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Sample records for molecule inhibitor qlt0267

  1. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  2. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Urea Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Anderson, Marc O.; Li, Fei; Li, Min; Lei, Tianluo; Ren, Huiwen; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-01-01

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, which include isoforms of UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta endothelia and erythrocytes, facilitate urinary concentrating function. Inhibitors of urea transporter function have potential clinical applications as sodium-sparing diuretics, or ‘urearetics,’ in edema from different etiologies, such as congestive heart failure and cirrhosis, as well as in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). High-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules has identified UT-A and UT-B inhibitors with nanomolar potency. Inhibitors have been identified with different UT-A versus UT-B selectivity profiles and putative binding sites on UT proteins. Studies in rodent models support the utility of UT inhibitors in reducing urinary concentration, though testing in clinically relevant animal models of edema has not yet been done. PMID:25298345

  3. Small molecule phagocytosis inhibitors for immune cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Neschadim, Anton; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Branch, Donald R

    2016-08-01

    Immune cytopenias are conditions characterized by low blood cell counts, such as platelets in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and red blood cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Chronic ITP affects approximately 4 in 100,000 adults annually while AIHA is much less common. Extravascular phagocytosis and massive destruction of autoantibody-opsonized blood cells by macrophages in the spleen and liver are the hallmark of these conditions. Current treatment modalities for ITP and AIHA include the first-line use of corticosteroids; whereas, IVIg shows efficacy in ITP but not AIHA. One main mechanism of action by which IVIg treatment leads to the reduction in platelet destruction rates in ITP is thought to involve Fcγ receptor (FcγR) blockade, ultimately leading to the inhibition of extravascular platelet phagocytosis. IVIg, which is manufactured from the human plasma of thousands of donors, is a limited resource, and alternative treatments, particularly those based on bioavailable small molecules, are needed. In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of ITP, the role of Fcγ receptors, and the mechanisms of action of IVIg in treating ITP, and outline the efforts and progress towards developing novel, first-in-class inhibitors of phagocytosis as synthetic, small molecule substitutes for IVIg in ITP and other conditions where the pathobiology of the disease involves phagocytosis. PMID:27296447

  4. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Anthrax Lethal Factor Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Peet, Norton P.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the preparation of new small molecule inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Our starting point was the symmetrical, bis-quinolinyl compound 1 (NSC 12155). Optimization of one half of this molecule led to new LF inhibitors that were desymmetrized to afford more drug-like compounds. PMID:24290062

  5. Probing translation using small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The translational apparatus of the bacterial cell remains one of the principal targets of antibiotics for the clinical treatment of infection worldwide. Since the introduction of specific translation inhibitors into clinical practise in the late 1940’s, intense efforts have been made to understand their precise mechanisms of action. Such research has often revealed significant and sometimes unexpected insights into many fundamental aspects of the translation mechanism. Central to progress in this area, high-resolution crystal structures of the bacterial ribosome identifying the sites of antibiotic binding are now available, which, together with recent developments in single-molecule and fast-kinetic approaches, provide an integrated view of the dynamic translation process. Assays employing these approaches and focusing on specific steps of the overall translation process are amenable for drug-screening. Such assays, coupled with structural studies, have the potential not only to accelerate the discovery of novel and effective antimicrobial agents, but also to refine our understanding of the translation mechanism, since antibiotics often stabilize specific functional states of the ribosome and allow distinct translation steps to be dissected in molecular detail. PMID:20609413

  6. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  7. A new small molecule inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Filipa; Gane, Paul; Hampden-Smith, Kathryn; Allerston, Charles K.; Garthwaite, John; Selwood, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a haem containing enzyme that regulates cardiovascular homeostasis and multiple mechanisms in the central and peripheral nervous system. Commonly used inhibitors of sGC activity act through oxidation of the haem moiety, however they also bind haemoglobin and this limits their bioavailability for in vivo studies. We have discovered a new class of small molecule inhibitors of sGC and have characterised a compound designated D12 (compound 10) which binds to the catalytic domain of the enzyme with a KD of 11 μM in a SPR assay. PMID:26264842

  8. Synthetic Small-Molecule Prohormone Convertase 2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Dorota; Liu, Jin; Appel, Jon R.; Ozawa, Akihiko; Nefzi, Adel; Mackin, Robert B.; Houghten, Richard A.; Lindberg, Iris

    2009-01-01

    The proprotein convertases are believed to be responsible for the proteolytic maturation of a large number of peptide hormone precursors. Although potent furin inhibitors have been identified, thus far, no small-molecule prohormone convertase 1/3 or prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) inhibitors have been described. After screening 38 small-molecule positional scanning libraries against recombinant mouse PC2, two promising chemical scaffolds were identified: bicyclic guanidines, and pyrrolidine bis-piperazines. A set of individual compounds was designed from each library and tested against PC2. Pyrrolidine bis-piperazines were irreversible, time-dependent inhibitors of PC2, exhibiting noncompetitive inhibition kinetics; the most potent inhibitor exhibited a Ki value for PC2 of 0.54 μM. In contrast, the most potent bicyclic guanidine inhibitor exhibited a Ki value of 3.3 μM. Cross-reactivity with other convertases was limited: pyrrolidine bis-piperazines exhibited Ki values greater than 25 μM for PC1/3 or furin, whereas the Ki values of bicyclic guanidines for these other convertases were more than 15 μM. We conclude that pyrrolidine bis-piperazines and bicyclic guanidines represent promising initial leads for the optimization of therapeutically active PC2 inhibitors. PC2-specific inhibitors may be useful in the pharmacological blockade of PC2-dependent cleavage events, such as glucagon production in the pancreas and ectopic peptide production in small-cell carcinoma, and to study PC2-dependent proteolytic events, such as opioid peptide production. PMID:19074544

  9. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  10. Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitors Promote Macrophage Anti-Infective Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Donato, Nicholas J.; Wobus, Christiane E.; O’Riordan, Mary X. D.

    2014-01-01

    The global spread of anti-microbial resistance requires urgent attention, and diverse alternative strategies have been suggested to address this public health concern. Host-directed immunomodulatory therapies represent one approach that could reduce selection for resistant bacterial strains. Recently, the small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor WP1130 was reported as a potential anti-infective drug against important human food-borne pathogens, notably Listeria monocytogenes and noroviruses. Utilization of WP1130 itself is limited due to poor solubility, but given the potential of this new compound, we initiated an iterative rational design approach to synthesize new derivatives with increased solubility that retained anti-infective activity. Here, we test a small library of novel synthetic molecules based on the structure of the parent compound, WP1130, for anti-infective activity in vitro. Our studies identify a promising candidate, compound 9, which reduced intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes at concentrations that caused minimal cellular toxicity. Compound 9 itself had no bactericidal activity and only modestly slowed Listeria growth rate in liquid broth culture, suggesting that this drug acts as an anti-infective compound by modulating host-cell function. Moreover, this new compound also showed anti-infective activity against murine norovirus (MNV-1) and human norovirus, using the Norwalk virus replicon system. This small molecule inhibitor may provide a chemical platform for further development of therapeutic deubiquitinase inhibitors with broad-spectrum anti-infective activity. PMID:25093325

  11. Small molecule glutaminase inhibitors block glutamate release from stimulated microglia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; O'Driscoll, Cliona M; Bressler, Joseph; Kaufmann, Walter; Rojas, Camilo J; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase plays a critical role in the generation of glutamate, a key excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Excess glutamate release from activated macrophages and microglia correlates with upregulated glutaminase suggesting a pathogenic role for glutaminase. Both glutaminase siRNA and small molecule inhibitors have been shown to decrease excess glutamate and provide neuroprotection in multiple models of disease, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis and ischemia. Consequently, inhibition of glutaminase could be of interest for treatment of these diseases. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetimido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) and 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), two most commonly used glutaminase inhibitors, are either poorly soluble or non-specific. Recently, several new BPTES analogs with improved physicochemical properties were reported. To evaluate these new inhibitors, we established a cell-based microglial activation assay measuring glutamate release. Microglia-mediated glutamate levels were significantly augmented by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands coincident with increased glutaminase activity. While several potent glutaminase inhibitors abrogated the increase in glutamate, a structurally related analog devoid of glutaminase activity was unable to block the increase. In the absence of glutamine, glutamate levels were significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the in vitro microglia assay may be a useful tool in developing glutaminase inhibitors of therapeutic interest. PMID:24269238

  12. Identification and characterization of small-molecule inhibitors of hepsin

    PubMed Central

    Chevillet, John R.; Park, Gemma J.; Bedalov, Antonio; Simon, Julian A.; Vasioukhin, Valeri I.

    2009-01-01

    Hepsin is a type-II transmembrane serine protease overexpressed in the majority of human prostate cancers. We recently demonstrated that hepsin promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis and thus represents a potential therapeutic target. Here we report the identification of novel small-molecule inhibitors of hepsin catalytic activity. We utilized purified human hepsin for high-throughput screening of established drug and chemical diversity libraries and identified sixteen inhibitory compounds with IC50 values against hepsin ranging from 0.23–2.31μM and relative selectivity of up to 86-fold or greater. Two compounds are orally administered drugs established for human use. Four compounds attenuated hepsin-dependent pericellular serine protease activity in a dose dependent manner with limited or no cytotoxicity to a range of cell types. These compounds may be used as leads to develop even more potent and specific inhibitors of hepsin to prevent prostate cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:18852137

  13. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Alonso; Latinovic, Olga S; Barbault, Florent; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV-1 infection into a managed condition with near-normal life expectancy. However, a significant number of patients remain with limited therapeutic options due to HIV-1 resistance, side effects, or drug costs. Further, it is likely that current drugs will not retain efficacy, due to risks of side effects and transmitted resistance. Results We describe compound 5660386 (3-ethyl-2-[3-(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-1-propen-1-yl]-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium) as a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 entry. Compound 5660386 inhibits HIV-1 entry in cell lines and primary cells, binds to HIV-1 envelope protein, and inhibits the interaction of GP120 to CD4. Further, compound 5660386 showed a unique and broad-range activity against primary HIV-1 isolates from different subtypes and geographical areas. Conclusion Development of small-molecule entry inhibitors of HIV-1 such as 5660386 may lead to novel classes of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. These inhibitors may be particularly effective against viruses resistant to current antiretroviral drugs and could have potential applications in both treatment and prevention. PMID:26491257

  14. Small-molecule inhibitors of ricin and Shiga toxins.

    PubMed

    Wahome, Paul G; Robertus, Jon D; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the successes and continuing challenges associated with the identification of small-molecule inhibitors of ricin and Shiga toxins, members of the RNA N-glycosidase family of toxins that irreversibly inactivate eukaryotic ribosomes through the depurination of a conserved adenosine residue within the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) of 28S rRNA. Virtual screening of chemical libraries has led to the identification of at least three broad classes of small molecules that bind in or near the toxin's active sites and thereby interfere with RNA N-glycosidase activity. Rational design is being used to improve the specific activity and solubility of a number of these compounds. High-throughput cell-based assays have also led to the identification of small molecules that partially, or in some cases, completely protect cells from ricin- and Shiga-toxin-induced death. A number of these recently identified compounds act on cellular proteins associated with intracellular trafficking or pro-inflammatory/cell death pathways, and one was reported to be sufficient to protect mice in a ricin challenge model. PMID:22006183

  15. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  16. Small Molecule Proprotein Convertase Inhibitors for Inhibition of Embryo Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Huiting; Singh, Harmeet; Heng, Sophea; Nero, Tracy L.; Paule, Sarah; Parker, Michael W.; Johnson, Alan T.; Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Nie, Guiying

    2013-01-01

    Uterine proprotein convertase (PC) 6 plays a critical role in embryo implantation and is pivotal for pregnancy establishment. Inhibition of PC6 may provide a novel approach for the development of non-hormonal and female-controlled contraceptives. We investigated a class of five synthetic non-peptidic small molecule compounds that were previously reported as potent inhibitors of furin, another PC member. We examined (i) the potency of these compounds in inhibiting PC6 activity in vitro; (ii) their binding modes in the PC6 active site in silico; (iii) their efficacy in inhibiting PC6-dependent cellular processes essential for embryo implantation using human cell-based models. All five compounds showed potent inhibition of PC6 activity in vitro, and in silico docking demonstrated that these inhibitors could adopt a similar binding mode in the PC6 active site. However, when these compounds were tested for their inhibition of decidualization of primary human endometrial stromal cells, a PC6-dependent cellular process critical for embryo implantation, only one (compound 1o) showed potent inhibition. The lack of activity in the cell-based assay may reflect the inability of the compounds to penetrate the cell membrane. Because compound's lipophilicity is linked to cell penetration, a measurement of lipophilicity (logP) was calculated for each compound. Compound 1o is unique as it appears the most lipophilic among the five compounds. Compound 1o also inhibited another crucial PC6-dependent process, the attachment of human trophoblast spheroids to endometrial epithelial cells (a model for human embryo attachment). We thus identified compound 1o as a potent small molecule PC6 inhibitor with pharmaceutical potential to inhibit embryo implantation. Our findings also highlight that human cell-based functional models are vital to complement the biochemical and in silico analyses in the selection of promising drug candidates. Further investigations for compound 1o are warranted in

  17. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from pomegranate.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and'no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications. PMID:24958333

  18. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and‘no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications. PMID:24958333

  19. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  20. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein is among the most attractive of cancer targets given that is deregulated in the majority of tumors and that its inhibition profoundly affects their growth and/or survival. However, its role as a seldom-mutated transcription factor, its lack of enzymatic activity for which suitable pharmaceutical inhibitors could be crafted and its expression by normal cells have largely been responsible for its being viewed as “undruggable”. Work over the past several years, however, has begun to reverse this idea by allowing us to view Myc within the larger context of global gene regulatory control. Thus, Myc and its obligate heterodimeric partner, Max, are integral to the coordinated recruitment and post-translational modification of components of the core transcriptional machinery. Moreover, Myc over-expression re-programs numerous critical cellular functions and alters the cell’s susceptibility to their inhibition. This new knowledge has therefore served as a framework upon which to develop new pharmaceutical approaches. These include the continuing development of small molecules which act directly to inhibit the critical Myc-Max interaction, those which act indirectly to prevent Myc-directed post-translational modifications necessary to initiate productive transcription and those which inhibit vital pathways upon which the Myc-transformed cell is particularly reliant. PMID:24657798

  1. Identification of a small molecule [beta]-secretase inhibitor that binds without catalytic aspartate engagement

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Thomas G.; Hills, Ivory D.; Nomland, Ashley A.; de León, Pablo; Allison, Timothy; McGaughey, Georgia; Colussi, Dennis; Tugusheva, Katherine; Haugabook, Sharie J.; Espeseth, Amy S.; Zuck, Paul; Graham, Samuel L.; Stachel, Shawn J.

    2010-09-02

    A small molecule inhibitor of beta-secretase with a unique binding mode has been developed. Crystallographic determination of the enzyme-inhibitor complex shows the catalytic aspartate residues in the active site are not engaged in inhibitor binding. This unprecedented binding mode in the field of aspartyl protease inhibition is described.

  2. Novel dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors: scaffolds and discovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Song, Anran; Yu, Haiqing; Wang, Changyuan; Zhu, Xingqi; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Searching for safe and effective treatments for HIV infection is still a great challenge worldwide in spite of the 27 marketed anti-HIV drugs and the powerful highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). As a promising prospect for generation of new HIV therapy drugs, multiple ligands (MDLs) were greatly focused on recently due to their lower toxicity, simplified dosing and patient adherence than single-target drugs. Till now, by disrupting two active sites or steps of HIV replications, a number of HIV dual inhibitors, such as CD4-gssucap120 inhibitors, CXCR4-gp20 inhibitors, RT-CXCR4 inhibitors, RT-protease inhibitors, RT-integrase inhibitors, and RTassociated functions inhibitors have been identified. Generally, these dual inhibitors were discovered mainly through screening approaches and design strategies. Of these compounds, the molecules bearing small skeletons exhibited strong anti-HIV activity and aroused great attention recently. Reviewing the progress of the dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors from the point of view of their scaffolds and discovery strategies will provide valuable information for producing more effective anti-HIV drugs. In this regard, novel dual small-molecule HIV inhibitors were illustrated, and their discovery paradigms as the major contents were also summarized in this manuscript. PMID:25269561

  3. Small Molecule Substrate Phosphorylation Site Inhibitors of Protein Kinases: Approaches and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are important mediators of cellular communication and attractive drug targets for many diseases. Although success has been achieved with developing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors, the disadvantages of ATP-competitive inhibitors have led to increased interest in targeting sites outside of the ATP binding pocket. Kinase inhibitors with substrate-competitive, ATP-noncompetitive binding modes are promising due to the possibility of increased selectivity and better agreement between biochemical and in vitro potency. However, the difficulty of identifying these types of inhibitors has resulted in significantly fewer small molecule substrate phosphorylation site inhibitors being reported compared to ATP-competitive inhibitors. This review surveys reported substrate phosphorylation site inhibitors and methods that can be applied to the discovery of such inhibitors, including a discussion of the challenges inherent to these screening methods. PMID:25494294

  4. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes producing human phospholipase inhibitor polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, B.P.; Pepinsky, R.B.; Garwin, J.L.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes a recombinant DNA molecule. In comprises a DNA sequence coding for a phospholopase inhibitor polypeptide and being selected from the group consisting of: the cDNA insert of ALC, DNA sequences which code on expression for a phospholopase inhibitor, and DNA sequences which are degenerate as a result of the genetic code to either of the foregoing DNA sequences and which code on expression for a phospholipase inhibitor.

  5. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism. PMID:26331549

  6. Determination of the inhibitor dissociation constant of an individual unmodified enzyme molecule in free solution.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeremie J; Hollett, Joshua W; Craig, Douglas B

    2016-08-01

    Single enzyme molecule assays on E. coli β-galactosidase were performed using a capillary electrophoresis-based method. Three types of assays were performed. The catalytic rate of 20 individual molecules was assayed in duplicate in the presence of 50 μM substrate. The ratio of rates for the second incubation relative to the first was 0.96 ± 0.03, showing the reproducibility of the method. In the second assay, the rates were determined in the absence and presence of 210 μM L-ribose, a competitive inhibitor. The ratio of the rate in the presence of inhibitor to that in its absence for 19 individual molecules was 0.44 ± 0.23. This large relative standard deviation suggests that each individual enzyme molecule was affected to a different extent by the presence of the inhibitor, which is consistent with KI being heterogeneous. To estimate KI for individual molecules, a third assay was performed. Each molecule was incubated in the presence of 30 and 50 μM substrate and then in the presence of 50 μM substrate plus 210 μM inhibitor. Comparison of the rates in the two substrate concentrations allowed for the determination of the individual Km of each molecule. From this value and the difference in rates in the presence and absence of inhibitor, the individual molecule KI values were determined. This value was found to differ between individual molecules and was found to increase with an increase in Km . Modeling showed that a heterogeneity in KI results in an alteration in the Michaelis-Menten curve for a population of enzymes in the presence of a competitive inhibitor. PMID:27271375

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of SETD8 with Cellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the sole protein lysine methyltransferase (PKMT) known to monomethylate lysine 20 of histone H4 in vivo. SETD8’s methyltransferase activity has been implicated in many essential cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. Developing SETD8 inhibitors with cellular activity is a key step toward elucidating the diverse roles of SETD8 via convenient pharmacological perturbation. From the hits of a prior high throughput screen (HTS), SPS8I1–3 (NSC663284, BVT948, and ryuvidine) were validated as potent SETD8 inhibitors. These compounds contain different structural motifs and inhibit SETD8 via distinct modes. More importantly, these compounds show cellular activity by suppressing the H4K20me1 mark of SETD8 and recapitulate characteristic S/G2/M-phase cell cycle defects as observed for RNAi-mediated SETD8 knockdown. The commonality of SPS8I1–3 against SETD8, together with their distinct structures and mechanisms for SETD8 inhibition, argues for the collective application of these compounds as SETD8 inhibitors. PMID:25137013

  8. Nanomolar-Potency Small Molecule Inhibitor of STAT5 Protein

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the design and synthesis of the first nanomolar binding inhibitor of STAT5 protein. Lead compound 13a, possessing a phosphotyrosyl-mimicking salicylic acid group, potently and selectively binds to STAT5 over STAT3, inhibits STAT5–SH2 domain complexation events in vitro, silences activated STAT5 in leukemic cells, as well as STAT5′s downstream transcriptional targets, including MYC and MCL1, and, as a result, leads to apoptosis. We believe 13a represents a useful probe for interrogating STAT5 function in cells as well as being a potential candidate for advanced preclinical trials. PMID:25419444

  9. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing with Nonpeptidic Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of 3-oxo-C12-HSL, tetramic acid, and tetronic acid analogues were synthesized to gain insights into the structural requirements for quorum sensing inhibition in Staphylococcus aureus. Compounds active against agr were noncompetitive inhibitors of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) activated AgrC receptor, by altering the activation efficacy of the cognate AIP-1. They appeared to act as negative allosteric modulators and are exemplified by 3-tetradecanoyltetronic acid 17, which reduced nasal cell colonization and arthritis in a murine infection model. PMID:24592914

  10. Synthetic small molecule furin inhibitors derived from 2,5-dideoxystreptamine

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Cregar, Lynne; Wang, Jinzhi; Millis, Sherri Z.; Tang, Cho; O'Malley, Sean; Johnson, Alan T.; Sareth, Sina; Larson, Jason; Thomas, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Furin plays a crucial role in embryogenesis and homeostasis and in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and viral and bacterial infections. Thus, inhibition of furin may provide a feasible and promising approach for therapeutic intervention of furin-mediated disease mechanisms. Here, we report on a class of small molecule furin inhibitors based on 2,5-dideoxystreptamine. Derivatization of 2,5-dideoxystreptamine by the addition of guanidinylated aryl groups yielded a set of furin inhibitors with nanomolar range potency against furin when assayed in a biochemical cleavage assay. Moreover, a subset of these furin inhibitors protected RAW 264.7 macrophage cells from toxicity caused by furin-dependent processing of anthrax protective antigen. These inhibitors were found to behave as competitive inhibitors of furin and to be relatively specific for furin. Molecular modeling revealed that these inhibitors may target the active site of furin as they showed site occupancy similar to the alkylating inhibitor decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-CH2Cl. The compounds presented here are bona fide synthetic small molecule furin inhibitors that exhibit potency in the nanomolar range, suggesting that they may serve as valuable tools for studying furin action and potential therapeutics agents for furin-dependent diseases. PMID:17179036

  11. Protein kinase small molecule inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis: Medicinal chemistry/clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, Charles J; Blumenthal, David E

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry strategies have contributed to the development, experimental study of and clinical trials assessment of the first type of protein kinase small molecule inhibitor to target the Janus kinase/Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway. The orally administered small molecule inhibitor, tofacitinib, is the first drug to target the JAK/STAT pathway for entry into the armamentarium of the medical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis. The introduction of tofacitinib into general rheumatologic practice coupled with increasing understanding that additional cellular signal transduction pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways as well as spleen tyrosine kinase also contribute to immune-mediated inflammatory in rheumatoid arthritis makes it likely that further development of orally administered protein kinase small molecule inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis will occur in the near future. PMID:25232525

  12. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  13. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    PubMed

    Ng, Wai-Leung; Perez, Lark; Cong, Jianping; Semmelhack, Martin F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives. PMID:22761573

  14. Harnessing Chaperones to Generate Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Amyloid β Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestwicki, Jason E.; Crabtree, Gerald R.; Graef, Isabella A.

    2004-10-01

    Protein aggregation is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and hence is considered an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. However, protein-protein interactions are exceedingly difficult to inhibit. Small molecules lack sufficient steric bulk to prevent interactions between large peptide surfaces. To yield potent inhibitors of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation, we synthesized small molecules that increase their steric bulk by binding to chaperones but also have a moiety available for interaction with Aβ. This strategy yields potent inhibitors of Aβ aggregation and could lead to therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of neurodegeneration.

  15. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  16. New Small-Molecule Inhibitors Effectively Blocking Picornavirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ford Siltz, Lauren A.; Viktorova, Ekaterina G.; Zhang, Ben; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Chumakov, Konstantin; Isaacs, Lyle

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Few drugs targeting picornaviruses are available, making the discovery of antivirals a high priority. Here, we identified and characterized three compounds from a library of kinase inhibitors that block replication of poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3, and encephalomyocarditis virus. Using an in vitro translation-replication system, we showed that these drugs inhibit different stages of the poliovirus life cycle. A4(1) inhibited both the formation and functioning of the replication complexes, while E5(1) and E7(2) were most effective during the formation but not the functioning step. Neither of the compounds significantly inhibited VPg uridylylation. Poliovirus resistant to E7(2) had a G5318A mutation in the 3A protein. This mutation was previously found to confer resistance to enviroxime-like compounds, which target a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KIIIβ)-dependent step in viral replication. Analysis of host protein recruitment showed that E7(2) reduced the amount of GBF1 on the replication complexes; however, the level of PI4KIIIβ remained intact. E7(2) as well as another enviroxime-like compound, GW5074, interfered with viral polyprotein processing affecting both 3C- and 2A-dependent cleavages, and the resistant G5318A mutation partially rescued this defect. Moreover, E7(2) induced abnormal recruitment to membranes of the viral proteins; thus, enviroxime-like compounds likely severely compromise the interaction of the viral polyprotein with membranes. A4(1) demonstrated partial protection from paralysis in a murine model of poliomyelitis. Multiple attempts to isolate resistant mutants in the presence of A4(1) or E5(1) were unsuccessful, showing that effective broad-spectrum antivirals could be developed on the basis of these compounds. IMPORTANCE Diverse picornaviruses can trigger multiple human maladies, yet currently, only hepatitis A virus and poliovirus can be controlled with vaccination. The development of antipicornavirus therapeutics is

  17. Development of Small-molecule HIV Entry Inhibitors Specifically Targeting gp120 or gp41

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Cai, Lifeng; Debnath, Asim K.; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41 play important roles in HIV-1 entry, thus serving as key targets for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. T20 peptide (enfuvirtide) is the first U.S. FDA-approved HIV entry inhibitor; however, its clinical application is limited by the lack of oral availability. Here, we have described the structure and function of the HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 subunits and reviewed advancements in the development of small-molecule HIV entry inhibitors specifically targeting these two Env glycoproteins. We then compared the advantages and disadvantages of different categories of HIV entry inhibitor candidates and further predicted the future trend of HIV entry inhibitor development. PMID:26324044

  18. Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Voronkov, Andrey; Krauss, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a branch of a functional network that dates back to the first metazoans and it is involved in a broad range of biological systems including stem cells, embryonic development and adult organs. Deregulation of components involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in a wide spectrum of diseases including a number of cancers and degenerative diseases. The key mediator of Wnt signaling, β-catenin, serves several cellular functions. It functions in a dynamic mode at multiple cellular locations, including the plasma membrane, where β-catenin contributes to the stabilization of intercellular adhesive complexes, the cytoplasm where β-catenin levels are regulated and the nucleus where β-catenin is involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin interactions. Central effectors of β-catenin levels are a family of cysteine-rich secreted glycoproteins, known as Wnt morphogens. Through the LRP5/6-Frizzled receptor complex, Wnts regulate the location and activity of the destruction complex and consequently intracellular β- catenin levels. However, β-catenin levels and their effects on transcriptional programs are also influenced by multiple other factors including hypoxia, inflammation, hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling, and the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The broad implications of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in development, in the adult body and in disease render the pathway a prime target for pharmacological research and development. The intricate regulation of β-catenin at its various locations provides alternative points for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23016862

  19. Small molecules ATP-competitive inhibitors of FLT3: a chemical overview.

    PubMed

    Schenone, S; Brullo, C; Botta, M

    2008-01-01

    FLT3 is a tyrosine kinase (TK), member of the class III TK receptor family, normally expressed in hematopoietic, immune and neural systems, also playing an important role in the pathogenesis of acute leukemias, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where it is present in constitutively activated mutated forms, correlated with poor prognosis, in a notable percentage of patients. For these reasons FLT3 soon appeared as a promising target for the therapeutic intervention for this severe and aggressive malignancy; the recent determination of the crystal structure of the autoinhibited form of FLT3 gave new trend for the design and the synthesis of potent inhibitors. Small molecules tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent one of the largest drug family currently targeted by pharmaceutical companies for the treatment of cancer. Exciting examples of such molecules have reached advanced clinical trials and have been recently approved by FDA for the treatment of different solid or haematological tumors. Usually TK inhibitors share common features, namely two hydrophobic/aromatic regions bearing one or more hydrogen bonding substituents. These two regions can be connected by different spacers and almost all the molecules contain a component resembling the ATP purine structure. This review will deal with FLT3 synthetic inhibitors, reporting not only the most important molecules that are in clinical trials, but also the new compounds that have appeared in literature in the last few years. Our attention will be focused on chemical structures, mechanisms of action and structure-activity relationships. PMID:19075657

  20. Improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules in the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Shuchismita; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Feng, Zukang; Persikova, Irina; Sen, Sanchayita; Shao, Chenghua; Westbrook, John; Young, Jasmine; Zhuravleva, Marina A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Berman, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    With the accumulation of a large number and variety of molecules in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) comes the need on occasion to review and improve their representation. The Worldwide PDB (wwPDB) partners have periodically updated various aspects of structural data representation to improve the integrity and consistency of the archive. The remediation effort described here was focused on improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules so that they can be easily identified and analyzed. Peptide-like inhibitors or antibiotics were identified in over 1000 PDB entries, systematically reviewed and represented either as peptides with polymer sequence or as single components. For the majority of the single-component molecules, their peptide-like composition was captured in a new representation, called the subcomponent sequence. A novel concept called "group" was developed for representing complex peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors that are composed of multiple polymer and nonpolymer components. In addition, a reference dictionary was developed with detailed information about these peptide-like molecules to aid in their annotation, identification and analysis. Based on the experience gained in this remediation, guidelines, procedures, and tools were developed to annotate new depositions containing peptide-like inhibitors and antibiotics accurately and consistently. PMID:24173824

  1. A small-molecule inhibitor of macrophage migration inhibitory factor for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Kithcart, Aaron P; Cox, Gina M; Sielecki, Thais; Short, Abigail; Pruitt, James; Papenfuss, Tracey; Shawler, Todd; Gienapp, Ingrid; Satoskar, Abhay R; Whitacre, Caroline C

    2010-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, debilitating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by demyelination and axon loss. The proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been shown to be elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients during relapses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new small-molecule inhibitor of MIF and its ability to reduce the severity of an animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We utilized 2 structurally related isoxazolines, which show in vitro inhibition of MIF tautomerase activity. We found that administration of an inhibitor of MIF to mice with established EAE immediately reduced the severity of clinical signs and expanded a population of regulatory T lymphocytes. We also noted that the inhibitor reduced relapses of disease in a relapsing/remitting model of EAE. An analysis of leukocyte migration into the brain revealed that administration of inhibitor reduced entry of these cells. No effects on inflammatory cytokine production or T-cell activation in the periphery were noted. From these studies, we conclude that a small-molecule inhibitor of MIF reduces the severity of EAE and prevents access of immune cells into the CNS, which could be of therapeutic relevance to MS. PMID:20624927

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat: the small-molecule with promising activity against therapeutically challenging haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    Histone acetyl transferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are counteracting epigenetic enzymes regulating the turnover of histone acetylation thereby regulating transcriptional events in a precise manner. Deregulation of histone acetylation caused by aberrant expression of HDACs plays a key role in tumour onset and progression making these enzymes as candidate targets for anticancer drugs and therapy. Small-molecules namely histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) modulating the biological function of HDACs have shown multiple biological effects including differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumour models. HDACi in general have been described in plethora of reviews with respect to various cancers. However, no review article is available describing thoroughly the role of inhibitor givinostat (ITF2357 or [6-(diethylaminomethyl) naphthalen-2-yl] methyl N-[4-(hydroxycarbamoyl) phenyl] carbamate) in haematological malignancies. Thus, the present review explores the intricate role of novel inhibitor givinostat in the defined malignancies including multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous leukaemia, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma apart from myeloproliferative neoplasms. The distinct molecular mechanisms triggered by this small-molecule inhibitor in these cancers to exert cytotoxic effect have also been dealt with. The article also highlights the combination strategy that can be used for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of this inhibitor in the upcoming future. PMID:27121910

