules are fabricated into thin films and molecular-sieving membranes. Cage molecules are solution cast on various substrates to form amorphous thin films, with the structures tuned by tailoring the cage chemistry and processing conditions. For the first time, uniform and pinhole-free microporous cage thin films are formed and demonstrated as molecular-sieving membranes for selective gas separation. PMID:26800019

  12. Molecular simulation of adsorption and separation of mixtures of short linear alkanes in pillared layered materials at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Zhuo; Liu, Zi-Yang; Che, Yu-Liang; Zhang, Dan

    2007-08-15

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo and configurational-bias Monte Carlo techniques are carried out to simulate the adsorption of ternary and quaternary mixtures of short linear alkanes, involving methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane, in pillared layered materials at ambient temperature, T=300 K. In the simulation, a pillared layered pore is modeled by a uniform distribution of pillars between two layered walls built by making two separate talc lamellas parallel each other with a given size of interlayer distance. The interaction between fluid molecules and two layered walls is measured by storing potentials calculated in advance at a series of grid points. The interaction between fluid molecules and pillars is also calculated by a site-to-site method. The potential model proposed in this work is proved to be effective because of the simulation result being good agreement with the experimental data for the adsorption of nitrogen at 77 K. Then, the adsorption isotherms of mixtures of short linear alkanes in pillared layered pores with three different porosities psi=0.98, 0.93 and 0.85, and three pore widths H=1.02, 1.70 and 2.38 nm at 300 K are obtained by taking advantage of the model. The simulation results tell us that the longer chain component is preferentially adsorbed at low pressures, and its adsorption increases and then decreases as the pressure increases while the shorter chain component is still adsorbed at high pressures. Moreover, the sorption selectivity of pillared layered materials for the longest chain component in alkane mixtures increases as the mole fraction of methane in the gas phase increases. The selectivity of pillared layered materials for the longest chain component in alkane mixtures also increases as the pore width decreases and the porosity increases. PMID:17482203

  13. Optical Properties of Thin Film Molecular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Shumway, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    Thin films composed of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric are being considered for use as solar selective coatings for a variety of space power applications. By controlling the degree of molecular mixing, the solar selective coatings can be tailored to have the combined properties of high solar absorptance, , and low infrared emittance, . On orbit, these combined properties would simultaneously maximize the amount of solar energy captured by the coating and minimize the amount of thermal energy radiated. Mini-satellites equipped with solar collectors coated with these cermet coatings may utilize the captured heat energy to power a heat engine to generate electricity, or to power a thermal bus that directs heat to remote regions of the spacecraft. Early work in this area identified the theoretical boundary conditions needed to operate a Carnot cycle in space, including the need for a solar concentrator, a solar selective coating at the heat inlet of the engine, and a radiator.1 A solar concentrator that can concentrate sunlight by a factor of 100 is ideal. At lower values, the temperature of the solar absorbing surface becomes too low for efficient heat engine operation, and at higher values, cavity type heat receivers become attractive. In designing the solar selective coating, the wavelength region yielding high solar absorptance must be separated from the wavelength region yielding low infrared emittance by establishing a sharp transition in optical properties. In particular, a sharp transition in reflectance is desired in the infrared to achieve the desired optical performance. For a heat engine operating at 450 C, a sharp transition at 1.8 micrometers is desired.2 The radiator completes the heat flow through the Carnot cycle.

  14. Analysis of the orientational order effect on n-alkanes: Evidences on experimental response functions and description using Monte Carlo molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Bessières, D; Piñeiro, M M; De Ferron, G; Plantier, F

    2010-08-21

    Short-range correlations of the molecular orientations in liquid n-alkanes have been extensively studied from depolarized Rayleigh scattering and thermodynamic measurements. These correlations between segments induce structural anisotropy in the fluid bulk. This phenomenon, which is characteristic of linear chain molecules when the constituting segments are nor freely jointed, but interact through a given angular potential, is then present in the linear n-Cn series, increasing its magnitude with chain length, and it is therefore less relevant or even completely absent in branched alkanes. This intermolecular effect is clearly revealed in second-order excess magnitudes such as heat capacities when the linear molecule is mixed with one whose structure approaches sphericity. The mixing process of different aspect ratio chain molecules is thought to modify the original pure fluid structure, by producing a diminution of the orientational order previously existing between pure n-alkane chains. However, second-order thermodynamics quantities of pure liquids C(P), ( partial differentialv/ partial differentialT)(P), and ( partial differentialv/ partial differentialP)(P) are known to be very sensitive to the specific interactions occurring at the microscopic level. In other words, the behavior of these derived properties versus temperature and pressure can be regarded as response functions of the complexity of the microscopic interactions. Thus, the purpose of the present work is to rationalize the orientational order evolution with both temperature and molecular chain length from the analysis of pure fluid properties. To this aim, we focused on two linear alkanes, n-octane (n-C(8)) and n-hexadecane (n-C(16)), and two of their branched isomers, i.e., 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (br-C(8)) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (br-C(16)). For each compound, we propose a combined study from direct experimental determination of second-order derivative properties and Monte Carlo

  15. Comparing the accuracy of high-dimensional neural network potentials and the systematic molecular fragmentation method: A benchmark study for all-trans alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastegger, Michael; Kauffmann, Clemens; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    Many approaches, which have been developed to express the potential energy of large systems, exploit the locality of the atomic interactions. A prominent example is the fragmentation methods in which the quantum chemical calculations are carried out for overlapping small fragments of a given molecule that are then combined in a second step to yield the system's total energy. Here we compare the accuracy of the systematic molecular fragmentation approach with the performance of high-dimensional neural network (HDNN) potentials introduced by Behler and Parrinello. HDNN potentials are similar in spirit to the fragmentation approach in that the total energy is constructed as a sum of environment-dependent atomic energies, which are derived indirectly from electronic structure calculations. As a benchmark set, we use all-trans alkanes containing up to eleven carbon atoms at the coupled cluster level of theory. These molecules have been chosen because they allow to extrapolate reliable reference energies for very long chains, enabling an assessment of the energies obtained by both methods for alkanes including up to 10 000 carbon atoms. We find that both methods predict high-quality energies with the HDNN potentials yielding smaller errors with respect to the coupled cluster reference.

  16. Comparing the accuracy of high-dimensional neural network potentials and the systematic molecular fragmentation method: A benchmark study for all-trans alkanes.

    PubMed

    Gastegger, Michael; Kauffmann, Clemens; Behler, Jörg; Marquetand, Philipp

    2016-05-21

    Many approaches, which have been developed to express the potential energy of large systems, exploit the locality of the atomic interactions. A prominent example is the fragmentation methods in which the quantum chemical calculations are carried out for overlapping small fragments of a given molecule that are then combined in a second step to yield the system's total energy. Here we compare the accuracy of the systematic molecular fragmentation approach with the performance of high-dimensional neural network (HDNN) potentials introduced by Behler and Parrinello. HDNN potentials are similar in spirit to the fragmentation approach in that the total energy is constructed as a sum of environment-dependent atomic energies, which are derived indirectly from electronic structure calculations. As a benchmark set, we use all-trans alkanes containing up to eleven carbon atoms at the coupled cluster level of theory. These molecules have been chosen because they allow to extrapolate reliable reference energies for very long chains, enabling an assessment of the energies obtained by both methods for alkanes including up to 10 000 carbon atoms. We find that both methods predict high-quality energies with the HDNN potentials yielding smaller errors with respect to the coupled cluster reference. PMID:27208939

  17. Molecular dynamics study of solubilization of immiscible solutes by a micelle: Free energy of transfer of alkanes from water to the micelle core by thermodynamic integration method.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K; Yoshii, N; Okazaki, S

    2010-08-21

    Free energy of transfer, DeltaG(w-->m), from water phase to a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle core has been calculated for a series of hydrophobic solutes originally immiscible with water by thermodynamic integration method combined with molecular dynamics calculations. The calculated free energy of transfer is in good correspondence to the experiment as well as the theoretical free energy of transfer. The calculated DeltaG(w-->m)'s are all negative, implying that the alkane molecules are more stable in the micelle than in the water phase. It decreases almost linearly as a function of the number of carbon atoms of the alkanes longer than methane with a decrement of 3.3 kJ mol(-1) per one methylene group. The calculated free energy of transfer indicates that, for example, at the micelle concentration of 50 CMC (critical micelle concentration), about only 1 of 6 micelles or 1 of 32 000 micelles does not contain a solute methane or n-octane molecule, respectively. PMID:20726656

  18. Molecular dynamics study of solubilization of immiscible solutes by a micelle: Free energy of transfer of alkanes from water to the micelle core by thermodynamic integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Yoshii, N.; Okazaki, S.

    2010-08-01

    Free energy of transfer, ΔGw→m, from water phase to a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle core has been calculated for a series of hydrophobic solutes originally immiscible with water by thermodynamic integration method combined with molecular dynamics calculations. The calculated free energy of transfer is in good correspondence to the experiment as well as the theoretical free energy of transfer. The calculated ΔGw→m's are all negative, implying that the alkane molecules are more stable in the micelle than in the water phase. It decreases almost linearly as a function of the number of carbon atoms of the alkanes longer than methane with a decrement of 3.3 kJ mol-1 per one methylene group. The calculated free energy of transfer indicates that, for example, at the micelle concentration of 50 CMC (critical micelle concentration), about only 1 of 6 micelles or 1 of 32 000 micelles does not contain a solute methane or n-octane molecule, respectively.

  19. Patterns and conformations in molecularly thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnet, Prem B.

    Molecularly thin films have been a subject of great interest for the last several years because of their large variety of industrial applications ranging from micro-electronics to bio-medicine. Additionally, molecularly thin films can be used as good models for biomembrane and other systems where surfaces are critical. Many different kinds of molecules can make stable films. My research has considered three such molecules: a polymerizable phospholipid, a bent-core molecules, and a polymer. One common theme of these three molecules is chirality. The phospolipid molecules studied here are strongly chiral, which can be due to intrinsically chiral centers on the molecules and also due to chiral conformations. We find that these molecules give rise to chiral patterns. Bent-core molecules are not intrinsically chiral, but individual molecules and groups of molecules can show chiral structures, which can be changed by surface interactions. One major, unconfirmed hypothesis for the polymer conformation at surface is that it forms helices, which would be chiral. Most experiments were carried out at the air/water interface, in what are called Langmuir films. Our major tools for studying these films are Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM) coupled with the thermodynamic information that can be deduced from surface pressure isotherms. Phospholipids are one of the important constituents of liposomes -- a spherical vesicle com-posed of a bilayer membrane, typically composed of a phospholipid and cholesterol bilayer. The application of liposomes in drug delivery is well-known. Crumpling of vesicles of polymerizable phospholipids has been observed. With BAM, on Langmuir films of such phospholipids, we see novel spiral/target patterns during compression. We have found that both the patterns and the critical pressure at which they formed depend on temperature (below the transition to a i¬‘uid layer). Bent-core liquid crystals, sometimes knows as banana liquid crystals, have drawn

  20. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  1. Structure and Phase Transitions of Monolayers of Intermediate-length n-alkanes on Graphite Studied by Neutron Diffraction and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, H.; Hansen, F.Y.; Diama, Amand; Matthies, Blake; Criswell, Leah; Mo, Haiding; Bai, M; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence from neutron diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three different monolayer phases of the intermediate-length alkanes tetracosane (n-C(24)H(50) denoted as C24) and dotriacontane (n-C(32)H(66) denoted as C32) adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. Our measurements indicate that the two monolayer films differ principally in the transition temperatures between phases. At the lowest temperatures, both C24 and C32 form a crystalline monolayer phase with a rectangular-centered (RC) structure. The two sublattices of the RC structure each consists of parallel rows of molecules in their all-trans conformation aligned with their long axis parallel to the surface and forming so-called lamellas of width approximately equal to the all-trans length of the molecule. The RC structure is uniaxially commensurate with the graphite surface in its [110] direction such that the distance between molecular rows in a lamella is 4.26 A=sqrt[3a(g)], where a(g)=2.46 A is the lattice constant of the graphite basal plane. Molecules in adjacent rows of a lamella alternate in orientation between the carbon skeletal plane being parallel and perpendicular to the graphite surface. Upon heating, the crystalline monolayers transform to a 'smectic' phase in which the inter-row spacing within a lamella expands by approximately 10% and the molecules are predominantly oriented with the carbon skeletal plane parallel to the graphite surface. In the smectic phase, the MD simulations show evidence of broadening of the lamella boundaries as a result of molecules diffusing parallel to their long axis. At still higher temperatures, they indicate that the introduction of gauche defects into the alkane chains drives a melting transition to a monolayer fluid phase as reported previously.

  2. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  3. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  4. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of C-C bond scission in polyethylene and linear alkanes: effects of the condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Popov, Konstantin V; Knyazev, Vadim D

    2014-03-27

    The reaction of C-C bond scission in polyethylene chains of various lengths was studied using molecular dynamics under the conditions of vacuum and condensed phase (polymer melt). A method of assigning meaningful rate constant values to condensed-phase bond scission reactions based on a kinetic mechanism accounting for dissociation, reverse recombination, and diffusional separation of fragments was developed. The developed method accounts for such condensed-phase phenomena as cage effects and diffusion of the decay products away from the reaction site. The results of C-C scission simulations indicate that per-bond rate constants decrease by an order of magnitude as the density of the system increases from vacuum to the normal density of a polyethylene melt. Additional calculations were performed to study the dependence of the rate constant on the length of the polymer chain under the conditions of the condensed phase. The calculations demonstrate that the rate constant is independent of the degree of polymerization if polyethylene samples of different lengths are kept at the same pressure. However, if instead molecular systems of different polyethylene chain lengths decompose under the conditions of the same density, shorter chains result in higher pressures and lower rate constants. The observed effect is attributed to a higher degree of molecular crowding (lower fraction of free intermolecular space available for molecular motion) in the case of shorter molecules. PMID:24571517

  6. Bubble bursting as an aerosol generation mechanism during an oil spill in the deep-sea environment: molecular dynamics simulations of oil alkanes and dispersants in atmospheric air/salt water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Zhang, Zenghui; Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Avij, Paria; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2014-01-01

    Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the properties of oil n-alkanes [i.e., n-pentadecane (C15), n-icosane (C20) and n-triacontane (C30)], as well as several surfactant species [i.e., the standard anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and three model dispersants similar to the Tween and Span species present in Corexit 9500A] at air/salt water interfaces. This study was motivated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, and our simulation results show that, from the thermodynamic point of view, the n-alkanes and the model dispersants have a strong preference to remain at the air/salt water interface, as indicated by the presence of deep free energy minima at these interfaces. The free energy minimum of these n-alkanes becomes deeper as their chain length increases, and as the concentration of surfactant species at the interface increases. The n-alkanes tend to adopt a flat orientation and form aggregates at the bare air/salt water interface. When this interface is coated with surfactants, the n-alkanes tend to adopt more tilted orientations with respect to the vector normal to the interface. These simulation results are consistent with the experimental findings reported in the accompanying paper [Ehrenhauser et al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts 2013, in press, (DOI: 10.1039/c3em00390f)]. The fact that these long-chain n-alkanes show a strong thermodynamic preference to remain at the air/salt water interfaces, especially if these interfaces are coated with surfactants, makes these species very likely to adsorb at the surface of bubbles or droplets and be ejected to the atmosphere by sea surface processes such as whitecaps (breaking waves) and bubble bursting. Finally, the experimental finding that more oil hydrocarbons are ejected when Corexit 9500A is present in the system is consistent with the deeper free energy minima observed for the n-alkanes at the air/salt water

  7. SAFT-γ force field for the simulation of molecular fluids: 2. Coarse-grained models of greenhouse gases, refrigerants, and long alkanes.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Carlos; Lafitte, Thomas; Adjiman, Claire S; Galindo, Amparo; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2013-03-01

    In the first paper of this series [C. Avendaño, T. Lafitte, A. Galindo, C. S. Adjiman, G. Jackson, and E. A. Müller, J. Phys. Chem. B2011, 115, 11154] we introduced the SAFT-γ force field for molecular simulation of fluids. In our approach, a molecular-based equation of state (EoS) is used to obtain coarse-grained (CG) intermolecular potentials that can then be employed in molecular simulation over a wide range of thermodynamic conditions of the fluid. The macroscopic experimental data for the vapor-liquid equilibria (saturated liquid density and vapor pressure) of a given system are represented with the SAFT-VR Mie EoS and used to estimate effective intermolecular parameters that provide a good description of the thermodynamic properties by exploring a wide parameter space for models based on the Mie (generalized Lennard-Jones) potential. This methodology was first used to develop a simple single-segment CG Mie model of carbon dioxide (CO2) which allows for a reliable representation of the fluid-phase equilibria (for which the model was parametrized), as well as an accurate prediction of other properties such as the enthalpy of vaporization, interfacial tension, supercritical density, and second-derivative thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and speed of sound). In our current paper, the methodology is further applied and extended to develop effective SAFT-γ CG Mie force fields for some important greenhouse gases including carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), modeled as simple spherical molecules, and for long linear alkanes including n-decane (n-C10H22) and n-eicosane (n-C20H42), modeled as homonuclear chains of spherical Mie segments. We also apply the SAFT-γ methodology to obtain a CG homonuclear two-segment Mie intermolecular potential for the more challenging polar and asymmetric compound 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234yf), a novel replacement

  8. Growth and physical properties of molecular organic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraxedas, J.

    2004-04-01

    Highly-oriented polycrystalline thin films of molecular organic materials consisting of small molecules can be easily obtained by physical and chemical vapour deposition methods. The crystallographic phase, orientation and morphology of the films critically depend on the interface and on the kinetics of growth and can be controlled, to a certain extent, by a judicious selection of the substrates and of the growth parameters. This article shortly explores the formation of organic-inorganic heterostructures as a function of coverage: from the most fundamental case, a single molecule on a surface, to thick films (thickness ˜ 1 μ m). The case of high-quality thick TTF-TCNQ films exemplifies the fact that the derived physical properties are essentially identical to those obtained from single crystals. Key words. Molecular organic materials thin films interfaces.

  9. Abundance and diversity of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in a forest soil co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and metals: a molecular study on alkB homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Unraveling functional genes related to biodegradation of organic compounds has profoundly improved our understanding of biological remediation processes, yet the ecology of such genes is only poorly understood. We used a culture-independent approach to assess the abundance and diversity of bacteria catalyzing the degradation of n-alkanes with a chain length between C(5) and C(16) at a forest site co-contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons and metals for nearly 60 years. The alkB gene coding for a rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase enzyme involved in the initial activation step of aerobic aliphatic hydrocarbon metabolism was used as biomarker. Within the area of study, four different zones were evaluated: one highly contaminated, two intermediately contaminated, and a noncontaminated zone. Contaminant concentrations, hydrocarbon profiles, and soil microbial respiration and biomass were studied. Abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria was quantified via real-time PCR of alkB, whereas genetic diversity was examined using molecular fingerprints (T-RFLP) and clone libraries. Along the contamination plume, hydrocarbon profiles and increased respiration rates suggested on-going natural attenuation at the site. Gene copy numbers of alkB were similar in contaminated and control areas. However, T-RFLP-based fingerprints suggested lower diversity and evenness of the n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the highly contaminated zone compared to the other areas; both diversity and evenness were negatively correlated with metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of alkB denoted a shift of the hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria in the control zone (most similar to Mycobacterium and Nocardia types) to Gram-negative genotypes in the contaminated zones (Acinetobacter and alkB sequences with little similarity to those of known bacteria). Our results underscore a qualitative rather than a quantitative response of

  10. Chloroaluminum phthalocyanine thin films: chemical reaction and molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Latteyer, Florian; Peisert, Heiko; Uihlein, Johannes; Basova, Tamara; Nagel, Peter; Merz, Michael; Schuppler, Stefan; Chassé, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    The chemical transformation of the polar chloroaluminum phthalocyanine, AlClPc, to μ-(oxo)bis(phthalocyaninato)aluminum(III), (PcAl)2O, in thin films on indium tin oxide is studied and its influence on the molecular orientation is discussed. The studies were conducted using complementary spectroscopic techniques: Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were performed in order to identify specific vibrations and to monitor the product formation. The thin films of AlClPc were annealed in controlled environmental conditions to obtain (PcAl)2O. It is shown that the chemical transformation in the thin films can proceed only in the presence of water. The influence of the reaction and the annealing on the molecular orientation was studied with Raman spectroscopy and NEXAFS spectroscopy in total electron yield and partial electron yield modes. The comparison of the results obtained from these techniques allows the determination of the molecular orientation of the film as a function of the probing depth. PMID:23494276

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M.; Kashyap, Hemant K.; DeVane, Russell H.; Shinoda, Wataru; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo

    2015-12-01

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    MacDermaid, Christopher M. Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo; Kashyap, Hemant K.; DeVane, Russell H.; Shinoda, Wataru; Klauda, Jeffery B.

    2015-12-28

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  13. Control of wettability of molecularly thin liquid films by nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Deguchi, Takanori; Yamawaki, Yasuhiro; Itoh, Shintaro; Muramatsu, Takuro; Zhang, Hedong

    2008-03-18

    The patterning of liquid thin films on solid surfaces is very important in various fields of science and engineering related to surfaces and interfaces. A method of nanometer-scale patterning of a molecularly thin liquid film on a silicon substrate using the lyophobicity of the oxide nanostructures has recently been reported (Fukuzawa, K.; Deguchi, T.; Kawamura, J.; Mitsuya, Y.; Muramatsu, T.; Zhang, H. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 87, 203108). However, the origin of the lyophobicity of the nanostructure with a height of around 1 nm, which was fabricated by probe oxidation, has not yet been clarified. In the present study, the change in thickness of the liquid film on mesa-shaped nanostructures and the wettability for the various combinations of the thickness of the liquid films and the height of ridge-shaped nanostructures were investigated. These revealed that lyophobicity is caused by a lowering of the intermolecular interaction between the liquid and silicon surfaces by the nanostructure and enables the patterning of a liquid film along it. The tendency of the wettability for a given liquid film and nanostructure size can be predicted by estimating the contributions of the intermolecular interaction and capillary pressure. In this method, the height of the nanostructure can control the wettability. These results can provide a novel method of nanoscale patterning of liquid thin films, which will be very useful in creating new functional surfaces. PMID:18237215

  14. Molecular tailoring of interfaces for thin film on substrate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Martha Elizabeth

    Thin film on substrate systems appear most prevalently within the microelectronics industry, which demands that devices operate in smaller and smaller packages with greater reliability. The reliability of these multilayer film systems is strongly influenced by the adhesion of each of the bimaterial interfaces. During use, microelectronic components undergo thermo-mechanical cycling, which induces interfacial delaminations leading to failure of the overall device. The ability to tailor interfacial properties at the molecular level provides a mechanism to improve thin film adhesion, reliability and performance. This dissertation presents the investigation of molecular level control of interface properties in three thin film-substrate systems: photodefinable polyimide films on passivated silicon substrates, self-assembled monolayers at the interface of Au films and dielectric substrates, and mechanochemically active materials on rigid substrates. For all three materials systems, the effect of interfacial modifications on adhesion is assessed using a laser-spallation technique. Laser-induced stress waves are chosen because they dynamically load the thin film interface in a precise, noncontacting manner at high strain rates and are suitable for both weak and strong interfaces. Photodefinable polyimide films are used as dielectrics in flip chip integrated circuit packages to reduce the stress between silicon passivation layers and mold compound. The influence of processing parameters on adhesion is examined for photodefinable polyimide films on silicon (Si) substrates with three different passivation layers: silicon nitride (SiNx), silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy), and the native silicon oxide (SiO2). Interfacial strength increases when films are processed with an exposure step as well as a longer cure cycle. Additionally, the interfacial fracture energy is assessed using a dynamic delamination protocol. The high toughness of this interface (ca. 100 J/m2) makes it difficult

  15. Preparation of Robust, Thin Zeolite Membrane Sheet for Molecular Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jian; Canfield, Nathan L.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2011-10-19

    This paper reports a feasibility study on the preparation of zeolite membrane films on a thin, porous metal support sheet (50-{micro}m thick). Zeolite sodium A (NaA) and silicalite zeolite frameworks are chosen to represent synthesis of respective hydrophilic-type and hydrophobic-type zeolite membranes on this new support. It is found that a dense, continuous inter-grown zeolite crystal layer at a thickness less than 2 {micro}m can be directly deposited on such a support by using direct and secondary growth techniques. The resulting membrane shows excellent adhesion on the metal sheet. Molecular-sieving functions of the prepared membranes are characterized with ethanol/water separation, CO2 separation, and air dehumidification. The results show great potential to make flexible metal-foil-like zeolite membranes for a range of energy conversion and environmental applications.

  16. Alkane metathesis by tandem alkane-dehydrogenation-olefin-metathesis catalysis and related chemistry.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Kundu, Sabuj; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S

    2012-06-19

    stable solid metal oxides as the olefin-metathesis catalysts. Both the pincer complexes and the alkylidene complexes have been supported on alumina via adsorption through basic para-substituents. This process does not significantly affect catalyst activity, and in some cases it increases both the catalyst lifetime and the compatibility of the co-catalysts. These molecular catalysts are the first systems that effect alkane metathesis with molecular-weight selectivity, particularly for the conversion of C(n)n-alkanes to C(2n-2)n-alkanes plus ethane. This molecular-weight selectivity offers a critical advantage over the few previously reported alkane metathesis systems. We have studied the factors that determine molecular-weight selectivity in depth, including the isomerization of the olefinic intermediates and the regioselectivity of the pincer-iridium catalyst for dehydrogenation at the terminal position of the n-alkane. Our continuing work centers on the development of co-catalysts with improved interoperability, particularly olefin-metathesis catalysts that are more robust at high temperature and dehydrogenation catalysts that are more active at low temperature. We are also designing dehydrogenation catalysts based on metals other than iridium. Our ongoing mechanistic studies are focused on the apparently complex combination of factors that determine molecular-weight selectivity. PMID:22584036

  17. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  18. New Molecular Theory for Dense, Thin Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl

    2015-03-01

    The development of a molecular theory for dense polymer systems ranks among the most challenging problems in the statistical mechanics of complex matter. These difficulties become compounded when considering the influence of molecular details on thermodynamic properties of thin polymer films, properties deviating from those of the bulk phases. A new theory of dense polymer films is developed as a significant generalization of methods used to devise the lattice cluster theory, an extension of Flory-Huggins theory that include details of monomer structure and short range correlations (neglected in FH theory) and that has successfully been applied to a wide range of polymer systems. The new theory incorporates the essential ``transport'' constraints of Helfand and focuses on the strict imposition of excluded volume constraints, appropriate to dense polymer systems, rather than the maintenance of chain connectivity as appropriate for lower densities and implemented in self-consistent theories of polymer adsorption at interfaces. The theory is illustrated by presenting examples of the computed density and chain end profiles for free standing films as a function of bulk density, chain length, temperature, and chain semi-flexibility.

  19. Molecularly Oriented Polymeric Thin Films for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Catharine C.; Stoakley, Diane M.; St.Clair, Anne K.

    1997-01-01

    The increased commitment from NASA and private industry to the exploration of outer space and the use of orbital instrumentation to monitor the earth has focused attention on organic polymeric materials for a variety of applications in space. Some polymeric materials have exhibited short-term (3-5 yr) space environmental durability; however, future spacecraft are being designed with lifetimes projected to be 10-30 years. This gives rise to concern that material property change brought about during operation may result in unpredicted spacecraft performance. Because of their inherent toughness and flexibility, low density, thermal stability, radiation resistance and mechanical strength, aromatic polyimides have excellent potential use as advanced materials on large space structures. Also, there exists a need for high temperature (200-300 C) stable, flexible polymeric films that have high optical transparency in the 300-600nm range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Polymers suitable for these space applications were fabricated and characterized. Additionally, these polymers were molecularly oriented to further enhance their dimensional stability, stiffness, elongation and strength. Both unoriented and oriented polymeric thin films were also cryogenically treated to temperatures below -184 C to show their stability in cold environments and determine any changes in material properties.

  20. Supercritical fluid molecular spray thin films and fine powders

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. The solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solution pressure is varied to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solution temperature is varied in relation to formation of a two-phase system during expansion to control porosity of the film or powder. A wide variety of film textures and powder shapes are produced of both organic and inorganic compounds. Films are produced with regular textural feature dimensions of 1.0-2.0 .mu.m down to a range of 0.01 to 0.1 .mu.m. Powders are formed in very narrow size distributions, with average sizes in the range of 0.02 to 5 .mu.m.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of VN thin films under indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tao; Peng, Xianghe; Huang, Cheng; Yin, Deqiang; Li, Qibin; Wang, Zhongchang

    2015-12-01

    We investigated with molecular dynamics simulation the mechanical responses of VN (0 0 1) thin films subjected to indentation with a diamond columnar indenter. We calculated the generalized stacking-fault energies as a function of the displacement in the rbond2 1 1 0lbond2 directions on the {0 0 1}, {1 1 0}, and {1 1 1} planes, and analyzed systematically the microstructures and their evolution during the indentation with the centro-symmetry parameters and the slices of the VN films. We found the slips on {1 1 0}rbond2 1 1 0lbond2 of the VN film under indentation at the initial stage. With the increase of indentation depth, slips are also activated on {1 1 1}rbond2 1 1 0lbond2 and {1 0 0}rbond2 0 1 1lbond2 systems. We further found that the slip system is determined by the stacking-fault energy rather than the layer spacing. The indentations with other different parameters were also performed, and the results further prove the validity of the conclusion.

  2. Ordered nanocolumn-array organic semiconductor thin films with controllable molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingchu; Duan, Haichao; Zhou, Conghua; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2013-12-01

    Ordered nanocolumn-array phthalocynine semiconductor thin films with controllable molecular orientation were fabricated by combining molecular template growth (MTG) and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) techniques. The pre-deposited planar perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-3,4,9,10-dianhydride (PTCDA) molecular template layer induces phthalocynine molecules arrange with a lying-down molecular orientation, in which the π-π stacking is vertical to the substrate improving the charge transport along the vertical direction; While the GLAD technique supports the formation of nanocolumn-array thin films, supplying a much larger exposed surface area than the conventional compact thin films. The ordered nanocolumn-array thin films with controllable molecular orientation fabricated by combining MTG and GLAD techniques show the potentials to fabricate ordered bulk heterojunction for improving the performance in organic photovoltaics.

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of thin film nucleation and substrate modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanhong

    Deposition of energetic particles on solid surfaces has found increasing application in surface science. However, the detailed surface chemistry and relevant atomic mechanisms are not well understood. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are an ideal method to study these processes atomistically because they usually occur on short time scales (of the order of a few picoseconds). In this dissertation, MD simulations are performed to investigate thin film formation through organic cluster beam deposition and chemical modification of carbon nanotube/polymer composites via polyatomic ion beam deposition. The interatomic forces are calculated from the reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potential for carbon-based systems coupled with the Lennard-Jones potentials. The reliability of this approach is examined by comparing its predictions for ethylene-cluster beam deposition with the results of a more accurate order-N nonorthogonal tight-binding method. The results show that the REBO potential captures the general characters of the relevant chemistry. The deposition processes of interest occur at room temperature; hence, appropriate temperature control methods must be employed in the simulations. A comparison study of four temperature control methods during the simulation of cluster deposition finds that the generalized Langevin equation approach is sufficient for dissipation of excess system energy if the deposition occurs on a large enough substrate at a moderate incident energy (<40 eV/cluster-atom). A new temperature control method has been developed for use at higher incident energies. In the simulations of thin film formation through organic cluster beam deposition, the dependence of the results on the intracluster bonding, incident angle and deposition direction is examined. Beams of ethylene clusters, adamantane molecules, and C20 molecules are thus deposited on a diamond surface with varying lateral momenta along two different crystallographic orientations at

  4. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbing

    The barrier to utilize solar generated electricity mainly comes from their higher cost relative to fossil fuels. However, innovations with new materials and processing techniques can potentially make cost effective photovoltaics. One such strategy is to develop solution processed photovoltaics which avoid the expensive vacuum processing required by traditional solar cells. The dissertation is mainly focused on two absorber material system for thin film solar cells: chalcopyrite CuIn(S,Se)2 (CISS) and kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4 organized in chronological order. Chalcopyrite CISS is a very promising material. It has been demonstrated to achieve the highest efficiency among thin film solar cells. Scaled-up industry production at present has reached the giga-watt per year level. The process however mainly relies on vacuum systems which account for a significant percentage of the manufacturing cost. In the first section of this dissertation, hydrazine based solution processed CISS has been explored. The focus of the research involves the procedures to fabricate devices from solution. The topics covered in Chapter 2 include: precursor solution synthesis with a focus on understanding the solution chemistry, CISS absorber formation from precursor, properties modification toward favorable device performance, and device structure innovation toward tandem device. For photovoltaics to have a significant impact toward meeting energy demands, the annual production capability needs to be on TW-level. On such a level, raw materials supply of rare elements (indium for CIS or tellurium for CdTe) will be the bottleneck limiting the scalability. Replacing indium with zinc and tin, earth abundant kesterite CZTS exhibits great potential to reach the goal of TW-level with no limitations on raw material availability. Chapter 3 shows pioneering work towards solution processing of CZTS film at low temperature. The solution processed devices show performances which rival vacuum

  5. Molecular Aspects of Transport in Thin Films of Controlled Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Bohn

    2009-04-16

    Our laboratory focuses on developing spatially localized chemistries which can produce structures of controlled architecture on the supermolecular length scale -- structures which allow us to control the motion of molecular species with high spatial resolution, ultimately on nanometer length scales. Specifically, nanocapillary array membranes (NCAMs) contain an array of nanometer diameter pores connecting vertically separated microfluidic channels. NCAMs can manipulate samples with sub-femtoliter characteristic volumes and attomole sample amounts and are opening the field of chemical analysis of mass-limited samples, because they are capable of digital control of fluid switching down to sub-attoliter volumes; extension of analytical “unit operations” down to sub-femtomole sample sizes; and exerting spatiotemporal control over fluid mixing to enable studies of reaction dynamics. Digital flow switching mediated by nanocapillary array membranes can be controlled by bias, ionic strength, or pore diameter and is being studied by observing the temporal characteristics of transport across a single nanopore in thin PMMA membranes. The control of flow via nanopore surface characteristics, charge density and functional group presentation, is being studied by coupled conductivity and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. Reactive mixing experiments previously established low millisecond mixing times for NCAM-mediated fluid transfer, and this has been exploited to demonstrate capture of mass-limited target species by Au colloids. Voltage and thermally-activated polymer switches have been developed for active control of transport in NCAMs. Thermally-switchable and size-selective transport was achieved by grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes onto the exterior surface of a Au-coated polycarbonate track-etched membrane, while the voltage-gated properties of poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) were characterized dynamically. Electrophoretic separations have been

  6. Molecular Sieves: Porous Organic Cage Thin Films and Molecular-Sieving Membranes (Adv. Mater. 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Song, Qilei; Jiang, Shan; Hasell, Tom; Liu, Ming; Sun, Shijing; Cheetham, Anthony K; Sivaniah, Easan; Cooper, Andrew I

    2016-04-01

    Porous organic cage molecules are a new class of molecular materials that combine microporosity and solution-processability. On page 2629, E. Sivaniah, A. I. Cooper, and co-workers demonstrate solution processing of cage molecules into thin films with tunable structures. For the first time, cage molecules are fabricated into continuous and pinhole-free microporous molecular-sieving membranes, as confirmed by selective gas transport in terms of high permeance and molecular selectivity. Image credit: Adam Kewley. PMID:27037946

  7. Vibrational studies of molecular organization in evaporated phthalocyanine thin solid films

    SciTech Connect

    Aroca, R.; Thedchanamoorthy, A.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents results on the study of the molecular organization, utilizing transmission and reflection absorption FTIR spectroscopy, of thin films of phthalocyanine complexes and metal free phthalocyanine. The spatial anisotropy was probed.

  8. Enhanced Rates of Photoinduced Molecular Orientation in a Series of Molecular Glassy Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Snell, Kristen E; Hou, Renjie; Ishow, Eléna; Lagugné-Labarthet, François

    2015-07-01

    Photoinduced orientation in a series of molecular glasses made of small push-pull azo derivatives is dynamically investigated for the first time. Birefringence measurements at 632.8 nm are conducted with a temporal resolution of 100 ms to probe the fast rate of the azo orientation induced under polarized light and its temporal stability over several consecutive cycles. To better evaluate the influence of the azo chemical substituents and their electronic properties on the orientation of the whole molecule, a series of push-pull azo derivatives involving a triphenylaminoazo core substituted with distinct electron-withdrawing moieties is studied. All resulting thin films are probed using polarization modulation infrared spectroscopy that yields dynamical linear dichroism measurements during a cycle of orientation followed by relaxation. We show here in particular that the orientation rates of small molecule-based azo materials are systematically increased up to 7-fold compared to those of a reference polymer counterpart. For specific compounds, the percentage of remnant orientation is also higher, which makes these materials of great interest and promising alternatives to azobenzene-containing polymers for a variety of applications requiring a fast response and absolute control over the molecular weight. PMID:26072966

  9. Alkane fluids confined and compressed by two smooth crystalline gold surfaces: Pure liquids and mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Lina P. Merchan

    With the use of grand canonical molecular dynamics, we studied the slow compression(0.01m/s) of very thin liquid films made of equimolar mixtures of short and long alkane chains (hexane and hexadecane), and branched and unbranched alkanes (phytane and hexadecane). Besides comparing how these mixtures behave under constant speed compression, we will compare their properties with the behavior and structure of the pure systems undergoing the same type of slow compression. To understand the arrangement of the molecules inside the confinement, we present segmental and molecular density profiles, average length and orientation of the molecules inside well formed gaps. To observe the effects of the compression on the fluids, we present the number of confined molecules, the inlayer orientation, the solvation force and the inlayer diffusion coefficient, versus the thickness of the gap. We observe that pure hexadecane, although liquid at this temperature, starts presenting strong solid-like behavior when it is compressed to thicknesses under 30A, while pure hexane and pure phytane continue to behave liquid-like except at 13A when they show some weak solid-like features. When hexadecane is mixed with the short straight hexane, it remains liquid down to 28A at which point this mixture behaves solid-like with an enhanced alignment of the long molecules not seen in its pure form; but when hexade-cane is mixed with the branched phytane the system does not present the solid-like features seen when hexadecane is compressed pure.

  10. Vibrational modes and changing molecular conformation of perfluororubrene in thin films and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, F.; Scholz, R.; Gerlach, A.; Schreiber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of perfluororubrene (PF-RUB) in thin films on silicon wafers with a native oxide layer as well as on silicon wafers covered with a self-assembled monolayer and in dichloromethane solution. In comparison with computed Raman and IR spectra, we can assign the molecular modes and identify two molecular conformations with twisted and planar tetracene backbones of the molecule. Moreover, we employ Raman imaging techniques to study the morphology and distribution of the molecular conformation in PF-RUB thin films.

  11. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  12. Dewetting dynamics of nickel thin film on alpha-quartz substrate: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Yuki; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    Dewetting dynamics of the nickel thin film on the alpha-quartz substrate is closely investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Morphology after the spontaneous dewetting of thin films changes from multi-droplets, single-droplet and cylindrical structure as the film thickness increases. In the thin cylindrical structure, a neck is induced to break into the droplet due to the Plateau-Rayleigh instability whereas the thick cylindrical structure does not break. Nucleation and subsequent solidification happen only in the large droplet after the dewetting due to the size effect, which is dominated by the kinetic factor of nucleation in the small system.

  13. Characterization of cyclic and acyclic alkanes in Forties and Kuwait petroleum crudes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.W. ); Pakdel, H. ); Bartle, K.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Alkane hydrocarbon fractions from Forties (North Sea) and Kuwait petroleum crudes, separated by distillation, solvent extraction and silicagel column chromatography and sub-fractionated by molecular-sieve adsorption, have been examined by gas chromatography (GC), {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, GC-mass spectrometry (MS) and field desorption (FD)MS. GC indicates that Forties contains rather more acyclic isoprenoids and cyclic alkanes than Kuwait; FDMS of Kuwait shows molecular-weight ranges for mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, and pentacyclic alkanes. {sup 13}C NMR spectra provide evidence of higher aromatic carbon, C{sub A}, in Forties than Kuwait and longer T{sub 1} relaxation times.

  14. Adsorption and dissociation kinetics of alkanes on CaO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakradhar, A.; Liu, Y.; Schmidt, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, U.

    2011-08-01

    The adsorption kinetics of ethane, butane, pentane, and hexane on CaO(100) have been studied by multi-mass thermal desorption (TDS) spectroscopy. The sample cleanliness was checked by Auger electron spectroscopy. A molecular and dissociative adsorption pathway was evident for the alkanes, except for ethane, which does not undergo bond activation. Two TDS peaks appeared when recording the parent mass, which are assigned to different adsorption sites/configurations of the molecularly adsorbed alkanes. Bond activation leads to desorption of hydrogen and several alkane fragments assigned to methane and ethylene formation. Only one TDS feature is seen in this case. Formation of carbon residuals was absent.

  15. Anomalous scaling behavior and surface roughening in molecular thin-film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, S.; Jones, T. S.

    2006-04-15

    The thin film growth dynamics of a molecular semiconductor, free-base phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}Pc), deposited by organic molecular beam deposition, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and height difference correlation function (HDCF) analysis. The measured dynamic scaling components ({alpha}{sub loc}=0.61{+-}0.12, {beta}=1.02{+-}0.08, and 1/z=0.72{+-}0.13) are consistent with rapid surface roughening and anomalous scaling behavior. A detailed analysis of AFM images and simple growth models suggest that this behavior arises from the pronounced upward growth of crystalline H{sub 2}Pc mounds during the initial stages of thin film growth.

  16. Thin Films of Molecular Metals TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraxedas, J.; Molas, S.; Figueras, A.; Jiménez, I.; Gago, R.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Goffman, M.

    2002-11-01

    We present recent results on the characterization of highly ordered polycrystalline thin films of the charge transfer salt TTF-TCNQ (TTF=tetrathiafulvalene, TCNQ=tetracyanoquinodimethane) prepared by thermal sublimation in high vacuum under different conditions. The increase in orientation and microcrystal size as a function of substrate and annealing temperatures is addressed. A consequence of such an increase is the reduction of the conductivity activation energy, which eventually leads to the observation of the Peierls transition by resistivity measurements. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy studies performed with synchrotron radiation reveal directly the influence of charge transfer on unoccupied states near the Fermi level.

