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Sample records for molecule ncam-deficient mice

  1. [Allergens-induced sensitization alters airway epithelial adhesion molecules expression in mice].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dan; Tan, Mei-Ling; Xiang, Yang; Qin, Xiao-Qun; Zhu, Li-Ming; Dai, Ai-Guo

    2015-12-25

    To explore the relationship between the epithelial adhesion molecules and immune responses of airway epithelium, we observed the expression of integrin β4 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the mice airway epithelium after sensitization with allergens. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) and then developed airway hyper-responsiveness as determined by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Both OVA and HDM sensitization led to increases of the number of peripheral leukocytes as well as inflammatory cells infiltration in lungs. OVA sensitized mice showed more severe inflammatory cells infiltration than HDM sensitized mice. Immunohistochemistry analysis of mice lung tissues revealed that sensitization with both allergens also led to a decrease of integrin β4 expression and an increase of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelia. OVA sensitized mice showed a more significant increase of ICAM-1 expression compared with HDM sensitized mice. siRNA mediated silencing of integrin β4 gene in 16HBE cells resulted in an up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression. Our results indicate a possible role of airway epithelial adhesion molecules in allergen-induced airway immune responses. PMID:26701635

  2. Increased expression of FGF1-mediated signaling molecules in adipose tissue of obese mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngshim; Jang, Suhyeon; Choi, Myung-Sook; Ryoo, Zae Young; Park, Taesun

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are pleiotropic growth factors that control cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Herein, we evaluated whether visceral adiposity of mice is accompanied by the alteration of signaling molecules mediated by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) induced by using two different male C57BL/6J mice models of obesity namely high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity for 12 weeks or mice with genetic deletion of leptin (ob/ob). Both HFD-fed and ob/ob mice exhibited significantly higher messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of FGF1, cyclin D (cycD), transcription factor E2F1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma 2 (PPAR-γ2), CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), and adipocyte protein 2 (aP2) genes in their epididymal adipose tissues compared to those of the normal diet (ND)-fed and lean control mice, respectively. In addition, immunoblot analyses of the epididymal adipose tissues revealed that both mice exposed to HFD and ob/ob mice exhibited elevated phosphorylation of FGFR1, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and retinoblastoma (Rb) proteins. These data support the notion that FGF1-mediated signaling represents an important signaling cascade related to adipogenesis, at least partially, among other known signaling pathways. These new findings regarding the molecular mechanisms controlling adipose tissue plasticity provide a novel insight about the functional network with potential therapeutic application against obesity. PMID:26847131

  3. The cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 is critical for normal enamel formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin J.; Brookes, Steven J.; Draper, Clare E.; Garrod, David; Kirkham, Jennifer; Shore, Roger C.; Dixon, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Nectin-1 is a member of a sub-family of immunoglobulin-like adhesion molecules and a component of adherens junctions. In the current study, we have shown that mice lacking nectin-1 exhibit defective enamel formation in their incisor teeth. Although the incisors of nectin-1-null mice were hypomineralized, the protein composition of the enamel matrix was unaltered. While strong immunostaining for nectin-1 was observed at the interface between the maturation-stage ameloblasts and the underlying cells of the stratum intermedium (SI), its absence in nectin-1-null mice correlated with separation of the cell layers at this interface. Numerous, large desmosomes were present at this interface in wild-type mice; however, where adhesion persisted in the mutant mice, the desmosomes were smaller and less numerous. Nectins have been shown to regulate tight junction formation; however, this is the first report showing that they may also participate in the regulation of desmosome assembly. Importantly, our results show that integrity of the SI–ameloblast interface is essential for normal enamel mineralization. PMID:18703497

  4. Differential up-regulation of circulating soluble and endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, S.; Flores, S.; Gerritsen, M. E.; Anderson, D. C.; Granger, D. N.

    1997-01-01

    Although circulating levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) are frequently used as an indicator of the severity of different immune, inflammatory, or neoplastic diseases, little is known about the factors that govern plasma sICAM-1 concentration and its relationship to the membranous form of ICAM-1 (mICAM-1) expressed on vascular endothelial cells. Plasma sICAM-1 concentration (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and mICAM-1 expression (measured using the dual radiolabeled monoclonal antibody technique) in different vascular beds (eg, lung, small intestine, and spleen) were monitored in wild-type (C57BL) and ICAM-1-deficient mice, before and after administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. In wild-type mice, TNF-alpha elicited time-dependent increases in lung and intestine mICAM-1 (plateau achieved at 12 hours), with a corresponding increase in plasma sICAM-1 (peaked at 5 hours and then declined). The initial increases in mICAM-1 and pulmonary leukocyte sequestration (measured as lung myeloperoxidase activity) induced by TNF-alpha preceded any detectable elevation in sICAM-1. In ICAM-1-deficient mice, plasma sICAM-1 was reduced by approximately 70%, with > 95% reductions of mICAM-1 in lung and intestine, and > 75% reduction in splenic accumulation of anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Although TNF-alpha doubled plasma sICAM-1 in ICAM-1-deficient mice, mICAM-1 was unaffected in all tissues. Either splenectomy or pretreatment with cycloheximide resulted in an attenuated TNF-induced increase in sICAM-1, without affecting mICAM-1 expression. These findings indicate that plasma sICAM-1 concentration does not accurately reflect the level of ICAM-1 expression on endothelial cells in different vascular beds. PMID:9212746

  5. Biodistribution of 211At labeled HER-2 binding affibody molecules in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Almqvist, Ylva; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Lundqvist, Hans; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Wilbur, D Scott; Carlsson, Jörgen

    2007-05-01

    The size of affibody molecules makes them suitable as targeting agents for targeted radiotherapy with the alpha-emitter 211At, since their biokinetic properties match the short physical half-live of 211At. In this study, the potential for this approach was investigated in vivo. Two different HER-2 binding affibody molecules were radiolabeled with 211At using both the linker PAB (N-succinimidyl-para-astatobenzoate) and a decaborate-based linker, and the biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice was investigated. The influence of L-lysine and Na-thiocyanate on the 211At uptake in normal tissues was also studied. Based on the biokinetic information obtained, the absorbed dose was calculated for different organs. Compared with a previous biodistribution with 125I, the 211At biodistribution using the PAB linker showed higher uptake in lungs, stomach, thyroid and salivary glands, indicating release of free 211At. When the decaborate-based linker was used, the uptake in those organs was decreased, but instead, high uptake in kidneys and liver was found. The uptake, when using the PAB linker, could be significantly reduced in some organs by the use of L-lysine and/or Na-thiocyanate. In conclusion, affibody molecules have suitable blood-kinetics for targeted radionuclide therapy with 211At. However, the labeling chemistry affects the distribution in normal organs to a high degree and needs to be improved to allow clinical use. PMID:17390057

  6. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  7. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric M; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L; Evanchik, Marc J; Gorham, Joshua M; Harrison, Brooke C; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D; Rodriguez, Hector M; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A; Spudich, James A; McDowell, Robert S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  8. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  9. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  10. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24055643

  11. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya Nan, Fa-Jun Li, Jia

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  12. Chronic treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule reverses dietary induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosick, Peter A; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic, low level treatment with a carbon monoxide releasing molecule (CO-RM), CORM-A1, has been shown to prevent the development of obesity in response to a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic, low level treatment with this CO-RM can reverse established obesity via a mechanism independent of food intake. Dietary induced obese mice were treated with CORM-A1, the inactive compound iCORM-A1, or saline every 48 hours for 30 weeks while maintained on a high fat (60%) diet. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 resulted in a 33% decrease from initial body weight over the 30 week treatment period while treatment with iCORM and saline were associated with 18 and 25% gain in initial body weight over the same time frame. Chronic treatment with CORM-A1 did not affect food intake or activity but resulted in a significant increase in metabolism. CORM-A1 treatment also resulted in lower fasting blood glucose, improvement in insulin sensitivity and decreased heptatic steatosis. Chronic treatment with CO releasing molecules can reverse dietary induced obesity and normalize insulin resistance independent of changes in food intake or activity. These findings are likely though a mechanism which increases metabolism. PMID:27144091

  13. Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule accelerates progression of crescentic glomerulonephritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Filipe, Anne; Rahuel, Cécile; Bonnin, Philippe; Mesnard, Laurent; Guérin, Coralie; Wang, Yu; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Migration of circulating leukocytes from the vasculature into the surrounding tissue is an important component of the inflammatory response. Among the cell surface molecules identified as contributing to leukocyte extravasation is VCAM-1, expressed on activated vascular endothelium, which participates in all stages of leukocyte–endothelial interaction by binding to leukocyte surface expressed integrin VLA-4. However, not all VLA-4-mediated events can be linked to VCAM-1. A novel interaction between VLA-4 and endothelial Lutheran (Lu) blood group antigens and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) proteins has been recently shown, suggesting that Lu/BCAM may have a role in leukocyte recruitments in inflamed tissues. Here, we assessed the participation of Lu/BCAM in the immunopathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis. High expression of Lu/BCAM in glomeruli of mice with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis suggests a potential role for the local expression of Lu/BCAM in nephritogenic recruitment of leukocytes. Genetic deficiency of Lu/BCAM attenuated glomerular accumulation of T cells and macrophages, crescent formation, and proteinuria, correlating with reduced fibrin and platelet deposition in glomeruli. Furthermore, we found a pro-adhesive interaction between human monocyte α4β1 integrin and Lu/BCAM proteins. Thus, Lu/BCAM may have a critical role in facilitating the accumulation of monocytes and macrophages, thereby exacerbating renal injury. PMID:24429403

  14. Biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex molecules and generation of T cells in Ii TAP1 double-mutant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tourne, S; van Santen, H M; van Roon, M; Berns, A; Benoist, C; Mathis, D; Ploegh, H

    1996-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules are loaded with peptides in distinct subcellular compartments. The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is responsible for delivering peptides derived from cytosolic proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum, where they bind to class I molecules, while the invariant chain (Ii) directs class II molecules to endosomal compartments, where they bind peptides originating mostly from exogenous sources. Mice carrying null mutations of the TAP1 or Ii genes (TAP10) or Ii0, respectively) have been useful tools for elucidating the two MHC/peptide loading pathways. To evaluate to what extent these pathways functionally intersect, we have studied the biosynthesis of MHC molecules and the generation of T cells in Ii0TAP10 double-mutant mice. We find that the assembly and expression of class II molecules in Ii0 and Ii0TAP10 animals are indistinguishable and that formation and display of class I molecules is the same in TAP10 and Ii0TAP10 animals. Thymic selection in the double mutants is as expected, with reduced numbers of both CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ thymocyte compartments. Surprisingly, lymph node T-cell populations look almost normal; we propose that population expansion of peripheral T cells normalizes the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in Ii0TAP10 mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8643655

  15. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Gökbayrak, Merve Ertan; Mutlu, Oguz; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. Material/Methods The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 μg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. Results The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. Conclusions Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  16. The small-molecule BGP-15 protects against heart failure and atrial fibrillation in mice.

    PubMed

    Sapra, Geeta; Tham, Yow Keat; Cemerlang, Nelly; Matsumoto, Aya; Kiriazis, Helen; Bernardo, Bianca C; Henstridge, Darren C; Ooi, Jenny Y Y; Pretorius, Lynette; Boey, Esther J H; Lim, Lydia; Sadoshima, Junichi; Meikle, Peter J; Mellet, Natalie A; Woodcock, Elizabeth A; Marasco, Silvana; Ueyama, Tomomi; Du, Xiao-Jun; Febbraio, Mark A; McMullen, Julie R

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) share common risk factors, frequently coexist and are associated with high mortality. Treatment of HF with AF represents a major unmet need. Here we show that a small molecule, BGP-15, improves cardiac function and reduces arrhythmic episodes in two independent mouse models, which progressively develop HF and AF. In these models, BGP-15 treatment is associated with increased phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), which is depressed in atrial tissue samples from patients with AF. Cardiac-specific IGF1R transgenic overexpression in mice with HF and AF recapitulates the protection observed with BGP-15. We further demonstrate that BGP-15 and IGF1R can provide protection independent of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and heat-shock protein 70; signalling mediators often defective in the aged and diseased heart. As BGP-15 is safe and well tolerated in humans, this study uncovers a potential therapeutic approach for HF and AF. PMID:25489988

  17. Small-molecule inhibitor of p53 binding to mitochondria protects mice from gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Strom, Evguenia; Sathe, Swati; Komarov, Pavel G; Chernova, Olga B; Pavlovska, Ivanda; Shyshynova, Inna; Bosykh, Dmitry A; Burdelya, Lyudmila G; Macklis, Roger M; Skaliter, Rami; Komarova, Elena A; Gudkov, Andrei V

    2006-09-01

    p53-dependent apoptosis contributes to the side effects of cancer treatment, and genetic or pharmacological inhibition of p53 function can increase normal tissue resistance to genotoxic stress. It has recently been shown that p53 can induce apoptosis through a mechanism that does not depend on transactivation but instead involves translocation of p53 to mitochondria. To determine the impact of this p53 activity on normal tissue radiosensitivity, we isolated a small molecule named pifithrin-mu (PFTmu, 1) that inhibits p53 binding to mitochondria by reducing its affinity to antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 but has no effect on p53-dependent transactivation. PFTmu has a high specificity for p53 and does not protect cells from apoptosis induced by overexpression of proapoptotic protein Bax or by treatment with dexamethasone (2). PFTmu rescues primary mouse thymocytes from p53-mediated apoptosis caused by radiation and protects mice from doses of radiation that cause lethal hematopoietic syndrome. These results indicate that selective inhibition of the mitochondrial branch of the p53 pathway is sufficient for radioprotection in vivo. PMID:16862141

  18. Epidermal Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 is Not a Primary Inducer of Cutaneous Inflammation in Transgenic Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ifor R.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    1994-10-01

    Keratinocytes at sites of cutaneous inflammation have increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), a cytokine-inducible adhesion molecule which binds the leukocyte integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. Transgenic mice were prepared in which the expression of mouse ICAM-1 was targeted to basal keratinocytes by using the human K14 keratin promoter. The level of constitutive expression attained in the transgenic mice exceeded the peak level of ICAM-1 expression induced on nontransgenic mouse keratinocytes in vitro by optimal combinations of interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α or in vivo by proinflammatory stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. In vitro adhesion assays demonstrated that cultured transgenic keratinocytes were superior to normal keratinocytes as a substrate for the LFA-1-dependent binding of mouse T cells, confirming that the transgene-encoded ICAM-1 was expressed in a functional form. However, the high level of constitutive ICAM-1 expression achieved on keratinocytes in vivo in these transgenic mice did not result in additional recruitment of CD45^+ leukocytes into transgenic epidermis, nor did it elicit dermal inflammation. Keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression also did not potentiate contact-hypersensitivity reactions to epicutaneous application of haptens. The absence of a spontaneous phenotype in these transgenic mice was not the result of increased levels of soluble ICAM-1, since serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 were equal in transgenic mice and controls. We conclude that elevated ICAM-1 expression on keratinocytes cannot act independently to influence leukocyte trafficking and elicit cutaneous inflammation.