  3. Small-Molecule Inhibitor Leads of Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Developed Using the Doorstop Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Park, Jewn Giew; Wang, Shaohua; Vummenthala, Anuradha; Mishra, Rajesh K.; McLaughlin, John E.; Di, Rong; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Tumer, Nilgun E.; Janosi, Laszlo; Davis, Jon; Millard, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxic because they bind to 28S rRNA and depurinate a specific adenine residue from the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL), thereby inhibiting protein synthesis. Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2), produced by Escherichia coli, are RIPs that cause outbreaks of foodborne diseases with significant morbidity and mortality. Ricin, produced by the castor bean plant, is another RIP lethal to mammals. Currently, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines nor therapeutics exist to protect against ricin, Shiga-like toxins, or other RIPs. Development of effective small-molecule RIP inhibitors as therapeutics is challenging because strong electrostatic interactions at the RIP•SRL interface make drug-like molecules ineffective in competing with the rRNA for binding to RIPs. Herein, we report small molecules that show up to 20% cell protection against ricin or Stx2 at a drug concentration of 300 nM. These molecules were discovered using the doorstop approach, a new approach to protein•polynucleotide inhibitors that identifies small molecules as doorstops to prevent an active-site residue of an RIP (e.g., Tyr80 of ricin or Tyr77 of Stx2) from adopting an active conformation thereby blocking the function of the protein rather than contenders in the competition for binding to the RIP. This work offers promising leads for developing RIP therapeutics. The results suggest that the doorstop approach might also be applicable in the development of other protein•polynucleotide inhibitors as antiviral agents such as inhibitors of the Z-DNA binding proteins in poxviruses. This work also calls for careful chemical and biological characterization of drug leads obtained from chemical screens to avoid the identification of irrelevant chemical structures and to avoid the interference caused by direct interactions between the chemicals being screened and the luciferase reporter used in screening assays. PMID:21455295

  4. Novel Oxindole Sulfonamides and Sulfamides: EPZ031686, the First Orally Bioavailable Small Molecule SMYD3 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna H; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Smith, Sherri; Thomenius, Michael; Rioux, Nathalie; Munchhof, Michael; Mills, James E; Klaus, Christine; Totman, Jennifer; Riera, Thomas V; Raimondi, Alejandra; Jacques, Suzanne L; West, Kip; Foley, Megan; Waters, Nigel J; Kuntz, Kevin W; Wigle, Tim J; Scott, Margaret Porter; Copeland, Robert A; Smith, Jesse J; Chesworth, Richard

    2016-02-11

    SMYD3 has been implicated in a range of cancers; however, until now no potent selective small molecule inhibitors have been available for target validation studies. A novel oxindole series of SMYD3 inhibitors was identified through screening of the Epizyme proprietary histone methyltransferase-biased library. Potency optimization afforded two tool compounds, sulfonamide EPZ031686 and sulfamide EPZ030456, with cellular potency at a level sufficient to probe the in vitro biology of SMYD3 inhibition. EPZ031686 shows good bioavailability following oral dosing in mice making it a suitable tool for potential in vivo target validation studies. PMID:26985287

  5. Antitumor activity of a small-molecule inhibitor of the histone kinase Haspin

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, D; Soler, M; Moreto, J; Villanueva, A; Martinez, A; Vidal, A; Charlton, M; Moffat, D; Patel, S; McDermott, J; Owen, J; Brotherton, D; Krige, D; Cuthill, S; Esteller, M

    2012-01-01

    The approval of histone deacetylase inhibitors for treatment of lymphoma subtypes has positioned histone modifications as potential targets for the development of new classes of anticancer drugs. Histones also undergo phosphorylation events, and Haspin is a protein kinase the only known target of which is phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 residue (H3T3ph), which is necessary for mitosis progression. Mitotic kinases can be blocked by small drugs and several clinical trials are underway with these agents. As occurs with Aurora kinase inhibitors, Haspin might be an optimal candidate for the pharmacological development of these compounds. A high-throughput screening for Haspin inhibitors identified the CHR-6494 compound as being one promising such agent. We demonstrate that CHR-6494 reduces H3T3ph levels in a dose-dependent manner and causes a mitotic catastrophe characterized by metaphase misalignment, spindle abnormalities and centrosome amplification. From the cellular standpoint, the identified small-molecule Haspin inhibitor causes arrest in G2/M and subsequently apoptosis. Importantly, ex vivo assays also demonstrate its anti-angiogenetic features; in vivo, it shows antitumor potential in xenografted nude mice without any observed toxicity. Thus, CHR-6494 is a first-in-class Haspin inhibitor with a wide spectrum of anticancer effects that merits further preclinical research as a new member of the family of mitotic kinase inhibitors. PMID:21804608

  6. The development and use of small molecule inhibitors of glycosphingolipid metabolism for lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shayman, James A.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid (GSL) storage diseases have been the focus of efforts to develop small molecule therapeutics from design, experimental proof of concept studies, and clinical trials. Two primary alternative strategies that have been pursued include pharmacological chaperones and GSL synthase inhibitors. There are theoretical advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches. Pharmacological chaperones are specific for an individual glycoside hydrolase and for the specific mutation present, but no candidate chaperone has been demonstrated to be effective for all mutations leading to a given disorder. Synthase inhibitors target single enzymes such as glucosylceramide synthase and inhibit the formation of multiple GSLs. A glycolipid synthase inhibitor could potentially be used to treat multiple diseases, but at the risk of lowering nontargeted cellular GSLs that are important for normal health. The basis for these strategies and specific examples of compounds that have led to clinical trials is the focus of this review. PMID:24534703

  7. Benzofuran Small Molecules as Potential Inhibitors of Human Protein Kinases. A Review.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Halina; Goszczyńska, Agata; Rokosz, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are known to regulate the majority of human cellular processes such as communication, division, metabolism, survival and apoptosis therefore they can be promising targets in cancer diseases, viral infection and in other disorders. Small molecules acting as selective human protein kinase inhibitors are very attractive pharmacological targets. This review presents a number of examples of biologically active natural and synthetic benzo[b]furans and their derivatives, such as benzo[b]furan-2- and 3-ones, benzo[b]furan-2- and 3-carboxylic acids, as well as benzo[c]furans as potential inhibitors of various human protein kinases. The pathways of function and implication of the inhibitors in cancer and other diseases are discussed. PMID:26648467

  8. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Choline Kinase Identified by Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Zech, Stephan G; Kohlmann, Anna; Zhou, Tianjun; Li, Feng; Squillace, Rachel M; Parillon, Lois E; Greenfield, Matthew T; Miller, David P; Qi, Jiwei; Thomas, R Mathew; Wang, Yihan; Xu, Yongjin; Miret, Juan J; Shakespeare, William C; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David C

    2016-01-28

    Choline kinase α (ChoKα) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and thereby plays key roles in regulation of cell proliferation, oncogenic transformation, and human carcinogenesis. Since several inhibitors of ChoKα display antiproliferative activity in both cellular and animal models, this novel oncogene has recently gained interest as a promising small molecule target for cancer therapy. Here we summarize our efforts to further validate ChoKα as an oncogenic target and explore the activity of novel small molecule inhibitors of ChoKα. Starting from weakly binding fragments, we describe a structure based lead discovery approach, which resulted in novel highly potent inhibitors of ChoKα. In cancer cell lines, our lead compounds exhibit a dose-dependent decrease of phosphocholine, inhibition of cell growth, and induction of apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. The druglike lead series presented here is optimizable for improvements in cellular potency, drug target residence time, and pharmacokinetic parameters. These inhibitors may be utilized not only to further validate ChoKα as antioncogenic target but also as novel chemical matter that may lead to antitumor agents that specifically interfere with cancer cell metabolism. PMID:26700752

  9. Mechanism of Inhibition of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein by Small Molecule Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chirasani, Venkat R; Sankar, Revathi; Senapati, Sanjib

    2016-08-25

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) facilitates the bidirectional exchange of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides between high-density lipoproteins and low- or very low-density lipoproteins. Recent studies have shown that the impairment of lipid exchange processes of CETP can be an effective strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Understanding the molecular mechanism of CETP inhibition has, therefore, attracted tremendous attention in recent past. In this study, we explored the detailed mechanism of CETP inhibition by a series of recently reported small molecule inhibitors that are currently under preclinical testing. Our results from molecular dynamics simulations and protein-ligand docking studies suggest that the hydrophobic interactions between the CETP core tunnel residues and inhibitor moieties play a pivotal role, and physical occlusion of the CETP tunnel by these small molecules is the primary mechanism of CETP inhibition. Interestingly, bound inhibitors were found to increase the plasticity of CETP, which was explained by principal component analysis that showed a larger space of sampling of CETP C-domain due to inhibitor binding. The atomic-level details presented here could help accelerate the structure-based drug-discovery processes targeting CETP for CVD therapeutics. PMID:27111423

  10. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to target serine biosynthesis in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mullarky, Edouard; Lucki, Natasha C.; Beheshti Zavareh, Reza; Anglin, Justin L.; Gomes, Ana P.; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Wong, Jenny C. Y.; Christen, Stefan; Takahashi, Hidenori; Singh, Pradeep K.; Blenis, John; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Asara, John M.; DeNicola, Gina M.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Lairson, Luke L.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to promote growth and proliferation. The genetic evidence pointing to the importance of the amino acid serine in tumorigenesis is striking. The gene encoding the enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), which catalyzes the first committed step of serine biosynthesis, is overexpressed in tumors and cancer cell lines via focal amplification and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated up-regulation. PHGDH-overexpressing cells are exquisitely sensitive to genetic ablation of the pathway. Here, we report the discovery of a selective small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH, CBR-5884, identified by screening a library of 800,000 drug-like compounds. CBR-5884 inhibited de novo serine synthesis in cancer cells and was selectively toxic to cancer cell lines with high serine biosynthetic activity. Biochemical characterization of the inhibitor revealed that it was a noncompetitive inhibitor that showed a time-dependent onset of inhibition and disrupted the oligomerization state of PHGDH. The identification of a small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH not only enables thorough preclinical evaluation of PHGDH as a target in cancers, but also provides a tool with which to study serine metabolism. PMID:26831078

  11. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, is found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppresses SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibits SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity. PMID:25455859

  12. Identification of the first small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7 DNA repair protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Actis, Marcelo L; Ambaye, Nigus D; Evison, Benjamin J; Shao, Youming; Vanarotti, Murugendra; Inoue, Akira; McDonald, Ezelle T; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Heath, Richard; Hara, Kodai; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2016-09-15

    DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair (ICLR) has been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to ICL-inducing chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the clinical significance of ICL-inducing chemotherapy, few studies have focused on developing small-molecule inhibitors for ICLR. The mammalian DNA polymerase ζ, which comprises the catalytic subunit REV3L and the non-catalytic subunit REV7, is essential for ICLR. To identify small-molecule compounds that are mechanistically capable of inhibiting ICLR by targeting REV7, high-throughput screening and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were performed. Compound 1 was identified as an inhibitor of the interaction of REV7 with the REV7-binding sequence of REV3L. Compound 7 (an optimized analog of compound 1) bound directly to REV7 in nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, and inhibited the reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL in between the promoter and reporter regions. The normalized clonogenic survival of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin and compound 7 was lower than that for cells treated with cisplatin only. These findings indicate that a small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7/REV3L interaction can chemosensitize cells by inhibiting ICLR. PMID:27448776

  13. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Elicit Anti-Tumorigenic and Anti-Angiogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Placencio, Veronica R.; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Miyata, Toshio; DeClerck, Yves A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown a paradoxical positive correlation between elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitior-1 (PAI-1) in tumors and blood of cancer patients with poor clinical outcome, suggesting that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target. Here we tested two orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 (TM5275 and TM5441) for their efficacy in pre-clinical models of cancer. We demonstrated that these inhibitors decreased cell viability in several human cancer cell lines with an IC50 in the 9.7 to 60.3 μM range and induced intrinsic apoptosis at concentrations of 50 μM. In vivo, oral administration of TM5441 (20 mg/kg daily) to HT1080 and HCT116 xenotransplanted mice increased tumor cell apoptosis and had a significant disruptive effect on the tumor vasculature that was associated with a decrease in tumor growth and an increase in survival that, however, were not statistically significant. Pharmacokinetics studies indicated an average peak plasma concentration of 11.4 μM one hour after oral administration and undetectable levels 23 hours after administration. The effect on tumor vasculature in vivo was further examined in endothelial cells (EC) in vitro and this analysis indicated that both TM5275 and TM5441 inhibited EC branching in a 3D Matrigel assay at concentrations where they had little effect on EC apoptosis. These studies bring novel insight on the activity of PAI-1 inhibitors and provide important information for the future design of inhibitors targeting PAI-1 as therapeutic agents in cancer. PMID:26207899

  14. Discovery of Diverse Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Mammalian Sterile20-like Kinase 3 (MST3).

    PubMed

    Olesen, Sanne H; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests key roles for members of the mammalian Sterile20-like (MST) family of kinases in many aspects of biology. MST3 is a member of the STRIPAK complex, the deregulation of which has recently been associated with cancer cell migration and metastasis. Targeting MST3 with small-molecule inhibitors may be beneficial for the treatment of certain cancers, but little information exists on the potential of kinase inhibitor scaffolds to engage with MST3. In this study we screened MST3 against a library of 277 kinase inhibitors using differential scanning fluorimetry and confirmed 14 previously unknown MST3 inhibitors by X-ray crystallography. These compounds, of which eight are in clinical trials or FDA approved, comprise nine distinct chemical scaffolds that inhibit MST3 enzymatic activity with IC50 values between 0.003 and 23 μm. The structure-activity relationships explain the differential inhibitory activity of these compounds against MST3 and the structural basis for high binding potential, the information of which may serve as a framework for the rational design of MST3-selective inhibitors as potential therapeutics and to interrogate the function of this enzyme in diseased cells. PMID:27135311

  15. Small-molecule auxin inhibitors that target YUCCA are powerful tools for studying auxin function.

    PubMed

    Kakei, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Chiaki; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Ayako; Sato, Akiko; Ishida, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Rie; Higashi, Shouichi; Kokudo, Yumiko; Ishii, Takahiro; Soeno, Kazuo; Shimada, Yukihisa

    2015-11-01

    Auxin is essential for plant growth and development, this makes it difficult to study the biological function of auxin using auxin-deficient mutants. Chemical genetics have the potential to overcome this difficulty by temporally reducing the auxin function using inhibitors. Recently, the indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) pathway was suggested to be a major biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana L. for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most common member of the auxin family. In this pathway, YUCCA, a flavin-containing monooxygenase (YUC), catalyzes the last step of conversion from IPyA to IAA. In this study, we screened effective inhibitors, 4-biphenylboronic acid (BBo) and 4-phenoxyphenylboronic acid (PPBo), which target YUC. These compounds inhibited the activity of recombinant YUC in vitro, reduced endogenous IAA content, and inhibited primary root elongation and lateral root formation in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings. Co-treatment with IAA reduced the inhibitory effects. Kinetic studies of BBo and PPBo showed that they are competitive inhibitors of the substrate IPyA. Inhibition constants (Ki ) of BBo and PPBo were 67 and 56 nm, respectively. In addition, PPBo did not interfere with the auxin response of auxin-marker genes when it was co-treated with IAA, suggesting that PPBo is not an inhibitor of auxin sensing or signaling. We propose that these compounds are a class of auxin biosynthesis inhibitors that target YUC. These small molecules are powerful tools for the chemical genetic analysis of auxin function. PMID:26402640

  16. A SMALL MOLECULE SCREEN IDENTIFIES SELECTIVE INHIBITORS OF UREA TRANSPORTER UT-A

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Urea transporter (UT) proteins, including UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta microvessels, facilitate urinary concentrating function. A screen for UT-A inhibitors was developed in MDCK cells expressing UT-A1, water channel aquaporin-1, and YFP-H148Q/V163S. An inwardly directed urea gradient produces cell shrinking followed by UT-A1-dependent swelling, which was monitored by YFP-H148Q/V163S fluorescence. Screening of ~90,000 synthetic small molecules yielded four classes of UT-A1 inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 that fully and reversibly inhibited urea transport by a non-competitive mechanism. Structure-activity analysis of >400 analogs revealed UT-A1-selective and UT-A1/UT-B non-selective inhibitors. Docking computations based on homology models of UT-A1 suggested inhibitor binding sites. UT-A inhibitors may be useful as diuretics (‘urearetics’) with a novel mechanism of action that may be effective in fluid-retaining conditions in which conventional salt transport-blocking diuretics have limited efficacy. PMID:24055006

  17. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-09-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes' biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme-cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors - especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting (1)O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  18. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes’ biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme–cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors – especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen (1O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting 1O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  19. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  20. Selectivity by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Interactions Can Be Driven by Protein Surface Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David K.; Karanicolas, John

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecules that inhibit interactions between specific pairs of proteins have long represented a promising avenue for therapeutic intervention in a variety of settings. Structural studies have shown that in many cases, the inhibitor-bound protein adopts a conformation that is distinct from its unbound and its protein-bound conformations. This plasticity of the protein surface presents a major challenge in predicting which members of a protein family will be inhibited by a given ligand. Here, we use biased simulations of Bcl-2-family proteins to generate ensembles of low-energy conformations that contain surface pockets suitable for small molecule binding. We find that the resulting conformational ensembles include surface pockets that mimic those observed in inhibitor-bound crystal structures. Next, we find that the ensembles generated using different members of this protein family are overlapping but distinct, and that the activity of a given compound against a particular family member (ligand selectivity) can be predicted from whether the corresponding ensemble samples a complementary surface pocket. Finally, we find that each ensemble includes certain surface pockets that are not shared by any other family member: while no inhibitors have yet been identified to take advantage of these pockets, we expect that chemical scaffolds complementing these “distinct” pockets will prove highly selective for their targets. The opportunity to achieve target selectivity within a protein family by exploiting differences in surface fluctuations represents a new paradigm that may facilitate design of family-selective small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25706586

  1. Targeting of the MYCN Protein with Small Molecule c-MYC Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Inga; Larsson, Karin; Frenzel, Anna; Oliynyk, Ganna; Zirath, Hanna; Prochownik, Edward V.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Henriksson, Marie Arsenian

    2014-01-01

    Members of the MYC family are the most frequently deregulated oncogenes in human cancer and are often correlated with aggressive disease and/or poorly differentiated tumors. Since patients with MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma have a poor prognosis, targeting MYCN using small molecule inhibitors could represent a promising therapeutic approach. We have previously demonstrated that the small molecule 10058-F4, known to bind to the c-MYC bHLHZip dimerization domain and inhibiting the c-MYC/MAX interaction, also interferes with the MYCN/MAX dimerization in vitro and imparts anti-tumorigenic effects in neuroblastoma tumor models with MYCN overexpression. Our previous work also revealed that MYCN-inhibition leads to mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in accumulation of lipid droplets in neuroblastoma cells. To expand our understanding of how small molecules interfere with MYCN, we have now analyzed the direct binding of 10058-F4, as well as three of its analogs; #474, #764 and 10058-F4(7RH), one metabolite C-m/z 232, and a structurally unrelated c-MYC inhibitor 10074-G5, to the bHLHZip domain of MYCN. We also assessed their ability to induce apoptosis, neurite outgrowth and lipid accumulation in neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, all c-MYC binding molecules tested also bind MYCN as assayed by surface plasmon resonance. Using a proximity ligation assay, we found reduced interaction between MYCN and MAX after treatment with all molecules except for the 10058-F4 metabolite C-m/z 232 and the non-binder 10058-F4(7RH). Importantly, 10074-G5 and 10058-F4 were the most efficient in inducing neuronal differentiation and lipid accumulation in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells. Together our data demonstrate MYCN-binding properties for a selection of small molecules, and provide functional information that could be of importance for future development of targeted therapies against MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma. PMID:24859015

  2. Discovery of GSK2795039, a Novel Small Molecule NADPH Oxidase 2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Kazufumi; Chen, Woei Shin; Chueng, Adeline L.W.; Dunne, Angela A.; Seredenina, Tamara; Filippova, Aleksandra; Ramachandran, Sumitra; Bridges, Angela; Chaudry, Laiq; Pettman, Gary; Allan, Craig; Duncan, Sarah; Lee, Kiew Ching; Lim, Jean; Ma, May Thu; Ong, Agnes B.; Ye, Nicole Y.; Nasir, Shabina; Mulyanidewi, Sri; Aw, Chiu Cheong; Oon, Pamela P.; Liao, Shihua; Li, Dizheng; Johns, Douglas G.; Miller, Neil D.; Davies, Ceri H.; Browne, Edward R.; Matsuoka, Yasuji; Chen, Deborah W.; Jaquet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of enzymes catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NOX enzymes not only have a key role in a variety of physiological processes but also contribute to oxidative stress in certain disease states. To date, while numerous small molecule inhibitors have been reported (in particular for NOX2), none have demonstrated inhibitory activity in vivo. As such, there is a need for the identification of improved NOX inhibitors to enable further evaluation of the biological functions of NOX enzymes in vivo as well as the therapeutic potential of NOX inhibition. In this study, both the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profiles of GSK2795039, a novel NOX2 inhibitor, were characterized in comparison with other published NOX inhibitors. Results: GSK2795039 inhibited both the formation of ROS and the utilization of the enzyme substrates, NADPH and oxygen, in a variety of semirecombinant cell-free and cell-based NOX2 assays. It inhibited NOX2 in an NADPH competitive manner and was selective over other NOX isoforms, xanthine oxidase, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzymes. Following systemic administration in mice, GSK2795039 abolished the production of ROS by activated NOX2 enzyme in a paw inflammation model. Furthermore, GSK2795039 showed activity in a murine model of acute pancreatitis, reducing the levels of serum amylase triggered by systemic injection of cerulein. Innovation and Conclusions: GSK2795039 is a novel NOX2 inhibitor that is the first small molecule to demonstrate inhibition of the NOX2 enzyme in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 358–374. PMID:26135714

  3. Small-Molecule Quinolinol Inhibitor Identified Provides Protection against BoNT/A in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Padma; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Chaudhary, Dilip; Chauhan, Vinita; Bharadwaj, Pranay; Pandey, Apurva; Upadhyay, Nisha; Dhaked, Ram Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylamino)methyl)-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096) to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC) on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC50 values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). PMID:23071727

  4. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  5. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  6. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I M; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E; Thomas, Craig J

    2016-07-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  7. Beyond trastuzumab: small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HER-2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Vivek; Perez, Edith A

    2009-11-01

    HER-2 is a transmembrane, tyrosine kinase (TK) receptor whose overexpression is associated with adverse prognosis in breast cancer. The biological effects of HER-2 are mediated by kinase activity causing phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor molecule, leading to activation of downstream growth-promoting pathways. Antibody-mediated inhibition by trastuzumab as well as TK inhibition are clinically effective anti-HER-2 strategies. Kinase inhibitors offer some potential therapeutic advantages over antibody-based therapies. Being small molecules, TK inhibitors (TKIs) have oral bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Because of their different mode of action, TKIs may be able to overcome some of the mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance. Preclinical, and limited clinical data also suggest that TKIs and trastuzumab have synergistic activity. Lapatinib is the only TKI available for clinical use at present, but several molecules with anti-HER-2 activity have been identified and are undergoing evaluation. These differ in the spectrum of kinases that they inhibit, potency of HER-2 inhibition, pharmacokinetic properties, and toxicity profiles, and are at various stages of clinical development. In this article we summarize selected HER-2 TKIs approved for clinical use or in development for which clinical data are available. PMID:19887469

  8. Domain-selective small-molecule inhibitor of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6)-mediated tubulin deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Haggarty, Stephen J.; Koeller, Kathryn M.; Wong, Jason C.; Grozinger, Christina M.; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2003-01-01

    Protein acetylation, especially histone acetylation, is the subject of both research and clinical investigation. At least four small-molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. These and other inhibitors also affect microtubule acetylation. A multidimensional, chemical genetic screen of 7,392 small molecules was used to discover “tubacin,” which inhibits α-tubulin deacetylation in mammalian cells. Tubacin does not affect the level of histone acetylation, gene-expression patterns, or cell-cycle progression. We provide evidence that class II histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is the intracellular target of tubacin. Only one of the two catalytic domains of HDAC6 possesses tubulin deacetylase activity, and only this domain is bound by tubacin. Tubacin treatment did not affect the stability of microtubules but did decrease cell motility. HDAC6 overexpression disrupted the localization of p58, a protein that mediates binding of Golgi elements to microtubules. Our results highlight the role of α-tubulin acetylation in mediating the localization of microtubule-associated proteins. They also suggest that small molecules that selectively inhibit HDAC6-mediated α-tubulin deacetylation, a first example of which is tubacin, might have therapeutic applications as antimetastatic and antiangiogenic agents. PMID:12677000

  9. Small-Molecule CFTR Inhibitors Slow Cyst Growth in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Baoxue; Sonawane, Nitin D.; Zhao, Dan; Somlo, Stefan; Verkman, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    Cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) involves progressive fluid accumulation, which is believed to require chloride transport by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Herein is reported that small-molecule CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone and glycine hydrazide classes slow cyst expansion in in vitro and in vivo models of PKD. More than 30 CFTR inhibitor analogs were screened in an MDCK cell model, and near-complete suppression of cyst growth was found by tetrazolo-CFTRinh-172, a tetrazolo-derived thiazolidinone, and Ph-GlyH-101, a phenyl-derived glycine hydrazide, without an effect on cell proliferation. These compounds also inhibited cyst number and growth by >80% in an embryonic kidney cyst model involving 4-d organ culture of embryonic day 13.5 mouse kidneys in 8-Br-cAMP–containing medium. Subcutaneous delivery of tetrazolo-CFTRinh-172 and Ph-GlyH-101 to neonatal, kidney-specific PKD1 knockout mice produced stable, therapeutic inhibitor concentrations of >3 μM in urine and kidney tissue. Treatment of mice for up to 7 d remarkably slowed kidney enlargement and cyst expansion and preserved renal function. These results implicate CFTR in renal cyst growth and suggest that CFTR inhibitors may hold therapeutic potential to reduce cyst growth in PKD. PMID:18385427

  10. Development of indole compounds as small molecule fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 glycoprotein-41

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyan; Wu, Dong; Snyder, Beth; Ptak, Roger G.; Kaur, Harmeet; Gochin, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Non-peptide inhibition of fusion remains an important goal in anti-HIV research, due to its potential for low cost prophylaxis or prevention of cell–cell transmission of the virus. We report here on a series of indole compounds that have been identified as fusion inhibitors of gp41 through a structure-based drug design approach. Experimental binding affinities of the compounds for the hydrophobic pocket were strongly correlated to fusion inhibitory data (R2 = 0.91), and corresponding inhibition of viral replication confirmed the hydrophobic pocket as a valid target for low molecular weight fusion inhibitors. The most active compound bound to the hydrophobic pocket and inhibited cell-cell fusion and viral replication at sub-µM levels. A common binding mode for the inhibitors in this series was established by carrying out docking studies using structures of gp41 in the Protein Data Bank. The molecules were flexible enough to conform to the contours of the pocket, and the most active compound was able to adopt a structure mimicking the hydrophobic contacts of the D-peptide PIE7. The results enhance our understanding of indole compounds as inhibitors of gp41. PMID:21928824

  11. Computer-assisted identification of novel small molecule inhibitors targeting GLUT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhining; Li, Xin; Sun, Rong; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Xinru; Rong, Li; Shi, Zheng; Bao, Jinku

    2015-12-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) are the main carriers of glucose that facilitate the diffusion of glucose in mammalian cells, especially GLUT1. Notably, GLUT1 is a rate-limiting transporter for glucose uptake, and its overexpression is a common characteristic in most cancers. Thus, the inhibition of GLUT1 by novel small compounds to lower glucose levels for cancer cells has become an emerging strategy. Herein, we employed high-throughput screening approaches to identify potential inhibitors against the sugar-binding site of GLUT1. Firstly, molecular docking screening was launched against the specs products, and three molecules (ZINC19909927, ZINC19908826, and ZINC19815451) were selected as candidate GLUT1 inhibitors for further analysis. Then, taking the initial ligand β-NG as a reference, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were applied to evaluate the binding stability and affinity of the three candidates towards GLUT1. Finally, we found that ZINC19909927 might have the highest affinity to occupy the binding site of GLUT1. Meanwhile, energy decomposition analysis identified several residues located in substrate-binding site that might provide clues for future inhibitor discovery towards GLUT1. Taken together, these results in our study may provide valuable information for identifying new inhibitors targeting GLUT1-mediated glucose transport and metabolism for cancer therapeutics.

  12. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Promising Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK–TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK–TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK–TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1) the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2) the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK–TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3) emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs. PMID:25110867

  13. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting RhoA subfamily Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xun; Marchioni, Fillipo; Sipes, Nisha; Evelyn, Chris R.; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Seibel, William; Wortman, Matthew; Zheng, Yi

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Rho GTPases have been implicated in diverse cellular functions and are potential therapeutic targets. By virtual screening, we have identified a Rho specific inhibitor, Rhosin. Rhosin contains two-aromatic rings tethered by a linker, and it binds to the surface area sandwiching Trp58 of RhoA with a submicromolar Kd and effectively inhibits GEF-catalyzed RhoA activation. In cells Rhosin specifically inhibited RhoA activity and RhoA-mediated cellular function without affecting Cdc42 or Rac1 signaling activities. By suppressing RhoA or RhoC activity Rhosin could inhibit mammary sphere formation by breast cancer cells, suppress invasion of mammary epithelial cells, and induce neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells in synergy with NGF. Thus, the rational designed RhoA subfamily specific small molecule inhibitor is useful for studying the physiological and pathologic roles of Rho GTPase. PMID:22726684

  14. Experimental Evaluation of Proposed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Water Channel Aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Jin, Byung-Ju; Lee, Sujin; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    The aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channel is a potentially important drug target, as AQP1 inhibition is predicted to have therapeutic action in edema, tumor growth, glaucoma, and other conditions. Here, we measured the AQP1 inhibition efficacy of 12 putative small-molecule AQP1 inhibitors reported in six recent studies, and one AQP1 activator. Osmotic water permeability was measured by stopped-flow light scattering in human and rat erythrocytes that natively express AQP1, in hemoglobin-free membrane vesicles from rat and human erythrocytes, and in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from AQP1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures. As a positive control, 0.3 mM HgCl2 inhibited AQP1 water permeability by >95%. We found that none of the tested compounds at 50 µM significantly inhibited or increased AQP1 water permeability in these assays. Identification of AQP1 inhibitors remains an important priority. PMID:26993802

  15. Comparison of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ and Identification of a Reliable Cross-Species Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David E.; Kim, Michelle B.; Moore, Jared T.; O’Brien, Terrence E.; Sorto, Nohemy A.; Grove, Charles I.; Lackner, Laura L.; Ames, James B.; Shaw, Jared T.