  17. Influence of molecular architecture on the dewetting of thin polystyrene films.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R S; Mackay, M E; Hawker, C J; Van Horn, B

    2005-06-21

    The control of dewetting for thin polymer films is a technical challenge and of significant academic interest. We have used polystyrene nanoparticles to inhibit dewetting of high molecular weight, linear polystyrene, demonstrating that molecular architecture has a unique effect on surface properties. Neutron reflectivity measurements were used to demonstrate that the nanoparticles were uniformly distributed in the thin (ca. 40 nm) film prior to high temperature annealing, yet after annealing, they were found to separate to the solid substrate, a silanized silicon wafer. Dewetting was eliminated when the nanoparticles separated to form a monolayer or above while below this surface coverage the dewetting dynamics was severely retarded. Blending linear polystyrene of similar molecular weight to the polystyrene nanoparticle with the high molecular weight polystyrene did not eliminate dewetting. PMID:15952821

  18. On droplet combustion of biodiesel fuel mixed with diesel/alkanes in microgravity condition

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Li, Je-Wei; Chen, Chien-Pei; Wang, Ching-Hua

    2009-10-15

    The burning characteristics of a biodiesel droplet mixed with diesel or alkanes such as dodecane and hexadecane were experimentally studied in a reduced-gravity environment so as to create a spherically symmetrical flame without the influence of natural convection due to buoyancy. Small droplets on the order of 500 {mu}m in diameter were initially injected via a piezoelectric technique onto the cross point intersected by two thin carbon fibers; these were prepared inside a combustion chamber that was housed in a drag shield, which was freely dropped onto a foam cushion. It was found that, for single component droplets, the tendency to form a rigid soot shell was relatively small for biodiesel fuel as compared to that exhibited by the other tested fuels. The soot created drifted away readily, showing a puffing phenomenon; this could be related to the distinct molecular structure of biodiesel leading to unique soot layers that were more vulnerable to oxidative reactivity as compared to the soot generated by diesel or alkanes. The addition of biodiesel to these more traditional fuels also presented better performance with respect to annihilating the soot shell, particularly for diesel. The burning rate generally follows that of multi-component fuels, by some means in terms of a lever rule, whereas the mixture of biodiesel and dodecane exhibits a somewhat nonlinear relation with the added fraction of dodecane. This might be related to the formation of a soot shell. (author)

  19. Tunneling Nanoelectromechanical Switches Based on Compressible Molecular Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Niroui, Farnaz; Wang, Annie I; Sletten, Ellen M; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Yablonovitch, Eli; Swager, Timothy M; Lang, Jeffrey H; Bulović, Vladimir

    2015-08-25

    Abrupt switching behavior and near-zero leakage current of nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches are advantageous properties through which NEMs can outperform conventional semiconductor electrical switches. To date, however, typical NEMs structures require high actuation voltages and can prematurely fail through permanent adhesion (defined as stiction) of device components. To overcome these challenges, in the present work we propose a NEM switch, termed a "squitch," which is designed to electromechanically modulate the tunneling current through a nanometer-scale gap defined by an organic molecular film sandwiched between two electrodes. When voltage is applied across the electrodes, the generated electrostatic force compresses the sandwiched molecular layer, thereby reducing the tunneling gap and causing an exponential increase in the current through the device. The presence of the molecular layer avoids direct contact of the electrodes during the switching process. Furthermore, as the layer is compressed, the increasing surface adhesion forces are balanced by the elastic restoring force of the deformed molecules which can promote zero net stiction and recoverable switching. Through numerical analysis, we demonstrate the potential of optimizing squitch design to enable large on-off ratios beyond 6 orders of magnitude with operation in the sub-1 V regime and with nanoseconds switching times. Our preliminary experimental results based on metal-molecule-graphene devices suggest the feasibility of the proposed tunneling switching mechanism. With optimization of device design and material engineering, squitches can give rise to a broad range of low-power electronic applications. PMID:26244821

  20. Modeling Ellipsometry Measurements of Molecular Thin-Film Contamination on Genesis Array Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of a molecular thin-film contamination on Genesis flown array samples changed the course of preliminary assessment strategies. Analytical techniques developed to measure solar wind elemental abundances must now compensate for a thin-film contamination. Currently, this is done either by experimental cleaning before analyses or by depth-profiling techniques that bypass the surface contamination. Inside Johnson Space Center s Genesis dedicated ISO Class 4 (Class 10) cleanroom laboratory, the selection of collector array fragments allocated for solar wind analyses are based on the documentation of overall surface quality, visible surface particle contamination greater than 1 m, and the amount of thin film contamination measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Documenting the exact thickness, surface topography, and chemical composition of these contaminates is also critical for developing accurate cleaning methods. However, the first step in characterization of the molecular film is to develop accurate ellipsometry models that will determine an accurate thickness measurement of the contamination film.

  1. Optical observations of molecular dissociation in thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Gay, T.J.; Brooks, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have measured the intensity and polarizations of light emitted from atomic excited states of dissociated molecular ions. Using HeH/sup +/ projectiles, we have observed factors of 1 to 5 enhancements of the light from n=3, /sup 1/ /sup 3/P,D states of He I and some He II and H I emissions. Observations of Lyman-..cap alpha.. emission after dissociation of H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/ show rapid variations in light yield for small internuclear separations at the foil surface.

  2. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Alkanes, Dissolved Fatty Acids in a Karst Underground River Water, in Chongqing Area].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Zheng-Lan; Liao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids were collected from Qingmuguan underground river in July, October 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), alkanes and fatty acids were quantitatively analyzed. The results showed that average contents of alkanes and fatty acids were 1 354 ng.L-1, 24203 ng.L-1 in July, and 667 ng.L-1, 2526 ng.L-1 in October respectively. With the increasing migration distance of dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids in underground river, their contents decreased. Based on the molecular characteristic indices of alkanes, like CPI, OEP, Paq and R, dissolved alkanes were mainly originated from microorganisms in July, and aquatic plants in October. Saturated straight-chain fatty acid had the highest contents in all samples with the dominant peak in C16:0, combined with the characteristics of carbon peak, algae or bacteria might be the dominant source of dissolved fatty acids. PMID:26717680

  3. Molecular-Orientation-Induced Rapid Roughening and Morphology Transition in Organic Semiconductor Thin-Film Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junliang; Yim, Sanggyu; Jones, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    We study the roughening process and morphology transition of organic semiconductor thin film induced by molecular orientation in the model of molecular semiconductor copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) using both experiment and simulation. The growth behaviour of F16CuPc thin film with the thickness, D, on SiO2 substrate takes on two processes divided by a critical thickness: (1) D ≤ 40 nm, F16CuPc thin films are composed of uniform caterpillar-like crystals. The kinetic roughening is confirmed during this growth, which is successfully analyzed by Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) model with scaling exponents α = 0.71 ± 0.12, β = 0.36 ± 0.03, and 1/z = 0.39 ± 0.12; (2) D > 40 nm, nanobelt crystals are formed gradually on the caterpillar-like crystal surface and the film growth shows anomalous growth behaviour. These new growth behaviours with two processes result from the gradual change of molecular orientation and the formation of grain boundaries, which conversely induce new molecular orientation, rapid roughening process, and the formation of nanobelt crystals. PMID:25801646

  4. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-01-12

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

  5. Rupture mechanism of liquid crystal thin films realized by large-scale molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trung D; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Brown, W Michael; Matheson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The ability of liquid crystal (LC) molecules to respond to changes in their environment makes them an interesting candidate for thin film applications, particularly in bio-sensing, bio-mimicking devices, and optics. Yet the understanding of the (in)stability of this family of thin films has been limited by the inherent challenges encountered by experiment and continuum models. Using unprecedented largescale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we address the rupture origin of LC thin films wetting a solid substrate at length scales similar to those in experiment. Our simulations show the key signatures of spinodal instability in isotropic and nematic films on top of thermal nucleation, and importantly, for the first time, evidence of a common rupture mechanism independent of initial thickness and LC orientational ordering. We further demonstrate that the primary driving force for rupture is closely related to the tendency of the LC mesogens to recover their local environment in the bulk state. Our study not only provides new insights into the rupture mechanism of liquid crystal films, but also sets the stage for future investigations of thin film systems using peta-scale molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Rupture mechanism of liquid crystal thin films realized by large-scale molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Dac; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Matheson, Michael A; Brown, W Michael

    2014-03-21

    The ability of liquid crystal (LC) molecules to respond to changes in their environment makes them an interesting candidate for thin film applications, particularly in bio-sensing, bio-mimicking devices, and optics. Yet the understanding of the (in)stability of this family of thin films has been limited by the inherent challenges encountered by experiment and continuum models. Using unprecedented large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we address the rupture origin of LC thin films wetting a solid substrate at length scales similar to those in experiment. Our simulations show the key signatures of spinodal instability in isotropic and nematic films on top of thermal nucleation, and importantly, for the first time, evidence of a common rupture mechanism independent of initial thickness and LC orientational ordering. We further demonstrate that the primary driving force for rupture is closely related to the tendency of the LC mesogens to recover their local environment in the bulk state. Our study not only provides new insights into the rupture mechanism of liquid crystal films, but also sets the stage for future investigations of thin film systems using peta-scale molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24264516

  7. Molecular layer-by-layer assembled thin-film composite membranes for water desalination.

    PubMed

    Gu, Joung-Eun; Lee, Seunghye; Stafford, Christopher M; Lee, Jong Suk; Choi, Wansuk; Kim, Bo-Young; Baek, Kyung-Youl; Chan, Edwin P; Chung, Jun Young; Bang, Joona; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2013-09-14

    Molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembled thin-film composite membranes fabricated by alternating deposition of reactive monomers on porous supports exhibit both improved salt rejection and enhanced water flux compared to traditional reverse osmosis membranes prepared by interfacial polymerization. Additionally, the well-controlled structures achieved by mLbL deposition further lead to improved antifouling performance. PMID:23847127

  8. MIR and NIR group spectra of n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwaśniewicz, Michał; Czarnecki, Mirosław A.

    2015-05-01

    Numerous attempts were undertaken to resolve the absorption originating from different parts of alkanes. The separation of the contributions from the terminal and midchain methylene units was observed only in the spectra of solid alkanes at low temperatures. On the other hand, for liquid alkanes this effect was not reported as yet. In this study, ATR-IR, Raman and NIR spectra of eight n-alkanes and seven 1-chloroalkanes in the liquid phase were measured from 1000 to 12,000 cm-1. The spectra were analyzed by using two-dimensional (2D) correlation approach and chemometrics methods. It was shown that in 2D asynchronous contour plots, constructed from the spectra of n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes, the methylene band was resolved into two components. These two components were assigned to the terminal and midchain methylene groups. For the first time, the contributions from these two molecular fragments were resolved in the spectra of liquid n-alkanes and 1-chloroalkanes. MCR-ALS resolved these spectra into two components that were assigned to the ethyl and midchain methylene groups. These components represent the group spectra that can be used for assignment, spectral analysis and prediction of unknown spectra. The spectral prediction based on the group spectra provides very good results for n-alkanes, especially in the first and second overtone regions.

  9. Alkane biohydroxylation: Interests, constraints and future developments.

    PubMed

    Soussan, Laurence; Pen, Nakry; Belleville, Marie-Pierre; Marcano, José Sanchez; Paolucci-Jeanjean, Delphine

    2016-03-20

    Alkanes constitute one of the vastest reserves of raw materials for the production of fine chemicals. This paper focuses on recent advances in alkane biohydroxylation, i.e. the bioactivation of alkanes into their corresponding alcohols. Enzyme and whole-cell biocatalysts have been reviewed. Process considerations to implement such biocatalysts in bioreactors at large scale by coupling the bioconversion with cofactor regeneration and product removal are also discussed. PMID:26853477

  10. Thickness determination of molecularly thin lubricant films by angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Chongjun; Bai, Mingwu

    2007-03-01

    An angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method used to measure the thickness of molecularly thin lubricants was developed. The method was built based on an island model of patched overlayer on a flat substrate by using the photoemission signal solely from the lubricant film. Typical molecularly thin Zdol films on the CHx overcoat of unused commercial magnetic disks were measured to verify the metrology. The lubricant thickness determined by the metrology was equal to the recent result by thermostatic high vacuum atomic force microscopy. The measured deduction in the thickness of the molecularly thin lubricant films, successively irradiated by the monochromatic source operated at 14 kV/250 W, was as low as 1 Ǻ during the first irradiation hour. XPS spectra showed that no hydrocarbons, water or oxygen were adsorbed over the Zdol outer surfaces in the tested XPS conditions. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of C 1s in Zdol or in CHx was found to be independent of take off angle (TOA) when TOA < 40°. The IMFP of C 1s in Zdol was ˜63.5 Ǻ and the lubricant island thickness was ˜35 Ǻ.

  11. Secondary organic aerosol composition from C12 alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schilling Fahnestock, Katherine A; Yee, Lindsay D; Loza, Christine L; Coggon, Matthew M; Schwantes, Rebecca; Zhang, Xuan; Dalleska, Nathan F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-05-14

    The effects of structure, NOx conditions, relative humidity, and aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are reported for the photooxidation of three C12 alkanes: n-dodecane, cyclododecane, and hexylcyclohexane. Acidity was modified through seed particle composition: NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4 + H2SO4. Off-line analysis of SOA was carried out by solvent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry. We report here 750 individual masses of SOA products identified from these three alkane systems and 324 isomers resolved by GC/MS analysis. The chemical compositions for each alkane system provide compelling evidence of particle-phase chemistry, including reactions leading to oligomer formation. Major oligomeric species for alkane SOA are peroxyhemiacetals, hemiacetals, esters, and aldol condensation products. Furans, dihydrofurans, hydroxycarbonyls, and their corresponding imine analogues are important participants in these oligomer-producing reactions. Imines are formed in the particle phase from the reaction of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol with carbonyl-bearing compounds present in all the SOA systems. Under high-NO conditions, organonitrate products can lead to an increase of aerosol volume concentration by up to a factor of 5 over that in low-NO conditions. Structure was found to play a key role in determining the degree of functionalization and fragmentation of the parent alkane, influencing the mean molecular weight of the SOA produced and the mean atomic O:C ratio. PMID:24814371

  12. Highly-oriented molecular arrangements and enhanced magnetic interactions in thin films of CoTTDPz using PTCDA templates.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Keitaro; Nanjo, Chihiro; Awaga, Kunio; Tseng, Hsiang-Han; Robaschik, Peter; Heutz, Sandrine

    2016-07-14

    In the present work, the templating effect of thin layers of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on the growth of cobalt tetrakis(thiadiazole)porphyrazine (CoTTDPz) thin films was examined. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption spectra indicate that while CoTTDPz forms amorphous thin films on the bare substrates, it forms crystalline thin films on the PTCDA templates, in which the molecular planes of CoTTDPz are considered to be parallel to the substrates. Magnetic measurements reveal a significantly enhanced antiferromagnetic interaction of CoTTDPz in the templated thin films, with values reaching over 13 K. The ability to generate crystalline films and to control their orientation using molecular templates is an important strategy in the fields of organic electronics and spintronics in order to tailor the physical properties of organic thin films to suit their intended application. PMID:27183955

  13. Defect-Controlled Preparation of UiO-66 Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films with Molecular Sieving Capability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caiqin; Zhao, Yajing; Li, Yali; Zhang, Xuetong; Chi, Lifeng; Lu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) UiO-66 thin films are solvothermally grown on conducting substrates. The as-synthesized MOF thin films are subsequently dried by a supercritical process or treated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The obtained UiO-66 thin films show excellent molecular sieving capability as confirmed by the electrochemical studies for redox-active species with different sizes. PMID:26548455

  14. Adsorption of alkanes on stoichiometric and oxygen-rich RuO2(110).

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Kim, Minkyu; Rai, Rahul; Liang, Zhu; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F

    2016-08-10

    We investigated the molecular adsorption of methane, ethane, propane and n-butane on stoichiometric and oxygen-rich RuO2(110) surfaces using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3) calculations. We find that each alkane adsorbs strongly on the coordinatively-unsaturated Ru (Rucus) atoms of s-RuO2(110), with desorption from this state producing a well-defined TPD peak at low alkane coverage. As the coverage increases, we find that alkanes first form a compressed layer on the Rucus atoms and subsequently adsorb on the bridging O atoms of the surface until the monolayer saturates. DFT-D3 calculations predict that methane preferentially adsorbs on top of a Rucus atom and that the C2 to C4 alkanes preferentially adopt bidentate configurations in which each molecule aligns parallel to the Rucus atom row and datively bonds to neighboring Rucus atoms. DFT-D3 predicts binding energies that agree quantitatively with our experimental estimates for alkane σ-complexes on RuO2(110). We find that oxygen atoms adsorbed on top of Rucus atoms (Oot atoms) stabilize the adsorbed alkane complexes that bind in a given configuration, while also blocking the sites needed for σ-complex formation. This site blocking causes the coverage of the most stable, bidentate alkane complexes to decrease sharply with increasing Oot coverage. Concurrently, we find that a new peak develops in the C2 to C4 alkane TPD spectra with increasing Oot coverage, and that the desorption yield in this TPD feature passes through a maximum at Oot coverages between ∼50% and 60%. We present evidence that the new TPD peak arises from C2 to C4 alkanes that adsorb in upright, monodentate configurations on stranded Rucus sites located within the Oot layer. PMID:27477390

  15. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Alkanes in flower surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis influence attraction to Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Sarkar, N; Barik, A

    2013-08-01

    Extraction, thin-layer chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry analyses revealed 15 alkanes representing 97.14% of the total alkanes in the surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng flowers. Nonacosane was the prevailing alkane followed by hexatriacontane, nonadecane, heptacosane, and hentriacontane, accounting for 39.08%, 24.24%, 13.52%, 6.32%, and 5.12%, respectively. The alkanes from flower surface waxes followed by a synthetic mixture of alkanes mimicking alkanes of flower surface waxes elicited attraction of the female insect, Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) between 2 and 10-μg/mL concentrations in a Y-shaped glass tube olfactometer bioassay under laboratory conditions. Synthetic nonadecane from 178.28-891.37 ng, heptacosane from 118.14-590.72 ng, and nonacosane at 784.73 ng showed attraction of the insect. A synthetic mixture of 534.82 ng nonadecane, 354.43 ng heptacosane, and 2,354.18 ng nonacosane elicited highest attraction of A. foveicollis. PMID:23949856

  17. n-Alkane hydroconversion on Zeogrid and colloidal ZSM-5 assembled from aluminosilicate nanoslabs of MFI framework type.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Alexander; Huybrechts, Ward; Kremer, Sebastien P B; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Theunissen, Elisabeth; Van Isacker, Annabel; Denayer, Joeri F M; Baron, Gino V; Thybaut, Joris W; Marin, Guy B; Jacobs, Pierre A; Martens, Johan A

    2003-08-01

    n-Alkane hydroisomerisation and hydrocracking experiments reveal that ZSM-5 materials synthesized by self-assembly of nanoslabs show different molecular shape selectivity than ZSM-5 synthesized by hydrothermal methods. PMID:12932017

  18. Production of Liquid Alkanes by Aqueous-Phase Processing of Biomass-Derived Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, George W.; Chheda, Juben N.; Barrett, Christopher J.; Dumesic, James A.

    2005-06-01

    Liquid alkanes with the number of carbon atoms ranging from C7 to C15 were selectively produced from biomass-derived carbohydrates by acid-catalyzed dehydration, which was followed by aldol condensation over solid base catalysts to form large organic compounds. These molecules were then converted into alkanes by dehydration/hydrogenation over bifunctional catalysts that contained acid and metal sites in a four-phase reactor, in which the aqueous organic reactant becomes more hydrophobic and a hexadecane alkane stream removes hydrophobic species from the catalyst before they go on further to form coke. These liquid alkanes are of the appropriate molecular weight to be used as transportation fuel components, and they contain 90% of the energy of the carbohydrate and H2 feeds.

  19. Molecularly thin fluoro-polymeric nanolubricant films: tribology, rheology, morphology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Chung, Pil Seung; Jhon, Myung S; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2016-03-01

    Molecularly thin perfluoropolyether (PFPE) has been used extensively as a high-performance lubricant in various applications and, more importantly, on carbon overcoats to enhance the reliability and lubrication of micro-/nanoelectro-mechanical systems, where the tribological performance caused by its molecular architecture is a critical issue, as are its physical properties and rheological characteristics. This Highlight addresses recent trends in the development of fluoro-polymeric lubricant films with regard to their tribology, rheology, and physio-chemical properties as they relate to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Nanorheology has been employed to examine the dynamic response of nonfunctional and functional PFPEs, while the viscoelastic properties of nanoscale PFPE films and the relaxation processes as a function of molecular structure and end-group functionality were analyzed experimentally; furthermore, the characteristics of binary blends were reported. PMID:26907953

  20. Changes in iso- and n-alkane distribution during biodegradation of crude oil under nitrate and sulphate reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasinger, Marion; Scherr, Kerstin E; Lundaa, Tserennyam; Bräuer, Leopold; Zach, Clemens; Loibner, Andreas Paul

    2012-02-20

    Crude oil consists of a large number of hydrocarbons with different susceptibility to microbial degradation. The influence of hydrocarbon structure and molecular weight on hydrocarbon biodegradation under anaerobic conditions is not fully explored. In this study oxygen, nitrate and sulphate served as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for the microbial degradation of a paraffin-rich crude oil in a freshly contaminated soil. During 185 days of incubation, alkanes from n-C11 to n-C39, three n- to iso-alkane ratios commonly used as weathering indicators and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) were quantified and statistically analyzed. The use of different TEAs for hydrocarbon degradation resulted in dissimilar degradative patterns for n- and iso-alkanes. While n-alkane biodegradation followed well-established patterns under aerobic conditions, lower molecular weight alkanes were found to be more recalcitrant than mid- to high-molecular weight alkanes under nitrate-reducing conditions. Biodegradation with sulphate as the TEA was most pronounced for long-chain (n-C32 to n-C39) alkanes. The observation of increasing ratios of n-C17 to pristane and of n-C18 to phytane provides first evidence of the preferential degradation of branched over normal alkanes under sulphate reducing conditions. The formation of distinctly different n- and iso-alkane biodegradation fingerprints under different electron accepting conditions may be used to assess the occurrence of specific degradation processes at a contaminated site. The use of n- to iso-alkane ratios for this purpose may require adjustment if applied for anaerobic sites. PMID:22001845

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and pulsed laser ablation of molecular sieves for thin film applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Trinidad, Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Molecular sieves are one class of crystalline low density metal oxides which are made up of one-, two-, and three dimensional pores and/or cages. We have investigated the synthesis and characterization of metal substituted aluminophosphates and all silica molecular sieves for thin film applications. A new copper substituted aluminophosphate, CuAPO-5 has been synthesized and characterized using x-ray powder diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electron spin resonance and electron spin echo modulation provided supporting evidence of framework incorporation of Cu(II) ions. Thus, an exciting addition has been added to the family of metal substituted aluminophosphates where substitution of the metal has been demonstrated as framework species. Also presented here is the synthesis and characterization of an iron substituted aluminophosphate, FeAPO-5, and an all silica zeolite, UTD-1 for thin film applications. Pulsed laser ablation has been employed as the technique to generate thin films. Here an excimer laser (KrFsp*, 248 nm) was used to deposit the molecular sieves on a variety of substrates including polished silicon, titanium nitride, and porous stainless steel disks. The crystallinity of the deposited films was enhanced by a post hydrothermal treatment. A vapor phase treatment of the laser deposited FeAPO-5 films has been shown to increase the crystallinity of the film without increasing film thickness. Thin films of the FeAPO-5 molecular sieves were subsequently used as the dielectric phase in capacitive type chemical sensors. The capacitance change of the FeAPO-5 devices to the relative moisture makes them potential humidity sensors. The all silica zeolite UTD-1 thin films were deposited on polished silicon and porous supports. A brief post hydrothermal treatment of the laser deposited films deposited on polished silicon and porous metal supports resulted in oriented film growth lending these films to applications in gas separations

  2. Molecular Orientation of Hydroquinone Adsorbed at a Platinum(111) Thin-Layer Electrode.

    PubMed

    Ren; Hubbard

    1999-01-15

    Reported are new findings regarding the molecular orientation of hydroquinone (HQ) adsorbed on Pt surfaces. The packing density of hydroquinone adsorbed from 1 M HClO4 supporting electrolyte has been measured by use of a Pt(111) thin-layer electrode. The packing-density-vs-concentration profiles for hydroquinone, measured by a differential thin-layer electrode method at an ordered Pt(111) surface and at an electrochemically disordered Pt(111) surface, are identical within an experimental error of about 8%. The profiles from this study are similar to the ones obtained previously at an ordered Pt(111) surface by Auger spectroscopy, but they are significantly different from those reported previously for polycrystalline Pt thin-layer electrodes. A procedure based upon displacement of HQ by thiocyanate has been developed as an alternative method for determining the packing density of adsorbed HQ. Both methods afford information regarding the molecular state of HQ adsorbed at the Pt(111) surface. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9885274

  3. The effects of polymer molecular weight on filament thinning and drop breakup in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, P. E.; Cramer, L.-A.; Gollub, J. P.; Durian, D. J.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on the dynamics of filament thinning and drop breakup processes in a cross-slot microchannel. Elasticity effects are examined using dilute aqueous polymeric solutions of molecular weight (MW) ranging from 1.5×103 to 1.8×107. Results for polymeric fluids are compared to those for a viscous Newtonian fluid. The shearing or continuous phase that induces breakup is mineral oil. All fluids possess similar shear-viscosity (~0.2 Pa s) so that the viscosity ratio between the oil and aqueous phases is close to unity. Measurements of filament thickness as a function of time show different thinning behavior for the different aqueous fluids. For Newtonian fluids, the thinning process shows a single exponential decay of the filament thickness. For low MW fluids (103, 104 and 105), the thinning process also shows a single exponential decay, but with a decay rate that is slower than for the Newtonian fluid. The decay time increases with polymer MW. For high MW (106 and 107) fluids, the initial exponential decay crosses over to a second exponential decay in which elastic stresses are important. We show that the decay rate of the filament thickness in this exponential decay regime can be used to measure the steady extensional viscosity of the fluids. At late times, all fluids cross over to an algebraic decay which is driven mainly by surface tension.

  4. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  5. Atomic/molecular layer deposition: a direct gas-phase route to crystalline metal-organic framework thin films.

    PubMed

    Ahvenniemi, E; Karppinen, M

    2016-01-21

    Atomic/molecular layer deposition offers us an elegant way of fabricating crystalline copper(ii)terephthalate metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films on various substrate surfaces. The films are grown from two gaseous precursors with a digital atomic/molecular level control for the film thickness under relatively mild conditions in a simple and fast one-step process. PMID:26612265

  6. Ion-beam assisted deposition of thin molybdenum films studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbemond, Arie; Thijsse, Barend J.

    1997-05-01

    We report results obtained by molecular dynamics simulation of low energy argon-ion assisted growth of thin molybdenum films (≈ 20 Å). The effects of a single ion impact are discussed, but more particularly we consider film growth from a manufacturing viewpoint and examine the properties of the completed films. Results for ion-beam assisted deposition are compared with those for unassisted growth (i.e. physical vapor deposition). Surface orientation, atomic displacements, surface roughness, sputtering, point defects, and the influence of off-normal atom incidence are discussed.

  7. Molecular dynamics as observed with probes of different dimensions in thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiang; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Jingfa; Wang, Fuyi; Liu, Di

    Rotational motion of individual fluorescence molecules doped in thin films of poly vinylacetate (PVAc) was monitored by single molecule fluorescence de-focus microscopy. Perylendiimide and its derivatives of different dimension were chosen as probes for local dynamics. The results demonstrate that the local vibration mode detected by different molecules probe depends on dimension of the probes - the larger probes the lower frequency. The population of rotating probes is found to increase with temperature elevation, depending on the molecular dimension as well. The comparison of the results with thermo-dynamic measurements helps to shed new light on the physical picture of glass transition. Supported by MoST of China.

  8. Influence of molecular structure and microstructure on device performance of polycrystalline pentacene thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Horng-Long; Mai, Yu-Shen; Chou, Wei-Yang; Chang, Li-Ren

    2007-04-01

    The authors have fabricated the pentacene thin films on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and on silicon dioxide dielectric surfaces featuring similar surface energy and surface roughness. On both surfaces the pentacene films displayed high crystal quality from x-ray diffraction scans, although the film on PMMA had significantly smaller grain size. The pentacene transistors with PMMA exhibited excellent electrical characteristics, including high mobility of above 1.1cm2/Vs, on/off ratio above 106, and sharp subthreshold slope below 1V/decade. The analysis of molecular microstructure of the pentacene films provided a reasonable explanation for the high performance using resonance micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Morphological Behavior of Thin Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Films at the Molecular Scale

    SciTech Connect

    G Evmenenko; B Stripe; P Dutta

    2011-12-31

    Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (XRR) was used to study the structure of thin films of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) with side organic chains of different flexibility and containing terminal epoxy groups. POSS films were deposited from volatile solvents on hydroxylated and hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces. The XRR data show a variety of structural morphologies, including autophobic molecular monolayers and bilayers as well as uniform films. The role of conformational and energetic factors governing the development of different morphologies in a restricted geometry is discussed.

  10. Imaging the condensation and evaporation of molecularly thin ethanol films with surface forces apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Zhang, Di; Ni, Zhonghua E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn

    2014-01-15

    A new method for imaging condensation and evaporation of molecularly thin ethanol films is reported. It is found that the first adsorbed layer of ethanol film on mica surface behaves as solid like structure that cannot flow freely. With the increase of exposure time, more ethanol molecules condense over the mica surface in the saturated ethanol vapor condition. The first layer of adsorbed ethanol film is about 3.8 Å thick measured from the surface forces apparatus, which is believed to be the average diameter of ethanol molecules while they are confined in between two atomically smooth mica surfaces.

  11. Oxidation Products of Semi-volatile Alkanes by Hydroxyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Worton, D. R.; Nah, T.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Alkanes are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and are important components that influence atmospheric chemistry. Semi-volatile alkanes are partitioned between the gas- and the particle-phases and can be readily oxidized in both phases. Previous studies have demonstrated that reaction rates and the products of OH oxidation are very different for organic compounds in the gas- and particle phases. In the present study, n-octadecane (C18H38), n-eicosane (C20H42), n-docosane (C22H46), n-tricosane (C24H50), and n-pentadecylcyclohexane (C21H42) were chosen as model compounds for semi-volatile alkanes to examine their OH-initiated oxidation reactions in a flow tube reactor. OH exposure was varied in the experiments, equivalent to oxidation of up to one week in the atmosphere. Oxidation products were collected on filters and analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight electron impact ionization and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer. Most of the oxygenated higher molecular weight isomers were separated and quantified. Our results suggest that aerosol samples formed in the n-octadecane experiment were more oxidized than the other model compounds (i.e., functionalization products with three oxygen atoms per molecule compared to two oxygen atoms per molecule) at similar OH exposures and aerosol mass loadings. This is likely due to the concentration of n-octadecane in the gas phase where oxidation is more rapid. We find that the first-generation gas-phase oxidation products quickly partition to the particle phase after which higher-generation oxidation likely occurs in the particle phase. Interestingly, functionalized carbonyl isomers for the normal alkanes were only observed on the 4 carbon positions closest to the molecule end in all cases, which is in contrast to structure-reactivity relationship (SRR) predictions for gas-phase reactions. For n-octadecane, the concentrations of first-generation functionalization

  12. Molecular doping for control of gate bias stress in organic thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, Moritz P. Lüssem, Björn; Jankowski, Jens; Tietze, Max L.; Riede, Moritz K.; Zakhidov, Alexander A.; Leo, Karl; Fraunhofer COMEDD, Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden

    2014-01-06

    The key active devices of future organic electronic circuits are organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Reliability of OTFTs remains one of the most challenging obstacles to be overcome for broad commercial applications. In particular, bias stress was identified as the key instability under operation for numerous OTFT devices and interfaces. Despite a multitude of experimental observations, a comprehensive mechanism describing this behavior is still missing. Furthermore, controlled methods to overcome these instabilities are so far lacking. Here, we present the approach to control and significantly alleviate the bias stress effect by using molecular doping at low concentrations. For pentacene and silicon oxide as gate oxide, we are able to reduce the time constant of degradation by three orders of magnitude. The effect of molecular doping on the bias stress behavior is explained in terms of the shift of Fermi Level and, thus, exponentially reduced proton generation at the pentacene/oxide interface.

  13. Coexistence of spinodal instability and thermal nucleation in thin-film rupture: insights from molecular levels.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Dac; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2014-03-01

    Despite extensive investigation using hydrodynamic models and experiments over the past decades, there remain open questions regarding the origin of the initial rupture of thin liquid films. One of the reasons that makes it difficult to identify the rupture origin is the coexistence of two dewetting mechanisms, namely, thermal nucleation and spinodal instability, as observed in many experimental studies. Using a coarse-grained model and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to characterize the very early stage of dewetting in nanometer-thick liquid-metal films wetting a solid substrate. We observe the features characteristic of both spinodal instability and thermal nucleation in the spontaneously dewetting films and show that these two macroscopic mechanisms share a common origin at molecular levels. PMID:24730848

  14. Coexistence of spinodal instability and thermal nucleation in thin-film rupture: Insights from molecular levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung Dac; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-03-01

    Despite extensive investigation using hydrodynamic models and experiments over the past decades, there remain open questions regarding the origin of the initial rupture of thin liquid films. One of the reasons that makes it difficult to identify the rupture origin is the coexistence of two dewetting mechanisms, namely, thermal nucleation and spinodal instability, as observed in many experimental studies. Using a coarse-grained model and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to characterize the very early stage of dewetting in nanometer-thick liquid-metal films wetting a solid substrate. We observe the features characteristic of both spinodal instability and thermal nucleation in the spontaneously dewetting films and show that these two macroscopic mechanisms share a common origin at molecular levels.

  15. Vacuum sublimed α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene thin films: Correlating electronic structure and molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhm, S.; Salzmann, I.; Koch, N.; Fukagawa, H.; Kataoka, T.; Hosoumi, S.; Nebashi, K.; Kera, S.; Ueno, N.

    2008-08-01

    In order to correlate the molecular orientation of organic thin films with charge injection barriers at organic/metal interfaces, the electronic structure and molecular orientation of vacuum sublimed thin films of α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene (DH6T) on the substrates Ag(111), highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and tetratetracontane (TTC) precovered Ag(111) were investigated. Results from metastable atom electron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction were used to derive growth models (including molecular orientation and conformation) of DH6T on the different substrates. On Ag(111), DH6T exhibits a transition from lying molecules in the monolayer/bilayer range to almost standing upright molecules in multilayers. This is accompanied by a shift of the molecular energy levels to a lower binding energy by 0.65 eV with respect to the vacuum level. The unit cell of standing DH6T on lying DH6T on Ag(111) is estimated to be similar to the DH6T bulk phase. On HOPG, DH6T grows in the bulk phase with lying orientation, starting already from the monolayer coverage. DH6T on TTC precovered Ag(111) grows in an almost lying orientation and a conformation that allows a strong overlap of the hexyl chains of DH6T with the alkyl chains of TTC. In all cases, the electronic structure and, particulary, the ionization energy of DH6T is dependent on the orientation of DH6T, i.e., lying DH6T has higher ionization energy than standing DH6T.

  16. Measuring long chain alkanes in diesel engine exhaust by thermal desorption PTR-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, M. H.; Gueneron, M.; Jobson, B. T.

    2014-01-01

    A method using thermal desorption sampling and analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to measure long chain alkanes (C12-C18) and other larger organics associated with diesel engine exhaust emissions is described. Long chain alkanes undergo dissociative proton transfer reactions forming a series of fragment ions with formula CnH2n+1. The PTR-MS is insensitive to n-alkanes less than C8 but displays an increasing sensitivity for larger alkanes. Fragment ion distribution and sensitivity is a function of drift conditions. At 80 Td the most abundant ion fragments from C10 to C16 n-alkanes were m/z 57, 71 and 85. The mass spectrum of gasoline and diesel fuel at 80 Td displayed ion group patterns that can be related to known fuel constituents, such as alkanes, alkylbenzenes and cycloalkanes, and other compound groups that are inferred from molecular weight distributions such as dihydronapthalenes and naphthenic monoaromatics. It is shown that thermal desorption sampling of gasoline and diesel engine exhausts at 80 Td allows for discrimination against volatile organic compounds, allowing for quantification of long chain alkanes from the abundance of CnH2n+1 fragment ions. The total abundance of long chain alkanes in diesel engine exhaust was measured to be similar to the total abundance of C1-C4 alkylbenzene compounds. The abundance patterns of compounds determined by thermal desorption sampling may allow for emission profiles to be developed to better quantify the relative contributions of diesel and gasoline exhaust emissions on organic compounds concentrations in urban air.

  17. Channel cracks in atomic-layer and molecular-layer deposited multilayer thin film coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Rong; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-06-21

    Metal oxide thin film coatings produced by atomic layer deposition have been shown to be an effective permeation barrier. The primary failure mode of such coatings under tensile loads is the propagation of channel cracks that penetrate vertically into the coating films. Recently, multi-layer structures that combine the metal oxide material with relatively soft polymeric layers produced by molecular layer deposition have been proposed to create composite thin films with desired properties, including potentially enhanced resistance to fracture. In this paper, we study the effects of layer geometry and material properties on the critical strain for channel crack propagation in the multi-layer composite films. Using finite element simulations and a thin-film fracture mechanics formalism, we show that if the fracture energy of the polymeric layer is lower than that of the metal oxide layer, the channel crack tends to penetrate through the entire composite film, and dividing the metal oxide and polymeric materials into thinner layers leads to a smaller critical strain. However, if the fracture energy of the polymeric material is high so that cracks only run through the metal oxide layers, more layers can result in a larger critical strain. For intermediate fracture energy of the polymer material, we developed a design map that identifies the optimal structure for given fracture energies and thicknesses of the metal oxide and polymeric layers. These results can facilitate the design of mechanically robust permeation barriers, an important component for the development of flexible electronics.

  18. Photoluminescence of localized excitons in ZnCdO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. Y.; Huang, Y. S.; Hu, S. Y.; Lee, Y. C.; Tiong, K. K.; Chang, C. C.; Shen, J. L.; Chou, W. C.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the luminescence characteristics of Zn1-xCdxO thin films with different Cd contents grown by molecular beam epitaxy system. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and excitation power-dependent PL spectra were measured to clarify the luminescence mechanisms of the Zn1-xCdxO thin films. The peak energy of the Zn1-xCdxO thin films with increasing the Cd concentration is observed as redshift and can be fitted by the quadratic function of alloy content. The broadened full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) estimated from the 15 K PL spectra as a function of Cd content shows a larger deviation between the experimental values and theoretical curve, which indicates that experimental FWHM values are affected not only by alloy compositional disorder but also by localized excitons occupying states in the tail of the density of states. The Urbach energy determined from an analysis of the lineshape of the low-energy side of the PL spectrum and the degree of localization effect estimated from the temperature-induced S-shaped PL peak position described an increasing mean exciton-localization effects in ZnCdO films with increasing the Cd content. In addition, the PL intensity and peak position as a function of excitation power are carried out to clarify the types of radiative recombination and the effects of localized exciton in the ZnCdO films with different Cd contents.

  19. Organic and inorganic-organic thin film structures by molecular layer deposition: A review.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Pia; Karppinen, Maarit

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to deposit purely organic and hybrid inorganic-organic materials in a way parallel to the state-of-the-art gas-phase deposition method of inorganic thin films, i.e., atomic layer deposition (ALD), is currently experiencing a strongly growing interest. Like ALD in case of the inorganics, the emerging molecular layer deposition (MLD) technique for organic constituents can be employed to fabricate high-quality thin films and coatings with thickness and composition control on the molecular scale, even on complex three-dimensional structures. Moreover, by combining the two techniques, ALD and MLD, fundamentally new types of inorganic-organic hybrid materials can be produced. In this review article, we first describe the basic concepts regarding the MLD and ALD/MLD processes, followed by a comprehensive review of the various precursors and precursor pairs so far employed in these processes. Finally, we discuss the first proof-of-concept experiments in which the newly developed MLD and ALD/MLD processes are exploited to fabricate novel multilayer and nanostructure architectures by combining different inorganic, organic and hybrid material layers into on-demand designed mixtures, superlattices and nanolaminates, and employing new innovative nanotemplates or post-deposition treatments to, e.g., selectively decompose parts of the structure. Such layer-engineered and/or nanostructured hybrid materials with exciting combinations of functional properties hold great promise for high-end technological applications. PMID:25161845

  20. Growth of SrVO{sub 3} thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Craig; Brahlek, Matthew; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Alipour, Hamideh M.; Grimley, Everett D.; LeBeau, James M.

    2015-11-15

    The authors report the growth of stoichiometric SrVO{sub 3} thin films on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7} (001) substrates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. This growth approach employs a conventional effusion cell to supply elemental A-site Sr and the metalorganic precursor vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP) to supply vanadium. Oxygen is supplied in its molecular form through a gas inlet. An optimal VTIP:Sr flux ratio has been identified using reflection high-energy electron-diffraction, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, demonstrating stoichiometric SrVO{sub 3} films with atomically flat surface morphology. Away from the optimal VTIP:Sr flux, characteristic changes in the crystalline structure and surface morphology of the films were found, enabling identification of the type of nonstoichiometry. For optimal VTIP:Sr flux ratios, high quality SrVO{sub 3} thin films were obtained with smallest deviation of the lattice parameter from the ideal value and with atomically smooth surfaces, indicative of the good cation stoichiometry achieved by this growth technique.

  1. Organic and inorganic–organic thin film structures by molecular layer deposition: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Summary The possibility to deposit purely organic and hybrid inorganic–organic materials in a way parallel to the state-of-the-art gas-phase deposition method of inorganic thin films, i.e., atomic layer deposition (ALD), is currently experiencing a strongly growing interest. Like ALD in case of the inorganics, the emerging molecular layer deposition (MLD) technique for organic constituents can be employed to fabricate high-quality thin films and coatings with thickness and composition control on the molecular scale, even on complex three-dimensional structures. Moreover, by combining the two techniques, ALD and MLD, fundamentally new types of inorganic–organic hybrid materials can be produced. In this review article, we first describe the basic concepts regarding the MLD and ALD/MLD processes, followed by a comprehensive review of the various precursors and precursor pairs so far employed in these processes. Finally, we discuss the first proof-of-concept experiments in which the newly developed MLD and ALD/MLD processes are exploited to fabricate novel multilayer and nanostructure architectures by combining different inorganic, organic and hybrid material layers into on-demand designed mixtures, superlattices and nanolaminates, and employing new innovative nanotemplates or post-deposition treatments to, e.g., selectively decompose parts of the structure. Such layer-engineered and/or nanostructured hybrid materials with exciting combinations of functional properties hold great promise for high-end technological applications. PMID:25161845

  2. Molecular orientation dependence of hole-injection barrier in pentacene thin film on the Au surface in organic thin film transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihm, Kyuwook; Kim, Bongsoo; Kang, Tai-Hee; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Joo, Min Ho; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Yoon, Sang Soo; Chung, Sukmin

    2006-07-01

    We have investigated the effects of a buffer layer insertion on the performance of the pentacene based thin film transistor with a bottom contact structure. When the pentacene molecules have a standing up coordination on the Au surface that is modified by the benzenethiol or methanethiol, the transition region in the pentacene thin film is removed along the boundary between the Au and silicon oxide region, and the hole-injection barrier decreases by 0.4eV. Pentacene on various surfaces showed that the highly occupied molecular level is 0.2-0.4eV lower in the standing up coordination than in the lying down coordination.

  3. Apparatus for producing ultraclean bicrystals by the molecular beam epitaxy growth and ultrahigh vacuum bonding of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri-Hezaveh, A.; Balluffi, R.W. )

    1993-10-01

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed which is capable of growing single-crystal thin films and then bonding them together face-to-face to produce bicrystals under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The films are grown in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system capable of growing well-characterized single-crystal thin films of metals, semiconductors, and high [ital T][sub [ital c

  4. Solar Selective Coatings Prepared From Thin-Film Molecular Mixtures and Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Don A.

    2003-01-01

    Thin films composed of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric are being considered for use as solar selective coatings for a variety of space power applications. By controlling molecular mixing during ion-beam sputter deposition, researchers can tailor the solar selective coatings to have the combined properties of high solar absorptance and low infrared emittance. On orbit, these combined properties simultaneously maximize the amount of solar energy captured by the coating and minimize the amount of thermal energy radiated. The solar selective coatings are envisioned for use on minisatellites, for applications where solar energy is used to power heat engines or to heat remote regions in the interior of the spacecraft. Such systems may be useful for various missions, particularly those to middle Earth orbit. Sunlight must be concentrated by a factor of 100 or more to achieve the desired heat inlet operating temperature. At lower concentration factors, the temperature of the heat inlet surface of the heat engine is too low for efficient operation, and at high concentration factors, cavity type heat receivers become attractive. The an artist's concept of a heat engine, with the annular heat absorbing surface near the focus of the concentrator coated with a solar selective coating is shown. In this artist's concept, the heat absorbing surface powers a small Stirling convertor. The astronaut's gloved hand is provided for scale. Several thin-film molecular mixtures have been prepared and evaluated to date, including mixtures of aluminum and aluminum oxide, nickel and aluminum oxide, titanium and aluminum oxide, and platinum and aluminum oxide. For example, a 2400- Angstrom thick mixture of titanium and aluminum oxide was found to have a solar absorptance of 0.93 and an infrared emittance of 0.06. On the basis of tests performed under flowing nitrogen at temperatures as high as 680 C, the coating appeared to be durable at elevated temperatures. Additional durability

  5. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  6. High-temperature antiferromagnetism in molecular semiconductor thin films and nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Serri, Michele; Wu, Wei; Fleet, Luke R; Harrison, Nicholas M; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F; Kay, Christopher W M; Fisher, Andrew J; Aeppli, Gabriel; Heutz, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The viability of dilute magnetic semiconductors in applications is linked to the strength of the magnetic couplings, and room temperature operation is still elusive in standard inorganic systems. Molecular semiconductors are emerging as an alternative due to their long spin-relaxation times and ease of processing, but, with the notable exception of vanadium-tetracyanoethylene, magnetic transition temperatures remain well below the boiling point of liquid nitrogen. Here we show that thin films and powders of the molecular semiconductor cobalt phthalocyanine exhibit strong antiferromagnetic coupling, with an exchange energy reaching 100 K. This interaction is up to two orders of magnitude larger than in related phthalocyanines and can be obtained on flexible plastic substrates, under conditions compatible with routine organic electronic device fabrication. Ab initio calculations show that coupling is achieved via superexchange between the singly occupied a1g () orbitals. By reaching the key milestone of magnetic coupling above 77 K, these results establish quantum spin chains as a potentially useable feature of molecular films. PMID:24445992

  7. High-temperature antiferromagnetism in molecular semiconductor thin films and nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Serri, Michele; Wu, Wei; Fleet, Luke R.; Harrison, Nicholas M.; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Kay, Christopher W.M.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Aeppli, Gabriel; Heutz, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The viability of dilute magnetic semiconductors in applications is linked to the strength of the magnetic couplings, and room temperature operation is still elusive in standard inorganic systems. Molecular semiconductors are emerging as an alternative due to their long spin-relaxation times and ease of processing, but, with the notable exception of vanadium-tetracyanoethylene, magnetic transition temperatures remain well below the boiling point of liquid nitrogen. Here we show that thin films and powders of the molecular semiconductor cobalt phthalocyanine exhibit strong antiferromagnetic coupling, with an exchange energy reaching 100 K. This interaction is up to two orders of magnitude larger than in related phthalocyanines and can be obtained on flexible plastic substrates, under conditions compatible with routine organic electronic device fabrication. Ab initio calculations show that coupling is achieved via superexchange between the singly occupied a1g () orbitals. By reaching the key milestone of magnetic coupling above 77 K, these results establish quantum spin chains as a potentially useable feature of molecular films. PMID:24445992

  8. Evaporation characteristics of thin film liquid argon in nano-scale confinement: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the evaporation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in nano-scale confinement. The present study has been conducted to realize the nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation inside a confined space for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of surface wetting conditions. The simulation domain consisted of two parallel platinum plates; one at the top and another at the bottom. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Considering hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of top and bottom surfaces, two different cases have been investigated: (i) Case A: Both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophilic, (ii) Case B: both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophobic. For all cases, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall was set to four different temperatures such as 110 K, 120 K, 130 K and 140 K to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat fluxes normal to top and bottom walls were estimated and discussed to illuminate the effectiveness of heat transfer in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic confinement at various boundary temperatures of the bottom plate.