  19. Nucleolin as the earliest target molecule of autoantibodies produced in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Hirata, D; Iwamoto, M; Yoshio, T; Okazaki, H; Masuyama, J; Mimori, A; Minota, S

    2000-10-01

    To elucidate the autoantigen against which autoantibodies are produced in the earliest phase of the disease process of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), serum samples were collected individually and serially from 10 NZB/NZW F1 and 10 MRL/lpr mice. Using immunoblots with mouse thymoma cell (EL-4) lysates as substrates, all mice were found to generate autoantibody against an either 150-kDa, 110-kDa, 75-kDa, or 55-kDa molecule in as early as 4 weeks. Anti-DNA antibodies occurred almost at the same time or after those against these four molecules. The number of antigens reactive with autoantibodies in immunoblots increased gradually with age. Antibodies against histone molecules were produced after 8 weeks of age. Among the four antigens, the 110-kDa molecule was identified as nucleolin, which is an abundant nucleolar phosphoprotein. Nucleolin binds DNA, RNA, and nucleic acid-binding proteins such as histone H1. Nucleolin is a target of granzyme A of cytotoxic T cells, and autoantibodies against it are found in sera from patients with SLE as well as from those with various viral infections. These results indicate that nucleolin is one of the immunodominant molecules that break down self-tolerance and initiate autoantibody-spreading in a mouse model of SLE. PMID:10998317

  20. Macrophage function in alloxan diabetic mice: expression of adhesion molecules, generation of monokines and oxygen and NO radicals

    PubMed Central

    Ptak, W; Klimek, M; Bryniarski, K; Ptak, M; Majcher, P

    1998-01-01

    The increased incidence of bacterial and mycotic infections in poorly controlled diabetic patients or animals is frequently attributed to impaired activities of professional phagocytes (granulocytes, macrophages) in hypoinsulinaemic milieu. We measured production of monokines (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)), active NO and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), as well as expression of several cell surface adhesion molecules (Mac-1, -2 and -3, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and FcγRII), by thioglycollate medium-induced peritoneal macrophages of normoglycaemic and alloxan diabetic CBA/J mice (blood glucose level in the range 300 or 500 mg/dl). Macrophages of animals with moderate diabetes (300 mg/dl) produced significantly more IL-6 and TNF-α and ROIs than cells of control mice and showed an increased expression of all cell surface molecules, except Mac-3. NO/NO2 production was not affected. Administration of insulin restored enhanced values to normal levels, except for the production of ROIs which remained unusually high. We conclude that two separate mechanisms influence macrophage physiology in diabetes—lack of saturation of insulin receptors on macrophages and an indirect effect due to formation of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGE) on their surfaces. The latter is possibly responsible for increased generation of ROIs, since it cannot be down-regulated by prolonged insulin treatment. How the increased activity of macrophages of moderately diabetic mice (enhanced production of proinflammatory monokines and oxygen radicals as well as expression of molecules) is related to their ability to kill bacteria is now under investigation. PMID:9764597

  1. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors. PMID:27246030

  2. Leptin Resistance Contributes to Obesity in Mice with Null Mutation of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Russo, Lucia; Castaneda, Tamara R; Pfeiffer, Verena; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Wu, Jieshen; Faulkner, Latrice D; Ergün, Süleyman; McInerney, Marcia F; Hill, Jennifer W; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-05-20

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes hepatic insulin clearance. Consistently, mice with null mutation of Ceacam1 (Cc1(-/-)) exhibit impaired insulin clearance with increased lipid production in liver and redistribution to white adipose tissue, leading to visceral obesity at 2 months of age. When the mutation is propagated on the C57/BL6J genetic background, total fat mass rises significantly with age, and glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance develop at 6 months of age. This study was carried out to determine the mechanisms underlying the marked increase in total fat mass in 6-month-old mutants. Indirect calorimetry analysis showed that Cc1(-/-) mice develop hyperphagia and a significant reduction in physical activity, in particular in the early hours of the dark cycle, during which energy expenditure is only slightly lower than in wild-type mice. They also exhibit increased triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle, due in part to incomplete fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, hypothalamic leptin signaling is reduced, as demonstrated by blunted STAT3 phosphorylation in coronal sections in response to an intracerebral ventricular injection of leptin. Hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity is also elevated in the mutants. Together, the data show that the increase in total fat mass in Cc1(-/-) mice is mainly attributed to hyperphagia and reduced spontaneous physical activity. Although the contribution of the loss of CEACAM1 from anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus is unclear, leptin resistance and elevated hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity could underlie altered energy balance in these mice. PMID:27002145

  3. Chloride channel inhibition by a red wine extract and a synthetic small molecule prevents rotaviral secretory diarrhoea in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Namkung, Wan; Ma, Tonghui; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Verkman, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe secretory diarrhoea in infants and young children globally. The rotaviral enterotoxin, NSP4, has been proposed to stimulate calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) on the apical plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. We previously identified red wine and small molecule CaCC inhibitors. Objective To investigate the efficacy of a red wine extract and a synthetic small molecule, CaCCinh-A01, in inhibiting intestinal CaCCs and rotaviral diarrhoea. Design Inhibition of CaCC-dependent current was measured in T84 cells and mouse ileum. The effectiveness of an orally administered wine extract and CaCCinh-A01 in inhibiting diarrhoea in vivo was determined in a neonatal mouse model of rotaviral infection. Results Screening of ~150 red wines revealed a Cabernet Sauvignon that inhibited CaCC current in T84 cells with IC50 at a ~1:200 dilution, and higher concentrations producing 100% inhibition. A >1 kdalton wine extract prepared by dialysis, which retained full inhibition activity, blocked CaCC current in T84 cells and mouse intestine. In rotavirus-inoculated mice, oral administration of the wine extract prevented diarrhoea by inhibition of intestinal fluid secretion without affecting rotaviral infection. The wine extract did not inhibit the cystic fibrosis chloride channel (CFTR) in cell cultures, nor did it prevent watery stools in neonatal mice administered cholera toxin, which activates CFTR-dependent fluid secretion. CaCCinh-A01 also inhibited rotaviral diarrhoea. Conclusions Our results support a pathogenic role for enterocyte CaCCs in rotaviral diarrhoea and demonstrate the antidiarrhoeal action of CaCC inhibition by an alcohol-free, red wine extract and by a synthetic small molecule. PMID:24052273

  4. Aromatase Deficient Female Mice Demonstrate Altered Expression of Molecules Critical for Renal Calcium Reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, Orhan K.; Hajibeigi, Asghar; Cummins, Carolyn; van Abel, Monique; Bindels, René J.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2007-04-01

    The incidence of kidney stones increases in women after the menopause, suggesting a role for estrogen deficiency. In order to determine if estrogen may be exerting an effect on renal calcium reabsorption, we measured urinary calcium excretion in the aromatase-deficient female mouse (ArKO) before and following estrogen therapy. ArKO mice had hypercalciuria that corrected during estrogen administration. To evaluate the mechanism by which estrogen deficiency leads to hypercalciuria, we examined the expression of several proteins involved in distal tubule renal calcium reabsorption, both at the message and protein levels. Messenger RNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, calbindin-D28K, the Na+/Ca++ exchanger (NCX1), and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA1b) were significantly decreased in kidneys of ArKO mice. On the other hand, klotho mRNA levels were elevated in kidneys of ArKO mice. ArKO renal protein extracts had lower levels of calbindin-D28K but higher levels of the klotho protein. Immunochemistry demonstrated increased klotho expression in ArKO kidneys. Estradiol therapy normalized the expression of TRPV5, calbindin-D28K, PMCA1b and klotho. Taken together, these results demonstrate that estrogen deficiency produced by aromatase inactivation is sufficient to produce a renal leak of calcium and consequent hypercalciuria. This may represent one mechanism leading to the increased incidence of kidney stones following the menopause in women.

  5. Small-Molecule Quinolinol Inhibitor Identified Provides Protection against BoNT/A in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Padma; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Chaudhary, Dilip; Chauhan, Vinita; Bharadwaj, Pranay; Pandey, Apurva; Upadhyay, Nisha; Dhaked, Ram Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), etiological agents of the life threatening neuroparalytic disease botulism, are the most toxic substances currently known. The potential for the use as bioweapon makes the development of small-molecule inhibitor against these deadly toxins is a top priority. Currently, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for BoNT intoxication. Although an effective vaccine/immunotherapy is available for immuno-prophylaxis but this cannot reverse the effects of toxin inside neurons. A small-molecule pharmacological intervention, especially one that would be effective against the light chain protease, would be highly desirable. Similarity search was carried out from ChemBridge and NSC libraries to the hit (7-(phenyl(8-quinolinylamino)methyl)-8-quinolinol; NSC 84096) to mine its analogs. Several hits obtained were screened for in silico inhibition using AutoDock 4.1 and 19 new molecules selected based on binding energy and Ki. Among these, eleven quinolinol derivatives potently inhibited in vitro endopeptidase activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain (rBoNT/A-LC) on synaptosomes isolated from rat brain which simulate the in vivo system. Five of these inhibitor molecules exhibited IC50 values ranging from 3.0 nM to 10.0 µM. NSC 84087 is the most potent inhibitor reported so far, found to be a promising lead for therapeutic development, as it exhibits no toxicity, and is able to protect animals from pre and post challenge of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). PMID:23071727

  6. Si Shen Wan Inhibits mRNA Expression of Apoptosis-Related Molecules in p38 MAPK Signal Pathway in Mice with Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-Mei; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Feng; Tong, Wen-Ting; Wan, Pan-Ting; Huang, Min-Fang; Ye, Qing; Liu, Duan-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Si Shen Wan (SSW) is used to effectively treat ulcerative colitis (UC) as a formula of traditional Chinese medicine. To explore the mechanism of SSW-inhibited apoptosis of colonic epithelial cell, the study observed mRNA expression of apoptosis-related molecules in p38 MAPK signal pathway in colonic mucosa in colitis mice treated with SSW. Experimental colitis was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in mice; meanwhile, the mice were administrated daily either SSW (5 g/kg) or p38 MAPK inhibitor (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (physiological saline) for 10 days. While microscopical evaluation was observed, apoptosis rate of colonic epithelial cell and mRNA expression of apoptosis-related molecules were tested. Compared with colitis mice without treatment, SSW alleviated colonic mucosal injuries and decreased apoptosis rate of colonic epithelial cell, while the mRNA expressions of p38 MAPK, p53, caspase-3, c-jun, c-fos, Bax, and TNF-α were decreased in the colonic mucosa in colitis mice treated with SSW, and Bcl-2 mRNA and the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax were increased. The present study demonstrated that SSW inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-related molecules in p38 MAPK signal pathway to downregulate colonic epithelial cells apoptosis in colonic mucosa in mice with colitis. PMID:24223057

  7. Phloroglucinol protects small intestines of mice from ionizing radiation by regulating apoptosis-related molecules: a comparative immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Ha, Danbee; Bing, So Jin; Cho, Jinhee; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Al-Amin, Mohammad; Park, Suk Jae; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-01-01

    Phloroglucinol (PG) is a phenolic compound isolated from Ecklonia cava, a brown algae abundant on Jeju island, Korea. Previous reports have suggested that PG exerts antioxidative and cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress. In this study, we confirmed that PG protected against small intestinal damage caused by ionizing radiation, and we investigated its protective mechanism in detail. Regeneration of intestinal crypts in the PG-treated irradiated group was significantly promoted compared with that in irradiated controls. The expression level of proapoptotic molecules such as p53, Bax, and Bak in the small intestine was downregulated and that of antiapoptotic molecules such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(S/L) was augmented in the PG-treated group. On histological observation of the small intestine, PG inhibited the immunoreactivity of p53, Bax, and Bak and increased that of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(S/L). These results demonstrate the protective mechanisms of PG in mice against intestinal damage from ionizing radiation, providing the benefit of raising the apoptosis threshold of jejunal crypt cells. PMID:23117934

  8. CSM murray award lecture - functional studies of the Lyme disease spirochete - from molecules to mice.

    PubMed

    Chaconas, George

    2012-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis, also known as Lyme disease, is now the most common vector transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and related species. In addition to their clinical importance, these organisms are fascinating to study because of the wide variety of unusual features they possess. Ongoing work in the laboratory in several areas will be described. (1) The segmented genomes contain up to two dozen genetic elements, the majority of which are linear with covalently closed hairpin ends. These linear DNAs also display a very high degree of ongoing genetic rearrangement. Mechanisms for these processes will be described. (2) Persistent infection by Borrelia species requires antigenic variation through a complex DNA rearrangement process at the vlsE locus on the linear plasmid lp28-1. Novel features of this recombination process will be presented. (3) Evidence for a new global regulatory pathway of B. burgdorferi gene expression that is required for pathogenicity will be described. The DEAH box RNA helicase HrpA is involved in this pathway, which may be relevant in other bacteria. (4) The mechanism of B. burgdorferi to effectively disseminate throughout its host is being studied in real time by high resolution intravital imaging in live mice. Recent work will be presented. PMID:22339274

  9. Intranasal antigen targeting to MHC class II molecules primes local IgA and serum IgG antibody responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Snider, D P; Underdown, B J; McDermott, M R

    1997-03-01

    Covalent conjugates of hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used to immunize mice intranasally. Three weeks after intranasal (IN) priming, mice responded rapidly to IN challenge with a mixture of HEL and cholera toxin (CT), by producing large titres of anti-HEL IgA and IgG1 antibody in serum, and IgA antibody in nasal secretions. No secondary response to HEL plus CT occurred in mice that received no priming or mice primed with HEL alone. The secondary serum IgG antibody response was dominated by the IgG1 subclass. HEL combined with CT adjuvant worked much better than HEL alone in producing the secondary response. Control conjugates, containing an IgG isotype-matched mAb without specificity for mouse tissues, provided poor priming. Mice expressing MHC class II molecules, to which the anti-MHC II mAb could not bind, produced a weak antibody response compared with those that expressed the appropriate. MHC class II molecule. Our results demonstrate that immunotargeting to MHC class II molecules via the IN route allows priming of the local IgA and circulating IgG antibody, and indicate that this technique is a feasible approach for delivery of subunit vaccines in the upper respiratory tract. PMID:9155636