    2012-01-01

    FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates cytokinesis in bacteria. FtsZ is homologous in structure to eukaryotic tubulin and polymerizes in a similar head-to-tail fashion. The study of tubulin’s function in eukaryotic cells has benefited greatly from specific and potent small molecule inhibitors, including colchicine and taxol. Although many small molecule inhibitors of FtsZ have been reported, none has emerged as a generally useful probe for modulating bacterial cell division. With the goal of establishing a useful and reliable small molecule inhibitor of FtsZ, a broad biochemical cross-comparison of reported FtsZ inhibitors was undertaken. Several of these molecules, including phenolic natural products, are unselective inhibitors that seem to derive their activity from the formation of microscopic colloids or aggregates. Other compounds, including the natural product viriditoxin and the drug development candidate PC190723, exhibit no inhibition of GTPase activity using protocols in this work or under published conditions. Of the compounds studied, only zantrin Z3 exhibits good levels of inhibition, maintains activity under conditions that disrupt small molecule aggregates, and provides a platform for exploration of structure-activity relationships (SAR). Preliminary SAR studies have identified slight modifications to the two sidechains of this structure that modulate the inhibitory activity of zantrin Z3. Collectively these studies will help focus future investigations toward the establishment of probes for FtsZ that fill the roles of colchicine and taxol in studies of tubulin. PMID:22958099

  16. Automated approach for the identification of functionally-relevant small molecule inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D M III

    2000-02-16

    Radiation induces the formation of DNA damages via direct ionization or through the production of reactive oxygen intermediates that chemically modify DNA. Radiation is thought to elicit its cytotoxicity by inducing the formation of lethal DNA damage, including modified bases, baseless sites and strand breaks. To avert the deleterious effects of radiation and chromosomal modifications, cells are equipped with DNA repair systems and cellular responses that function to amend genetic imperfections and to prevent the replication of damaged DNA. The focus of this proposal is to develop a novel, function-based technology for isolating inhibitors of proteins involved in radiation-protection. Such inhibitor molecules represent potential radiosensitizing agents, which could be used to increase the biological effectiveness of a given radiation dose in anti-cancer treatment schemes. This project combines unique laboratory expertise in robotics, computational modeling, combinatorial chemistry, and DNA repair enzymology from the Biology & Biotechnology Research Program and the Chemistry and Material Science Directorate. The screening technique will utilize a simple flow-based filter system operated by robotics. Commercial laboratory instrumentation and automation are available for creating a nearly hands-off system for inhibitor molecule screening. Specifically, a general purpose dispensing instrument (i.e. the Packard Multiprobe II), using opaque, filter-backed microtiter plates, will be combined with on-deck vacuum extraction to generate a rapid screening technology. System integration tools and experience from the LLNL Human Genome Project will be leveraged. This screening capability will be applied to current lab research on proteins involved in the repair of radiation damaged DNA. Inhibitors of proteins involved in cellular resistance to radiation have potential value as co-therapeutics in anti-cancer treatments and would be licensed to pharmaceutical companies for further

  17. Identification of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the capsid hexamer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimmy P; Branson, Jeffrey D; Lawrence, Rae; Cocklin, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The HIV-1 CA protein is an attractive therapeutic target for the development of new antivirals. An inter-protomer pocket within the hexamer configuration of the CA, which is a binding site for key host dependency factors, is an especially appealing region for small molecule targeting. Using a field-based pharmacophore derived from an inhibitor known to interact with this region, coupled to biochemical and biological assessment, we have identified a new compound that inhibits HIV-1 infection and that targets the assembled CA hexamer. PMID:26747394

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors of IκB kinase (IKK) and IKK-related kinases.

    PubMed

    Llona-Minguez, Sabin; Baiget, Jessica; Mackay, Simon P

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factors NF-κB and IFN control important signaling cascades and mediate the expression of a number of important pro-inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, growth factors and anti-apoptotic survival proteins. IκB kinase (IKK) and IKK-related kinases (IKKε and TBK1) are key regulators of these biological pathways and, as such, modulators of these enzymes may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer. We have reviewed the most recent IKK patent literature (2008-2012), added publications of interest overlooked in previous patent reviews and identified all the players involved in small-molecule inhibitors of the IKKs. This will provide the reader with a decisive summary of the IKK arena, a field that has reached maturity over a decade of research. PMID:24237125

  19. A novel tankyrase small-molecule inhibitor suppresses APC mutation-driven colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ted; Chan, Emily; Callow, Marinella; Waaler, Jo; Boggs, Jason; Blake, Robert A; Magnuson, Steven; Sambrone, Amy; Schutten, Melissa; Firestein, Ron; Machon, Ondrej; Korinek, Vladimir; Choo, Edna; Diaz, Dolores; Merchant, Mark; Polakis, Paul; Holsworth, Daniel D; Krauss, Stefan; Costa, Mike

    2013-05-15

    Most colorectal cancers (CRC) are initiated by mutations of APC, leading to increased β-catenin-mediated signaling. However, continued requirement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling for tumor progression in the context of acquired KRAS and other mutations is less well-established. To attenuate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tumors, we have developed potent and specific small-molecule tankyrase inhibitors, G007-LK and G244-LM, that reduce Wnt/β-catenin signaling by preventing poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent AXIN degradation, thereby promoting β-catenin destabilization. We show that novel tankyrase inhibitors completely block ligand-driven Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cell culture and display approximately 50% inhibition of APC mutation-driven signaling in most CRC cell lines. It was previously unknown whether the level of AXIN protein stabilization by tankyrase inhibition is sufficient to impact tumor growth in the absence of normal APC activity. Compound G007-LK displays favorable pharmacokinetic properties and inhibits in vivo tumor growth in a subset of APC-mutant CRC xenograft models. In the xenograft model most sensitive to tankyrase inhibitor, COLO-320DM, G007-LK inhibits cell-cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and induces differentiation, suggesting that β-catenin-dependent maintenance of an undifferentiated state may be blocked by tankyrase inhibition. The full potential of the antitumor activity of G007-LK may be limited by intestinal toxicity associated with inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell proliferation in intestinal crypts. These results establish proof-of-concept antitumor efficacy for tankyrase inhibitors in APC-mutant CRC models and uncover potential diagnostic and safety concerns to be overcome as tankyrase inhibitors are advanced into the clinic. PMID:23539443

  20. A High Throughput Screening Assay System for the Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of gsp

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Hu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z.; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Zheng, Wei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Marugan, Juan J.; Southall, Noel; Neumann, Susanne; Northup, John K.; Ferrer, Marc; Collins, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT) or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H). Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT) or higher (R201C and R201H) cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)–based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses. PMID:24667240

  1. Small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions: progressing towards the reality

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, Michelle R.; Tang, Yinyan; Wells, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The past twenty years have seen many advances in our understanding of protein-protein interactions (PPI) and how to target them with small-molecule therapeutics. In 2004, we reviewed some early successes; since then, potent inhibitors have been developed for diverse protein complexes, and compounds are now in clinical trials for six targets. Surprisingly, many of these PPI clinical candidates have efficiency metrics typical of ‘lead-like’ or ‘drug-like’ molecules and are orally available. Successful discovery efforts have integrated multiple disciplines and make use of all the modern tools of target-based discovery - structure, computation, screening, and biomarkers. PPI become progressively more challenging as the interfaces become more complex, i.e., as binding epitopes are displayed on primary, secondary, or tertiary structures. Here, we review the last ten years of progress, focusing on the properties of PPI inhibitors that have advanced to clinical trials and prospects for the future of PPI drug discovery. PMID:25237857

  2. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2

    PubMed Central

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E.; Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M.; Ogilvie, Donald J.; Ward, Simon E.; Atack, John R.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5′-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a ‘humanized’ form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  3. Mode of action of DNA-competitive small molecule inhibitors of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2.

    PubMed

    Hornyak, Peter; Askwith, Trevor; Walker, Sarah; Komulainen, Emilia; Paradowski, Michael; Pennicott, Lewis E; Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Raoof, Ali; Watson, Mandy; Jordan, Allan M; Ogilvie, Donald J; Ward, Simon E; Atack, John R; Pearl, Laurence H; Caldecott, Keith W; Oliver, Antony W

    2016-07-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase important for the repair of DNA adducts generated by non-productive (abortive) activity of topoisomerase II (TOP2). TDP2 facilitates therapeutic resistance to topoisomerase poisons, which are widely used in the treatment of a range of cancer types. Consequently, TDP2 is an interesting target for the development of small molecule inhibitors that could restore sensitivity to topoisomerase-directed therapies. Previous studies identified a class of deazaflavin-based molecules that showed inhibitory activity against TDP2 at therapeutically useful concentrations, but their mode of action was uncertain. We have confirmed that the deazaflavin series inhibits TDP2 enzyme activity in a fluorescence-based assay, suitable for high-throughput screen (HTS)-screening. We have gone on to determine crystal structures of these compounds bound to a 'humanized' form of murine TDP2. The structures reveal their novel mode of action as competitive ligands for the binding site of an incoming DNA substrate, and point the way to generating novel and potent inhibitors of TDP2. PMID:27099339

  4. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Pre-mRNA Splicing*

    PubMed Central

    Pawellek, Andrea; McElroy, Stuart; Samatov, Timur; Mitchell, Lee; Woodland, Andrew; Ryder, Ursula; Gray, David; Lührmann, Reinhard; Lamond, Angus I.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression for all genes that contain introns. In contrast to transcription and translation, few well characterized chemical inhibitors are available with which to dissect the splicing process, particularly in cells. Therefore, the identification of specific small molecules that either inhibit or modify pre-mRNA splicing would be valuable for research and potentially also for therapeutic applications. We have screened a highly curated library of 71,504 drug-like small molecules using a high throughput in vitro splicing assay. This identified 10 new compounds that both inhibit pre-mRNA splicing in vitro and modify splicing of endogenous pre-mRNA in cells. One of these splicing modulators, DDD00107587 (termed “madrasin,” i.e. 2-((7methoxy-4-methylquinazolin-2-yl)amino)-5,6-dimethylpyrimidin-4(3H)-one RNAsplicing inhibitor), was studied in more detail. Madrasin interferes with the early stages of spliceosome assembly and stalls spliceosome assembly at the A complex. Madrasin is cytotoxic at higher concentrations, although at lower concentrations it induces cell cycle arrest, promotes a specific reorganization of subnuclear protein localization, and modulates splicing of multiple pre-mRNAs in both HeLa and HEK293 cells. PMID:25281741

  5. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of GSK-3: Structural Insights and Their Application to Alzheimer's Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Thomas; Schmidt, Boris; Lo Monte, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The world health organization (WHO) estimated that 18 million people are struck by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The USA, France, Germany, and other countries launched major programmes targeting the identification of risk factors, the improvement of caretaking, and fundamental research aiming to postpone the onset of AD. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is implicated in multiple cellular processes and has been linked to the pathogenesis of several diseases including diabetes mellitus, cancer, and AD. Inhibition of GSK-3 leads to neuroprotective effects, decreased β-amyloid production, and a reduction in tau hyperphosphorylation, which are all associated with AD. Various classes of small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors have been published in patents and original publications. Herein, we present a comprehensive summary of small molecules reported to interact with GSK-3. We illustrate the interactions of the inhibitors with the active site. Furthermore, we refer to the biological characterisation in terms of activity and selectivity for GSK-3, elucidate in vivo studies and pre-/clinical trials. PMID:22888461

  6. Pyrvinium, a Potent Small Molecule Wnt Inhibitor, Promotes Wound Repair and Post-MI Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Saraswati, Sarika; Alfaro, Maria P.; Thorne, Curtis A.; Atkinson, James; Lee, Ethan; Young, Pampee P.

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays an important role in developmental and stem cell biology. To test the hypothesis that temporary inhibition of Wnt signaling will enhance granulation tissue and promote angiogenesis in tissue repair, we employed a recently characterized small molecule Wnt inhibitor. Pyrvinium is an FDA-approved drug that we identified as a Wnt inhibitor in a chemical screen for small molecules that stabilize β-catenin and inhibit Axin degradation. Our subsequent characterization of pyrvinium has revealed that its critical cellular target in the Wnt pathway is Casein Kinase 1α. Daily administration of pyrvinium directly into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponges implanted subcutaneously in mice generated better organized and vascularized granulation tissue; this compound also increased the proliferative index of the tissue within the sponges. To evaluate its effect in myocardial repair, we induced a myocardial infarction (MI) by coronary artery ligation and administered a single intramyocardial dose of pyrvinium. Mice were evaluated by echocardiography at 7 and 30 days post-MI and treatment; post mortem hearts were evaluated by histology at 30 days. Pyrvinium reduced adverse cardiac remodeling demonstrated by decreased left ventricular internal diameter in diastole (LVIDD) as compared to a control compound. Increased Ki-67+ cells were observed in peri-infarct and distal myocardium of pyrvinium-treated animals. These results need to be further followed-up to determine if therapeutic inhibition of canonical Wnt may avert adverse remodeling after ischemic injury and its impact on myocardial repair and regeneration. PMID:21170416

  7. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  8. High throughput screen identifies small molecule inhibitors specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoserine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  9. Identification of Drug-Like Inhibitors of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase Through Small-Molecule Screening.

    PubMed

    Engen, Karin; Rosenström, Ulrika; Axelsson, Hanna; Konda, Vivek; Dahllund, Leif; Otrocka, Magdalena; Sigmundsson, Kristmundur; Nikolaou, Alexandros; Vauquelin, Georges; Hallberg, Mathias; Jenmalm Jensen, Annika; Lundbäck, Thomas; Larhed, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin IV, a ligand of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), has been shown to improve cognitive functions in several animal models. Consequently, IRAP is considered a potential target for treatment of cognitive disorders. To identify nonpeptidic IRAP inhibitors, we adapted an established enzymatic assay based on membrane preparations from Chinese hamster ovary cells and a synthetic peptide-like substrate for high-throughput screening purposes. The 384-well microplate-based absorbance assay was used to screen a diverse set of 10,500 compounds for their inhibitory capacity of IRAP. The assay performance was robust with Z'-values ranging from 0.81 to 0.91, and the screen resulted in 23 compounds that displayed greater than 60% inhibition at a compound concentration of 10 μM. After hit confirmation experiments, purity analysis, and promiscuity investigations, three structurally different compounds were considered particularly interesting as starting points for the development of small-molecule-based IRAP inhibitors. After resynthesis, all three compounds confirmed low μM activity and were shown to be rapidly reversible. Additional characterization included activity in a fluorescence-based orthogonal assay and in the presence of a nonionic detergent and a reducing agent, respectively. Importantly, the characterized compounds also showed inhibition of the human ortholog, prompting our further interest in these novel IRAP inhibitors. PMID:27078680

  10. High Throughput Screen Identifies Small Molecule Inhibitors Specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phosphoserine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  11. Structure-Based Drug Design of Small Molecule Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors to Treat Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Wang, Tao; Qiu, Shengzhi; Zhu, Yasheng; Liang, Li; Zheng, Youguang

    2016-01-01

    Human peptide deformylase (HsPDF) is an important target for anticancer drug discovery. In view of the limited HsPDF, inhibitors were reported, and high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS) studies based on HsPDF for developing new PDF inhibitors remain to be reported. We reported here on diverse small molecule inhibitors with excellent anticancer activities designed based on HTVS and molecular docking studies using the crystal structure of HsPDF. The compound M7594_0037 exhibited potent anticancer activities against HeLa, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50s of 35.26, 29.63 and 24.63 μM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggested that M7594_0037 and its three derivatives could interact with HsPDF by several conserved hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties of M7594_0037 and its derivatives were predicted using the OSIRIS property explorer. Thus, M7594_0037 and its derivatives might represent a promising scaffold for the further development of novel anticancer drugs. PMID:27023495

  12. Identification of alsterpaullone as a novel small molecule inhibitor to target group 3 medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Faria, Claudia C; Agnihotri, Sameer; Mack, Stephen C; Golbourn, Brian J; Diaz, Roberto J; Olsen, Samantha; Bryant, Melissa; Bebenek, Matthew; Wang, Xin; Bertrand, Kelsey C; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Clark, Ian; Dirks, Peter; Smith, Christian A; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T

    2015-08-28

    Advances in the molecular biology of medulloblastoma revealed four genetically and clinically distinct subgroups. Group 3 medulloblastomas are characterized by frequent amplifications of the oncogene MYC, a high incidence of metastasis, and poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. We investigated several potential small molecule inhibitors to target Group 3 medulloblastomas based on gene expression data using an in silico drug screen. The Connectivity Map (C-MAP) analysis identified piperlongumine as the top candidate drug for non-WNT medulloblastomas and the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor alsterpaullone as the compound predicted to have specific antitumor activity against Group 3 medulloblastomas. To validate our findings we used these inhibitors against established Group 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. The C-MAP predicted drugs reduced cell proliferation in vitro and increased survival in Group 3 medulloblastoma xenografts. Alsterpaullone had the highest efficacy in Group 3 medulloblastoma cells. Genomic profiling of Group 3 medulloblastoma cells treated with alsterpaullone confirmed inhibition of cell cycle-related genes, and down-regulation of MYC. Our results demonstrate the preclinical efficacy of using a targeted therapy approach for Group 3 medulloblastomas. Specifically, we provide rationale for advancing alsterpaullone as a targeted therapy in Group 3 medulloblastoma. PMID:26061748

  13. Identification of alsterpaullone as a novel small molecule inhibitor to target group 3 medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Claudia C.; Agnihotri, Sameer; Mack, Stephen C.; Golbourn, Brian J.; Diaz, Roberto J.; Olsen, Samantha; Bryant, Melissa; Bebenek, Matthew; Wang, Xin; Bertrand, Kelsey C.; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Clark, Ian; Dirks, Peter; Smith, Christian A.; Taylor, Michael D.; Rutka, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of medulloblastoma revealed four genetically and clinically distinct subgroups. Group 3 medulloblastomas are characterized by frequent amplifications of the oncogene MYC, a high incidence of metastasis, and poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. We investigated several potential small molecule inhibitors to target Group 3 medulloblastomas based on gene expression data using an in silico drug screen. The Connectivity Map (C-MAP) analysis identified piperlongumine as the top candidate drug for non-WNT medulloblastomas and the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor alsterpaullone as the compound predicted to have specific antitumor activity against Group 3 medulloblastomas. To validate our findings we used these inhibitors against established Group 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. The C-MAP predicted drugs reduced cell proliferation in vitro and increased survival in Group 3 medulloblastoma xenografts. Alsterpaullone had the highest efficacy in Group 3 medulloblastoma cells. Genomic profiling of Group 3 medulloblastoma cells treated with alsterpaullone confirmed inhibition of cell cycle-related genes, and down-regulation of MYC. Our results demonstrate the preclinical efficacy of using a targeted therapy approach for Group 3 medulloblastomas. Specifically, we provide rationale for advancing alsterpaullone as a targeted therapy in Group 3 medulloblastoma. PMID:26061748

  14. New small-molecule inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase inhibit Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Nguyen, Thao; McMichael, Megan; Velu, Sadanandan E; Zou, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Wu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major aetiological agent of dental caries. Formation of biofilms is a key virulence factor of S. mutans. Drugs that inhibit S. mutans biofilms may have therapeutic potential. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a critical role in regulating the metabolism of folate. DHFR inhibitors are thus potent drugs and have been explored as anticancer and antimicrobial agents. In this study, a library of analogues based on a DHFR inhibitor, trimetrexate (TMQ), an FDA-approved drug, was screened and three new analogues that selectively inhibited S. mutans were identified. The most potent inhibitor had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 454.0±10.2nM for the biofilm and 8.7±1.9nM for DHFR of S. mutans. In contrast, the IC50 of this compound for human DHFR was ca. 1000nM, a >100-fold decrease in its potency, demonstrating the high selectivity of the analogue. An analogue that exhibited the least potency for the S. mutans biofilm also had the lowest activity towards inhibiting S. mutans DHFR, further indicating that inhibition of biofilms is related to reduced DHFR activity. These data, along with docking of the most potent analogue to the modelled DHFR structure, suggested that the TMQ analogues indeed selectively inhibited S. mutans through targeting DHFR. These potent and selective small molecules are thus promising lead compounds to develop new effective therapeutics to prevent and treat dental caries. PMID:26022931

  15. Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors against Meso-2, 6-Diaminopimelate Dehydrogenase from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Victoria N.; Parikh, Hardik I.; El-rami, Fadi; Ge, Xiuchun; Chen, Weihau; Zhang, Yan; Kellogg, Glen E.; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Species-specific antimicrobial therapy has the potential to combat the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance and alteration of the human microbiome. We therefore set out to demonstrate the beginning of a pathogen-selective drug discovery method using the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis as a model. Through our knowledge of metabolic networks and essential genes we identified a “druggable” essential target, meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase, which is found in a limited number of species. We adopted a high-throughput virtual screen method on the ZINC chemical library to select a group of potential small-molecule inhibitors. Meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase from P. gingivalis was first expressed and purified in Escherichia coli then characterized for enzymatic inhibitor screening studies. Several inhibitors with similar structural scaffolds containing a sulfonamide core and aromatic substituents showed dose-dependent inhibition. These compounds were further assayed showing reasonable whole-cell activity and the inhibition mechanism was determined. We conclude that the establishment of this target and screening strategy provides a model for the future development of new antimicrobials. PMID:26544875

  16. Small Molecules, Inhibitors of DNA-PK, Targeting DNA Repair, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Panasci, Lawrence; Aloyz, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining a major mechanism for the repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA-PK. Computer based drug

  17. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  18. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  19. Constant pH Molecular Dynamics Reveals pH-Modulated Binding of Two Small-Molecule BACE1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Christopher R; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Hou, Xinjun; Shen, Jana

    2016-03-17

    Targeting β-secretase (BACE1) with small-molecule inhibitors offers a promising route for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, the intricate pH dependence of BACE1 function and inhibitor efficacy has posed major challenges for structure-based drug design. Here we investigate two structurally similar BACE1 inhibitors that have dramatically different inhibitory activity using continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD). At high pH, both inhibitors are stably bound to BACE1; however, within the enzyme active pH range, only the iminopyrimidinone-based inhibitor remains bound, while the aminothiazine-based inhibitor becomes partially dissociated following the loss of hydrogen bonding with the active site and change of the 10s loop conformation. The drastically lower activity of the second inhibitor is due to the protonation of a catalytic aspartate and the lack of a propyne tail. This work demonstrates that CpHMD can be used for screening pH-dependent binding profiles of small-molecule inhibitors, providing a new tool for structure-based drug design and optimization. PMID:26905811

  20. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  1. Chemical ‘Jekyll and Hyde’s: Small-molecule inhibitors of developmental signaling pathways†

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Tomoyo; Chen, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Small molecules that perturb developmental signaling pathways can have devastating effects on embryonic patterning, as evidenced by the chemically induced onset of cyclopic lambs and children with severely shortened limbs during the 1950s. Recent studies, however, have revealed critical roles for these pathways in human disorders and diseases, spurring the re-examination of these compounds as new targeted therapies. In this tutorial review, we describe four case studies of teratogenic compounds, including inhibitors of the Hedgehog (Hh), Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways. We discuss how these teratogens were discovered, their mechanisms of action, their utility as molecular probes, and their potential as therapeutic agents. We also consider current challenges in the field and possible directions for future research. PMID:21505654

  2. Discovery of RG7112: A Small-Molecule MDM2 Inhibitor in Clinical Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a potent transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of cellular responses to stress. It is controlled by its negative regulator MDM2, which binds directly to p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity. MDM2 also targets p53 for degradation by the proteasome. Many tumors produce high levels of MDM2, thereby impairing p53 function. Restoration of p53 activity by inhibiting the p53-MDM2 interaction may represent a novel approach to cancer treatment. RG7112 (2g) is the first clinical small-molecule MDM2 inhibitor designed to occupy the p53-binding pocket of MDM2. In cancer cells expressing wild-type p53, RG7112 stabilizes p53 and activates the p53 pathway, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and inhibition or regression of human tumor xenografts. PMID:24900694

  3. Shutting down the pore: The search for small molecule inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Šileikytė, Justina; Forte, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) is now recognized as playing a key role in a wide variety of human diseases whose common pathology may be based in mitochondrial dysfunction. Recently, PTP assays have been adapted to high-throughput screening approaches to identify small molecules specifically inhibiting the PTP. Following extensive secondary chemistry, the most potent inhibitors of the PTP described to date have been developed. This review will provide an overview of each of these screening efforts, use of resulting compounds in animal models of PTP-based diseases, and problems that will require further study. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26924772

  4. Discovery of RG7112: A Small-Molecule MDM2 Inhibitor in Clinical Development.

    PubMed

    Vu, Binh; Wovkulich, Peter; Pizzolato, Giacomo; Lovey, Allen; Ding, Qingjie; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jin-Jun; Zhao, Chunlin; Glenn, Kelli; Wen, Yang; Tovar, Christian; Packman, Kathryn; Vassilev, Lyubomir; Graves, Bradford

    2013-05-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a potent transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of cellular responses to stress. It is controlled by its negative regulator MDM2, which binds directly to p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity. MDM2 also targets p53 for degradation by the proteasome. Many tumors produce high levels of MDM2, thereby impairing p53 function. Restoration of p53 activity by inhibiting the p53-MDM2 interaction may represent a novel approach to cancer treatment. RG7112 (2g) is the first clinical small-molecule MDM2 inhibitor designed to occupy the p53-binding pocket of MDM2. In cancer cells expressing wild-type p53, RG7112 stabilizes p53 and activates the p53 pathway, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and inhibition or regression of human tumor xenografts. PMID:24900694

  5. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric M; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L; Evanchik, Marc J; Gorham, Joshua M; Harrison, Brooke C; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D; Rodriguez, Hector M; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A; Spudich, James A; McDowell, Robert S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  6. Functional characterization of a SUMO deconjugating protease of Plasmodium falciparum using newly identified small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Albrow, Victoria E.; Leader, Brittany A.; Békés, Miklós; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Fonović, Urša Pečar; Shen, Aimee; Drag, Marcin; Xiao, Junpeng; Deu, Edgar; Campbell, Amy J.; Powers, James C.; Salvesen, Guy S.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is implicated in the regulation of numerous biological processes including transcription, protein localization, and cell cycle control. Protein modification by SUMO is found in Plasmodium falciparum; however, its role in the regulation of the parasite lifecycle is poorly understood. Here we describe functional studies of a SUMO-specific protease (SENP) of P. falciparum, PfSENP1 (PFL1635w). Expression of the catalytic domain of PfSENP1 and biochemical profiling using a positional scanning substrate library demonstrated that this protease has unique cleavage sequence preference relative to the human SENPs. In addition, we describe a novel class of small molecule inhibitors of this protease. The most potent lead compound inhibited both recombinant PfSENP1 activity and P. falciparum replication in infected human blood. These studies provide valuable new tools for the study of SUMOylation in P. falciparum. PMID:21700207

  7. Covalent Small Molecule Inhibitors of Ca2+-Bound S100B

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of the tumor marker S100B are observed in malignant melanoma, and this EF-hand-containing protein was shown to directly bind wild-type (wt) p53 in a Ca2+-dependent manner, dissociate the p53 tetramer, and inhibit its tumor suppression functions. Likewise, inhibiting S100B with small interfering RNA (siRNAS100B) is sufficient to restore wild-type p53 levels and its downstream gene products and induce the arrest of cell growth and UV-dependent apoptosis in malignant melanoma. Therefore, it is a goal to develop S100B inhibitors (SBiXs) that inhibit the S100B–p53 complex and restore active p53 in this deadly cancer. Using a structure–activity relationship by nuclear magnetic resonance approach (SAR by NMR), three persistent binding pockets are found on S100B, termed sites 1–3. While inhibitors that simultaneously bind sites 2 and 3 are in place, no molecules that simultaneously bind all three persistent sites are available. For this purpose, Cys84 was used in this study as a potential means to bridge sites 1 and 2 because it is located in a small crevice between these two deeper pockets on the protein. Using a fluorescence polarization competition assay, several Cys84-modified S100B complexes were identified and examined further. For five such SBiX–S100B complexes, crystallographic structures confirmed their covalent binding to Cys84 near site 2 and thus present straightforward chemical biology strategies for bridging sites 1 and 3. Importantly, one such compound, SC1982, showed an S100B-dependent death response in assays with WM115 malignant melanoma cells, so it will be particularly useful for the design of SBiX molecules with improved affinity and specificity. PMID:25268459

  8. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Evan R.; Yang, Jing; So, Juhoon; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Kahn, Michael; Ishitani, Tohru; Shin, Donghun; Mustata Wilson, Gabriela; Monga, Satdarshan P.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, lacks effective medical therapy. Large subsets of HCC demonstrate Wnt/β-catenin activation, making this an attractive therapeutic target. We report strategy and characterization of a novel small-molecule inhibitor, ICG-001, known to affect Wnt signaling by disrupting β-catenin–CREB binding protein interactions. We queried the ZINC online database for structural similarity to ICG-001 and identified PMED-1 as the lead compound, with ≥70% similarity to ICG-001. PMED-1 significantly reduced β-catenin activity in hepatoblastoma and several HCC cells, as determined by TOPflash reporter assay, with an IC50 ranging from 4.87 to 32 μmol/L. Although no toxicity was observed in primary human hepatocytes, PMED-1 inhibited Wnt target expression in HCC cells, including those with CTNNB1 mutations, and impaired cell proliferation and viability. PMED-1 treatment decreased β-catenin–CREB binding protein interactions without affecting total β-catenin levels or activity of other common kinases. PMED-1 treatment of Tg(OTM:d2EGFP) zebrafish expressing GFP under the β-catenin/Tcf reporter led to a notable decrease in β-catenin activity. The PMED effect on β-catenin signaling lasted from 12 to 24 hours in vitro and 6 to 15 hours in vivo. Thus, using a rapid and cost-effective computational methodology, we have identified a novel and specific small-molecule inhibitor of Wnt signaling that may have implications for HCC treatment. PMID:24819961

  9. Chalcone-based small-molecule inhibitors attenuate malignant phenotype via targeting deubiquitinating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Issaenko, Olga A; Amerik, Alexander Yu

    2012-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is usurped by many if not all cancers to regulate their survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Bioflavonoids curcumin and chalcones exhibit anti-neoplastic selectivity through inhibition of the 26S proteasome-activity within the UPS. Here, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of action of chalcone-based derivatives AM146, RA-9 and RA-14, which exert anticancer activity by targeting deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) without affecting 20S proteasome catalytic-core activity. The presence of the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group susceptible to nucleophilic attack from the sulfhydryl of cysteines in the active sites of DUB determines the capacity of novel small-molecules to act as cell-permeable, partly selective DUB inhibitors and induce rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and deplete the pool of free ubiquitin. These chalcone-derivatives directly suppress activity of DUB UCH-L1, UCH-L3, USP2, USP5 and USP8, which are known to regulate the turnover and stability of key regulators of cell survival and proliferation. Inhibition of DUB-activity mediated by these compounds downregulates cell-cycle promoters, e.g., cyclin D1 and upregulates tumor suppressors p53, p27(Kip1) and p16(Ink4A). These changes are associated with arrest in S-G 2/M, abrogated anchorage-dependent growth and onset of apoptosis in breast, ovarian and cervical cancer cells without noticeable alterations in primary human cells. Altogether, this work provides evidence of antitumor activity of novel chalcone-based derivatives mediated by their DUB-targeting capacity; supports the development of pharmaceuticals to directly target DUB as a most efficient strategy compared with proteasome inhibition and also provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of these novel small-molecule DUB inhibitors. PMID:22510564

  10. Covalent small molecule inhibitors of Ca(2+)-bound S100B.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Michael C; Pierce, Adam D; Wilder, Paul T; Alasady, Milad J; Hartman, Kira G; Neau, David B; Foley, Timothy L; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David J; Simeonov, Anton; Toth, Eric A; Weber, David J

    2014-10-28

    Elevated levels of the tumor marker S100B are observed in malignant melanoma, and this EF-hand-containing protein was shown to directly bind wild-type (wt) p53 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, dissociate the p53 tetramer, and inhibit its tumor suppression functions. Likewise, inhibiting S100B with small interfering RNA (siRNA(S100B)) is sufficient to restore wild-type p53 levels and its downstream gene products and induce the arrest of cell growth and UV-dependent apoptosis in malignant melanoma. Therefore, it is a goal to develop S100B inhibitors (SBiXs) that inhibit the S100B-p53 complex and restore active p53 in this deadly cancer. Using a structure-activity relationship by nuclear magnetic resonance approach (SAR by NMR), three persistent binding pockets are found on S100B, termed sites 1-3. While inhibitors that simultaneously bind sites 2 and 3 are in place, no molecules that simultaneously bind all three persistent sites are available. For this purpose, Cys84 was used in this study as a potential means to bridge sites 1 and 2 because it is located in a small crevice between these two deeper pockets on the protein. Using a fluorescence polarization competition assay, several Cys84-modified S100B complexes were identified and examined further. For five such SBiX-S100B complexes, crystallographic structures confirmed their covalent binding to Cys84 near site 2 and thus present straightforward chemical biology strategies for bridging sites 1 and 3. Importantly, one such compound, SC1982, showed an S100B-dependent death response in assays with WM115 malignant melanoma cells, so it will be particularly useful for the design of SBiX molecules with improved affinity and specificity. PMID:25268459

  11. Structure-Function Correlation of G6, a Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor of Jak2

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Anurima; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Magis, Andrew; Kiss, Róbert; Polgár, Tímea; Baskin, Rebekah; Allan, Robert W.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Reuther, Gary W.; Keserű, György M.; Bisht, Kirpal S.; Sayeski, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the Jak2 protein, such as V617F, cause aberrant Jak/STAT signaling and can lead to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms. This discovery has led to the search for small molecule inhibitors that target Jak2. Using structure-based virtual screening, our group recently identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of Jak2 named G6. Here, we identified a structure-function correlation of this compound. Specifically, five derivative compounds of G6 having structural similarity to the original lead compound were obtained and analyzed for their ability to (i) inhibit Jak2-V617F-mediated cell growth, (ii) inhibit the levels of phospho-Jak2, phospho-STAT3, and phospho-STAT5; (iii) induce apoptosis in human erythroleukemia cells; and (iv) suppress pathologic cell growth of Jak2-V617F-expressing human bone marrow cells ex vivo. Additionally, we computationally examined the interactions of these compounds with the ATP-binding pocket of the Jak2 kinase domain. We found that the stilbenoid core-containing derivatives of G6 significantly inhibited Jak2-V617F-mediated cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. They also inhibited phosphorylation of Jak2, STAT3, and STAT5 proteins within cells, resulting in higher levels of apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Finally, the stilbenoid derivatives inhibited the pathologic growth of Jak2-V617F-expressing human bone marrow cells ex vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that G6 has a stilbenoid core that is indispensable for maintaining its Jak2 inhibitory potential. PMID:20667821

  12. Characterizing the Covalent Targets of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of the Lysine Acetyltransferase P300.