  9. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion

    PubMed Central

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H.; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180–200 °C) and pressures (1–6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical–thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  10. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion.

    PubMed

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2016-03-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180-200 °C) and pressures (1-6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical-thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  11. Metathesis of alkanes and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Copéret, Christophe; Soulivong, Daravong; Taoufik, Mostafa; Cazat, Jean Thivolle

    2010-02-16

    The transformation of alkanes remains a difficult challenge because of the relative inertness of the C-H and C-C bonds. The rewards for asserting synthetic control over unfunctionalized, saturated hydrocarbons are considerable, however, because converting short alkanes into longer chain analogues is usually a value-adding process. Alkane metathesis is a novel catalytic and direct transformation of two molecules of a given alkane into its lower and higher homologues; moreover, the process proceeds at relatively low temperature (ambient conditions or higher). It was discovered through the use of a silica-supported tantalum hydride, ([triple bond]SiO)(2)TaH, a multifunctional catalyst with a single site of action. This reaction completes the story of the metathesis reactions discovered over the past 40 years: olefin metathesis, alkyne metathesis, and ene-yne cyclizations. In this Account, we examine the fundamental mechanistic aspects of alkane metathesis as well as the novel reactions that have been derived from its study. The silica-supported tantalum hydride catalyst was developed as the result of systematic and meticulous studies of the interaction between oxide supports and organometallic complexes, a field of study denoted surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). A careful examination of this surface-supported tantalum hydride led to the later discovery of alumina-supported tungsten hydride, W(H)(3)/Al(2)O(3), which proved to be an even better catalyst for alkane metathesis. Supported tantalum and tungsten hydrides are highly unsaturated, electron-deficient species that are very reactive toward the C-H and C-C bonds of alkanes. They show a great versatility in various other reactions, such as cross-metathesis between methane and alkanes, cross-metathesis between toluene and ethane, or even methane nonoxidative coupling. Moreover, tungsten hydride exhibits a specific ability in the transformation of isobutane into 2,3-dimethylbutane as well as in the metathesis

  12. Improved Stability Of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors Using Molecular Passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Meena Suhanya; Pandey, Archana; Vilayur Ganapathy, Subramanian; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2013-10-21

    The role of back channel surface chemistry on amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) bottom gate thin film transistors (TFT) have been characterized by positive bias-stress measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Positive bias-stress turn-on voltage shifts for ZTO-TFTs were significantly reduced by passivation of back channel surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of n-hexylphosphonic acid (n-HPA) when compared to ZTO-TFTs with no passivation. These results indicate that adsorption of molecular species on exposed back channel of ZTO-TFTs strongly influence observed turn-on voltage shifts, as opposed to charge injection into the dielectric or trapping due to oxygen vacancies.

  13. Self-Limiting Growth of Metal Fluoride Thin Films by Oxidation Reactions Employing Molecular Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S. R.; Lai, H.-F.; Yarmoff, J. A.

    2000-08-14

    FeF{sub 2} films are grown by the reaction of XeF{sub 2} and SeF{sub 6} with iron foil. The growth initially follows the Mott-Cabrera parabolic rate law, indicating that the process is diffusion limited. At a certain film thickness, however, the growth abruptly stops, with the thickness using XeF{sub 2} being nearly double that with SeF{sub 6} . It is suggested that the shutdown is due to the inability of the molecules to dissociate when too far from the substrate and that SeF{sub 6} must approach more closely than XeF{sub 2} . This work suggests the use of molecular precursors to grow thin films via a self-limiting chemical process. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Highly Ordered Organic Molecular Thin Films on Silicon Studied by STM and LEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sean; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2014-03-01

    Achieving growth of long-range ordered organic molecular thin films on inorganic substrates continues to be a significant challenge for organic electronics applications. Here, we report the growth of highly ordered zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) thin films both in-plane and out-of-plane on the deactivated Si(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). By adjusting the substrate temperature during deposition, the anisotropic step-flow growth mode can be accessed causing a reduction in the substrate symmetry which allows for the long-range in-plane ordering as well as the decrease of grain boundary density. Additionally, the ZnPc molecules are able to maintain a highly ordered configuration in multi-layers despite a gradual decrease in the molecule-substrate interaction, which is attributed to the strong interlayer π- π interaction. We appreciate the fruitful discussion with Prof. Richard Lunt. This research is funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program (Grant number DE-SC0006400) through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  15. Molecular Layer-seeded Ultra-thin Top-gate Dielectrics for High Transconductance Graphene Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Vinod; Jariwala, Deep; Karmel, Hunter; Alaboson, Justice; Lauhon, Lincoln; Marks, Tobin; Hersam, Mark

    2012-02-01

    The potential of graphene in integrated analog and digital circuits can only be fully realized through incorporation of ultra-thin gate dielectrics to enable large-scale small-channel graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs). Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) is a viable technique to fabricate gate-dielectrics, however, it requires a seeding layer on otherwise inert graphene. Here, we demonstrate a single molecule thick perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride overlayer as an effective seeding layer to grow high-κ Al2O3 on mechanically exfoliated graphene for high-performance GFETs. Using an ultra-thin (< 1nm) seeding layer, in contrast to polymer films (5-10 nm), we demonstrate fabrication of the thinnest ALD-grown gate-dielectric (4 nm) reported to date in top-gated GFETs. This yields high performance GFETs with the intrinsic transconductance parameter approaching 2.4 mS and the field-effect mobility ˜3000 cm^2/Vs. We also demonstrate generalization of this molecular layer seeded-ALD growth method to higher- κ gate dielectrics, yielding further enhanced GFET transconductance for possible application to radio-frequency circuits.

  16. Coherent growth of superconducting TiN thin films by plasma enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideki; Semba, Kouich

    2012-10-15

    We have investigated the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) thin films on (001) MgO substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and radio frequency acitvated nitrogen plasma. Although cubic TiN is stabile over a wide temperature range, superconducting TiN films are exclusively obtained when the substrate temperature exceeds 710 Degree-Sign C. TiN films grown at 720 Degree-Sign C show a high residual resistivity ratio of approximately 11 and the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}) is well above 5 K. Superconductivity has been confirmed also by magnetiztion measurements. In addition, we determined the upper critical magnetic field ({mu}{sub 0}H{sub c2}) as well as the corresponding coherence length ({xi}{sub GL}) by transport measurements under high magnetic fields. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy data revealed full in plane coherency to the substrate as well as a low defect density in the film, in agreement with a mean-free path length Script-Small-L Almost-Equal-To 106 nm, which is estimated from the residual resistivity value. The observations of reflection high energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations during the growth, distinct Laue fringes around the main Bragg peaks, and higher order diffraction spots in the reciprocal space map suggest the full controlability of the thickness of high quality superconducting TiN thin films.

  17. Nanometric thin polymeric films based on molecularly imprinted technology: towards electrochemical sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg-Turgeman, Roni; Mandler, Daniel

    2010-09-28

    A new approach for assembling selective electrodes based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) is presented. The approach is based on the radical polymerization of a mixture of methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) in the presence of an initiator, benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and an activator, N,N'-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMpT) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To form nanometric thin polymeric films the polymerization solution was spin-coated in the course of polymerization. The different physical and chemical parameters that affected the properties of the films, such as the spinning rate and the EGDMA:MAA ratio, were studied and optimized. A variety of techniques, e.g., rheoscopy, SEM, AFM, profilometry and electrochemistry, were used to characterize the films and the polymerization process. By optimizing the conditions very thin and reproducible films could be prepared and imprinted. The electrochemical behavior of the films showed that they were permeable to water-soluble electroactive species providing that either polyethylene glycol or template species were added to the polymerization mixture. Finally, we demonstrated that films imprinted with ferrocenylmethyl alcohol (Fc-MeOH) successfully extracted the imprinted species after their removal from MIPs. PMID:20668737

  18. Growth Parameters for Thin Film InBi Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, B.; Makin, R.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Sallis, S.; Piper, L. J.; McCombe, B.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The alloying of bismuth with III-V semiconductors, in particular GaAs and InAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has attracted considerable interest due to the accompanying changes in band structure and lattice constant. Specifically, bismuth incorporation in these compounds results in both a reduction in band gap (through shifting of the valence band) and an increase in the lattice constant of the alloy. To fully understand the composition of these alloys, a better understanding of the binary endpoints is needed. At present, a limited amount of literature exists on the III-Bi family of materials, most of which is theoretical work based on density functional theory calculations. The only III-Bi material known to exist (in bulk crystal form) is InBi, but its electrical properties have not been sufficiently studied and, to date, the material has not been fabricated as a thin film. We have successfully deposited crystalline InBi on (100) GaAs substrates using MBE. Wetting of the substrate is poor, and regions of varying composition exist across the substrate. To obtain InBi, the growth temperature had to be below 100 °C. It was found that film crystallinity improved with reduced Bi flux, into an In-rich regime. Additionally, attempts were made to grow AlBi and GaBi.

  19. Multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 Thin Films Grown Via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent; García-Castro, Camilo; Kc, Amit; Schrecongost, Dustin; Cen, Cheng; Romero, Aldo; Lederman, David

    Multiferroic materials exhibit exciting physics related to the simultaneous presence of multiple long-range orders, in many cases consisting of antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferroelectric (FE) orderings. In order to provide a new, promising route for fluoride-based multiferroic material engineering, we grew multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 in thin film form on Al2O3 (0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The films grow with the orthorhombic b-axis out-of-plane and with three in-plane structural twin domains along the polar c-axis directions. The FE ordering in thin films was verified by FE remanent hysteresis loops measurements at T = 14 K and by room temperature piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). An AF behavior was found below Neel temperature TN ~ 80 K, which is in agreement with the bulk properties. At lower temperatures two additional magnetic phase transitions at 19 K and 41 K were found. First-principles calculations demonstrated that the growth strain applied to the bulk BaCoF4 indeed favors two canted spin orders, along the b- and a-axes, respectively, in addition to the main AF spin order along the c-axis. Supported by FAME (Contract 2013-MA-2382), WV Research Challenge Grant (HEPC.dsr.12.29), and DMREF-NSF 1434897.

  20. Epitaxial Cd3As2 Thin Films Synthesized by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Timo; Goyal, Manik; Stemmer, Susanne

    Cd3As2 is a three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal, i.e. it possesses Dirac cones in a 3D bulk state where the band dispersion relation is linear near the Fermi energy. Cd3As2 is has raised considerable interest due to its high electron mobilities in bulk crystals and for novel quantum phenomena, such as chiral anomalies. However, few studies have been performed using thin films of Cd3As2. In this presentation, we report on the synthesis of Cd3As2 thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Single phase, epitaxial films were grown on undoped GaSb(111)B substrates with the (112) facet of Cd3As2 parallel to the GaSb(111) surface. We report on the structural quality and orientation variants in the films. Electrical transport properties indicate electron mobilities exceeding 6000 cm2V-1s-1. We discuss the impact of the MBE growth parameters and substrate preparation on the structural and electrical properties of the films.

  1. Thin film growth of CaFe2As2 by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Nakamura, I.; Mori, Y.; Harada, S.; Ujihara, T.; Ikuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Film growth of CaFe2As2 was realized by molecular beam epitaxy on six different substrates that have a wide variation in the lattice mismatch to the target compound. By carefully adjusting the Ca-to-Fe flux ratio, we obtained single-phase thin films for most of the substrates. Interestingly, an expansion of the CaFe2As2 lattice to the out-of-plane direction was observed for all films, even when an opposite strain was expected. A detailed microstructure observation of the thin film grown on MgO by transmission electron microscope revealed that it consists of cube-on-cube and 45°-rotated domains. The latter domains were compressively strained in plane, which caused a stretching along the c-axis direction. Because the domains were well connected across the boundary with no appreciable discontinuity, we think that the out-of-plane expansion in the 45°-rotated domains exerted a tensile stress on the other domains, resulting in the unexpectedly large c-axis lattice parameter, despite the apparently opposite lattice mismatch.

  2. Molecular separations using nanostructured porous thin films fabricated by glancing angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuidenhout, Louis Wentzel

    Biomolecular separation techniques are an enabling technology that indirectly in.uence many aspects of our lives. Advances have led to faster analyses, reduced costs, higher specificity, and new analytical techniques, impacting areas such as health care, environmental monitoring, polymer sciences, agriculture, and nutrition. Further development of separations technology is anticipated to follow the path of computing technology such that miniaturization through the development of microfluidics technology, lab-on-a-chip systems, and other integrative, multi-component systems will further extend our analysis capabilities. Creation of new and improvement of existing separation technologies is an integral part of the pathway to miniaturized systems. the work of this thesis investigates molecular separations using porous nanostructured films fabricated by the thin film process glancing angle deposition (GLAD). Structural architecture, pore size and shape, and film density can be finely controlled to produce high-surface area thin films with engineered morphology. The characteristic size scales and structural control of GLAD films are well-suited to biomolecules and separation techniques, motivating investigation into the utility and performance of GLAD films for biomolecular separations. This project consisted of three phases. First, chromatographic separation of dye molecules on silica GLAD films was demonstrated by thin layer chromatography Direct control of film nanostructure altered the separation characteristics; most strikingly, anisotropic structures provided two-dimensional analyte migration. Second, nanostructures made with GLAD were integrated in PDMS microfluidic channels using a sacrificial etching process; DNA molecules (10/48 kbp and 6/10/20 kbp mixtures) were electrophoretically separated on a microfluidic chip using a porous bed of SiO2 vertical posts. Third, mass spectrometry of proteins and drugs in the mass range of 100-1300 m/z was performed using

  3. Mass effect on the Soret coefficient in n-alkane mixtures.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Mezquia, David; Bou-Ali, M Mounir; Madariaga, J Antonio; Santamaría, Carlos

    2014-02-28

    We have determined the Soret coefficient of different equimolar and non equimolar n-alkane mixtures from measurements of the molecular diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients. It is shown that equimolar mixtures behave as isotopic-like mixtures in which only the mass effect contributes to the Soret effect. In non equimolar mixtures, a small linear dependence with the molar fraction is observed. Finally, we have obtained a new correlation, which allows the determination of the Soret coefficient of n-alkane mixtures using the data of viscosity, the thermal expansion coefficient of the pure components, and the density of the equimolar mixture. PMID:24588181

  4. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy deposition of Gd2O3 thin films on SrTiO3 (100) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinxing; Hao, Jinghua; Zhang, Yangyang; Wei, Hongmei; Mu, Juyi

    2016-06-01

    Gd2O3 thin films are grown on the SrTiO3 (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) are performed to investigate the microstructure of deposited thin films. It is found that the as-deposited thin film possesses a very uniform thickness of ∼40 nm and is composed of single cubic phase Gd2O3 grains. STEM and TEM observations reveal that Gd2O3 thin film grows epitaxially on the SrTiO3 (100) substrate with (001)Gd2O3//(100)STO and [110]Gd2O3//[001]STO orientations. Furthermore, the Gd atoms are found to diffuse into the SrTiO3 substrate for a depth of one unit cell and substitute for the Sr atoms near the interface.

  6. Phases, line tension and pattern formation in molecularly thin films at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pritam

    A Langmuir film, which is a molecularly thin insoluble film on a liquid substrate, is one practical realization of a quasi-two dimensional matter. The major advantages of this system for the study of phase separation and phase co-existence are (a) it allows accurate control of the components and molecular area of the film and (b) it can be studied by various methods that require very flat films. Phase separation in molecularly thin films plays an important role in a range of systems from biomembranes to biosensors. For example, phase-separated lipid nano-domains in biomembranes are thought to play crucial roles in membrane function. I use Brewster Angel Microscopy (BAM) coupled with Fluorescence Microscopy (FM) and static Light Scattering Microscopy (LSM) to image phases and patterns within Langmuir films. The three microscopic techniques --- BAM, FM and LSM --- are complimentary to each other, providing distinct sets of information. They allow direct comparison with literature results in lipid systems. I have quantitatively validated the use of detailed hydrodynamic simulations to determine line tension in monolayers. Line tension decreases as temperature rises. This decrease gives us information on the entropy associated with the line, and thus about line structure. I carefully consider the thermodynamics of line energy and entropy to make this connection. In the longer run, LSM will be exploited to give us further information about line structure. I have also extended the technique by testing it on domains within the curved surface of a bilayer vesicle. I also note that in the same way that the presence of surface-active agents, known as surfactants, affects surface energy, the addiction of line active agents alters the inter-phase line energy. Thus my results set to stage to systematically study the influence of line active agents ---'linactants' --- on the inter-phase line energy. Hierarchal self-assembled chiral patterns were observed as a function of

  7. Catalytic dehydroaromatization of n-alkanes by pincer-ligated iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Ritu; Punji, Benudhar; Findlater, Michael; Supplee, Carolyn; Schinski, William; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S.

    2011-02-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are among the most important building blocks in the chemical industry. Benzene, toluene and xylenes are obtained from the high temperature thermolysis of alkanes. Higher alkylaromatics are generally derived from arene-olefin coupling, which gives branched products—that is, secondary alkyl arenes—with olefins higher than ethylene. The dehydrogenation of acyclic alkanes to give alkylaromatics can be achieved using heterogeneous catalysts at high temperatures, but with low yields and low selectivity. We present here the first catalytic conversion of n-alkanes to alkylaromatics using homogeneous or molecular catalysts—specifically ‘pincer’-ligated iridium complexes—and olefinic hydrogen acceptors. For example, the reaction of n-octane affords up to 86% yield of aromatic product, primarily o-xylene and secondarily ethylbenzene. In the case of n-decane and n-dodecane, the resulting alkylarenes are exclusively unbranched (that is, n-alkyl-substituted), with selectivity for the corresponding o-(n-alkyl)toluene.

  8. The synergetic effect of starch and alpha amylase on the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Biria, D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of adding soluble starch on biodegradation of n-alkanes (C10-C14) by Bacillus subtilis TB1 was investigated. Gas chromatography was employed to measure the residual hydrocarbons in the system. It was observed that the efficiency of biodegradation improved with the presence of starch and the obtained residual hydrocarbons in the system were 53% less than the samples without starch. The produced bacterial enzymes were studied through electrophoresis and reverse zymography for explaining the observations. The results indicated that the produced amylase by the bacteria can degrade hydrocarbons and the same was obtained by the application of a commercial alpha amylase sample. In addition, in silico docking of alpha-amylase with n-alkanes with different molecular weights was studied by Molegro virtual docker which showed high negative binding energies and further substantiated the experimental observations. Overall, the findings confirmed the catalytic effect of alpha amylase on n-alkanes degradation. PMID:26971168

  9. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Andrew D.; Waldie, Fraser D.; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; ‘Pete' Silks, Louis A.; Gordon, John C.

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons.

  10. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Waldie, Fraser D; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; Silks, Louis A Pete; Gordon, John C

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons. PMID:23609095

  11. Molecular dynamic simulations of surface morphology and pulsed laser deposition growth of lithium niobate thin films on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hao-Nan; Pei, Zi-Dong; Kong, Yong-Fa; Xu, Jing-Jun

    2015-05-01

    The molecular dynamic simulation of lithium niobate thin films deposited on silicon substrate is carried out by using the dissipative particle dynamics method. The simulation results show that the Si (111) surface is more suitable for the growth of smooth LiNbO3 thin films compared to the Si(100) surface, and the optimal deposition temperature is around 873 K, which is consistent with the atomic force microscope results. In addition, the calculation molecular number is increased to take the electron spins and other molecular details into account. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB922003), the International S&T Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2013DFG52660), the Taishan Scholar Construction Project Special Fund, China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 65030091 and 65010961).

  12. Structure and solvation forces in confined films: Linear and branched alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Luedtke, W.D.; Landman, U.

    1997-03-01

    Equilibrium structures, solvation forces, and conformational dynamics of thin confined films of n-hexadecane and squalane are investigated using a new grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics method for simulations of confined liquids. The method combines constant pressure simulations with a computational cell containing solid surfaces and both bulk and confined liquid regions in equilibrium with each other. Layered density oscillations in the confined films are found for various widths of the confining gap. The solvation force oscillations as a function of the gap width for the straight chain n-hexadecane liquid are more pronounced exhibiting attractive and repulsive regions, while for the branched alkane the solvation forces are mostly repulsive, with the development of shallow local attractive regions for small values of the gap width. Furthermore, the nature of the transitions between well-formed layered configurations is different in the two systems. The n-hexadecane film exhibits solid-like characteristics portrayed by step-like variations in the number of confined segments occurring in response to a small decrease in the gap width, starting from well-layered states of the film; the behavior of the squalane film is liquid-like, exhibiting a monotonic continuous decrease in the number of confined segments as the gap width is decreased. These characteristics are correlated with structural properties of the confined films which, for n-hexadecane, exhibit enhanced layered ordering and in-plane ordered molecular arrangements, as well as with the relatively high tendency for interlayer molecular interdigitation in the squalane films. Reduced conformational (trans-guache) transition rates in the confined films, compared to their bulk values, are found, and their oscillatory dependence on the degree of confinement is analyzed, showing smaller transition rates for the well-formed layered states of the films. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Growth mechanism of CuZnInSe2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ya Hsin; Yang, Chu Shou; Wu, Chia Hsing; Chiu, Jai Wei; Yang, Min De; Wu, Chih-Hung

    2013-09-01

    CuZnInSe2 (CZIS) has potential application in solar cell for absorption layer, and give an advantage to change the band gap from CuInSe2 (1.02 eV) to ZnSe (2.67 eV). Using molecular beam epitaxy technology, the CZIS thin films were grown via CuInSe (CIS) and ZnSe base. In the case of CIS, thin films were grown on Mo-coated soda lime glass with various zinc flux. CIS was transformed into chalcopyrite and sphalerite coexisting CZIS easily but it is difficult to transform into the pure sphalerite CZIS. Zn/(Zn+In+Cu) ratio has limited to approximate 36 at% and the excess-Zn played a catalyst role. In the case of ZnSe base, which was grown on GaAs (001), various In and Cu flux defined as the TIn series and TCu series, respectively. There are four types of compound in the TIn series and TCu series, including ZnSe, InxSey, ZnIn2Se4 (ZIS) and CZIS. In the TIn series under the lowest In and Cu flux, selenium (Se) were randomly combined with cations to form the CZIS. When TIn is increased in this moment, the CZIS was transformed into ZIS. In the TCu series, CZIS demonstrated via In-rich ZIS (Zn(In, Cu)Se) and InxSey base ((Zn, Cu)InSe). It is chalcopyrite and sphalerite coexisting structure in the medium TCu region. In the high TCu region, it is transformed into the Zn-poor and Cu-rich CZIS.

  14. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  15. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering. PMID:25971893

  16. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  18. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  19. Producing and imaging a thin line of He2 ∗ molecular tracers in helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Marakov, A.; Guo, W.; Pawlowski, B. T.; Van Sciver, S. W.; Ihas, G. G.; McKinsey, D. N.; Vinen, W. F.

    2015-09-01

    Cryogenic helium-4 has long been recognized as a useful material in fluids research. The unique properties of helium-4 in the gaseous phase and the normal liquid phase allow for the generation of turbulent flows with exceptionally high Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers. In the superfluid phase, helium-4 exhibits two-fluid hydrodynamics and possesses fascinating properties due to its quantum nature. However, studying the flows in helium-4 has been very challenging largely due to the lack of effective visualization and velocimetry techniques. In this article, we discuss the development of novel instrumentation for flow-visualization in helium based on the generation and imaging of thin lines of metastable He2 ∗ tracer molecules. These molecular tracers are created via femtosecond-laser field-ionization of helium atoms and can be imaged using a laser-induced fluorescence technique. By observing the displacement and distortion of the tracer lines in helium, quantitative information about the flow field can be extracted. We present experimental results in the study of thermal counterflow in superfluid helium that validate the concept of this technique. We also discuss anticipated future developments of this powerful visualization technique.

  20. Producing and imaging a thin line of He*₂ molecular tracers in helium-4.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Marakov, A; Guo, W; Pawlowski, B T; Van Sciver, S W; Ihas, G G; McKinsey, D N; Vinen, W F

    2015-09-01

    Cryogenic helium-4 has long been recognized as a useful material in fluids research. The unique properties of helium-4 in the gaseous phase and the normal liquid phase allow for the generation of turbulent flows with exceptionally high Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers. In the superfluid phase, helium-4 exhibits two-fluid hydrodynamics and possesses fascinating properties due to its quantum nature. However, studying the flows in helium-4 has been very challenging largely due to the lack of effective visualization and velocimetry techniques. In this article, we discuss the development of novel instrumentation for flow-visualization in helium based on the generation and imaging of thin lines of metastable He*₂ tracer molecules. These molecular tracers are created via femtosecond-laser field-ionization of helium atoms and can be imaged using a laser-induced fluorescence technique. By observing the displacement and distortion of the tracer lines in helium, quantitative information about the flow field can be extracted. We present experimental results in the study of thermal counterflow in superfluid helium that validate the concept of this technique. We also discuss anticipated future developments of this powerful visualization technique. PMID:26429454

  1. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Gregory T.; Wilhide, Joshua A.; LaCourse, William R.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot.

  2. Graphene nanosheet: synthesis, molecular engineering, thin film, hybrids, and energy and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaojun; Dong, Shaojun

    2011-05-01

    The emergence of graphene nanosheet (GN, 2010 Nobel Prize for Physics) has recently opened up an exciting new field in the science and technology of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with continuously growing academic and technological impetus. GN exhibits unique electronic, optical, magnetic, thermal and mechanical properties arising from its strictly 2D structure and thus has many important technical applications. Actually, GN-based materials have enormous potential to rival or even surpass the performance of carbon nanotube-based counterparts, given that cheap, large-scale production and processing methods for high-quality GN become available. Therefore, the studies on GN in the aspects of chemistry, physical, materials, biology and interdisciplinary science have been in full flow in the past five years. In this critical review, from the viewpoint of chemistry and materials, we will cover recent significant advances in synthesis, molecular engineering, thin film, hybrids, and energy and analytical applications of the "star-material" GN together with discussion on its major challenges and opportunities for future GN research (315 references). PMID:21283849

  3. Adhesion and friction properties of molecularly thin perfluoropolyether liquid films on solid surface.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Norio

    2012-02-28

    The adhesion and friction properties of molecularly thin perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricant films dip-coated on a diamond-like carbon (DLC) overcoat of magnetic disks were studied using a pin-on-disk-type micro-tribotester that we developed. The load and friction forces were simultaneously measured on a rotating disk surface under an increasing/decreasing load cycle and slow sliding conditions. Experiments were performed using two types of PFPE lubricants: Fomblin Z-tetraol2000S with functional end-groups and Fomblin Z-03 without any end-group. The curves of the friction force as a function of the applied load agree with the curves estimated using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. The friction forces on the Z-03 films having different thicknesses were not found to decrease drastically; however, the friction forces on the Z-tetraol film were found to decrease drastically when the film thickness is more than ~1.2 nm. This drastic change in the case of the Z-tetraol film is estimated to be affected by the coverage of the lubricant film. PMID:22292931

  4. Molecular Ionization-Desorption Analysis Source (MIDAS) for Mass Spectrometry: Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Winter, Gregory T; Wilhide, Joshua A; LaCourse, William R

    2016-02-01

    Molecular ionization-desorption analysis source (MIDAS), which is a desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) type source, for mass spectrometry has been developed as a multi-functional platform for the direct sampling of surfaces. In this article, its utility for the analysis of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is highlighted. Amino acids, which are difficult to visualize without staining reagents or charring, were detected and identified directly from a TLC plate. To demonstrate the full potential of MIDAS, all active ingredients from an analgesic tablet, separated on a TLC plate, were successfully detected using both positive and negative ion modes. The identity of each of the compounds was confirmed from their mass spectra and compared against standards. Post separation, the chemical signal (blue permanent marker) as reference marks placed at the origin and solvent front were used to calculate retention factor (Rf) values from the resulting ion chromatogram. The quantitative capabilities of the device were exhibited by scanning caffeine spots on a TLC plate of increasing sample amount. A linear curve based on peak are, R2 = 0.994, was generated for seven spots ranging from 50 to 1000 ng of caffeine per spot. PMID:26471042

  5. Frictional Response of Molecularly Thin Liquid Polymer Films Subject to Constant Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschirhart, Charles; Troian, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of the frictional response of nanoscale viscous films are typically obtained using the surface force apparatus in which a fluid layer is confined between smooth solid substrates approaching at constant speed or force. The squeezing pressure causes lateral flow from which the shear viscosity can be deduced. Under these conditions however, molecularly thin films tend to solidify wholly or partially and estimates of the shear viscosity can exceed those in macroscale films by many orders of magnitude. This problem can be avoided altogether by examining the response of an initially flat, supported, free surface film subject to comparable values of surface shear stress by application of an external inert gas stream. This method was first conceived by Derjaguin in 1944; more recent studies by Mate et al. at IBM Almaden on complex polymeric systems have uncovered fluid layering and other interesting behaviors. The only drawback is that this alternative technique requires an accurate model for interface distortion. We report on ellipsometric measurements of ultrathin polymeric films in efforts to determine whether the usual interface equations for free surface films based purely on continuum models can be properly extended to nanoscale films. Supported by a Fred and Jean Felberg Fellowship and G. W. Housner Student Discovery Fund.

  6. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, BongSoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-09-01

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and electron mobility of 0.17 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs. PMID:26243510

  7. Small molecular weight organic thin-film photodetectors and solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peumans, Peter; Yakimov, Aharon; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    In this review, we discuss the physics underlying the operation of single and multiple heterojunction, vacuum-deposited organic solar cells based on small molecular weight thin films. For single heterojunction cells, we find that the need for direct contact between the deposited electrode and the active organics leads to quenching of excitons. An improved device architecture, the double heterojunction, is shown to confine excitons within the active layers, allowing substantially higher internal efficiencies to be achieved. A full optical and electrical analysis of the double heterostructure architecture leads to optimal cell design as a function of the optical properties and exciton diffusion lengths of the photoactive materials. Combining the double heterostructure with novel light trapping schemes, devices with external efficiencies approaching their internal efficiency are obtained. When applied to an organic photovoltaic cell with a power conversion efficiency of 1.0%±0.1% under 1 sun AM1.5 illumination, devices with external power conversion efficiencies of 2.4%±0.3% are reported. In addition, we show that by using materials with extended exciton diffusion lengths LD, highly efficient double heterojunction photovoltaic cells are obtained, even in the absence of a light trapping geometry. Using C60 as an acceptor material, double heterostructure external power conversion efficiencies of 3.6%±0.4% under 1 sun AM1.5 illumination are obtained. Stacking of single heterojunction devices leads to thin film multiple heterojunction photovoltaic and photodetector structures. Thin bilayer photovoltaic cells can be stacked with ultrathin (˜5 Å), discontinuous Ag layers between adjacent cells serving as efficient recombination sites for electrons and holes generated in the neighboring cells. Such stacked cells have open circuit voltages that are n times the open circuit voltage of a single cell, where n is the number of cells in the stack. In optimized structures, the

  8. Structural and Magnetic Phase Transitions in Manganese Arsenide Thin-Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Felix Till

    Phase transitions play an important role in many fields of physics and engineering, and their study in bulk materials has a long tradition. Many of the experimental techniques involve measurements of thermodynamically extensive parameters. With the increasing technological importance of thin-film technology there is a pressing need to find new ways to study phase transitions at smaller length-scales, where the traditional methods are insufficient. In this regard, the phase transitions observed in thin-films of MnAs present interesting challenges. As a ferromagnetic material that can be grown epitaxially on a variety of technologically important substrates, MnAs is an interesting material for spintronics applications. In the bulk, the first order transition from the low temperature ferromagnetic alpha-phase to the beta-phase occurs at 313 K. The magnetic state of the beta-phase has remained controversial. A second order transition to the paramagnetic gamma-phase takes place at 398 K. In thin-films, the anisotropic strain imposed by the substrate leads to the interesting phenomenon of coexistence of alpha- and beta-phases in a regular array of stripes over an extended temperature range. In this dissertation these phase transitions are studied in films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (001). The films are confirmed to be of high structural quality and almost purely in the A0 orientation. A diverse set of experimental techniques, germane to thin-film technology, is used to probe the properties of the film: Temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction and atomic-force microscopy (AFM), as well as magnetotransport give insights into the structural properties, while the anomalous Hall effect is used as a probe of magnetization during the phase transition. In addition, reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) is used as a sensitive probe of electronic structure. Inductively coupled plasma etching with BCl3 is demonstrated to be effective for patterning MnAs. We show

  9. Defect-free thin InAs nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we designed a simple method to achieve the growth of defect-free thin InAs nanowires with a lateral dimension well below their Bohr radius on different substrate orientations. By depositing and annealing a thin layer of Au thin film on a (100) substrate surface, we have achieved the growth of defect-free uniform-sized thin InAs nanowires. This study provides a strategy to achieve the growth of pure defect-free thin nanowires. PMID:26671780

  10. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  11. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  12. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  13. Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-06-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  14. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (δD and δ13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 μg/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1σ, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their δ13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift δD records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the δ13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (δDn-alkene - δDn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the δ13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (δ13Cn-alkene - δ13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  15. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  16. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F.; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  17. Structure and Mass Transport Characteristics at the Intrinsic Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Chilukoti, Hari Krishna; Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, an instantaneous interface definition has been used to study the intrinsic structure and self-diffusion coefficient in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interfaces of decane and tetracosane at three different temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations, and the results have been compared with those obtained on the basis of the conventional Gibbs dividing surface (time- and space-averaged interface). The alkane molecules were modeled using the united atom NERD force field. Partial layered structures of alkane molecules at the liquid-vapor interface are observed as a pinned structure of alkane liquids based on the intrinsic interface. This kind of characteristic has not been observed in the density profiles obtained based on the Gibbs dividing surface. By examining the orientation order parameter and radius of gyration of the alkane molecules, it was observed that the alkane molecules were preferentially oriented to be more parallel to the intrinsic interface than to the Gibbs dividing surface, and the shape of the alkane molecules is slightly changed in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interfaces. The self-diffusion coefficient parallel to the intrinsic interface was examined using the Green-Kubo relation, where the projection of the velocity in the parallel direction to the local intrinsic interface is used in the velocity correlation function. It was found that the self-diffusion coefficient in the direction parallel to the intrinsic interface changes as the position approaches the interface in a more obvious manner as compared with the self-diffusion coefficient obtained with respect to the Gibbs dividing surface. These results suggest that the use of an instantaneous interface definition allowed us to capture sharp variations in transport properties which are originating due to steeper structure at the liquid-vapor interfaces. PMID:27387788

  18. Isomerization of alkanes on sulfated zirconia: Promotion by Pt and by adamantyl hydride transfer species

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesia, E.; Soled, S.L.; Kramer, G.M. )

    1993-11-01

    The work shows that hydride transfer species, such as adamantane, increase isomerization rates and inhibit C-C scission reactions. n-Heptane isomerization rates show positive hydrogen kinetic orders, suggesting that the reaction proceeds on Pt/ZrO[sub 2]-SO[sub 4] via chain transfer pathways, in which carbenium ions propagate, after a chain initiation step involvings loss of hydrogen from alkanes, by hydride transfer from neutral species to carbonations. These pathways contrast with those involved in the bifunctional (metal-acid) catalytic sequences usually required for alkane isomerization, in which metal sites catalyze alkane dehydrogenation and acid sites catalyze skeletal rearrangements of alkenes. Rate-limiting hydride transfer steps are consistent with the strong influence of molecular hydride transfer agents such as adamantane, which act as co-catalysts and increase isomerization rate and selectivity. The addition of small amounts of adamantane (0.1-0.8 wt%) to n-heptane increases isomerizations rates by a factor of 3 and inhibits undesirable cracking reactions. Adamantane increases hydride transfer and carbenium ion termination rates, thus reducing the surface residence time required for a catalytic turnover. As a result, desorption occurs before secondary cracking of isomerized carbenium ions. Less effective hydride transfer agents (n-alkanes, isoalkanes) also increase n-alkanes isomerization rate and selectivity, but require much higher concentrations than adamantane. Dihydrogen also acts as a hydride source in alkane isomerization catalysis, but it requires the additional presence of metals or reducible oxides, which catalyze H[sub 2] dissociation and the formation of hydridic and protonic forms of hydrogen. 40 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Molecular Packing Structure of Mesogenic Octa-Hexyl Substituted Phthalocyanine Thin Film by X-ray Diffraction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Masashi; Higashi, Takuya; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    The molecular packing structure in a thin film of the liquid crystalline phthalocyanine, 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2), which is a promising small-molecular material for solution-processable organic thin-film solar cells, has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. The crystal structure of C6PcH2 in the spin-coated film was determined to be a centered rectangular structure (a = 36.4 Å, b = 20.3 Å). The tilt angle of the phthalocyanine core normal vector was 34-39° from the column axis, and the shortest intermolecular distance was 3.9-4.0 A. The crystal structure determined by XRD analysis was ascertained to be consistent with that calculated by Fourier analvsis. PMID:27451624

  20. Water solubility of selected C9-C18 alkanes using a slow-stir technique: Comparison to structure - property models.

    PubMed

    Letinski, Daniel J; Parkerton, Thomas F; Redman, Aaron D; Connelly, Martin J; Peterson, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous solubility is a fundamental physical-chemical substance property that strongly influences the distribution, fate and effects of chemicals upon release into the environment. Experimental water solubility was determined for 18 selected C9-C18 normal, branched and cyclic alkanes. A slow-stir technique was applied to obviate emulsion formation, which historically has resulted in significant overestimation of the aqueous solubility of such hydrophobic liquid compounds. Sensitive GC-MS based methods coupled with contemporary sample extraction techniques were employed to enable reproducible analysis of low parts-per billion aqueous concentrations. Water solubility measurements for most of the compounds investigated, are reported for the first time expanding available data for branched and cyclic alkanes. Measured water solubilities spanned four orders of magnitude ranging from 0.3 μg/L to 250 μg/L. Good agreement was observed for selected alkanes tested in this work and reported in earlier literature demonstrating the robustness of the slow-stir water solubility technique. Comparisons of measured alkane water solubilities were also made with those predicted by commonly used quantitative structure-property relationship models (e.g. SPARC, EPIWIN, ACD/Labs). Correlations are also presented between alkane measured water solubilities and molecular size parameters (e.g. molar volume, solvent accessible molar volume) affirming a mechanistic description of empirical aqueous solubility results and prediction previously reported for a more limited set of alkanes. PMID:26924078

  1. RESEARCH ON THE ELECTRONIC AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYMER AND OTHER ORGANIC MOLECULAR THIN FILMS

    SciTech Connect

    ALEXEI G. VITUKHNOVSKY; IGOR I. SOBELMAN - RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    1995-09-06

    Optical properties of highly ordered films of poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) on different substrates, thin films of mixtures of conjugated polymers, of fullerene and its composition with polymers, molecular J-aggregates of cyanine dyes in frozen matrices have been studied within the framework of the Agreement. Procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum deposited PPP films on different substrates (ITO, Si, GaAs and etc.) were developed. Using time-correlated single photon counting technique and fluorescence spectroscopy the high quality of PPP films has been confirmed. Dependence of structure and optical properties on the conditions of preparation were investigated. The fluorescence lifetime and spectra of highly oriented vacuum deposited PPP films were studied as a function of the degree of polymerization. It was shown for the first time that the maximum fluorescence quantum yield is achieved for the chain length approximately equal to 35 monomer units. The selective excitation of luminescence of thin films of PPP was performed in the temperature range from 5 to 300 K. The total intensity of luminescence monotonically decreases with decreasing temperature. Conditions of preparation of highly cristallyne fullerene C{sub 60} films by the method of vacuum deposition were found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers PPV and polyacetylene (PA) were prepared. The results on fluorescence quenching, IR and resonant Raman spectroscopy are consistent with earlier reported ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from PPV to C{sub 60} and show that the electron transfer is absent in the case of the PA-C{sub 60} composition. Strong quenching of PPV fluorescence was observed in the PPV-PA blends. The electron transfer from PPV to PA can be considered as one of the possible mechanisms of this quenching. The dynamics of photoexcitations in different types of J-aggregates of the carbocyanine dye was studied at different temperatures in frozen matrices. The optical

  2. Shear thinning behavior of linear polymer melts under shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2014-05-01

    The properties of both untangled and entangled linear polymer melts under shear flow are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the dependence of shear viscosity η on shear rate dot{γ }, expressed by η ˜ dot{γ }^{-n}, exhibits three distinct regimes. The first is the well-known Newtonian regime, namely, η independent of shear rate at small shear rates dot{γ }<τ 0^{-1} (where τ0 is the longest polymer relaxation time at equilibrium). In the non-Newtonian regime (dot{γ }>τ 0^{-1}), the shear dependence of viscosity exhibits a crossover at a critical shear rate dot{γ }c dividing this regime into two different regimes, shear thinning regime I (ST-I) and II (ST-II), respectively. In the ST-I regime (τ ^{-1}_0dot{γ }c) a universal power law η ˜ dot{γ }^{-0.37} is found for considered chain lengths. Furthermore, the longer the polymer chain is, the smaller the shear viscosity for a given shear rate in the ST-II regime. The simulation also shows that a characteristic chain length, below which dot{γ }c will be equal to τ 0^{-1}, lies in the interval 30 < N < 50. For all considered chain lengths in the ST-II regime, we also find that the first and second normal stress differences N1 and N2 follow power laws of N1 ˜ dot{γ }^{2/3} and N2 ˜ dot{γ }^{0.82}, respectively; the orientation resistance parameter mG follows the relation mG ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75} and the tumbling frequency ftb follows f_{tb} ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75}. These results imply that the effects of entanglement on the shear dependences of these properties may be negligible in the ST-II regime. These findings may shed some light on the nature of shear thinning in flexible linear polymer melts.

  3. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. These systems are also characterized by sharp physicochemical gradients that have been shown to have a pronounced effect on microbial ecology and activity. Sediments were collected from a Middle Valley field with relatively high concentrations of short-chain alkanes and incubated in anaerobic batch reactors with each individual alkane (C1, C2, C3 and C4, respectively) at a range of temperatures (25, 55 and 75 °C) to mimic environmental physico-chemical conditions in a closed system. Stable carbon isotope ratios and radiotracer incubations provide clear evidence for C2-C4 alkane oxidation in the sediments over time. Upon identifying sediments with anaerobic alkane oxidation activity, microbial communities were screened via 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, and key phylotypes were then quantified using both molecular and microscopic methods. There were shifts in overall community composition and putative alkane-oxidizing phylotypes after the incubation period with the alkane substrates. These are the first evidence to date indicating that anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation occurs across a broad range of temperatures in metalliferous sediments.