  10. Identification of the key molecules involved in chronic copper exposure-aggravated memory impairment in transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease using proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Luo, Xiaobin; Xu, Hua; Ma, Quan; Yuan, Jianhui; Li, Xuling; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Yang, Xifei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive impairment of cognitive functions including spatial learning and memory. Excess copper exposure accelerates the development of AD; however, the potential mechanisms by which copper exacerbates the symptoms of AD remain unknown. In this study, we explored the effects of chronic copper exposure on cognitive function by treating 6 month-old triple AD transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper sulfate in drinking water for 6 months, and identified several potential key molecules involved in the effects of chronic copper exposure on memory by proteomic analysis. The behavioral test showed that chronic copper exposure aggravated memory impairment of 3xTg-AD mice. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with mass spectrometry revealed a total of 44 differentially expressed proteins (18 upregulated and 26 down-regulated) in hippocampus between the wild-type (WT) mice and non-exposed 3xTg-AD mice. A total of 40 differentially expressed proteins were revealed (20 upregulated and 20 down-regulated) in hippocampus between copper exposed and non-exposed 3xTg-AD mice. Among these differentially expressed proteins, complexin-1 and complexin-2, two memory associated proteins, were significantly decreased in hippocampus of 3xTg-AD mice compared with the WT mice. Furthermore, the expression of these two proteins was further down-regulated in 3xTg-AD mice when exposed to copper. The abnormal expression of complexin-1 and complexin-2 identified by proteomic analysis was verified by western blot analysis. Taken together, our data showed that chronic copper exposure accelerated memory impairment and altered the expression of proteins in hippocampus in 3xTg-AD mice. The functional analysis on the differentially expressed proteins suggested that complexin-1 and complexin-2 may be the key molecules involved in chronic copper exposure

  11. Pharmacokinetic and Biodistribution Assessment of a Near Infrared-Labeled PSMA-Specific Small Molecule in Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, Joy L.; Cheung, Lael L.; Simpson, Melanie A.; Olive, D. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and often requires surgery. Use of near infrared (NIR) technologies to perform image-guided surgery may improve accurate delineation of tumor margins. To facilitate preclinical testing of such outcomes, here we developed and characterized a PSMA-targeted small molecule, YC-27. IRDye 800CW was conjugated to YC-27 or an anti-PSMA antibody used for reference. Human 22Rv1, PC3M-LN4, and/or LNCaP prostate tumor cells were exposed to the labeled compounds. In vivo targeting and clearance properties were determined in tumor-bearing mice. Organs and tumors were excised and imaged to assess probe localization. YC-27 exhibited a dose dependent increase in signal upon binding. Binding specificity and internalization were visualized by microscopy. In vitro and in vivo blocking studies confirmed YC-27 specificity. In vivo, YC-27 showed good tumor delineation and tissue contrast at doses as low as 0.25 nmole. YC-27 was cleared via the kidneys but bound the proximal tubules of the renal cortex and epididymis. Since PSMA is also broadly expressed on the neovasculature of most tumors, we expect YC-27 will have clinical utility for image-guided surgery and tumor resections. PMID:24804103

  12. The absence of the embryo in the pseudopregnant uterus alters the deposition of some ECM molecules during decidualization in mice.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Ambart E C; Barrence, Fernanda C; Zorn, Telma M T

    2015-06-01

    The embryo-implantation promotes deep changes in the uterus resulting in the formation of a new structure at the maternal-fetal interface, the decidua. Decidualization can also be induced in pseudopregnant rodents resulting in a structure called deciduoma that is morphologically and functionally similar to the decidua. Previous studies from our and other laboratories demonstrate that in rodents, decidualization of the endometrium requires remarkable remodeling of the endometrial extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mainly coordinated by estradiol and progesterone. The influence of the embryo in this process, however, has not yet been investigated. To enlarge the knowledge on this subject, the present study investigates the behavior of a set of ECM molecules, in the absence of paracrine cues originated from the embryo. For that deciduoma was induced in pseudopregnant Swiss mice, and the distribution of collagen types I, III, IV, V and the proteoglycans decorin and biglycan was investigated by immunolabeling from the fifth to the eighth day of pseudopregnancy. It was observed the deposition of collagen types III and IV as well as decorin and biglycan was similar to that previously described by our group in the decidua. However, in the absence of the embryo, some differences occur in the distribution of collagen types I and V, suggesting that beside the major role of ovarian hormones on the endometrial ECM remodeling, molecular signals originated from the conceptus may influence this process. PMID:25738597

  13. Cell cycle reactivation of cochlear progenitor cells in neonatal FUCCI mice by a GSK3 small molecule inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Roccio, M; Hahnewald, S; Perny, M; Senn, P

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of regenerative capacity of the mammalian auditory epithelium, sensory hair cell loss results in permanent hearing deficit. Nevertheless, a population of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells has been recently described. Identification of methods to trigger their activity could lead to exploitation of their potential therapeutically. Here we validate the use of transgenic mice reporting cell cycle progression (FUCCI), and stemness (Lgr5-GFP), as a valuable tool to identify regulators of cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells within the auditory epithelium. The small molecule compound CHIR99021 was used to inhibit GSK3 activity. This led to a significant increase in the fraction of proliferating sphere-forming cells, labeled by the FUCCI markers and in the percentage of Lgr5-GFP + cells, as well as a selective increase in the fraction of S-G2-M cells in the Lgr5 + population. Using whole mount cultures of the organ of Corti we detected a statistically significant increment in the fraction of proliferating Sox2 supporting cells after CHIR99021 treatment, but only rarely appearance of novel MyoVIIa +/Edu + hair cells. In conclusion, these tools provide a robust mean to identify novel regulators of auditory organ regeneration and to clarify the contribution of stem cell activity. PMID:26643939

  14. The B Cell Adaptor Molecule Bam32 Is Critically Important for Optimal Antibody Response and Resistance to Trypanosoma congolense Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Jia, Ping; Jayachandran, Nipun; Hou, Sen; Okwor, Ifeoma; Kuriakose, Shiby; Marshall, Aaron; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bam32, a 32 kDa adaptor molecule, plays important role in B cell receptor signalling, T cell receptor signalling and antibody affinity maturation in germinal centres. Since antibodies against trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) are critically important for control of parasitemia, we hypothesized that Bam32 deficient (Bam32-/-) mice would be susceptible to T. congolense infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that T. congolense-infected Bam32-/- mice successfully control the first wave of parasitemia but then fail to control subsequent waves and ultimately succumb to their infection unlike wild type (WT) C57BL6 mice which are relatively resistant. Although infected Bam32-/- mice had significantly higher hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, their serum AST and ALT levels were not different, suggesting that increased liver pathology may not be responsible for the increased susceptibility of Bam32-/- mice to T. congolense. Using direct ex vivo flow cytometry and ELISA, we show that CD4+ T cells from infected Bam32-/- mice produced significantly increased amounts of disease-exacerbating proinflammatory cytokines (including IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6). However, the percentages of regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing CD4+ cells were similar in infected WT and Bam32-/- mice. While serum levels of parasite-specific IgM antibodies were normal, the levels of parasite-specific IgG, (particularly IgG1 and IgG2a) were significantly lower in Bam32-/- mice throughout infection. This was associated with impaired germinal centre response in Bam32-/- mice despite increased numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Adoptive transfer studies indicate that intrinsic B cell defect was responsible for the enhanced susceptibility of Bam32-/- mice to T. congolense infection. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our data show that Bam32 is important for optimal anti-trypanosome IgG antibody response and suppression of disease-promoting proinflammatory cytokines

  15. Hepatitis B Surface Antigen S Gene is an Effective Carrier Molecule for Developing GnRH DNA Immunocastration Vaccine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Y G; Ye, W J; Liu, G Q; Jiang, X P; Ijaz, N; Zhao, J Y; Tesema, B

    2016-06-01

    Relatively molecular mass of GnRH antigens is small and hence needs to couple to a large carrier molecule to enhance its immunogenicity. This study investigated whether hepatitis B surface antigen S (HBsAg-S) gene can be used as an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine. Two copies of human GnRH gene were fused with HBsAg-S gene for constructing a recombinant plasmid pVAX-HBsAg-S-2GnRH that coded for 27 kDa target fusion protein. Ten male mice were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (50 μg/mice) prepared in saline solution was injected into male mice at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 7 of the experiment. Vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in terms of GnRH-specific IgG antibody response, plasma testosterone levels, testicular weight and extent of the testicular tissue damage. The specific anti-GnRH antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than in controls in only 4th week of immunization (p < 0.05). In addition, vaccinated animals showed lower testicular weight than those of the controls (p < 0.05). Spermatogenesis in seminiferous tubules in vaccinated animals was suppressed. In conclusion, in this study, the engineered plasmid to be used as a GnRH DNA vaccine induced antibody response and suppressed spermatogenesis in mice. This suggests that HBsAg-S gene can be an effective carrier molecule for developing GnRH DNA immunocastration vaccine when relatively molecular mass of the aimed antigens is small. PMID:27157596

  16. Salt-inducible kinase 3 deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock accompanied by increased levels of pro-inflammatory molecules in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanosaka, Masato; Fujimoto, Minoru; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Nagatake, Takahiro; Itoh, Yumi; Kagawa, Mai; Kumagai, Ayako; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kunisawa, Jun; Naka, Tetsuji; Takemori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the innate immune system during infection and systemic inflammation. When bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binds to Toll-like receptor 4 on macrophages, several signalling cascades co-operatively up-regulate gene expression of inflammatory molecules. The present study aimed to examine whether salt-inducible kinase [SIK, a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family] could contribute to the regulation of immune signal not only in cultured macrophages, but also in vivo. LPS up-regulated SIK3 expression in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and exogenously over-expressed SIK3 negatively regulated the expression of inflammatory molecules [interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO) and IL-12p40] in RAW264.7 macrophages. Conversely, these inflammatory molecule levels were up-regulated in SIK3-deficient thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (TEPM), despite no impairment of the classical signalling cascades. Forced expression of SIK3 in SIK3-deficient TEPM suppressed the levels of the above-mentioned inflammatory molecules. LPS injection (10 mg/kg) led to the death of all SIK3-knockout (KO) mice within 48 hr after treatment, whereas only one mouse died in the SIK1-KO (n = 8), SIK2-KO (n = 9) and wild-type (n = 8 or 9) groups. In addition, SIK3-KO bone marrow transplantation increased LPS sensitivity of the recipient wild-type mice, which was accompanied by an increased level of circulating IL-6. These results suggest that SIK3 is a unique negative regulator that suppresses inflammatory molecule gene expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:25619259

  17. SS31, a Small Molecule Antioxidant Peptide, Attenuates β-Amyloid Elevation, Mitochondrial/Synaptic Deterioration and Cognitive Deficit in SAMP8 Mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan-Li; Sun, Su-Juan; Chen, Jing-Hong; Jia, Qian; Huo, Tian-Tian; Chu, Li-Fang; Bai, Jiang-Tao; Yu, Ye-Jing; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and β -amyloid (Aβ) formation are thought to cause neuronal and synaptic degeneration underlying cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The senescence-accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8) mice have been used as an animal model for mechanistic and translational research for AD. In the present study we characterized mitochondrial and synaptic alterations in SAMP8 mice relative to SAMR1control mice and explored a protective effect of the small molecule peptide SS31, a cell membrane penetrant antioxidant, on mitochondrial and synaptic protein integrity as well as cognitive performance. Electron microscopic analysis revealed mitochondrial/synaptic deterioration in 10 months-old SAMP8 relative to SAMR1 mice, with the changes in the former rescued following 8 weeks treatment with SS31 (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.). Elevation of Aβ42, mitochondrial fission protein (DLP1, Fis1) and matrix protein cyclophilin D (CypD), and reductions of mitochondrial fusion protein (Mfn2) and synaptic (i.e. synaptophysin, postsynaptic density protein 95 and growth associated protein 43) proteins, were detected in hippocampal lysates in SAMP8 mice relative to SAMR1. The above altered protein expressions in the SAMP8 mouse brain were restored with the SS31 treatment. Moreover, the SS31 treatment rescued learning and memory deficits detected in 10 month-old SAMP8 mice. Together, the findings suggest that this mitochondria-targeting antioxidant peptide may be of potential utility for AD therapy, with its pharmacological efficacy involves lowering of central Aβ levels and protection of mitochondrial homeostasis and synaptic integrity, which may help slow down cognitive decline. PMID:26679857

  18. Specific acceptance of fetal bowel allograft in mice after combined treatment with anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Y; Yamataka, A; Yagita, H; Okumura, K; Fujiwara, T; Miyano, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to see whether tolerance could be induced by simultaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) after transplantation of fetal small bowel between fully incompatible mice strains. METHODS: Fetal small bowel from either BALB/c (H-2d) or C3H/He (H-2k) mice was transplanted into the space between the peritoneum and rectus abdominis of adult C3H/He recipient mice. Syngeneic (n = 6) and two allogeneic transplant groups were made. In one of the allogeneic groups (n = 8), no immunosuppressant was given. In the other allogeneic group (n = 13), both anti-LFA-1 and anti-ICAM-1 MoAbs (50 micrograms each/mouse/day) were given intraperitoneally after transplantation for the first 4 weeks. In the syngeneic and untreated allogeneic groups, all mice were killed 4 weeks after transplantation. In the treated allogeneic group, eight mice were killed 6 weeks after cessation of the MoAb treatment. At the time the mice were killed, the bowel graft as well as the recipient spleen were taken for histologic analysis and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay, respectively. Each mouse in the remaining treated five mice was transplanted with BALB/c and C57BL/6 (as third-party) full-thickness skin simultaneously 8 weeks after cessation of the MoAb treatment. RESULTS: All grafts in the syngeneic group survived with normally developing villi, whereas all grafts in the untreated allogeneic group disappeared. In the treated allogeneic group, all allografts developed normal mucosa without any sign of rejection. Splenocytes from the recipient mice in the untreated allogeneic group showed increased CTL induction against donor-type alloantigen (p < 0.005), compared with that in the syngeneic group. Suppressed CTL induction against donor-type alloantigen was observed in the treated allografted recipient (p < 0.001), whereas CTL induction against third

  19. Increased Glucose-induced Secretion of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Mice Lacking the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 2 (CEACAM2).