    PubMed

    Shrimp, Jonathan H; Sorum, Alexander W; Garlick, Julie M; Guasch, Laura; Nicklaus, Marc C; Meier, Jordan L

    2016-02-11

    C646 inhibits the lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) p300 and CBP and represents the most potent and selective small molecule KAT inhibitor identified to date. To gain insights into the cellular activity of this epigenetic probe, we applied chemoproteomics to identify covalent targets of the C646 chemotype. Modeling and synthetic derivatization was used to develop a clickable analogue (C646-yne) that inhibits p300 similarly to the parent compound and enables enrichment of bound proteins. LC-MS/MS identified the major covalent targets of C646-yne as highly abundant cysteine-containing proteins, and follow-up studies found that C646 can inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. Finally, we provide evidence that thiol reactivity of C646 may limit its ability to antagonize acetylation in cells. These findings should enable a more precise interpretation of studies utilizing C646 as a chemical probe of KAT activity and suggest that an underappreciated liability of electrophile-containing inhibitors is a reduction in their cellular potency due to consumption by abundant protein and metabolite thiol sinks. PMID:26985290

  13. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M.; Wang, Charles X.; An, W. Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  14. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M; Wang, Charles X; An, W Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V

    2016-05-19

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  15. Targeting DDX3 with a small molecule inhibitor for lung cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bol, Guus M; Vesuna, Farhad; Xie, Min; Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Gandhi, Nishant; Levine, Anne; Irving, Ashley; Korz, Dorian; Tantravedi, Saritha; Heerma van Voss, Marise R; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Bordt, Evan A; Polster, Brian M; Cope, Leslie; van der Groep, Petra; Kondaskar, Atul; Rudek, Michelle A; Hosmane, Ramachandra S; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Tran, Phuoc T; Raman, Venu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and is a focus for developing targeted therapies due to its refractory nature to current treatment. We identified a RNA helicase, DDX3, which is overexpressed in many cancer types including lung cancer and is associated with lower survival in lung cancer patients. We designed a first-in-class small molecule inhibitor, RK-33, which binds to DDX3 and abrogates its activity. Inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 caused G1 cell cycle arrest, induced apoptosis, and promoted radiation sensitization in DDX3-overexpressing cells. Importantly, RK-33 in combination with radiation induced tumor regression in multiple mouse models of lung cancer. Mechanistically, loss of DDX3 function either by shRNA or by RK-33 impaired Wnt signaling through disruption of the DDX3–β-catenin axis and inhibited non-homologous end joining—the major DNA repair pathway in mammalian somatic cells. Overall, inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 promotes tumor regression, thus providing a compelling argument to develop DDX3 inhibitors for lung cancer therapy. PMID:25820276

  16. Phenylphthalazines as small-molecule inhibitors of urea transporter UT-B and their binding model

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jian-hua; Li, Min; Tou, Weng-Ieong; Lei, Tian-luo; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian; Yang, Bao-xue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Urea transporters (UT) are a family of transmembrane proteins that specifically transport urea. UT inhibitors exert diuretic activity without affecting electrolyte balance. The purpose of this study was to discover novel UT inhibitors and determine the inhibition mechanism. Methods: The primary screening urea transporter B (UT-B) inhibitory activity was conducted in a collection of 10 000 diverse small molecules using mouse erythrocyte lysis assay. After discovering a hit with a core structure of 1-phenylamino-4-phenylphthalazin, the UT-B inhibitory activity of 160 analogs were examined with a stopped-flow light scattering assay and their structure-activity relationship (SAR) was analyzed. The inhibition mechanism was further investigated using in silico assays. Results: A phenylphthalazine compound PU1424, chemically named 5-(4-((4-methoxyphenyl) amino) phthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylbenzene sulfonamide, showed potent UT-B inhibition activity, inhibited human and mouse UT-B-mediated urea transport with IC50 value of 0.02 and 0.69 μmol/L, respectively, and exerted 100% UT-B inhibition at higher concentrations. The compound PU1424 did not affect membrane urea transport in mouse erythrocytes lacking UT-B. Structure-activity analysis revealed that the analogs with methoxyl group at R4 and sulfonic amide at R2 position exhibited the highest potency inhibition activity on UT-B. Furthermore, in silico assays validated that the R4 and R2 positions of the analogs bound to the UT-B binding pocket and exerted inhibition activity on UT-B. Conclusion: The compound PU1424 is a novel inhibitor of both human and mouse UT-B with IC50 at submicromolar ranges. Its binding site is located at the So site of the UT-B structure. PMID:27238209

  17. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  18. Small molecule inhibitors of PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions as novel analgesics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Hung; Xu, Zhili; Ashpole, Nicole M; Hudmon, Andy; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Thakur, Ganesh A; Lai, Yvonne Y; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant increases in NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling contributes to central nervous system sensitization and chronic pain by activating neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and generating nitric oxide (NO). Because the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDA (PSD95) tethers nNOS to NMDARs, the PSD95-nNOS complex represents a therapeutic target. Small molecule inhibitors IC87201 (EC5O: 23.94 μM) and ZL006 (EC50: 12.88 μM) directly inhibited binding of purified PSD95 and nNOS proteins in AlphaScreen without altering binding of PSD95 to ErbB4. Both PSD95-nNOS inhibitors suppressed glutamate-induced cell death with efficacy comparable to MK-801. IC87201 and ZL006 preferentially suppressed phase 2A pain behavior in the formalin test and suppressed allodynia induced by intraplantar complete Freund's adjuvant administration. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed mechanical and cold allodynia induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (ED50s: 2.47 and 0.93 mg/kg i.p. for IC87201 and ZL006, respectively). Efficacy of PSD95-nNOS disruptors was similar to MK-801. Motor ataxic effects were induced by MK-801 but not by ZL006 or IC87201. Finally, MK-801 produced hyperalgesia in the tail-flick test whereas IC87201 and ZL006 did not alter basal nociceptive thresholds. Our studies establish the utility of using AlphaScreen and purified protein pairs to establish and quantify disruption of protein-protein interactions. Our results demonstrate previously unrecognized antinociceptive efficacy of ZL006 and establish, using two small molecules, a broad application for PSD95-nNOS inhibitors in treating neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Collectively, our results demonstrate that disrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions is effective in attenuating pathological pain without producing unwanted side effects (i.e. motor ataxia) associated with NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26071110

  19. A Comprehensive Insight into the Chemical Space and ADME Features of Small Molecule NS5A Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ivanenkov, Yan A; Veselov, Mark S; Shakhbazyan, Artem G; Aladinskiy, Vladimir A; Aladinskaya, Anastasia V; Yartseva, Sofya M; Majouga, Alexander G; Vantskul, Anton S; Leonov, Sergey V; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Koteliansky, Victor E

    2016-01-01

    Non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein plays a crucial role in the replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and during the past decade has attracted increasing attention as a promising biological target for the treatment of viral infections and related disorders. Small-molecule NS5A inhibitors have shown significant antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo. Several lead molecules are reasonably regarded as novel highly potent drug candidates with favorable ADME features and tolerable side effects. The first-in-class daclatasvir has recently been launched into the market and 14 novel molecules are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. From this perspective, we provide an overview of the available chemical space of small-molecule NS5A inhibitors and their PK properties, mainly focusing on the diversity in structure and scaffold representation. PMID:26585933

  20. Discovery and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of the BET family bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chun-Wa; Coste, Herve; White, Julia H; Mirguet, Olivier; Wilde, Jonathan; Gosmini, Romain L; Delves, Chris; Magny, Sylvie M; Woodward, Robert; Hughes, Stephen A; Boursier, Eric V; Flynn, Helen; Bouillot, Anne M; Bamborough, Paul; Brusq, Jean-Marie G; Gellibert, Francoise J; Jones, Emma J; Riou, Alizon M; Homes, Paul; Martin, Sandrine L; Uings, Iain J; Toum, Jerome; Clement, Catherine A; Boullay, Anne-Benedicte; Grimley, Rachel L; Blandel, Florence M; Prinjha, Rab K; Lee, Kevin; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Nicodeme, Edwige

    2011-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation have a profound role in normal development and disease processes. An integral part of this mechanism occurs through lysine acetylation of histone tails which are recognized by bromodomains. While the biological and structural characterization of many bromodomain containing proteins has advanced considerably, the therapeutic tractability of this protein family is only now becoming understood. This paper describes the discovery and molecular characterization of potent (nM) small molecule inhibitors that disrupt the function of the BET family of bromodomains (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4). By using a combination of phenotypic screening, chemoproteomics, and biophysical studies, we have discovered that the protein-protein interactions between bromodomains and acetylated histones can be antagonized by selective small molecules that bind at the acetylated lysine recognition pocket. X-ray crystal structures of compounds bound into bromodomains of Brd2 and Brd4 elucidate the molecular interactions of binding and explain the precisely defined stereochemistry required for activity. PMID:21568322

  1. Small molecule inhibitors of Clostridium difficile toxin B-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Tam, John; Beilhartz, Greg L; Auger, Anick; Gupta, Pulkit; Therien, Alex G; Melnyk, Roman A

    2015-02-19

    Clostridium difficile causes life-threatening diarrhea through the actions of its homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on human colonocytes. Therapeutic agents that block toxin-induced damage are urgently needed to prevent the harmful consequences of toxin action that are not addressed with current antibiotic-based treatments. Here, we developed an imaging-based phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that protected human cells from TcdB-induced cell rounding. A series of structurally diverse compounds with antitoxin activity were identified and found to act through one of a small subset of mechanisms, including direct binding and sequestration of TcdB, inhibition of endosomal maturation, and noncompetitive inhibition of the toxin glucosyltransferase activity. Distinct classes of inhibitors were used further to dissect the determinants of the toxin-mediated necrosis phenotype occurring at higher doses of toxin. These findings validate and inform novel targeting strategies for discovering small molecule agents to treat C. difficile infection. PMID:25619932

  2. Small molecule inhibitors of HIVgp41 N-heptad repeat trimer formation.

    PubMed

    Allen, William J; Yi, Hyun Ah; Gochin, Miriam; Jacobs, Amy; Rizzo, Robert C

    2015-07-15

    Identification of mechanistically novel anti-HIV fusion inhibitors was accomplished using a computer-aided structure-based design approach with the goal of blocking the formation of the N-heptad repeat (NHR) trimer of the viral protein gp41. A virtual screening strategy that included per-residue interaction patterns (footprints) was employed to identify small molecules compatible with putative binding pockets at the internal interface of the NHR helices at the core native viral six-helix bundle. From a screen of ∼2.8 million compounds using the DOCK program, 120 with favorable energetic and footprint overlap characteristics were purchased and experimentally tested leading to two compounds with favorable cell-cell fusion (IC50) and cytotoxicity profiles. Importantly, both hits were identified on the basis of scores containing footprint overlap terms and would not have been identified using the standard DOCK energy function alone. To our knowledge, these compounds represent the first reported small molecules that inhibit viral entry via the proposed NHR-trimer obstruction mechanism. PMID:26013847

  3. Discovery and mechanistic study of a small molecule inhibitor for motor protein KIFC1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaquan; Mikule, Keith; Wang, Wenxian; Su, Nancy; Petteruti, Philip; Gharahdaghi, Farzin; Code, Erin; Zhu, Xiahui; Jacques, Kelly; Lai, Zhongwu; Yang, Bin; Lamb, Michelle L; Chuaqui, Claudio; Keen, Nicholas; Chen, Huawei

    2013-10-18

    Centrosome amplification is observed in many human cancers and has been proposed to be a driver of both genetic instability and tumorigenesis. Cancer cells have evolved mechanisms to bundle multiple centrosomes into two spindle poles to avoid multipolar mitosis that can lead to chromosomal segregation defects and eventually cell death. KIFC1, a kinesin-14 family protein, plays an essential role in centrosomal bundling in cancer cells, but its function is not required for normal diploid cell division, suggesting that KIFC1 is an attractive therapeutic target for human cancers. To this end, we have identified the first reported small molecule inhibitor AZ82 for KIFC1. AZ82 bound specifically to the KIFC1/microtubule (MT) binary complex and inhibited the MT-stimulated KIFC1 enzymatic activity in an ATP-competitive and MT-noncompetitive manner with a Ki of 0.043 μM. AZ82 effectively engaged with the minus end-directed KIFC1 motor inside cells to reverse the monopolar spindle phenotype induced by the inhibition of the plus end-directed kinesin Eg5. Treatment with AZ82 caused centrosome declustering in BT-549 breast cancer cells with amplified centrosomes. Consistent with genetic studies, our data confirmed that KIFC1 inhibition by a small molecule holds promise for targeting cancer cells with amplified centrosomes and provided evidence that functional suppression of KIFC1 by inhibiting its enzymatic activity could be an effective means for developing cancer therapeutics. PMID:23895133

  4. Small‐Molecule and Peptide Inhibitors of the Pro‐Survival Protein Mcl‐1

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ability of protein–protein interactions to regulate cellular processes in both beneficial and detrimental ways has made them obvious drug targets. The Bcl‐2 family of proteins undergo a series of protein–protein interactions which regulate the intrinsic cell‐death pathway. The pro‐survival members of the Bcl‐2 family, including Bcl‐2, Bcl‐xL, and Mcl‐1, are commonly overexpressed in a number of human cancers. Effective modulators of members of the Bcl‐2 family have been developed and are undergoing clinical trials, but the efficient modulation of Mcl‐1 is still not represented in the clinic. In addition, Mcl‐1 is a major cause of resistance to radio‐ and chemotherapies, including inhibitors that target other Bcl‐2 family members. Subsequently, the inhibition of Mcl‐1 has become of significant interest to the scientific community. This review covers the progress made to date in modulating the activity of Mcl‐1, by both stapled peptides and small molecules. The development of peptides as drug candidates, and the advancement of experimental and computational techniques used to discover small molecules are also highlighted. PMID:26696548

  5. Design of a Small-Molecule Entry Inhibitor with Activity against Primary Measles Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plemper, Richard K.; Doyle, Joshua; Sun, Aiming; Prussia, Andrew; Cheng, Li-Ting; Rota, Paul A.; Liotta, Dennis C.; Snyder, James P.; Compans, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of measles virus (MV) infection has been significantly reduced in many nations through extensive vaccination; however, the virus still causes significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Measles outbreaks also occur in some developed countries that have failed to maintain high vaccine coverage rates. While vaccination is essential in preventing the spread of measles, case management would greatly benefit from the use of therapeutic agents to lower morbidity. Thus, the development of new therapeutic strategies is desirable. We previously reported the generation of a panel of small-molecule MV entry inhibitors. Here we show that our initial lead compound, although providing proof of concept for our approach, has a short half-life (<16 h) under physiological conditions. In order to combine potent antiviral activity with increased compound stability, a targeted library of candidate molecules designed on the structural basis of the first lead has been synthesized and tested against MV. We have identified an improved lead with low toxicity and high stability (half-life ≫ 16 h) that prevents viral entry and hence infection. This compound shows high MV specificity and strong activity (50% inhibitory concentration = 0.6 to 3.0 μM, depending on the MV genotype) against a panel of wild-type MV strains representative of viruses that are currently endemic in the field. PMID:16127050

  6. High-throughput small molecule screen identifies inhibitors of aberrant chromatin accessibility.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Samantha G; Simon, Jeremy M; Wali, Aminah; Jayakody, Chatura N; Troutman, Jacob; McFadden, Andrew W; Wooten, Joshua; Wood, Cameron C; Frye, Stephen V; Janzen, William P; Davis, Ian J

    2016-03-15

    Mutations in chromatin-modifying proteins and transcription factors are commonly associated with a wide variety of cancers. Through gain- or loss-of-function, these mutations may result in characteristic alterations of accessible chromatin, indicative of shifts in the landscape of regulatory elements genome-wide. The identification of compounds that reverse a specific chromatin signature could lead to chemical probes or potential therapies. To explore whether chromatin accessibility could serve as a platform for small molecule screening, we adapted formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE), a chemical method to enrich for nucleosome-depleted genomic regions, as a high-throughput, automated assay. After demonstrating the validity and robustness of this approach, we applied this method to screen an epigenetically targeted small molecule library by evaluating regions of aberrant nucleosome depletion mediated by EWSR1-FLI1, the chimeric transcription factor critical for the bone and soft tissue tumor Ewing sarcoma. As a class, histone deacetylase inhibitors were greatly overrepresented among active compounds. These compounds resulted in diminished accessibility at targeted sites by disrupting transcription of EWSR1-FLI1. Capitalizing on precise differences in chromatin accessibility for drug discovery efforts offers significant advantages because it does not depend on the a priori selection of a single molecular target and may detect novel biologically relevant pathways. PMID:26929321

  7. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  8. Ani9, A Novel Potent Small-Molecule ANO1 Inhibitor with Negligible Effect on ANO2

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yohan; Lee, Ho K.; Park, Jinhong; Jeon, Dong-kyu; Jo, Sungwoo; Jo, Minjae; Namkung, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Anoctamin1 (ANO1)/transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A), a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC), is involved in many physiological functions such as fluid secretion, smooth muscle contraction, nociception and cancer progression. To date, only a few ANO1 inhibitors have been described, and these have low potency and selectivity for ANO1. Here, we performed a high-throughput screening to identify highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of ANO1. Three novel ANO1 inhibitors were discovered from screening of 54,400 synthetic small molecules, and they were found to fully block ANO1 channel activity with an IC50 < 3 μM. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that the most potent inhibitor, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methylideneamino]-acetamide (Ani9), completely inhibited ANO1 chloride current with submicromolar potency. Notably, unlike previous small-molecule ANO1 inhibitors identified to date, Ani9 displayed high selectivity for ANO1 as compared to ANO2, which shares a high amino acid homology to ANO1. In addition, Ani9 did not affect the intracellular calcium signaling and CFTR chloride channel activity. Our results suggest that Ani9 may be a useful pharmacological tool for studying ANO1 and a potential development candidate for drug therapy of cancer, hypertension, pain, diarrhea and asthma. PMID:27219012

  9. Ani9, A Novel Potent Small-Molecule ANO1 Inhibitor with Negligible Effect on ANO2.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yohan; Lee, Ho K; Park, Jinhong; Jeon, Dong-Kyu; Jo, Sungwoo; Jo, Minjae; Namkung, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Anoctamin1 (ANO1)/transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A), a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC), is involved in many physiological functions such as fluid secretion, smooth muscle contraction, nociception and cancer progression. To date, only a few ANO1 inhibitors have been described, and these have low potency and selectivity for ANO1. Here, we performed a high-throughput screening to identify highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of ANO1. Three novel ANO1 inhibitors were discovered from screening of 54,400 synthetic small molecules, and they were found to fully block ANO1 channel activity with an IC50 < 3 μM. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that the most potent inhibitor, 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-N-[(2-methoxyphenyl)methylideneamino]-acetamide (Ani9), completely inhibited ANO1 chloride current with submicromolar potency. Notably, unlike previous small-molecule ANO1 inhibitors identified to date, Ani9 displayed high selectivity for ANO1 as compared to ANO2, which shares a high amino acid homology to ANO1. In addition, Ani9 did not affect the intracellular calcium signaling and CFTR chloride channel activity. Our results suggest that Ani9 may be a useful pharmacological tool for studying ANO1 and a potential development candidate for drug therapy of cancer, hypertension, pain, diarrhea and asthma. PMID:27219012

  10. Tripolin A, a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Aurora A Kinase, Reveals New Regulation of HURP's Distribution on Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Kesisova, Iliana A.; Nakos, Konstantinos C.; Tsolou, Avgi; Angelis, Dimitrios; Lewis, Joe; Chatzaki, Aikaterini; Agianian, Bogos; Giannis, Athanassios; Koffa, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic regulators exhibiting gain of function in tumor cells are considered useful cancer therapeutic targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors. The human Aurora kinases are a family of such targets. In this study, from a panel of 105 potential small-molecule inhibitors, two compounds Tripolin A and Tripolin B, inhibited Aurora A kinase activity in vitro. In human cells however, only Tripolin A acted as an Aurora A inhibitor. We combined in vitro, in vivo single cell and in silico studies to demonstrate the biological action of Tripolin A, a non-ATP competitive inhibitor. Tripolin A reduced the localization of pAurora A on spindle microtubules (MTs), affected centrosome integrity, spindle formation and length, as well as MT dynamics in interphase, consistent with Aurora A inhibition by RNAi or other specific inhibitors, such as MLN8054 or MLN8237. Interestingly, Tripolin A affected the gradient distribution towards the chromosomes, but not the MT binding of HURP (Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein), a MT-associated protein (MAP) and substrate of the Aurora A kinase. Therefore Tripolin A reveals a new way of regulating mitotic MT stabilizers through Aurora A phosphorylation. Tripolin A is predicted to bind Aurora A similarly but not identical to MLN8054, therefore it could be used to dissect pathways orchestrated by Aurora kinases as well as a scaffold for further inhibitor development. PMID:23516487

  11. A SMYD3 Small-Molecule Inhibitor Impairing Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Armenio Jorge; Di Virgilio, Valeria; Fittipaldi, Raffaella; Fabini, Edoardo; Bertucci, Carlo; Varchi, Greta; Moyer, Mary Pat; Caretti, Giuseppina; Del Rio, Alberto; Simone, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    SMYD3 is a histone lysine methyltransferase that plays an important role in transcriptional activation as a member of an RNA polymerase complex, and its oncogenic role has been described in different cancer types. We studied the expression and activity of SMYD3 in a preclinical model of colorectal cancer (CRC) and found that it is strongly upregulated throughout tumorigenesis both at the mRNA and protein level. Our results also showed that RNAi-mediated SMYD3 ablation impairs CRC cell proliferation indicating that SMYD3 is required for proper cancer cell growth. These data, together with the importance of lysine methyltransferases as a target for drug discovery, prompted us to carry out a virtual screening to identify new SMYD3 inhibitors by testing several candidate small molecules. Here we report that one of these compounds (BCI-121) induces a significant reduction in SMYD3 activity both in vitro and in CRC cells, as suggested by the analysis of global H3K4me2/3 and H4K5me levels. Of note, the extent of cell growth inhibition by BCI-121 was similar to that observed upon SMYD3 genetic ablation. Most of the results described above were obtained in CRC; however, when we extended our observations to tumor cell lines of different origin, we found that SMYD3 inhibitors are also effective in other cancer types, such as lung, pancreatic, prostate, and ovarian. These results represent the proof of principle that SMYD3 is a druggable target and suggest that new compounds capable of inhibiting its activity may prove useful as novel therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. PMID:25728514

  12. A novel small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair protein Ku70/80.

    PubMed

    Weterings, Eric; Gallegos, Alfred C; Dominick, Lauren N; Cooke, Laurence S; Bartels, Trace N; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2016-07-01

    Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. The NHEJ pathway is frequently upregulated in several solid cancers as a compensatory mechanism for a separate DSB repair defect or for innate genomic instability, making this pathway a powerful target for synthetic lethality approaches. In addition, NHEJ reduces the efficacy of cancer treatment modalities which rely on the introduction of DSBs, like radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapy. Consequently, inhibition of the NHEJ pathway can modulate a radiation- or chemo-refractory disease presentation. The Ku70/80 heterodimer protein plays a pivotal role in the NHEJ process. It possesses a ring-shaped structure with high affinity for DSBs and serves as the first responder and central scaffold around which the rest of the repair complex is assembled. Because of this central position, the Ku70/80 dimer is a logical target for the disruption of the entire NHEJ pathway. Surprisingly, specific inhibitors of the Ku70/80 heterodimer are currently not available. We here describe an in silico, pocket-based drug discovery methodology utilizing the crystal structure of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. We identified a novel putative small molecule binding pocket and selected several potential inhibitors by computational screening. Subsequent biological screening resulted in the first identification of a compound with confirmed Ku-inhibitory activity in the low micro-molar range, capable of disrupting the binding of Ku70/80 to DNA substrates and impairing Ku-dependent activation of another NHEJ factor, the DNA-PKCS kinase. Importantly, this compound synergistically sensitized human cell lines to radiation treatment, indicating a clear potential to diminish DSB repair. The chemical scaffold we here describe can be utilized as a lead-generating platform for the design and development of a novel class of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27130816

  13. Cytoprotective effect of selective small-molecule caspase inhibitors against staurosporine-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianghong; Wang, Yuren; Liang, Shuguang; Ma, Haiching

    2014-01-01

    Caspases are currently known as the central executioners of the apoptotic pathways. Inhibition of apoptosis and promotion of normal cell survival by caspase inhibitors would be a tremendous benefit for reducing the side effects of cancer therapy and for control of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s diseases. The objective of this study was to discover small-molecule caspase inhibitors with which to achieve cytoprotective effect. We completed the high-throughput screening of Bionet’s 37,500-compound library (Key Organics Limited, Camelford, Cornwall, UK) against caspase-1, -3, and -9 and successfully identified 43 initial hit compounds. The 43 hit compounds were further tested for cytoprotective activity against staurosporine-induced cell death in NIH3T3 cells. Nineteen compounds were found to have significant cytoprotective effects in cell viability assays. One of the compounds, RBC1023, was demonstrated to protect NIH3T3 cells from staurosporine-induced caspase-3 cleavage and activation. RBC1023 was also shown to protect against staurosporine-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that staurosporine treatment induced broad global gene expression alterations, and RBC1023 co-treatment significantly restored these changes, especially of the genes that are related to cell growth and survival signaling such as Egr1, Cdc25c, cdkn3, Rhob, Nek2, and Taok1. Collectively, RBC1023 protects NIH3T3 cells against staurosporine-induced apoptosis via inhibiting caspase activity, restoring mitochondrial membrane potential, and possibly upregulating some cell survival-related gene expressions and pathways. PMID:24920883

  14. Multi-Functional Diarylurea Small Molecule Inhibitors of TRPV1 with Therapeutic Potential for Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhiwei; Pearce, Larry V; Zhang, Yu; Xing, Changrui; Herold, Brienna K A; Ma, Shifan; Hu, Ziheng; Turcios, Noe A; Yang, Peng; Tong, Qin; McCall, Anna K; Blumberg, Peter M; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-07-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), a heat-sensitive calcium channel protein, contributes to inflammation as well as to acute and persistent pain. Since TRPV1 occupies a central position in pathways of neuronal inflammatory signaling, it represents a highly attractive potential therapeutic target for neuroinflammation. In the present work, we have in silico identified a series of diarylurea analogues for hTRPV1, of which 11 compounds showed activity in the nanomolar to micromolar range as validated by in vitro biological assays. Then, we utilized molecular docking to explore the detailed interactions between TRPV1 and the compounds to understand the contributions of the different substituent groups. Tyr511, Leu518, Leu547, Thr550, Asn551, Arg557, and Leu670 were important for the recognition of the small molecules by TRPV1. A hydrophobic group in R2 or a polar/hydrophilic group in R1 contributed significantly to the activities of the antagonists at TRPV1. In addition, the subtle different binding pose of meta-chloro in place of para-fluoro in the R2 group converted antagonism into partial agonism, as was predicted by our short-term molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and validated by bioassay. Importantly, compound 15, one of our best TRPV1 inhibitors, also showed potential binding affinity (1.39 μM) at cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), which is another attractive target for immuno-inflammation diseases. Furthermore, compound 1 and its diarylurea analogues were predicted to target the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), although bioassay validation of CXCR2 with these compounds still needs to be performed. This prediction from the modeling is of interest, since CXCR2 is also a potential therapeutic target for chronic inflammatory diseases. Our findings provide novel strategies to develop a small molecule inhibitor to simultaneously target two or more inflammation-related proteins for the treatment of a wide range of inflammatory disorders including

  15. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  16. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Go, Yoon Young; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC). In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell-clumps were scattered

  17. Identification and characterization of small molecule human papillomavirus E6 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Malecka, Kimberly A; Fera, Daniela; Schultz, David C; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Reichman, Melvin; Donover, Preston S; Murphy, Maureen E; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2014-07-18

    Cervical cancer is the sixth most common cancer in women worldwide and the leading cause of women's death in developing countries. Nearly all cervical cancers are associated with infection of the human papillomavirus (HPV). This sexually transmitted pathogen disrupts the cell cycle via two oncoproteins: E6 and E7. Cells respond to E7-mediated degradation of pRB by upregulating the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. However, E6 thwarts this response by binding to the cellular E6-Associating Protein (E6AP) and targeting p53 for degradation. These two virus-facilitated processes pave the way for cellular transformation. Prophylactic HPV vaccines are available, but individuals already infected with HPV lack drug-based therapeutic options. To fill this void, we sought to identify small molecule inhibitors of the E6-E6AP interaction. We designed an ELISA-based high throughput assay to rapidly screen compound libraries, and hits were confirmed in several orthogonal biochemical and cell-based assays. Over 88,000 compounds were screened; 30 had in vitro potencies in the mid-nanomolar to mid-micromolar range and were classified as validated hits. Seven of these hits inhibited p53 degradation in cell lines with HPV-integrated genomes. Two compounds of similar scaffold successfully blocked p53 degradation and inhibited cell proliferation in cells stably transfected with E6. Together, these studies suggest that small molecules can successfully block E6-dependent p53 degradation and restore p53 activity. The compounds identified here constitute attractive starting points for further medicinal chemistry efforts and development into beneficial therapeutics. PMID:24854633

  18. Characterization of Two Classes of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Arp2/3 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, B.; Tomasevic, N; Russell, A; Pierce, D; Jia, Z; McCormick, C; Hartman, J; Sakowicz, R; Pollard, T

    2009-01-01

    Polymerization of actin filaments directed by the actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 complex supports many types of cellular movements. However, questions remain regarding the relative contributions of Arp2/3 complex versus other mechanisms of actin filament nucleation to processes such as path finding by neuronal growth cones; this is because of the lack of simple methods to inhibit Arp2/3 complex reversibly in living cells. Here we describe two classes of small molecules that bind to different sites on the Arp2/3 complex and inhibit its ability to nucleate actin filaments. CK-0944636 binds between Arp2 and Arp3, where it appears to block movement of Arp2 and Arp3 into their active conformation. CK-0993548 inserts into the hydrophobic core of Arp3 and alters its conformation. Both classes of compounds inhibit formation of actin filament comet tails by Listeria and podosomes by monocytes. Two inhibitors with different mechanisms of action provide a powerful approach for studying the Arp2/3 complex in living cells.