  4. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-08-01

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm2 V-1 s-1 and electron mobility of 0.17 cm2 V-1 s-1 in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs.Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically

  5. Ultrafast structural dynamics of LaVO3 thin films grown by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahlek, Matthew; Lapano, Jason; Stoica, Vladimir; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Eaton, Craig; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Freeland, John; Wen, Haidan; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    LaVO3, with a partially full d-shell is expected to be metallic, but due to electron-electron interactions a gap emerges and the ground state is a Mott insulator. Such effects are a strong function of the bonding geometry, and particularly the V-O-V bond angle. Controlling these structural effects on the ultrafast time scale can lead to control over the underlying electronic ground state. Here we report the ultrafast structural dynamics of 25 and 50 nm thick LaVO3 thin films grown by the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy technique on SrTiO3 when excited across the bandgap by 800 nm light. Using time-resolved x-ray diffraction on the 100 ps time scale at Sector 7 of the Advanced Photon Source, we directly measured the structural changes with atomic accuracy by monitoring integer Bragg diffraction peaks and find a large out-of-plane strain of 0.18% upon optical excitation; the recovery time is ~1 ns for the 25 nm film and ~2 ns for the 50 nm film, consistent with the thermal transport from the film to the substrate. Further, we will discuss the response of the oxygen octahedral rotation patterns indicated by changes of the half-order diffraction peaks. Understanding such ultrafast structural deformation is important for optimizing optical excitations to create new metastable phases starting from a Mott insulator. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Grant DE-SC0012375, and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Phase sensitive molecular dynamics of self-assembly glycolipid thin films: A dielectric spectroscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayutham, T. S.; Ng, B. K.; Gan, W. C.; Majid, W. H. Abd.; Hashim, R.; Zahid, N. I.; Chaiprapa, Jitrin

    2014-08-01

    Glycolipid, found commonly in membranes, is also a liquid crystal material which can self-assemble without the presence of a solvent. Here, the dielectric and conductivity properties of three synthetic glycolipid thin films in different thermotropic liquid crystal phases were investigated over a frequency and temperature range of (10-2-106 Hz) and (303-463 K), respectively. The observed relaxation processes distinguish between the different phases (smectic A, columnar/hexagonal, and bicontinuous cubic Q) and the glycolipid molecular structures. Large dielectric responses were observed in the columnar and bicontinuous cubic phases of the longer branched alkyl chain glycolipids. Glycolipids with the shortest branched alkyl chain experience the most restricted self-assembly dynamic process over the broad temperature range studied compared to the longer ones. A high frequency dielectric absorption (Process I) was observed in all samples. This is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network from the sugar group. An additional low-frequency mechanism (Process II) with a large dielectric strength was observed due to the internal dynamics of the self-assembly organization. Phase sensitive domain heterogeneity in the bicontinuous cubic phase was related to the diffusion of charge carriers. The microscopic features of charge hopping were modelled using the random walk scheme, and two charge carrier hopping lengths were estimated for two glycolipid systems. For Process I, the hopping length is comparable to the hydrogen bond and is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network. Additionally, that for Process II is comparable to the bilayer spacing, hence confirming that this low-frequency mechanism is associated with the internal dynamics within the phase.

  7. Fidelity of fossil n-alkanes from leaf to paleosol and applications to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.; Baczynski, A. A.; Wing, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    modern plant data. These results suggest that n-alkanes extracted directly from a fossil leaf provide a true signature of an individual leaf fossil rather than a mixture from the entire plant community. Therefore, comparisons between fossil morphotypes and between fossil and related modern taxa should be robust. Furthermore, by placing fossil leaf data within the context of the chemostratigraphy of Bighorn Basin sediments across the P-E boundary, fossil leaf n-alkanes can be used to bridge the gap between our understanding of modern plant lipids and bulk lipid data from sediments across the PETM. It has been hypothesized that changes in the both the molecular distribution and carbon isotope composition of n-alkanes across the PETM were due to changes in the local plant community, which included a large proportion of deciduous gymnosperms before and after-but not during-the PETM. Analysis of fossils such as Ginkgo and angiosperms provides the opportunity to compare and distinguish the molecular and isotopic signatures of gymnosperms and angiosperms. These comparisons shed light on the dynamics of climate and ecosystem changes as they are recorded in the signatures of lipid biomarkers.

  8. Density functional steric analysis of linear and branched alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-12-16

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (E(s)[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (E(e)[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (E(q)[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes. PMID:21086970

  9. Density Functional Steric Analysis of Linear and Branched Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-11-18

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (Ee[[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (Ee[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (Eq[[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  10. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  11. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  12. Ordered Self-assembled Alkane Monolayer on Graphite and Graphene Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yudan; Han, Huiling; Wang, Feng; Cai, Qun; Tian, Chuanshan; Shen, Y. R.

    2015-03-01

    The 2D self-assembly of long chain alkane molecule on graphite and graphene had been studied with phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (PS-SFVS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The spectrum of Imχs(2) (ωIR) which directly characterizes the surface resonances, shows 10-cm-1 red-shift of the symmetric-stretch frequency of the CH2 groups pointing towards graphite (or graphene) surface indicating Van der Waals interaction in between. The Gibbs adsorption energy of polyethylene (PE, n ~ 140) on graphite from chloroform solution was determined to be -42kJ/mol per molecule or -0.6 kJ/mol per CH2 unit. This large adsorption energy drives the long alkane chain to form an ordered self-assembled monolayer on graphite (or graphene). The sum frequency spectra suggest the orientation of carbon skeleton plane of alkane is predominately perpendicular to the graphite/graphene surface. Our STM result also provides clear evidence for the proposed molecular adsorption model. These results explain the large amount residual of long chain alkane on polystyrene (PS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transferred graphene, and facilitate a better way to fabricate cleaner large-size graphene.

  13. The Structure of Ice Nanoclusters and Thin-films of Water Ice: Implications for Icy Grains in Cold Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Blake, David; Uffindell, Christine; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in water ice (I(sub c) yields I(sub h)) is used to measure the extent to which surface structure and impurities control bulk properties. In pure crystalline (I(sub c)) water ice nanoclusters and in thin-films of impure water ice, I(sub c) yields I(sub h) occurs at lower temperatures than in thin-films of pure water ice. The disordered surface of the 20 nm diameter nanoclusters promotes transformations or reactions which would otherwise be kinetically hindered. Likewise, impurities such as methanol introduce defects into the ice network, thereby allowing sluggish structural transitions to proceed. Such surface-related phenomena play an important role in promoting chemical reactions on interstellar ice grains within cold molecular clouds, where the first organic compounds are formed.

  14. Influence of molecular structure peculiarities of phthalocyanine derivatives on their supramolecular organization and properties in the bulk and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usol'tseva, Nadezhda V.; Kazak, Alexandr V.; Luk'yanov, Ivan Yu.; Sotsky, Valentin V.; Smirnova, Antonina I.; Yudin, Sergey G.; Shaposhnikov, Gennadiy P.; Galanin, Nikolay E.

    2014-08-01

    In order to study the influence of molecular structure peculiarities on supramolecular organization and properties in the bulk and thin films of discotic mesogens six new mix-substituted phthalocyanine derivatives with 3,6-dioctyloxyphthalonitrile and 3,4,5,6-tetrachlorophthalonitrile fragments were synthesized. Temperatures of phase transitions, types of mesophase and their dependence on molecule structure, chemical nature, position and ratio of different substituents as well as presence of holmium in the metal complexes were analyzed. The behavior of the studied molecules on the boundary between water and air was investigated and the peculiarity of supramolecular organization in floating layers as well as in thin films was determined. Quenching of luminescence in solutions of the studied compounds in the presence of fullerene C60 was determined, thus giving prospects for application of these compounds as sensors for fullerene microquantities.

  15. Self-regulated growth of LaVO{sub 3} thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Tian; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-06-08

    LaVO{sub 3} thin films were grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. A volatile metalorganic precursor, vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP), and elemental La were co-supplied in the presence of a molecular oxygen flux. By keeping the La flux fixed and varying the VTIP flux, stoichiometric LaVO{sub 3} films were obtained for a range of cation flux ratios, indicating the presence of a self-regulated growth window. Films grown under stoichiometric conditions were found to have the largest lattice parameter, which decreased monotonically with increasing amounts of excess La or V. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering measurements were carried out to confirm film compositions. Stoichiometric growth of complex vanadate thin films independent of cation flux ratios expands upon the previously reported self-regulated growth of perovskite titanates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy, thus demonstrating the general applicability of this growth approach to other complex oxide materials, where a precise control over film stoichiometry is demanded by the application.

  16. Stimulation of Lipase Production During Bacterial Growth on Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Breuil, Colette; Shindler, D. B.; Sijher, J. S.; Kushner, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffi strain O16, a facultative psychrophile, can grow on crude oil, hexadecane, octadecane, and most alkanes when tested at 20 but not at 30°C. Growth occurred on a few alkanes at 30°C but after a longer lag than at 20°C. Cells grown on alkanes as sole carbon sources had high levels of cell-bound lipase. In contrast, previous work has shown that those grown on complex medium produced cell-free lipase and those grown on defined medium without alkanes produced little or no lipase. Low concentrations of the detergent Triton X-100 caused the liberation of most of the lipase activity of alkane-grown cells and increased total lipase activity. When ethanol and hexadecane were both present in a mineral medium, diauxic growth occurred; until the ethanol was completely used up, hexadecane was not utilized, and the lipase activity was very low. When growth on hexadecane began, lipase activity increased, reaching a level 50- to 100-fold higher than that of cells growing on ethanol. A similar pattern of lipase formation and hexadecane utilization was observed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Whenever A. lwoffi and other bacteria degraded alkanes they exhibited substantial lipase activity. Not all bacteria that produced lipase, however, could attack alkanes. Bacteria that could not produce lipase did not attack alkanes. The results suggest that a correlation may exist between lipase formation and alkane utilization. PMID:627533

  17. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlinski, Michael D.; Quesnel, David J.

    2015-12-01

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu2O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the films

  18. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Lilian M; Loviso, Claudia L; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K; Dionisi, Hebe M; Lozada, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes. PMID:26547568

  19. Molecular fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic initiated chemically vapor-deposited (iCVD) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R; Goktekin, E; Wang, MH; Gleason, KK

    2014-08-08

    Biofouling is a universal problem in various applications ranging from water purification to implantable biomedical devices. Recent advances in surface modification have created a rich library of antifouling surface chemistries, many of which can be categorized into one of the two groups: hydrophilic surfaces or amphiphilic surfaces. We report the straightforward preparation of antifouling thin film coatings in both categories via initiated chemical vapor deposition. A molecular force spectroscopy-based method is demonstrated as a rapid and quantitative assessment tool for comparing the differences in antifouling characteristics. The fouling propensity of single molecules, as opposed to bulk protein solution or bacterial culture, is assessed. This method allows for the interrogation of molecular interaction without the complication resulted from protein conformational change or micro-organism group interactions. The molecular interaction follows the same trend as bacterial adhesion results obtained previously, demonstrating that molecular force probe is a valid method for the quantification and mechanistic examination of fouling. In addition, the molecular force spectroscopy-based method is able to distinguish differences in antifouling capability that is not resolvable by traditional static protein adsorption tests. To lend further insight into the intrinsic fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic surface chemistries, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, advancing and receding water contact angles, and atomic force microscopy are used to elucidate the film properties that are relevant to their antifouling capabilities.

  20. Molecular fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic initiated chemically vapor-deposited (iCVD) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R; Goktekin, E; Wang, MH; Gleason, KK

    2014-01-01

    Biofouling is a universal problem in various applications ranging from water purification to implantable biomedical devices. Recent advances in surface modification have created a rich library of antifouling surface chemistries, many of which can be categorized into one of the two groups: hydrophilic surfaces or amphiphilic surfaces. We report the straightforward preparation of antifouling thin film coatings in both categories via initiated chemical vapor deposition. A molecular force spectroscopy-based method is demonstrated as a rapid and quantitative assessment tool for comparing the differences in antifouling characteristics. The fouling propensity of single molecules, as opposed to bulk protein solution or bacterial culture, is assessed. This method allows for the interrogation of molecular interaction without the complication resulted from protein conformational change or micro-organism group interactions. The molecular interaction follows the same trend as bacterial adhesion results obtained previously, demonstrating that molecular force probe is a valid method for the quantification and mechanistic examination of fouling. In addition, the molecular force spectroscopy-based method is able to distinguish differences in antifouling capability that is not resolvable by traditional static protein adsorption tests. To lend further insight into the intrinsic fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic surface chemistries, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, advancing and receding water contact angles, and atomic force microscopy are used to elucidate the film properties that are relevant to their antifouling capabilities.

  1. Improving stability of photoluminescence of ZnSe thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy by incorporating Cl dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Chen, W. J.; Yang, C. S.; Tsai, Y. H.; Wang, H. H.; Chen, R. H.; Shen, J. L.; Tsai, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation studies the effect of chlorine (Cl) dopant in ZnSe thin films that were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on their photoluminescence (PL) and the stability thereof. Free excitonic emission was observed at room-temperature in the Cl-doped sample. Photon irradiation with a wavelength of 404 nm and a power density of 9.1 W/cm2 has a much stronger effect on PL degradation than does thermal heating to a temperature of 150 °C. Additionally, this study shows that the generation of nonradiative centers by both photon irradiation and thermal heating can be greatly inhibited by incorporating Cl dopant.

  2. Effect of molecular coverage on the electric conductance of a multi-walled carbon nanotube thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokabu, Takuya; Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the influence of water adsorption on a CNT thin film. When we assumed that the magnitude of the change in electrical resistance was correlated with the surface coverage of the adsorbed molecules, this phenomenon could be explained by two-layer adsorption. The first layer was expressed by Langmuir adsorption and that on the second layer was expressed by Fowler-Guggenheim adsorption, which was derived by Bragg-Williams approximation and involved a lateral molecular interaction. The adsorption energy estimated by this assumption was on the same order as derived by DFT calculation.

  3. Molecular weight effects in the third-harmonic generation spectroscopy of thin films of the conjugated polymer MEH-PPV.

    PubMed

    Bahtiar, Ayi; Koynov, Kaloian; Ahn, Taek; Bubeck, Christoph

    2008-03-27

    Thin spin-cast films of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) were prepared from samples whose weight-average molecular weight (Mw) was varied in the range of 10-1600 kg/mol. We have characterized the films by means of transmission and reflection ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy to derive the linear optical constants, and third-harmonic generation spectroscopy with variable laser wavelengths to get the modulus and phase angles of the complex third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility chi(3). Increasing molecular weight yields films with significantly larger chi(3) values, absorption coefficients, and refractive indices. The chi(3) values of films from the largest and lowest Mw differ by a factor of 4, which is caused by chain orientation effects, local field effects, and changes of the effective conjugation length. PMID:18311961

  4. Coexistence of spinodal instability and thermal nucleation in thin-film rupture:Insights from molecular levels

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trung D; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive investigation using hydrodynamic models and experiments over the past decades, there remain open questions regarding the origin of the initial rupture of thin liquid films. One of the reasons that makes it difficult to identify the rupture origin is the coexistence of two dewettingmechanisms, namely, thermal nucleation and spinodal instability, as observed in many experimental studies. Using a coarse-grained model and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we are able to characterize the very early stage of dewetting in nanometer-thick liquid-metal films wetting a solid substrate. We observe the features characteristic of both spinodal instability and thermal nucleation in the spontaneously dewetting films and show that these two macroscopic mechanisms share a common origin at molecular levels.

  5. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarella, F. Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A.; Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  6. Characterization of the non-uniform reaction in chemically-amplified calix[4]resorcinarene molecular resist thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Vivek M.; Kang, Shuhui; Kline, R. Joseph; DeLongchamp, Dean M.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wu, Wen-li; Satija, Sushil K.; Bonnesen, Peter V; Sha, Jing; Ober, Christoper K.

    2011-01-01

    The ccc stereoisomer-purified tert-butoxycarbonyloxy (t-Boc) protected calix[4]resorcinarene molecular resists blended with photoacid generator exhibit a non-uniform photoacid catalyzed reaction in thin films. The surface displays a reduced reaction extent, compared to the bulk, with average surface-layer thickness (7.0 1.8) nm determined by neutron reflectivity with deuterium-labeled t-Boc groups. Ambient impurities (amines and organic bases) are known to quench surface reactions and contribute, but grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows an additional effect that the protected molecular resist are preferentially oriented at the surface, while the bulk of the film displayed diffuse scattering representative of amorphous packing. The surface deprotection reaction and presence of photoacid was quantified by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurements.

  7. The Uptake and Assembly of Alkanes within a Porous Nanocapsule in Water: New Information about Hydrophobic Confinement.

    PubMed

    Kopilevich, Sivil; Gottlieb, Hugo; Keinan-Adamsky, Keren; Müller, Achim; Weinstock, Ira A

    2016-03-24

    In Nature, enzymes provide hydrophobic cavities and channels for sequestering small alkanes or long-chain alkyl groups from water. Similarly, the porous metal oxide capsule [{Mo(VI) 6 O21 (H2 O)6 }12 {(Mo(V) 2 O4 )30 (L)29 (H2 O)2 }](41-) (L=propionate ligand) features distinct domains for sequestering differently sized alkanes (as in Nature) as well as internal dimensions suitable for multi-alkane clustering. The ethyl tails of the 29 endohedrally coordinated ligands, L, form a spherical, hydrophobic "shell", while their methyl end groups generate a hydrophobic cavity with a diameter of 11 Å at the center of the capsule. As such, C7 to C3 straight-chain alkanes are tightly intercalated between the ethyl tails, giving assemblies containing 90 to 110 methyl and methylene units, whereas two or three ethane molecules reside in the central cavity of the capsule, where they are free to rotate rapidly, a phenomenon never before observed for the uptake of alkanes from water by molecular cages or containers. PMID:26880403

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of long-chain n-alkanes by the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    PubMed Central

    Khelifi, Nadia; Amin Ali, Oulfat; Roche, Philippe; Grossi, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Valette, Odile; Ollivier, Bernard; Dolla, Alain; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    The thermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC-16 (DSM 4304), which is known to oxidize fatty acids and n-alkenes, was shown to oxidize saturated hydrocarbons (n-alkanes in the range C10–C21) with thiosulfate or sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The amount of n-hexadecane degradation observed was in stoichiometric agreement with the theoretically expected amount of thiosulfate reduction. One of the pathways used by anaerobic microorganisms to activate alkanes is addition to fumarate that involves alkylsuccinate synthase as a key enzyme. A search for genes encoding homologous enzymes in A. fulgidus identified the pflD gene (locus-tag AF1449) that was previously annotated as a pyruvate formate lyase. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that this gene is of bacterial origin and was likely acquired by A. fulgidus from a bacterial donor through a horizontal gene transfer. Based on three-dimensional modeling of the corresponding protein and molecular dynamic simulations, we hypothesize an alkylsuccinate synthase activity for this gene product. The pflD gene expression was upregulated during the growth of A. fulgidus on an n-alkane (C16) compared with growth on a fatty acid. Our results suggest that anaerobic alkane degradation in A. fulgidus may involve the gene pflD in alkane activation through addition to fumarate. These findings highlight the possible importance of hydrocarbon oxidation at high temperatures by A. fulgidus in hydrothermal vents and the deep biosphere. PMID:24763368

  9. Comprehensive chemical kinetic modeling of the oxidation of C8 and larger n-alkanes and 2-methylalkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Togbe, C; Dagaut, P; Wang, H; Oehlschlaeger, M; NIemann, U; Seshadri, K; Veloo, P S; Ji, C; Egolfopoulos, F; Lu, T

    2011-03-16

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed and reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for singly methylated iso-alkanes (i.e., 2-methylalkanes) ranging from C{sub 8} to C{sub 20}. The mechanism also includes an updated version of our previously published C{sub 8} to C{sub 16} n-alkanes model. The complete detailed mechanism contains approximately 7,200 species 31,400 reactions. The proposed model is validated against new experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices including premixed and nonpremixed flames, perfectly stirred reactors and shock tubes. This new model is used to show how the presence of a methyl branch affects important combustion properties such as laminar flame propagation, ignition, and species formation.

  10. Conformation of liquid N-alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Goodsaid-Zalduondo, F; Engelman, D M

    1981-01-01

    The conformations of liquid n-alkanes have been studied using neutron scattering techniques to better understand the conformational forces present in membrane lipid interiors. We have studied hydrocarbon chains having lengths comparable to those found for esterified membrane lipid fatty acids, and find that the steric constraints of packing in the liquid state do not change the conformational distributions of hydrocarbon chains from those imposed by the intrachain forces present in the gas phase. It follows that the central region of membranes containing lipids in the disordered state should contain hydrocarbon chain conformations determined primarily by intrachain forces. PMID:7272453

  11. Growth characteristics of Ti-based fumaric acid hybrid thin films by molecular layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan-Qiang; Zhu, Lin; Li, Xin; Cao, Zheng-Yi; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Ti-based fumaric acid hybrid thin films were successfully prepared using inorganic TiCl4 and organic fumaric acid as precursors by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The effect of deposition temperature from 180 °C to 350 °C on the growth rate, composition, chemical state, and topology of hybrid films has been investigated systematically by means of a series of analytical tools such as spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The MLD process of the Ti-fumaric acid shows self-limiting surface reaction with a reasonable growth rate of ∼0.93 Å per cycle and small surface roughness of ∼0.59 nm in root-mean-square value at 200 °C. A temperature-dependent growth characteristic has been observed in the hybrid films. On increasing the temperature from 180 °C to 300 °C, the growth rate decreases from 1.10 to 0.49 Å per cycle and the XPS composition of the film's C : O : Ti ratio changes from 8.35 : 7.49 : 1.00 to 4.66 : 4.80 : 1.00. FTIR spectra indicate that the hybrid films show bridging bonding mode at a low deposition temperature of 200 °C and bridging/bidentate mixed bonding mode at elevated deposition temperatures of 250 and 300 °C. The higher C and O amounts deviating from the ideal composition may be ascribed to increased organic incorporation into the hybrid films at lower deposition temperature and temperature-dependent density of reactive sites (-OH). The composition of hybrid films grown at 350 °C shows a dramatic decrease in C and O elemental composition (C : O : Ti = 1.97 : 2.76 : 1.00) due to the thermal decomposition of the fumaric acid precursor. The produced by-product H2O changes the structure of the hybrid films, resulting in the formation of more Ti-O bonds at high temperatures. The stability of the hybrid films against chemical and thermal treatment, and long-term storage by

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of irradiation of α-Fe thin films with energetic Fe ions under channeling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliaga, M. J.; Prokhodtseva, A.; Schaeublin, R.; Caturla, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with recent interatomic potentials developed for Fe, we have studied the defects in thin films of pure bcc Fe induced by the displacement cascade produced by Fe atoms of 50, 100, and 150 keV impinging under a channeling incident angle of 6° to a [0 0 1] direction. The thin films have a thickness between 40 and 100 nm, to reproduce the thickness of the samples used in transmission electron microscope in situ measurements during irradiation. In the simulations we focus mostly on the effect of channeling and free surfaces on damage production. The results are compared to bulk cascades. The comparison shows that the primary damage in thin films of pure Fe is quite different from that originated in the volume of the material. The presence of near surfaces can lead to a variety of events that do not occur in bulk collisional cascades, such as the production of craters and the glide of self-interstitial defects to the surface. Additionally, in the range of energies and the incident angle used, channeling is a predominant effect that significantly reduces damage compared to bulk cascades.

  13. O thin films with different Mg contents on r-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Pan, X. H.; Ding, P.; Zhang, H. H.; Chen, S. S.; Dai, W.; Huang, J. Y.; Lu, B.; Ye, Z. Z.

    2014-09-01

    We report the growth and characterization of a series of non-polar Zn1- x Mg x O thin films with different Mg contents, which have been prepared on r-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Structural properties are anisotropic and surfaces of films show stripes running along the c-axis direction. The films exhibit atomically smooth surface with the minimal root mean square surface roughness of 0.36 nm. Non-polar Zn1- x Mg x O thin film is much easier to obtain pure a-plane single crystal orientation when Mg content is high. The quality of the non-polar Zn1- x Mg x O thin films is evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curves full-width at half-maximum of 1,350 arcsec for the () reflection and 1,760 arcsec for the () reflection, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence peak shifts monotonously from 3.29 to 3.56 eV as Mg content increases from 0 to 0.13. Alloying with Mg is found to widen the bandgap energy of the ZnO.

  14. Atomic/Molecular Layer Deposition of Lithium Terephthalate Thin Films as High Rate Capability Li-Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Nisula, Mikko; Karppinen, Maarit

    2016-02-10

    We demonstrate the fabrication of high-quality electrochemically active organic lithium electrode thin films by the currently strongly emerging combined atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique using lithium terephthalate, a recently found anode material for lithium-ion battery (LIB), as a proof-of-the-concept material. Our deposition process for Li-terephthalate is shown to well comply with the basic principles of ALD-type growth including the sequential self-saturated surface reactions, a necessity when aiming at micro-LIB devices with three-dimensional architectures. The as-deposited films are found crystalline across the deposition temperature range of 200-280 °C, which is a trait highly desired for an electrode material but rather unusual for hybrid inorganic-organic thin films. Excellent rate capability is ascertained for the Li-terephthalate films with no conductive additives required. The electrode performance can be further enhanced by depositing a thin protective LiPON solid-state electrolyte layer on top of Li-terephthalate; this yields highly stable structures with capacity retention of over 97% after 200 charge/discharge cycles at 3.2 C. PMID:26812433

  15. GC-{sup 13}C IRMS characterisation of extractable and covalently bound alkanes in petroleum source rocks to reveal compositional fractionation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Love, G.D.; Fallick, A.E.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    The application of a sequential extraction/degradation scheme to differentiate between molecular alkanes (both easily extractable and physically-trapped) and covalently-bound alkyl moieties to a number of vitrinite concentrates and petroleum source rocks has been reported previously. Gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry GC-s{sup 13}C IRMS has now been applied to the different awe fractions to probe compositional fractionation effects that might occur from the different initial biological inputs. For a Turkish oil shale (Goynuk - Type I kerogen), inputs from diverse sources, including phytoplanktron, higher plants and bacteria were implied from analysis of solvent-extractable alkanes. However, the much larger quantities of covalently-bound alkanes had an isotopic signature typical of eukarytoic (freshwater) algae. The isotopic uniformity of alkanes/alkenes released from sequential hydropyrolysis of a torbanite (Duunet shale) confirmed that this sample was largely derived from the selective preservation of resistant aliphatic biopolymers found in Botryococcus cell walls.

  16. Selective Adsorption of n-Alkanes from n-Octane on Metal-Organic Frameworks: Length Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-03-16

    The liquid-phase adsorption of n-alkanes (from n-octane (C8) solvent) with different chain lengths was carried out over three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), viz., metal-azolate framework-6 (MAF-6), copper-benzenetricarboxylate (Cu-BTC), and iron-benzenetricarboxylate (MIL-100(Fe)), and a conventional adsorbent activated carbon (AC). MAF-6 and Cu-BTC were found to have significant selectivity for the adsorption of n-dodecane (C12) and n-heptane (C7), respectively, from C8. Selectivity for C12 on MAF-6 was also observed in competitive adsorption from binary adsorbate systems. To understand the selective adsorption of C12 on MAF-6 more, the adsorption of C12 from C8 over MAF-6 was investigated in detail and compared with that over AC. The obtained selectivities over MAF-6 and Cu-BTC for C12 and C7, respectively, might be explained by the similarity between cavity size of adsorbents and molecular length of n-alkanes. In the case of AC and MIL-100(Fe), no specific adsorption selectivity was observed because the cavity sizes of the two adsorbents are larger than the size of the n-alkanes used in this study. The adsorption capacities (qt) of n-alkanes over AC and MIL-100(Fe) decreased and increased, respectively, as the polarity (or length) of the adsorbates increased, probably because of nonpolar and polar interactions between the adsorbents and n-alkanes. On the basis of the results obtained, it can be concluded that matching the cavity size (of adsorbents) with the molecular length (of n-alknaes) is more important parameter than the MOF's hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity for the selective adsorption/separation of alkanes. PMID:26905721

  17. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, M. Elena; Savage, Michael D.; Cerro, Ramon L.

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations—particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  18. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  19. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Biscardi, J.; Bowden, P.T.; Durante, V.A.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Gray, H.B.; Gorbey, R.G.; Hayes, R.C.; Hodge, J.; Hughes, M.; Langdale, W.A.; Lyons, J.E.; Marcus, B.; Messick, D.; Merrill, R.A.; Moore, F.A.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Seitzer, W.H.; Shaikh, S.N.; Tsao, W.H.; Wagner, R.W.; Warren, R.W.; Wijesekera, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    The first Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between January 1. 1992 and March 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient porphryinic macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE III).

  20. Maximizing the dielectric response of molecular thin films via quantum chemical design.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Henry M; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-12-23

    Developing high-capacitance organic gate dielectrics is critical for advances in electronic circuitry based on unconventional semiconductors. While high-dielectric constant molecular substances are known, the mechanism of dielectric response and the fundamental chemical design principles are not well understood. Using a plane-wave density functional theory formalism, we show that it is possible to map the atomic-scale dielectric profiles of molecule-based materials while capturing important bulk characteristics. For molecular films, this approach reveals how basic materials properties such as surface coverage density, molecular tilt angle, and π-system planarity can dramatically influence dielectric response. Additionally, relatively modest molecular backbone and substituent variations can be employed to substantially enhance film dielectric response. For dense surface coverages and proper molecular alignment, conjugated hydrocarbon chains can achieve dielectric constants of >8.0, more than 3 times that of analogous saturated chains, ∼2.5. However, this conjugation-related dielectric enhancement depends on proper molecular orientation and planarization, with enhancements up to 60% for proper molecular alignment with the applied field and an additional 30% for conformations such as coplanarity in extended π-systems. Conjugation length is not the only determinant of dielectric response, and appended polarizable high-Z substituents can increase molecular film response more than 2-fold, affording estimated capacitances of >9.0 μF/cm2. However, in large π-systems, polar substituent effects are substantially attenuated. PMID:25415650

  1. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  2. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  4. Thomas Reiche Kuhn populations in alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic populations in a molecule have been defined via the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule for oscillator strengths written within the acceleration gauge. These atomic populations are related to nuclear electric shieldings, i.e., to geometrical derivatives of electric dipole moment, and can therefore be connected with observable infrared intensities. A number of relationships can be considered to test a priori the quality of calculated electronic charges and to assess their physical meaning. It is shown via extended numerical tests on the first members of the alkane series that the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn populations are consistent with a (small) polarity C +-H - of carbon-hydrogen bond in methane, for which a bond dipole moment can be exactly defined. Although the idea of bond dipole cannot be extended to the C-H fragments belonging to other alkane molecules in the absence of local C3 v symmetry, the calculations prove that the same electron charge polarization should characterize the whole homologous series.

  5. Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

    1980-06-01

    About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

  6. Utilization of n-Alkanes by Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Teh, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Four different isolates of Cladosporium resinae from Australian soils were tested for their ability to utilize liquid n-alkanes ranging from n-hexane to n-octadecane under standard conditions. The isolates were unable to make use of n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane for growth. In fact, these hydrocarbons, particularly n-hexane, exerted an inhibitory effect on spore germination and mycelial growth. All higher n-alkanes from n-nonane to n-octadecane were assimilated by the fungus, although only limited growth occurred on n-nonane and n-decane. The long chain n-alkanes (C14 to C18) supported good growth of all isolates, but there was no obvious correlation between cell yields and chain lengths of these n-alkanes. Variation in growth responses to individual n-alkane among the different isolates was also observed. The cause of this variation is unknown. PMID:4735447

  7. Sophorolipids from Torulopsis bombicola: possible relation to alkane uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Torulopsis bombicola produces extracellular sophorolipids when it is grown on water-insoluble alkanes. Sophorolipids and related model compounds, which were not themselves used for growth, were found to stimulate markedly the growth of T. bombicola on alkanes. This stimulatory effect was restricted to growth on C10 to C20 alkanes, whereas no significantly influence was observed for growth on fatty alcohols, fatty acids, glucose, or glycerol. The nonionic methyl ester of the glycolipid supported the greatest cell yield. However, a number of synthetic nonionic surfactants were unable to replace the glycolipid. When organisms were grown on hexadecane, stimulation of growth by sophorolipids was observed almost exclusively with strains of Torulopsis yeasts. In contrast, the growth of other typical alkane-utilizing yeasts, such as candida and Pichia strains, was inhibited or not affected. It appears that sophorolipids are involved in alkane dissimilation by T. bombicola through an undetermined mechanism. PMID:7201782

  8. Synthesis, conformational and theoretical studies of 1,n-di(2-formyl-4-phenylazophenoxy)alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, R.; Manimekalai, A.

    2016-01-01

    1,n-di(2-Formyl-4-phenylazophenoxy)alkanes 1 and 2 and 1,3-di(2-formyl-4-phenylazophenoxymethyl)benzene 3 were synthesis and characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectral studies. The stable conformations of 1-3 were predicted theoretically and selected geometrical parameters were derived from optimized structures. The molecular parameters of HOMO-LUMO energies, polarizability, hyperpolarizability, natural bond orbital (NBO), atom in molecule (AIM) analysis and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces were determined by the density functional theory (DFT) method and analysed.

  9. Intermolecular electronic coupling in organic molecular thin films measured by temperature modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek; Jin, Y; Chan, P. K. L.; Shtein, Max; Pipe, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature modulation spectroscopy is used to obtain the temperature dependences of oscillator strength, exciton transition energy, and line width for a copper phthalocyanine thin film. With increasing temperature, the oscillator strength exhibits a pronounced decrease for charge transfer (CT) excitons, making this technique suitable for differentiating exciton types. From the measured magnitude and temperature dependence of the CT oscillator strength, we obtain estimates for the intermolecular electronic coupling and its exponential decay coefficient.

  10. Spectroscopy of the tilde A state of NO-alkane complexes (alkane = methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Gardner, Adrian M.; Harris, Joe P.; McDaniel, Jodie; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-12-01

    We have recorded (1+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of complexes formed between NO and the alkanes: CH4, C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10. The spectra correspond to the tilde A ← tilde X transition, which is a NO-localized 3s ← 2pπ* transition. In line with previous work, the spectrum for NO-CH4 has well-defined structure, but this is only partially resolved for the other complexes. The spectra recorded in the NO+-alkane mass channels all show a slowly rising onset, followed by a sharp offset, which is associated with dissociation of NO-alkane, from which binding energies in the tilde X and tilde A states are deduced. Beyond this sharp offset, there is a further rise in signal, which is attributed to fragmentation of higher complexes, NO-(alkane)n. Analysis of these features allows binding energies for (NO-alkane) ... alkane to be estimated, and these suggest that in the NO-(alkane)2 complexes, the second alkane molecule is bound to the first, rather than to NO. Calculated structures for the 1:1 complexes are reported, as well as binding energies.

  11. Molecular solution approach to synthesize electronic quality Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenbing; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Cha, Kitty C; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Hsu, Wan-Ching; Zhou, Huanping; Bob, Brion; Yang, Yang

    2013-05-01

    Successful implementation of molecular solution processing from a homogeneous and stable precursor would provide an alternative, robust approach to process multinary compounds compared with physical vapor deposition. Targeting deposition of chemically clear, high quality crystalline films requires specific molecular structure design and solvent selection. Hydrazine (N2H4) serves as a unique and powerful medium, particularly to incorporate selected metallic elements and chalcogens into a stable solution as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCC). However, not all the elements and compounds can be easily dissolved. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a paradigm to incorporate previously insoluble transitional-metal elements into molecular solution as metal-atom hydrazine/hydrazine derivative complexes (MHHD), as exemplified by dissolving of the zinc constituent as Zn(NH2NHCOO)2(N2H4)2. Investigation into the evolution of molecular structure reveals the hidden roadmap to significantly enrich the variety of building blocks for soluble molecule design. The new category of molecular structures not only set up a prototype to incorporate other elements of interest but also points the direction for other compatible solvent selection. As demonstrated from the molecular precursor combining Sn-/Cu-MCC and Zn-MHHD, an ultrathin film of copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) was deposited. Characterization of a transistor based on the CZTS channel layer shows electronic properties comparable to CuInSe2, confirming the robustness of this molecular solution processing and the prospect of earth abundant CZTS for next generation photovoltaic materials. This paradigm potentially outlines a universal pathway, from individual molecular design using selected chelated ligands and combination of building blocks in a simple and stable solution to fundamentally change the way multinary compounds are processed. PMID:23581974

  12. Path Integral Monte Carlo Simulations of Solid Molecular Hydrogen Surfaces and Thin HELIUM-4 Films on Molecular Hydrogen Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Marcus

    Based on Richard P. Feynman's formulation of quantum mechanics, Path Integral Monte Carlo is a computational ab-initio method to calculate finite temperature equilibrium properties of quantum many-body systems. As input, only fundamental physical constants and pair-potentials are required. We carry out the first ab-initio particle simulations of three related physical systems. First, the bare H _2 substrate is simulated between 0.5 and 1.3K, because a liquid H_2 film is a candidate for a new superfluid. We find evidence of quantum exchange in surface terraces for up to 1K. Second, the melting of the H_2 surface between 3 and 15K is examined since this is the cleanest example of quantum surface melting. Third, atomically thin superfluid ^4He films on H_2 surfaces are simulated, calculating binding energies per ^4He atom and third sound, an important experimental probe for superfuid ^4 He films. For all systems we compute density profiles perpendicular and parallel to the surface and compare to experiment. We treat both H_2 molecules and ^4He atoms on the same footing, as spherical particles. For simulations of bulk/vapor interfaces and surface adsorption, a realistic representation of the macroscopic surface is crucial. Therefore, we introduce an external potential to account for arbitrarily layered substrates and long-range corrections. Two algorithms for parallel computers with independent processors are introduced, one to manage concurrent simulations of entire phase-diagrams, and one to improve input/output speed for files shared by all processors.

  13. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Skarlinski, Michael D.; Quesnel, David J.

    2015-12-21

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu{sub 2}O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the

  14. The role of surface electronic structure in thin film molecular ordering.

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, T.; Tromp, R. M.; Meyer zu Heringdorf, F.; Sadowski, J.; Thayer, Gayle Echo

    2005-05-01

    We show that the orientation of pentacene molecules is controlled by the electronic structure of the surface on which they are deposited. We suggest that the near-Fermi level density of states above the surface controls the interaction of the substrate with the pentacene {pi} orbitals. A reduction of this density as compared to noble metals, realized in semimetallic Bi(001) and Si(111)(5 x 2)Au surfaces, results in pentacene standing up. Interestingly, pentacene grown on Bi(001) is highly ordered, yielding the first vertically oriented epitaxial pentacene thin films observed to date.

  15. Molecular Beam Epitaxial (MBE) Growth and Characterization of Thin Films of Semiconductor Tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, P.; Taylor, P.; Rong, C.; Nichols, B.; Hier, H.; Burke, R.; Neupane, M.

    Recent theoretical predictions that a two-dimensional monolayer of semiconductor tin is a two-dimensional topological insulator and experimental evidence of three-dimensional topological insulator behavior in strained ultrathin films of semiconductor tin grown by MBE on InSb has generated intense research interest. This research is primarily focused on the MBE growth and topological characteristics of ultrathin films of semiconductor tin. In this talk we present results of a study on the MBE growth and the transport, structural and optical characterization of thin films of semiconductor tin on several different substrates.

  16. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  17. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  18. Epitaxial growth of SrTiO{sub 3} thin film on Si by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Y.; Miao, J.; Dai, J. Y.; Chan, H. L. W.; Choy, C. L.; Wang, Y.; Li, Q.

    2007-01-01

    SrTiO{sub 3} thin films have been deposited on Si (001) wafers by laser molecular beam epitaxy using an ultrathin Sr layer as the template. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that SrTiO{sub 3} was well crystallized and epitaxially aligned with Si. Cross-sectional observations in a transmission electron microscope revealed that the SrTiO{sub 3}/Si interface was sharp, smooth, and fully crystallized. The thickness of the Sr template was found to be a critical factor that influenced the quality of SrTiO{sub 3} and the interfacial structure. Electrical measurements revealed that the SrTiO{sub 3} film was highly resistive.

  19. Nucleation and stochiometry dependence of rutile-TiO2 thin films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Costel; Sun, Kai; Feenstra, R. M.

    2008-03-01

    Considerable interest has been shown of late in transition-metal oxides. One case is the titanium dioxide system, which can have applications as a high-k dielectric gate insulator for Si-based devicesootnotetextZ. J. Luo et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 2803. In this study, rutile-TiO2 thin films were grown on GaN(0001) substrates by oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Two sets of films were grown, one in which the initial GaN surface is prepared WITH the pseudo 1x1 Ga-rich surface reconstruction, and the other set, WITHOUT the pseudo 1x1. On top of these two type of surfaces, the rutile-TiO2 thin films were grown at Ts˜ 600 ^oC, and with a thickness ˜ 40 - 50 nm. During growth, reflection high-energy electron diffraction indicated a reversible stoichiometry transition from O-rich to Ti-rich growth. Post-growth x-ray diffraction measurements performed on the samples WITHOUT the GaN pseudo 1x1, show the presence of additional peaks at 2θ = 52.9^o, which implies the existence of additional phases. In addition, the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy performed on these samples show a high degree of disorder, as compared to the samples prepared WITH the pseudo 1x1. Work supported by ONR.

  20. 7-Octenyltrichrolosilane/trimethyaluminum hybrid dielectrics fabricated by molecular-atomic layer deposition on ZnO thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Lee, Mingun; Lucero, Antonio T.; Cheng, Lanxia; Ha, Min-Woo; Kim, Jiyoung

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of 7-octenytrichlorosilane (7-OTS)/trimethylaluminum (TMA) organic–inorganic hybrid films using molecular-atomic layer deposition (MALD). The properties of 7-OTS/TMA hybrid films are extensively investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electrical measurements. Our results suggest that uniform and smooth amorphous hybrid thin films with excellent insulating properties are obtained using the MALD process. Films have a relatively high dielectric constant of approximately 5.0 and low leakage current density. We fabricate zinc oxide (ZnO) based thin film transistors (TFTs) using 7-OTS/TMA hybrid material as a back gate dielectric with the top ZnO channel layer deposited in-situ via MALD. The ZnO TFTs exhibit a field effect mobility of approximately 0.43 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, a threshold voltage of approximately 1 V, and an on/off ratio of approximately 103 under low voltage operation (from ‑3 to 9 V). This work demonstrates an organic–inorganic hybrid gate dielectric material potentially useful in flexible electronics application.

  1. Effect of twin boundary on nanoimprint process of bicrystal Al thin film studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yue-Hong; Xu, Jian-Gang; Song, Hai-Yang; Zhang, Yun-Guang

    2015-02-01

    The effects of a twin boundary (TB) on the mechanical properties of two types of bicrystal Al thin films during the nanoimprint process are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that for the TB direction parallel to the imprinting direction, the yield stress reaches the maximum for the initial dislocation nucleation when the mould directly imprints to the TB, and the yield stress first decreases with the increase of the marker interval and then increases. However, for the TB direction perpendicular to the imprinting direction, the effect of the TB location to the imprinting forces is very small, and the yield stress is greater than that with the TB direction parallel to the imprinting direction. The results also demonstrate that the direction of the slip dislocations and the deformation of the thin film caused by spring-back are different due to various positions and directions of the TB. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 10902083), the Program for New Century Excellent Talent in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-12-1046), the Program for New Scientific and Technological Star of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2012KJXX-39), and the Program for Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JQ1036).

  2. Charge Transfer-Induced Molecular Hole Doping into Thin Film of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deok Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Boukhvalov, Danil W; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2015-08-26

    Despite the highly porous nature with significantly large surface area, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can be hardly used in electronic and optoelectronic devices due to their extremely poor electrical conductivity. Therefore, the study of MOF thin films that require electron transport or conductivity in combination with the everlasting porosity is highly desirable. In the present work, thin films of Co3(NDC)3DMF4 MOFs with improved electronic conductivity are synthesized using layer-by-layer and doctor blade coating techniques followed by iodine doping. The as-prepared and doped films are characterized using FE-SEM, EDX, UV/visible spectroscopy, XPS, current-voltage measurement, photoluminescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and incident photon to current efficiency measurements. In addition, the electronic and semiconductor properties of the MOF films are characterized using Hall Effect measurement, which reveals that, in contrast to the insulator behavior of the as-prepared MOFs, the iodine doped MOFs behave as a p-type semiconductor. This is caused by charge transfer-induced hole doping into the frameworks. The observed charge transfer-induced hole doping phenomenon is also confirmed by calculating the densities of states of the as-prepared and iodine doped MOFs based on density functional theory. Photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates an efficient interfacial charge transfer between TiO2 and iodine doped MOFs, which can be applied to harvest solar radiations. PMID:26226050

  3. Research on the electronic and optical properties of polymer and other organic molecular thin films

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The main goal of the work is to find materials and methods of optimization of organic layered electroluminescent cells and to study such properties of polymers and other organic materials that can be used in various opto-electronic devices. The summary of results obtained during the first year of work is presented. They are: (1) the possibility to produce electroluminescent cells using a vacuum deposition photoresist technology for commercial photoresists has been demonstrated; (2) the idea to replace the polyaryl polymers by other polymers with weaker hole conductivity for optimization of electroluminescent cells with ITO-Al electrodes has been suggested. The goal is to obtain amorphous processable thin films of radiative recombination layers in electroluminescent devices; (3) procedures of preparation of high-quality vacuum-deposited poly (p-phenylene) (PPP) films on various substrates have been developed; (4) it was found for the first time that the fluorescence intensity of PPP films depends on the degree of polymerization; (5) the role of interfaces between organic compounds, on one side, and metals or semiconductors, on the other side, has been studied and quenching of the fluorescence caused by semiconductor layer in thin sandwiches has been observed; (6) studies of the dynamics of photoexcitations revealed the exciton self-trapping in quasi-one-dimensional aggregates; and (7) conditions for preparation of highly crystalline fullerene C{sub 60} films by vacuum deposition have been found. Composites of C{sub 60} with conjugated polymers have been prepared.