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Simona S; Heinrich, Garrett; Lester, Sumona G; Pfeiffer, Verena; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Patel, Payal R; DeAngelis, Anthony M; Dai, Tong; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Smiley, Zachary N; Jung, Dae Y; Lee, Yongjin; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ergun, Suleyman; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Kim, Jason K; Giovannucci, David R; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 2 (CEACAM2) regulates food intake as demonstrated by hyperphagia in mice with the Ceacam2 null mutation (Cc2(-/-)). This study investigated whether CEACAM2 also regulates insulin secretion. Ceacam2 deletion caused an increase in β-cell secretory function, as assessed by hyperglycemic clamp analysis, without affecting insulin response. Although CEACAM2 is expressed in pancreatic islets predominantly in non-β-cells, basal plasma levels of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin, islet areas, and glucose-induced insulin secretion in pooled Cc2(-/-) islets were all normal. Consistent with immunofluorescence analysis showing CEACAM2 expression in distal intestinal villi, Cc2(-/-) mice exhibited a higher release of oral glucose-mediated GLP-1, an incretin that potentiates insulin secretion in response to glucose. Compared with wild type, Cc2(-/-) mice also showed a higher insulin excursion during the oral glucose tolerance test. Pretreating with exendin(9-39), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, suppressed the effect of Ceacam2 deletion on glucose-induced insulin secretion. Moreover, GLP-1 release into the medium of GLUTag enteroendocrine cells was increased with siRNA-mediated Ceacam2 down-regulation in parallel to an increase in Ca(2+) entry through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Thus, CEACAM2 regulates insulin secretion, at least in part, by a GLP-1-mediated mechanism, independent of confounding metabolic factors. PMID:26586918

  20. Involvement of resistin-like molecule β in the development of methionine-choline deficient diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Hirofumi; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Iizuka, Masaki; Taki, Naoyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Kamata, Hideaki; Nagamachi, Akiko; Inaba, Toshiya; Nishimura, Fusanori; Katagiri, Hideki; Asahara, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuto; Chonan, Osamu; Encinas, Jeffery; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) reportedly has multiple functions including local immune responses in the gut. In this study, we investigated the possible contribution of RELMβ to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. First, RELMβ knock-out (KO) mice were shown to be resistant to methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced NASH development. Since it was newly revealed that Kupffer cells in the liver express RELMβ and that RELMβ expression levels in the colon and the numbers of RELMβ-positive Kupffer cells were both increased in this model, we carried out further experiments using radiation chimeras between wild-type and RELMβ-KO mice to distinguish between the contributions of RELMβ in these two organs. These experiments revealed the requirement of RELMβ in both organs for full manifestation of NASH, while deletion of each one alone attenuated the development of NASH with reduced serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. The higher proportion of lactic acid bacteria in the gut microbiota of RELMβ-KO than in that of wild-type mice may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lower serum LPS level the former. These data suggest the contribution of increases in RELMβ in the gut and Kupffer cells to NASH development, raising the possibility of RELMβ being a novel therapeutic target for NASH. PMID:26818807

  1. Involvement of resistin-like molecule β in the development of methionine-choline deficient diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Hirofumi; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Iizuka, Masaki; Taki, Naoyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Kamata, Hideaki; Nagamachi, Akiko; Inaba, Toshiya; Nishimura, Fusanori; Katagiri, Hideki; Asahara, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuto; Chonan, Osamu; Encinas, Jeffery; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) reportedly has multiple functions including local immune responses in the gut. In this study, we investigated the possible contribution of RELMβ to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. First, RELMβ knock-out (KO) mice were shown to be resistant to methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced NASH development. Since it was newly revealed that Kupffer cells in the liver express RELMβ and that RELMβ expression levels in the colon and the numbers of RELMβ-positive Kupffer cells were both increased in this model, we carried out further experiments using radiation chimeras between wild-type and RELMβ-KO mice to distinguish between the contributions of RELMβ in these two organs. These experiments revealed the requirement of RELMβ in both organs for full manifestation of NASH, while deletion of each one alone attenuated the development of NASH with reduced serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. The higher proportion of lactic acid bacteria in the gut microbiota of RELMβ-KO than in that of wild-type mice may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lower serum LPS level the former. These data suggest the contribution of increases in RELMβ in the gut and Kupffer cells to NASH development, raising the possibility of RELMβ being a novel therapeutic target for NASH. PMID:26818807

  2. Yogurt containing bioactive molecules produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 exerts a protective effect against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in mice.

    PubMed

    Zeinhom, Mohamed; Tellez, Angela M; Delcenserie, Veronique; El-Kholy, A M; El-Shinawy, S H; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-10-01

    An active fraction extracted from Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 cell-free spent medium (LAla-5AF) was incorporated in a dairy matrix and tested to assess its antivirulent effect against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Mice in experimental groups were fed for 4 days with yogurt supplemented with LAla-5AF. On the fifth day, mice were challenged with a single dose (10(7) CFU per mouse) of E. coli O157:H7. The clinical manifestations of the infection were significantly less severe in mice fed the yogurt supplemented with LAla-5AF. EHEC attachment and colonization was attenuated by LAla-5AF. Tumor necrosis factor alpha production was down-regulated, which might indicate a protective effect in the kidney during EHEC infection. To investigate the mechanisms associated with the in vivo effects observed, LAla-5AF was tested by reverse transcription real-time PCR to confirm its effects on the expression of several virulence genes of EHEC O157. The results showed that these fractions were able to down-regulate several virulence genes of EHEC, including stxB2, qseA, luxS, tir, ler, eaeA, and hlyB. PMID:23043828

  3. Small Molecule Kaempferol Promotes Insulin Sensitivity and Preserved Pancreatic β-Cell Mass in Middle-Aged Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalidy, Hana; Moore, William; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Aihua; Ali, Mostafa; Suh, Kyung-Shin; Zhen, Wei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Jia, Zhenquan; Hulver, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and a progressive decline in functional β-cell mass are hallmarks of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for natural, low-cost compounds to target these two defects could be a promising strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of T2D. Here, we show that dietary intake of flavonol kaempferol (0.05% in the diet) significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and circulating lipid profile, which were associated with the improved peripheral insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Kaempferol treatment reversed HF diet impaired glucose transport-4 (Glut4) and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) expression in both muscle and adipose tissues from obese mice. In vitro, kaempferol increased lipolysis and prevented high fatty acid-impaired glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, AMPK activity, and Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle cells. Using another mouse model of T2D generated by HF diet feeding and low doses of streptozotocin injection, we found that kaempferol treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in obese diabetic mice, which are associated with the improved islet β-cell mass. These results demonstrate that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic agent by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity and protecting against pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. PMID:26064984

  4. Beneficial effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) on acute doxorubicin cardiotoxicity in mice: Role of oxidative stress and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Hitesh; Pandya, Gaurav; Patel, Praful; Acharya, Aviseka; Jain, Mukul; Mehta, Anita A.

    2011-05-15

    Doxorubicin (DXR) has been used in variety of human malignancies for decades. Despite its efficacy in cancer, clinical usage is limited because of its cardiotoxicity, which has been associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs) have been shown to reduce the oxidative damage and apoptosis. The present study investigated the effects of CORM-2, a fast CO-releaser, against DXR-induced cardiotoxicity in mice using biochemical, histopathological and gene expression approaches. CORM-2 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 10 days and terminated the study on day 11. DXR (20 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected before 72 h of termination. Mice treated with DXR showed cardiotoxicity as evidenced by elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), caspase-3 and decrease the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in heart tissues. Pre- and post-treatment with CORM-2 (30 mg/kg, i.p.) elicited significant improvement in CK, LDH, MDA, caspase-3 and TAS levels. Histopathological studies showed that cardiac damage with DXR has been reversed with CORM-2 + DXR treatment. There was dramatic decrease in hematological count in DXR-treated mice, which has been improved with CORM-2. Furthermore, there was also elevation of mRNA expression of heme oxygenase-1, hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor and decrease in inducible-nitric oxide synthase expression upon treatment with CORM-2 that might be linked to cardioprotection. These data suggest that CORM-2 treatment provides cardioprotection against acute doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice and this effect may be attributed to CORM-2-mediated antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties.

  5. Age-Related Cognitive Impairments in Mice with a Conditional Ablation of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisaz, Reto; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Genoux, David; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the mechanisms involved in neural plasticity support cognition, and aging has a considerable effect on some of these processes. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays a pivotal role in structural and functional plasticity and is required to modulate cognitive and emotional behaviors. However,…

  6. Novel Small Molecule Agonist of TGR5 Possesses Anti-Diabetic Effects but Causes Gallbladder Filling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Briere, Daniel A.; Ruan, Xiaoping; Cheng, Christine C.; Siesky, Angela M.; Fitch, Thomas E.; Dominguez, Carmen; Sanfeliciano, Sonia Gutierrez; Montero, Carlos; Suen, Chen S.; Xu, Yanping; Coskun, Tamer; Michael, M. Dodson

    2015-01-01

    Activation of TGR5 via bile acids or bile acid analogs leads to the release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from intestine, increases energy expenditure in brown adipose tissue, and increases gallbladder filling with bile. Here, we present compound 18, a non-bile acid agonist of TGR5 that demonstrates robust GLP-1 secretion in a mouse enteroendocrine cell line yet weak GLP-1 secretion in a human enteroendocrine cell line. Acute administration of compound 18 to mice increased GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY) secretion, leading to a lowering of the glucose excursion in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), while chronic administration led to weight loss. In addition, compound 18 showed a dose-dependent increase in gallbladder filling. Lastly, compound 18 failed to show similar pharmacological effects on GLP-1, PYY, and gallbladder filling in Tgr5 knockout mice. Together, these results demonstrate that compound 18 is a mouse-selective TGR5 agonist that induces GLP-1 and PYY secretion, and lowers the glucose excursion in an OGTT, but only at doses that simultaneously induce gallbladder filling. Overall, these data highlight the benefits and potential risks of using TGR5 agonists to treat diabetes and metabolic diseases. PMID:26312995

  7. Small molecule TBTC as a new selective retinoid X receptor α agonist improves behavioral deficit in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanyan; Fan, Jun; Zhu, Zhiyuan; Guo, Xiaodan; Zhou, Tingting; Duan, Wenhu; Shen, Xu

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by progressive cognitive impairments. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is determined as the main pathogenesis of AD, and either decrease of Aβ production or increase of Aβ clearance is beneficial in the treatment of AD, while Aβ clearance regulation seems to be more attractive as a promising therapeutic strategy against AD based on the fact that the insufficient clearance of Aβ is tightly associated with the late onset of AD that is represented as the majority of AD cases. Here, we report that the small molecular compound, methyl 2-amino-6-(tert-butyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxylate (TBTC), as a selective agonist of retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) can effectively activate the heterodimerization of RXRα with either liver X receptor α (LXRα) or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), stimulate the expressions of the genes of apoE, ABCA1 and ABCG1, and decrease Aβ content both in cells and animal models. In addition, administration of TBTC (30mg/kg/day) in the transgenic APP-PS1 mice could also reduce the formation of senile plaques and improve the daily living activity of the mice. Therefore, our findings have suggested that TBTC might hold the potential as a drug lead compound for the treatment of AD. PMID:26026644

  8. Toll-Like Receptor and Accessory Molecule mRNA Expression in Humans and Mice as Well as in Murine Autoimmunity, Transient Inflammation, and Progressive Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Santhosh Kumar Vankayala; Günthner, Roman; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The cell type-, organ-, and species-specific expression of the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are well described, but little is known about the respective expression profiles of their accessory molecules. We therefore determined the mRNA expression levels of LBP, MD2, CD36, CD14, granulin, HMGB1, LL37, GRP94, UNC93b1, TRIL, PRAT4A, AP3B1, AEP and the respective TLRs in human and mouse solid organs. Humans and mice displayed significant differences between their respective mRNA expression patterns of these factors. In addition, the expression profiles in transient tissue inflammation upon renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, in spleens and kidneys from mice with lupus-like systemic autoimmunity, and in progressive tissue fibrosis upon unilateral ureteral obstruction were studied. Several TLR co-factors were specifically regulated during the different phases of these disease entities, suggesting a functional involvement in the disease process. Thus, the organ- and species-specific expression patterns need to be considered in the design and interpretation of studies related to TLR-mediated innate immunity, which seems to be involved in the tissue injury phase, in the phase of tissue regeneration, and in progressive tissue remodelling. PMID:23803655

  9. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  10. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes. PMID:26394692

  11. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes. PMID:26394692

  12. Targeting JNK by a New Curcumin Analog to Inhibit NF-kB-Mediated Expression of Cell Adhesion Molecules Attenuates Renal Macrophage Infiltration and Injury in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lu; Ren, Luqing; Tang, Longguang; Wang, Jingying; Zhao, Yunjie; Wang, Yonggang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetic renal injury. However, the regulatory mechanisms between macrophage infiltration and epithelial cell activation are still unclear. Our previous study found that C66, a novel curcumin analog, was able to inhibit inflammatory cytokine expression in vitro and in vivo. This study further elucidated whether C66 can prevent glucose-induced renal epithelial activation and inflammatory macrophage infiltration by a MAPK/NF-κB medicated mechanism. Our data show that pretreatment with C66 not only significantly reduced high glucose (HG)-induced over-expressions of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and MCP-1, but also remarkably inhibited NF-κB activation, MAPKs phosphorylation, and subsequently macrophage adhesion in renal epithelial NRK-52E cells. Furthermore, we find that MAPKs, especially JNK, play important roles in HG-induced NF-κB activation, which regulates the over-expression of adhesion molecules in HG-stimulated NRK-52E cells. A molecular docking predicted that C66 may target JNK2, which leads to its anti-inflammatory actions. In vivo, administration of C66 or JNK special inhibitor SP600125 at 5 mg/kg markedly decreased diabetes-induced renal adhesion molecule expression, NF-κB activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and pathological indexes in the kidneys of diabetic mice. These findings provide a perspective on the renoprotective effects of C66 in diabetes, and outline a novel therapeutic strategy of JNK inhibition for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24260158