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Tec Kinase Block Unconventional Secretion of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2.

    PubMed

    La Venuta, Giuseppe; Wegehingel, Sabine; Sehr, Peter; Müller, Hans-Michael; Dimou, Eleni; Steringer, Julia P; Grotwinkel, Mareike; Hentze, Nikolai; Mayer, Matthias P; Will, David W; Uhrig, Ulrike; Lewis, Joe D; Nickel, Walter

    2016-08-19

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a potent mitogen promoting both tumor cell survival and tumor-induced angiogenesis. It is secreted by an unconventional secretory mechanism that is based upon direct translocation across the plasma membrane. Key steps of this process are (i) phosphoinositide-dependent membrane recruitment, (ii) FGF2 oligomerization and membrane pore formation, and (iii) extracellular trapping mediated by membrane-proximal heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Efficient secretion of FGF2 is supported by Tec kinase that stimulates membrane pore formation based upon tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2. Here, we report the biochemical characterization of the direct interaction between FGF2 and Tec kinase as well as the identification of small molecules that inhibit (i) the interaction of FGF2 with Tec, (ii) tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2 mediated by Tec in vitro and in a cellular context, and (iii) unconventional secretion of FGF2 from cells. We further demonstrate the specificity of these inhibitors for FGF2 because tyrosine phosphorylation of a different substrate of Tec is unaffected in their presence. Building on previous evidence using RNA interference, the identified compounds corroborate the role of Tec kinase in unconventional secretion of FGF2. In addition, they are valuable lead compounds with great potential for drug development aiming at the inhibition of FGF2-dependent tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:27382052

  20. ETV6-NTRK3 as a therapeutic target of small molecule inhibitor PKC412

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Hoang Thanh; Ly, Bui Thi Kim; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tojo, Arinobu; Sato, Yuko

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETV6-NTRK3 is an oncogene with transformation activity in multiple cell lineages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC412 could block ETV6-NTRK3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ETV6-NTRK3 phosphorylation leads to inactivation of its downstream signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of ETV6-NTRK3 activation by PKC412 could be a novel strategy for the treatment. -- Abstract: The ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) fusion gene which encodes a chimeric tyrosine kinase was first identified by cloning of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation in congenital fibrosarcoma (CFS). Since then, EN has been also found in congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN), secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Using IMS-M2 and M0-91 cell lines harboring the EN fusion gene, and Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with EN, we demonstrated that PKC412, also known as midostaurin, is an inhibitor of EN. Inhibition of EN activity by PKC412 suppressed the activity of it downstream molecules leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Our data for the first time suggested that PKC412 could serve as therapeutic drug for treatment of patients with this fusion.

  1. Metabolic targeting of malignant tumors: small-molecule inhibitors of bioenergetic flux.

    PubMed

    Mathupala, Saroj P

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism in tumors deviates significantly from that of normal tissues. Increasingly, the underlying aberrant metabolic pathways are being considered as novel targets for cancer therapy. Denoted "metabolic targeting", small molecule drugs are under investigation for focused inhibition of key metabolic steps that are utilized by tumors, since such inhibitors should harbor minimal toxicity towards surrounding normal tissues. This review will examine the primary biochemical pathways that tumors harness to enhance their bioenergetic capacity, which in turn, help their rapid proliferation and metastasis within the host. It is hoped that "metabolite-mimetic" drugs can be utilized to interfere with metabolic flux pathways active within the tumor, and across tumor-microenvironment boundary. In fact, the major pathways of mammalian metabolism, i.e., the carbohydrate, amino-acid, and fatty-acid metabolic pathways have been examined as putative targets for drug development, with some drug candidates advancing to phase II/III stages. In this regard, glucose metabolism, i.e., the glycolytic pathway - that predominates the bio-energetic flux in tumors, and the associated mitochondrial metabolism have received the most attention as suitable "druggable" targets, focused either at the pathway enzymes or at the plasma-membrane-bound metabolite transporters. Outlined in this review are pre-clinical studies that have led to the discovery of promising drug candidates to target tumor-metabolic flux, and ensuing patents, with descriptions of the biochemical rationale for the combinatorial strategy of a particular metabolic pathway-drug candidate pair. PMID:21110820

  2. A Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting the IL-6 Receptor β Subunit, Glycoprotein 130.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soon-Sun; Choi, Jung Ho; Lee, Sung Yoon; Park, Yeon-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Yeon; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Juyoung; Gajulapati, Veeraswamy; Goo, Ja-Il; Singh, Sarbjit; Lee, Kyeong; Kim, Young-Kook; Im, So Hee; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Rose-John, Stefan; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Choi, Yongseok

    2015-07-01

    IL-6 is a major causative factor of inflammatory disease. Although IL-6 and its signaling pathways are promising targets, orally available small-molecule drugs specific for IL-6 have not been developed. To discover IL-6 antagonists, we screened our in-house chemical library and identified LMT-28, a novel synthetic compound, as a candidate IL-6 blocker. The activity, mechanism of action, and direct molecular target of LMT-28 were investigated. A reporter gene assay showed that LMT-28 suppressed activation of STAT3 induced by IL-6, but not activation induced by leukemia inhibitory factor. In addition, LMT-28 downregulated IL-6-stimulated phosphorylation of STAT3, gp130, and JAK2 protein and substantially inhibited IL-6-dependent TF-1 cell proliferation. LMT-28 antagonized IL-6-induced TNF-α production in vivo. In pathologic models, oral administration of LMT-28 alleviated collagen-induced arthritis and acute pancreatitis in mice. Based on the observation of upstream IL-6 signal inhibition by LMT-28, we hypothesized IL-6, IL-6Rα, or gp130 to be putative molecular targets. We subsequently demonstrated direct interaction of LMT-28 with gp130 and specific reduction of IL-6/IL-6Rα complex binding to gp130 in the presence of LMT-28, which was measured by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that LMT-28 is a novel synthetic IL-6 inhibitor that functions through direct binding to gp130. PMID:26026064

  3. Identification of a Small Molecule Cyclophilin D Inhibitor for Rescuing Aβ-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Sun, Qinru; Fang, Du; Zhang, Zhihua; Yu, Qing; Guo, Yaopeng; Li, Jianping; Roy, Anuradha; ShiDu Yan, Shirley

    2016-03-10

    Cyclophilin D (CypD), a peptidylprolyl isomerase F (PPIase), plays a central role in opening the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore leading to cell death. CypD resides in the mitochondrial matrix, associates with the inner mitochondrial membrane, interacts with amyloid beta to exacerbate mitochondrial and neuronal stress and has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report the biological activity of a small-molecule CypD inhibitor (C-9), which binds strongly to CypD and attenuates mitochondrial and cellular perturbation insulted by Aβ and calcium stress. Binding affinities for C-9 were determined using in vitro surface plasmon resonance. This compound antagonized calcium-mediated mitochondrial swelling, abolished Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction as shown by increased cytochrome c oxidase activity and adenosine-5'-triphosphate levels, and inhibited CypD PPIase enzymatic activity by real-time fluorescence capture assay using Hamamatsu FDSS 7000. Compound C-9 seems a good candidate for further investigation as an AD drug. PMID:26985318

  4. Structure–activity exploration of a small-molecule Lipid II inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Yu, Wenbo; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M; Chauhan, Jay; Opperman, Timothy J; MacKerell, Alexander D; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified low-molecular weight compounds that act as inhibitors of Lipid II, an essential precursor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Lipid II comprises specialized lipid (bactoprenol) linked to a hydrophilic head group consisting of a peptidoglycan subunit (N-acetyl glucosamine [GlcNAc]–N-acetyl muramic acid [MurNAc] disaccharide coupled to a short pentapeptide moiety) via a pyrophosphate. One of our lead compounds, a diphenyl-trimethyl indolene pyrylium, termed BAS00127538, interacts with the MurNAc moiety and the isoprenyl tail of Lipid II. Here, we report on the structure–activity relationship of BAS00127538 derivatives obtained by in silico analyses and de novo chemical synthesis. Our results indicate that Lipid II binding and bacterial killing are related to three features: the diphenyl moiety, the indolene moiety, and the positive charge of the pyrylium. Replacement of the pyrylium moiety with an N-methyl pyridinium, which may have importance in stability of the molecule, did not alter Lipid II binding or antibacterial potency. PMID:25987836

  5. A small-molecule inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasome for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Coll, Rebecca C; Robertson, Avril A B; Chae, Jae Jin; Higgins, Sarah C; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Inserra, Marco C; Vetter, Irina; Dungan, Lara S; Monks, Brian G; Stutz, Andrea; Croker, Daniel E; Butler, Mark S; Haneklaus, Moritz; Sutton, Caroline E; Núñez, Gabriel; Latz, Eicke; Kastner, Daniel L; Mills, Kingston H G; Masters, Seth L; Schroder, Kate; Cooper, Matthew A; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2015-03-01

    The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a component of the inflammatory process, and its aberrant activation is pathogenic in inherited disorders such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) and complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. We describe the development of MCC950, a potent, selective, small-molecule inhibitor of NLRP3. MCC950 blocked canonical and noncanonical NLRP3 activation at nanomolar concentrations. MCC950 specifically inhibited activation of NLRP3 but not the AIM2, NLRC4 or NLRP1 inflammasomes. MCC950 reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in vivo and attenuated the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, MCC950 treatment rescued neonatal lethality in a mouse model of CAPS and was active in ex vivo samples from individuals with Muckle-Wells syndrome. MCC950 is thus a potential therapeutic for NLRP3-associated syndromes, including autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and a tool for further study of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human health and disease. PMID:25686105

  6. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  7. Diuresis and reduced urinary osmolality in rats produced by small-molecule UT-A-selective urea transport inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Su, Tao; Lee, Sujin; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Urea transport (UT) proteins of the UT-A class are expressed in epithelial cells in kidney tubules, where they are required for the formation of a concentrated urine by countercurrent multiplication. Here, using a recently developed high-throughput assay to identify UT-A inhibitors, a screen of 50,000 synthetic small molecules identified UT-A inhibitors of aryl-thiazole, γ-sultambenzosulfonamide, aminocarbonitrile butene, and 4-isoxazolamide chemical classes. Structure-activity analysis identified compounds that inhibited UT-A selectively by a noncompetitive mechanism with IC50 down to ∼1 μM. Molecular modeling identified putative inhibitor binding sites on rat UT-A. To test compound efficacy in rats, formulations and administration procedures were established to give therapeutic inhibitor concentrations in blood and urine. We found that intravenous administration of an indole thiazole or a γ-sultambenzosulfonamide at 20 mg/kg increased urine output by 3–5-fold and reduced urine osmolality by ∼2-fold compared to vehicle control rats, even under conditions of maximum antidiuresis produced by 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP). The diuresis was reversible and showed urea > salt excretion. The results provide proof of concept for the diuretic action of UT-A-selective inhibitors. UT-A inhibitors are first in their class salt-sparing diuretics with potential clinical indications in volume-overload edemas and high-vasopressin-associated hyponatremias.—Esteva-Font, C., Cil, O., Phuan, P.-W., Su, T., Lee, S., Anderson, M. O., Verkman, A. S. Diuresis and reduced urinary osmolality in rats produced by small-molecule UT-A-selective urea transport inhibitors. PMID:24843071

  8. Identification and Mechanism of Action of a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Arenavirus Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Nhi; Cubitt, Beatrice; Iwasaki, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and represent important public health problems in the regions where these viruses are endemic. In addition, evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is an important neglected human pathogen. There are no licensed arenavirus vaccines and current antiarenavirus therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. Therefore, there is an unmet need for novel antiarenaviral therapeutics. Here, we report the generation of a novel recombinant LCM virus and its use to develop a cell-based high-throughput screen to rapidly identify inhibitors of LCMV multiplication. We used this novel assay to screen a library of 30,400 small molecules and identified compound F3406 (chemical name: N-[3,5-bis(fluoranyl)phenyl]-2-[5,7-bis(oxidanylidene)-6-propyl-2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-[1,3]thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidin-4-yl]ethanamide), which exhibited strong anti-LCMV activity in the absence of cell toxicity. Mechanism-of-action studies revealed that F3406 inhibited LCMV cell entry by specifically interfering with the pH-dependent fusion in the endosome compartment that is mediated by LCMV glycoprotein GP2 and required to release the virus ribonucleoprotein into the cell cytoplasm to initiate transcription and replication of the virus genome. We identified residue M437 within the transmembrane domain of GP2 as critical for virus susceptibility to F3406. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses (HFA) are important human pathogens that cause high morbidity and mortality in areas where these viruses are endemic. In addition, evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Concerns posed by arenavirus infections are aggravated by the lack of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-licensed arenavirus vaccines and current

  9. Structure of human tankyrase 1 in complex with small-molecule inhibitors PJ34 and XAV939

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Christina A.; Cheung, Atwood; Fazal, Aleem; Shultz, Michael D.; Stams, Travis

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structures of tankyrase 1 (TNKS1) in complex with two small-molecule inhibitors, PJ34 and XAV939, both at 2.0 Å resolution, are reported. The structure of TNKS1 in complex with PJ34 reveals two molecules of PJ34 bound in the NAD+ donor pocket. One molecule is in the nicotinamide portion of the pocket, as previously observed in other PARP structures, while the second molecule is bound in the adenosine portion of the pocket. Additionally, unlike the unliganded crystallization system, the TNKS1–PJ34 crystallization system has the NAD+ donor site accessible to bulk solvent in the crystal, which allows displacement soaking. The TNKS1–PJ34 crystallization system was used to determine the structure of TNKS1 in complex with XAV939. These structures provide a basis for the start of a structure-based drug-design campaign for TNKS1. PMID:22297980

  10. Optimal Classes of Chemotherapeutic Agents Sensitized by Specific Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Akt In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Liu, Xuesong; Han, Edward K.; Guan, Ran; Shoemaker, Alexander R.; Oleksijew, Anatol; Woods, Keith W.; Fisher, John P.; Klinghofer, Vered; Lasko, Loren; McGonigal, Thomas; Li, Qun; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Giranda, Vincent L.; Luo, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that transduces survival signals from survival/growth factors. Deregulation and signal imbalance in cancer cells make them prone to apoptosis. Upregulation or activation of Akt to aid the survival of cancer cells is a common theme in human malignancies. We have developed small-molecule Akt inhibitors that are potent and specific. These Akt inhibitors can inhibit Akt activity and block phosphorylation by Akt on multiple downstream targets in cells. Synergy in apoptosis induction was observed when Akt inhibitors were combined with doxorubicin or camptothecin. Akt inhibitor–induced enhancement of topoisomerase inhibitor cytotoxicity was also evident in long-term cell survival assay. Synergy with paclitaxel in apoptosis induction was evident in cells pretreated with paclitaxel, and enhancement of tumor delay by paclitaxel was demonstrated through cotreatment with Akt inhibitor Compound A (A-443654). Combination with other classes of chemotherapeutic agents did not yield any enhancement of cytotoxicity. These findings provide important guidance in selecting appropriate classes of chemotherapeutic agents for combination with Akt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:16331885

  11. Antibacterial Activity of and Resistance to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the ClpP Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Corey L.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Sauer, Robert T.; Sello, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    There is rapidly mounting evidence that intracellular proteases in bacteria are compelling targets for antibacterial drugs. Multiple reports suggest that the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria may be particularly sensitive to small molecules that perturb the activities of self-compartmentalized peptidases, which catalyze intracellular protein turnover as components of ATP-dependent proteolytic machines. Here, we report chemical syntheses and evaluations of structurally diverse β-lactones, which have a privileged structure for selective, suicide inhibition of the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase. β-lactones with certain substituents on the α- and β-carbons were found to be toxic to M. tuberculosis. Using an affinity-labeled analog of a bioactive β-lactone in a series of chemical proteomic experiments, we selectively captured the ClpP1P2 peptidase from live cultures of two different actinobacteria that are related to M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we found that the growth inhibitory β-lactones also inactivate the M. tuberculosis ClpP1P2 peptidase in vitro via formation of a covalent adduct at the ClpP2 catalytic serine. Given the potent antibacterial activity of these compounds and their medicinal potential, we sought to identify innate mechanisms of resistance. Using a genome mining strategy, we identified a genetic determinant of β-lactone resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor, a non-pathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis. Collectively, these findings validate the potential of ClpP inhibition as a strategy in antibacterial drug development and define a mechanism by which bacteria could resist the toxic effects of ClpP inhibitors. PMID:24047344

  12. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule and Endogenous NOS Inhibitor: Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Poniedziałek-Czajkowska, Elżbieta; Mierzyński, Radzisław; Szymula, Dariusz; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bożena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1) and endogenous NOS inhibitor, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), as markers of endothelium dysfunction in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Patients and Methods. The levels of s-ICAM-1 and ADMA were analysed in the group of 56 patients with GDM and compared to 25 healthy pregnant women. The concentrations of s-ICAM-1 and ADMA were measured in serum using ELISA tests. Results. The groups did not differ by baseline descriptors: age (30.75 ± 6.32 versus 28.50 ± 4.95 years, NS) and gestational age (28.96 ± 2.85 versus 29.12 ± 2.96 hbd, NS). The patients with GDM were more obese (BMI 27.93 ± 7.02 versus 22.34 ± 4.21 kg/m2, p = 0.032) and had higher concentration of C-reactive protein (6.46 ± 6.03 versus 3.18 ± 3.83 mg/L, p = 0.029). In the GDM group the level of ADMA was lower (0.38 ± 0.17 versus 0.60 ± 0.28 μmol/L, p = 0.001) and the level of s-ICAM-1 was significantly higher (289.95 ± 118.12 versus 232.56 ± 43.31 ng/mL, p = 0.036) compared to controls. Conclusions. The pregnant women with GDM are characterized by higher concentration of s-ICAM-1 that reflects the activation and dysfunction of the endothelial cells. The decreased ADMA level in GDM patients seems to be preventive in the limitation of NO synthesis caused by the impaired insulin action and the endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26981539

  13. Structure-based Design of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Welsh, William J.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Daly, Thomas; Ejigiri, Ijeoma; Sinnis, Photini; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Bergman, Lawrence W.

    2010-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in most developing countries, with nearly 500 million cases estimated to occur each year. The need to design a new generation of antimalarial drugs that can combat the most drug-resistant forms of the malarial parasite is well recognized. In this study, we wanted to develop inhibitors of key proteins that form the invasion machinery of the malarial parasite. A critical feature of host-cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites is the interaction between the carboxy terminal tail of myosin A (MyoA) and the myosin tail interacting protein (MTIP). Using the co-crystal structure of the Plasmodium knowlesi MTIP and the MyoA tail peptide as input to the hybrid structure-based virtual screening approach, we identified a series of small molecules as having the potential to inhibit MTIP-MyoA interactions. Of the initial fifteen compounds tested, a pyrazole-urea compound inhibited P. falciparum growth with an EC50 value of 145 nM. We screened an additional 51 compounds belonging to the same chemical class and identified eight compounds with EC50 values less than 400 nM. Interestingly, the compounds appeared to act at several stages of the parasite’s life cycle to block growth and development. The pyrazole-urea compounds identified in this study could be effective antimalarial agents because they competitively inhibit a key protein-protein interaction between MTIP and MyoA responsible for the gliding motility and invasive features of the malarial parasite. PMID:20426475

  14. New Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors Targeting Hemagglutinin-Mediated Influenza A Virus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Wang, Minxiu; Li, Bing; Mills, Debra M.; Ames, Jessica A.; Nash, Peter J.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Prichard, Mark N.; Keith, Kathy A.; Barnard, Dale L.; Caffrey, Michael; Rong, Lijun; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are a major public health threat worldwide, and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The influenza virus glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) plays critical roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, making it a potential target for the development of anti-influenza drugs. Using pseudotype virus-based high-throughput screens, we have identified several new small molecules capable of inhibiting influenza virus entry. We prioritized two novel inhibitors, MBX2329 and MBX2546, with aminoalkyl phenol ether and sulfonamide scaffolds, respectively, that specifically inhibit HA-mediated viral entry. The two compounds (i) are potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 0.3 to 5.9 μM); (ii) are selective (50% cytotoxicity concentration [CC50] of >100 μM), with selectivity index (SI) values of >20 to 200 for different influenza virus strains; (iii) inhibit a wide spectrum of influenza A viruses, which includes the 2009 pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1/2009, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/H5N1, and oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 strains; (iv) exhibit large volumes of synergy with oseltamivir (36 and 331 μM2 % at 95% confidence); and (v) have chemically tractable structures. Mechanism-of-action studies suggest that both MBX2329 and MBX2546 bind to HA in a nonoverlapping manner. Additional results from HA-mediated hemolysis of chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), competition assays with monoclonal antibody (MAb) C179, and mutational analysis suggest that the compounds bind in the stem region of the HA trimer and inhibit HA-mediated fusion. Therefore, MBX2329 and MBX2546 represent new starting points for chemical optimization and have the potential to provide valuable future therapeutic options and research tools to study the HA-mediated entry process. PMID:24198411

  15. Antitumor effect of dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a small molecule inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB, on glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makiko; Yorita, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Hideo; Umezawa, Kazuo; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant type of brain tumor. Despite recent advances in therapeutic modalities, the prognosis of glioblastoma remains very poor. Recent studies have indicated that RelA/nuclear factor (NF)-κB is consistently activated in human glioblastoma. In this study, we searched for a new treatment modality for glioblastoma, by examining the effects of dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), a unique small molecule inhibitor of NF-κB. Addition of DHMEQ to cultured human glioblastoma cells inhibited the nuclear translocation of RelA. It also reduced the growth rate of human glioblastoma cells significantly in 6 cell lines and modestly in 3 among 10 cell lines examined. Then, we performed further analyses using 3 sensitive cell lines (U87, U251, and YKG-1). The growth retardation was accompanied by G2/M arrest in vitro. Increased apoptosis was observed in U87 and YKG-1, but not U251 cells after DHMEQ treatment. Then, we tested the efficacy of DHMEQ in chemoprevention through the use of a nude mouse model. Subcutaneous tumors formed by U87 or U251 cells were reduced by ∼40% in size by intraperitoneal administration of DHMEQ started immediately after implantation of the cells. DHMEQ treatment achieved statistically significant improvements in survival curves of mice intracranially implanted with U87 or U251 cells. Histological analysis revealed increased areas of necrosis, increased numbers of collapsed microvessels, decreased nuclear immunoreactivity of RelA, and decreased immunoreactivity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the DHMEQ-treated U87 tumor tissues. These results suggest that the targeting of NF-κB by DHMEQ may serve as a promising treatment modality in glioblastoma. PMID:21968049

  16. Phase I and Pharmacokinetic Study of YM155, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Survivin

    PubMed Central

    Tolcher, Anthony W.; Mita, Alain; Lewis, Lionel D.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Till, Elizabeth; Daud, Adil I.; Patnaik, Amita; Papadopoulos, Kyri; Takimoto, Chris; Bartels, Pamela; Keating, Anne; Antonia, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and assess the safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity of YM155, a small-molecule inhibitor of survivin. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced solid malignancies or lymphoma were treated with escalating doses of YM155 administered by 168-hour continuous intravenous infusion (CIVI). Plasma and urine samples were assayed to determine pharmacokinetic parameters and excretion. Results Forty-one patients received 127 cycles of YM155 at doses ranging from 1.8 to 6.0 mg/m2/d by 168-hour CIVI every 3 weeks. Overall, the most common grade 1 to 2 toxicities were stomatitis, pyrexia, and nausea, whereas grade 3 and 4 toxicities were rare. Reversible elevation in serum creatinine in two patients, with one developing acute tubular necrosis, was dose-limiting at 6.0 mg/m2. The MTD was 4.8 mg/m2. At the MTD, the mean steady-state concentration, clearance, volume of distribution at steady-state, and terminal elimination half-life were 7.7 ng/mL, 47.7 L/h, 1,763 L, and 26 hours, respectively. One complete and two partial responses lasting 8, 24+ and 48+ months occurred in three patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, two patients with hormone- and docetaxel-refractory prostate cancer had prostate-specific antigen responses, and one patient with non–small-cell lung cancer had a minor response. Conclusion YM155 can be administered safely at 4.8 mg/m2/d 168 hours CIVI every 3 weeks. The absence of severe toxicities, attainment of plasma concentrations active in preclinical models, and compelling antitumor activity warrant further disease-directed studies of this agent alone and in combination with chemotherapy in a broad array of tumors. PMID:18824702

  17. Dye-Binding Assays for Evaluation of the Effects of Small Molecule Inhibitors on Amyloid (Aβ) Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Dye-binding assays, such as those utilizing Congo red and thioflavin T, are among the most widely used tools to probe the aggregation of amyloidogenic biomolecules and for the evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of amyloid aggregation and fibrillization. A number of recent reports have indicated that these dye-binding assays could be prone to false positive effects when assessing inhibitors’ potential toward Aβ peptides, species involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Specifically, this review focuses on the application of thioflavin T for determining the efficiency of small molecule inhibitors of Aβ aggregation and addresses potential reasons that might be associated with the false positive effects in an effort to increase reliability of dye-binding assays. PMID:23173064

  18. Small-Molecule Screening Identifies the Selanazal Drug Ebselen as a Potent Inhibitor of DMT1-Mediated Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Wetli, Herbert A.; Buckett, Peter D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Summary HEK293T cells overexpressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were established to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of iron uptake. Using a fluorescence-based assay, we tested 2000 known bioactive compounds to find 3 small molecules that potently block ferrous iron uptake. One of the inhibitors, ebselen, is a seleno compound used in clinical trials as a protective agent against ischemic stroke. Ebselen inhibited Fe(II) uptake (IC50 of ~0.22 μM), but did not influence Fe(III) transport or DMT1-mediated manganese uptake. An unrelated antioxidant, pyrrolidine dithiobarbamate (PDTC), also inhibited DMT1 activity (IC50 of ~1.54 μM). Both ebselen and PDTC increased cellular levels of reduced glutathione. These observations indicate that Fe(II) transport by DMT1 can be modulated by cellular redox status and suggest that ebselen may act therapeutically to limit iron-catalyzed damage due to transport inhibition. PMID:16984886

  19. Small molecule non-peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype E: Structure-activity relationship and a pharmacophore model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gyanendra; Agarwal, Rakhi; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-09-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous biological substance known to humans. They cause flaccid paralysis by blocking the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we report a number of small molecule non-peptide inhibitors of BoNT serotype E. The structure-activity relationship and a pharmacophore model are presented. Although non-peptidic in nature, these inhibitors mimic key features of the uncleavable substrate peptide Arg-Ile-Met-Glu (RIME) of the SNAP-25 protein. Among the compounds tested, most of the potent inhibitors bear a zinc-chelating moiety connected to a hydrophobic and aromatic moiety through a carboxyl or amide linker. All of them show low micromolar IC50 values. PMID:27353886

  20. Microplate-based screening for small molecule inhibitors of neuropilin-2/vascular endothelial growth factor-C interactions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew W; Vander Kooi, Craig W

    2014-05-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) is a secreted growth factor essential for lymphangiogenesis. VEGF-C functions in both physiological and pathological lymphangiogenesis, particularly in tumor metastasis, making it an attractive therapeutic target. Members of two families of cell surface receptors transduce VEGF-C signals: neuropilin-2 (Nrp2) and VEGF-receptor (VEGFR)-2/3. Nrp2 is a promising target for inhibition because it is highly expressed in lymphatic vessels. Here we describe a microplate-based assay for discovery of VEGF-C/Nrp2 inhibitors. We optimize this assay for use in screening an inhibitor library and identify three novel Nrp2/VEGF-C binding inhibitors from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Collection small molecule library. PMID:24583243

  1. Discovery and Validation of a New Class of Small Molecule Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Matthew D.; Jia, Hongpeng; Eyer, Benjamin; Good, Misty; Guerriero, Christopher J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Afrazi, Amin; Prindle, Thomas; Ma, Congrong; Branca, Maria; Ozolek, John; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Wipf, Peter; Hackam, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases may be linked to pathologically elevated signaling via the receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). There has thus been great interest in the discovery of TLR4 inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Recently, the structure of TLR4 bound to the inhibitor E5564 was solved, raising the possibility that novel TLR4 inhibitors that target the E5564-binding domain could be designed. We utilized a similarity search algorithm in conjunction with a limited screening approach of small molecule libraries to identify compounds that bind to the E5564 site and inhibit TLR4. Our lead compound, C34, is a 2-acetamidopyranoside (MW 389) with the formula C17H27NO9, which inhibited TLR4 in enterocytes and macrophages in vitro, and reduced systemic inflammation in mouse models of endotoxemia and necrotizing enterocolitis. Molecular docking of C34 to the hydrophobic internal pocket of the TLR4 co-receptor MD-2 demonstrated a tight fit, embedding the pyran ring deep inside the pocket. Strikingly, C34 inhibited LPS signaling ex-vivo in human ileum that was resected from infants with necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings identify C34 and the β-anomeric cyclohexyl analog C35 as novel leads for small molecule TLR4 inhibitors that have potential therapeutic benefit for TLR4-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23776545

  2. Discovery of an orally active small-molecule irreversible inhibitor of protein disulfide isomerase for ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shili; Butkevich, Alexey N.; Yamada, Roppei; Zhou, Yu; Debnath, Bikash; Duncan, Roger; Zandi, Ebrahim; Petasis, Nicos A.; Neamati, Nouri

    2012-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, catalyzes disulfide bond breakage, formation, and rearrangement. The effect of PDI inhibition on ovarian cancer progression is not yet clear, and there is a need for potent, selective, and safe small-molecule inhibitors of PDI. Here, we report a class of propynoic acid carbamoyl methyl amides (PACMAs) that are active against a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. Using fluorescent derivatives, 2D gel electrophoresis, and MS, we established that PACMA 31, one of the most active analogs, acts as an irreversible small-molecule inhibitor of PDI, forming a covalent bond with the active site cysteines of PDI. We also showed that PDI activity is essential for the survival and proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells. In vivo, PACMA 31 showed tumor targeting ability and significantly suppressed ovarian tumor growth without causing toxicity to normal tissues. These irreversible small-molecule PDI inhibitors represent an important approach for the development of targeted anticancer agents for ovarian cancer therapy, and they can also serve as useful probes for investigating the biology of PDI-implicated pathways. PMID:22988091

  3. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  4. Biological and Molecular Effects of Small Molecule Kinase Inhibitors on Low-Passage Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Falko; Franz, Benjamin; Maletzki, Claudia; Linnebacher, Michael; Hühns, Maja; Jaster, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Low-passage cancer cell lines are versatile tools to study tumor cell biology. Here, we have employed four such cell lines, established from primary tumors of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, to evaluate effects of the small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI) vemurafenib, trametinib, perifosine, and regorafenib in an in vitro setting. The mutant BRAF (V600E/V600K) inhibitor vemurafenib, but also the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib efficiently inhibited DNA synthesis, signaling through ERK1/2 and expression of genes downstream of ERK1/2 in BRAF mutant cells only. In case of the AKT inhibitor perifosine, three cell lines showed a high or intermediate responsiveness to the drug while one cell line was resistant. The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib inhibited proliferation of all CRC lines with similar efficiency and independent of the presence or absence of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 mutations. Regorafenib action was associated with broad-range inhibitory effects at the level of gene expression but not with a general inhibition of AKT or MEK/ERK signaling. In vemurafenib-sensitive cells, the antiproliferative effect of vemurafenib was enhanced by the other SMI. Together, our results provide insights into the determinants of SMI efficiencies in CRC cells and encourage the further use of low-passage CRC cell lines as preclinical models. PMID:25309914