  4. Adsorption Behaviors of Mixed Monolayers of n-Alkanes at the Liquid-Solid Interface.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Masahiro

    2016-05-17

    To understand the self-assembly of monolayers at the liquid-solid interface, a thermodynamic model, which describes the contributions of the molecular interactions, is essential. We present an adapted Zimm-Bragg model of the cooperativity transitions for determining the Gibbs free energy for self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to observe the monolayers formed on graphite from phenyloctane solutions of binary mixtures of n-hexacosane (C26H54) and n-tetratriacontane (C34H70). This revealed that the sharp transition in the monolayers from the full surface coverage of the long-chain alkane, which is adsorbed preferentially, to the full coverage of the short-chain alkane is a function of the mixture composition. The model allows for the estimation of the free-energy changes associated with the difference in the alkyl chain length and the interface between the two different alkane regions in the monolayers. It is also suitable for understanding more complex systems that exhibit intermolecular interactions. PMID:27124544

  5. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  6. Diffusion of methane and other alkanes in metal-organic frameworks for natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, B; Zhang, HD; Snurr, RQ

    2015-03-03

    Diffusion of methane, ethane, propane and n-butane was studied within the micropores of several metal organic frameworks (MOFs) of varying topologies, including the MOFs PCN-14, NU-125, NU-1100 and DUT-49. Diffusion coefficients of the pure components, as well as methane/ethane, methane/ propane and methane/butane binary mixtures, were calculated using molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of the longer alkanes on uptake of natural gas in MOB. The calculated self diffusion coefficients of all four components are on the order of 10(-8) m(2)/s. The diffusion coefficients of the pure components decrease as a function of chain length in all of the MOFs studied and show different behaviour as a function of loading in different MOB. The self-diffusivities follow the trend DPCN-14 < DNU-125 approximate to DNU-1100 < DDUT-49, which is exactly the reverse order of the densities of the MOFs: PCN-14 > NU-125 approximate to NU-1100 > DUT-49. By comparing the diffusion of pure methane and methane mixtures vvith the higher alkancs, it is observed that the diffusivity of methane is unaffected by the presence of the higher alkanes in the MOFs considered, indicating that the diffusion path of methane is not blocked by the higher alkanes present in natural gas. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering of an ultra-thin molecular superconductor by charge transfer

    DOEpatents

    Hla, Saw Wai; Hassanien, Abdelrahim; Kendal, Clark

    2016-06-07

    A method of forming a superconductive device of a single layer of (BETS).sub.2GaCl.sub.4 molecules on a substrate surface which displays a superconducting gap that increases exponentially with the length of the molecular chain is provided.

  8. Formation of Organic Thin Films of Nonlinear Optical Materials by Molecular Layer Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtman, V.; Kopylova, T. N.; Van Der Boom, M.; Gadirov, R. M.; Tel'minov, E. N.; Nikonov, S. Yu.; Nikonova, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    Conditions are described under which films of [(aminophenyl)azo]pyridine are formed by molecular layer epitaxy, and their optical absorption and x-ray photoelectron spectra are investigated. The nonlinear properties of such structures are described with the help of measurements of the intensity of second harmonic generation as a function of the angle of incidence.

  9. The taxonomic status of the endangered thin-spined porcupine, Chaetomys subspinosus (Olfers, 1818), based on molecular and karyologic data

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Roberto V; Machado, Taís; Ventura, Karen; Fagundes, Valéria; de J Silva, Maria José; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo

    2009-01-01

    Background The thin-spined porcupine, also known as the bristle-spined rat, Chaetomys subspinosus (Olfers, 1818), the only member of its genus, figures among Brazilian endangered species. In addition to being threatened, it is poorly known, and even its taxonomic status at the family level has long been controversial. The genus Chaetomys was originally regarded as a porcupine in the family Erethizontidae, but some authors classified it as a spiny-rat in the family Echimyidae. Although the dispute seems to be settled in favor of the erethizontid advocates, further discussion of its affinities should be based on a phylogenetic framework. In the present study, we used nucleotide-sequence data from the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and karyotypic information to address this issue. Our molecular analyses included one individual of Chaetomys subspinosus from the state of Bahia in northeastern Brazil, and other hystricognaths. Results All topologies recovered in our molecular phylogenetic analyses strongly supported Chaetomys subspinosus as a sister clade of the erethizontids. Cytogenetically, Chaetomys subspinosus showed 2n = 52 and FN = 76. Although the sexual pair could not be identified, we assumed that the X chromosome is biarmed. The karyotype included 13 large to medium metacentric and submetacentric chromosome pairs, one small subtelocentric pair, and 12 small acrocentric pairs. The subtelocentric pair 14 had a terminal secondary constriction in the short arm, corresponding to the nucleolar organizer region (Ag-NOR), similar to the erethizontid Sphiggurus villosus, 2n = 42 and FN = 76, and different from the echimyids, in which the secondary constriction is interstitial. Conclusion Both molecular phylogenies and karyotypical evidence indicated that Chaetomys is closely related to the Erethizontidae rather than to the Echimyidae, although in a basal position relative to the rest of the Erethizontidae. The high levels of molecular and morphological

  10. Alkanes-filled photonic crystal fibers as sensor transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marć, P.; Przybysz, N.; Stasiewicz, K.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose alkanes-filled PCFs as the new class of transducers for optical fiber sensors. We investigated experimentally thermo-optic properties of a commercially available LMA8 partially filled with different alkanes with a higher number of carbon atoms. A partially filled PCF spliced with standard SMFs constitutes one of the newest type transducer. We have selected a group of eight alkanes which have melting points in different temperatures. An analysis of temperature spectral characteristics of these samples will allow to design an optical fiber sensor with different temperature thresholds at specific wavelengths.

  11. Abnormal carbon and hydrogen isotopes of alkane gases from the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China, suggesting abiogenic alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanyou; Dai, Jinxing; Jin, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Wu, Xiaoqi; Meng, Qingqiang; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Qinghua; Feng, Zihui; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    It is great debate that the alkane gases of abiogenic origin would constitute a major portion of the commercial accumulation of the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China. In this study, abiogenic gases characterized by heavy δ13C1 values, reversal of the usual carbon isotopic trend of C1-C5 alkanes, very narrow variation in δ2HC1 values, and low CH4/3He ratios associated with high R/Ra values (>1) were identified. The hydrocarbon gas in the Qingshen gas field is a mixture of thermogenic alkanes derived from Cretaceous mudstone (type I kerogen) or Jurassic coal (type III kerogen) and abiogenic alkanes (mainly CH4) from mantle degassing. A quantitative estimation of abiogenic alkanes contribution to the Qingshen gas field is made based on a δ13C1 vs. δ13C2 plot: about 30-40% of alkane gases in the Qingshen gas field, along with its helium, are estimated to be derived from the mantle via magmatic activity. Particularly, the abiogenic formation of CH4 generated from the reduction of CO2 by hydrothermal activity may contribute. Our study suggests that abiogenic alkane gases in certain geological settings could be more widespread than previously thought, and may accumulate into economic reservoirs.

  12. Growth of Cr2CoGa and inverse Heusler thin films using Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamer, Michelle; Decapua, Matthew; Player, Gabriel; Heiman, Don

    Theoretical calculations have predicted the existence of inverse Heusler compounds that exhibit zero-moment magnetization while retaining their half-metallicity. These unique compounds have been labeled spin gapless semiconductors (SGS), where the density of states (DOS) can behave as a half-metal or gapless semiconductor. There is a special interest for zero-moment SGS compounds since traditional antiferromagnets cannot be spin-polarized. Such compounds are experimentally attractive for future spintronic devices due to their large magnetic transition temperature (400-800 K). This work focuses on zero-moment inverse Heusler compounds including Cr2CoGa and Mn3Al. Thin films have been grown using MBE and their magnetic, structural, and electrical properties of these compounds have been characterized by various techniques, including XMCD and magnetometry. The atomic moments are found to be large, but significant cancellations lead to small average moments. Supported by NSF Grant ECCS-1402738.

  13. Preparation and characterization of conducting thin films of molecular organic conductors (TTF-TCNQ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, A.; Garelik, S.; Caro, J.; Cifré, J.; Veciana, J.; Rovira, C.; Ribera, E.; Canadell, E.; Seffar, A.; Fontcuberta, J.

    1996-09-01

    Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) form a charge-transfer complex which exhibits a high electric conductivity. In this work TTF-TCNQ thin films were prepared by CVD (chemical vapour deposition) at low pressure and using TTF and TCNQ as precursors. Substrates were common glass. These layers exhibit preferential orientation in the crystallization along the [001] direction and have a room temperature conductivity ranged between 6-24 Ω -1 cm -1. Whereas at low temperatures (smaller than a transition temperature Tp) they display a highly resistive semiconductor-like behaviour, above Tp the conductivity exhibits a small effective activation energy. Tp ≈ 50-60 K is interpreted as a signature of the Peierls transition. The evaluation of the stoichiometry was performed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The morphology and structure of the layers were also studied.

  14. Ion and electron beam processing of condensed molecular solids to form thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Mowlem, J.K.; Moore, J.F.; Strongin, D.R.

    1992-12-31

    Electron and ion beams can be used to deposit thin films and etch surfaces using gas phase precursors. However, the generation of undesirable gas phase products and the diffusion of the reactive species beyond the region irradiated by the electron or ion beam can limit selectivity. In this paper, the feasibility of processing condensed precursors such as diborane, tri-methyl aluminum, ammonia and water at 78 K with low energy ( 100--1000 eV) electron and ion beams (Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 2}{sup +}) ranging in current density from 50 nA to several {mu}a per cm{sup 2} is examined. It was found that boron, boron nitride and stoichiometric aluminum oxide films could be deposited from the condensed volatile; species using charged particle beams and some of the physical and chemical aspects and limitations of this new technique are discussed.

  15. Ion and electron beam processing of condensed molecular solids to form thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M. ); Mowlem, J.K.; Moore, J.F.; Strongin, D.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01

    Electron and ion beams can be used to deposit thin films and etch surfaces using gas phase precursors. However, the generation of undesirable gas phase products and the diffusion of the reactive species beyond the region irradiated by the electron or ion beam can limit selectivity. In this paper, the feasibility of processing condensed precursors such as diborane, tri-methyl aluminum, ammonia and water at 78 K with low energy ( 100--1000 eV) electron and ion beams (Ar[sup +], N[sub 2][sup +] and H[sub 2][sup +]) ranging in current density from 50 nA to several [mu]a per cm[sup 2] is examined. It was found that boron, boron nitride and stoichiometric aluminum oxide films could be deposited from the condensed volatile; species using charged particle beams and some of the physical and chemical aspects and limitations of this new technique are discussed.

  16. The effect of surfaces on molecular ordering in thin liquid-crystal systems.

    PubMed

    Śliwa, I; Jeżewski, W; Zakharov, A V

    2016-08-28

    A theoretical method for analyzing the interplay between pair long-range intermolecular forces and nonlocal, relatively short-range, surface interactions in liquid crystals, confined between plates of thin planar cells, is developed. It is shown that this method, as involving the concept of local orientational and translational order parameters, enables detailed investigations of the emergence of smectic A, nematic, and isotopic phases, as well as yields an insight into phase transitions between them, in cases of systems strongly affected by surfaces. The evidence of various surface effects, including the coexistence of different phases and the inward propagation of surface melting under the increase of temperature, is also given. The underlying numerical procedure, based on the algorithm of self-consistent calculations of local order parameters, is found to be very effective, allowing one to consider model systems of rather large thicknesses, corresponding to thicknesses of real sample cells. PMID:27586944

  17. A novel approach in controlling the conductivity of thin films using molecular layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Bannis, Mohammad N.; Xiao, Biwei; Lawes, Stephen; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a novel way to grow aluminum alkoxide films with tunable conductivity with molecular level accuracy with the use of molecular layer deposition (MLD). Alternating exposures of trimethylaluminum (TMA), ethylene glycol (EG), and terephthaloyl chloride (TC) are used to grow the aluminium alkoxide films. Control over film composition was accomplished by alternating cycles of EG and TC between cycles of TMA and EG. In this fashion the aluminum to carbon ratio can be accurately controlled. These films were then pyrolyzed under a reducing atmosphere to yield a conductive Al2O3/carbon composite. Raman spectroscopy determined that nanocrystalline sp2-graphitic carbon was formed following pyrolysis while sheet resistance measurements determined that conductivity of the film is directly related to aluminium-carbon ratio. To further elucidate the origin of conductivity within the film, synchrotron based XPS was performed.

  18. Stratification-induced order--disorder phase transitions in molecularly thin confined films

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, M. ); Diestler, D.J. ); Cushman, J.H. )

    1994-10-15

    By means of grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of a monatomic film confined between unstructured (i.e., molecularly smooth) rigidly fixed solid surfaces (i.e., walls), we investigate the mechanism of molecular stratification, i.e., the tendency of atoms to arrange themselves in layers parallel with the walls. Stratification is accompanied by a heretofore unnoticed order--disorder phase transition manifested as a maximum in density fluctuations at the transition point. The transition involves phases with different transverse packing characteristics, although the number of layers accommodated between the walls remains unchanged during the transition, which occurs periodically as the film thickens. However, with increasing thickness, an increasingly smaller proportion of the film is structurally affected by the transition. Thus, the associated maximum in density fluctuations diminishes rapidly with film thickness.

  19. Distance and molecular weight dependence of surface enhanced fluorescence in conjugated polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffo, Michael S.; Carter, Sue A.

    2008-08-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) in the presence of Silver nanoparticles (NP) is studied. The purpose of this research is to understand the PL distance dependence of plasmon-polymer separation and a correlation between the surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) and polymer molecular weight. Distinct peaks in PL are found for plasmon-polymer separations ranging from near the far field to the near field, under 100 nm. Extinction of the devices shows that changes in absorption cannot explain all enhancement in PL and suggests that a modification of the radiative lifetime is modified. The dependence of the photoluminescence of MEH-PPV on molecular weight shows variation but overall suggests chain length does not affect film quenching. This is largely attributed to the large polydispersity of the polymer materials used.

  20. Molecular resolution friction microscopy of Cu phthalocyanine thin films on dolomite (104) in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Paweł; Pimentel, Carlos; Luo, Feng; Milián-Medina, Begoña; Gierschner, Johannes; Pina, Carlos M.; Gnecco, Enrico

    2014-06-01

    The reliability of ultrathin organic layers as active components for molecular electronic devices depends ultimately on an accurate characterization of the layer morphology and ability to withstand mechanical stresses on the nanoscale. To this end, since the molecular layers need to be electrically decoupled using thick insulating substrates, the use of AFM becomes mandatory. Here, we show how friction force microscopy (FFM) in water allows us to identify the orientation of copper(ii)phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules previously self-assembled on a dolomite (104) mineral surface in ultra-high vacuum. The molecular features observed in the friction images show that the CuPc molecules are stacked in parallel rows with no preferential orientation with respect to the dolomite lattice, while the stacking features resemble well the single CuPc crystal structure. This proves that the substrate induction is low and makes friction force microscopy in water a suitable alternative to more demanding dynamic AFM techniques in ultra-high vacuum.

  1. Molecular resolution friction microscopy of Cu phthalocyanine thin films on dolomite (104) in water.

    PubMed

    Nita, Paweł; Pimentel, Carlos; Luo, Feng; Milián-Medina, Begoña; Gierschner, Johannes; Pina, Carlos M; Gnecco, Enrico

    2014-07-21

    The reliability of ultrathin organic layers as active components for molecular electronic devices depends ultimately on an accurate characterization of the layer morphology and ability to withstand mechanical stresses on the nanoscale. To this end, since the molecular layers need to be electrically decoupled using thick insulating substrates, the use of AFM becomes mandatory. Here, we show how friction force microscopy (FFM) in water allows us to identify the orientation of copper(ii)phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules previously self-assembled on a dolomite (104) mineral surface in ultra-high vacuum. The molecular features observed in the friction images show that the CuPc molecules are stacked in parallel rows with no preferential orientation with respect to the dolomite lattice, while the stacking features resemble well the single CuPc crystal structure. This proves that the substrate induction is low and makes friction force microscopy in water a suitable alternative to more demanding dynamic AFM techniques in ultra-high vacuum. PMID:24932960

  2. Simple DFT-LSDA modeling of the molecular-like aspects of ultra-thin film properties

    SciTech Connect

    Trickey, S.B.; Mathar, R.J.; Boettger, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    Ordered ultra-thin films (UTF`s) are atomic n-layers (n = 1,2,3,...) with translational symmetry in-plane and molecular-like inter-planar spacings. Though commonly used (especially at relatively large n-values) as models of crystalline surfaces, they are intrinsically interesting and of growing technological significance as the basic building blocks of multi-layer electronic devices. Predicting the structure and properties of even a simple diatomic 1-layer means addressing aspects of molecular binding (and boundary conditions) in the context of an extended, periodically bounded system. At the level of refinement provided by the local spin density approximation to Density Functional Theory, the baseline standard of today`s predictive, chemically specific solid-state calculations, a number of technical and fundamental issues arise. The authors focus on treatment of the isolated atoms, on basis sets, and on numerical precision, as illustrated by the Fe atom and BN 1- and 2-layer calculations. Computational requirements are illustrated by a brief summary of recently completed calculations on crystalline sapphire, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which used the same code.

  3. Molecular dynamics study on the effect of boundary heating rate on the phase change characteristics of thin film liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Morshed, A. K. M. Monjur; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    In this study, theoretical investigation of thin film liquid phase change phenomena under different boundary heating rates has been conducted with the help of molecular dynamics simulation. To do this, the case of argon boiling over a platinum surface has been considered. The study has been conducted to get a better understanding of the nano-scale physics of evaporation/boiling for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of boundary heating rate. The simulation domain consisted of liquid and vapor argon atoms placed over a platinum wall. Initially the whole system was brought to an equilibrium state at 90K with the help of equilibrium molecular dynamics and then the temperature of the bottom wall was increased to a higher temperature (250K/130K) over a finite heating period. Depending on the heating period, the boundary heating rate has been varied in the range of 1600×109 K/s to 8×109 K/s. The variations of argon region temperature, pressure, net evaporation number with respect to time under different boundary heating rates have been determined and discussed. The heat fluxes normal to platinum wall for different cases were also calculated and compared with theoretical upper limit of maximum possible heat transfer to elucidate the effect of boundary heating rate.

  4. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  5. Development of molecular precursors for deposition of indium sulphide thin film electrodes for photoelectrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Muhammad Ali; Peiris, T A Nirmal; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Arifin, Zainudin; Mazhar, Muhammad; Lo, K M; McKee, Vickie

    2013-08-14

    Symmetrical and unsymmetrical dithiocarbamato pyridine solvated and non-solvated complexes of indium(III) with the general formula [In(S2CNRR')3]·n(py) [where py = pyridine; R,R' = Cy, n = 2 (1); R,R' = (i)Pr, n = 1.5 (2); NRR' = Pip, n = 0.5 (3) and R = Bz, R' = Me, n = 0 (4)] have been synthesized. The compositions, structures and properties of these complexes have been studied by means of microanalysis, IR and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray single crystal and thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses. The applicability of these complexes as single source precursors (SSPs) for the deposition of β-In2S3 thin films on fluorine-doped SnO2 (FTO) coated conducting glass substrates by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) at temperatures of 300, 350 and 400 °C is studied. All films have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) for the detection of phase and stoichiometry of the deposit. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that precursors (1)-(4), irrespective of different metal ligand design, generate comparable morphologies of β-In2S3 thin films at different temperatures. Direct band gap energies of 2.2 eV have been estimated from the UV-vis spectroscopy for the β-In2S3 films fabricated from precursors (1) and (4). The photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of β-In2S3 were confirmed by recording the current-voltage plots under light and dark conditions. The plots showed anodic photocurrent densities of 1.25 and 0.65 mA cm(-2) at 0.23 V vs. Ag/AgCl for the β-In2S3 films made at 400 and 350 °C from the precursors (1) and (4), respectively. The photoelectrochemical performance indicates that the newly synthesised precursors are highly useful in fabricating β-In2S3 electrodes for solar energy harvesting and optoelectronic application. PMID:23787951

  6. Coherent control of the optical nonlinear and luminescence anisotropies in molecular thin films by multiphoton excitations.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Brasselet, Sophie; Zyss, Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Photoinduced orientational distributions are implemented with one- and two-photon absorption interference in polymer films containing chromophores that exhibit luminescent and nonlinear properties. The odd- and even-order parameters of the final distribution are probed by simultaneous measurement of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF). We show the possibility of engineering local SHG and TPF anisotropies by controlling the polarization states and intensities of the writing optical fields. Complex multipolar orders are modeled with an irreducible spherical tensor-based formalism jointly applied to the molecular polarizabilities and field tensors. PMID:15214309

  7. o-Carborane functionalized pentacenes: synthesis, molecular packing and ambipolar organic thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jixi; Liu, Danqing; Zhang, Jiahui; Zhang, Jiji; Miao, Qian; Xie, Zuowei

    2015-08-01

    New 6,13-bis[1'-(C≡C)-2'-R-1',2'-C2B10H10]pentacenes (R = H, Me, Et, n-Bu) are synthesized and fully characterized. The results show that the alkyl substituents on the second cage carbon have a significant impact on the molecular packing, and the incorporation of the o-carboranyl moiety into a π conjugated system can lower both LUMO and HOMO energy levels, converting a typical p-type semiconductor into an ambipolar one. PMID:26121634

  8. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  9. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  10. Enthalpy difference between conformations of normal alkanes: effects of basis set and chain length on intramolecular basis set superposition error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabin, Roman M.

    2011-03-01

    The quantum chemistry of conformation equilibrium is a field where great accuracy (better than 100 cal mol-1) is needed because the energy difference between molecular conformers rarely exceeds 1000-3000 cal mol-1. The conformation equilibrium of straight-chain (normal) alkanes is of particular interest and importance for modern chemistry. In this paper, an extra error source for high-quality ab initio (first principles) and DFT calculations of the conformation equilibrium of normal alkanes, namely the intramolecular basis set superposition error (BSSE), is discussed. In contrast to out-of-plane vibrations in benzene molecules, diffuse functions on carbon and hydrogen atoms were found to greatly reduce the relative BSSE of n-alkanes. The corrections due to the intramolecular BSSE were found to be almost identical for the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Their cancelation is expected when CCSD(T)/CBS (CBS, complete basis set) energies are evaluated by addition schemes. For larger normal alkanes (N > 12), the magnitude of the BSSE correction was found to be up to three times larger than the relative stability of the conformer; in this case, the basis set superposition error led to a two orders of magnitude difference in conformer abundance. No error cancelation due to the basis set superposition was found. A comparison with amino acid, peptide, and protein data was provided.

  11. Realization of Cu-Doped p-Type ZnO Thin Films by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Suja, Mohammad; Bashar, Sunayna B; Morshed, Muhammad M; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-04-29

    Cu-doped p-type ZnO films are grown on c-sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments reveal a shallow acceptor state at 0.15 eV above the valence band edge. Hall effect results indicate that a growth condition window is found for the formation of p-type ZnO thin films, and the best conductivity is achieved with a high hole concentration of 1.54 × 10(18) cm(-3), a low resistivity of 0.6 Ω cm, and a moderate mobility of 6.65 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Metal oxide semiconductor capacitor devices have been fabricated on the Cu-doped ZnO films, and the characteristics of capacitance-voltage measurements demonstrate that the Cu-doped ZnO thin films under proper growth conditions are p-type. Seebeck measurements on these Cu-doped ZnO samples lead to positive Seebeck coefficients and further confirm the p-type conductivity. Other measurements such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron, Raman, and absorption spectroscopies are also performed to elucidate the structural and optical characteristics of the Cu-doped p-type ZnO films. The p-type conductivity is explained to originate from Cu substitution of Zn with a valency of +1 state. However, all p-type samples are converted to n-type over time, which is mostly due to the carrier compensation from extrinsic defects of ZnO. PMID:25835032

  12. On the dynamic and static manifestation of molecular absorption in thin films probed by a microcantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Finot, Eric; Fabre, Arnaud; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical resonators shaped like microcantilevers have been demonstrated as a platform for very sensitive detection of chemical and biological analytes. However, its use as an analytical tool will require fundamental understanding of the molecular absorption-induced effects in the static and dynamic sensor response. The effect of absorption-induced surface stress on the microcantilever response is here investigated using palladium hydride formation. It is shown that the resonance and deformation states of the cantilever monitored simultaneously exhibit excellent correlation with the phase of the hydride formation. However, the associated frequency shifts and quasistatic bending are observed to be independent during solid solution phase. Importantly, absorption-induced changes in the elastic parameters of the palladium film are found to play a dominant role in the static and dynamic response. The presented results help in discerning the parameters that control the cantilever response as well as the relationships between these parameters.

  13. Synthesis of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films on nickel foils by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhaie, S.; Wofford, J. M.; Schumann, T.; Jahn, U.; Ramsteiner, M.; Hanke, M.; Lopes, J. M. J. Riechert, H.

    2015-05-25

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered two-dimensional material with properties that make it promising as a dielectric in various applications. We report the growth of h-BN films on Ni foils from elemental B and N using molecular beam epitaxy. The presence of crystalline h-BN over the entire substrate is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy is used to examine the morphology and continuity of the synthesized films. A scanning electron microscopy study of films obtained using shorter depositions offers insight into the nucleation and growth behavior of h-BN on the Ni substrate. The morphology of h-BN was found to evolve from dendritic, star-shaped islands to larger, smooth triangular ones with increasing growth temperature.

  14. Electrical and mechanical properties of molecularly functionalized mesoporous silica thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit Pratap

    Mesoporous silica (MPS) thin films are attractive for achieving low relative dielectric permittivity (low-kappa) interlayer isolation in integrated circuit wiring, but are susceptible to instabilities in electrical behavior due to water uptake and copper diffusion. This work investigates the electrical, chemical, and thermal instabilities, Cu diffusion, and adhesion of these materials for evaluating and enabling their use for applications as interlayer insulators in nanodevice wiring. Upon annealing Al/MPS/Si(001)/Al capacitors between 80 to 200°C, the flat-band voltage first increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. Concurrently, the initially observed deep depletion behavior is replaced by strong inversion. Subsequent air-exposure restores the preanneal C-V characteristics. Kinetics analyses reveal two thermally activated processes: proton generation through fissure of silanol bonds (activation energy Ea1 = 0.42 +/- 0.04 eV) and proton-induced depassivation of dangling bond traps (Ea2 = 0.54 +/- 0.05 eV) at the MPS/Si interface. We present an empirical model correlating these processes with the C-V characteristics. Further, we show that capping MPS films with a trimethyl-terminated organosilane irreversibly suppresses moisture-induced capacitance instabilities, and decreases the relative dielectric permittivity and Cu-induced leakage currents. Analysis of capacitance-voltage and current-voltage characteristics along with infrared spectroscopy shows that the trimethyl organosilanes inhibit hydrogen bonding of water molecules by rendering the dielectric surfaces hydrophobic. Fracture behavior and mechanical properties of pristine (i.e., un-functionalized MPS) and silylated mesoporous silica (SMPS) films were studied by four-point bend tests and nanoindentation measurements. Four-point bend measurements on Si/epoxy/Ti/Cu/MPS/Si stacks show that structures with un-silylated MPS films fracture at ˜3 J/m2, while those with SMPS films show a ˜50% lower

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of mechanical deformation of ultra-thin metal and ceramic films

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.; Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Stowers, I.F.

    1995-04-01

    We present an overview of the molecular dynamics computer simulation method as employed in the study of the mechanical properties of surfaces at the manometer scale. The embedded atom method is used to model a clean metal surface and the bond-order model is used to model ceramic surfaces. The computer experiment consists of the indentation and scraping of a hard diamond-like tool into and across the surface. Results are presented for the (111) surface of copper and silver and for the (100) surface of silicon. We explicitly demonstrate in our point indentation simulations that nanoscale plasticity in metals takes place by nondislocation mechanisms, a result suggested by recent nanoindentation experiments. We also observe the surface to accommodate nearly the entire volume of the tip and the annealing out of plastic work as the tip is removed. In our orthogonal cutting simulation, we observe an interesting phenomenon: the system dynamically reorients the gain in front of the tool tip to minimize the work performed on the shear plane (i.e. the shear plane becomes an easy slip plane). Silicon transforms into an amorphous state which then flows plastically.

  16. Selective hydroxylation of alkanes by an extracellular fungal peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sebastian; Kinne, Matthias; Wang, Xiaoshi; Ullrich, René; Kayser, Gernot; Groves, John T; Hofrichter, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Fungal peroxygenases are novel extracellular heme-thiolate biocatalysts that are capable of catalyzing the selective monooxygenation of diverse organic compounds, using only H(2)O(2) as a cosubstrate. Little is known about the physiological role or the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. We have found that the peroxygenase secreted by Agrocybe aegerita catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-dependent hydroxylation of linear alkanes at the 2-position and 3-position with high efficiency, as well as the regioselective monooxygenation of branched and cyclic alkanes. Experiments with n-heptane and n-octane showed that the hydroxylation proceeded with complete stereoselectivity for the (R)-enantiomer of the corresponding 3-alcohol. Investigations with a number of model substrates provided information about the route of alkane hydroxylation: (a) the hydroxylation of cyclohexane mediated by H(2)(18)(2) resulted in complete incorporation of (18)O into the hydroxyl group of the product cyclohexanol; (b) the hydroxylation of n-hexane-1,1,1,2,2,3,3-D(7) showed a large intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(k(H)/k(D))(obs)] of 16.0 ± 1.0 for 2-hexanol and 8.9 ± 0.9 for 3-hexanol; and (c) the hydroxylation of the radical clock norcarane led to an estimated radical lifetime of 9.4 ps and an oxygen rebound rate of 1.06 × 10(11) s(-1). These results point to a hydrogen abstraction and oxygen rebound mechanism for alkane hydroxylation. The peroxygenase appeared to lack activity on long-chain alkanes (> C(16)) and highly branched alkanes (e.g. tetramethylpentane), but otherwise exhibited a broad substrate range. It may accordingly have a role in the bioconversion of natural and anthropogenic alkane-containing structures (including alkyl chains of complex biomaterials) in soils, plant litter, and wood. PMID:21812933

  17. Structure, Energetics, and Dynamics of Screw Dislocations in Even n-Alkane Crystals.

    PubMed

    Olson, Isabel A; Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Hakobyan, Gagik; Rohl, Andrew L; Raiteri, Paolo; Ward, Michael D; Kahr, Bart

    2016-08-18

    Spiral hillocks on n-alkane crystal surfaces were observed immediately after Frank recognized the importance of screw dislocations for crystal growth, yet their structures and energies in molecular crystals remain ill-defined. To illustrate the structural chemistry of screw dislocations that are responsible for plasticity in organic crystals and upon which the organic electronics and pharmaceutical industries depend, molecular dynamics was used to examine heterochiral dislocation pairs with Burgers vectors along [001] in n-hexane, n-octane, and n-decane crystals. The cores were anisotropic and elongated in the (110) slip plane, with significant local changes in molecular position, orientation, conformation, and energy. This detailed atomic level picture produced a distribution of strain consistent with linear elastic theory, giving confidence in the simulations. Dislocations with doubled Burgers vectors split into pairs with elementary displacements. These results suggest a pathway to understanding the mechanical properties and failure associated with elastic and plastic deformation in soft crystals. PMID:27478906

  18. Fluxes, source and transport of organic matter in the western Sea of Okhotsk: Stable carbon isotopic ratios of n-alkanes and total organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Chisato; Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Wakatsuchi, Masaaki

    2006-02-01

    Settling particles and surface sediments collected from the western region of the Sea of Okhotsk were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), long-chain n-alkanes and their stable carbon isotope ratio ( δ13C) to investigate sources and transport of total and terrestrial organic matter in the western region of the sea. The δ13C measurements of TOC in time-series sediment traps indicate lateral transport of resuspended organic matter from the northwestern continental shelf to the area off Sakhalin via the dense shelf water (DSW) flow at intermediate depth. The n-alkanes in the surface sediments showed strong odd carbon number predominance with relatively lighter δ13C values (from -33‰ to -30‰). They fall within the typical values of C3-angiosperms, which is the main vegetation in east Russia, including the Amur River basin. On the other hand, the molecular distributions and δ13C values of n-alkanes in the settling particles clearly showed two different sources: terrestrial plant and petroleum in the Sea of Okhotsk. We reconstructed seasonal change in the fluxes of terrestrial n-alkanes in settling particles using the mixing model proposed by Lichtfouse and Eglinton [1995. 13C and 14C evidence of a soil by fossil fuel and reconstruction of the composition of the pollutant. Organic Geochemistry 23, 969-973]. Results of the terrestrial n-alkane fluxes indicate that there are two transport pathways of terrestrial plant n-alkanes to sediments off Sakhalin, the Sea of Okhotsk. One is lateral transport of resuspended particles with lithogenic material from the northwestern continental shelf by the DSW flow. Another is the vertical transport of terrestrial plant n-alkanes, which is independent of transport of lithogenic material. The latter may include dry/wet deposition of aerosol particles derived from terrestrial higher plants possibly associated with forest fires in Siberia.

  19. Molecular bottle brushes in thin films: An off-lattice Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saariaho, Mika; Ikkala, Olli; ten Brinke, Gerrit

    1999-01-01

    The effect of intramolecular excluded volume interactions on the conformations of isolated comb-shaped copolymers—"molecular bottle brushes"—in athermal solvents confined between two hard impenetrable parallel plates is studied by off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Equilibrium conformational properties of molecules consisting of a freely jointed backbone of 100 hard spheres (beads), where 50 equally flexible side chains of lengths M up to 30 beads are connected, are determined as a function of the width of the slit, including the pure two-dimensional (2D) case. Besides general properties such as the size and the shape of the chains and the orientation of the chains with respect to the confining plates, the persistence length of the bottle-brush backbone λ is considered in particular. It is demonstrated that due to the side chains, the backbone is, in fact, effectively confined between two soft plates, i.e., the side chains act like softening springs between the backbone and plates. The most striking result is that, unlike the three-dimensional (3D) situation, in the 2D case the ratio between λ and the diameter D, λ/D, of the bottle brush starts to increase as a function of the side chain length for M⩾10. For 3D, an increase of λ/D (the essential parameter for lyotropic behavior) as a function of M is predicted by theory but has so far not been observed numerically for the regime studied (i.e., M⩽30). These results suggest that due to the weaker excluded volume effect in 3D, a possible upturn of λ/D may only be observed for longer side chains than studied so far.

  20. Molecular-dynamics simulations of thin polyisoprene films confined between amorphous silica substrates.

    PubMed

    Guseva, D V; Komarov, P V; Lyulin, Alexey V

    2014-03-21

    Constant temperature-constant pressure (NpT) molecular-dynamics computer simulations have been carried out for the united-atom model of a non-crosslinked (1,4) cis-polyisoprene (PI) melt confined between two amorphous, fully coordinated silica surfaces. The Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential was implemented to describe the polymer-silica interactions. The thickness H of the produced PI-silica film has been varied in a wide range, 1 < H/R(g) < 8, where R(g) is the individual PI chain radius of gyration measured under the imposed confinement. After a thorough equilibration, the PI film stratified structure and polymer segmental dynamics have been studied. The chain structure in the middle of the films resembles that in a corresponding bulk, but the polymer-density profile shows a pronounced ordering of the polymer segments in the vicinity of silica surfaces; this ordering disappears toward the film middles. Tremendous slowing down of the polymer segmental dynamics has been observed in the film surface layers, with the segmental relaxation more than 150 times slower as compared to that in a PI bulk. This effect increases with decreasing the polymer-film thickness. The segmental relaxation in the PI film middles shows additional relaxation process which is absent in a PI bulk. Even though there are fast relaxation processes in the film middle, its overall relaxation is slower as compared to that in a bulk sample. The interpretation of the results in terms of polymer glassy bridges has been discussed. PMID:24655202

  1. Molecular-dynamics simulations of thin polyisoprene films confined between amorphous silica substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, D. V.; Komarov, P. V.; Lyulin, Alexey V.

    2014-03-21

    Constant temperature–constant pressure (NpT) molecular-dynamics computer simulations have been carried out for the united-atom model of a non-crosslinked (1,4) cis-polyisoprene (PI) melt confined between two amorphous, fully coordinated silica surfaces. The Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential was implemented to describe the polymer–silica interactions. The thickness H of the produced PI–silica film has been varied in a wide range, 1 < H/R{sub g} < 8, where R{sub g} is the individual PI chain radius of gyration measured under the imposed confinement. After a thorough equilibration, the PI film stratified structure and polymer segmental dynamics have been studied. The chain structure in the middle of the films resembles that in a corresponding bulk, but the polymer-density profile shows a pronounced ordering of the polymer segments in the vicinity of silica surfaces; this ordering disappears toward the film middles. Tremendous slowing down of the polymer segmental dynamics has been observed in the film surface layers, with the segmental relaxation more than 150 times slower as compared to that in a PI bulk. This effect increases with decreasing the polymer-film thickness. The segmental relaxation in the PI film middles shows additional relaxation process which is absent in a PI bulk. Even though there are fast relaxation processes in the film middle, its overall relaxation is slower as compared to that in a bulk sample. The interpretation of the results in terms of polymer glassy bridges has been discussed.

  2. Subdiffraction-Resolution Optical Measurements of Molecular Transport in Thin Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Pahal, Suman; Raichur, Ashok M; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of molecular transport within polymer films yields information about the internal structural organization of the films and is useful in applications such as the design of polymeric capsules for drug delivery. Layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayer films has been widely used in such applications where the multilayer structure often exhibits anisotropic transport resulting in different diffusivities in the lateral (parallel to the film) and transverse (normal to the film) directions. Although lateral transport can be probed using techniques such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), it cannot be applied to probing transverse diffusivity in polymer films smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Here we present a technique to probe the transport of molecules tagged with fluorphores in polymer films thinner than the optical diffraction limit using the modulation of fluorescence emission depending on the distance of the tagged molecules from a metal surface. We have used this technique to probe the diffusion of proteins biotin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in polyelectrolyte multilayer films. We also studied the interdiffusion of chains in multilayer films using this technique. We observed a 3 order of magnitude increase in interdiffusion as a function of the ionic strength of the medium. This technique, along with FRAP, will be useful in studying anisotropic transport in polymer films, even those thinner than the diffraction limit, because the signal in this technique arises only from transverse and not lateral transport. Finally, this technique is also applicable to studying the diffusion of chromophore-labeled species within a polymer film. We demonstrate this aspect by measuring the transverse diffusion of methylene blue in the PAH-PAA multilayer system. PMID:27175850

  3. Photoconductivity of ultra-thin Ge(GeSn) layers grown in Si by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talochkin, A. B.; Chistokhin, I. B.; Mashanov, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    Photoconductivity (PC) spectra of Si/Ge(GeSn)/Si structures with the ultra-thin (1.0-2.3 nm) Ge and GeSn alloy layers grown by the low-temperature (T = 100 °C) molecular beam epitaxy are studied. Photoresponse in the range of 1.2-0.4 eV related to light absorption in the buried Ge(GeSn) layer is observed. It is shown that in case of lateral PC, a simple diffusion model can be used to determine the absorption coefficient of this layer α ˜ 105 cm-1. This value is 100 times larger than that of a single Ge quantum dot layer and is reached significantly above the band gap of most bulk semiconductors. The observed absorption is caused by optical transitions between electron and hole states localized at the interfaces. The anomalous high value of α can be explained by the unusual state of Ge(GeSn) layer with high concentration of dangling bonds, the optical properties of which have been predicted theoretically by Knief and von Niessen (Phys. Rev. B 59, 12940 (1999)).

  4. Bone responses to zirconia implants with a thin carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite coating using a molecular precursor method.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Tohru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Sato, Mitsunobu; Hara, Hiroki; Toyama, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Thin carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite (CA) films coating partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) were prepared (CA-Y-TZP) to establish a metal-free implant system. CA was coated using a molecular precursor method. The CA film was deposited on the surface of Y-TZP using a precursor solution, which was a mixture of a calcium-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) complex and phosphate compounds. The deposited CA film was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. A focus ion beam system technique revealed that the thickness of the CA film was less than 1.0 µm. Biological evaluations of CA-Y-TZP were performed by immersion experiments in simulated body fluid (SBF) and implantation experiments in the tibiae and femoral condyles of rabbits. In the SBF immersion experiment, apatite deposition progressed more on CA-Y-TZP at the early stage of immersion than on Y-TZP without the CA coating. Animal experiments revealed that bone formation on CA-Y-TZP was similar with than on Y-TZP. Histomorphometrical evaluations showed a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio and bone mass on CA-Y-TZP after implantation into the femoral trabecular bone of rabbits. Therefore, CA-Y-TZP appears to be applicable as a metal-free implant. PMID:24449291

  5. Engineering the Crystalline Morphology of Polymer Thin Films at a Molecular Level via Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyuncheol; Arnold, Craig; Priestley, Rodney

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the crystalline morphology of polymeric thin films at a molecular level has been increasingly important due to their potential as the active layer in organic electronics. Typically, the crystalline morphology in films is achieved via thermal annealing or melt-crystallization of spin-cast polymers. This approach often leads to a spherulitic morphology where the crystalline lamellae grow in all directions. Here, we introduce an alternative approach to make crystalline polymer films via Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE). Using polyethylene oxide (PEO) as a model polymer, we show that the preferential orientation of polymer crystals can be controlled during the film growth. By laser-ablating a frozen dilute solution of the desired polymer, MAPLE provides a non-destructive means for the deposition of polymer films. Due to the liquid nature of as-deposited polymers confined in nanodroplets, this technique can exploit the substrate effect on the crystal nucleation and growth of nano-confined polymers during the film growth. Mimicking the epitaxial growth of metallic films, this novel polymer deposition technique may enable the engineering of film properties in a way not achievable in bulk.

  6. Progressive Degradation of Crude Oil n-Alkanes Coupled to Methane Production under Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Shi, Shengbao; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jianfa; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Yahai

    2014-01-01

    Although methanogenic degradation of hydrocarbons has become a well-known process, little is known about which crude oil tend to be degraded at different temperatures and how the microbial community is responded. In this study, we assessed the methanogenic crude oil degradation capacity of oily sludge microbes enriched from the Shengli oilfield under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The microbial communities were investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes combined with cloning and sequencing. Enrichment incubation demonstrated the microbial oxidation of crude oil coupled to methane production at 35 and 55°C, which generated 3.7±0.3 and 2.8±0.3 mmol of methane per gram oil, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that crude oil n-alkanes were obviously degraded, and high molecular weight n-alkanes were preferentially removed over relatively shorter-chain n-alkanes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the concurrence of acetoclastic Methanosaeta and hydrogenotrophic methanogens but different methanogenic community structures under the two temperature conditions. Candidate divisions of JS1 and WWE 1, Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Syntrophaceae, Desulfobacteraceae and Syntrophorhabdus) and Firmicutes (mainly consisting of Desulfotomaculum) were supposed to be involved with n-alkane degradation in the mesophilic conditions. By contrast, the different bacterial phylotypes affiliated with Caldisericales, “Shengli Cluster” and Synergistetes dominated the thermophilic consortium, which was most likely to be associated with thermophilic crude oil degradation. This study revealed that the oily sludge in Shengli oilfield harbors diverse uncultured microbes with great potential in methanogenic crude oil degradation over a wide temperature range, which extend our previous understanding of methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes. PMID:25409013

  7. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one

  8. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics. PMID:27566686

  9. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  10. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  11. Molecular beam deposition of Dy sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. (001) high-temperature superconductor thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, J.; Seshadri, P.; Choudhary, K.M. )

    1992-03-01

    Epitaxial Dy{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}(001) high-temperature superconductor thin films on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates have been prepared by coevaporation of Dy, BaF{sub 2}, and Cu and postannealing. The vapors in desired ratio were evaporated from effusion cells in a miniature molecular beam deposition system. The films show critical transition temperature ({ital T}{sub {ital c},0}) of 89.5{plus minus}0.5 K. During process development it was found that single phase Dy{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2{minus}x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}(001) thin films can be grown ({ital x}=0 to 0.3). Their electrical properties were useful in calibration of quartz crystal thin film thickness monitor (FTM) for determination of relationships between the actual vapor arrival rate (flux) and FTM reading.