  13. Expression and Localization of the Cell Adhesion Molecule SgIGSF during Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsukioka, Fusae; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Tsukatani, Toshiaki; Miwa, Takaki; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Iseki, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    Spermatogenic immunoglobulin superfamily (SgIGSF) is a cell adhesion molecule originally discovered in mouse testis. SgIGSF is expressed not only in spermatogenic cells but also in lung and liver epithelial cells and in neurons and glia of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the present study, we examined the expression and localization of SgIGSF in mouse olfactory epithelium before and after transection of the olfactory nerves, by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In normal olfactory mucosa, SgIGSF showed 100 kDa in molecular weight, which was identical with that in the lung but different from that in the brain. SgIGSF was expressed on the membrane of all olfactory, sustentacular and basal cells, but more abundantly in the apical portions of the olfactory epithelium where the dendrites of olfactory cells are in contact with sustentacular cells. After olfactory nerve transection, mature olfactory cells disappeared in 4 days but were regenerated around 7–15 days by proliferation and differentiation of basal cells into mature olfactory cells through the step of immature olfactory cells. During this period, both the mRNA and protein for SgIGSF showed a transient increase, with peak levels at 7 days and 11 days, respectively, after the transection. Immunohistochemistry showed that the enriched immunoreactivity for SgIGSF at 7–11 days was localized primarily to the membrane of immature olfactory cells. These results suggested that, during regeneration of the olfactory epithelium, the adhesion molecule SgIGSF plays physiological roles in differentiation, migration, and maturation of immature olfactory cells. PMID:17576432

  14. Deletion of Fibrinogen-like Protein 2 (FGL-2), a Novel CD4+ CD25+ Treg Effector Molecule, Leads to Improved Control of Echinococcus multilocularis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew; Spiliotis, Markus; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L.; Shalev, Itay; Levy, Gary; Lu, Xiaomei; Lin, Renyong; Wen, Hao; Gottstein, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background The growth potential of the tumor-like Echinococcus multilocularis metacestode (causing alveolar echinococcosis, AE) is directly linked to the nature/function of the periparasitic host immune-mediated processes. We previously showed that Fibrinogen-like-protein 2 (FGL2), a novel CD4+CD25+ Treg effector molecule, was over-expressed in the liver of mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis. However, little is known about its contribution to the control of this chronic helminth infection. Methods/Findings Key parameters for infection outcome in E. multilocularis-infected fgl2-/- (AE-fgl2-/-) and wild type (AE-WT) mice at 1 and 4 month(s) post-infection were (i) parasite load (i. e. wet weight of parasitic metacestode tissue), and (ii) parasite cell proliferation as assessed by determining E. multilocularis 14-3-3 gene expression levels. Serum FGL2 levels were measured by ELISA. Spleen cells cultured with ConA for 48h or with E. multilocularis Vesicle Fluid (VF) for 96h were analyzed ex-vivo and in-vitro. In addition, spleen cells from non-infected WT mice were cultured with rFGL2/anti-FGL2 or rIL-17A/anti-IL-17A for further functional studies. For Treg-immune-suppression-assays, purified CD4+CD25+ Treg suspensions were incubated with CD4+ effector T cells in the presence of ConA and irradiated spleen cells as APCs. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR were used to assess Treg, Th17-, Th1-, Th2-type immune responses and maturation of dendritic cells. We showed that AE-fgl2-/- mice exhibited (as compared to AE-WT-animals) (a) a significantly lower parasite load with reduced proliferation activity, (b) an increased T cell proliferative response to ConA, (c) reduced Treg numbers and function, and (d) a persistent capacity of Th1 polarization and DC maturation. Conclusions FGL2 appears as one of the key players in immune regulatory processes favoring metacestode survival by promoting Treg cell activity and IL-17A production that contributes to FGL2-regulation

  15. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; et al

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisinglymore » impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.« less

  16. Tandem repeats of the extracellular domain of Matrix 2 influenza protein exposed in Brucella lumazine synthase decameric carrier molecule induce protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paula; Zylberman, Vanesa; Ghersi, Giselle; Boado, Lorena; Palacios, Carlos; Goldbaum, Fernando; Mattion, Nora

    2013-01-21

    The antigenic variation of influenza virus represents a major prevention problem. However, the ectodomain of the protein Matrix 2 (M2e) is nearly invariant in all human influenza A strains and has been considered as a promising candidate for a broadly protective vaccine because antibodies to M2e are protective in animal models. In this work we evaluated the possible use of Brucella abortus lumazine synthase protein (BLS), a highly immunogenic decameric protein, as a carrier of the M2e peptide. Chimeric proteins generated by the fusion of one or four in tandem copies of M2e to BLS were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and assembled in decameric subunits similarly to the wild type BLS enzyme, as demonstrated by the comparative circular dichroism spectra and size exclusion chromatography and static light scattering analysis. The M2e peptides were stably exposed at the ten N-terminal ends of each BLS molecule. Immunization of mice with purified chimeras carrying only one M2e (BLS-M2e) copy elicited a significant humoral immune response with the addition of different adjuvants. The fusion of four in tandem copies of the M2e peptide (BLS-4M2e) resulted in similar levels of humoral immune response but in the absence of adjuvant. Survival of mice challenged with live influenza virus was 100% after vaccination with BLS-4M2e adjuvanted with Iscomatrix(®) (P<0.001) and 80% when adjuvanted with alum (P<0.01), while the chimera alone protected 60% of the animals (P<0.05). The approach described in this study is intended as a contribution to the generation of universal influenza immunogens, through a simple production and purification process and using safe carriers that might eventually avoid the use of strong adjuvants. PMID:23246552

  17. Expression of human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and alveolar progenitor cells in normal and injured lungs of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-E; Barrette, Anne Marie; Chapin, Cheryl; Gonzales, Linda W; Gonzalez, Robert F; Dobbs, Leland G; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is expressed in the epithelium of various primate tissues, including lung airway and alveoli. In human lung, CEACAM6 is developmentally and hormonally regulated, protects surfactant function, has anti-apoptotic activity and is dysregulated in cancers. We hypothesized that alveolar CEACAM6 expression increases in lung injury and promotes cell proliferation during repair. Studies were performed in CEABAC transgenic mice-containing human CEACAM genes. The level of CEACAM6 in adult CEABAC lung was comparable to that in human infants; expression occurred in epithelium of airways and of some alveoli but rarely co-localized with markers of type I or type II cells. Ten days after bleomycin instillation, both the number of CEACAM6(+) cells and immunostaining intensity were elevated in injured lung areas, and there was increased co-localization with type I and II cell markers. To specifically address type II cells, we crossed CEABAC mice with animals expressing EGFP driven by the SP-C promoter. After bleomycin injury, partially flattened, elongated epithelial cells were observed that expressed type I cell markers and were primarily either EGFP(+) or CEACAM6(+). In cell cycle studies, mitosis was greater in CEACAM6(+) non-type II cells versus CEACAM6(+)/EGFP(+) cells. CEACAM6 epithelial expression was also increased after hyperoxic exposure and LPS instillation, suggesting a generalized response to acute lung injuries. We conclude that CEACAM6 expression is comparable in human lung and the CEABAC mouse. CEACAM6 in this model appears to be a marker of a progenitor cell population that contributes to alveolar epithelial cell replenishment after lung injury. PMID:26702074

  18. Small Molecule p75NTR Ligands Reduce Pathological Phosphorylation and Misfolding of Tau, Inflammatory Changes, Cholinergic Degeneration, and Cognitive Deficits in AβPPL/S Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V.; Shen, Lin; Griend, Lilith Vander; Quach, Lisa N.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Saw, Nay; Yang, Tao; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR ) is involved in degenerative mechanisms related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, p75NTR levels are increased in AD and the receptor is expressed by neurons that are particularly vulnerable in the disease. Therefore, modulating p75NTR function may be a significant disease-modifying treatment approach. Prior studies indicated that the non-peptide, small molecule p75NTR ligands LM11A-31, and chemically unrelated LM11A-24, could block amyloid-β-induced deleterious signaling and neurodegeneration in vitro, and LM11A-31 was found to mitigate neuritic degeneration and behavioral deficits in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we determined whether these in vivo findings represent class effects of p75NTR ligands by examining LM11A-24 effects. In addition, the range of compound effects was further examined by evaluating tau pathology and neuroinflammation. Following oral administration, both ligands reached brain concentrations known to provide neuroprotection in vitro. Compound induction of p75NTR cleavage provided evidence for CNS target engagement. LM11A-31 and LM11A-24 reduced excessive phosphorylation of tau, and LM11A-31 also inhibited its aberrant folding. Both ligands decreased activation of microglia, while LM11A-31 attenuated reactive astrocytes. Along with decreased inflammatory responses, both ligands reduced cholinergic neurite degeneration. In addition to the amelioration of neuropathology in AD model mice, LM11A-31, but not LM11A-24, prevented impairments in water maze performance, while both ligands prevented deficits in fear conditioning. These findings support a role for p75NTR ligands in preventing fundamental tau-related pathologic mechanisms in AD, and further validate the development of these small molecules as a new class of therapeutic compounds. PMID:24898660

  19. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  20. Correlation of ionizing irradiation-induced late pulmonary fibrosis with long-term bone marrow culture fibroblast progenitor cell biology in mice homozygous deletion recombinant negative for endothelial cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Guo, Hongliang; Shields, Donna; Zhang, Xichen; Greenberger, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    Ionizing irradiation damage to the lung is associated with an acute inflammatory reaction, followed by a latent period and then late effects including predominantly pulmonary fibrosis. The cells mediating fibrosis have recently been shown to derive from the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment. Initiation of late pulmonary irradiation lung damage has been correlated with up-regulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in pulmonary endothelial cells, followed by infiltration of macrophages and bone marrow-derived fibroblasts forming the fibrotic lesions of organizing alveolitis/fibrosis. To determine whether the absence of expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, or other adhesion molecules known to be relevant to inflammatory cell attachment to lung endothelial cells was associated with a decrease in irradiation-induced lung fibrosis, homozygous deletion recombinant knockout mice lacking each of several adhesion molecules were tested compared to littermates for survival and development of organizing alveolitis following 20 Gy irradiation to both lungs. Bone marrow culture longevity has been shown to be a parameter, which correlates with both hematopoietic stem cell reserve and the integrity of fibroblast progenitors of the supportive hematopoietic microenvironment; radiation lung survival data were correlated to longevity of hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures established from tibia and femur bone marrow of the same mice. Homozygous deletion recombinant negative mice including VCAM-1-/-, ICAM-1-/-, E-Selectin-/-, or L-Selectin-/- were irradiated to 20 Gy to both lungs and followed for survival and percent organizing alveolitis at time of death compared to each normal littermate. A significant increase in survival (median 190 days) was detected with L-Selectin-/- compared to littermate control mice (median 140 days) or other groups. Long-term bone marrow cultures from L-Selectin-/- mice showed no detectable difference in marrow fibroblasts or hematopoietic cell biology

  1. Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) induces differential leukocyte accumulation in mice genetically selected for acute inflammatory reaction: the role of host genetic background on expression of adhesion molecules and release of endogenous mediators.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Adriana S; Ribeiro, Orlando G; Cabrera, Wafa H K; Vorraro, Francisca; De Franco, Marcelo; Ibañez, Olga M; Starobinas, Nancy

    2008-10-01

    The dynamics of the local inflammatory events induced by Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) inoculation in footpad of mice genetically selected for maximal (AIRmax) and minimal (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) was investigated. The BjV injection induced a marked inflammatory cell infiltrate with predominance of neutrophils, with increased blood cell numbers before its accumulation, suggesting a stimulatory action of BjV on mechanisms of cell mobilization from bone marrow. The process of cell migration is regulated by different cell-adhesion molecules (CAM). Our results showed that neutrophil cells from both lines had the same pattern of response concerning CAMs expression, presenting the involvement of l-selectin, Mac-1 and PECAM-1 adhesion molecules in BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation. The effect of BjV on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines related with cellular migration was also studied and IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and MIP-2 levels could be detected after venom injection. The AIRmax mice were shown to be more responsive than AIRmin with respect to leukocyte influx, expression of MIP-2 and release of IL-1beta and IL-6. These results demonstrate the importance of host genetic background in the local response and the involvement of alleles accumulated in AIRmax mice in the inflammatory events induced by BjV. PMID:18723041

  2. Reduced insulin secretion function is associated with pancreatic islet redistribution of cell adhesion molecules (CAMS) in diabetic mice after prolonged high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Viviane Tannuri F L; Maschio, Daniela A; de Fontes, Camila Calvo; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Santos-Silva, Junia C; Almeida, Anna Carolina Soares; Vanzela, Emerielle C; Cartaxo, Maria Tereza; Carvalho, Carolina P F; Collares-Buzato, Carla Beatriz

    2016-07-01

    Intercellular junctions play a role in regulating islet cytoarchitecture, insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In this study, we investigated the animal metabolic state as well as islet histology and cellular distribution/expression of CAMs and F-actin in the endocrine pancreas of C57BL/6/JUnib mice fed a high-fat diet (HFd) for a prolonged time period (8 months). Mice fed a HFd became obese and type 2 diabetic, displaying significant peripheral insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and moderate hyperinsulinemia. Isolated islets of HFd-fed mice displayed a significant impairment of glucose-induced insulin secretion associated with a diminished frequency of intracellular calcium oscillations compared with control islets. No marked change in islet morphology and cytoarchitecture was observed; however, HFd-fed mice showed higher beta cell relative area in comparison with controls. As shown by immunohistochemistry, ZO-1, E-, N-cadherins, α- and β-catenins were expressed at the intercellular contact site of endocrine cells, while VE-cadherin, as well as ZO-1, was found at islet vascular compartment. Redistribution of N-, E-cadherins and α-catenin (from the contact region to the cytoplasm in endocrine cells) associated with increased submembranous F-actin cell level as well as increased VE-cadherin islet immunolabeling was observed in diabetic mice. Increased gene expression of VE-cadherin and ZO-1, but no change for the other proteins, was observed in islets of diabetic mice. Only in the case of VE-cadherin, a significant increase in islet content of this CAM was detected by immunoblotting in diabetic mice. In conclusion, CAMs are expressed by endocrine and endothelial cells of pancreatic islets. The distribution/expression of N-, E- and VE-cadherins as well as α-catenin and F-actin is significantly altered in islet cells of obese and diabetic mice. PMID:27020567