  5. Synthesis of a 10,000-membered library of molecules resembling carpanone and discovery of vesicular traffic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Goess, Brian C; Hannoush, Rami N; Chan, Lawrence K; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Shair, Matthew D

    2006-04-26

    Split-and-pool synthesis of a 10,000-membered library of molecules resembling the natural product carpanone has been achieved. The synthesis features development of solid-phase multicomponent reactions between nitrogen nucleophiles, enones, and hydroxylamines, and a solid-phase application of the Huisgen cycloaddition affording substituted triazoles. The synthesis was performed in high-capacity (500 microm) polystyrene beads using a one bead-one stock solution strategy that enabled phenotypic screens of the resulting library. Using whole-cell fluorescence imaging, we discovered a series of molecules from the carpanone-based library that inhibit exocytosis from the Golgi apparatus. The most potent member of this series has an IC(50) of 14 microM. We also report structure-activity relationships for the molecules exhibiting this interesting phenotype. These inhibitors of exocytosis may be useful reagents for the study of vesicular traffic. PMID:16620111

  6. Electrostatic Similarities between Protein and Small Molecule Ligands Facilitate the Design of Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kam Y. J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the underlying principles in drug discovery is that a biologically active compound is complimentary in shape and molecular recognition features to its receptor. This principle infers that molecules binding to the same receptor may share some common features. Here, we have investigated whether the electrostatic similarity can be used for the discovery of small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors (SMPPIIs). We have developed a method that can be used to evaluate the similarity of electrostatic potentials between small molecules and known protein ligands. This method was implemented in a software called EleKit. Analyses of all available (at the time of research) SMPPII structures indicate that SMPPIIs bear some similarities of electrostatic potential with the ligand proteins of the same receptor. This is especially true for the more polar SMPPIIs. Retrospective analysis of several successful SMPPIIs has shown the applicability of EleKit in the design of new SMPPIIs. PMID:24130741

  7. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Haggie, Peter M; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    Pendrin (SLC26A4) is a Cl(-)/anion exchanger expressed in the epithelium of inflamed airways where it is thought to facilitate Cl(-) absorption and HCO3 (-) secretion. Studies using pendrin knockout mice and airway epithelial cells from hearing-impaired subjects with pendrin loss of function suggest involvement of pendrin in inflammatory lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), perhaps by regulation of airway surface liquid (ASL) volume. Here we identified small-molecule pendrin inhibitors and demonstrated their efficacy in increasing ASL volume. A cell-based, functional high-throughput screen of ∼36,000 synthetic small molecules produced 3 chemical classes of inhibitors of human pendrin. After structure-activity studies, tetrahydropyrazolopyridine and pyrazolothiophenesulfonamide compounds reversibly inhibited pendrin-facilitated Cl(-) exchange with SCN(-), I(-), NO3 (-), and HCO3 (-) with drug concentration causing 50% inhibition down to ∼2.5 μM. In well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells from non-CF and CF subjects, treatment with IL-13, which causes inflammation with strong pendrin up-regulation, strongly increased Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange and the increase was blocked by pendrin inhibition. Pendrin inhibition significantly increased ASL depth (by ∼8 μm) in IL-13-treated non-CF and CF cells but not in untreated cells. These studies implicate the involvement of pendrin-facilitated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) in the regulation of ASL volume and suggest the utility of pendrin inhibitors in inflammatory lung diseases, including CF.-Haggie, P. M., Phuan, P.-W., Tan, J.-A., Zlock, L., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26932931

  8. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor-induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus RnpA-Mediated RNA Turnover and tRNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Eidem, Tess M.; Lounsbury, Nicole; Emery, John F.; Bulger, Jeffrey; Smith, Andrew; Abou-Gharbia, Magid

    2015-01-01

    New agents are urgently needed for the therapeutic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections. In that regard, S. aureus RNase RnpA may represent a promising novel dual-function antimicrobial target that participates in two essential cellular processes, RNA degradation and tRNA maturation. Accordingly, we previously used a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the RNA-degrading activity of the enzyme and showed that the RnpA inhibitor RNPA1000 is an attractive antimicrobial development candidate. In this study, we used a series of in vitro and cellular assays to characterize a second RnpA inhibitor, RNPA2000, which was identified in our initial screening campaign and is structurally distinct from RNPA1000. In doing so, it was found that S. aureus RnpA does indeed participate in 5′-precursor tRNA processing, as was previously hypothesized. Further, we show that RNPA2000 is a bactericidal agent that inhibits both RnpA-associated RNA degradation and tRNA maturation activities both in vitro and within S. aureus. The compound appears to display specificity for RnpA, as it did not significantly affect the in vitro activities of unrelated bacterial or eukaryotic ribonucleases and did not display measurable human cytotoxicity. Finally, we show that RNPA2000 exhibits antimicrobial activity and inhibits tRNA processing in efflux-deficient Gram-negative pathogens. Taken together, these data support the targeting of RnpA for antimicrobial development purposes, establish that small-molecule inhibitors of both of the functions of the enzyme can be identified, and lend evidence that RnpA inhibitors may have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. PMID:25605356

  10. A High-Throughput Screen Reveals New Small-Molecule Activators and Inhibitors of Pantothenate Kinases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) is a regulatory enzyme that controls coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. The association of PanK with neurodegeneration and diabetes suggests that chemical modifiers of PanK activity may be useful therapeutics. We performed a high throughput screen of >520000 compounds from the St. Jude compound library and identified new potent PanK inhibitors and activators with chemically tractable scaffolds. The HTS identified PanK inhibitors exemplified by the detailed characterization of a tricyclic compound (7) and a preliminary SAR. Biophysical studies reveal that the PanK inhibitor acts by binding to the ATP–enzyme complex. PMID:25569308

  11. Proteomic profiling of small-molecule inhibitors reveals dispensability of MTH1 for cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kawatani, Makoto; Muroi, Makoto; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Tanaka, Miho; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Since recent publications suggested that the survival of cancer cells depends on MTH1 to avoid incorporation of oxidized nucleotides into the cellular DNA, MTH1 has attracted attention as a potential cancer therapeutic target. In this study, we identified new purine-based MTH1 inhibitors by chemical array screening. However, although the MTH1 inhibitors identified in this study targeted cellular MTH1, they exhibited only weak cytotoxicity against cancer cells compared to recently reported first-in-class inhibitors. We performed proteomic profiling to investigate the modes of action by which chemically distinct MTH1 inhibitors induce cancer cell death, and found mechanistic differences among the first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors. In particular, we identified tubulin as the primary target of TH287 and TH588 responsible for the antitumor effects despite the nanomolar MTH1-inhibitory activity in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of MTH1 did not rescue cells from MTH1 inhibitor–induced cell death, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of MTH1 did not suppress cancer cell growth. Taken together, we conclude that the cytotoxicity of MTH1 inhibitors is attributable to off-target effects and that MTH1 is not essential for cancer cell survival. PMID:27210421

  12. Efficacy of small-molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors in the postnatal rat model of tau hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Selenica, M-L; Jensen, H S; Larsen, A K; Pedersen, M L; Helboe, L; Leist, M; Lotharius, J

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) affects neuropathological events associated with Alzheimeŕs disease (AD) such as hyperphosphorylation of the protein, tau. GSK-3β expression, enzyme activity and tau phosphorylated at AD-relevant epitopes are elevated in juvenile rodent brains. Here, we assess five GSK-3β inhibitors and lithium in lowering phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and GSK-3β enzyme activity levels in 12-day old postnatal rats. Experimental approach: Brain levels of inhibitors following treatment in vivo were optimized based on pharmacokinetic data. At optimal doses, p-tau (Ser396) levels in brain tissue was measured by immunoblotting and correlated with GSK-3β enzyme activities in the same tissues. Effects of GSK inhibitors on p-tau, GSK-3β activities and cell death were measured in a human neuronal cell line (LUHMES). Key results: Lithium and CHIR98014 reduced tau phosphorylation (Ser396) in the cortex and hippocampus of postnatal rats, while Alsterpaullone and SB216763 were effective only in hippocampus. AR-A014418 and Indirubin-3′-monoxime were ineffective in either brain region. Inhibition of p-tau in brain required several-fold higher levels of GSK inhibitors than the IC50 values obtained in recombinant or cell-based GSK-3β enzyme activity assays. The inhibitory effect on GSK-3β activity ex vivo correlated with protection against cell death and decrease of p-tau- in LUHMES cells, using low μM inhibitor concentrations. Conclusions and Implications: Selective small-molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 reduce tau phosphorylation in vivo. These findings corroborate earlier suggestions that GSK-3β may be an attractive target for disease-modification in AD and related conditions where tau phosphorylation is believed to contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:17906685

  13. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for the analysis of small-molecule inhibitor binding to human and parasitic phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Marco; Shanmugham, Anitha; England, Paul; van der Meer, Tiffany; Bebelman, Jan Paul; Blaazer, Antoni R; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2016-06-15

    In the past decade, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based technology has been exploited more and more to characterize the interaction between drug targets and small-molecule modulators. Here, we report the successful application of SPR methodology for the analysis of small-molecule binding to two therapeutically relevant cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs), Trypanosoma brucei PDEB1 which is implicated in African sleeping sickness and human PDE4D which is implicated in a plethora of disease conditions including inflammatory pulmonary disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and central nervous system (CNS) disorders. A protocol combining the use of directed capture using His-tagged PDE_CDs with covalent attachment to the SPR surface was developed. This methodology allows the determination of the binding kinetics of small-molecule PDE inhibitors and also allows testing their specificity for the two PDEs. The SPR-based assay could serve as a technology platform for the development of highly specific and high-affinity PDE inhibitors, accelerating drug discovery processes. PMID:27033007

  14. Discovery of MK-7145, an Oral Small Molecule ROMK Inhibitor for the Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haifeng; Zhu, Yuping; Teumelsan, Nardos; Walsh, Shawn P; Shahripour, Aurash; Priest, Birgit T; Swensen, Andrew M; Felix, John P; Brochu, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Pai, Lee-Yuh; Hampton, Caryn; Corona, Aaron; Hernandez, Melba; Metzger, Joseph; Forrest, Michael; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Owens, Karen; Tong, Vincent; Parmee, Emma; Roy, Sophie; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Yang, Lihu; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Garcia, Maria L; Pasternak, Alexander

    2016-07-14

    ROMK, the renal outer medullary potassium channel, is involved in potassium recycling at the thick ascending loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct in the kidney nephron. Because of this dual site of action, selective inhibitors of ROMK are expected to represent a new class of diuretics/natriuretics with superior efficacy and reduced urinary loss of potassium compared to standard-of-care loop and thiazide diuretics. Following our earlier work, this communication will detail subsequent medicinal chemistry endeavors to further improve lead selectivity against the hERG channel and preclinical pharmacokinetic properties. Pharmacological assessment of highlighted inhibitors will be described, including pharmacodynamic studies in both an acute rat diuresis/natriuresis model and a subchronic blood pressure model in spontaneous hypertensive rats. These proof-of-biology studies established for the first time that the human and rodent genetics accurately predict the in vivo pharmacology of ROMK inhibitors and supported identification of the first small molecule ROMK inhibitor clinical candidate, MK-7145. PMID:27437080

  15. Promiscuous Actions of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Protein Kinase D-Class IIa HDAC Axis in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Douglas D.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Horn, Todd R.; Stratton, Matthew S.; Ferguson, Bradley S.; Wempe, Michael F.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    PKD-mediated phosphorylation of class IIa HDACs frees the MEF2 transcription factor to activate genes that govern muscle differentiation and growth. Studies of the regulation and function of this signaling axis have involved MC1568 and Gö-6976, which are small molecule inhibitors of class IIa HDAC and PKD catalytic activity, respectively. We describe unanticipated effects of these compounds. MC1568 failed to inhibit class IIa HDAC catalytic activity in vitro, and exerted divergent effects on skeletal muscle differentiation compared to a bona fide inhibitor of these HDACs. In cardiomyocytes, Gö-6976 triggered calcium signaling and activated stress-inducible kinases. Based on these findings, caution is warranted when employing MC1568 and Gö-6976 as pharmacological tool compounds to assess functions of class IIa HDACs and PKD. PMID:25816750

  16. A Novel Small-molecule Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Attenuates Inflammation in a Hepatitis Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Gong, Haiyan; Zhu, Haiyan; Ji, Qing; Su, Pei; Liu, Peng; Cao, Shannan; Yao, Jianfeng; Jiang, Linlin; Han, Mingzhe; Ma, Xiaotong; Xiong, Dongsheng; Luo, Hongbo R.; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Yuanfu

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a hallmark of many inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and septic shock and hepatitis, making it a potential therapeutic target for clinical interventions. To explore chemical inhibitors against TNFα activity, we applied computer-aided drug design combined with in vitro and cell-based assays and identified a lead chemical compound, (E)-4-(2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl) (named as C87 thereafter), which directly binds to TNFα, potently inhibits TNFα-induced cytotoxicity (IC50 = 8.73 μm) and effectively blocks TNFα-triggered signaling activities. Furthermore, by using a murine acute hepatitis model, we showed that C87 attenuates TNFα-induced inflammation, thereby markedly reducing injuries to the liver and improving animal survival. Thus, our results lead to a novel and highly specific small-molecule TNFα inhibitor, which can be potentially used to treat TNFα-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24634219

  17. A Target-Based High Throughput Screen Yields Trypanosoma brucei Hexokinase Small Molecule Inhibitors with Antiparasitic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Lyda, Todd A.; Dodson, Heidi C.; Mustata, Gabriela; Morris, Meredith T.; Leimgruber, Stephanie S.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Close, David; Lazo, John S.; Morris, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK), an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the γ-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. Methodology/Principal Findings Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were ∼20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03≤EC50<3 µM) with parasite specificity of the compounds being demonstrated using insect stage T. brucei parasites, Leishmania promastigotes, and mammalian cell lines. Analysis of two structurally related compounds, ebselen and SID 17387000, revealed that both were mixed inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics. Conclusions/Significance The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome. PMID:20405000

  18. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R.; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian

    2013-02-14

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kD{sub a} and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3{zeta} in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer.

  19. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R; Upadhyay, Anup K; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T; Khuri, Fadlo R; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian

    2011-09-27

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kD(a) and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3ζ in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer. PMID:21908710

  20. State-of-the-art of small molecule inhibitors of the TAM family: the point of view of the chemist.

    PubMed

    Baladi, Tom; Abet, Valentina; Piguel, Sandrine

    2015-11-13

    The TAM family of tyrosine kinases receptors (Tyro3, Axl and Mer) is implicated in cancer development, autoimmune reactions and viral infection and is therefore emerging as an effective and attractive therapeutic target. To date, only a few small molecules have been intentionally designed to block the TAM kinases, while most of the inhibitors were developed for blocking different protein kinases and then identified through selectivity profile studies. This minireview will examine in terms of chemical structure the different compounds able to act on either one, two or three TAM kinases with details about structure-activity relationships, drug-metabolism and pharmacokinetics properties where they exist. PMID:26498569

  1. Indole molecules as inhibitors of tubulin polymerization: potential new anticancer agents, an update (2013-2015).

    PubMed

    Patil, Renukadevi; Patil, Siddappa A; Beaman, Kenneth D; Patil, Shivaputra A

    2016-07-01

    Discovery of new indole-based tubulin polymerization inhibitors will continue to dominate the synthetic efforts of many medicinal chemists working in the field. The indole ring system is an essential part of several tubulin inhibitors identified in the recent years. The present review article will update the synthesis, anticancer and tubulin inhibition activities of several important new indole classes such as 2-phenylindoles (28, 29 & 30), oxindoles (35 & 38), indole-3-acrylamides (44), indolines (46), aroylindoles (49), carbozoles (75, 76 & 82), azacarbolines (87) and annulated indoles (100-105). PMID:27476704

  2. Identification of a Pyridoxine-Derived Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting Dengue Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Hassounah, Said; Quashie, Peter K; Han, Yingshan; Oliveira, Maureen; Stranix, Brent R; Wainberg, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity of the dengue virus (DENV) NS5 protein is an attractive target for drug design. Here, we report the identification of a novel class of inhibitor (i.e., an active-site metal ion chelator) that acts against DENV RdRp activity. DENV RdRp utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism of catalysis; therefore, we constructed a small library of compounds, through mechanism-based drug design, aimed at chelating divalent metal ions in the catalytic site of DENV RdRp. We now describe a pyridoxine-derived small-molecule inhibitor that targets DENV RdRp and show that 5-benzenesulfonylmethyl-3-hydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid hydroxyamide (termed DMB220) inhibited the RdRp activity of DENV serotypes 1 to 4 at low micromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s of 5 to 6.7 μM) in an enzymatic assay. The antiviral activity of DMB220 against DENV infection was also verified in a cell-based assay and showed a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of <3 μM. Enzyme assays proved that DMB220 was competitive with nucleotide incorporation. DMB220 did not inhibit the enzymatic activity of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and showed only weak inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity, indicating high specificity for DENV RdRp. S600T substitution in the DENV RdRp, which was previously shown to confer resistance to nucleoside analogue inhibitors (NI), conferred 3-fold hypersusceptibility to DMB220, and enzymatic analyses showed that this hypersusceptibility may arise from the decreased binding/incorporation efficiency of the natural NTP substrate without significantly impacting inhibitor binding. Thus, metal ion chelation at the active site of DENV RdRp represents a viable anti-DENV strategy, and DMB220 is the first of a new class of DENV inhibitor. PMID:26574011

  3. Identification of a Pyridoxine-Derived Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting Dengue Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P.; Hassounah, Said; Quashie, Peter K.; Han, Yingshan; Oliveira, Maureen; Stranix, Brent R.

    2015-01-01

    The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity of the dengue virus (DENV) NS5 protein is an attractive target for drug design. Here, we report the identification of a novel class of inhibitor (i.e., an active-site metal ion chelator) that acts against DENV RdRp activity. DENV RdRp utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism of catalysis; therefore, we constructed a small library of compounds, through mechanism-based drug design, aimed at chelating divalent metal ions in the catalytic site of DENV RdRp. We now describe a pyridoxine-derived small-molecule inhibitor that targets DENV RdRp and show that 5-benzenesulfonylmethyl-3-hydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid hydroxyamide (termed DMB220) inhibited the RdRp activity of DENV serotypes 1 to 4 at low micromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s of 5 to 6.7 μM) in an enzymatic assay. The antiviral activity of DMB220 against DENV infection was also verified in a cell-based assay and showed a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of <3 μM. Enzyme assays proved that DMB220 was competitive with nucleotide incorporation. DMB220 did not inhibit the enzymatic activity of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and showed only weak inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity, indicating high specificity for DENV RdRp. S600T substitution in the DENV RdRp, which was previously shown to confer resistance to nucleoside analogue inhibitors (NI), conferred 3-fold hypersusceptibility to DMB220, and enzymatic analyses showed that this hypersusceptibility may arise from the decreased binding/incorporation efficiency of the natural NTP substrate without significantly impacting inhibitor binding. Thus, metal ion chelation at the active site of DENV RdRp represents a viable anti-DENV strategy, and DMB220 is the first of a new class of DENV inhibitor. PMID:26574011

  4. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  5. Small molecule screen for inhibitors of expression from canonical CREB response element-containing promoters

    PubMed Central

    Mitton, Bryan; Hsu, Katie; Dutta, Ritika; Tiu, Bruce C.; Cox, Nick; McLure, Kevin G.; Chae, Hee-Don; Smith, Mark; Eklund, Elizabeth A.; Solow-Cordero, David E.; Sakamoto, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) is an important determinant in the growth of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) cells. CREB overexpression increases AML cell growth by driving the expression of key regulators of apoptosis and the cell cycle. Conversely, CREB knockdown inhibits proliferation and survival of AML cells but not normal hematopoietic cells. Thus, CREB represents a promising drug target for the treatment of AML, which carries a poor prognosis. In this study, we performed a high-throughput small molecule screen to identify compounds that disrupt CREB function in AML cells. We screened ∼114,000 candidate compounds from Stanford University's small molecule library, and identified 5 molecules that inhibit CREB function at micromolar concentrations, but are non-toxic to normal hematopoietic cells. This study suggests that targeting CREB function using small molecules could provide alternative approaches to treat AML. PMID:26840025

  6. N-Aryl-benzimidazolones as novel small molecule HSP90 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruncko, Milan; Tahir, Stephen K.; Song, Xiaohong; Chen, Jun; Ding, Hong; Huth, Jeffrey R.; Jin, Sha; Judge, Russell A.; Madar, David J.; Park, Chang H.; Park, Cheol-Min; Petros, Andrew M.; Tse, Christin; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Elmore, Steven W.

    2012-03-16

    We describe the development of a novel series of N-aryl-benzimidazolone HSP90 inhibitors (9) targeting the N-terminal ATP-ase site. SAR development was influenced by structure-based design based around X-ray structures of ligand bound HSP90 complexes. Lead compounds exhibited high binding affinities, ATP-ase inhibition and cellular client protein degradation.

  7. 5-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazoles: first small molecules as substrate competitive inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Valle; Perez, Daniel I; Perez, Concepcion; Morales-Garcia, Jose A; Soteras, Ignacio; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Encinas, Arantxa; Castro, Ana; Campillo, Nuria E; Perez-Castillo, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Martinez, Ana

    2012-02-23

    Cumulative evidence strongly supports that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a pathogenic molecule when it is up-dysregulated, emerging as an important therapeutic target in severe unmet human diseases. GSK-3 specific inhibitors might be promising effective drugs for the treatment of devastating pathologies such as neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and mood disorders. As GSK-3 has the ability to phosphorylate primed substrates, small molecules able to bind to this site should be perfect drug candidates, able to partially block the activity of the enzyme over some specific substrates. Here, we report substituted 5-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazoles as the first small molecules able to inhibit GSK-3 in a substrate competitive manner. These compounds are cell permeable, able to decrease inflammatory activation and to selectively differentiate neural stem cells. Overall, 5-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazoles are presented here as new molecules able to decrease neuronal cell death and to increase endogenous neurogenesis blocking the GSK-3 substrate site. PMID:22257026

  8. Retinal toxicity induced by small-molecule Hsp90 inhibitors in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Chisako; Yamada, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Shuji; Matsushita, Tomochika; Suda, Atsushi; Nagayasu, Miho; Kimura, Kazuya; Chiba, Shuichi

    2014-02-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a constitutively expressed molecular chaperone and plays an important role in the folding of client proteins with key regulatory roles in growth, survival, differentiation and metastasis. Because inhibition of Hsp90 degrades multiple oncogenic client proteins, it is considered to be an attractive anticancer therapy, and clinical trials of several Hsp90 inhibitors have been carried out. In the present study, two structurally distinct Hsp90 inhibitors, CH5164840 and CH5449302, were orally administered to beagle dogs to evaluate systemic toxicity. CH5164840 induced symptoms that suggest visual disorder, and ophthalmological observation and electroretinography (ERG) revealed loss of pupillary light reflex and abnormal waveforms, respectively. Histopathological examination showed changes in the photoreceptor cell layer and the outer nuclear layer of retina. On the other hand, while there were no clinical symptoms related to visual disorder, animals treated with CH5449302 showed similar abnormalities of ERG responses and histopathological changes in the photoreceptor cell layer and the outer nuclear layer of retina. The visual symptoms and abnormalities of ERG responses were noted at an earlier stage or lower dose than other toxicities in both compounds. Considering that two structurally distinct Hsp90 inhibitors induced a retinal toxicity in dogs after repeated administration, and that visual disorders were also reported in some clinical trials of Hsp90 inhibitors, it would seem highly likely that Hsp90 inhibition induces retinal toxicity. Also, our study indicated that a detailed ocular examination to evaluate the safety of Hsp90 inhibitors would be useful in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:24418710

  9. Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interaction with Capillary Electrophoresis Frontal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei; Liu, Chao; Zhou, Mi; Li, Qing; Wang, Renxiao; Kang, Jingwu

    2016-08-16

    A simple and effective method for identifying inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) was developed by using capillary electrophoresis frontal analysis (CE-FA). Antiapoptotic B-cell-2 (Bcl-2) family member Bcl-XL protein, a 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled peptide truncated from the BH3 domain of Bid (F-Bid) as the ligand, and a known Bcl-XL-Bid interaction inhibitor ABT-263 were employed as an experimental model for the proof of concept. In CE-FA, the free ligand is separated from the protein and protein-ligand complex to permit the measurement of the equilibrium concentration of the ligand, hence the dissociation constant of the protein-ligand complex. In the presence of inhibitors, formation of the protein-ligand complex is hindered, thereby the inhibition can be easily identified by the raised plateau height of the ligand and the decayed plateau of the complex. Further, we proposed an equation used to convert the IC50 value into the inhibition constant Ki value, which is more useful than the former for comparison. In addition, the sample pooling strategy was employed to improve the screening throughput more than 10 times. A small chemical library composed of synthetic compounds and natural extracts were screened with the method, two natural products, namely, demethylzeylasteral and celastrol, were identified as new inhibitors to block the Bcl-XL-Bid interaction. Cell-based assay was performed to validate the activity of the identified compounds. The result demonstrated that CE-FA represents a straightforward and robust technique for screening of PPI inhibitors. PMID:27425825

  10. Clinical development of galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate), a small molecule inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Herbertz, Stephan; Sawyer, J Scott; Stauber, Anja J; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Driscoll, Kyla E; Estrem, Shawn T; Cleverly, Ann L; Desaiah, Durisala; Guba, Susan C; Benhadji, Karim A; Slapak, Christopher A; Lahn, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling regulates a wide range of biological processes. TGF-β plays an important role in tumorigenesis and contributes to the hallmarks of cancer, including tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and escape of immune surveillance. There are several pharmacological approaches to block TGF-β signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, antisense oligonucleotides, and small molecule inhibitors. Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate) is an oral small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor I kinase that specifically downregulates the phosphorylation of SMAD2, abrogating activation of the canonical pathway. Furthermore, galunisertib has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing animal models such as breast, colon, lung cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Continuous long-term exposure to galunisertib caused cardiac toxicities in animals requiring adoption of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy to allow further development. The use of such a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model defined a therapeutic window with an appropriate safety profile that enabled the clinical investigation of galunisertib. These efforts resulted in an intermittent dosing regimen (14 days on/14 days off, on a 28-day cycle) of galunisertib for all ongoing trials. Galunisertib is being investigated either as monotherapy or in combination with standard antitumor regimens (including nivolumab) in patients with cancer with high unmet medical needs such as glioblastoma, pancreatic cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present review summarizes the past and current experiences with different pharmacological treatments that enabled galunisertib to be investigated in patients. PMID:26309397

  11. Small molecule inhibitors of the Dishevelled-CXXC5 interaction are new drug candidates for bone anabolic osteoporosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Yi; Choi, Sehee; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Lim, Hwan Jung; Lee, Hyuk; Choi, Jiwon; Ro, Eun Ji; Heo, Jung-Nyoung; Lee, Weontae; No, Kyoung Tai; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2016-01-01

    Bone anabolic agents promoting bone formation and rebuilding damaged bones would ideally overcome the limitations of anti-resorptive therapy, the current standard prescription for osteoporosis. However, the currently prescribed parathyroid hormone (PTH)-based anabolic drugs present limitations and adverse effects including osteosarcoma during long-term use. Also, the antibody-based anabolic drugs that are currently being developed present the potential limits in clinical application typical of macromolecule drugs. We previously identified that CXXC5 is a negative feedback regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway via its interaction with Dishevelled (Dvl) and suggested the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction as a potential target for anabolic therapy of osteoporosis. Here, we screened small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction via a newly established in vitro assay system. The screened compounds were found to activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and enhance osteoblast differentiation in primary osteoblasts. The bone anabolic effects of the compounds were shown using ex vivo-cultured calvaria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titration analysis confirmed interaction between Dvl PDZ domain and KY-02061, a representative of the screened compounds. Oral administration of KY-02327, one of 55 newly synthesized KY-02061 analogs, successfully rescued bone loss in the ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model. In conclusion, small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction that block negative feedback regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are potential candidates for the development of bone anabolic anti-osteoporosis drugs. PMID:26941261

  12. Eliciting renal failure in mosquitoes with a small-molecule inhibitor of inward-rectifying potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F; Hopkins, Corey R; Gogliotti, Rocco D; Lovell, Kimberly M; Hine, Rebecca M; Ghosalkar, Dhairyasheel; Longo, Anthony; Beyenbach, Klaus W; Denton, Jerod S; Piermarini, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever take a large toll on global health. The primary chemical agents used for controlling mosquitoes are insecticides that target the nervous system. However, the emergence of resistance in mosquito populations is reducing the efficacy of available insecticides. The development of new insecticides is therefore urgent. Here we show that VU573, a small-molecule inhibitor of mammalian inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, inhibits a Kir channel cloned from the renal (Malpighian) tubules of Aedes aegypti (AeKir1). Injection of VU573 into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti) disrupts the production and excretion of urine in a manner consistent with channel block of AeKir1 and renders the mosquitoes incapacitated (flightless or dead) within 24 hours. Moreover, the toxicity of VU573 in mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti) is exacerbated when hemolymph potassium levels are elevated, suggesting that Kir channels are essential for maintenance of whole-animal potassium homeostasis. Our study demonstrates that renal failure is a promising mechanism of action for killing mosquitoes, and motivates the discovery of selective small-molecule inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels for use as insecticides. PMID:23734226

  13. Clinical development of galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate), a small molecule inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Herbertz, Stephan; Sawyer, J Scott; Stauber, Anja J; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Driscoll, Kyla E; Estrem, Shawn T; Cleverly, Ann L; Desaiah, Durisala; Guba, Susan C; Benhadji, Karim A; Slapak, Christopher A; Lahn, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling regulates a wide range of biological processes. TGF-β plays an important role in tumorigenesis and contributes to the hallmarks of cancer, including tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and escape of immune surveillance. There are several pharmacological approaches to block TGF-β signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, antisense oligonucleotides, and small molecule inhibitors. Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate) is an oral small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor I kinase that specifically downregulates the phosphorylation of SMAD2, abrogating activation of the canonical pathway. Furthermore, galunisertib has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing animal models such as breast, colon, lung cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Continuous long-term exposure to galunisertib caused cardiac toxicities in animals requiring adoption of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy to allow further development. The use of such a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model defined a therapeutic window with an appropriate safety profile that enabled the clinical investigation of galunisertib. These efforts resulted in an intermittent dosing regimen (14 days on/14 days off, on a 28-day cycle) of galunisertib for all ongoing trials. Galunisertib is being investigated either as monotherapy or in combination with standard antitumor regimens (including nivolumab) in patients with cancer with high unmet medical needs such as glioblastoma, pancreatic cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present review summarizes the past and current experiences with different pharmacological treatments that enabled galunisertib to be investigated in patients. PMID:26309397

  14. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of BRCT domains of breast cancer gene 1.