  12. Alkane inducible proteins in Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial step of β-oxidation is catalyzed by acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in prokaryotes and mitochondria, while acyl-CoA oxidase primarily functions in the peroxisomes of eukaryotes. Oxidase reaction accompanies emission of toxic by-product reactive oxygen molecules including superoxide anion, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities are essential to detoxify them in the peroxisomes. Although there is an argument about whether primitive life was born and evolved under high temperature conditions, thermophilic archaea apparently share living systems with both bacteria and eukaryotes. We hypothesized that alkane degradation pathways in thermophilic microorganisms could be premature and useful to understand their evolution. Results An extremely thermophilic and alkane degrading Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23 was previously isolated from a deep subsurface oil reservoir in Japan. In the present study, we identified novel membrane proteins (P16, P21) and superoxide dismutase (P24) whose production levels were significantly increased upon alkane degradation. Unlike other bacteria acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activities were also increased in strain B23 by addition of alkane. Conclusion We first suggested that peroxisomal β-oxidation system exists in bacteria. This eukaryotic-type alkane degradation pathway in thermophilic bacterial cells might be a vestige of primitive living cell systems that had evolved into eukaryotes. PMID:19320977

  13. Diffusion of Benzene and Alkylbenzenes in n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Register, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes have been determined in four n-alkanes at room temperature using capillary flow techniques. The alkylbenzenes are toluene, ethylbenzene, 1-phenylpropane, 1-phenylpentane, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenylundecane, 1-phenyltetradecane, and 1-phenylheptadecane. The n-alkanes are n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane. Ratios of the solutes' D values are independent of solvent and in general agreement with the predictions of diffusion models for cylinders and lollipops. For the latter, an alkylbenzene's phenyl ring is the lollipop's candy; the alkyl chain is its handle. A model that considers the solutes to be spheres with volumes determined by the van der Waals increments of their constituent atoms is not in agreement with experiment. The diffusion constants of 1-alkene and n-alkane solutes in n-alkane solvents also are compared with the cylinder model; reasonably good agreement is found. The n-alkanes are relatively extended, and this appears to be the case for the alkyl chains of the 1-alkenes and alkylbenzenes as well. PMID:26417941

  14. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of methane and C2+ alkanes in electrical spark discharge: implications for identifying sources of hydrocarbons in terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings.

    PubMed

    Telling, Jon; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    The low-molecular-weight alkanes--methane, ethane, propane, and butane--are found in a wide range of terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings. The development of robust criteria for distinguishing abiogenic from biogenic alkanes is essential for current investigations of Mars' atmosphere and for future exobiology missions to other planets and moons. Here, we show that alkanes synthesized during gas-phase radical recombination reactions in electrical discharge experiments have values of δ(2)H(methane)>δ(2)H(ethane)>δ(2)H(propane), similar to those of the carbon isotopes. The distribution of hydrogen isotopes in gas-phase radical reactions is likely due to kinetic fractionations either (i) from the preferential incorporation of (1)H into longer-chain alkanes due to the more rapid rate of collisions of the smaller (1)H-containing molecules or (ii) by secondary ion effects. Similar δ(13)C(C1-C2+) and δ(2)H(C1-C2+) patterns may be expected in a range of extraterrestrial environments where gas-phase radical reactions dominate, including interstellar space, the atmosphere and liquid hydrocarbon lakes of Saturn's moon Titan, and the outer atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus. Radical recombination reactions at high temperatures and pressures may provide an explanation for the combined reversed δ(13)C(C1-C2+) and δ(2)H(C1-C2+) patterns of terrestrial alkanes documented at a number of high-temperature/pressure crustal sites. PMID:23683048

  15. A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of gaseous alkanes in a barrier discharge and features of the reaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of C1-C4 alkanes into gaseous and liquid products in a barrier discharge is proposed. It consists in inhibiting the formation of deposits on the reactor electrode surfaces due to the addition of distilled water into the flow of hydrocarbon gases. The energy consumption on hydrocarbon conversion decreases from methane to n-butane from ~46 to 35 eV molecule-1. The main gaseous products of the conversion of light alkanes are hydrogen and C2-C4 hydrocarbons. The liquid reaction products contain C5+ alkanes with a predominantly isomeric structure. The results of modeling the kinetics of chemical reactions show that an increase in the molecular weight of the reaction products is mainly due to processes involving CH2 radical and the recombination of alkyl radicals.

  16. Fine-Tunable Absorption of Uniformly Aligned Polyurea Thin Films for Optical Filters Using Sequentially Self-Limited Molecular Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Yi-Seul; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Hyein; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-05-11

    Development of methods enabling the preparation of uniformly aligned polymer thin films at the molecular level is a prerequisite for realizing their optoelectronic characteristics as innovative materials; however, these methods often involve a compromise between scalability and accuracy. In this study, we have grown uniformly aligned polyurea thin films on a SiO2 substrate using molecular layer deposition (MLD) based on sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. By integrating plane-polarized Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopic tools, and density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated the uniform alignment of polyurea MLD films. Furthermore, the selective-wavelength absorption characteristics of thickness-controlled MLD films were investigated by integrating optical measurements and finite-difference time-domain simulations of reflection spectra, resulting from their thickness-dependent fine resonance with photons, which could be used as color filters in optoelectronics. PMID:27092573

  17. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of strontium lanthanum copper oxide thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, John Wallace

    Among the multitude of known cuprate material families and associated structures, the archetype is "infinite-layer" ACuO2, where perfectly square and flat CuO2 planes are separated by layers of alkaline earth atoms. The infinite-layer structure is free of magnetic rare earth ions, oxygen chains, orthorhombic distortions, incommensurate superstructures, ordered vacancies, and other complications that abound among the other material families. Furthermore, it is the only cuprate that can be made superconducting by both electron and hole doping, making it a potential platform for decoding the complex many-body interactions responsible for high-temperature superconductivity. Research on the infinite-layer compound has been severely hindered by the inability to synthesize bulk single crystals, but recent progress has led to high-quality superconducting thin film samples. Here we report in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of epitaxially-stabilized Sr1-chiLa chiCuO2 thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. At low doping, the material exhibits a dispersive lower Hubbard band typical of other cuprate parent compounds. As carriers are added to the system, a continuous evolution from Mott insulator to superconducting metal is observed as a coherent low-energy band develops on top of a concomitant remnant lower Hubbard band, gradually filling in the Mott gap. For chi = 0.10, our results reveal a strong coupling between electrons and (pi,pi) anti-ferromagnetism, inducing a Fermi surface reconstruction that pushes the nodal states below the Fermi level and realizing nodeless superconductivity. Electron diffraction measurements indicate the presence of a surface reconstruction that is consistent with the polar nature of Sr1-chiLachiCuO2. Most knowledge about the electron-doped side of the cuprate phase diagram has been deduced by generalizing from a single material family, Re2-chi CechiCuO4, where robust antiferromagnetism has been observed past chi

  18. Synthesis and modification of mesoporous silica and the preparation of molecular sieve thin films via pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, Decio Heringer

    2001-07-01

    Hexagonal mesoporous DAM-1 (Dallas Amorphous Material-1) was prepared using Vitamin E TPGS as the structure-directing agent. Depending upon the temperature and gel composition, highly ordered and hydrothermally stable DAM-1 with various morphologies could be achieved including spheres, gyroids, discoid, hexagonal plates and rods. This synthesis was modified to prepare hybrid organic-inorganic amine and thiol bifunctionalized DAM-1 by direct co-condensation under acidic conditions. Patterned DAM-1 thin films were prepared on patterned transparencies utilizing pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and line patterning techniques. DAM-1 laser ablation onto the patterned substrate followed by hydrothermal treatment resulted in a densely packed film. Removal of the patterned lines by sonication revealed patterned DAM-1 films. Thin films of zeolite type X were also prepared using the PLD technique. Laser ablation of zeolite X onto TiN-coated silicon wafers followed by a hydrothermal treatment resulted in partially oriented, crystalline membranes. Hydrothermal treatment of PLD films on stainless steel mesh produced a coated wire mesh with a 3-mum thick zeolite X film. A novel strategy for imprinting mesoporous SBA-15 that combines a triblock copolymer template and a chiral ruthenium complex is reported. A chiral PEO helix was formed by the chiral ruthenium complex interaction with the block copolymer during the synthesis of SBA-15. Upon removal of the chiral ruthenium complex, a stereospecfic cavity was created. Preliminary results indicated stereoselective absorption of Delta or Λ-Ru(phen)3 2+ isomer from a racemic mixture could be achieved depending on the chirality of the PEO chain. Practicum Two. The industrial practicum report describes the process development unit (PDU) 3-pentenenitrile (3PN) refining operation. This distillation works was operated to refine crude 3PN product, which contained 3PN, 2-methyl-3-butenenitrile (2M3BN), and other byproducts. This report also

  19. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  20. Growth of 3C-SiC( 1 0 0 ) thin films on Si( 1 0 0 ) by the molecular ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Kiuchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Goto, Seiichi

    2001-11-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were produced on Si(1 0 0) at low growth temperatures of 750-1000°C, using the molecular ion beam deposition (IBD) technique with a precursor of organosilicon ions. The ions extracted at 25 keV were mass selected, and decelerated to 100 eV. The precursor of methylsilicenium ions (SiCH 3+), which has a Si-C bond in the molecular structure, was generated from dimethylsilane (SiH 2(CH 3) 2). The energy distribution of SiCH 3+ ions was measured by a PPM421 plasma process monitor. It was confirmed that the energy distributions were 100±1 eV. The chemical bondings and surface structures of SiC thin films were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). In the Raman spectrum, a peak at 796 cm -1 was assigned to transverse optic phonon scattering in 3C-SiC. As a result of the analysis of RHEED patterns, 3C-SiC(1 0 0) were formed on Si(1 0 0) substrates. Using the molecular IBD technique with the precursor of methylsilicenium ions, the formation of SiC thin films is available on Si(1 0 0) at low temperature (750°C).

  1. BIODEGRADATION AND GAS-EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS ALKANES IN MODEL ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas exchange-biodegradation experiments conducted in model estuarine ecosystems indicate that the ease of degradation of gaseious normal alkanes increases with chain length. The behavior of gaseous perhalogenated alkanes can be explained by gas exchange alone with no degradation....

  2. Modeling of alkane emissions from a wood stain

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Guo, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a function of time after the application of the wood stain. It was found that the test house concentrations can be simulated by an integrated IAQ model which takes into consideration source, sink, and ventilation effects. The alkane emissions were controlled by an evaporation-like process.

  3. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal. PMID:22996726

  4. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  5. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  6. A compound-specific n-alkane δ 13C and δD approach for assessing source and delivery processes of terrestrial organic matter within a forested watershed in northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Osamu; Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Shibata, Hideaki; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2010-01-01

    We measured molecular distributions and compound-specific hydrogen (δD) and stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ 13C) of mid- and long-chain n-alkanes in forest soils, wetland peats and lake sediments within the Dorokawa watershed, Hokkaido, Japan, to better understand sources and processes associate with delivery of terrestrial organic matter into the lake sediments. δ 13C values of odd carbon numbered C 23-C 33n-alkanes ranged from -37.2‰ to -31.5‰, while δD values of these alkanes showed a large degree of variability that ranged from -244‰ to -180‰. Molecular distributions in combination with stable carbon isotopic compositions indicate a large contribution of C3 trees as the main source of n-alkanes in forested soils whereas n-alkanes in wetland soil are exclusively derived from marsh grass and/or moss. We found that the n-alkane δD values are much higher in forest soils than wetland peat. The higher δD values in forest samples could be explained by the enrichment of deuterium in leaf and soil waters due to increased evapotranspiration in the forest or differences in physiology of source plants between wetland and forest. A δ 13C vs. δD diagram of n-alkanes among forest, wetland and lake samples showed that C 25-C 31n-alkanes deposited in lake sediments are mainly derived from tree leaves due to the preferential transport of the forest soil organic matter over the wetland or an increased contribution of atmospheric input of tree leaf wax in the offshore sites. This study demonstrates that compound-specific δD analysis provides a useful approach for better understanding source and transport of terrestrial biomarkers in a C3 plant-dominated catchment.

  7. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-14

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ∼ M{sup β}, is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from −1.8 to −2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature T{sub g} where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔH{sub a} and entropy ΔS{sub a} of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a “critical” chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a “buckling transition” from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔS{sub a} ∝ ΔH{sub a}, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔH{sub a} and ΔS{sub a} with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  8. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-01

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ˜ Mβ, is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from -1.8 to -2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature Tg where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔHa and entropy ΔSa of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a "critical" chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a "buckling transition" from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔSa ∝ ΔHa, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔHa and ΔSa with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  9. Propagation and extinction of premixed C{sub 5}-C{sub 12}n-alkane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chunsheng; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Yang L.; Wang, Hai; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2010-02-15

    Laminar flame speeds and extinction strain rates of premixed C{sub 5}-C{sub 12}n-alkane flames were determined at atmospheric pressure and elevated unburned mixture temperatures, over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Experiments were performed in the counterflow configuration and flow velocities were measured using Laser Doppler Velocimetry. The laminar flame speeds were obtained using a non-linear extrapolation technique utilizing numerical simulations of the counterflow experiments with detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport. Compared to linearly extrapolated values, the laminar flame speeds obtained using non-linear extrapolations were found to be 1-4 cm/s lower depending on the equivalence ratio. It was determined that the laminar flame speeds of all n-alkane/air mixtures considered in this investigation are similar to each other and sensitive largely to the H{sub 2}/CO and C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbon kinetics. Additionally, the resistance to extinction decreases as the fuel molecular weight increases. Simulations of the experiments were performed using the recently developed JetSurF 0.2 reaction model consisting of 194 species and 1459 reactions. The laminar flame speeds were predicted with good accuracy for all the n-alkane-air mixtures considered. The experimental extinction strain rates are well predicted by the model for fuel-lean mixtures. For stoichiometric and fuel-rich mixtures, the predicted extinction strain rates are approximately 10% lower than the experimental values. Insights into the physical and chemical processes that control the response of n-alkane flames are provided through detailed sensitivity analyses on both reaction rates and binary diffusion coefficients. (author)

  10. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  11. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  12. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  15. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  16. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  17. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  18. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  19. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  20. Analysis of the vibrational bandwidths of alkane-urea clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kurt A.; Snyder, Robert G.; Strauss, Herbert L.

    1989-11-01

    The only large amplitude motion possible for an n-alkane molecule in urea-inclusion compounds is libration-torsion about the long axis of the chain. We present a quantitative model that incorporates the effect of this motion on the widths of the alkane vibrational bands. This model explains the difference in the widths of the different vibrations of the alkanes and their temperature dependence. Two effects are combined: (1) a modulation of the angles between the components of the polarizability in the space and the molecule-fixed frames for Raman spectra or between the components of the dipole moment for the infrared spectra, and (2) a modulation of the frequency of the alkane vibration via anharmonic coupling terms with the libration-torsion. The first effect gives rise to a distinctly non-Lorentzian band shape, which is convoluted with the approximately Lorentzian band of the second effect to produce the final result. The libration-torsional motion is modeled as that of a Brownian harmonic oscillator. Most of the parameters that enter the calculation are obtained from data other than that involving the bandwidths themselves. The libration-torsion relaxation time of about 1 ps obtained from fitting the observed bandwidths agrees with the value obtained from recent quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. Other bandwidth mechanisms that have been proposed are evaluated and it is shown that site hopping is too slow to account for the observations.

  1. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  2. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  3. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product. PMID:26476644

  4. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  5. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    DOEpatents

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  6. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement. PMID:26556131

  7. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, η, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6πηr). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/η(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed. PMID:24528091

  8. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  9. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  10. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). he test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fun...

  11. A superoleophobic textile repellent towards impacting drops of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artus, Georg R. J.; Zimmermann, Jan; Reifler, Felix A.; Brewer, Stuart A.; Seeger, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    A commercially available polyester fabric has been rendered superoleophobic by coating with silicone nanofilaments and subsequent plasma fluorination. The treated samples show outstanding oil-repellency. They achieve the highest possible oil-repellency grade of 8, repel impacting drops of alkanes and show a plastron layer in hexadecane. The oil repellency is shown to depend on the topography of the silicone nanofilament coating.

  12. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A.; Cox, Kenneth R.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2014-08-01

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ɛW/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E—ɛW/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  13. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Amy V.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) via “reverse methanogenesis” and is catalyzed by a homolog of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and SRB, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, “intra-aerobic” pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appear to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase). Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an “intra-aerobic” denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ PMID:23717304

  14. Gas/particle partitioning of n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs in urban Denver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mingjie; Hannigan, Michael P.; Barsanti, Kelley C.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a medium volume sampler equipped with quartz fiber filters (QFFs) and a polyurethane foam (PUF)/XAD-4/PUF sandwich (PXP) was used to collect semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in both gaseous and particle (PM2.5) phases. A backup QFF (bQFF) was used to evaluate possible sampling artifact of particulate organics due to vapor-phase adsorption. A series of n-alkanes (molecular weight: 170-562) and PAHs (128-300), and two oxy-PAHs (acenaphthenone, 168; fluorenone, 180) were measured. Breakthrough experiments demonstrated that the PXP could collect all gas-phase target compounds with high efficiency, even the low molecular weight (MW) species (e.g., naphthalene). Comparing species concentrations across different sampling matrices encountered at the Denver, Colorado field site, the light n-alkanes (MW < 282) and PAHs (MW < 192) were mostly distributed into the gas phase; while those heavy n-alkanes (MW > 324) and PAHs (MW > 202) were primarily in the particle phase (Average temperature, 12.5 ± 10.1 °C). Log values of measured gas/particle (G/P) partitioning coefficients (Kmp,OM) of selected SVOCs (docosane, tricosane, fluoranthene, pyrene, acenaphthenone and fluorenone) were linearly regressed to those of theoretically-based partitioning coefficients (Ktp,OM) for comparison. Prior to Kmp,OM calculation, the gas- and particle-phase concentrations of SVOCs were corrected following two different approaches based on bQFF measurements. The first approach assumed that the bQFF associated SVOCs were from the adsorption of gaseous SVOCs (positive artifact); the second approach assumed equal contributions from positive and negative (organics evaporated from top QFF and adsorbed by bQFF) artifacts. Under both corrections, significant correlations (p < 0.05) were observed between log Kmp,OM and log Ktp,OM for the six selected SVOCs, suggesting that the predicted G/P partitioning can reasonably capture the measured G/P partitioning behavior. The large

  15. The vibrational spectrum of water in liquid alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, M P; Strauss, H L

    1985-01-01

    The water wire hypothesis of hydrogen-ion transport in lipid bilayers has prompted a search for water aggregates in bulk hydrocarbons. The asymmetric stretching vibration of the water dissolved in n-decane and in a number of other alkanes and alkenes has been observed. The water band in the alkanes is very wide and fits to the results of a J-diffusion calculation for the water rotation. This implies that the water is freely rotating between collisions with the solvent and certainly not hydrogen bonded to anything. The existence of water aggregates is thus most unlikely. In contrast, water in an alkene is hydrogen bonded to the solvent molecules (although not to other water molecules) and shows an entirely different spectrum. PMID:4016205

  16. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  18. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  19. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria. PMID

  20. Hydroxylation of alkanes using sodium hypochlorite catalyzed by iron porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A.B.; Khenkin, A.M.

    1988-10-01

    This communication presents data about the oxidation of alkanes to alcohols with hypochlorite in the presence of Fe(III) phenylporphyrin derivatives in the system water-benzene. We used as catalysts the following compounds: tetraphenylporphyrin iron chloride, tetramesitylporphyrin iron chloride, tetra(2-fluorophenyl)porphyrin from chloride, and tetra (2-ntrophenyl)porphyrin iron chloride. The reaction products were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The efficiency of the reaction was determined by the structure of the porphyrin used.

  1. Effect of Varying the 1-4 Intramolecular Scaling Factor in Atomistic Simulations of Long-Chain N-alkanes with the OPLS-AA Model

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Ye, Xianggui; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation study of n-alkanes using the Optimized Potential for Liquid Simulation-All Atoms (OPLS-AA) force field at ambient condition has been performed. Our results indicate that while simulations with the OPLS-AA force field accurately predict the liquid state mass density for n-alkanes with carbon number equal or less than 10, for n-alkanes with carbon number equal or exceeding 12, the OPLS-AA force field with the standard scaling factor for the 1-4 intramolecular Van der Waals and electrostatic interaction gives rise to a quasi-crystalline structure. We found that accurate predictions of the liquid state properties are obtained by successively reducing the aforementioned scaling factor for each increase of the carbon number beyond n-dodecane. To better un-derstand the effects of reducing the scaling factor, we analyzed the variation of the torsion potential pro-file with the scaling factor, and the corresponding impact on the gauche-trans conformer distribution, heat of vaporization, melting point, and self-diffusion coefficient for n-dodecane. This relatively simple procedure thus allows for more accurate predictions of the thermo-physical properties of longer n-alkanes.

  2. Diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacteria in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Alkane degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane degrading bacterial community in the near surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that trace amount of volatile hydrocarbons migrated from oil and gas reservoirs caused a shift of the n-alkane degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) to Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter). Real-time PCR results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils underlying oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils due to efficient microbial degradation. Our findings broadened the knowledge on the ecological characteristics of alkane degrading community in hydrocarbon microseeps and may provide a new approach for microbial prospecting for oil and gas (MPOG).

  3. Laboratory spectroscopic analyses of electron irradiated alkanes and alkenes in solar system ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, K. P.; Carlson, R. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report results from laboratory experiments of 10 keV electron irradiation of thin ice films of water and short-chain hydrocarbons at ˜10-8 Torr and temperatures ranging from 70-100 K. Hydrocarbon mixtures include water with C3H8, C3H6, C4H10 (butane and isobutane), and C4H8, (1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). The double bonds of the alkenes in our initial mixtures were rapidly destroyed or converted to single carbon bonds, covalent bonds with hydrogen, bonds with -OH (hydroxyl), bonds with oxygen (C-O), or double bonds with oxygen (carbonyl). Spectra resulting from irradiation of alkane and alkene ices are largely indistinguishable; the initial differences in film composition are destroyed and the resulting mixture includes long-chain, branched aliphatics, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. Methane was observed as a product during radiolysis but CO was largely absent. We find that while some of the carbon is oxidized and lost to CO2 formation, some carbon is sequestered into highly refractory, long-chain aliphatic compounds that remain as a thin residue even after the ice film has been raised to standard temperature and pressure. We conclude that the high availability of hydrogen in our experiments leads to the formation of the formyl radical which then serves as the precursor for formaldehyde and polymerization of longer hydrocarbon chains.

  4. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  5. Nanoscale Trapping and Squeeze-Out of Confined Alkane Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gosvami, N N; O'Shea, S J

    2015-12-01

    We present combined force curve and conduction atomic force microscopy (AFM) data for the linear alkanes CnH2n+2 (n = 10, 12, 14, 16) confined between a gold-coated AFM tip and a graphite surface. Solvation layering is observed in the force curves for all liquids, and conduction AFM is used to study in detail the removal of the confined (mono)layer closest to the graphite surface. The squeeze-out behavior of the monolayer can be very different depending upon the temperature. Below the monolayer melting transition temperatures the molecules are in an ordered state on the graphite surface, and fast and complete removal of the confined molecules is observed. However, above the melting transition temperature the molecules are in a disordered state, and even at large applied pressure a few liquid molecules are trapped within the tip-sample contact zone. These findings are similar to a previous study for branched alkanes [ Gosvami Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 076101 ], but the observation for the linear alkane homologue series demonstrates clearly the dependence of the squeeze-out and trapping on the state of the confined material. PMID:26529283

  6. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  7. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules. PMID:26360875

  8. Biochemical studies on the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, K H; Albano, E F; Tomasi, A; Slater, T F

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews recent investigations by Slater and colleagues into the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes in general and carbon tetrachloride in particular. It is becoming increasingly accepted that free radical intermediates are involved in the toxicity of many such compounds through mechanisms including lipid peroxidation, covalent binding, and cofactor depletion. Here we describe the experimental approaches that are used to establish that halogenated alkanes are metabolized in animal tissues to reactive free radicals. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to identify free-radical products, often using spin-trapping compounds. The generation of specific free radicals by radiolytic methods is useful in the determination of the precise reactivity of radical intermediates postulated to be injurious to the cell. The enzymic mechanism of the production of such free radicals and their subsequent reactions with biological molecules is studied with specific metabolic inhibitors and free-radical scavengers. These combined techniques provide considerable insight into the process of metabolic activation of halogenated compounds. It is readily apparent, for instance, that the local oxygen concentration at the site of activation is of crucial importance to the subsequent reactions; the formation of peroxy radical derivatives from the primary free-radical product is shown to be of great significance in relation to carbon tetrachloride and may be of general importance. However, while these studies have provided much information on the biochemical mechanisms of halogenated alkane toxicity, it is clear that many problems remain to be solved. PMID:3007102

  9. Detection of charge storage on molecular thin films of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) by Kelvin force microscopy: a candidate system for high storage capacity memory cells.

    PubMed

    Paydavosi, Sarah; Aidala, Katherine E; Brown, Patrick R; Hashemi, Pouya; Supran, Geoffrey J; Osedach, Timothy P; Hoyt, Judy L; Bulović, Vladimir

    2012-03-14

    Retention and diffusion of charge in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq(3)) molecular thin films are investigated by injecting electrons and holes via a biased conductive atomic force microscopy tip into the Alq(3) films. After the charge injection, Kelvin force microscopy measurements reveal minimal changes with time in the spatial extent of the trapped charge domains within Alq(3) films, even for high hole and electron densities of >10(12) cm(-2). We show that this finding is consistent with the very low mobility of charge carriers in Alq(3) thin films (<10(-7) cm(2)/(Vs)) and that it can benefit from the use of Alq(3) films as nanosegmented floating gates in flash memory cells. Memory capacitors using Alq(3) molecules as the floating gate are fabricated and measured, showing durability over more than 10(4) program/erase cycles and the hysteresis window of up to 7.8 V, corresponding to stored charge densities as high as 5.4 × 10(13) cm(-2). These results demonstrate the potential for use of molecular films in high storage capacity nonvolatile memory cells. PMID:22332966

  10. Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Graphite into Single- and Few-Layer Graphene with α-Functionalized Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Haar, Sébastien; Bruna, Matteo; Lian, Jian Xiang; Tomarchio, Flavia; Olivier, Yoann; Mazzaro, Raffaello; Morandi, Vittorio; Moran, Joseph; Ferrari, Andrea C; Beljonne, David; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-07-21

    Graphene has unique physical and chemical properties, making it appealing for a number of applications in optoelectronics, sensing, photonics, composites, and smart coatings, just to cite a few. These require the development of production processes that are inexpensive and up-scalable. These criteria are met in liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE), a technique that can be enhanced when specific organic molecules are used. Here we report the exfoliation of graphite in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, in the presence of heneicosane linear alkanes terminated with different head groups. These molecules act as stabilizing agents during exfoliation. The efficiency of the exfoliation in terms of the concentration of exfoliated single- and few-layer graphene flakes depends on the functional head group determining the strength of the molecular dimerization through dipole-dipole interactions. A thermodynamic analysis is carried out to interpret the impact of the termination group of the alkyl chain on the exfoliation yield. This combines molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics to rationalize the role of functionalized alkanes in the dispersion and stabilization process, which is ultimately attributed to a synergistic effect of the interactions between the molecules, graphene, and the solvent. PMID:27349897

  11. Modeling the role of alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and their oligomers in secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Pye, Havala O T; Pouliot, George A

    2012-06-01

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations over the United States. Oxidation of alkanes is predicted to produce more aerosol than oxidation of PAHs driven by relatively higher alkane emissions. SOA from alkanes and PAHs, although small in magnitude, can be a substantial fraction of the SOA from anthropogenic hydrocarbons, particularly in winter, and could contribute more if emission inventories lack intermediate volatility alkanes (>C(13)) or if the vehicle fleet shifts toward diesel-powered vehicles. The SOA produced from oxidation of alkanes correlates well with ozone and odd oxygen in many locations, but the lower correlation of anthropogenic oligomers with odd oxygen indicates that models may need additional photochemically dependent pathways to low-volatility SOA. PMID:22568386

  12. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  13. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  15. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of CuInSe2 Thin Films by Molecular-Beam Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Mikihiko; Negami, Takayuki; Terauchi, Masaharu; Hirao, Takashi

    1992-02-01

    Polycrystalline CuInSe2 films were prepared by coevaporation of the elements under an ultrahigh vacuum by a molecular-beam deposition method. The composition of the film was controlled by changing the In molecular-beam flux intensity while the other elements remained at a constant value. It is shown, at the substrate temperature of 500°C, that there is a critical In molecular-beam flux intensity for the fabrication of stoichiometric films. At the In molecular-beam intensities higher than the critical value, single-phase CuInSe2 films with nearly constant compositions are obtained as a result of the removal effects of excess In. It is shown that the present coevaporation process is suitable for the fabrication of stoichiometric or slightly In-rich composition films. Furthermore, the structural and electrical properties of the films were investigated and discussed in relation to film composition.

  17. Molecular aspects of transport in thin films of controlled architecture. [Annual] technical summary, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Work has progressed in two principal areas during the past year: diffusion in swollen polymer films with and without a barrier layer, and molecular aspects of swelling using enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Gas-Phase Reactions of Atomic Gold Cations with Linear Alkanes (C2-C9).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-06-30

    To develop proper ionization methods for alkanes, the reactivity of bare or ligated transition metal ions toward alkanes has attracted increasing interests. In this study, the reactions of the gold cations with linear alkanes from ethane up to nonane (CnH2n+2, n = 2-9) under mild conditions have been characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. When reacting with Au(+), small alkanes (n = 2-6) were confirmed to follow specific reaction channels of dehydrogenation for ethane and hydride transfer for others to generate product ions characteristic of the original alkanes, which indicates that Au(+) can act as a reagent ion to ionize alkanes from ethane to n-hexane. Strong dependence of the chain length of alkanes was observed for the rate constants and reaction efficiencies. Extensive fragmentation took place for larger alkanes (n > 6). Theoretical results show that the fragmentation induced by the hydride transfer occurs after the release of AuH. Moreover, the fragmentation of n-heptane was successfully avoided when the reaction took place in a high-pressure reactor. This implies that Au(+) is a potential reagent ion to ionize linear and even the branched alkanes. PMID:27266670

  19. Alkane, terpene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geochemistry of the Mackenzie River and Mackenzie shelf: Riverine contributions to Beaufort Sea coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Mark B.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Cretney, Walter J.; Fowler, Brian R.; McLaughlin, Fiona A.

    1993-07-01

    To study the largest source of river sediment to the Arctic Ocean, we have collected suspended particulates from the Mackenzie River in all seasons and sediments from the Mackenzie shelf between the river mouth and the shelf edge. These samples have been analyzed for alkanes, triterpenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We found that naturally occurring hydrocarbons predominate in the river and on the shelf. These hydrocarbons include biogenic alkanes and triterpenes with a higher plant/peat origin, diagenetic PAHs from peat and plant detritus, petrogenic alkanes, triterpenes and PAHs from oil seeps and/or bitumens and combustion PAHs that are likely relict in peat deposits. Because these components vary independently, the season is found to strongly influence the concentration and composition of hydrocarbons in the Mackenzie River. While essentially the same pattern of alkanes, diagenetic hopanes and alkyl PAHs is observed in all river and most shelf sediment samples, alkane and triterpene concentration variations are strongly linked to the relative amount of higher plant/peat material. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecular-mass profiles also appear to be tied primarily to varying proportions of peat, with an additional petrogenic component which is most likely associated with lithic material mobilized by the Mackenzie River at freshet. Consistent with the general lack of alkyl PAHs in peat, the higher PAHs found in the river are probably derived from forest and tundra fires. A few anthropogenic/pyrogenic compounds are manifest only at the shelf edge, probably due to a weakening of the river influence. We take this observation of pyrogenic PAHs and the pronounced source differences between two sediment samples collected at the shelf edge as evidence of a transition from dominance by the Mackenzie River to the geochemistry prevalent in Arctic regions far removed from major rivers.

  20. Both water source and atmospheric water impact leaf wax n-alkane 2H/1H values of hydroponically grown angiosperm trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipple, B. J.; Berke, M. A.; Hambach, B.; Roden, J. S.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The extent to which both water source and leaf water 2H-enrichment affect the δ2H values of terrestrial plant leaf waxes is an area of active research as ecologists seek a mechanistic understanding of the environmental determinants of leaf wax isotope values before applying δ2H values of leaf waxes to reconstruct past hydrologic conditions. To elucidate the effects of both water source and atmospheric water vapor on δ2H values of leaf waxes for broad-leaved angiosperms, we analyzed hydrogen isotope ratios of high-molecular weight n-alkanes from two tree species that were grown throughout the spring and summer (five months) in a hydroponic system under controlled atmospheric conditions. Here, 12 subpopulations each of Populus fremontii and Betula occidentalis saplings were grown under one of six source different waters ranging in hydrogen isotope ratio values from -120 to +180 ‰ and under either 40 % or 75 % relative humidity conditions. We found n-alkane δ2H values of both species were linearly related to source water δ2H values with differences in slope associated with differing atmospheric humidity. A Craig-Gordon model was used to predict the δ2H values of leaf water and, by extension, n-alkane δ2H values under the range of growth conditions. The modeled leaf water values were found to be linearly related to observed n-alkane δ2H values with a statistically indistinguishable slope between the high and low humidity treatments. These leaf wax observations support a constant biosynthetic fractionation factor between evaporatively-enriched leaf water and n-alkanes for each species. However, we found the calculated biosynthetic fractionation between modeled leaf-water and n-alkane to be different between the two species. We submit that these dissimilarities were due to model inputs and not differences in the specific-species biochemistry. Nonetheless, these results are significant as they indicated that the δ2H value of atmospheric water vapor and

  1. Infrared Transition Moment Orientational Analysis on the Structural Organization of the Distinct Molecular Subunits in Thin Layers of a High Mobility n-Type Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Anton, Arthur Markus; Steyrleuthner, Robert; Kossack, Wilhelm; Neher, Dieter; Kremer, Friedrich

    2015-05-13

    The IR-based method of infrared transition moment orientational analysis (IR-TMOA) is employed to unravel molecular order in thin layers of the semiconducting polymer poly[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene) (P(NDI2OD-T2)). Structure-specific vibrational bands are analyzed in dependence on polarization and inclination of the sample with respect to the optical axis. By that the molecular order parameter tensor for the respective molecular moieties with regard to the sample coordinate system is deduced. Making use of the specificity of the IR spectral range, we are able to determine separately the orientation of atomistic planes defined through the naphthalenediimide (NDI) and bithiophene (T2) units relative to the substrate, and hence, relative to each other. A pronounced solvent effect is observed: While chlorobenzene causes the T2 planes to align preferentially parallel to the substrate at an angle of 29°, using a 1:1 chloronaphthalene:xylene mixture results in a reorientation of the T2 units from a face on into an edge on arrangement. In contrast the NDI unit remains unaffected. Additionally, for both solvents evidence is observed for the aggregation of chains in accord with recently published results obtained by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. PMID:25892664

  2. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  3. Metal-metal chalcogenide molecular precursors to binary, ternary, and quaternary metal chalcogenide thin films for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihong; Cho, Seonghyuk; Lim, Daw Gen; Hu, Xianyi; Stach, Eric A; Handwerker, Carol A; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2016-04-11

    Bulk metals and metal chalcogenides are found to dissolve in primary amine-dithiol solvent mixtures at ambient conditions. Thin-films of CuS, SnS, ZnS, Cu2Sn(S(x),Se(1-x))3, and Cu2ZnSn(S(x)Se(1-x))4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) were deposited using the as-dissolved solutions. Cu2ZnSn(S(x)Se(1-x))4 solar cells with efficiencies of 6.84% and 7.02% under AM1.5 illumination were fabricated from two example solution precursors, respectively. PMID:26981781

  4. Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

    1991-01-01

    New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

  5. Effect of GaN interlayer on polarity control of epitaxial ZnO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. Q.; Sun, H. P.; Pan, X. Q.

    2010-10-11

    Epitaxial ZnO thin films were grown on nitrided (0001) sapphire substrates with an intervening GaN layer by rf-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It was found that polarity of the ZnO epilayer could be controlled by modifying the GaN interlayer. ZnO grown on a distorted 3-nm-thick GaN interlayer has Zn-polarity while ZnO on a 20-nm-thick GaN interlayer with a high structural quality has O-polarity. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates that the polarity of ZnO epilayer is controlled by the atomic structure of the interface between the ZnO buffer layer and the intervening GaN layer.

  6. Electron spin resonance of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O thin films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wassner, T. A.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.; Laumer, B.; Althammer, M.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Eickhoff, M.

    2010-08-30

    Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O thin films with a Mg content x between 0 and 0.42 grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on c-plane sapphire substrates were investigated by electron spin resonance at 5 K. Above band gap illumination induces a persistent resonance signal, which is attributed to free conduction band electrons. The g-factors of the Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O epitaxial layers and their anisotropy were determined experimentally and an increase from g{sub ||}=1.957 for x=0 to g{sub ||}=1.970 for x=0.42 was found, accompanied by a decrease in anisotropy. A comparison with g-factors of the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N system is also given.

  7. A simple atomic force microscopy calibration method for direct measurement of surface energy on nanostructured surfaces covered with molecularly thin liquid films

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Ralf; Talke, Frank E.; Etsion, Izhak

    2009-05-15

    A simple calibration method is described for the determination of surface energy by atomic force microscopy (AFM) pull-off force measurements on nanostructured surfaces covered with molecularly thin liquid films. The method is based on correlating pull-off forces measured in arbitrary units on a nanostructured surface with pull-off forces measured on macroscopically smooth dip-coated gauge surfaces with known surface energy. The method avoids the need for complex calibration of the AFM cantilever stiffness and the determination of the radius of curvature of the AFM tip. Both of the latter measurements are associated with indirect and less accurate measurements of surface energy based on various contact mechanics adhesion models.

  8. Topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films grown on double-layer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Song Canli; Jiang Yeping; Chang Cuizu; Xue Qikun; Wang Yilin; Zhang Yi; Wang Lili; He Ke; Fang Zhong; Dai Xi; Xie Xincheng; Ma Xucun; Chen Xi; Jia Jinfeng; Wang Yayu; Qi Xiaoliang; Zhang Shoucheng

    2010-10-04

    Atomically flat thin films of topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} have been grown on double-layer graphene formed on 6H-SiC(0001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. By a combined study of reflection high energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we identified the Se-rich condition and temperature criterion for layer-by-layer growth of epitaxial Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films. The as-grown films without doping exhibit a low defect density of 1.0{+-}0.2x10{sup 11}/cm{sup 2}, and become a bulk insulator at a thickness of ten quintuple layers, as revealed by in situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement.

  9. Magnetic properties of Mn{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}N thin films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S. X.; Xia, Y. Q.; Yu, X. L.; Liu, Y. J.; Li, S. W.

    2007-09-15

    High-quality Mn{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}N thin films were grown on MgO(001) substrates using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetic measurements evidence the presence of ferromagnetism with Curie temperature exceeding 380 K. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the Mn ions are in a divalent state and uniformly substitute on Ti cation sites, consistent with the ferromagnetism that correlates with Mn substitution on Ti sites. The origin of the ferromagnetism might be attributed to itinerant-carrier mediated Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)-type long-range coupling which allows for arbitrary itinerant-carrier spin polarization and dynamic correlations.

  10. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and transmission electron microscopy studies of thin GaAs/InAs(100) multiple quantum well structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Fernandez, R.; Lewis, B. F.; Yen, M. Y.; Lee, T. C.; Madhukar, A.

    1985-01-01

    GaAs/InAs(100) multiple interface structures involving 7.4 percent lattice mismatch have been fabricated via molecular beam epitaxy and examined via transmission electron microscopy. It is found that high-quality, dislocation-free interfaces involving such high lattice mismatch can indeed be experimentally realized for very thin layers provided proper care is given to achieve a balance between the growth kinetics and the thermodynamics leading to the equilibrium ground state of the strained layer. The compressive strain is homogeneously accommodated and a tetragonal distortion is induced in the InAs layer with a perpendicular lattice constant in close agreement with that expected on the basis of the continuum theory and elastic constants of bulk InAs.

  11. Domain formation due to surface steps in topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films grown on Si (111) by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, S.; Kampmeier, J.; Mussler, G.; Grützmacher, D.; Luysberg, M.

    2013-08-19

    The atomic structure of topological insulators Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films on Si (111) substrates grown in van der Waals mode by molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Besides single and multiple quintuple layer (QL) steps, which are typical for the step-flow mode of growth, a number of 0.4 QL steps is observed. We determine that these steps originate from single steps at the substrate surface causing domain boundaries in the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film. Due to the peculiar structure of these domain boundaries the domains are stable and penetrate throughout the entire film.

  12. Molecular Engineering of Potent Sensitizers for Very Efficient Light Harvesting in Thin-Film Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yaoyao; Giordano, Fabrizio; Schreier, Marcel; Pellet, Norman; Hu, Yue; Yi, Chenyi; Robertson, Neil; Hua, Jianli; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Tian, He; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-08-31

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have shown significant potential for indoor and building-integrated photovoltaic applications. Herein we present three new D-A-π-A organic sensitizers, XY1, XY2, and XY3, that exhibit high molar extinction coefficients and a broad absorption range. Molecular modifications of these dyes, featuring a benzothiadiazole (BTZ) auxiliary acceptor, were achieved by introducing a thiophene heterocycle as well as by shifting the position of BTZ on the conjugated bridge. The ensuing high molar absorption coefficients enabled the fabrication of highly efficient thin-film solid-state DSSCs with only 1.3 μm mesoporous TiO2 layer. XY2 with a molar extinction coefficient of 6.66 × 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1) at 578 nm led to the best photovoltaic performance of 7.51%. PMID:27488265

  13. Investigation of ZnO thin films deposited on ferromagnetic metallic buffer layer by molecular beam epitaxy toward realization of ZnO-based magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Belmoubarik, M.; Nozaki, T.; Sahashi, M.; Endo, H.

    2013-05-07

    Deposition of ZnO thin films on a ferromagnetic metallic buffer layer (Co{sub 3}Pt) by molecular beam epitaxy technique was investigated for realization of ZnO-based magnetic tunneling junctions with good quality hexagonal ZnO films as tunnel barriers. For substrate temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C, ZnO films exhibited low oxygen defects and high electrical resistivity of 130 {Omega} cm. This value exceeded that of hexagonal ZnO films grown by sputtering technique, which are used as tunnel barriers in ZnO-MTJs. Also, the effect of oxygen flow during deposition on epitaxial growth conditions and Co{sub 3}Pt surface oxidation was discussed.

  14. Layer by layer growth of BaTiO 3 thin films with extremely smooth surfaces by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. S.; Ma, K.; Cui, D. F.; Peng, Z. Q.; Zhou, Y. L.; Lu, H. B.; Chen, Z. H.; Li, L.; Yang, G. Z.

    1997-05-01

    Using pure ozone-assisted laser molecular beam epitaxy, we have grown c-axis-oriented single crystal BaTiO 3 thin films on SrTiO 3 substrates at temperatures ( Ts) of 400-750°C and under ambient gas pressures of 5 × 10 -5 to 1 × 10 -1 Pa, respectively. Stripy reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns and regular RHEED intensity oscillations reveal the smooth surface and layer-by-layer epitaxial growth of the films. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that the films are free of pinholes, grain boundaries and outgrowths on the surface. In addition, we found a strong dependence of the film lattice constant c on Ts, which might be related to the strain in the film.