  3. Suppression of development of glomerulonephritis in NZB x NZWF1 mice by persistent infection with lactic dehydrogenase virus: relations between intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on endothelial cells and leucocyte accumulation in glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Y.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of glomerulonephritis (GN) in autoimmune NZB x NZWF1 mice was suppressed by persistent lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection. In this study the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells in glomeruli was examined during the development of GN. ICAM-1 expression on endothelial cells preceded the accumulation of leucocytes within glomeruli. The uninfected mice exhibited an age-related and profound increase in ICAM-1 expression associated with the development of a GN as evidenced by deposits of IgG and C3. Uninfected mice also showed increased accumulation of leucocytes, such as polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs), macrophages, T and CD4+ cells, which express the lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) within glomeruli during the development of GN. These changes were strongly suppressed by LDV infection. Our findings suggest that the expression of ICAM-1 in glomerular endothelial cells may, at least in part, contribute to the development of GN. Suppressed expression of ICAM-1 in LDV-infected mice may be responsible for the suppression of GN seen in these animals. Thus there may be a pathogenetic role for ICAM-1 expression and for intraglomerular accumulation of leucocytes, especially PMNs, which express LFA-1 in the development of GN. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 11 PMID:7947231

  4. Absence of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, PECAM-1/CD31, In Vivo Increases Resistance to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Michael D.; Yap, May Lin; Yip, Jana; Muller, William; Wijburg, Odilia

    2013-01-01

    PECAM-1/CD31 is known to regulate inflammatory responses and exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. This study was designed to determine the functional role of PECAM-1 in susceptibility to murine primary in vivo infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and in in vitro inflammatory responses of peritoneal macrophages. Lectin profiling showed that cellular PECAM-1 and recombinant human PECAM-1-Ig chimera contain high levels of mannose sugars and N-acetylglucosamine. Consistent with this carbohydrate pattern, both recombinant human and murine PECAM-1-Ig chimeras were shown to bind S. Typhimurium in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Using oral and fecal-oral transmission models of S. Typhimurium SL1344 infection, PECAM-1−/− mice were found to be more resistant to S. Typhimurium infection than wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. While fecal shedding of S. Typhimurium was comparable in wild-type and PECAM-1−/− mice, the PECAM-1-deficient mice had lower bacterial loads in systemic organs such as liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes than WT mice, suggesting that extraintestinal dissemination was reduced in the absence of PECAM-1. This reduced bacterial load correlated with reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) levels in sera of PECAM-1−/− mice. Following in vitro stimulation of macrophages with either whole S. Typhimurium, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (Toll-like receptor 4 [TLR4] ligand), or poly(I·C) (TLR3 ligand), production of TNF and IL-6 by PECAM-1−/− macrophages was reduced. Together, these results suggest that PECAM-1 may have multiple functions in resistance to infection with S. Typhimurium, including binding to host cells, extraintestinal spread to deeper tissues, and regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by infected macrophages. PMID:23509149

  5. D-aspartate dysregulation in Ddo(-/-) mice modulates phencyclidine-induced gene expression changes of postsynaptic density molecules in cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Errico, Francesco; Aceto, Giuseppe; Tomasetti, Carmine; Usiello, Alessandro; Iasevoli, Felice

    2015-10-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction has been considered a key alteration in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Thus, several strategies aimed at enhancing glutamatergic transmission, included the introduction in therapy of D-amino acids, such as D-serine and D-cycloserine augmentation, have been proposed to counteract difficult-to-treat symptoms or treatment-resistant forms of schizophrenia. Another D-amino acid, D-aspartate, has recently gained increasing interest for its role in NMDAR activation and has been found reduced in post-mortem cortex of schizophrenia patients. NMDAR is the core of the postsynaptic density (PSD), a postsynaptic site involved in glutamate signaling and responsive to antipsychotic treatment. In this study, we investigated striatal and cortical gene expression of key PSD transcripts (i.e. Homer1a, Homer1b/c, and PSD-95) in mice with persistently elevated brain D-aspartate-levels, i.e. the D-aspartate-oxidase knockout mice (Ddo(-/-)). These animal models were analyzed both in naive condition and after phencyclidine (PCP) treatment. Naive Ddo(-/-) mice showed decreased Homer1a expression in the prefrontal cortex, increased Homer1b/c expression in the striatum, and decreased PSD-95 expression in the striatum and in the cortex. Acute PCP treatment restored, and even potentiated, Homer1a expression in the prefrontal cortex of mutant mice, while it had limited effects on the other genes. These results suggest that persistently elevated D-aspartate, by enhancing NMDA transmission, may cause complex adaptive mechanisms affecting Homer1a, which in turn may explain the recently demonstrated protective effects of this D-amino acid against PCP-induced behavioral alterations, such as ataxic behavior. PMID:25979765

  6. Evidence that small molecule enhancement of β-hexosaminidase activity corrects the behavioral phenotype in Dutch APP(E693Q) mice through reduction of ganglioside-bound Aβ.

    PubMed

    Knight, E M; Williams, H N; Stevens, A C; Kim, S H; Kottwitz, J C; Morant, A D; Steele, J W; Klein, W L; Yanagisawa, K; Boyd, R E; Lockhart, D J; Sjoberg, E R; Ehrlich, M E; Wustman, B A; Gandy, S

    2015-02-01

    Certain mutant Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (that is, Dutch mutant APP(E693Q)) form complexes with gangliosides (GAβ). These mutant Aβ peptides may also undergo accelerated aggregation and accumulation upon exposure to GM2 and GM3. We hypothesized that increasing β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) activity would lead to a reduction in GM2 levels, which in turn, would cause a reduction in Aβ aggregation and accumulation. The small molecule OT1001 is a β-hex-targeted pharmacological chaperone with good bioavailability, blood-brain barrier penetration, high selectivity for β-hex and low cytotoxicity. Dutch APP(E693Q) transgenic mice accumulate oligomeric Aβ as they age, as well as Aβ oligomer-dose-dependent anxiety and impaired novel object recognition (NOR). Treatment of Dutch APP(E693Q) mice with OT1001 caused a dose-dependent increase in brain β-hex levels up to threefold over those observed at baseline. OT1001 treatment was associated with reduced anxiety, improved learning behavior in the NOR task and dramatically reduced GAβ accumulation in the subiculum and perirhinal cortex, both of which are brain regions required for normal NOR. Pharmacological chaperones that increase β-hex activity may be useful in reducing accumulation of certain mutant species of Aβ and in preventing the associated behavioral pathology. PMID:25349165

  7. Prophylactic effects of the histamine H1 receptor antagonist epinastine and the dual thromboxane A2 receptor and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells antagonist ramatroban on allergic rhinitis model in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuh; Inoue, Toshio; Yamamoto, Atsuki; Sugimoto, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The prophylactic use of anti-allergic drugs has been proposed to be effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis in humans. However, there is little information regarding the prophylactic effect of thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) receptor antagonist on allergic rhinitis. Recent studies revealed that a TXA(2) receptor antagonist ramatroban could block the prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) receptor and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2). In the present study, we investigated the prophylactic effects of the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist epinastine and the TXA(2) receptor antagonist ramatroban and seratrodast on mouse models of allergic rhinitis. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized by an intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin and alum on days 0, 5, 14 and 21. Seven days later, mice were sensitized by intranasal application of ovalbumin thrice a week. Drugs were administered once a day from day 22. The severity of allergic rhinitis was assessed by determining the extent of 2 nasal allergic symptoms (sneezing and nasal rubbing). Histamine sensitivity and eosinophil infiltration into the nasal mucosa were also determined. Epinastine and ramatroban significantly reduced nasal symptoms and the number of eosinophils in the nasal mucosa. Seratrodast showed no effect on nasal symptoms and eosinophil infiltration into the nasal mucosa. In addition, histamine sensitivity was reduced by epinastine and ramatroban. These results indicate that epinastine and ramatroban induce the prophylactic effect on allergic rhinitis. PMID:21467637

  8. Post-training intrahippocampal injection of synthetic poly-α-2,8-sialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule mimetic peptide improves spatial long-term performance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Florian, Cédrick; Foltz, Jane; Norreel, Jean-Chrétien; Rougon, Geneviève; Roullet, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Several data have shown that the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is necessary for long-term memory formation and might play a role in the structural reorganization of synapses. The NCAM, encoded by a single gene, is represented by several isoforms that differ with regard to their content of α-2,8-linked sialic acid residues (PSA) on their extracellular domain. The carbohydrate PSA is known to promote plasticity, and PSA-NCAM isoforms remain expressed in the CA3 region of the adult hippocampus. In the present study, we investigated the effect on spatial memory consolidation of a PSA gain of function by injecting a PSA mimetic peptide (termed pr2) into the dorsal hippocampus. Mice were subjected to massed training in the spatial version of the water maze. Five hours after the last training session, experimental mice received an injection of pr2, whereas control mice received PBS or reverse peptide injections in the hippocampal CA3 region. Memory retention was tested at different time intervals: 24 h, 1 wk, and 4 wk. The results showed that the post-training infusion of pr2 peptide significantly increases spatial performance whenever it was assessed after the training phase. By contrast, administration of the control reverse peptide did not affect retention performance. These findings provide evidence that (1) PSA-NCAM is involved in memory consolidation processes in the CA3 hippocampal region, and (2) PSA mimetic peptides can facilitate the formation of long-term spatial memory when injected during the memory consolidation phase. PMID:16705136

  9. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  10. Sustained functional improvement by hepatocyte growth factor-like small molecule BB3 after focal cerebral ischemia in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, Rafael E; Izutsu, Miwa; Sasaki, Toshihiro; Sheng, Huaxin; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Qin, Tao; von Bornstadt, Daniel; Herisson, Fanny; Duan, Bin; Li, Jing-Song; Jiang, Kai; Pearlstein, Molly; Pearlstein, Robert D; Smith, David E; Goldberg, Itzhak D; Ayata, Cenk; Warner, David S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), efficacious in preclinical models of acute central nervous system injury, is burdened by administration of full-length proteins. A multiinstitutional consortium investigated the efficacy of BB3, a small molecule with HGF-like activity that crosses the blood–brain barrier in rodent focal ischemic stroke using Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) and Good Laboratory Practice guidelines. In rats, BB3, begun 6 hours after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) reperfusion, or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) onset, and continued for 14 days consistently improved long-term neurologic function independent of sex, age, or laboratory. BB3 had little effect on cerebral infarct size and no effect on blood pressure. BB3 increased HGF receptor c-Met phosphorylation and synaptophysin expression in penumbral tissue consistent with a neurorestorative mechanism from HGF-like activity. In mouse tMCAO, BB3 starting 10 minutes after reperfusion and continued for 14 days improved neurologic function that persisted for 8 weeks in some, but not all measures. Study in animals with comorbidities and those exposed to common stroke drugs are the next steps to complete preclinical assessment. These data, generated in independent, masked, and rigorously controlled settings, are the first to suggest that the HGF pathway can potentially be harnessed by BB3 for neurologic benefit after ischemic stroke. PMID:25712497

  11. Evaluation of the efficiency of tumor and tissue delivery of carrier-mediated agents (CMA) and small molecule (SM) agents in mice using a novel pharmacokinetic (PK) metric: relative distribution index over time (RDI-OT)

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Andrew J.; Rawal, Sumit; Sandison, Katie; Schell, Ryan; Schorzman, Allison; Deal, Allison; Feng, Lan; Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell; DeSimone, Joseph; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) of carrier-mediated agents (CMA) is dependent upon the carrier system. As a result, CMA PK differs greatly from the PK of small molecule (SM) drugs. Advantages of CMAs over SMs include prolonged circulation time in plasma, increased delivery to tumors, increased antitumor response, and decreased toxicity. In theory, CMAs provide greater tumor drug delivery than SMs due to their prolonged plasma circulation time. We sought to create a novel PK metric to evaluate the efficiency of tumor and tissue delivery of CMAs and SMs. We conducted a study evaluating the plasma, tumor, liver, and spleen PK of CMAs and SMs in mice bearing subcutaneous flank tumors using standard PK parameters and a novel PK metric entitled relative distribution over time (RDI-OT), which measures efficiency of delivery. RDI-OT is defined as the ratio of tissue drug concentration to plasma drug concentration at each time point. The standard concentration versus time area under the curve values (AUC) of CMAs were higher in all tissues and plasma compared with SMs. However, 8 of 17 SMs had greater tumor RDI-OT AUC0–last values than their CMA comparators and all SMs had greater tumor RDI-OT AUC0–6 h values than their CMA comparators. Our results indicate that in mice bearing flank tumor xenografts, SMs distribute into tumor more efficiently than CMAs. Further research in additional tumor models that may more closely resemble tumors seen in patients is needed to determine if our results are consistent in different model systems. PMID:26392803

  12. Expression profile of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD106) in inflammatory foci using rhenium-188 labelled monoclonal antibody in mice.

    PubMed

    Kairemo, K J; Strömberg, S; Nikula, T K; Karonen, S L

    1998-06-01

    Rhenium (Re)-188 is a generator (W-188/Re-188) produced high energy beta-emitter suitable for radionuclide therapy (T1/2 is 16.9 hrs and Emax 2.1 MeV (range 11 mm)). We have labelled monoclonal antibody (MAb) raised against vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) with Re-188 using glucoheptonate chelation technique and SnCl2 as reducing agent. The labelling efficiency, free perrhenate and reduced Re were controlled with thin layer chromatography and the purification of Re-188-MoAbs was performed using gel filtration. Our results indicate that Re-188-labelled antibodies remain in vitro stable and the labelling purity is > 90%. We also have applied these Re-188-MoAbs for detection of inflammatory disease in a mouse. The effective half-lives of organs of interest after an injection of Re-188-anti-VCAM1 were as follows: blood 5.2 hr, kidney 4.7 hr, and liver 9.6 hr. Re-188-anti-VCAM-1 was found to accumulate mainly in kidney and liver. One hour after the injection, the kidney contained in average as high as 12.5% and the liver 2.8 ID/g tissue. After 6 hr, the kidney contained 5.5% ID/g and the liver 2.6% ID/g. At 24 hr, the kidney uptake was 0.5% ID/g and the liver uptake 0.8% ID/g, respectively. The inflamed foci, subcutaneous lesions in the footpad skin, were visualized using gamma camera. From the distribution data the uptakes in the inflamed foci as follows: at 1 hr 2.18 (inflammation) and 1.72% ID/g (control), at 6 hr 1.42 (inflammation) and 0.85% ID/g (control), and at 24 hr 0.17 (inflammation) and 0.084% ID/g (control), respectively. Anti-VCAM-1 MAb showed better targeting as compared to control MoAbs in inflammation (caused by E.coli lipoplysaccaride). In conclusion, Re-188 is suitable for MAb labelling, and MAb against VCAM-1 may be used for detection of local inflammatory disease. PMID:9762472

  13. Development and validation of a UPLC-MS/MS method for the novel folate-targeted small molecule drug conjugate EC1456 and its metabolites in tumor homogenates from mice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Satish I; Pugh, Michael; Nelson, Melissa; Reddy, Joseph A; Klein, Patrick J; Leamon, Christopher P