    PubMed

    Lokesh, G L; Rachamallu, Aparna; Kumar, G D Kishore; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2006-05-01

    The C-terminus region of the 1863 residue early onset of breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) nuclear protein contains a tandem globular carboxy terminus domain termed BRCT. The BRCT repeats in BRCA1 are phosphoserine- and/or phosphothreonine-specific binding modules. The interaction of the BRCT(BRCA1) domains with phosphorylated BRCA1-associated carboxyl terminal helicase (BACH1) is cell cycle regulated and is essential for DNA damage-induced checkpoint control during the transition from the G(2) phase to the M phase of the cell cycle. Development of a competitive, homogeneous, high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of BRCT(BRCA1)-BACH1 interaction is reported here. The FP assay was used for measuring binding affinities and inhibition constants of BACH1 peptides and small molecule inhibitors of BRCT(BRCA1) domains, respectively. A fluorescently labeled wild-type BACH1 decapeptide (BDP1) containing the critical phosphoserine, a phenylalanine at (P+3), and a GST-BRCT fusion protein were used to establish the FP assay. BDP1 has a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.58+/-0.01microM and a dynamic range (DeltamP) of 164.9+/-1.9. The assay tolerates 20% dimethyl sulfoxide, which enables screening poorly soluble compounds. Under optimized conditions, a Z' factor of 0.87 was achieved in a 384-well format for high-throughput screening. PMID:16500609

  15. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  16. Small Molecule MRP1 Inhibitor Reversan Increases the Therapeutic Index of Chemotherapy in Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Catherine A.; Watt, Fujiko; Murray, Jayne; Pajic, Marina; Prokvolit, Anatoly; Xue, Chengyuan; Flemming, Claudia; Smith, Janice; Purmal, Andrei; Isachenko, Nadezhda; Komarov, Pavel G.; Gurova, Katerina V.; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Marshall, Glenn M.; Norris, Murray D.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Haber, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) has been closely linked to poor treatment response in several cancers, most notably neuroblastoma. Homozygous deletion of the MRP1 gene in primary murine neuroblastoma tumors resulted in increased sensitivity to MRP1 substrate drugs (vincristine, etoposide, doxorubicin) compared to tumors containing both copies of wild-type MRP1, indicating that MRP1 plays a significant role in the drug resistance in this tumor type and defining this multidrug transporter as a target for pharmacological suppression. Cell-based readout system was created to functionally determine intracellular accumulation of MRP1 substrates using p53-responsive reporter as an indicator of drug-induced DNA damage. Screening of small molecule libraries in this readout system revealed pyrazolopyrimidines as a prominent structural class of potent MRP1 inhibitors. Reversan, the lead compound of this class, increased the efficacy of both vincristine and etoposide in murine models of neuroblastoma (syngeneic and human xenografts). As opposed to the majority of inhibitors of multidrug transporters, Reversan was not toxic by itself nor did it increase the toxicity of chemotherapeutic drug exposure in mice. Therefore, Reversan represents a new class of non-toxic MRP1 inhibitor, which may be clinically useful for the treatment of neuroblastoma and other MRP1 over-expressing drug refractory tumors by increasing their sensitivity to conventional chemotherapy. PMID:19654298

  17. Development of a small-molecule screening method for inhibitors of cellular response to myostatin and activin A.

    PubMed

    Cash, Jennifer N; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Kirby, R Jason; Merck, Lisa; Seibel, William L; Wortman, Matthew D; Papoian, Ruben; Nelson, Sandra; Thompson, Thomas B

    2013-08-01

    Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of secreted ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, therapeutic inhibitors of myostatin are actively being investigated for their potential in the treatment of muscle-wasting diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. Here, we sought to develop a high-throughput screening (HTS) method for small-molecule inhibitors that target myostatin. We created a HEK293 stable cell line that expresses the (CAGA)12-luciferase reporter construct and robustly responds to signaling of certain classes of TGF-β family ligands. After optimization and miniaturization of the assay to a 384-well format, we successfully screened a library of compounds for inhibition of myostatin and the closely related activin A. Selection of some of the tested compounds was directed by in silico screening against myostatin, which led to an enrichment of target hits as compared with random selection. Altogether, we present an HTS method that will be useful for screening potential inhibitors of not only myostatin but also many other ligands of the TGF-β family. PMID:23543431

  18. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human As(III) S-Adenosylmethionine Methyltransferase (AS3MT)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most ubiquitous environmental toxin and carcinogen. Long-term exposure to arsenic is associated with human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Human As(III) S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) methyltransferases (hAS3MT) methylates As(III) to trivalent mono- and dimethyl species that are more toxic and potentially more carcinogenic than inorganic arsenic. Modulators of hAS3MT activity may be useful for the prevention or treatment of arsenic-related diseases. Using a newly developed high-throughput assay for hAS3MT activity, we identified 10 novel noncompetitive small molecule inhibitors. In silico docking analysis with the crystal structure of an AS3MT orthologue suggests that the inhibitors bind in a cleft between domains that is distant from either the As(III) or SAM binding sites. This suggests the presence of a possible allosteric and regulatory site in the enzyme. These inhibitors may be useful tools for future research in arsenic metabolism and are the starting-point for the development of drugs against hAS3MT. PMID:26577531

  19. HA14-1, a small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2, bypasses chemoresistance in leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Lisa; Mahé, Béatrice; Gréé, René; Vallette, François M; Juin, Philippe

    2007-06-01

    We analyzed the biological activity of HA14-1, a small organic compound inhibitor of Bcl-2, against established leukaemia cell lines and blasts from acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. HA14-1 had a potent killing activity against the leukaemia cell line that expressed endogenous or ectopic Bcl-2. This activity was mostly caspase-independent and was not altered by the expression of a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Moreover, HA14-1 efficiently induced cell death in a broad spectrum of AML blasts but not in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. Thus, single-agent regimens using Bcl-2 inhibitors such as HA14-1 may be advantageous in overcoming some forms of chemoresistance in AML. PMID:17224180

  20. More powerful virus inhibitors from structure-based analysis of HEV71 capsid-binding molecules

    PubMed Central

    Spyrou, John A. B.; Kelly, James; Ren, Jingshan; Grimes, Jonathan; Puerstinger, Gerhard; Stonehouse, Nicola; Walter, Thomas S.; Hu, Zhongyu; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Xuemei; Peng, Wei; Rowlands, David; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (HEV71) epidemics amongst children and infants result mainly in mild symptoms, however, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, infection can be fatal. At present no therapies are available. We have used structural analysis of the complete virus to guide the design of HEV71 inhibitors. Analysis of complexes with four 3-(-4-pyridyl)-2-imidazolidinone derivatives with varying anti-HEV71 activities, pinpointed key structure-activity correlates. We then identified additional potentially beneficial substitutions, developed methods to reliably triage compounds by quantum mechanics-enhanced ligand docking, and synthesized two candidates. Structural analysis and in vitro assays confirmed the predicted binding modes and their ability to block viral infection. One ligand (IC50 = 25 pM) is an order of magnitude more potent than the best previously reported inhibitor, and is also more soluble. Our approach may be useful in the design of effective drugs for enterovirus infections. PMID:24509833

  1. Discovery of Selective Small Molecule ROMK Inhibitors as Potential New Mechanism Diuretics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haifeng; Walsh, Shawn P; Yan, Yan; de Jesus, Reynalda K; Shahripour, Aurash; Teumelsan, Nardos; Zhu, Yuping; Ha, Sookhee; Owens, Karen A; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande S; Felix, John P; Liu, Jessica; Kohler, Martin; Priest, Birgit T; Bailey, Timothy; Brochu, Richard; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Roy, Sophie; Yang, Lihu; Mills, Sander G; Garcia, Maria L; Pasternak, Alexander

    2012-05-10

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK or Kir1.1) is a putative drug target for a novel class of diuretics that could be used for the treatment of hypertension and edematous states such as heart failure. An internal high-throughput screening campaign identified 1,4-bis(4-nitrophenethyl)piperazine (5) as a potent ROMK inhibitor. It is worth noting that this compound was identified as a minor impurity in a screening hit that was responsible for all of the initially observed ROMK activity. Structure-activity studies resulted in analogues with improved rat pharmacokinetic properties and selectivity over the hERG channel, providing tool compounds that can be used for in vivo pharmacological assessment. The featured ROMK inhibitors were also selective against other members of the inward rectifier family of potassium channels. PMID:24900480

  2. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of BRD4 Using Structure-Based Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are epigenetic readers that recognize acetylated-lysine (KAc) on proteins and are implicated in a number of diseases. We describe a virtual screening approach to identify BRD inhibitors. Key elements of this approach are the extensive design and use of substructure queries to compile a set of commercially available compounds featuring novel putative KAc mimetics and docking this set for final compound selection. We describe the validation of this approach by applying it to the first BRD of BRD4. The selection and testing of 143 compounds lead to the discovery of six novel hits, including four unprecedented KAc mimetics. We solved the crystal structure of four hits, determined their binding mode, and improved their potency through synthesis and the purchase of derivatives. This work provides a validated virtual screening approach that is applicable to other BRDs and describes novel KAc mimetics that can be further explored to design more potent inhibitors. PMID:24090311

  3. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of ricin and shiga toxin using a cell-based high-throughput screen

    PubMed Central

    Wahome, Paul G.; Bai, Yan; Neal, Lori M.; Robertus, Jon D.; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    The Category B agents, ricin and shiga toxin (Stx), are RNA N-glycosidases that target a highly conserved adenine residue within the sarcin-ricin loop of eukaryotic 28S ribosomal RNA. In an effort to identify small-molecule inhibitors of these toxins that could serve as lead compounds for potential therapeutics, we have developed a simple Vero cell-based high-throughput cytotoxicity assay and have used it to screen ∼81,300 compounds in 17 commercially available chemical libraries. This initial screen identified ∼300 compounds with weak (≥30-<50%), moderate (≥50-<80%), or strong (≥80%) ricin inhibitory activity. Secondary analysis of 244 of these original “hits” was performed, and 20 compounds that were capable of reducing ricin cytotoxicity by >50% were chosen for further study. Four compounds demonstrated significant dose-dependent ricin inhibitory activity in the Vero cell-based assay, with 50% effective inhibitory concentration (EC50) values ranging from 25 to 60 μM. The same 20 compounds were tested in parallel for the ability to inhibit ricin's and Stx1's enzymatic activities in an in vitro translation reaction. Three of the 20 compounds, including the most effective compound in the cell-based assay, had discernible anti-toxin activity. One compound in particular, 4-fluorophenyl methyl 2-(furan-2-yl)quinoline-4-carboxylate (“compound 8”), had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 30 μM, a value indicating > 10-fold higher potency than is the case for previously described ricin-Stx1 inhibitors. Computer modeling predicted that compound 8 is capable of docking within the ricin active site. In conclusion, we have used a simple high-throughput cell-based method to identify several new small-molecule inhibitors of ricin and Stx. PMID:20350563

  4. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule HIV-1 Replication Inhibitors That Stabilize Capsid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Titolo, Steve; Lemke, Christopher T.; Goudreau, Nathalie; Mercier, Jean-François; Wardrop, Elizabeth; Shah, Vaibhav B.; von Schwedler, Uta K.; Langelier, Charles; Banik, Soma S. R.; Aiken, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of novel antiretroviral agents is required to provide alternative treatment options for HIV-1-infected patients. The screening of a phenotypic cell-based viral replication assay led to the identification of a novel class of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazol-6-one (pyrrolopyrazolone) HIV-1 inhibitors, exemplified by two compounds: BI-1 and BI-2. These compounds inhibited early postentry stages of viral replication at a step(s) following reverse transcription but prior to 2 long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circle formation, suggesting that they may block nuclear targeting of the preintegration complex. Selection of viruses resistant to BI-2 revealed that substitutions at residues A105 and T107 within the capsid (CA) amino-terminal domain (CANTD) conferred high-level resistance to both compounds, implicating CA as the antiviral target. Direct binding of BI-1 and/or BI-2 to CANTD was demonstrated using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift titration analyses. A high-resolution crystal structure of the BI-1:CANTD complex revealed that the inhibitor bound within a recently identified inhibitor binding pocket (CANTD site 2) between CA helices 4, 5, and 7, on the surface of the CANTD, that also corresponds to the binding site for the host factor CPSF-6. The functional consequences of BI-1 and BI-2 binding differ from previously characterized inhibitors that bind the same site since the BI compounds did not inhibit reverse transcription but stabilized preassembled CA complexes. Hence, this new class of antiviral compounds binds CA and may inhibit viral replication by stabilizing the viral capsid. PMID:23817385

  5. Synthetic lethal screening with small molecule inhibitors provides a pathway to rational combination therapies for melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Roller, Devin; Axelrod, Mark; Capaldo, Brian; Jensen, Karin; Mackey, Aaron; Weber, Michael J; Gioeli, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate that extracellular signals are transmitted through a network of proteins rather than hierarchical signaling pathways suggesting why inhibition of a single component of a canonical pathway is insufficient for the treatment of cancer. The biological outcome of signaling through a network is inherently more robust and resistant to inhibition of a single network component. In this study, we performed a functional chemical genetic screen to identify novel interactions between signaling inhibitors that would not be predicted based on our current understanding of signaling networks. We screened over 300 drug combinations in nine melanoma cell lines and have identified pairs of compounds that show synergistic cytotoxicity. The synergistic cytotoxicities identified did not correlate with the known RAS and BRAF mutational status of the melanoma cell lines. Among the most robust results was synergy between sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor with activity against RAF, and diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Drug substitution experiments using the NSAIDs celecoxib and ibuprofen or the MEK inhibitor PD325901 and the RAF inhibitor RAF265 suggest that inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) and MAP kinase signaling are targets for the synergistic cytotoxicity of sorafenib and diclofenac. Co-treatment with sorafenib and diclofenac interrupts a positive feedback signaling loop involving ERK, cPLA2, and COX. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrates synergy-specific down-regulation of survival-related genes. This study has uncovered novel functional drug combinations and suggests that the underlying signaling networks that control responses to targeted agents can vary substantially depending on unexplored components of the cell genotype. PMID:22962324

  6. Discovery of novel small-molecule HIV-1 replication inhibitors that stabilize capsid complexes.

    PubMed

    Lamorte, Louie; Titolo, Steve; Lemke, Christopher T; Goudreau, Nathalie; Mercier, Jean-François; Wardrop, Elizabeth; Shah, Vaibhav B; von Schwedler, Uta K; Langelier, Charles; Banik, Soma S R; Aiken, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I; Mason, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The identification of novel antiretroviral agents is required to provide alternative treatment options for HIV-1-infected patients. The screening of a phenotypic cell-based viral replication assay led to the identification of a novel class of 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazol-6-one (pyrrolopyrazolone) HIV-1 inhibitors, exemplified by two compounds: BI-1 and BI-2. These compounds inhibited early postentry stages of viral replication at a step(s) following reverse transcription but prior to 2 long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circle formation, suggesting that they may block nuclear targeting of the preintegration complex. Selection of viruses resistant to BI-2 revealed that substitutions at residues A105 and T107 within the capsid (CA) amino-terminal domain (CANTD) conferred high-level resistance to both compounds, implicating CA as the antiviral target. Direct binding of BI-1 and/or BI-2 to CANTD was demonstrated using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift titration analyses. A high-resolution crystal structure of the BI-1:CANTD complex revealed that the inhibitor bound within a recently identified inhibitor binding pocket (CANTD site 2) between CA helices 4, 5, and 7, on the surface of the CANTD, that also corresponds to the binding site for the host factor CPSF-6. The functional consequences of BI-1 and BI-2 binding differ from previously characterized inhibitors that bind the same site since the BI compounds did not inhibit reverse transcription but stabilized preassembled CA complexes. Hence, this new class of antiviral compounds binds CA and may inhibit viral replication by stabilizing the viral capsid. PMID:23817385

  7. A Selective Small Molecule DNA2 Inhibitor for Sensitization of Human Cancer Cells to Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenpeng; Zhou, Mian; Li, Zhengke; Li, Hongzhi; Polaczek, Piotr; Dai, Huifang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Changwei; Karanja, Kenneth K; Popuri, Vencat; Shan, Shu-Ou; Schlacher, Katharina; Zheng, Li; Campbell, Judith L; Shen, Binghui

    2016-04-01

    Cancer cells frequently up-regulate DNA replication and repair proteins such as the multifunctional DNA2 nuclease/helicase, counteracting DNA damage due to replication stress and promoting survival. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking both DNA replication and repair by inhibiting the bifunctional DNA2 could be a potent strategy to sensitize cancer cells to stresses from radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. We show that homozygous deletion of DNA2 sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and camptothecin (CPT). Using a virtual high throughput screen, we identify 4-hydroxy-8-nitroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (C5) as an effective and selective inhibitor of DNA2. Mutagenesis and biochemical analysis define the C5 binding pocket at a DNA-binding motif that is shared by the nuclease and helicase activities, consistent with structural studies that suggest that DNA binding to the helicase domain is necessary for nuclease activity. C5 targets the known functions of DNA2 in vivo: C5 inhibits resection at stalled forks as well as reducing recombination. C5 is an even more potent inhibitor of restart of stalled DNA replication forks and over-resection of nascent DNA in cells defective in replication fork protection, including BRCA2 and BOD1L. C5 sensitizes cells to CPT and synergizes with PARP inhibitors. PMID:27211550

  8. Antiinfective therapy with a small molecule inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus sortase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hongchuan; Zhu, Kongkai; Gong, Shouzhe; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Wang, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiafei; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Ruihan; Zhou, Lu; Lan, Lefu; Jiang, Hualiang; Schneewind, Olaf; Luo, Cheng; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2014-09-16

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most frequent cause of hospital-acquired infection, which manifests as surgical site infections, bacteremia, and sepsis. Due to drug-resistance, prophylaxis of MRSA infection with antibiotics frequently fails or incites nosocomial diseases such as Clostridium difficile infection. Sortase A is a transpeptidase that anchors surface proteins in the envelope of S. aureus, and sortase mutants are unable to cause bacteremia or sepsis in mice. Here we used virtual screening and optimization of inhibitor structure to identify 3-(4-pyridinyl)-6-(2-sodiumsulfonatephenyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazole and related compounds, which block sortase activity in vitro and in vivo. Sortase inhibitors do not affect in vitro staphylococcal growth yet protect mice against lethal S. aureus bacteremia. Thus, sortase inhibitors may be useful as antiinfective therapy to prevent hospital-acquired S. aureus infection in high-risk patients without the side effects of antibiotics. PMID:25197057

  9. Structural basis for specificity of TGF[beta] family receptor small molecule inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Zeqiraj, Elton; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Sicheri, Frank; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; David, Laurent

    2012-07-24

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) receptor kinase inhibitors have a great therapeutic potential. SB431542 is one of the mainly used kinase inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway receptors, but needs improvement of its EC{sub 50} (EC{sub 50} = 1 {mu}M) to be translated to clinical use. A key feature of SB431542 is that it specifically targets receptors from the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway but not the closely related receptors from the bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) pathway. To understand the mechanisms of this selectivity, we solved the crystal structure of the TGF{beta} type I receptor (T{beta}RI) kinase domain in complex with SB431542. We mutated T{beta}RI residues coordinating SB431542 to their counterparts in activin-receptor like kinase 2 (ALK2), a BMP receptor kinase, and tested the kinase activity of mutated T{beta}RI. We discovered that a Ser280Thr mutation yielded a T{beta}RI variant that was resistant to SB431542 inhibition. Furthermore, the corresponding Thr283Ser mutation in ALK2 yielded a BMP receptor sensitive to SB431542. This demonstrated that Ser280 is the key determinant of selectivity for SB431542. This work provides a framework for optimising the SB431542 scaffold to more potent and selective inhibitors of the TGF{beta}/Activin pathway.

  10. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Hideyasu; Furuichi, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Keiji Shimbara, Naoki

    2008-04-18

    The inducible transcription factor NF-{kappa}B regulates divergent signaling pathways including inflammatory response and cancer development. Selective inhibitors for NF-{kappa}B signaling are potentially useful for treatment of inflammation and cancer. NF-{kappa}B is canonically activated by preferential disposal of its inhibitory protein; I{kappa}B, which suppresses the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. I{kappa}B{alpha} (a major member of I{kappa}B family proteins) is phosphorylated with an I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and subsequently polyubiquitylated by SCF{sup {beta}}{sup TrCP1} ubiquitin-ligase in the presence of E1 and E2 prior to proteasomal degradation. Here, we describe a novel inhibitor termed GS143, which suppressed I{kappa}B{alpha} ubiquitylation, but not I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, MDM2-directed p53 ubiquitylation, and proteasome activity in vitro. GS143 markedly suppressed the destruction of I{kappa}B{alpha} stimulated by TNF{alpha} and a set of downstream responses coupled to NF-{kappa}B signaling but not those of p53 and {beta}-catenin in vivo. Our results indicate that GS143 serves as an effective inhibitor of multiple pathways served by NF-{kappa}B signaling.

  11. High-Throughput Minigenome System for Identifying Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Ebola Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Megan R.; Pietzsch, Colette; Vausselin, Thibaut; Shaw, Megan L.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the family Filoviridae, is a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus that causes severe, often lethal, disease in humans. EBOV RNA synthesis is carried out by a complex that includes several viral proteins. The function of this machinery is essential for viral gene expression and viral replication and is therefore a potential target for antivirals. We developed and optimized a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay based on an EBOV minigenome assay, which assesses the function of the polymerase complex. The assay is robust in 384-well format and displays a large signal to background ratio and high Z-factor values. We performed a pilot screen of 2080 bioactive compounds, identifying 31 hits (1.5% of the library) with >70% inhibition of EBOV minigenome activity. We further identified eight compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations below their 50% cytotoxic concentrations, five of which had selectivity index (SI) values >10, suggesting specificity against the EBOV polymerase complex. These included an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, a target known to modulate the EBOV replication complex. They also included novel classes of inhibitors, including inhibitors of protein synthesis and hypoxia inducible factor-1. Five compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit replication of a recombinant EBOV that expresses GFP (EBOV-GFP), and four inhibited EBOV-GFP growth at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. These data demonstrate the utility of the HTS minigenome assay for drug discovery and suggest potential directions for antifiloviral drug development. PMID:26284260

  12. A Selective Small Molecule DNA2 Inhibitor for Sensitization of Human Cancer Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenpeng; Zhou, Mian; Li, Zhengke; Li, Hongzhi; Polaczek, Piotr; Dai, Huifang; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Changwei; Karanja, Kenneth K.; Popuri, Vencat; Shan, Shu-ou; Schlacher, Katharina; Zheng, Li; Campbell, Judith L.; Shen, Binghui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently up-regulate DNA replication and repair proteins such as the multifunctional DNA2 nuclease/helicase, counteracting DNA damage due to replication stress and promoting survival. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking both DNA replication and repair by inhibiting the bifunctional DNA2 could be a potent strategy to sensitize cancer cells to stresses from radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. We show that homozygous deletion of DNA2 sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and camptothecin (CPT). Using a virtual high throughput screen, we identify 4-hydroxy-8-nitroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (C5) as an effective and selective inhibitor of DNA2. Mutagenesis and biochemical analysis define the C5 binding pocket at a DNA-binding motif that is shared by the nuclease and helicase activities, consistent with structural studies that suggest that DNA binding to the helicase domain is necessary for nuclease activity. C5 targets the known functions of DNA2 in vivo: C5 inhibits resection at stalled forks as well as reducing recombination. C5 is an even more potent inhibitor of restart of stalled DNA replication forks and over-resection of nascent DNA in cells defective in replication fork protection, including BRCA2 and BOD1L. C5 sensitizes cells to CPT and synergizes with PARP inhibitors. PMID:27211550

  13. Structural Basis for Specificity of TGFβ Family Receptor Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Zeqiraj, Elton; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Sicheri, Frank; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; David, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) receptor kinase inhibitors have a great therapeutic potential. SB431542 is one of the mainly used kinase inhibitors of the TGFβ/Activin pathway receptors, but needs improvement of its EC50 (EC50 = 1 μM) to be translated to clinical use. A key feature of SB431542 is that it specifically targets receptors from the TGFβ/Activin pathway but not the closely related receptors from the bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) pathway. To understand the mechanisms of this selectivity, we solved the crystal structure of the TGFβ type I receptor (TβRI) kinase domain in complex with SB431542. We mutated TβRI residues coordinating SB431542 to their counterparts in activin-receptor like kinase 2 (ALK2), a BMP receptor kinase, and tested the kinase activity of mutated TβRI. We discovered that a Ser280Thr mutation yielded a TβRI variant that was resistant to SB431542 inhibition. Furthermore, the corresponding Thr283Ser mutation in ALK2 yielded a BMP receptor sensitive to SB431542. This demonstrated that Ser280 is the key determinant of selectivity for SB431542. This work provides a framework for optimizing the SB431542 scaffold to more potent and selective inhibitors of the TGFβ/Activin pathway. PMID:21983015

  14. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B. Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage.

  15. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hasinoff, Brian B; Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage. PMID:20832415

  16. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of MyD88-dependent signaling pathways using a computational screen

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Mark A.; Lee, Michael S.; Kissner, Teri L.; Alam, Shahabuddin; Waugh, David S.; Saikh, Kamal U.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used high-throughput computational screening to discover drug-like inhibitors of the host MyD88 protein-protein signaling interaction implicated in the potentially lethal immune response associated with Staphylococcal enterotoxins. We built a protein-protein dimeric docking model of the Toll-interleukin receptor (TIR)-domain of MyD88 and identified a binding site for docking small molecules. Computational screening of 5 million drug-like compounds led to testing of 30 small molecules; one of these molecules inhibits the TIR-TIR domain interaction and attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human primary cell cultures. Compounds chemically similar to this hit from the PubChem database were observed to be more potent with improved drug-like properties. Most of these 2nd generation compounds inhibit Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-1β production at 2–10 μM in human primary cells. Biochemical analysis and a cell-based reporter assay revealed that the most promising compound, T6167923, disrupts MyD88 homodimeric formation, which is critical for its signaling function. Furthermore, we observed that administration of a single dose of T6167923 completely protects mice from lethal SEB-induced toxic shock. In summary, our in silico approach has identified anti-inflammatory inhibitors against in vitro and in vivo toxin exposure with promise to treat other MyD88-related pro-inflammatory diseases. PMID:26381092

  17. Escape of HIV-1 from a Small Molecule CCR5 Inhibitor Is Not Associated with a Fitness Loss

    PubMed Central

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G; Marozsan, Andre J; Matet, Alexandre; Snyder, Amy D; Arts, Eric J; Kuhmann, Shawn E; Moore, John P

    2007-01-01

    Fitness is a parameter used to quantify how well an organism adapts to its environment; in the present study, fitness is a measure of how well strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replicate in tissue culture. When HIV-1 develops resistance in vitro or in vivo to antiretroviral drugs such as reverse transcriptase or protease inhibitors, its fitness is often impaired. Here, we have investigated whether the development of resistance in vitro to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, AD101, has an associated fitness cost. To do this, we developed a growth-competition assay involving dual infections with molecularly cloned viruses that are essentially isogenic outside the env genes under study. Real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR (QPCR) was used to quantify each competing virus individually via probes specific to different, phenotypically silent target sequences engineered within their vif genes. Head-to-head competition assays of env clones derived from the AD101 escape mutant isolate, the inhibitor-sensitive parental virus, and a passage control virus showed that AD101 resistance was not associated with a fitness loss. This observation is consistent with the retention of the resistant phenotype when the escape mutant was cultured for a total of 20 passages in the absence of the selecting compound. Amino acid substitutions in the V3 region of gp120 that confer complete AD101 resistance cause a fitness loss when introduced into an AD101-sensitive, parental clone; however, in the resistant isolate, changes elsewhere in env that occurred prior to the substitutions within V3 appear to compensate for the adverse effect of the V3 changes on replicative capacity. These in vitro studies may have implications for the development and management of resistance to other CCR5 inhibitors that are being evaluated clinically for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:17542646

  18. Inhibition of TLR2 signaling by small molecule inhibitors targeting a pocket within the TLR2 TIR domain.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Pragnesh; Laird, Michelle H W; Schwarz, Ryan S; Greene, Shannon; Dyson, Tristan; Snyder, Greg A; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Chauhan, Jay; Fletcher, Steven; Toshchakov, Vladimir Y; MacKerell, Alexander D; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2015-04-28

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is initiated by dimerization of intracellular Toll/IL-1 receptor resistance (TIR) domains. For all TLRs except TLR3, recruitment of the adapter, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), to TLR TIR domains results in downstream signaling culminating in proinflammatory cytokine production. Therefore, blocking TLR TIR dimerization may ameliorate TLR2-mediated hyperinflammatory states. The BB loop within the TLR TIR domain is critical for mediating certain protein-protein interactions. Examination of the human TLR2 TIR domain crystal structure revealed a pocket adjacent to the highly conserved P681 and G682 BB loop residues. Using computer-aided drug design (CADD), we sought to identify a small molecule inhibitor(s) that would fit within this pocket and potentially disrupt TLR2 signaling. In silico screening identified 149 compounds and 20 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs based on their predicted ability to bind in the BB loop pocket. These compounds were screened in HEK293T-TLR2 transfectants for the ability to inhibit TLR2-mediated IL-8 mRNA. C16H15NO4 (C29) was identified as a potential TLR2 inhibitor. C29, and its derivative, ortho-vanillin (o-vanillin), inhibited TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 signaling induced by synthetic and bacterial TLR2 agonists in human HEK-TLR2 and THP-1 cells, but only TLR2/1 signaling in murine macrophages. C29 failed to inhibit signaling induced by other TLR agonists and TNF-α. Mutagenesis of BB loop pocket residues revealed an indispensable role for TLR2/1, but not TLR2/6, signaling, suggesting divergent roles. Mice treated with o-vanillin exhibited reduced TLR2-induced inflammation. Our data provide proof of principle that targeting the BB loop pocket is an effective approach for identification of TLR2 signaling inhibitors. PMID:25870276

  19. Small Molecule Microarrays of RNA-Focused Peptoids Identifies Inhibitors of a Pathogenic Group I Intron RNA

    PubMed Central

    Labuda, Lucas P.; Pushechnikov, Alexei; Disney, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Peptoids that inhibit the group I intron RNA from Candida albicans, an opportunistic pathogen that kills immunocompromised hosts, have been identified using microarrays. The arrayed peptoid library was constructed using submonomers with moieties similar to ones found in small molecules known to bind RNA. Library members that passed quality control analysis were spotted onto a microarray and screened for binding to the C. albicans group I intron ribozyme. Each ligand binder identified from microarray-based screening inhibited self-splicing in the presence of 1 mM nucleotide concentration of bulk yeast tRNA with IC50’s between 150 and 2200 µM. The binding signals and the corresponding IC50’s were used to identify features in the peptoids that predispose them for RNA binding. After statistical analysis of the peptoids’ structures that bind, a second generation of inhibitors was constructed using these important features; all second generation inhibitors have improved potencies with IC50’s <100 µM. The most potent inhibitor is composed of one phenylguanidine and three tryptamine submonomers and has an IC50 of 31 µM. This compound is 6-fold more potent than pentamidine, a clinically used drug that inhibits self-splicing. These results show that: 1.) modulators of RNA function can be identified by designing RNA-focused chemical libraries and screening them via microarray; 2.) statistical analysis of ligand binders can identify features in leads that predispose them for binding to their targets; and 3.) features can then be programmed into second generation inhibitors to design ligands with improved potencies. PMID:19278238

  20. Phenotypic Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors: Implications for Therapeutic Discovery and Drug Target Development in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2016-01-01

    The inability of central nervous system (CNS) neurons to regenerate damaged axons and dendrites following traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a substantial obstacle for functional recovery. Apoptotic cell death, deposition of scar tissue, and growth-repressive molecules produced by glia further complicate the problem and make it challenging for re-growing axons to extend across injury sites. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of TBI, accentuating the need for relevant leads. Cell-based and organotypic bioassays can better mimic outcomes within the native CNS microenvironment than target-based screening methods and thus should speed the discovery of therapeutic agents that induce axon or dendrite regeneration. Additionally, when used to screen focused chemical libraries such as small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors, these assays can help elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in neurite outgrowth and regeneration as well as identify novel drug targets. Here, we describe a phenotypic cellular (high content) screening assay that utilizes brain-derived primary neurons for screening small-molecule chemical libraries. PMID:27604745