  15. Transporter engineering for improved tolerance against alkane biofuels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrocarbon alkanes, components of major fossil fuels, are considered as next-generation biofuels because their biological production has recently been shown to be possible. However, high-yield alkane production requires robust host cells that are tolerant against alkanes, which exhibit cytotoxicity. In this study, we aimed to improve alkane tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key industrial microbial host, by harnessing heterologous transporters that potentially pump out alkanes. Results To this end, we attempted to exploit ABC transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica based on the observation that it utilizes alkanes as a carbon source. We confirmed the increased transcription of ABC2 and ABC3 transporters upon exposure to a range of alkanes in Y. lipolytica. We then showed that the heterologous expression of ABC2 and ABC3 transporters significantly increased tolerance against decane and undecane in S. cerevisiae through maintaining lower intracellular alkane level. In particular, ABC2 transporter increased the tolerance limit of S. cerevisiae about 80-fold against decane. Furthermore, through site-directed mutagenesis for glutamate (E988 for ABC2, and E989 for ABC3) and histidine (H1020 for ABC2, and H1021 for ABC3), we provided the evidence that glutamate was essential for the activity of ABC2 and ABC3 transporters, with ATP most likely to be hydrolyzed by a catalytic carboxylate mechanism. Conclusions Here, we demonstrated that transporter engineering through expression of heterologous efflux pumps led to significantly improved tolerance against alkane biofuels in S. cerevisiae. We believe that our results laid the groundwork for developing robust alkane-producing yeast cells through transporter engineering, which will greatly aid in next-generation alkane biofuel production and recovery. PMID:23402697

  16. Combining a molecular modelling approach with direct current and high power impulse magnetron sputtering to develop new TiO2 thin films for antifouling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Jérôme; Lecoq, Elodie; Duday, David; Puhakka, Eini; Riihimäki, Markus; Keiski, Riitta; Chemin, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of crystallization deposits at the surface of heat exchangers results in the increase of the heat transfer resistance and a drastic loss of efficiency. Coating surfaces with a thin film can limit the scale-surface adhesion force and thus the fouling process. This study compares the efficiency of TiO2 layers exhibiting various crystalline planes and microstructures to reduce the kinetic of fouling. Molecular modelling with density functional theory is first carried out to determine the energy of CaCO3 deposition on anatase (1 0 1), (0 0 4), and (2 0 0) surfaces as well as on a rutile (1 0 1) one. TiO2 thin films (thickness < 1 μm) are then synthesized by direct current and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (dcMS and HiPIMS respectively) in order to tune their crystallinity and microstructure. Lastly, the induction time to grow CaCO3 crystals at the surface of such materials is determined. Comparing the modelling and fouling results allows to draw general trends on the potential anti-scaling properties of TiO2 crystallized under various forms. Until now, such a comparison combining a theoretical approach with experimental fouling tests has never been reported in the literature.

  17. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Structural and Electrical Properties of Single Crystalline Ga-Doped ZnO Thin Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Zou, Wen-Qin; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Zhang, Feng-Ming; Du, You-Wei

    2009-11-01

    High-quality Ga-doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) single crystalline films with various Ga concentrations are grown on a-plane sapphire substrates using molecular-beam epitaxy. The site configuration of doped Ga atoms is studied by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy. It is found that nearly all Ga can substitute into ZnO lattice as electrically active donors, a generating high density of free carriers with about one electron per Ga dopant when the Ga concentration is no more than 2%. However, further increasing the Ga doping concentration leads to a decrease of the conductivity due to partial segregation of Ga atoms to the minor phase of the spinel ZnGa2O4 or other intermediate phase. It seems that the maximum solubility of Ga in the ZnO single crystalline film is about 2 at.% and the lowest resistivity can reach 1.92 × 10-4 Ω·cm at room temperature, close to the best value reported. In contrast to ZnO:Ga thin film with 1% or 2% Ga doping, the film with 4% Ga doping exhibits a metal semiconductor transition at 80 K. The scattering mechanism of conducting electrons in single crystalline ZnO:Ga thin film is discussed.

  18. Characterization of high-κ LaLuO3 thin film grown on AlGaN/GaN heterostructure by molecular beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu; Huang, Sen; Chen, Hongwei; Schnee, Michael; Zhao, Qing-Tai; Schubert, Jürgen; Chen, Kevin J.

    2011-10-01

    We report the study of high-dielectric-constant (high-κ) dielectric LaLuO3 (LLO) thin film that is grown on AlGaN/GaN heterostructure by molecular beam deposition (MBD). The physical properties of LLO on AlGaN/GaN heterostrucure have been investigated with atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and TEM. It is revealed that the MBD-grown 16 nm-thick LLO film is polycrystalline with a thin (˜2 nm) amorphous transition layer at the LLO/GaN interface. The bandgap of LLO is derived as 5.3 ± 0.04 eV from O1s energy loss spectrum. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of a Ni-Au/LLO/III-nitride metal-insulator-semiconductor diode exhibit small frequency dispersion (<2%) and reveal a high effective dielectric constant of ˜28 for the LLO film. The LLO layer is shown to be effective in suppressing the reverse and forward leakage current in the MIS diode. In particular, the MIS diode forward current is reduced by 7 orders of magnitude at a forward bias of 1 V compared to a conventional Ni-Au/III-nitride Schottky diode.

  19. Luminescence of W(CO){sub 4}(4-Me-phen) in photosensitive thin films: A molecular probe of acrylate polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlins, K.A.; Lees, A.J.; Fuerniss, S.J.; Papathomas, K.I.

    1996-07-01

    The complex W(CO){sub 4}(4-Me-phen) (4-Me-phen = 4-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline) has been determined to be luminescent and act as a spectroscopic probe in UV-curable trimethylolpropane triacrylate/poly(methyl methacrylate) thin films. Electronic absorption and luminescence characteristics have been measured for this complex in room-temperature solutions and low-temperature (80 K) glasses and in 10 mil thin films of the unexposed and exposed acrylate resins. In each environment dual luminescence bands were observed which are attributed to triplet-centered metal-to-ligand charge-transfer ({sup 3}MLCT) excited states. For the unexposed photoresist these transitions were recorded at 520 and 750 nm and in the exposed material these are moved to 525 and 715 nm, respectively. The lowest energy emission band undergoes a substantial blue-shift and intensified greatly on polymerization; this phenomenon provides a useful molecular probe of the acrylate cross-linking process. These changes in emission characteristics are associated with a rigidochromic effect imparted on the lowest lying and solvent sensitive b{sub 2} {yields} b{sub 2}({pi}*) {sup 3}MLCT electronically excited state in this complex. The complex W(CO){sub 5}(4-CN-py) (4-CN-py = 4-cyanopyridine) was also investigated as a spectroscopic probe in the acrylate system but appears unsuitable for this purpose as it was found to degrade significantly in the resin. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Far-infrared transmission in GaN, AlN, and AlGaN thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, J.; Hernandez, S.; Alarcon-Llado, E.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Novikov, S. V.; Foxon, C. T.; Calleja, E.

    2008-08-01

    We present a far-infrared transmission study on group-III nitride thin films. Cubic GaN and AlN layers and c-oriented wurtzite GaN, AlN, and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x<0.3) layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs and Si(111) substrates, respectively. The Berreman effect allows us to observe simultaneously the transverse optic and the longitudinal optic phonons of both the cubic and the hexagonal films as transmission minima in the infrared spectra acquired with obliquely incident radiation. We discuss our results in terms of the relevant electromagnetic theory of infrared transmission in cubic and wurtzite thin films. We compare the infrared results with visible Raman-scattering measurements. In the case of films with low scattering volumes and/or low Raman efficiencies and also when the Raman signal of the substrate material obscures the weaker peaks from the nitride films, we find that the Berreman technique is particularly useful to complement Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Effect of alkane chain length and counterion on the freezing transition of cationic surfactant adsorbed film at alkane mixture - water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yuhei; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    Penetration of alkane molecules into the adsorbed film gives rise to a surface freezing transition of cationic surfactant at the alkane-water interface. To examine the effect of the alkane chain length and counterion on the surface freezing, we employed interfacial tensiometry and ellipsometry to study the interface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride aqueous solutions against dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures. Applying theoretical equations to the experimental results obtained, we found that the alkane molecules that have the same chain length as the surfactant adsorb preferentially into the surface freezing film. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the freezing transition temperature of cationic surfactant adsorbed film was independent of the kind of counterion. PMID:25932500

  2. Strain distribution of thin InN epilayers grown on (0001) GaN templates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delimitis, A.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Kehagias, Th.; Kioseoglou, J.; Karakostas, Th.; Nouet, G.

    2007-02-01

    A structural characterization of thin InN films is performed to determine the post-growth strain distribution, using electron microscopy techniques. A 60° misfit dislocation network at the InN /GaN interface effectively accommodates the lattice mismatch. The InN in-plane lattice parameter, which remained practically constant throughout the epilayer thickness, was precisely determined by electron diffraction analysis, and cross-section and plan-view lattice images. Image analysis using the geometric phase and projection methods revealed a uniform distribution of the residual tensile strain along the growth and lateral directions. The in-plane strain is primarily attributed to InN island coalescence during the initial stages of growth.

  3. Defect study of molecular beam epitaxy grown undoped GaInNAsSb thin film using junction-capacitance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2013-02-18

    Defects in undoped GaInNAsSb thin film (i-GaInNAsSb) were investigated by junction-capacitance technique using admittance and transient photocapacitance (TPC) spectroscopy. An electron trap D2 was identified at 0.34 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}) of i-GaInNAsSb using admittance spectroscopy. Optical transition of valance band (E{sub V}) electrons to a localized state OH1 (E{sub V} + 0.75 eV) was manifested in negative TPC signal. Combined activation energy of OH1 and D2 defect corresponds to the band-gap of i-GaInNAsSb, suggesting that OH1/D2 acts as an efficient recombination center. TPC signal at {approx}1.59 eV above E{sub V} was attributed to the nitrogen-induced localized state in GaInNAsSb.

  4. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  14. Measurement of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Holley, A E; Walker, M K; Cheeseman, K H; Slater, T F

    1993-09-01

    A modified method was developed to measure nM levels of a range of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples such as blood plasma and tissue homogenates and also in Folch lipid extracts of these samples. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and desferrioxamine (Desferal) were added to samples to prevent artifactual peroxidation. Aldehydes were reacted with 1,3-cyclohexanedione (CHD), cleaned up by solid-phase extraction on a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge and the fluorescent decahydroacridine derivatives resolved by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gradient elution. A wider range of aldehydes was detected in lipid extracts of plasma and liver homogenate compared to whole (unextracted) samples. Human plasma contained nM levels of acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal, pentanal, hexanal, and heptanal. 4-Hydroxynonenal (0.93 nmol/g) and alkanals with two to six carbons (up to 7.36 nmol/g) were detected in rat liver. Recovery of aldehydes added to whole plasma or to lipid extracts of plasma was dependent on carbon chain length, varying from 95% for acetaldehyde to 8% for decanal. Recovery from biological samples was significantly less than that of standards taken through the Sep-Pak clean-up procedure, suggesting that aldehydes can bind to plasma protein and lipid components. PMID:8406128

  15. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  16. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  17. Mononuclear Nonheme High-Spin Iron(III)-Acylperoxo Complexes in Olefin Epoxidation and Alkane Hydroxylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Clémancey, Martin; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Latour, Jean-Marc; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-02-24

    Mononuclear nonheme high-spin iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes bearing an N-methylated cyclam ligand were synthesized, spectroscopically characterized, and investigated in olefin epoxidation and alkane hydroxylation reactions. In the epoxidation of olefins, epoxides were yielded as the major products with high stereo-, chemo-, and enantioselectivities; cis- and trans-stilbenes were oxidized to cis- and trans-stilbene oxides, respectively. In the epoxidation of cyclohexene, cyclohexene oxide was formed as the major product with a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 1.0, indicating that nonheme iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes prefer C═C epoxidation to allylic C-H bond activation. Olefin epoxidation by chiral iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes afforded epoxides with high enantioselectivity, suggesting that iron(III)-acylperoxo species, not high-valent iron-oxo species, are the epoxidizing agent. In alkane hydroxylation reactions, iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes hydroxylated C-H bonds as strong as those in cyclohexane at -40 °C, wherein (a) alcohols were yielded as the major products with high regio- and stereoselectivities, (b) activation of C-H bonds by the iron(III)-acylperoxo species was the rate-determining step with a large KIE value and good correlation between reaction rates and bond dissociation energies of alkanes, and (c) the oxygen atom in the alcohol product was from the iron(III)-acylperoxo species, not from molecular oxygen. In isotopically labeled water (H2(18)O) experiments, incorporation of (18)O from H2(18)O into oxygenated products was not observed in the epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions. On the basis of mechanistic studies, we conclude that mononuclear nonheme high-spin iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes are strong oxidants capable of oxygenating hydrocarbons prior to their conversion into iron-oxo species via O-O bond cleavage. PMID:26816269

  18. Isolation and characterization of different bacterial strains for bioremediation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Guermouche M'rassi, A; Bensalah, F; Gury, J; Duran, R

    2015-10-01

    Crude oil is a common environmental pollutant composed of a large number of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Biodegradation is carried out by microbial communities that are important in determining the fate of pollutants in the environment. The intrinsic biodegradability of the hydrocarbons and the distribution in the environment of competent degrading microorganisms are crucial information for the implementation of bioremediation processes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of various bacteria toward aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate and characterize hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from contaminated soil of a refinery in Arzew, Algeria. A collection of 150 bacterial strains was obtained; the bacterial isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and their ability to degrade hydrocarbon compounds characterized. The isolated strains were mainly affiliated to the Gamma-Proteobacteria class. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the ability to metabolize high molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds such as pristane (C19) at 35.11 % by strain LGM22 and benzo[a] pyrene (C20) at 33.93 % by strain LGM11. Some strains were able to grow on all the hydrocarbons tested including octadecane, squalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Some strains were specialized degrading only few substrates. In contrast, the strain LGM2 designated as Pseudomonas sp. was found able to degrade both linear and branched alkanes as well as low and high poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The alkB gene involved in alkane degradation was detected in LGM2 and other Pseudomonas-related isolates. The capabilities of the isolated bacterial strains to degrade alkanes and PAHs should be of great practical significance in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:25813636

  19. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (−3.5 and −6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial

  20. Substrate independence of THz vibrational modes of polycrystalline thin films of molecular solids in waveguide THz-TDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha, S. Sree; Melinger, Joseph. S.; Qadri, S. B.; Grischkowsky, D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the metal substrate on the measurement of high resolution THz vibrational modes of molecular solids with the waveguide THz-TDS technique is investigated. The sample film of salicylic acid is studied using waveguide THz-TDS on three different metal substrates and two-surface passivated substrates. The independence of the observed THz vibrational modes to the metal substrate is demonstrated. Independently, surface passivation is presented as a viable experimental addition to the waveguide THz-TDS technique to aid the characterization of samples with known reactivity to metal surfaces.

  1. Molecular Basis of Mesophase Ordering in a Thiophene-Based Copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    DeLongchamp,D.; Kline, R.; Jung, Y.; Lin, E.; Fischer, D.; Gundlach, D.; Cotts, S.; Moad, A.; Richter, L.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The carrier mobility of poly(2,5-bis(3-alkylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) semiconductors can be substantially enhanced after heating through a thermotropic mesophase transition, which causes a significant improvement in thin film structural order. By directly measuring film structure throughout a heating and cooling cycle, we identify the molecular origin of this mesophase transition as the melting of interdigitated linear alkane side chains, in this case quaterdecyl. The morphology and phase behavior throughout the thermal cycle are controlled by the changing conformation of the side chains. Surprisingly, the melting of the side chains allows increases in the backbone order, p-p stacking, and carrier mobility. Upon cooling, the side chains recrystallize to preserve the excellent mesophase order and enhanced electrical performance.

  2. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from β-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product

  3. Molecular beam epitaxy-grown wurtzite MgS thin films for solar-blind ultra-violet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Y. H.; He, Q. L.; Cheung, W. Y.; Lok, S. K.; Wong, K. S.; Sou, I. K.; Ho, S. K.; Tam, K. W.

    2013-04-29

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown MgS on GaAs(111)B substrate was resulted in wurtzite phase, as demonstrated by detailed structural characterizations. Phenomenological arguments were used to account for why wurtzite phase is preferred over zincblende phase or its most stable rocksalt phase. Results of photoresponse and reflectance measurements performed on wurtzite MgS photodiodes suggest a direct bandgap at around 5.1 eV. Their response peaks at 245 nm with quantum efficiency of 9.9% and enjoys rejection of more than three orders at 320 nm and close to five orders at longer wavelengths, proving the photodiodes highly competitive in solar-blind ultraviolet detection.

  4. An automated spin-assisted approach for molecular layer-by-layer assembly of crosslinked polymer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Edwin P.; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M.; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2012-11-15

    We present the design of an automated spin-coater that facilitates fabrication of polymer films based on molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of ultrathin crosslinked fully-aromatic polyamide (PA) films that are chemically identical to polymer membranes used in water desalination applications as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate that the automated mLbL assembly creates films with a constant film growth rate and minimal roughness compared with the traditional interfacial polymerization of PA. This automated spin-coater improves the scalability and sample-to-sample consistency by reducing human involvement in the mLbL assembly.

  5. Characterization of deep acceptor level in as-grown ZnO thin film by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, M.; K., Mahmood; A. Hasan, M.; T. Ferguson, I.; Tsu, R.; Willander, M.

    2014-09-01

    We report deep level transient spectroscopy results from ZnO layers grown on silicon by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The hot probe measurements reveal mixed conductivity in the as-grown ZnO layers, and the current—voltage (I—V) measurements demonstrate a good quality p-type Schottky device. A new deep acceptor level is observed in the ZnO layer having activation energy of 0.49 ±0.03 eV and capture cross-section of 8.57 × 10-18 cm2. Based on the results from Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) of the ZnO layer, the observed acceptor trap level is tentatively attributed to a nitrogen-zinc vacancy complex in ZnO.

  6. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  7. Equilibrium thermophysical properties of alkanes at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Arunachalam, C.; Bozkurt, B.; Eubank, P.T.

    1996-01-01

    In order to perform calculations for thermal plasmas, sparks, and arcs, as in the thermal arc and electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes, thermophysical properties, such as the density, enthalpy, and heat capacity, of the original ambient dielectric liquid are required at very high temperatures and often pressures in the plasma state. A statistical model has been developed to provide these properties. At high temperatures, these hydrocarbons undergo a series of reactions to first dissociate and then to ionize to produce a plasma. The partition functions of each of the species generated are calculated and sued to determine the equilibrium mole fractions or particle fractions of each constituent of the resultant plasma. Only the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio matters so mixtures of alkanes can also be used. Specifically, tables of particles fractions, densities, enthalpies, and specific heat capacities are provided for methane and for hexadecane to 60,000 K and 10 kbar.

  8. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  9. Cometabolism of Methyl tertiary Butyl Ether and Gaseous n-Alkanes by Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 Grown on C5 to C8 n-Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 grew well on toluene, n-alkanes (C5 to C8), and 1° alcohols (C2 to C8) but not on other aromatics, gaseous n-alkanes (C1 to C4), isoalkanes (C4 to C6), 2° alcohols (C3 to C8), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), or tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA). Cells grown under carbon-limited conditions on n-alkanes in the presence of MTBE (42 μmol) oxidized up to 94% of the added MTBE to TBA. Less than 3% of the added MTBE was oxidized to TBA when cells were grown on either 1° alcohols, toluene, or dextrose in the presence of MTBE. Concentrated n-pentane-grown cells oxidized MTBE to TBA without a lag phase and without generating tertiary butyl formate (TBF) as an intermediate. Neither TBF nor TBA was consumed by n-pentane-grown cells, while formaldehyde, the expected C1 product of MTBE dealkylation, was rapidly consumed. Similar Ks values for MTBE were observed for cells grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes (12.95 ± 2.04 mM), suggesting that the same enzyme oxidizes MTBE in cells grown on each n-alkane. All growth-supporting n-alkanes (C5 to C8) inhibited MTBE oxidation by resting n-pentane-grown cells. Propane (Ki = 53 μM) and n-butane (Ki = 16 μM) also inhibited MTBE oxidation, and both gases were also consumed by cells during growth on n-pentane. Cultures grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes also exhibited up to twofold-higher levels of growth in the presence of propane or n-butane, whereas no growth stimulation was observed with methane, ethane, MTBE, TBA, or formaldehyde. The results are discussed in terms of their impacts on our understanding of MTBE biodegradation and cometabolism. PMID:14660389

  10. Enrichment and Characterization of a Psychrotolerant Consortium Degrading Crude Oil Alkanes Under Methanogenic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Ma, Tingting; Hu, Anyi; Dai, Lirong; He, Qiao; Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Anaerobic alkane degradation via methanogenesis has been intensively studied under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. While there is a paucity of information on the ability and composition of anaerobic alkane-degrading microbial communities under low temperature conditions. In this study, we investigated the ability of consortium Y15, enriched from Shengli oilfield, to degrade hydrocarbons under different temperature conditions (5-35 °C). The consortium could use hexadecane over a low temperature range (15-30 °C). No growth was detected below 10 °C and above 35 °C, indicating the presence of cold-tolerant species capable of alkane degradation. The preferential degradation of short chain n-alkanes from crude oil was observed by this consortium. The structure and dynamics of the microbial communities were examined using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and Sanger sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The core archaeal communities were mainly composed of aceticlastic Methanosaeta spp. Syntrophaceae-related microorganisms were always detected during consecutive transfers and dominated the bacterial communities, sharing 94-96 % sequence similarity with Smithella propionica strain LYP(T). Phylogenetic analysis of Syntrophaceae-related clones in diverse methanogenic alkane-degrading cultures revealed that most of them were clustered into three sublineages. Syntrophaceae clones retrieved from this study were mainly clustered into sublineage I, which may represent psychrotolerant, syntrophic alkane degraders. These results indicate the wide geographic distribution and ecological function of syntrophic alkane degraders. PMID:25783218

  11. Low-energy electron induced processes in molecular thin films condensed on silicon and titanium dioxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christopher D.

    The focus of the presented experimental research is to examine the fundamental physics and chemistry of electron-stimulated reactions upon adsorbate covered single crystal surfaces. Specifically, condensed SiCl4 on the Si(111) surface and condensed H2O on the TiO2 (110) surface have been studied. By varying adsorbate film thicknesses, the coupling strength of the electron target molecule to the substrate and surrounding media dictates the progression of the electron induced reactions. To investigate the electron interactions with SiCl4 on the Si(111) surface, a multilayer to monolayer approach was taken. Experiments measuring the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of fragment cations are discussed in Chapter 3. ESD of neutrals was performed on a multilayer (100 ML) coverage of SiCl4 and is discussed in Chapter 4. These experiments remove the influence of the silicon substrate on the electron induced dissociative processes that are monitored via time of flight mass spectrometry (ToF-MS). The results in Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 have been published in Surface Science 593 (2005) 173 and in the Journal of Chemical Physics 124 (2006) 164702, respectively. Results from electron induced reactions within thin films of SiCl4 are presented in Chapter 5. In the low coverage region, the cation and neutral desorption channels are monitored simultaneously, and the adsorbate coupling strength to the silicon substrate is substantially greater. This affects the desorption yields and the autodetachment probability of the transient negative ion (SiCl4-). Chapters 6--8 discuss work that focuses on the electron-stimulated reactions within the H2O/TiO2 system. A discussion of the interactions of H2O with the TiO2(110) surface is presented in Chapter 6. The transition metal oxide surface is comprised of acidic and basic water adsorption sites along with intrinsic surface defects where surface oxygen atoms are missing. These surface defect sites significantly influence the interactions of

  12. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length alkanes at low temperatures by a psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, L.G.; Hawari, J.; Zhou, E.; Bourbonniere, L.; Greer, C.W.; Inniss, W.E.

    1998-07-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5 C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C{sub 10} to C{sub 21} alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5 C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5 C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-do-decanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25 C.

  13. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope composition of n-alkanes in combustion residuals of fossil fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Huiling; Peng, Lin; Li, Zhongping; Liu, Xiaofeng; Song, Chongfang; Mu, Ling

    2014-11-01

    The hydrogen isotope compositions (δD) of n-alkanes present in the combustion residuals of fossil fuels (coal, gasoline, and diesel) were measured using GC-IRMS to distinguish between coal soot and vehicle exhaust. The n-alkane δD values of industrial and domestic coal soot ranged from -95.3‰ to -219.6‰ and -128.1‰ to -188.6‰, respectively, exhibiting similar tendencies. The δD values of the C15-C18n-alkanes in both types of coal soot were nearly consistent, and the δD values of the C19-C24n-alkanes exhibited a zigzag profile. The δD values of C16-C22n-alkanes in gasoline exhaust exhibited a saw-tooth distribution, decreased with the carbon number, and were more positive than the δD values of C16-C22n-alkanes in diesel exhaust, which increased with the carbon number. However, the δD values of the C23-C29n-alkanes in gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust were mostly consistent. The weighted average δD values of the C16-C19n-alkanes in industrial and domestic coal soot were similar to the average δD values in gasoline and diesel vehicle exhausts; however, the average δD values of the C21-C29n-alkanes in vehicle exhausts were richer in D than those in coal soot.

  14. Diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Tang, Y.; Ren, C.; Zhao, K.; Sun, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Alkane-degrading bacteria have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but their ecological characteristics in hydrocarbon microseep habitats are still poorly understood. In this study, the diversity and abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the near-surface soils of a Chinese onshore oil and gas field were investigated using molecular techniques. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of alkB genes revealed that Gram-negative genotypes (Alcanivorax and Acinetobacter) dominated n-alkane-degrading bacterial communities in the near-surface soils of oil and gas reservoirs, while the dominant microbial communities were Gram-positive bacteria (Mycobacterium and Rhodococcus) in background soil. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results furthermore showed that the abundance of alkB genes increased substantially in the surface soils above oil and gas reservoirs even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these soils. The results of this study implicate that trace amounts of volatile hydrocarbons migrate from oil and gas reservoirs, and likely result in the changes of microbial communities in the near-surface soil.

  15. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE. PMID:25432418

  16. David Adler Lectureship Award Talk: Friction and energy dissipation mechanisms in adsorbed molecules and molecularly thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krim, Jacqueline

    2015-03-01

    Studies of the fundamental origins of friction have undergone rapid progress in recent years, with the development of new experimental and computational techniques for measuring and simulating friction at atomic length and time scales. The increased interest has sparked a variety of discussions and debates concerning the nature of the atomic-scale and quantum mechanisms that dominate the dissipative process by which mechanical energy is transformed into heat. Measurements of the sliding friction of physisorbed monolayers and bilayers can provide information on the relative contributions of these various dissipative mechanisms. Adsorbed films, whether intentionally applied or present as trace levels of physisorbed contaminants, moreover are ubiquitous at virtually all surfaces. As such, they impact a wide range of applications whose progress depends on precise control and/or knowledge of surface diffusion processes. Examples include nanoscale assembly, directed transport of Brownian particles, material flow through restricted geometries such as graphene membranes and molecular sieves, passivation and edge effects in carbon-based lubricants, and the stability of granular materials associated with frictional and frictionless contacts. Work supported by NSFDMR1310456.

  17. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  18. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  19. Effect of n-alkanes on asphaltene structuring in petroleum oils.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Christian; Viguié, Jean-Romain; Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; Rogalski, Marek

    2005-05-24

    The interactions between asphaltenes and short- to medium-chain n-alkanes were studied using titration microcalorimetry and inverse chromatography. The exothermic heat effects observed upon mixing of asphaltenes and n-alkanes were interpreted in terms of assembling of the two types of compounds into mixed structures. We show that the energy of the interactions between n-alkanes and the asphaltene hydrocarbon chains is close to the energy of the interactions between the asphaltene chains. We propose that the latter interactions are responsible for the formation of the asphaltene aggregates and are the driving force of the aggregate assembly into higher structures. PMID:15896019

  20. Usefulness of conventional transbronchial needle aspiration in the diagnosis, staging and molecular characterization of pulmonary neoplasias by thin-prep based cytology: experience of a single oncological institute

    PubMed Central

    Ramieri, Maria Teresa; Marandino, Ferdinando; Visca, Paolo; Salvitti, Tommaso; Gallo, Enzo; Casini, Beatrice; Giordano, Francesca Romana; Frigieri, Claudia; Caterino, Mauro; Carlini, Sandro; Rinaldi, Massimo; Ceribelli, Anna; Pennetti, Annarita; Alò, Pier Luigi; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Filippetti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (c-TBNA) contributed to improve the bronchoscopic examination, allowing to sample lesions located even outside the tracheo-bronchial tree and in the hilo-mediastinal district, both for diagnostic and staging purposes. Methods We have evaluated the sensitivity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the c-TBNA performed during the 2005–2015 period for suspicious lung neoplasia and/or hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy at the Thoracic endoscopy of the Thoracic Surgery Department of the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome. Data from 273 consecutive patients (205 males and 68 females) were analyzed. Results Among 158 (58%) adequate specimens, 112 (41%) were neoplastic or contained atypical cells, 46 (17%) were negative or not diagnostic. We considered in the analysis first the overall period; then we compared the findings of the first [2005–2011] and second period [2012–2015] and, finally, only those of adequate specimens. During the overall period, sensibility and accuracy values were respectively of 53% and 63%, in the first period they reached 41% and 53% respectively; in the second period sensibility and accuracy reached 60% and 68%. Considering only the adequate specimens, sensibility and accuracy during the overall period were respectively of 80% and 82%; the values obtained for the first period were 68% and 72%. Finally, in the second period, sensibility reached 86% and accuracy 89%. Carcinoma-subtyping was possible in 112 cases, adenocarcinomas being diagnosed in 50 cases; further, in 30 cases molecular predictive data could be obtained. Conclusions The c-TBNA proved to be an efficient method for the diagnosis/staging of lung neoplasms and for the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Endoscopist’s skill and technical development, associated to thin-prep cytology and to a rapid on site examination (ROSE), were able to provide by c-TBNA a

  1. Layer-by-layer grown scalable redox-active ruthenium-based molecular multilayer thin films for electrochemical applications and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Maharajan, Sivarajakumar; Pobelov, Ilya V; Kwon, Nam Hee; Mohos, Miklos; Broekmann, Peter; Fromm, Katharina M; Haga, Masa-aki; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-11-14

    Here we report the first study on the electrochemical energy storage application of a surface-immobilized ruthenium complex multilayer thin film with anion storage capability. We employed a novel dinuclear ruthenium complex with tetrapodal anchoring groups to build well-ordered redox-active multilayer coatings on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface using a layer-by-layer self-assembly process. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV-Visible (UV-Vis) and Raman spectroscopy showed a linear increase of peak current, absorbance and Raman intensities, respectively with the number of layers. These results indicate the formation of well-ordered multilayers of the ruthenium complex on ITO, which is further supported by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the layers can be controlled with nanometer precision. In particular, the thickest layer studied (65 molecular layers and approx. 120 nm thick) demonstrated fast electrochemical oxidation/reduction, indicating a very low attenuation of the charge transfer within the multilayer. In situ-UV-Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy results demonstrated the reversible electrochromic/redox behavior of the ruthenium complex multilayered films on ITO with respect to the electrode potential, which is an ideal prerequisite for e.g. smart electrochemical energy storage applications. Galvanostatic charge-discharge experiments demonstrated a pseudocapacitor behavior of the multilayer film with a good specific capacitance of 92.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 10 μA cm(-2) and an excellent cycling stability. As demonstrated in our prototypical experiments, the fine control of physicochemical properties at nanometer scale, relatively good stability of layers under ambient conditions makes the multilayer coatings of this type an excellent material for e.g. electrochemical energy storage, as interlayers in inverted bulk heterojunction solar cell applications and as functional components in molecular electronics applications

  2. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  3. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  4. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Martina; Presentato, Alessandro; Milazzo, Giorgio; Turner, Raymond J.; Fedi, Stefano; Frascari, Dario; Zannoni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane) were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from n-butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD—coding for Soluble Di-Iron Monooxgenases (SDIMOs) involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation—were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids, or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria–Bertani broth). The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane) and/or liquid (n-hexane) short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step. PMID:26029173

  5. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Martina; Presentato, Alessandro; Milazzo, Giorgio; Turner, Raymond J; Fedi, Stefano; Frascari, Dario; Zannoni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane) were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from n-butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD-coding for Soluble Di-Iron Monooxgenases (SDIMOs) involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation-were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids, or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria-Bertani broth). The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane) and/or liquid (n-hexane) short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step. PMID:26029173

  6. Characterization of the Medium- and Long-Chain n-Alkanes Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain SJTD-1 and Its Alkane Hydroxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12–C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18. PMID:25165808

  7. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Final report, January 1, 1990--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement (Phase I-III), we uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of fight alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of fight hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane>propane>ethane>methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase V). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases IV, VI), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases VII through IX). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phases V and VI so that further work is not anticipated. We made excellent progress during 1994 in generating a class of less costly new materials which have the potential for high catalytic activity. New routes were developed for replacing costly perfluorophenyl groups in the meso-position of metalloporphyrin catalysts with far less expensive and lower molecular weight perfluoromethyl groups.

  8. Laser annealing of laser assisted molecular beam deposited ZnO thin films with application to metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li Meiya; Anderson, Wayne; Chokshi, Nehal; De Leon, Robert L.; Tompa, Gary

    2006-09-01

    We report on the effect of postdeposition laser annealing of undoped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films grown by laser assisted molecular beam deposition. Hall-effect measurements show that some undoped ZnO films change from n type with mobility values in the range of 200 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} to p-type material with mobility value of 73 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, after laser annealing. The photoconductive behavior was clearly seen on the laser-annealed samples, with values of 0.28 m{omega}{sup -1}. The structural and optical properties of the films were improved with laser annealing as shown by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, and photoluminescence measurement. All of the nonlaser and laser annealed samples showed near-band emission at {approx}3.3 eV. Metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors were fabricated from the films.

  9. Structural properties of Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Se{sub 3} thin films grown via molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Babakiray, Sercan; Johnson, Trent A.; Borisov, Pavel; Holcomb, Mikel B.; Lederman, David; Marcus, Matthew A.; Tarafder, Kartick

    2015-07-28

    The effects of Mn doping on the structural properties of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in thin film form were studied in samples grown via molecular beam epitaxy. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, supported by density functional theory calculations, indicate that preferential incorporation occurs substitutionally in Bi sites across the entire film volume. This finding is consistent with x-ray diffraction measurements which show that the out of plane lattice constant expands while the in plane lattice constant contracts as the Mn concentration is increased. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the Mn valency is 2+ and that the Mn bonding is similar to that in MnSe. The expansion along the out of plane direction is most likely due to weakening of the Van der Waals interactions between adjacent Se planes. Transport measurements are consistent with this Mn{sup 2+} substitution of Bi sites if additional structural defects induced by this substitution are taken into account.

  10. Magnetic and transport properties of epitaxial thin film MgFe2O4 grown on MgO (100) by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han-Chun; Mauit, Ozhet; Coileáin, Cormac Ó; Syrlybekov, Askar; Khalid, Abbas; Mouti, Anas; Abid, Mourad; Zhang, Hong-Zhou; Abid, Mohamed; Shvets, Igor V.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium ferrite is a very important magnetic material due to its interesting magnetic and electrical properties and its chemical and thermal stability. Here we report on the magnetic and transport properties of epitaxial MgFe2O4 thin films grown on MgO (001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The structural properties and chemical composition of the MgFe2O4 films were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The nonsaturation of the magnetization in high magnetic fields observed for M (H) measurements and the linear negative magnetoresistance (MR) curves indicate the presence of anti-phase boundaries (APBs) in MgFe2O4. The presence of APBs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, post annealing decreases the resistance and enhances the MR of the film, suggesting migration of the APBs. Our results may be valuable for the application of MgFe2O4 in spintronics. PMID:25388355

  11. A photoluminescence comparison of CdTe thin films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Bevan, M. J.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Choyke, W. J.

    1988-09-01

    High perfection CdTe thin films have been grown on (001) InSb and CdTe substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and sputtering in ultrahigh vacuum techniques. The quality of the as-grown CdTe films are characterized by 2-K photoluminescence. The spectra show strong and sharp exciton transitions and weak 1.40-1.50-eV defect-related bands. Radiative defect densities of lower than 0.002 are realized. High-resolution spectroscopy shows that the full width at half maximum of the principal bound exciton lines is about 0.1 meV. Such small ρ values and narrow photoluminescence lines have not been previously reported. The largest luminescence efficiency is observed for MOCVD-CdTe films grown on CdTe substrates. A variety of impurities appear to be responsible for the observed radiative transitions in these three kinds of CdTe films. We attempt to assign the observed impurity related lines by a comparison with ``known'' impurities in bulk CdTe spectra given in the literature.

  12. Shear thinning and shear dilatancy of liquid n-hexadecane via equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations: Temperature, pressure, and density effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Chang; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2008-07-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed in both isochoric-isothermal (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensemble systems. Under steady state shearing conditions, thermodynamic states and rheological properties of liquid n-hexadecane molecules have been studied. Between equilibrium and nonequilibrium states, it is important to understand how shear rates (γ˙) affect the thermodynamic state variables of temperature, pressure, and density. At lower shear rates of γ˙<1×1011s-1, the relationships between the thermodynamic variables at nonequilibrium states closely approximate those at equilibrium states, namely, the liquid is very near its Newtonian fluid regime. Conversely, at extreme shear rates of γ˙>1×1011s-1, specific behavior of shear dilatancy is observed in the variations of nonequilibrium thermodynamic states. Significantly, by analyzing the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and density on shear flow system, we report a variety of rheological properties including the shear thinning relationship between viscosity and shear rate, zero-shear-rate viscosity, rotational relaxation time, and critical shear rate. In addition, the flow activation energy and the pressure-viscosity coefficient determined through Arrhenius and Barus equations acceptably agree with the related experimental and MD simulation results.

  13. A Rhodium–Pentane Sigma‐Alkane Complex: Characterization in the Solid State by Experimental and Computational Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, F. Mark; Rees, Nicholas H.; Krämer, Tobias; Iannuzzi, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The pentane σ‐complex [Rh{Cy2P(CH2CH2)PCy2}(η2:η2‐C5H12)][BArF 4] is synthesized by a solid/gas single‐crystal to single‐crystal transformation by addition of H2 to a precursor 1,3‐pentadiene complex. Characterization by low temperature single‐crystal X‐ray diffraction (150 K) and SSNMR spectroscopy (158 K) reveals coordination through two Rh⋅⋅⋅H−C interactions in the 2,4‐positions of the linear alkane. Periodic DFT calculations and molecular dynamics on the structure in the solid state provide insight into the experimentally observed Rh⋅⋅⋅H−C interaction, the extended environment in the crystal lattice and a temperature‐dependent pentane rearrangement implicated by the SSNMR data. PMID:26880330

  14. A Rhodium-Pentane Sigma-Alkane Complex: Characterization in the Solid State by Experimental and Computational Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, F Mark; Rees, Nicholas H; Weller, Andrew S; Krämer, Tobias; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Macgregor, Stuart A

    2016-03-01

    The pentane σ-complex [Rh{Cy2 P(CH2 CH2 )PCy2 }(η(2) :η(2) -C5 H12 )][BAr(F) 4 ] is synthesized by a solid/gas single-crystal to single-crystal transformation by addition of H2 to a precursor 1,3-pentadiene complex. Characterization by low temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction (150 K) and SSNMR spectroscopy (158 K) reveals coordination through two Rh⋅⋅⋅H-C interactions in the 2,4-positions of the linear alkane. Periodic DFT calculations and molecular dynamics on the structure in the solid state provide insight into the experimentally observed Rh⋅⋅⋅H-C interaction, the extended environment in the crystal lattice and a temperature-dependent pentane rearrangement implicated by the SSNMR data. PMID:26880330

  15. STRUCTURE-REACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS IN DEHYDROHALOGENATION REACTIONS OF POLYCHLORINATED AND POLYBROMINATED ALKANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current information is inadequate to predict the rates at which polyhalogenated alkanes undergo dehydrohalogenation rations under environmental conditions, forming olefins that are frequently more toxic and more recalcitrant than the products of substitution reactions. o permit e...

  16. Modeling the Role of Alkanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Their Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations ...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  18. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES... mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  19. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers. PMID:25346450

  20. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

    1998-06-23

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins are disclosed, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

  1. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, Tilak; Lyons, James E.; Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Bhinde, Manoj V.

    1998-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

  2. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain. PMID:25401074

  3. Regulation of the Alkane Hydroxylase CYP153 Gene in a Gram-Positive Alkane-Degrading Bacterium, Dietzia sp. Strain DQ12-45-1b

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie-Liang; JiangYang, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    CYP153, one of the most common medium-chain n-alkane hydroxylases belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is widely expressed in n-alkane-degrading bacteria. CYP153 is also thought to cooperate with AlkB in degrading various n-alkanes. However, the mechanisms regulating the expression of the protein remain largely unknown. In this paper, we studied CYP153 gene transcription regulation by the potential AraC family regulator (CypR) located upstream of the CYP153 gene cluster in a broad-spectrum n-alkane-degrading Gram-positive bacterium, Dietzia sp. strain DQ12-45-1b. We first identified the transcriptional start site and the promoter of the CYP153 gene cluster. Sequence alignment of upstream regions of CYP153 gene clusters revealed high conservation in the −10 and −35 regions in Actinobacteria. Further analysis of the β-galactosidase activity in the CYP153 gene promoter-lacZ fusion cell indicated that the CYP153 gene promoter was induced by n-alkanes comprised of 8 to 14 carbon atoms, but not by derived decanol and decanic acid. Moreover, we constructed a cypR mutant strain and found that the CYP153 gene promoter activities and CYP153 gene transcriptional levels in the mutant strain were depressed compared with those in the wild-type strain in the presence of n-alkanes, suggesting that CypR served as an activator for the CYP153 gene promoter. By comparing CYP153 gene arrangements in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, we found that the AraC family regulator is ubiquitously located upstream of the CYP153 gene, suggesting its universal regulatory role in CYP153 gene transcription. We further hypothesize that the observed mode of CYP153 gene regulation is shared by many Actinobacteria. PMID:26567302

  4. The Number of High-Energy Bands in the Photoelectron Spectrum of Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merris, Russell; Gutman, Ivan

    2000-12-01

    It was observed that within the Bieri-Dill-Heilbronner-Schmelzer model for the calculation of the ion-ization energies of alkanes CnH2n+2, there are exactly n C2s -electron energy levels lying below the degenerate α-ß manifold. We now show that, indeed, this regularity is obeyed by practically all alkane species. Exceptions do exist, but they must possess a (chemically infeasible) group of more than six mutually connected quaternary carbon atoms.

  5. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-01-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella. PMID:21914097

  6. Carbon Isotopes of Alkanes in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperatures and Pressures: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques [1-4]. With more evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history [5-7], abiotic formation by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis during serpentization reactions may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars [8, 9]. While the experimental studies performed to date leave little doubt that chemical reactions exist for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds by mineral surface-catalyzed reactions [10-12], little is known about the reaction pathways by which CO2 and/or CO are reduced under hydrothermal conditions. Carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements of alkanes have been used as an effective tool to constrain the origin and reaction pathways of hydrocarbon formation. Alkanes generated by thermal breakdown of high molecular weight organic compounds have carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures completely distinct from those formed abiotically [13-15]. Recent experimental studies, however, showed that different abiogenic hydrocarbon formation processes (e.g., polymerization vs. depolymerization) may have different carbon and hydrogen isotopic patterns [16]. Results from previous experiments studying decomposition of higher molecular weight organic compounds (lignite) also suggested that pressure could be a crucial factor affecting fractionation of carbon isotopes [17]. Under high pressure conditions, no experimental data are available describing fractionation of carbon isotope during mineral catalyzed FTT synthesis. Thus, hydrothermal experiments present an excellent opportunity to provide the requisite carbon isotope data. Such data can also be used to identify reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis under experimental conditions.