    2016-04-15

    EC1456 is a novel folate-targeted small molecule drug conjugate of tubulysin B hydrazide being developed as an anticancer agent for patients with advanced solid tumors expressing the folate receptor. To try and correlate circulating systemic levels of EC1456 and its metabolites to tumor concentrations and potentially develop a PK/PD model, a sensitive bioanalytical method was developed and validated for the quantitation of the analytes in KB tumor homogenates. The method involved homogenizing tumors with buffer containing N-maleoyl-β-alanine, mannitol and acetic acid, precipitation of the homogenate with acetone followed by heating at 55°C for 1h to convert tubulysin B hydrazide to its corresponding hydrazone. The extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method demonstrated good inter-day (3 runs, n=18) accuracy (-2.3% to 7.3%) and precision (1.7% to 10.3%) for all three analytes. Stability was established for three freeze-thaw cycles, 4h on the bench-top on ice, 20h in the autosampler at 8°C and for at least 46days frozen at -70°C. This method was successfully used to determine concentration of EC1456 and its metabolites tubulysin B hydrazide and tubulysin B in tumor homogenates in preliminary experiments with KB tumor bearing mice dosed intravenously with EC1456. PMID:26855286

  14. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  15. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  16. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  17. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  18. A novel small-molecule PPI inhibitor targeting integrin αvβ3-osteopontin interface blocks bone resorption in vitro and prevents bone loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Doori; Park, Chan-Won; Choi, YoungJin; Lin, Jingjing; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Lee, Soo Young; Kang, In-Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Small molecule-inhibition targeting protein-protein interaction (PPI) is now recognized as an emerging and challenging area in drug design. We developed a novel interactive drug discovery methodology known as Protein Chip technology (ProteoChip) as a cutting-edge PPI assay system applicable for unique PPI-targeting therapeutics integrated with computer-aided drug design (CADD). Here, we describe a novel small molecular PPI inhibitor, IPS-02001, which the blocks integrin αvβ3-osteopontin interface a novel PPI inhibitor identified by the interactive methodology of both ProteoChip- and CADD-based PPI assay. IPS-02001 (6,7-Dichloro-2,3,5,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) was screened from different compound libraries (InterBioScreen, Commercial libraries) using an in silico structure-based molecular docking simulation method and a protein chip-based protein-protein interaction assay system. Additionally, integrin αvβ3, an adhesion receptor expressed in osteoclasts (OCs), was implicated in the regulation of OC function via regulation of the cytoskeletal organization of OCs. IPS-02001 blocked OC maturation from murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, as well as the resorptive function of OCs. Moreover, treatment with IPS-02001 impaired downstream signaling of integrin αvβ3 linked to Pyk2, c-Src, PLCγ2, and Vav3 and disrupted the actin cytoskeleton in mature OCs. Furthermore, IPS-02001 blocked RANKL-induced bone destruction by reducing the number of OCs and protected against ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice. Thus, IPS-02001 may represent a promising new class of anti-resorptive drugs for treatment of bone diseases associated with increased OC function. PMID:27187277

  19. Small Molecules in the Cone Snail Arsenal.

    PubMed

    Neves, Jorge L B; Lin, Zhenjian; Imperial, Julita S; Antunes, Agostinho; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-10-16

    Cone snails are renowned for producing peptide-based venom, containing conopeptides and conotoxins, to capture their prey. A novel small-molecule guanine derivative with unprecedented features, genuanine, was isolated from the venom of two cone snail species. Genuanine causes paralysis in mice, indicating that small molecules and not just polypeptides may contribute to the activity of cone snail venom. PMID:26421741

  20. Effect of NCAM on aged-related deterioration in vision.

    PubMed

    Luke, Margaret Po-Shan; LeVatte, Terry L; O'Reilly, Amanda M; Smith, Benjamin J; Tremblay, François; Brown, Richard E; Clarke, David B

    2016-05-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in developmental processes and age-associated cognitive decline; however, little is known concerning the effects of NCAM in the visual system during aging. Using anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays, we analyzed age-related changes in visual function of NCAM deficient (-/-) and wild-type mice. Anatomical analyses indicated that aging NCAM -/- mice had fewer retinal ganglion cells, thinner retinas, and fewer photoreceptor cell layers than age-matched controls. Electroretinogram testing of retinal function in young adult NCAM -/- mice showed a 2-fold increase in a- and b-wave amplitude compared with wild-type mice, but the retinal activity dropped dramatically to control levels when the animals reached 10 months. In behavioral tasks, NCAM -/- mice had no visual pattern discrimination ability and showed premature loss of vision as they aged. Together, these findings demonstrate that NCAM plays significant roles in the adult visual system in establishing normal retinal anatomy, physiology and function, and in maintaining vision during aging. PMID:27103522

  1. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  2. Post-Training Intrahippocampal Injection of Synthetic Poly-Alpha-2,8-Sialic Acid-Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Mimetic Peptide Improves Spatial Long-Term Performance in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florian, Cedrick; Foltz, Jane; Norreel, Jean-Chretien; Rougon, Genevieve; Roullet, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Several data have shown that the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is necessary for long-term memory formation and might play a role in the structural reorganization of synapses. The NCAM, encoded by a single gene, is represented by several isoforms that differ with regard to their content of alpha-2,8-linked sialic acid residues (PSA) on their…

  3. Electron microscopy of low iodinated thyroglobulin molecules.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Ekholm, R

    1975-04-29

    Thyroglobulin molecules were studied in the electron microscope with negative staining technique. In a first series of experiments samples of thyroglobulin varying in iodine content from 0.5 to 0.03% were prepared from the thyroids of mice and rats kept on iodine-poor diets. All samples contained thyroglobulin molecules of the normal ovoid shape, not deviating in size or shape from molecules obtained from normal thyroids. However, in addition, another type of molecule having a cylindrical shape was observed in all samples. The proportion of these cylindrical molecules increased from a few per cent in the moderately iodine-poor thyroglobulin samples to more than 80% in the highly iodine-deficient thyroglobulin (0.03%). In a second series of experiments extremely iodine-poor thyroglobulin (smaller than 0.005%) was obtained from propylthiouracil-treated rats. In these preparations practically all molecules had a cylindrical shape. These samples also contained smaller particles interpreted to be dissociation products. The cylindrical molecules were of two types, one appearing compact and measuring 250 times 135 A (length times diameter) and the other appearing porous and having a length of 145 and a diameter of 205 A. It is concluded that the cylindrical molecules represent non- or low-iodinated thyroglobulin and it is suggested that the porous cylindrical molecule is an unfolded form of the compact cylinder. PMID:1138879

  4. The expression of acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins on the surface membrane of different tissues in autoimmune and normal mice which are the target molecules for anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, K H; Liu, W T; Tang, S J; Tsai, C Y; Hsieh, S C; Wu, T H; Han, S H; Yu, C L

    1996-01-01

    Affinity-purified polyclonal anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) exert a cytostatic effect on cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells (MC). The cognate antigens expressed on the surface of MC have been proved to be acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins (P proteins) in our previous study. The mesangial cytostatic effect of anti-dsDNA antibodies is attributed to the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with membrane-expressed P proteins, but not to the effect of minute amounts of anti-ribosomal P proteins antibodies contained in the anti-dsDNA preparations. Immunofluorescence staining of the native cells demonstrated that anti-dsDNA antibodies bound to the surface of rat mesangial cells, rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1) and mouse fibroblasts (3T3). Anti-dsDNA antibodies also exert potent cytostatic effects on these cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the plasma membranes of different cell lines and tissues from normal and autoimmune mice were isolated and probed by anti-dsDNA antibodies in Western blot analysis. We found the actively proliferating cells such as MC, RBA-1 and 3T3 may express both P0 (38,000 MW) and P1 (19,000 MW) on the surface membrane. In addition, the kidney, liver and spleen from either autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr or BALB/c mice may constantly express P0 protein, but the expression of P1 is inconsistent. In contrast, brain and muscle from either mice failed to express P proteins on their surface. Unexpectedly, a high molecular weight substance (larger than 205,000 MW) with unknown nature appears in the membrane of brain and muscle tissues in both mice. Immunoprecipitation of the surface-biotinylated MC-lysate by anti-dsDNA antibodies further confirmed that P1 (19,000 MW) and P2 (17,000 MW) are really expressed on the cell surface. These results suggest that P proteins expressed on the surface of different tissues become the targets for anti-dsDNA antibodies mediating pleomorphic tissue

  5. Protective effect of leaf essential oil from Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira on endotoxin-induced intestinal injury in mice associated with suppressed local expression of molecules in the signaling pathways of TLR4 and NLRP3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Hsu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Chien-Chun; Chen, Ke-Ming; Liu, Cheng-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin is a potent microbial mediator implicated in sepsis. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of leaf essential oil from Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira (CO) of the linalool chemotype on endotoxin-injected mice. Mice were administered CO or vehicle by gavage before endotoxin injection and were killed 12 h after injection. Neither growth nor the organ weight or tissue weight to body weight ratio was affected by CO treatment. CO significantly lowered peripheral levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, interferon-γ, and nitric oxide and inhibited the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88), myeloid differentiation factor 2, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC), caspase-1, and Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). CO also inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-ĸB, inhibited the activity of caspase-1 in small intestine, and ameliorated intestinal edema. Our data provide strong evidence for a protective effect of CO of the linalool chemotype in the endotoxin-induced systemic inflammatory response in close association with suppression of the TLR4 and NLRP3 signaling pathways in intestine. PMID:25794175

  6. Protective Effect of Leaf Essential Oil from Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira on Endotoxin-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice Associated with Suppressed Local Expression of Molecules in the Signaling Pathways of TLR4 and NLRP3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien-Chun; Chen, Ke-Ming; Liu, Cheng-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin is a potent microbial mediator implicated in sepsis. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of leaf essential oil from Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira (CO) of the linalool chemotype on endotoxin-injected mice. Mice were administered CO or vehicle by gavage before endotoxin injection and were killed 12 h after injection. Neither growth nor the organ weight or tissue weight to body weight ratio was affected by CO treatment. CO significantly lowered peripheral levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, interferon-γ, and nitric oxide and inhibited the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88), myeloid differentiation factor 2, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC), caspase-1, and Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). CO also inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-ĸB, inhibited the activity of caspase-1 in small intestine, and ameliorated intestinal edema. Our data provide strong evidence for a protective effect of CO of the linalool chemotype in the endotoxin-induced systemic inflammatory response in close association with suppression of the TLR4 and NLRP3 signaling pathways in intestine. PMID:25794175

  7. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  8. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and age-related correlations of NADPH oxidase, MMP-9, and cell adhesion molecules: The increased disease severity and blood-brain barrier permeability in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Eun; Hasan, Mahbub; Han, Joon-Seung; Kang, Min-Jung; Jung, Byung-Hwa; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Kim, Ho-Youn; Kwon, Oh-Seung

    2015-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of two different ages (6 weeks [6 W] vs. 6 months [6 M]) on blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in EAE and evaluate the expression and correlations of NADPH oxidase, MMP-9, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 following increased age and EAE induction. Higher disease severity was observed in 6 M-EAE than 6 W-EAE. The four factors were significantly elevated and correlated in 6 M-EAE. BBB permeability increased with statistically significant interaction between age and EAE effects. We suggest strong correlations between NADPH oxidase and the other factors play important roles in increased BBB disruption and EAE susceptibility in middle-aged mice. PMID:26439961

  9. A Small Molecule Swertisin from Enicostemma littorale Differentiates NIH3T3 Cells into Islet-Like Clusters and Restores Normoglycemia upon Transplantation in Diabetic Balb/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Dadheech, Nidheesh; Soni, Sanket; Srivastava, Abhay; Dadheech, Sucheta; Gupta, Shivika; Gopurappilly, Renjitha; Bhonde, Ramesh R; Gupta, Sarita

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Stem cell therapy is one of the upcoming therapies for the treatment of diabetes. Discovery of potent differentiating agents is a prerequisite for increasing islet mass. The present study is an attempt to screen the potential of novel small biomolecules for their differentiating property into pancreatic islet cells using NIH3T3, as representative of extra pancreatic stem cells/progenitors. Methods. To identify new agents that stimulate islet differentiation, we screened various compounds isolated from Enicostemma littorale using NIH3T3 cells and morphological changes were observed. Characterization was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, Q-PCR, immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting, and insulin secretion assay for functional response in newly generated islet-like cell clusters (ILCC). Reversal of hyperglycemia was monitored after transplanting ILCC in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Results. Among various compounds tested, swertisin, an isolated flavonoid, was the most effective in differentiating NIH3T3 into endocrine cells. Swertisin efficiently changed the morphology of NIH3T3 cells from fibroblastic to round aggregate cell cluster in huge numbers. Dithizone (DTZ) stain primarily confirmed differentiation and gene expression studies signified rapid onset of differentiation signaling cascade in swertisin-induced ILCC. Molecular imaging and immunoblotting further confirmed presence of islet specific proteins. Moreover, glucose induced insulin release (in vitro) and decreased fasting blood glucose (FBG) (in vivo) in transplanted diabetic BALB/c mice depicted functional maturity of ILCC. Insulin and glucagon expression in excised islet grafts illustrated survival and functional integrity. Conclusions. Rapid induction for islet differentiation by swertisin, a novel herbal biomolecule, provides low cost and readily available differentiating agent that can be translated as a therapeutic tool for effective treatment in diabetes. PMID:23662125

  10. A Small Molecule Swertisin from Enicostemma littorale Differentiates NIH3T3 Cells into Islet-Like Clusters and Restores Normoglycemia upon Transplantation in Diabetic Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dadheech, Nidheesh; Soni, Sanket; Srivastava, Abhay; Dadheech, Sucheta; Gupta, Shivika; Gopurappilly, Renjitha; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Gupta, Sarita