  1. New Antibiotic Molecules: Bypassing the Membrane Barrier of Gram Negative Bacteria Increases the Activity of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mamelli, Laurent; Petit, Sylvain; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Giglione, Carmela; Lieutaud, Aurélie; Meinnel, Thierry; Artaud, Isabelle; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide and urgently require the development of new antibacterial molecules. Peptide deformylase is an intracellular target now well-recognized for the design of new antibiotics. The bacterial susceptibility to such a cytoplasmic target primarily depends on the capacity of the compound to reach and accumulate in the cytosol. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the respective involvement of penetration (influx) and pumping out (efflux) mechanisms to peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDF-I) activity, the potency of various series was determined using various genetic contexts (efflux overproducers or efflux-deleted strains) and membrane permeabilizers. Depending on the structure of the tested molecules, two behaviors could be observed: (i) for actinonin the first PDF-I characterized, the AcrAB efflux system was the main parameter involved in the bacterial susceptibility, and (ii), for the lastest PDF-Is such as the derivatives of 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-hydroxyacetamide, the penetration through the membrane was a important limiting step. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly show that the bacterial membrane plays a key role in modulating the antibacterial activity of PDF-Is. The bacterial susceptibility for these new antibacterial molecules can be improved by two unrelated ways in MDR strains: by collapsing the Acr efflux activity or by increasing the uptake rate through the bacterial membrane. The efficiency of the second method is associated with the nature of the compound. PMID:19649280

  2. Development of a High-Throughput Screening Paradigm for the Discovery of Small-Molecule Modulators of Adenylyl Cyclase: Identification of an Adenylyl Cyclase 2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Jason M.; Brand, Cameron S.; Bogard, Amy S.; Pratt, Evan P. S.; Xu, Ruqiang; Hockerman, Gregory H.; Ostrom, Rennolds S.; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2013-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms are implicated in several physiologic processes and disease states, but advancements in the therapeutic targeting of AC isoforms have been limited by the lack of potent and isoform-selective small-molecule modulators. The discovery of AC isoform-selective small molecules is expected to facilitate the validation of AC isoforms as therapeutic targets and augment the study of AC isoform function in vivo. Identification of chemical probes for AC2 is particularly important because there are no published genetic deletion studies and few small-molecule modulators. The present report describes the development and implementation of an intact-cell, small-molecule screening approach and subsequent validation paradigm for the discovery of AC2 inhibitors. The NIH clinical collections I and II were screened for inhibitors of AC2 activity using PMA-stimulated cAMP accumulation as a functional readout. Active compounds were subsequently confirmed and validated as direct AC2 inhibitors using orthogonal and counterscreening assays. The screening effort identified SKF-83566 [8-bromo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepin-7-ol hydrobromide] as a selective AC2 inhibitor with superior pharmacological properties for selective modulation of AC2 compared with currently available AC inhibitors. The utility of SKF-83566 as a small-molecule probe to study the function of endogenous ACs was demonstrated in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells and human bronchial smooth muscle cells. PMID:24008337

  3. Novel Schiff-base molecules as efficient corrosion inhibitors for mild steel surface in 1 M HCl medium: experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav Kr; Dutta, Alokdut; Ghosh, Pritam; Sukul, Dipankar; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-07-21

    In order to evaluate the effect of the functional group present in the ligand backbone towards corrosion inhibition performances, three Schiff-base molecules namely, (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)pyridine (L(1)), (E)-4-(2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)hydrazinyl)benzonitrile (L(2)) and (E)-4-((2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (L(3)) were synthesized and used as corrosion inhibitors on mild steel in 1 M HCl medium. The corrosion inhibition effectiveness of the studied inhibitors was investigated by weight loss and several sophisticated analytical tools such as potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Experimentally obtained results revealed that corrosion inhibition efficiencies followed the sequence: L(3) > L(1) > L(2). Electrochemical findings showed that inhibitors impart high resistance towards charge transfer across the metal-electrolyte interface and behaved as mixed type inhibitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to examine the protective film formed on the mild steel surface. The adsorption as well as inhibition ability of the inhibitor molecules on the mild steel surface was investigated by quantum chemical calculation and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In quantum chemical calculations, geometry optimized structures of the Schiff-base inhibitors, electron density distribution in HOMO and LUMO and Fukui indices of each atom were employed for their possible mode of interaction with the mild steel surfaces. MD simulations revealed that all the inhibitors molecules adsorbed in parallel orientation with respect to the Fe(110) surface. PMID:27315235

  4. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Pot1 Binding to Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Croy, Johnny E.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of S. pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ~20,000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with submicromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red, was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. ITC and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption. PMID:22978652

  5. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J; Valente, Susana T

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  6. Potent Host-Directed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Myxovirus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Stefanie A.; Ndungu, J. Maina; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Dochow, Melanie; Sun, Aiming; Natchus, Michael; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid adaptation to a pathogen

  7. Progress in the development and application of small molecule inhibitors of bromodomain-acetyl-lysine interactions.

    PubMed

    Hewings, David S; Rooney, Timothy P C; Jennings, Laura E; Hay, Duncan A; Schofield, Christopher J; Brennan, Paul E; Knapp, Stefan; Conway, Stuart J

    2012-11-26

    Bromodomains, protein modules that recognize and bind to acetylated lysine, are emerging as important components of cellular machinery. These acetyl-lysine (KAc) "reader" domains are part of the write-read-erase concept that has been linked with the transfer of epigenetic information. By reading KAc marks on histones, bromodomains mediate protein-protein interactions between a diverse array of partners. There has been intense activity in developing potent and selective small molecule probes that disrupt the interaction between a given bromodomain and KAc. Rapid success has been achieved with the BET family of bromodomains, and a number of potent and selective probes have been reported. These compounds have enabled linking of the BET bromodomains with diseases, including cancer and inflammation, suggesting that bromodomains are druggable targets. Herein, we review the biology of the bromodomains and discuss the SAR for the existing small molecule probes. The biology that has been enabled by these compounds is summarized. PMID:22924434

  8. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70)

    PubMed Central

    Leu, J. I-Ju; Pimkina, Julia; Frank, Amanda; Murphy, Maureen E.; George, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The multifunctional, stress-inducible, molecular chaperone HSP70 has important roles in aiding protein folding and maintaining protein homeostasis. HSP70 expression is elevated in many cancers, contributing to tumor cell survival and resistance to therapy. We have determined that a small molecule called 2-Phenylethynesulfonamide (PES) interacts selectively with HSP70, and leads to a disruption of the association between HSP70 and several of its co-chaperones and substrate proteins. Treatment of cultured tumor cells with PES promotes cell death that is associated with protein aggregation, impaired autophagy, and inhibition of lysosomal function. Moreover, this small molecule is able to suppress tumor development and enhance survival in a mouse model of Myc-induced lymphomagenesis. The data demonstrate that PES disrupts actions of HSP70 in multiple cell signaling pathways offering an opportunity to better understand the diverse functions of this molecular chaperone, and also to aid in the development of new cancer therapies. PMID:19818706

  9. Functional Characterization of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of the DKK1-LRP6 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Iozzi, Sara; Remelli, Rosaria; Lelli, Barbara; Diamanti, Daniela; Pileri, Silvia; Bracci, Luisa; Roncarati, Renza; Caricasole, Andrea; Bernocco, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    Background. DKK1 antagonizes canonical Wnt signalling through high-affinity binding to LRP5/6, an essential component of the Wnt receptor complex responsible for mediating downstream canonical Wnt signalling. DKK1 overexpression is known for its pathological implications in osteoporosis, cancer, and neurodegeneration, suggesting the interaction with LRP5/6 as a potential therapeutic target. Results. We show that the small-molecule NCI8642 can efficiently displace DKK1 from LRP6 and block DKK1 inhibitory activity on canonical Wnt signalling, as shown in binding and cellular assays, respectively. We further characterize NCI8642 binding activity on LRP6 by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technology. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that the DKK1-LRP6 interaction can be the target of small molecules and unlocks the possibility of new therapeutic tools for diseases associated with DKK1 dysregulation. PMID:27398238

  10. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Ca(2+)-S100B Reveal Two Protein Conformations.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Michael C; Ansari, Mohd Imran; Pierce, Adam D; Wilder, Paul T; McKnight, Laura E; Raman, E Prabhu; Neau, David B; Bezawada, Padmavani; Alasady, Milad J; Charpentier, Thomas H; Varney, Kristen M; Toth, Eric A; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew; Weber, David J

    2016-01-28

    The drug pentamidine inhibits calcium-dependent complex formation with p53 ((Ca)S100B·p53) in malignant melanoma (MM) and restores p53 tumor suppressor activity in vivo. However, off-target effects associated with this drug were problematic in MM patients. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were therefore completed here with 23 pentamidine analogues, and X-ray structures of (Ca)S100B·inhibitor complexes revealed that the C-terminus of S100B adopts two different conformations, with location of Phe87 and Phe88 being the distinguishing feature and termed the "FF-gate". For symmetric pentamidine analogues ((Ca)S100B·5a, (Ca)S100B·6b) a channel between sites 1 and 2 on S100B was occluded by residue Phe88, but for an asymmetric pentamidine analogue ((Ca)S100B·17), this same channel was open. The (Ca)S100B·17 structure illustrates, for the first time, a pentamidine analog capable of binding the "open" form of the "FF-gate" and provides a means to block all three "hot spots" on (Ca)S100B, which will impact next generation (Ca)S100B·p53 inhibitor design. PMID:26727270

  11. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Ca2+-S100B Reveal Two Protein Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Ansari, Mohd. Imran; Pierce, Adam D.; Wilder, Paul T.; McKnight, Laura E.; Raman, E. Prabhu; Neau, David B.; Bezawada, Padmavani; Alasady, Milad J.; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Varney, Kristen M.; Toth, Eric A.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Coop, Andrew; Weber, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The drug pentamidine inhibits calcium-dependent complex formation with p53 (CaS100B•p53) in malignant melanoma (MM), and restores p53 tumor suppressor activity in vivo. However, off-target effects associated with this drug were problematic in MM patients. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were therefore completed here with 23 pentamidine analogues, and X-ray structures of CaS100B•inhibitor complexes revealed that the C-terminus of S100B adopts two different conformations, with location of Phe-87 and Phe-88 being the distinguishing feature and termed the “FF-Gate”. For symmetric pentamidine analogues (CaS100B•5a, CaS100B•6b) a channel between Sites 1 and 2 on S100B was occluded by residue Phe-88, but for an asymmetric pentamidine analogue (CaS100B•17), this same channel was open. The CaS100B•17 structure illustrates, for the first time, a pentamidine analog capable of binding the “open” form of the “FF-gate” and provides a means to block all three “hot spots” on CaS100B, which will impact next generation CaS100B•p53 inhibitor design. PMID:26727270

  12. Plasma membrane calcium pumps in smooth muscle: from fictional molecules to novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pande, Jyoti; Grover, Ashok K

    2005-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps (PMCA pumps) are Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPases that expel Ca2+ from the cytosol to extracellular space and are pivotal to cell survival and function. PMCA pumps are encoded by the genes PMCA1, -2, -3, and -4. Alternative splicing results in a large number of isoforms that differ in their kinetics and activation by calmodulin and protein kinases A and C. Expression by 4 genes and a multifactorial regulation provide redundancy to allow for animal survival despite genetic defects. Heterozygous mice with ablation of any of the PMCA genes survive and only the homozygous mice with PMCA1 ablation are embryolethal. Some PMCA isoforms may also be involved in other cell functions. Biochemical and biophysical studies of PMCA pumps have been limited by their low levels of expression. Delineation of the exact physiological roles of PMCA pumps has been difficult since most cells also express sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps and a Na+-Ca2+-exchanger, both of which can lower cytosolic Ca2+. A major limitation in the field has been the lack of specific inhibitors of PMCA pumps. More recently, a class of inhibitors named caloxins have emerged, and these may aid in delineating the roles of PMCA pumps. PMID:16333376

  13. Snake Venom PLA2s Inhibitors Isolated from Brazilian Plants: Synthetic and Natural Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, B. M. A.; Santos, J. D. L.; Xavier, B. M.; Almeida, J. R.; Resende, L. M.; Martins, W.; Marcussi, S.; Marangoni, S.; Stábeli, R. G.; Calderon, L. A.; Soares, A. M.; Da Silva, S. L.; Marchi-Salvador, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites. PMID:24171158

  14. Potent New Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Endopeptidase Developed by Synthesis-Based Computer-Aided Molecular Design

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Vummenthala, Anuradha; Mishra, Rajesh K.; Park, Jewn Giew; Wang, Shaohua; Davis, Jon; Millard, Charles B.; Schmidt, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNTA) causes a life-threatening neuroparalytic disease known as botulism. Current treatment for post exposure of BoNTA uses antibodies that are effective in neutralizing the extracellular toxin to prevent further intoxication but generally cannot rescue already intoxicated neurons. Effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNTA endopeptidase (BoNTAe) are desirable because such inhibitors potentially can neutralize the intracellular BoNTA and offer complementary treatment for botulism. Previously we reported a serotype-selective, small-molecule BoNTAe inhibitor with a Kiapp value of 3.8±0.8 µM. This inhibitor was developed by lead identification using virtual screening followed by computer-aided optimization of a lead with an IC50 value of 100 µM. However, it was difficult to further improve the lead from micromolar to even high nanomolar potency due to the unusually large enzyme-substrate interface of BoNTAe. The enzyme-substrate interface area of 4,840 Å2 for BoNTAe is about four times larger than the typical protein-protein interface area of 750–1,500 Å2. Inhibitors must carry several functional groups to block the unusually large interface of BoNTAe, and syntheses of such inhibitors are therefore time-consuming and expensive. Herein we report the development of a serotype-selective, small-molecule, and competitive inhibitor of BoNTAe with a Ki value of 760±170 nM using synthesis-based computer-aided molecular design (SBCAMD). This new approach accounts the practicality and efficiency of inhibitor synthesis in addition to binding affinity and selectivity. We also report a three-dimensional model of BoNTAe in complex with the new inhibitor and the dynamics of the complex predicted by multiple molecular dynamics simulations, and discuss further structural optimization to achieve better in vivo efficacy in neutralizing BoNTA than those of our early micromolar leads. This work provides new insight into structural modification

  15. The Sulfamate Small Molecule CAIX Inhibitor S4 Modulates Doxorubicin Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Niemans, Raymon; Lieuwes, Natasja G.; Biemans, Rianne; Telfer, Brian A.; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Yaromina, Ala; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig J.; Williams, Kaye J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a tumor-specific protein that is upregulated during hypoxic conditions where it is involved in maintaining the pH balance. CAIX causes extracellular acidification, thereby limiting the uptake of weak basic chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, and decreasing its efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine if doxorubicin efficacy can be increased when combined with the selective sulfamate CAIX inhibitor S4. The effect of S4 on doxorubicin efficacy was tested in vitro using cell viability assays with MDA-MB-231, FaDu, HT29 –CAIX high and HT29 –CAIX low cell lines. In addition, the efficacy of this combination therapy was investigated in tumor xenografts of the same cell lines. The addition of S4 in vitro increased the efficacy of doxorubicin in the MDA-MB-231 during hypoxic exposure (IC50 is 0.25 versus 0.14 µM, p = 0.0003). Similar results were observed for HT29—CAIX high with S4 during normoxia (IC50 is 0.20 versus 0.08 µM, p<0.0001) and in the HT29 –CAIX low cells (IC50 is 0.09 µM, p<0.0001). In vivo doxorubicin treatment was only effective in the MDA-MB-231 xenografts, but the efficacy of doxorubicin was decreased when combined with S4. In conclusion, the efficacy of doxorubicin treatment can be increased when combined with the selective sulfamate CAIX inhibitor S4 in vitro in certain cell lines. Nevertheless, in xenografts S4 did not enhance doxorubicin efficacy in the FaDu and HT29 tumor models and decreased doxorubicin efficacy in the MDA-MB-231 tumor model. These results stress the importance of better understanding the role of CAIX inhibitors in intratumoral pH regulation before combining them with standard treatment modalities, such as doxorubicin. PMID:27513947

  16. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, P.; Hema, M.; Kaur, Gurmeet; Sridharan, V.; Prabu, P. C.; Sumana, M. N.; Princy, S. Adline

    2015-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA) is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent development, the study aims to develop a potential drug molecule targeting the SarA of S. aureus to combat biofilm associated infections in which it is involved. In our previous studies, we have reported the antibiofilm activity of SarA based biofilm inhibitor, (SarABI) with a 50% minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50) value of 200 μg/mL against S. aureus associated with vascular graft infections and also the antibiofilm activity of the root ethanolic extracts of Melia dubia against uropathogenic E. coli. In the present study, in silico design of a hybrid molecule composed of a molecule screened from M. dubia root ethanolic extracts and a modified SarA based inhibitor (SarABIM) was undertaken. SarABIM is a modified form of SarABI where the fluorine groups are absent in SarABIM. Chemical synthesis of the hybrid molecule, 4-(Benzylamino)cyclohexyl 2-hydroxycinnamate (henceforth referred to as UTI Quorum-Quencher, UTIQQ) was then performed, followed by in vitro and in vivo validation. The MBIC50 and MBIC90 of UTIQQ were found to be 15 and 65 μg/mL, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images witnessed biofilm reduction and bacterial killing in either UTIQQ or in combined use of antibiotic gentamicin and UTIQQ. Similar results were observed with in vivo studies of experimental UTI in rat model. So, we propose that the drug UTIQQ would be a promising candidate when used alone or, in combination with an antibiotic for staphylococcal associated UTI. PMID

  17. Flipping the switch: tools for detecting small molecule inhibitors of staphylococcal virulence

    PubMed Central

    Quave, Cassandra L.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    Through the expression of the accessory gene regulator quorum sensing cascade, Staphylococcus aureus is able to produce an extensive array of enzymes, hemolysins and immunomodulators essential to its ability to spread through the host tissues and cause disease. Many have argued for the discovery and development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) to augment existing antibiotics as adjuvant therapies. Here, we discuss the state-of-the-art tools that can be used to conduct screens for the identification of such QSIs. Examples include fluorescent reporters, MS-detection of autoinducing peptide production, agar plate methods for detection of hemolysins and lipase, High performance liquid chromatography-detection of hemolysins from supernatants, and cell-toxicity assays for detecting damage (or relief thereof) against human keratinocyte cells. In addition to providing a description of these various approaches, we also discuss their amenability to low-, medium-, and high-throughput screening efforts for the identification of novel QSIs. PMID:25566220

  18. Characterization of small molecule binding. I. Accurate identification of strong inhibitors in virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Jian; Li, Nan; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-28

    Accurately ranking docking poses remains a great challenge in computer-aided drug design. In this study, we present an integrated approach called MIEC-SVM that combines structure modeling and statistical learning to characterize protein-ligand binding based on the complex structure generated from docking. Using the HIV-1 protease as a model system, we showed that MIEC-SVM can successfully rank the docking poses and consistently outperformed the state-of-art scoring functions when the true positives only account for 1% or 0.5% of all the compounds under consideration. More excitingly, we found that MIEC-SVM can achieve a significant enrichment in virtual screening even when trained on a set of known inhibitors as small as 50, especially when enhanced by a model average approach. Given these features of MIEC-SVM, we believe it provides a powerful tool for searching for and designing new drugs. PMID:23259763

  19. Tumor cell-specific inhibition of MYC function using small molecule inhibitors of the HUWE1 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Stefanie; Bultinck, Jennyfer; Myant, Kevin; Jaenicke, Laura A; Walz, Susanne; Müller, Judith; Gmachl, Michael; Treu, Matthias; Boehmelt, Guido; Ade, Carsten P; Schmitz, Werner; Wiegering, Armin; Otto, Christoph; Popov, Nikita; Sansom, Owen; Kraut, Norbert; Eilers, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Deregulated expression of MYC is a driver of colorectal carcinogenesis, necessitating novel strategies to inhibit MYC function. The ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 (HECTH9, ARF-BP1, MULE) associates with both MYC and the MYC-associated protein MIZ1. We show here that HUWE1 is required for growth of colorectal cancer cells in culture and in orthotopic xenograft models. Using high-throughput screening, we identify small molecule inhibitors of HUWE1, which inhibit MYC-dependent transactivation in colorectal cancer cells, but not in stem and normal colon epithelial cells. Inhibition of HUWE1 stabilizes MIZ1. MIZ1 globally accumulates on MYC target genes and contributes to repression of MYC-activated target genes upon HUWE1 inhibition. Our data show that transcriptional activation by MYC in colon cancer cells requires the continuous degradation of MIZ1 and identify a novel principle that allows for inhibition of MYC function in tumor cells. PMID:25253726

  20. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of amyloid β-induced neuronal apoptosis acting through the imidazoline I(2) receptor.

    PubMed

    Montolio, Marisol; Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Pineda, David; Mestres, Jordi; Navarro, Pilar

    2012-11-26

    Aberrant activation of signaling pathways plays a pivotal role in central nervous system disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using a combination of virtual screening and experimental testing, novel small molecule inhibitors of tPA-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk)1/2 activation were identified that provide higher levels of neuroprotection from Aβ-induced apoptosis than Memantine, the most recently FDA-approved drug for AD treatment. Subsequent target deconvolution efforts revealed that they all share low micromolar affinity for the imidazoline I(2) receptor, while being devoid of any significant affinity to a list of AD-relevant targets, including the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). Targeting the imidazoline I(2) receptor emerges as a new mechanism of action to inhibit tPA-induced signaling in neurons for the treatment of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23098038

  1. The pharmacology and therapeutic potential of small molecule inhibitors of acid-sensing ion channels in stroke intervention

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Tian-dong; Xiong, Zhi-gang

    2013-01-01

    In the nervous system, a decrease in extracellular pH is a common feature of various physiological and pathological processes, including synaptic transmission, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, brain trauma, and tissue inflammation. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. Following the recent identification of ASICs as critical acid-sensing extracellular proton receptors, growing evidence has suggested that the activation of ASICs plays important roles in physiological processes such as nociception, mechanosensation, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. However, the over-activation of ASICs is also linked to adverse outcomes for certain pathological processes, such as brain ischemia and multiple sclerosis. Based on the well-demonstrated role of ASIC1a activation in acidosis-mediated brain injury, small molecule inhibitors of ASIC1a may represent novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurological disorders, such as stroke. PMID:22820909

  2. Carboxylated, heteroaryl-substituted chalcones as inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression for use in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q; Ni, Liming; Worsencroft, Kimberly J; Ye, Zhihong; Weingarten, M David; Simpson, Jacob E; Skudlarek, Jason W; Marino, Elaine M; Suen, Ki-Ling; Kunsch, Charles; Souder, Amy; Howard, Randy B; Sundell, Cynthia L; Wasserman, Martin A; Sikorski, James A

    2007-03-22

    Starting from a simple chalcone template, structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to a series of carboxylated, heteroaryl-substituted chalcone derivatives as novel, potent inhibitors of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression. Correlations between lipophilicity determined by calculated logP values and inhibitory efficacy were observed among structurally similar compounds of the series. Various substituents were found to be tolerated at several positions of the chalcone backbone as long as the compounds fell into the right range of lipophilicity. The chalcone alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone moiety seemed to be the pharmacophore required for inhibition of VCAM-1 expression. Compound 19 showed significant antiinflammatory effects in a mouse model of allergic inflammation, indicating that this series of compounds might have therapeutic value for human asthma and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:17323940

  3. Identification of a small molecule yeast TORC1 inhibitor with a flow cytometry-based multiplex screen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Young, Susan M.; Allen, Chris; Seeber, Andrew; Péli-Gulli, Marie-Pierre; Panchaud, Nicolas; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Yao, Tuanli; Golden, Jennifer E.; Strouse, J. Jacob; Carter, Mark B.; Kang, Huining; Bologa, Cristian G.; Foutz, Terry D.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Peterson, Blake R.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Werner-Washburne, Margaret; Loewith, Robbie J.; De Virgilio, Claudio; Sklar, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) is a serine/threonine kinase, evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human, which functions as a fundamental controller of cell growth. The moderate clinical benefit of rapamycin in mTOR-based therapy of many cancers favors the development of new TOR inhibitors. Here we report a high throughput flow cytometry multiplexed screen using five GFP-tagged yeast clones that represent the readouts of four branches of the TORC1 signaling pathway in budding yeast. Each GFP-tagged clone was differentially color-coded and the GFP signal of each clone was measured simultaneously by flow cytometry, which allows rapid prioritization of compounds that likely act through direct modulation of TORC1 or proximal signaling components. A total of 255 compounds were confirmed in dose-response analysis to alter GFP expression in one or more clones. To validate the concept of the high throughput screen, we have characterized CID 3528206, a small molecule most likely to act on TORC1 as it alters GFP expression in all five GFP clones in an analogous manner to rapamycin. We have shown that CID 3528206 inhibited yeast cell growth, and that CID 3528206 inhibited TORC1 activity both in vitro and in vivo with EC50s of 150 nM and 3.9 μM, respectively. The results of microarray analysis and yeast GFP collection screen further support the notion that CID 3528206 and rapamycin modulate similar cellular pathways. Together, these results indicate that the HTS has identified a potentially useful small molecule for further development of TOR inhibitors. PMID:22260433

  4. Metronomic Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) Is Antiangiogenic and Potentiates the Antitumor Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Benjamin D.; Spalding, Aaron C.; Campos, Marcia S.; Ashimori, Naoki; Dong Zhihong; Wang Shaomeng; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Noer, Jacques E.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of a metronomic (low-dose, high-frequency) small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) in combination with radiotherapy on microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Methods and Materials: Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to ionizing radiation and/or TW-37 and colony formation, as well as capillary sprouting in three-dimensional collagen matrices, was evaluated. Xenografts vascularized with human blood vessels were engineered by cotransplantation of human squamous cell carcinoma cells (OSCC3) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells seeded in highly porous biodegradable scaffolds into the subcutaneous space of immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with metronomic TW-37 and/or radiation, and tumor growth was evaluated. Results: Low-dose TW-37 sensitized primary endothelial cells to radiation-induced inhibition of colony formation. Low-dose TW-37 or radiation partially inhibited endothelial cell sprout formation, and in combination, these therapies abrogated new sprouting. Combination of metronomic TW-37 and low-dose radiation inhibited tumor growth and resulted in significant increase in time to failure compared with controls, whereas single agents did not. Notably, histopathologic analysis revealed that tumors treated with TW-37 (with or without radiation) are more differentiated and showed more cohesive invasive fronts, which is consistent with less aggressive phenotype. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that metronomic TW-37 potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy and suggest that patients with head and neck cancer might benefit from the combination of small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 and radiation therapy.

  5. Structure–Activity Relationship Studies of Indole-Based Compounds as Small Molecule HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting Glycoprotein 41

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously described indole-containing compounds with the potential to inhibit HIV-1 fusion by targeting the hydrophobic pocket of transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Here we report optimization and structure–activity relationship studies on the basic scaffold, defining the role of shape, contact surface area, and molecular properties. Thirty new compounds were evaluated in binding, cell–cell fusion, and viral replication assays. Below a 1 μM threshold, correlation between binding and biological activity was diminished, indicating an amphipathic requirement for activity in cells. The most active inhibitor 6j exhibited 0.6 μM binding affinity and 0.2 μM EC50 against cell–cell fusion and live virus replication and was active against T20 resistant strains. Twenty-two compounds with the same connectivity displayed a consensus pose in docking calculations, with rank order matching the biological activity. The work provides insight into requirements for small molecule inhibition of HIV-1 fusion and demonstrates a potent low molecular weight fusion inhibitor. PMID:24856833

  6. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of influenza A virus acts by suppressing PA endonuclease activity of the viral polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuofeng; Chu, Hin; Singh, Kailash; Zhao, Hanjun; Zhang, Ke; Kao, Richard Y. T.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus comprises conserved and independently-folded subdomains with defined functionalities. The N-terminal domain of the PA subunit (PAN) harbors the endonuclease function so that it can serve as a desired target for drug discovery. To identify a class of anti-influenza inhibitors that impedes PAN endonuclease activity, a screening approach that integrated the fluorescence resonance energy transfer based endonuclease inhibitory assay with the DNA gel-based endonuclease inhibitory assay was conducted, followed by the evaluation of antiviral efficacies and potential cytotoxicity of the primary hits in vitro and in vivo. A small-molecule compound ANA-0 was identified as a potent inhibitor against the replication of multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9 and H9N2, in cell cultures. Combinational treatment of zanamivir and ANA-0 exerted synergistic anti-influenza effect in vitro. Intranasal administration of ANA-0 protected mice from lethal challenge and reduced lung viral loads in H1N1 virus infected BALB/c mice. In summary, ANA-0 shows potential to be developed to novel anti-influenza agents. PMID:26956222

  7. Modification and structure-activity relationship of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingsong; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso; Song, Haijing; Redfield, Robert; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes selected modification and structure-activity relationship of the small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor, 4-benzoyl-1-[(4-methoxy-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)oxoacetyl]-2-(R)-methylpiperazine (BMS-378806). The results revealed: i) that both the presence and configuration (R vs. S) of the 3-methyl group on the piperazine moiety are important for the antiviral activity, with the 3-(R)-methyl derivatives showing the highest activity; ii) that the electronegativity of the C-4 substituent on the indole or azaindole ring seems to be important for the activity, with a small, electron-donating group such as a fluoro or a methoxy group showing enhanced activity, while a nitro group diminishes the activity; iii) that the N-1 position of the indole ring is not eligible for modification without losing activity; and iv) that bulky groups around the C-4 position of the indole or azaindole ring diminish the activity, probably due to steric hindrance in the binding. We found that a synthetic bivalent compound with two BMS-378806 moieties being tethered by a spacer demonstrated about 5-fold enhanced activity in an nM range against HIV-1 infection than the corresponding monomeric inhibitor. But the polyacrylamide-based polyvalent compounds did not show inhibitory activity at up to 200 nM. PMID:15858664

  8. Novel small-molecule SIRT1 inhibitors induce cell death in adult T-cell leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Uchida, Yuichiro; Kuroki, Ayako; Aikawa, Akiyoshi; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Arima, Naomichi; Soeda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term infection with human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV)-1. The identification of new molecular targets for ATL prevention and treatment is desired. SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide+ -dependent histone/protein deacetylase, plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, including aging and apoptosis. We previously reported that ATL patients had significantly higher SIRT1 protein levels than healthy controls. Here, we demonstrate that two novel small-molecule SIRT1 inhibitors, NCO-01/04, reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptotic cells in peripheral blood monocyte cells of patients with acute ATL, which has a poor prognosis. NCO-01/04 also reduced the cell viability with DNA fragmentation, Annexin V-positive cells, and caspase activation. However, a caspase inhibitor did not inhibit this caspase-dependent cell death. NCO-01/04 enhanced the endonuclease G level in the nucleus with loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, which can promote caspase-independent death. Interestingly, NCO-01/04 increased the LC3-II-enriched protein fraction, indicating autophagosome accumulation as well as autophagy. Thus, NCO-01/04 simultaneously caused caspase activation and autophagy. These results suggest that NCO-01/04 is highly effective against ATL cells in caspase-dependent or -independent manners with autophagy, and that its clinical application might improve the prognosis of patients with this fatal disease. PMID:26091232

  9. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of ITK and RLK Impairs Th1 Differentiation and Prevents Colitis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyoung-Soo; Shin, Hyun Mu; Haberstock-Debic, Helena; Xing, Yan; Owens, Timothy D.; Funk, Jens Oliver; Hill, Ronald J.; Bradshaw, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    In T cells, the Tec kinases IL-2–inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and resting lymphocyte kinase (RLK) are activated by TCR stimulation and are required for optimal downstream signaling. Studies of CD4+ T cells from Itk−/− and Itk−/−Rlk−/− mice have indicated differential roles of ITK and RLK in Th1, Th2, and Th17 differentiation and cytokine production. However, these findings are confounded by the complex T cell developmental defects in these mice. In this study, we examine the consequences of ITK and RLK inhibition using a highly selective and potent small molecule covalent inhibitor PRN694. In vitro Th polarization experiments indicate that PRN694 is a potent inhibitor of Th1 and Th17 differentiation and cytokine production. Using a T cell adoptive transfer model of colitis, we find that in vivo administration of PRN694 markedly reduces disease progression, T cell infiltration into the intestinal lamina propria, and IFN-γ production by colitogenic CD4+ T cells. Consistent with these findings, Th1 and Th17 cells differentiated in the presence of PRN694 show reduced P-selectin binding and impaired migration to CXCL11 and CCL20, respectively. Taken together, these data indicate that ITK plus RLK inhibition may have therapeutic potential in Th1-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26466958

  10. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.