  7. Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria as whole-cell biosensors for n-alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Sevilla, Emma; Yuste, Luis; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors offer potentially useful, cost-effective systems for the in-situ monitoring of seawater for hydrocarbons derived from accidental spills. The present work compares the performance of a biosensor system for the detection of alkanes in seawater, hosted in either Escherichia coli (commonly employed in whole-cell biosensors but not optimized for alkane assimilation) or different marine bacteria specialized in assimilating alkanes. The sensor system was based on the Pseudomonas putida AlkS regulatory protein and the PalkB promoter fused to a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein. While the E. coli sensor provided the fastest response to pure alkanes (25-fold induction after 2 h under the conditions used), a sensor based on Alcanivorax borkumensis was slower, requiring 3–4 h to reach similar induction values. However, the A. borkumensis sensor showed a fourfold lower detection threshold for octane (0.5 μM), and was also better at sensing the alkanes present in petrol. At petrol concentrations of 0.0125%, the A. borkumensis sensor rendered a sevenfold induction, while E. coli sensor showed no response. We discuss possible explanations to this behaviour in terms of the cellular adaptations to alkane uptake and the basal fluorescence produced by each bacterial strain, which was lowest for A. borkumensis. PMID:25874658

  8. Two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, N; Yeager, C M; Arp, D J

    2001-11-01

    Alkane monooxygenases in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8 were examined at the physiological and genetic levels. Strain CF8 can utilize alkanes ranging in chain length from C(2) to C(16). Butane degradation by butane-grown cells was strongly inhibited by allylthiourea, a copper-selective chelator, while hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells showed detectable butane degradation activity in the presence of allylthiourea. Growth on butane and hexane was strongly inhibited by 1-hexyne, while 1-hexyne did not affect growth on octane or decane. A specific 30-kDa acetylene-binding polypeptide was observed for butane-, hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells but was absent from cells grown with octane or decane in the presence of 1-hexyne. These results suggest the presence of two monooxygenases in strain CF8. Degenerate primers designed for PCR amplification of genes related to the binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas oleovorans were used to clone a related gene from strain CF8. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that this gene encoding a binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase was expressed in cells grown on alkanes above C(6). These results indicate the presence of two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8. PMID:11679317

  9. Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Normal Alkane Fuels in a Model Combustor of Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    今村, 宰; 石川, 雄太; 鈴木, 俊介; 福本, 皓士郎; 西田, 俊介; 氏家, 康成; 津江, 光洋

    Effect of kinds of one-component n-alkane liquid fuels on combustion characteristics was investigated experimentally using a model combustor of scramjet engine. The inlet condition of a model combustor is 2.0 of Mach number, up to 2400K of total temperature, and 0.38MPa of total pressure. Five kinds of n-alkane are tested, of which carbon numbers are 7, 8, 10, 13, and 16. They are more chemically active and less volatile with an increase of alkane carbon number. Fuels are injected to the combustor in the upstream of cavity with barbotage nitrogen gas and self-ignition performance was investigated. The result shows that self-ignition occurs with less equivalence ratio when alkane carbon number is smaller. This indicates that physical characteristic of fuel, namely volatile of fuel, is dominant for self-ignition behavior. Effect on flame-holding performance is also examined with adding pilot hydrogen and combustion is kept after cutting off pilot hydrogen with the least equivalence ratio where alkane carbon number is from 8 to 10. These points are discussed qualitatively from the conflict effect of chemical and physical properties on alkane carbon number.

  10. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; et al

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS).more » Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have implications on atmospheric gas-phase chemistry and the oxidative stability of organic substances.« less

  11. Multifunctional thin film surface

    SciTech Connect

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  12. Quantitative determination of molecular structure in multilayered thin films of biaxial and lower symmetry from photon spectroscopies. I. Reflection infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Atul N.; Allara, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A semitheoretical formalism based on classical electromagnetic wave theory has been developed for application to the quantitative treatment of reflection spectra from multilayered anisotropic films on both metallic and nonmetallic substrates. Both internal and external reflection experiments as well as transmission can be handled. The theory is valid for all wavelengths and is appropriate, therefore, for such experiments as x-ray reflectivity, uv-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry, and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Further, the theory is applicable to multilayered film structures of variable number of layers, each with any degree of anisotropy up to and including full biaxial symmetry. The reflectivities (and transmissivities) are obtained at each frequency by solving the wave propagation equations using a rigorous 4×4 transfer matrix method developed by Yeh in which the optical functions of each medium are described in the form of second rank (3×3) tensors. In order to obtain optical tensors for materials not readily available in single crystal form, a method has been developed to evaluate tensor elements from the complex scalar optical functions (n̂) obtained from the isotropic material with the limitations that the molecular excitations are well characterized and obey photon-dipole selection rules. This method is intended primarily for infrared vibrational spectroscopy and involves quantitative decomposition of the isotropic imaginary optical function (k) spectrum into a sum of contributions from fundamental modes, the assignment of a direction in molecular coordinates to the transition dipole matrix elements for each mode, the appropriate scaling of each k vector component in surface coordinates according to a selected surface orientation of the molecule to give a diagonal im(n̂) tensor, and the calculation of the real(n̂) spectrum tensor elements by the Kramers-Kronig transformation. Tensors for other surface orientations are generated by an

  13. Determination of Sudan I in paprika powder by molecularly imprinted polymers-thin layer chromatography-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Hu, Yaxi; Chen, Da; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Grant, Edward; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-10-01

    Sudan I is a carcinogenic and mutagenic azo-compound that has been utilized as a common adulterant in spice and spice blends to impart a desirable red color to foods. A novel biosensor combining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), thin layer chromatography (TLC) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) could determine Sudan I levels in paprika powder to 1 ppm (or 2 ng/spot). Sudan I spiked paprika extracts (spiking levels: 0, 1, 5, 10, 40, 70 and 100 ppm) were prepared. Sudan I imprinted polymers were synthesized by employing the interaction between Sudan I (template) and methacrylic acid (functional monomer), followed by washing to remove Sudan I leaving the Sudan I-binding sites exposed. MIPs were used as a stationary phase for TLC and could selectively retain Sudan I at the original spot with little interference. A gold colloid SERS substrate could enhance Raman intensity for Sudan I in this MIP-TLC system. Principal component analysis plot and partial least squares regression (R(2)=0.978) models were constructed and a linear regression model (R(2)=0.983) correlated spiking levels (5, 10, 40, 70 and 100 ppm) with the peak intensities (721 cm(-1)) of Sudan I SERS spectra. Both separation (30-40s) and detection (1s or 0.1s) were extremely fast by using both commercial bench-top and custom made portable Raman spectrometers. This biosensor can be applied as a rapid, low-cost and reliable tool for screening Sudan I adulteration in foods. PMID:26078169

  14. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  15. Conversion of alkanes to linear alkylsilanes using an iridium-iron-catalysed tandem dehydrogenation-isomerization-hydrosilylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiangqing; Huang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The conversion of inexpensive, saturated hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added speciality chemicals using regiospecific, catalytic functionalization of alkanes is a major goal of organometallic chemistry. Linear alkylsilanes represent one such speciality chemical—they have a wide range of applications, including release coatings, silicone rubbers and moulding products. Direct, selective, functionalization of alkanes at primary C-H bonds is difficult and, to date, methods for catalytically converting alkanes into linear alkylsilanes are unknown. Here, we report a well-defined, dual-catalyst system for one-pot, two-step alkane silylations. The system comprises a pincer-ligated Ir catalyst for alkane dehydrogenation and an Fe catalyst that effects a subsequent tandem olefin isomerization-hydrosilylation. This method exhibits exclusive regioselectivity for the production of terminally functionalized alkylsilanes. This dual-catalyst strategy has also been applied to regioselective alkane borylations to form linear alkylboronate esters.

  16. Conversion of alkanes to linear alkylsilanes using an iridium-iron-catalysed tandem dehydrogenation-isomerization-hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Huang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The conversion of inexpensive, saturated hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added speciality chemicals using regiospecific, catalytic functionalization of alkanes is a major goal of organometallic chemistry. Linear alkylsilanes represent one such speciality chemical-they have a wide range of applications, including release coatings, silicone rubbers and moulding products. Direct, selective, functionalization of alkanes at primary C-H bonds is difficult and, to date, methods for catalytically converting alkanes into linear alkylsilanes are unknown. Here, we report a well-defined, dual-catalyst system for one-pot, two-step alkane silylations. The system comprises a pincer-ligated Ir catalyst for alkane dehydrogenation and an Fe catalyst that effects a subsequent tandem olefin isomerization-hydrosilylation. This method exhibits exclusive regioselectivity for the production of terminally functionalized alkylsilanes. This dual-catalyst strategy has also been applied to regioselective alkane borylations to form linear alkylboronate esters. PMID:26791899

  17. Berberine cation: A fluorescent chemosensor for alkanes and other low-polarity compounds. An explanation of this phenomenon

    PubMed

    Cossio; Arrieta; Cebolla; Membrado; Vela; Garriga; Domingo

    2000-07-27

    Alkanes in the presence of berberine sulfate provide an enhancement of fluorescent signal, which depends on alkane concentration and structure, when the system is irradiated with monochromatic UV light. Computational analysis suggests that an ion-induced dipole between alkanes and berberine sulfate is responsible for this phenomenon. This interaction can properly model the experimentally obtained fluorescent response. The proposed explanation allows other interacting systems to be designed, which have been experimentally confirmed. PMID:10930271

  18. Layer-by-layer grown scalable redox-active ruthenium-based molecular multilayer thin films for electrochemical applications and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Maharajan, Sivarajakumar; Pobelov, Ilya V.; Kwon, Nam Hee; Mohos, Miklos; Broekmann, Peter; Fromm, Katharina M.; Haga, Masa-Aki; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Here we report the first study on the electrochemical energy storage application of a surface-immobilized ruthenium complex multilayer thin film with anion storage capability. We employed a novel dinuclear ruthenium complex with tetrapodal anchoring groups to build well-ordered redox-active multilayer coatings on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface using a layer-by-layer self-assembly process. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV-Visible (UV-Vis) and Raman spectroscopy showed a linear increase of peak current, absorbance and Raman intensities, respectively with the number of layers. These results indicate the formation of well-ordered multilayers of the ruthenium complex on ITO, which is further supported by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the layers can be controlled with nanometer precision. In particular, the thickest layer studied (65 molecular layers and approx. 120 nm thick) demonstrated fast electrochemical oxidation/reduction, indicating a very low attenuation of the charge transfer within the multilayer. In situ-UV-Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy results demonstrated the reversible electrochromic/redox behavior of the ruthenium complex multilayered films on ITO with respect to the electrode potential, which is an ideal prerequisite for e.g. smart electrochemical energy storage applications. Galvanostatic charge-discharge experiments demonstrated a pseudocapacitor behavior of the multilayer film with a good specific capacitance of 92.2 F g-1 at a current density of 10 μA cm-2 and an excellent cycling stability. As demonstrated in our prototypical experiments, the fine control of physicochemical properties at nanometer scale, relatively good stability of layers under ambient conditions makes the multilayer coatings of this type an excellent material for e.g. electrochemical energy storage, as interlayers in inverted bulk heterojunction solar cell applications and as functional components in molecular electronics applications

  19. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the C—H bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane. PMID:25904994

  20. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation by cultures enriched from oil sands tailings ponds involves multiple species capable of fumarate addition.

    PubMed

    Tan, BoonFei; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    A methanogenic short-chain alkane-degrading culture (SCADC) was enriched from oil sands tailings and transferred several times with a mixture of C6, C7, C8 and C10 n-alkanes as the predominant organic carbon source, plus 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane as minor components. Cultures produced ∼40% of the maximum theoretical methane during 18 months incubation while depleting the n-alkanes, 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane. Substrate depletion correlated with detection of metabolites characteristic of fumarate activation of 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane, but not n-alkane metabolites. During active methanogenesis with the mixed alkanes, reverse-transcription PCR confirmed the expression of functional genes (assA and bssA) associated with hydrocarbon addition to fumarate. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified during active alkane degradation revealed enrichment of Clostridia (particularly Peptococcaceae) and methanogenic Archaea (Methanosaetaceae and Methanomicrobiaceae). Methanogenic cultures transferred into medium containing sulphate produced sulphide, depleted n-alkanes and produced the corresponding succinylated alkane metabolites, but were slow to degrade 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane; these cultures were enriched in Deltaproteobacteria rather than Clostridia. 3-Methylpentane was not degraded by any cultures. Thus, nominally methanogenic oil sands tailings harbour dynamic and versatile hydrocarbon-degrading fermentative syntrophs and sulphate reducers capable of degrading n-, iso- and cyclo-alkanes by addition to fumarate. PMID:25873461

  1. [Distribution Characteristics and Source Apportionment of n-Alkanes in Water from Yellow River in Henan Section].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing-lan; Xi, Nan-nan; Zhang, Fei; Liu, Shu-hui; Sun, Jian-hui

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the distributions and possible sources of n-alkanes in water and suspended particulate matter from Yellow River in Henan section, 26 water and suspended particulate matter samples were collected in August 2010 and 22 n-alkanes (C₁₄-C₃₆) were quantitatively determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Potential sources of n-alkanes were analyzed using different characteristic parameters. The results indicated that total concentrations of 22 n-alkanes were 521-5,843 ng · L⁻¹ with a mean concentration of 1,409 ng · L⁻¹, while the total amounts of n-alkanes in the suspended particulate matter were 463-11,142 ng · L⁻¹ with a mean value of 1,951 ng · L⁻¹. The composition profiles of n-alkanes in water showed unimodal distribution with a peak at C₂₅ in water. However, the composition characteristics of n-alkanes in SPM were of bimodal type, but still with the advantage of high carbon hydrocarbons peak at C₂₅. Results of characteristic parameters including CPI, TAR, OEP and % WaxCn showed that n-alkanes in the studied area were derived mainly from combustion of fossil fuel, while terrestrial higher plant played a role in the existence of n-alkanes in water and suspended particulate matter from Yellow River in Henan section. PMID:27337879

  2. Leaf wax n-alkane distributions in and across modern plants: Implications for paleoecology and chemotaxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Rosemary T.; McInerney, Francesca A.

    2013-09-01

    Long chain (C21 to C37) n-alkanes are among the most long-lived and widely utilized terrestrial plant biomarkers. Dozens of studies have examined the range and variation of n-alkane chain-length abundances in modern plants from around the world, and n-alkane distributions have been used for a variety of purposes in paleoclimatology and paleoecology as well as chemotaxonomy. However, most of the paleoecological applications of n-alkane distributions have been based on a narrow set of modern data that cannot address intra- and inter-plant variability. Here, we present the results of a study using trees from near Chicago, IL, USA, as well as a meta-analysis of published data on modern plant n-alkane distributions. First, we test the conformity of n-alkane distributions in mature leaves across the canopy of 38 individual plants from 24 species as well as across a single growing season and find no significant differences for either canopy position or time of leaf collection. Second, we compile 2093 observations from 86 sources, including the new data here, to examine the generalities of n-alkane parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and chain-length ratios for different plant groups. We show that angiosperms generally produce more n-alkanes than do gymnosperms, supporting previous observations, and furthermore that CPI values show such variation in modern plants that it is prudent to discard the use of CPI as a quantitative indicator of n-alkane degradation in sediments. We also test the hypotheses that certain n-alkane chain lengths predominate in and therefore can be representative of particular plant groups, namely, C23 and C25 in Sphagnum mosses, C27 and C29 in woody plants, and C31 in graminoids (grasses). We find that chain-length distributions are highly variable within plant groups, such that chemotaxonomic distinctions between grasses and woody plants are difficult to make based on n-alkane abundances. In contrast

  3. Ubiquitous Presence and Novel Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane Degraders in Cold Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gittel, Antje; Donhauser, Johanna; Røy, Hans; Girguis, Peter R.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.

    2015-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil and are released to the marine environment by natural seepage and from anthropogenic sources. Due to their chemical inertness, their removal from anoxic marine sediments is primarily controlled by the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms. To facilitate comprehensive cultivation-independent surveys of the diversity and distribution of anaerobic alkane degraders, we designed novel PCR primers that cover all known diversity of the 1-methylalkyl succinate synthase gene (masD/assA), which catalyzes the initial activation of alkanes. We studied masD/assA gene diversity in pristine and seepage-impacted Danish coastal sediments, as well as in sediments and alkane-degrading enrichment cultures from the Middle Valley (MV) hydrothermal vent system in the Pacific Northwest. MasD/assA genes were ubiquitously present, and the primers captured the diversity of both known and previously undiscovered masD/assA gene diversity. Seepage sediments were dominated by a single masD/assA gene cluster, which is presumably indicative of a substrate-adapted community, while pristine sediments harbored a diverse range of masD/assA phylotypes including those present in seepage sediments. This rare biosphere of anaerobic alkane degraders will likely increase in abundance in the event of seepage or accidental oil spillage. Nanomolar concentrations of short-chain alkanes (SCA) were detected in pristine and seepage sediments. Interestingly, anaerobic alkane degraders closely related to strain BuS5, the only SCA degrader in pure culture, were found in mesophilic MV enrichments, but not in cold sediments from Danish waters. We propose that the new masD/assA gene lineages in these sediments represent novel phylotypes that are either fueled by naturally occurring low levels of SCA or that metabolize medium- to long-chain alkanes. Our study highlights that masD/assA genes are a relevant diagnostic marker to identify seepage and microseepage, e

  4. Ubiquitous Presence and Novel Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane Degraders in Cold Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Gittel, Antje; Donhauser, Johanna; Røy, Hans; Girguis, Peter R; Jørgensen, Bo B; Kjeldsen, Kasper U

    2015-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil and are released to the marine environment by natural seepage and from anthropogenic sources. Due to their chemical inertness, their removal from anoxic marine sediments is primarily controlled by the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms. To facilitate comprehensive cultivation-independent surveys of the diversity and distribution of anaerobic alkane degraders, we designed novel PCR primers that cover all known diversity of the 1-methylalkyl succinate synthase gene (masD/assA), which catalyzes the initial activation of alkanes. We studied masD/assA gene diversity in pristine and seepage-impacted Danish coastal sediments, as well as in sediments and alkane-degrading enrichment cultures from the Middle Valley (MV) hydrothermal vent system in the Pacific Northwest. MasD/assA genes were ubiquitously present, and the primers captured the diversity of both known and previously undiscovered masD/assA gene diversity. Seepage sediments were dominated by a single masD/assA gene cluster, which is presumably indicative of a substrate-adapted community, while pristine sediments harbored a diverse range of masD/assA phylotypes including those present in seepage sediments. This rare biosphere of anaerobic alkane degraders will likely increase in abundance in the event of seepage or accidental oil spillage. Nanomolar concentrations of short-chain alkanes (SCA) were detected in pristine and seepage sediments. Interestingly, anaerobic alkane degraders closely related to strain BuS5, the only SCA degrader in pure culture, were found in mesophilic MV enrichments, but not in cold sediments from Danish waters. We propose that the new masD/assA gene lineages in these sediments represent novel phylotypes that are either fueled by naturally occurring low levels of SCA or that metabolize medium- to long-chain alkanes. Our study highlights that masD/assA genes are a relevant diagnostic marker to identify seepage and microseepage, e

  5. Supramolecular assemblies of alkane functionalized poly ethylene glycol copolymer for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lida

    The therapeutic effects of many modern drugs were limited owing to their physical properties and half-life in the blood stream. The purpose of this research is to study the relationship between drug delivery performances and chemical properties of the polymer micelle drug carriers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) based alternating copolymer poly[(polyoxyethylene)-oxy-5-hydroxyisophthalic] (Ppeg) with PEG molecular weights of 600 and 1000 were synthesized and modified with different alkanes to study the effects of altering the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chain lengths. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum, critical micelle concentration (CMC), micelle size, and micelle zeta potential of the synthesized polymers were measured. The resulting polymer particles were able to form micelles in aqueous solution with CMCs lower than 0.04 wt%. Drug delivery studies were performed with a model hydrophobic drug, pyrene. Drug loading data showed the polymer particles were able to encapsulate pyrene and has a loading capacity up to 8 wt%. The sustain release ability was measured and the pyrene release was extended over 5 days. Both loading capacity and sustain release ability were found to be highly dependent on CMC. Cell culture study was implemented with RAW 264.7 cells in order to determine the polymer micelle's cytocompatibility, Most Ppeg polymer micelles showed more than 85% cell viability with and without pyrene loading. Cell internalization of the micelles encapsulated drug was measured both quantitatively and qualitatively and was enhanced comparing to unencapsulated drug. The results indicated that the internalization enhancement effect of polymer micelle was mainly affected by hydrophilic chain length; neither hydrophobic chain length nor loading capacity has significant influence on internalization.

  6. Presence of two transcribed malate synthase genes in an n-alkane-utilizing yeast, Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Hikida, M; Atomi, H; Fukuda, Y; Aoki, A; Hishida, T; Teranishi, Y; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    1991-12-01

    The presence of two genomic DNA regions encoding malate synthase (MS) was shown by Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA from an n-alkane-assimilating yeast, Candida tropicalis, using a partial MS cDNA probe, in accordance with the fact that two types of partial MS cDNAs have previously been isolated. This was also confirmed by the restriction mapping of the two genes screened from the yeast lambda EMBL library. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the respective genomic DNAs, named MS-1 gene and MS-2 gene, revealed that both regions encoding MS had the same length of 1,653 base pairs, corresponding to 551 amino acids (molecular mass of MS-1, 62,448 Da; MS-2, 62,421 Da). Although 29 nucleotide pairs differed in the sequences of the coding regions, the number of amino acid replacements was only one: 159Asn (MS-1)----159Ser (MS-2). In the 5'-flanking regions, there were replacements of four nucleotide pairs, deletion of one pair, and insertion of four pairs. In spite of the fact that two genomic genes were present and transcribed, RNA blot analysis demonstrated that only one band (about 2 kb) was observable even when the carbon sources in the cultivation medium were changed. A comparison of the amino acid sequences was made with MSs of rape (Brassica napus L.), cucumber seed, pumpkin seed, Escherichia coli, and Hansenula polymorpha. A high homology was observed among these enzymes, the results indicating that the protein structure was relatively well conserved through the evolution of the molecule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1794980

  7. Biodegradation of C7 and C8 iso-alkanes under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Abu Laban, Nidal; Dao, Anh; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Iso-alkanes comprise a substantial proportion of petroleum and refined products that impact the environment, but their fate is cryptic under methanogenic conditions. We investigated methanogenic biodegradation of C7 and C8 iso-alkanes found in naphtha, specifically 2-methylhexane, 3-methylhexane, 2-methylheptane, 4-methylheptane and 3-ethylhexane. These were incubated as a mixture or individually with enrichment cultures derived from oil sands tailings ponds that generate methane from naphtha components; substrate depletion and methane production were monitored for up to 663 days. 3-Methylhexane and 4-methylheptane were degraded both singly and in the mixture, whereas 2-methylhexane and 2-methylheptane resisted degradation as single substrates but were depleted in the iso-alkane mixture, suggesting co-metabolism. 3-Ethylhexane was degraded neither singly nor with co-substrates. Putative metabolites consistent with succinylated C7 and C8 were detected, suggesting activation by addition of iso-alkanes to fumarate and corresponding to detection of alkylsuccinate synthase-like genes. 454 pyrotag sequencing, cloning and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA genes revealed predominance of a novel member of the family Peptococcaceae (order Clostridiales) and Archaea affiliated with Methanoregula and Methanosaeta. We report here isomer-specific metabolism of C7 -C8 iso-alkanes under methanogenic conditions and propose their activation by a novel Peptococcaceae via addition to fumarate. PMID:25331365

  8. Effects of fuel properties on the burning characteristics of collision-merged alkane/water droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Pan, K.L.; Huang, W.C.; Wen, H.C.; Yang, J.Y.; Law, C.K.

    2008-04-15

    The combustion characteristics of freely falling droplets, individually generated by the merging of colliding alkane and water droplets, were experimentally investigated. The outcome of the collision droplets was first studied and then the subsequent burning processes such as the flame appearance, ignition and burning behaviors were recorded, through either visual observation or microphotography with the aid of stroboscopic lighting. If the merged droplets were exhibited in an insertive manner, while the water droplet inserted into the alkane droplet, these yield the burning behaviors prior to the end of flame were very much similar to that of pure alkane. The burning was ended with droplet extinction for lower-C alkane, and with either droplet ''flash vaporization'' or extinction for hexadecane. And if the merged droplets were in adhesive manner, for hexadecane with large water content, they either could not be ignited for the large merged droplets, or be ignited with a much prolonged ignition delay, followed by a soot-reducing flame and an ending of droplet extinction for the small merged droplets. ''Homogeneous'' explosion was not observed in any of the tests, and ''heterogeneous'' explosion, induced by trapped air bubbles, occasionally occurred for merged droplets with C-atom in alkane is higher than dodecane. And the sudden disappearance of droplet definitely decreased the burning time and thus enhanced the burning intensity. Besides, the fuel mass consumption rates were increased, even in the cases that having droplet extinction, because of the enlargement of the surface area due to the stuffing of water droplet. (author)

  9. Whole‐cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; He, Yi; Wang, Yun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Lin; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil–water interface of 10–80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets. These properties make ADP1 an ideal bacterial chassis for constructing bioreporters that are able to actively search and sense oil spill in water and soils. Acinetobacter baylyi bioreporter ADPWH_alk was developed and applied to the detection of alkanes and alkenes in water, seawater and soils. Bioreporter ADPWH_alk was able to detect a broad range of alkanes and alkenes with carbon chain length from C7 to C36. So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18. This bioreporter responded to the alkanes in about 30 min and it was independent to the cell growth phase because of two point mutations in alkM promoter recognized by alkane regulatory protein ALKR. ADPWH_alk was applied to detect mineral oil, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in water and seawater in the range 0.1–100 mg l−1, showing that the bioreporter oil detection was semi‐quantitative. This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi‐quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils. PMID:21951420

  10. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M.; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90–99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2–C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production. PMID:25108218

  11. Biogeographic variation of foliar n-alkanes of Juniperus communis var. saxatilis Pallas from the Balkans.

    PubMed

    Rajčević, Nemanja; Janaćković, Pedja; Dodoš, Tanja; Tešević, Vele; Marin, Petar D

    2014-12-01

    The composition of the epicuticular n-alkanes isolated from the leaves of ten populations of Juniperus communis L. var. saxatilis Pallas from central (continental) and western (coastal) areas of the Balkan Peninsula was characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. In the leaf waxes, 14 n-alkane homologues with chain-lengths ranging from C22 to C35 were identified. All samples were dominated by n-tritriacontane (C33 ), but differences in two other dominant n-alkanes allowed separating the coastal from the continental populations. Several statistical methods (ANOVA, principal component, discriminant, and cluster analyses as well as the Mantel test) were deployed to analyze the diversity and variability of the epicuticular-leaf-n-alkane patterns of the ten natural populations of J. communis var. saxatilis and their relation to different geographic and bioclimatic parameters. Cluster analysis showed a high correlation of the leaf-n-alkane patterns with the geographical distribution of the investigated samples, differentiating the coastal from the continental populations of this taxon. Several bioclimatic parameters related to aridity were highly correlated with this differentiation. PMID:25491336

  12. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Pohl, P.I.; Brinker, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    Separating light gases using membranes is a technology area for which there exists opportunities for significant energy savings. Examples of industrial needs for gas separation include hydrogen recovery, natural gas purification, and dehydration. A membrane capable of separating H{sub 2} from other gases at high temperatures could recover hydrogen from refinery waste streams, and facilitate catalytic dehydrogenation and the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction. Natural gas purification requires separating CH{sub 4} from mixtures with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and higher alkanes. A dehydrating membrane would remove water vapor from gas streams in which water is a byproduct or a contaminant, such as refrigeration systems. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, natural gas constituents, and water vapor at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. It is in applications such as these that the authors expect inorganic molecular sieve membranes to compete most effectively with current gas separation technologies. Cryogenic separations are very energy intensive. Polymer membranes do not have the thermal stability appropriate for high temperature hydrogen recovery, and tend to swell in the presence of hydrocarbon natural gas constituents. The authors goal is to develop a family of microporous oxide films that offer permeability and selectivity exceeding those of polymer membranes, allowing gas membranes to compete with cryogenic and adsorption technologies for large-scale gas separation applications.

  13. Thickness measurement of semiconductor thin films by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence benchtop instrumentation: Application to GaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt, I.; Ibañez, J.; Marguí, E.; Pujol, J.

    2010-07-01

    The importance of thin films in modern high technology products, such as semiconductors, requires fast and non-destructive analysis. A methodology to determine the thickness of single layers with benchtop energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) instrumentation is described and tested following analytical validation criteria. The experimental work was carried out on gallium nitride thin films epitaxially grown on sapphire substrate. The results of samples with layers in the range from 400 to 1000 nm exhibit a good correlation with the layer thickness determined by optical reflectance. Spectral data obtained using thin layered samples indicate the possibility to precisely evaluate layer thickness from 5 nm, with a low relative standard deviation (RSD < 2%) of the results. In view of the limits of optical reflectance for very thin layer determination, EDXRF analysis offers the potential for the thickness determination of such kind of samples.

  14. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  15. Dehydrogenation of n-alkanes catalyzed by iridium ``pincer`` complexes: Regioselective formation of {alpha}-olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Singh, B.; Goldman, A.S.; Pak, E.B.; Jensen, C.M.

    1999-04-28

    The development of methods for the functionalization of alkanes is of cardinal importance in catalytic chemistry. A specific functionalization of particularly great potential value is the conversion of n-alkanes to the corresponding 1-alkenes ({alpha}-olefins) since these serve as precursors for a wide range of commodity-scale chemicals (>2 {times} 10{sup 9} kg/yr). Such a conversion is also an intriguing challenge as viewed from a fundamental perspective. n-Alkanes are the simplest organic molecules with the potential to undergo regioselective transformations; {alpha}-olefins are the thermodynamically least stable of the corresponding double-bond isomers and any mechanism for their formation must presumably involve activation of the strongest bond (primary C-{single_bond}H) in the molecule.

  16. Oxidation of alkanes by cobalt(II) salts of weakly coordinating anions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.S.; Drago, R.S. )

    1991-11-27

    Catalysts which effect the selective oxidation of alkanes under mild reaction conditions are highly desired. Commercial processes exist which involve the oxidation of alkanes by O{sub 2} with cobalt carboxylate catalysts. Elevated temperatures and pressures are required, and the metal ion function is to decompose hydroperoxides formed in a radical-chain process. The authors have demonstrated that a weakly solvated cobalt-acetonitrile complex (Co(NCCH{sub 3}){sub 4})(PF{sub 6}){sub 2}, with a weakly coordinating anion catalyzes the air oxidation of alkanes under mild conditions (75C and 3 atm). Cyclohexane and adamantane are converted to the corresponding alcohol and ketone products. The commercial catalyst for cyclohexane oxidation does not function under these milder conditions. Experiments indicate a mechanism in which the metal ion functions both as an initiator and as a hydroperoxide decomposition catalyst.

  17. The low temperature phase transition in octane and its possible generalisation to other n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Radaelli, P. G.

    2001-05-01

    A neutron powder diffraction study of three n-alkanes, octane, nonane and pentadecane, down to 2 K is presented. The temperature dependence of the octane diffraction pattern reveals a solid state phase transition between 40 and 55 K, which involves a doubling of the unit cell in the b direction, the space group remaining P 1¯. Confirmation of the phase transition, which results in a doubling of the number of crystallographically inequivalent methyl groups, is sought in the published NMR, tunnelling data and neutron scattering, vibrational data. Density functional theory and force field techniques are used to simulate spectroscopic data based on the measured structures. While no unequivocal evidence is found in spectroscopic data, the published data does not rule out the existence of energetically inequivalent methyl groups. Indeed close inspection of the spectroscopic data for other n-alkanes suggests that the phase transition may be common to many alkanes.

  18. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyu, V. R.; Harji, R. R.; Bhosle, N. B.; Sawant, S. S.; Venkat, K.

    2013-04-01

    Surface sediments collected from 19 stations along Visakhapatnam harbour were analysed for organic carbon (OC), δ 13Coc, total lipids (TL), total hydrocarbon (THC), n-alkane concentration and composition. OC, δ 13Coc, TL and THC ranged from 0.6% to 7.6%, -29.3 to -23.8‰, 300 to 14,948 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, and 0.2 to 2,277 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, respectively. Predominance of even carbon numbers n-alkanes C12-C21 with carbon preference index (CPI) of <1 suggests major microbial influence. Fair abundance of odd carbon number n-alkanes in the range of C15-C22 and C23-C33 indicates some input from phytoplankton and terrestrial sources, respectively. Petrogenic input was evident from the presence of hopanes and steranes. The data suggest that organic matter (OM) sources varied spatially and were mostly derived from mixed source.

  19. Leaf-wax n-alkanes record the plant–water environment at leaf flush

    PubMed Central

    Tipple, Brett J.; Berke, Melissa A.; Doman, Christine E.; Khachaturyan, Susanna; Ehleringer, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-wax n-alkanes 2H/1H ratios are widely used as a proxy in climate reconstruction. Although the broad nature of the relationship between n-alkanes δ2H values and climate is appreciated, the quantitative details of the proxy remain elusive. To examine these details under natural environmental conditions, we studied a riparian broadleaf angiosperm species, Populus angustifolia, growing on water with a constant δ2H value and monitored the δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes and of stem, leaf, stream, and atmospheric waters throughout the entire growing season. Here we found the δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes recorded only a 2-wk period during leaf flush and did not vary for the 19 weeks thereafter when leaves remained active. We found δ2H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes of P. angustifolia record conditions earlier in the season rather than fully integrating the entire growing season. Using these data, we modeled precipitation δ2H values during the time of wax synthesis. We observed that the isotope ratios of this precipitation generally were 2H-enriched compared with mean annual precipitation. This model provides a mechanistic basis of the often-observed 2H-enrichment from the expected fractionation values in studies of broadleaf angiosperm leaf-wax δ2H. In addition, these findings may have implications for the spatial and temporal uses of n-alkane δ2H values in paleoapplications; when both plant community and growth form are known, this study allows the isolation of the precipitation dynamics of individual periods of the growing season. PMID:23359675

  20. n-Alkane assimilation and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) oxidation capacity in Mycobacterium austroafricanum strains.

    PubMed

    Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas; Mathis, Hugues; Labbé, Diane; Monot, Frédéric; Greer, Charles W; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise

    2007-06-01

    Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2012, which grows on methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and on tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), the main intermediate of MTBE degradation, also grows on a broad range of n-alkanes (C2 to C16). A single alkB gene copy, encoding a non-heme alkane monooxygenase, was partially amplified from the genome of this bacterium. Its expression was induced after growth on n-propane, n-hexane, n-hexadecane and on TBA but not after growth on LB. The capacity of other fast-growing mycobacteria to grow on n-alkanes (C1 to C16) and to degrade TBA after growth on n-alkanes was compared to that of M. austroafricanum IFP 2012. We studied M. austroafricanum IFP 2012 and IFP 2015 able to grow on MTBE, M. austroafricanum IFP 2173 able to grow on isooctane, Mycobacterium sp. IFP 2009 able to grow on ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), M. vaccae JOB5 (M. austroaafricanum ATCC 29678) able to degrade MTBE and TBA and M. smegmatis mc2 155 with no known degradation capacity towards fuel oxygenates. The M. austroafricanum strains grew on a broad range of n-alkanes and three were able to degrade TBA after growth on propane, hexane and hexadecane. An alkB gene was partially amplified from the genome of all mycobacteria and a sequence comparison demonstrated a close relationship among the M. austroafricanum strains. This is the first report suggesting the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase in TBA oxidation, a key step during MTBE metabolism. PMID:17347817

  1. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10103 - Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10103 Naphtha (Fischer-Tropsch), C4-11-alkane... substance identified as naphtha (fischer-tropsch), C4-11-alkane, branched and linear (PMN P-04-235; CAS...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Distillation bottoms, alkylated... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Distillation bottoms, alkylated... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  8. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant CYP153A6 enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-01-29

    Cytochrome P450 CYP153A6 from Myobacterium sp. strain HXN1500 was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small-chain alkanes regioselectively. Mutant CYP153A6-BMO1 selectively hydroxylates butane and pentane at the terminal carbon to form 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively, at rates greater than wild-type CYP153A6 enzymes. This biocatalyst is highly active for small-chain alkane substrates and the regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  9. Thermodynamic functions of formation of n-alkane complexes with crystalline urea

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmachev, V.V.; Semenov, L.V.; Gaile, A.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.

    1987-07-10

    For optimization of the conditions of deparaffination of petroleum fractions with the aid of urea, with the composition of the feedstock taken into account, it is important to know the equilibrium constants of formation of complexes of urea with n-alkanes differing in the number of carbon atoms in their molecules, as functions of temperature. In this investigation they obtained experimental data necessary for calculating the thermodynamic functions of formation of n-alkane complexes with crystalline urea up to the decomposition temperature, using Kirchhoff's equations.

  10. Monocarboxylic acids from oxidation of acyclic isoprenoid alkanes by Mycobacterium fortuitum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. E.; Maxwell, J. R.; Myers, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum utilizes certain stereoisomeric mixtures of individual multimethyl branched alkanes as sole carbon source, including 2,6(R), 10(S), 14(RS)-tetramethylhexadecane; 2,6(R), 10(S), 14(RS)-tetramethylheptadecane; 2,6(RS), 10(RS)-trimethyltetradecane, and 2,6(R), 10(S)-trimethylpentadecane. Products of oxidation isolated from the bacterial lipids were acids derived predominantly from oxidation of the isopropyl terminus of each alkane, except in the case of 2,6(RS), 10(RS)-trimethyltetradecane. With the latter, acids from oxidation at either terminus were detected in comparable proportions.

  11. Determination of n-alkane content in middle and heavy distillates by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Fadeev, V.S.; Shteingardt, N.S.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have modified a procedure of determination of n-alkane content in middle and heavy distillates by gas chromatography. The zeolite is replaced by a surface-layer absorbent consisting of grains of diatomite on which there has been deposited a surface layer of MgA zeolite particles, and the helium is replaced by hydrogen. A special chromatograph attachment is described and the chromatograms are calculated on the basis of the heights or areas of the peaks of the charge and the impurity hydrocarbons which are not n-alkanes.

  12. Two-Step Freezing in Alkane Monolayers on Colloidal Silica Nanoparticles: From a Stretched-Liquid to an Interface-Frozen State.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xia; Huber, Patrick; Su, Yunlan; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Dujin

    2016-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of an archetypical soft/hard hybrid nanocomposite, that is, an n-octadecane C18/SiO2-nanoparticle composite, was investigated by a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and variable-temperature solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (VT solid-state (13)C NMR) as a function of silica nanoparticles loading. Two latent heat peaks prior to bulk freezing, observed for composites with high silica loading, indicate that a sizable fraction of C18 molecules involve two phase transitions unknown from the bulk C18. Combined with the NMR measurements as well as experiments on alkanes and alkanols at planar amorphous silica surfaces reported in the literature, this phase behavior can be attributed to a transition toward a 2D liquid-like monolayer and subsequently a disorder-to-order transition upon cooling. The second transition results in the formation of a interface-frozen monolayer of alkane molecules with their molecular long axis parallel to the nanoparticles' surface normal. Upon heating, the inverse phase sequence was observed, however, with a sizable thermal hysteresis in accord with the characteristics of the first-order phase transition. A thermodynamic model considering a balance of interfacial bonding, chain stretching elasticity, and entropic effects quantitatively accounts for the observed behavior. Complementary synchrotron-based wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) experiments allow us to document the strong influence of this peculiar interfacial freezing behavior on the surrounding alkane melts and in particular the nucleation of a rotator phase absent in the bulk C18. PMID:27386888

  13. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2009-03-09

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  14. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; Hansen, Nils; Dagaut, Philippe; Sarathy, S. Mani

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS). Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have

  15. Superposition-additive approach: thermodynamic parameters of clusterization of monosubstituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2011-12-21

    The applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole electric polarisabilities, molecular diamagnetic susceptibilities, π-electron circular currents, as well as for the estimation of the thermodynamic parameters of substituted alkanes, was demonstrated earlier. Now the applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the description of clusterization of fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, carboxylic acids at the air/water interface is studied. Two superposition-additive schemes are used that ensure the maximum superimposition of the graphs of the considered molecular structures including the intermolecular CH-HC interactions within the clusters. The thermodynamic parameters of clusterization are calculated for dimers, trimers and tetramers. The calculations are based on the values of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization calculated earlier using the semiempirical quantum chemical PM3 method. It is shown that the proposed approach is capable of the reproduction with sufficiently enough accuracy of the values calculated previously. PMID:22042000

  16. Enhanced translocation and growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 in the alkane phase of aqueous-alkane two phase cultures were mediated by GroEL2 overexpression.

    PubMed

    Takihara, Hayato; Ogihara, Jun; Yoshida, Takao; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakajima, Mutsuyasu; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sunairi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that R. erythropolis PR4 translocated from the aqueous to the alkane phase, and then grew in two phase cultures to which long-chain alkanes had been added. This was considered to be beneficial for bioremediation. In the present study, we investigated the proteins involved in the translocation of R. erythropolis PR4. The results of our proteogenomic analysis suggested that GroEL2 was upregulated more in cells that translocated inside of the pristane (C19) phase than in those located at the aqueous-alkane interface attached to the n-dodecane (C12) surface. PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) and PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) strains were constructed to confirm the effects of the upregulation of GroEL2 in translocated cells. The expression of GroEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) was 15.5-fold higher than that in PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) in two phase cultures containing C12. The growth and cell surface lipophilicity of PR4 were enhanced by the introduction of pK4-EL2-1. These results suggested that the plasmid overexpression of groEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) led to changes in cell localization, enhanced growth, and increased cell surface lipophilicity. Thus, we concluded that the overexpression of GroEL2 may play an important role in increasing the organic solvent tolerance of R. erythropolis PR4 in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures. PMID:25311591

  17. Adiabatic Coupling Constant of Nitrobenzene- n-Alkane Critical Mixtures. Evidence from Ultrasonic Spectra and Thermodynamic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaev, Sirojiddin Z.; Kaatze, Udo

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasonic spectra of mixtures of nitrobenzene with n-alkanes, from n-hexane to n-nonane, are analyzed. They feature up to two Debye-type relaxation terms with discrete relaxation times and, near the critical point, an additional relaxation term due to the fluctuations in the local concentration. The latter can be well represented by the dynamic scaling theory. Its amplitude parameter reveals the adiabatic coupling constant of the mixtures of critical composition. The dependence of this thermodynamic parameter upon the length of the n-alkanes corresponds to that of the slope in the pressure dependence of the critical temperature and is thus taken another confirmation of the dynamic scaling model. The change in the variation of the coupling constant and of several other mixture parameters with alkane length probably reflects a structural change in the nitrobenzene- n-alkane mixtures when the number of carbon atoms per alkane exceeds eight.

  18. Some optical and electron microscope comparative studies of excimer laser-assisted and nonassisted molecular-beam epitaxically grown thin GaAs films on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lao, Pudong; Tang, Wade C.; Rajkumar, K. C.; Guha, S.; Madhukar, A.; Liu, J. K.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    The quality of GaAs thin films grown via MBE under pulsed excimer laser irradiation on Si substrates is examined in both laser-irradiated and nonirradiated areas using Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and by photoluminescence (PL), as a function of temperature, and by TEM. The temperature dependence of the PL and Raman peak positions indicates the presence of compressive stress in the thin GaAs films in both laser-irradiated and nonirradiated areas. This indicates incomplete homogeneous strain relaxation by dislocations at the growth temperature. The residual compressive strain at the growth temperature is large enough such that even with the introduction of tensile strain arising from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients of GaAs and Si, a compressive strain is still present at room temperature for these thin GaAs/Si films.

  19. Process modeling and analysis of structure and stoichiometry of magnesium oxide nano thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on 6 hydrogen-silicon carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ghulam Moeen

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in effective integration of nano scale functional oxides with semiconductors for third and fourth generation nano devices including high-K dielectrics based electronic devices and paradigm-shifting spintronics-based circuits. In this research we investigate the growth of MgO nano thin films on 6H-SiC substrate in a molecular beam epitaxy process. Here MgO serves as a template layer to minimize the mismatch with both substrate and a functional oxide films such as BTO and BaM. In this research we constructed neural network based process models using historical experimental data. Based on these process models we performed structural and stoichiometric analyses through both design of experiments and Monte Carlo simulation. We found that the percentage starting oxygen on the substrate is the most critical variable that promotes the undesired bonding states, i.e., Mg-OH and excessive strain in film crystalline structure. In addition the impact of percentage of starting oxygen on structure and stoichiometry is affected by the film thickness. The interaction between substrate temperature and oxygen on the starting substrate surface is the critical pair that affects the dynamics of Mg-OH bonding state. This study helped us analyze the process behavior and gain process knowledge to conduct systematic experimentation. After conducting the systematic experiments we quantitatively studied the causal relationship the undesired bonding states and the percentage starting oxygen at 3 levels of film thickness. Moreover, the cleaning of silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate surface is an essential and important step to grow MgO films with minimum undesired bonding states. We investigated high temperature hydrogen etching process to clean the substrate surface. In this research we studied the impact of cleaning time and cleaning temperature by analyzing the reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) structural performance

  20. Plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth and effect of varying buffer thickness on the formation of ultra-thin In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN heterostructure on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Subhra; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2015-02-23

    This work reports on the detailed plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of ultra-thin In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN heterostructures on Si(111) substrate with three different buffer thickness (600 nm, 400 nm, and 200 nm). Growth through critical optimization of growth conditions is followed by the investigation of impact of varying buffer thickness on the formation of ultra-thin 1.5 nm, In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N–1.25 nm, GaN–1.5 nm, In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N heterostructure, in terms of threading dislocation (TD) density. Analysis reveals a drastic reduction of TD density from the order 10{sup 10 }cm{sup −2} to 10{sup 8 }cm{sup −2} with increasing buffer thickness resulting smooth ultra-thin active region for thick buffer structure. Increasing strain with decreasing buffer thickness is studied through reciprocal space mapping analysis. Surface morphology through atomic force microscopy analysis also supports our study by observing an increase of pits and root mean square value (0.89 nm, 1.2 nm, and 1.45 nm) with decreasing buffer thickness which are resulted due to the internal strain and TDs.