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Stem cell therapy is one of the upcoming therapies for the treatment of diabetes. Discovery of potent differentiating agents is a prerequisite for increasing islet mass. The present study is an attempt to screen the potential of novel small biomolecules for their differentiating property into pancreatic islet cells using NIH3T3, as representative of extra pancreatic stem cells/progenitors. Methods. To identify new agents that stimulate islet differentiation, we screened various compounds isolated from Enicostemma littorale using NIH3T3 cells and morphological changes were observed. Characterization was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, Q-PCR, immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting, and insulin secretion assay for functional response in newly generated islet-like cell clusters (ILCC). Reversal of hyperglycemia was monitored after transplanting ILCC in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Results. Among various compounds tested, swertisin, an isolated flavonoid, was the most effective in differentiating NIH3T3 into endocrine cells. Swertisin efficiently changed the morphology of NIH3T3 cells from fibroblastic to round aggregate cell cluster in huge numbers. Dithizone (DTZ) stain primarily confirmed differentiation and gene expression studies signified rapid onset of differentiation signaling cascade in swertisin-induced ILCC. Molecular imaging and immunoblotting further confirmed presence of islet specific proteins. Moreover, glucose induced insulin release (in vitro) and decreased fasting blood glucose (FBG) (in vivo) in transplanted diabetic BALB/c mice depicted functional maturity of ILCC. Insulin and glucagon expression in excised islet grafts illustrated survival and functional integrity. Conclusions. Rapid induction for islet differentiation by swertisin, a novel herbal biomolecule, provides low cost and readily available differentiating agent that can be translated as a therapeutic tool for effective treatment in diabetes. PMID:23662125

  11. Immunosuppression by Co-stimulatory Molecules: Inhibition of CD2-CD48/CD58 Interaction by Peptides from CD2 to Suppress Progression of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya; Kanthala, Shanthi; Latendresse, John; Taneja, Veena; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2013-01-01

    Targeting co-stimulatory molecules to modulate the immune response has been shown to have useful therapeutic effects for autoimmune diseases. Among the co-stimulatory molecules, CD2 and CD58 are very important in the early stages of generation of an immune response. Our goal was to utilize CD2-derived peptides to modulate protein-protein interactions between CD2 and CD58, thereby modulating the immune response. Several peptides were designed based on the structure of the CD58 binding domain of CD2 protein. Among the CD2-derived peptides, peptide 6 from the F and C β-strand region of CD2 protein exhibited inhibition of cell-cell adhesion in the nanomolar concentration range. Peptide 6 was evaluated for its ability to bind to CD58 in Caco-2 cells and to CD48 in T cells from rodents. A molecular model was proposed for binding a peptide to CD58 and CD48 using docking studies. Furthermore, in vivo studies were carried out to evaluate the therapeutic ability of the peptide to modulate the immune response in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. In vivo studies indicated that peptide 6 was able to suppress the progression of CIA. Evaluation of the antigenicity of peptides in CIA and transgenic animal models indicated that this peptide is not immunogenic. PMID:23530775

  12. Small molecule TSHR agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Gershengorn, M C

    2011-04-01

    TSH activates the TSH receptor (TSHR) thereby stimulating the function of thyroid follicular cells (thyrocytes) leading to biosynthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones. Because TSHR is involved in several thyroid pathologies, there is a strong rationale for the design of small molecule "drug-like" ligands. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH, Thyrogen(®)) has been used in the follow-up of patients with thyroid cancer to increase the sensitivity for detection of recurrence or metastasis. rhTSH is difficult to produce and must be administered by injection. A small molecule TSHR agonist could produce the same beneficial effects as rhTSH but with greater ease of oral administration. We developed a small molecule ligand that is a full agonist at TSHR. Importantly for its clinical potential, this agonist elevated serum thyroxine and stimulated thyroidal radioiodide uptake in mice after its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract following oral administration. Graves' disease (GD) is caused by persistent, unregulated stimulation of thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) that activate TSHR. We identified the first small molecule TSHR antagonists that inhibited TSH- and TSAb-stimulated signalling in primary cultures of human thyrocytes. Our results provide proof-of-principle for effectiveness of small molecule agonists and antagonists for TSHR. We suggest that these small molecule ligands are lead compounds for the development of higher potency ligands that can be used as probes of TSHR biology with therapeutic potential. PMID:21511239

  13. Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and

  14. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  15. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  16. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  17. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  18. Disturbed Homeostasis of Lung Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 During Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Laudes, Ines J.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Riedemann, Niels C.; Speyer, Cecilia; Craig, Ron; Sarma, J. Vidya; Ward, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice was associated with perturbations in vascular adhesion molecules. In CLP mice, lung vascular binding of 125I-monoclonal antibodies to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 revealed sharp increases in binding of anti-ICAM-1 and significantly reduced binding of anti-VCAM-1. In whole lung homogenates, intense ICAM-1 up-regulation was found (both in mRNA and in protein levels) during sepsis, whereas very little increase in VCAM-1 could be measured although some increased mRNA was found. During CLP soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) appeared in the serum. When mouse dermal microvascular endothelial cells (MDMECs) were incubated with serum from CLP mice, constitutive endothelial VCAM-1 fell in association with the appearance of sVCAM-1 in the supernatant fluids. Under the same conditions, ICAM-1 cell content increased in MDMECs. When MDMECs were evaluated for leukocyte adhesion, exposure to CLP serum caused increased adhesion of neutrophils and decreased adhesion of macrophages and T cells. The progressive build-up in lung myeloperoxidase after CLP was ICAM-1-dependent and independent of VLA-4 and VCAM-1. These data suggest that sepsis disturbs endothelial homeostasis, greatly favoring neutrophil adhesion in the lung microvasculature, thereby putting the lung at increased risk of injury. PMID:15039231

  19. Ultracold polar KRb molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyenhuis, Brian; Chotia, Amodsen; Moses, Steven; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah

    2011-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules in the quantum degenerate regime open the possibility of realizing quantum gases with long-range, and spatially anisotropic, interparticle interactions. Currently, we can create a gas of ultracold fermionic ground-state KRb molecules in with a peak density of 1012 cm-3 and a temperature just 1.4 times the Fermi temperature. We will report on efforts to further cool this gas of molecules. One possibility is to evaporatively cool a spin-polarized molecular Fermi gas confined in quasi-2D, where we would rely on dipole-dipole interactions for rethermalization. We acknowledge funding from NIST, NSF, and AFOSR-MURI.

  20. Poisson's spot with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, Thomas; Holst, Bodil; Patel, Amil A.; Smith, Henry I.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo

    2009-05-15

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  1. Poisson's spot with molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil A.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-05-01

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson’s spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson’s spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  2. Single-Molecule Enzymology

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang; Lu, H PETER.

    1999-06-04

    Viewing a movie of an enzyme molecule made from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we see incredible details of molecular motions, be it a change of the conformation or the action of a chemical reaction.

  3. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  4. Of Mice and Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dewald, Oliver; Ren, Guofeng; Duerr, Georg D.; Zoerlein, Martin; Klemm, Christina; Gersch, Christine; Tincey, Sophia; Michael, Lloyd H.; Entman, Mark L.; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2004-01-01

    Large animal models have provided much of the descriptive data regarding the cellular and molecular events in myocardial infarction and repair. The availability of genetically altered mice may provide a valuable tool for specific cellular and molecular dissection of these processes. In this report we compare closed chest models of canine and mouse infarction/reperfusion qualitatively and quantitatively for temporal, cellular, and spatial differences. Much like the canine model, reperfused mouse hearts are associated with marked induction of endothelial adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines. Reperfused mouse infarcts show accelerated replacement of cardiomyocytes by granulation tissue leading to a thin mature scar at 14 days, when the canine infarction is still cellular and evolving. Infarcted mouse hearts demonstrate a robust but transient postreperfusion inflammatory reaction, associated with a rapid up-regulation of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β. Unlike canine infarcts, infarcted mouse hearts show only transient macrophage infiltration and no significant mast cell accumulation. In correlation, the growth factor for macrophages, M-CSF, shows modest and transient up-regulation in the early days of reperfusion; and the obligate growth factor for mast cells, stem cell factor, SCF, is not induced. In summary, the postinfarction inflammatory response and resultant repair in the mouse heart shares many common characteristics with large mammalian species, but has distinct temporal and qualitative features. These important species-specific differences should be considered when interpreting findings derived from studies using genetically altered mice. PMID:14742270

  5. Polyatomic molecule vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Polyatomic molecule vibrations are analyzed as harmonic vibrations along normal coordinates. The energy eigenvalues are found for linear and nonlinear symmetric triatomic molecules for valence bond models of the potential function with arbitrary coupling coefficients; such models can usually be fitted to observed energy levels with reasonably good accuracy. Approximate normal coordinates for the H2O molecule are discussed. Degenerate vibrational modes such as occur in CO2 are analyzed and expressions for Fermi resonance between close-lying states of the same symmetry are developed. The bending modes of linear triatomic molecules are expressed in terms of Laguerre polynomials in cylindrical coordinates as well as in terms of Hermite polynomials in Cartesian coordinates. The effects of large-amplitude bending such as occur in the C3 molecule are analyzed, along with anharmonic effects, which split the usually degenerate bending mode energy levels. Finally, the vibrational frequencies, degeneracies, and symmetry properties of XY3, X2Y2, and XY4 type molecules are discussed.

  6. Positron binding to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    While there is theoretical evidence that positrons can bind to atoms, calculations for molecules are much less precise. Unfortunately, there have been no measurements of positron-atom binding, due primarily to the difficulty in forming positron-atom bound states in two-body collisions. In contrast, positrons attach to molecules via Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which a vibrational mode absorbs the excess energy. Using a high-resolution positron beam, this VFR process has been studied to measure binding energies for more than 40 molecules. New measurements will be described in two areas: positron binding to relatively simple molecules, for which theoretical calculations appear to be possible; and positron binding to molecules with large permanent dipole moments, which can be compared to analogous, weakly bound electron-molecule (negative-ion) states. Binding energies range from 75 meV for CS2 (no dipole moment) to 180 meV for acetonitrile (CH3CN). Other species studied include aldehydes and ketones, which have permanent dipole moments in the range 2.5 - 3.0 debye. The measured binding energies are surprisingly large (by a factor of 10 to 100) compared to those for the analogous negative ions, and these differences will be discussed. New theoretical calculations for positron-molecule binding are in progress, and a recent result for acetonitrile will be discussed. This ability to compare theory and experiment represents a significant step in attempts to understand positron binding to matter. In collaboration with A. C. L. Jones, J. J. Gosselin, and C. M. Surko, and supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  7. Understanding ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul

    2009-05-01

    The successful production of a dense sample of ultracold ground state KRb polar molecules [1] opens the door to a new era of research with dipolar gases and lattices of such species. This feat was achieved by first associating a K and a Rb atom to make a weakly bound Feshbach molecule and then coherently transferring the population to the ground vibrational level of the molecule. This talk focuses on theoretical issues associated with making and using ultracold polar molecules, using KRb as an example [2]. Full understanding of this species and the processes by which it is made requires taking advantage of accurate molecular potentials [3], ab initio calculations [4], and the properties of the long-range potential. A highly accurate model is available for KRb for all bound states below the ground state separated atom limit and could be constructed for other species. The next step is to develop an understanding of the interactions between polar molecules, and their control in the ultracold domain. Understanding long-range interactions and threshold resonances will be crucial for future work. [1] K.-K. Ni, et al, Science 322, 231(2008). [2] P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0812:1233. [3] Pashov et al., Phys. Rev. A76, 022511 (2007). [4] S. Kotochigova, et al., arXiv:0901.1486.

  8. Molecules on ice

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, D.C.

    1996-03-15

    The ozone hole that forms in the spring months over the Antarctic is thought to be produced through a network of chemical reactions catalyzed by the surfaces of ice crystals in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A reaction between chlorine reservoir molecules, such as HCl + ClONO{sub 2} > HNO{sub 3} + Cl{sub 2}, is kinetically forbidden in the gas phase but proceeds quickly on the surface of ice and produces Cl{sub 2} molecules that are photodissociated by sunlight to yield the Cl atoms that destroy ozone. This destructive chain of events begins when HCl molecules stick to the ice crystals, and the mechanism for this crucial sticking process has been the subject of much debate. Recent work describes a mechanism that explains how HCl sticks to ice. This article goes on to detail research focusing surface reactions in stratospheric chemistry. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Positronium ions and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on positronium ions and molecules are discussed. A positronium ion is a three particle system consisting of two electrons in singlet spin state, and a positron. Recent studies include calculations of its binding energy, positron annihilation rate, and investigations of its doubly excited resonant states. A positronium molecule is a four body system consisting of two positrons and two electrons in an overall singlet spin state. The recent calculations of its binding energy against the dissociation into two positronium atoms, and studies of auto-detaching states in positronium molecules are discussed. These auto-dissociating states, which are believed to be part of the Rydberg series as a result of a positron attaching to a negatively charged positronium ion, Ps-, would appear as resonances in Ps-Ps scattering.

  10. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  11. Single-Molecule Bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Lemay, Serge G.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques which interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. Here we review several technologies which can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  12. Single-molecule bioelectronics.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Jacob K; Lemay, Serge G; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques that interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. In this study, we review several technologies that can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  13. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  14. Molecules in η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO+, HCN, HNC, and N2H+, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13CO and H13CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (~100 km s-1), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO+ do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  15. Poisson's Spot with Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-03-01

    In the Poisson-Spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. The Poisson spot is the last of the classical optics experiments to be realized with neutral matter waves. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's Spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength-independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large-molecule diffraction and coherence in atom-lasers to patterning with large molecules.

  16. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  17. Towards single molecule switches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  18. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  19. Prebiologically Important Interstellar Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Y.-J.; Huang, H.-C.; Charnley, S. B.; Tseng, W.-L.; Snyder, L. E.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kisiel, Z.; Thorwirth, S.; Bohn, R. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the organic chemistry of molecular clouds, particularly the formation of biologically important molecules, is fundamental to the study of the processes which lead to the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Galaxy. Determining the level of molecular complexity attainable in the clouds, and the nature of the complex organic material available to protostellar disks and the planetary systems that form from them, requires an understanding of the possible chemical pathways and is therefore a central question in astrochemistry. We have thus searched for prebiologically important molecules in the hot molecular cloud cores: Sgr B2(N-LMH), W51 e1/e2 and Orion-KL. Among the molecules searched: Pyrimidine is the unsubstituted ring analogue for three of the DNA and RNA bases. 2H-Azirine and Aziridine are azaheterocyclic compounds. And Glycine is the simplest amino acid. Detections of these interstellar organic molecular species will thus have important implications for Astrobiology. Our preliminary results indicate a tentative detection of interstellar glycine. If confirmed, this will be the first detection of an amino acid in interstellar space and will greatly strengthen the thesis that interstellar organic molecules could have played a pivotal role in the prebiotic chemistry of the early Earth.

  20. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  1. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  2. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  3. The Science of Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flory, Paul J.

    1974-01-01

    The author maintains that chemistry has a key role as the science of molecules and rejects the concept of chemistry as a branch of physics. The scope of chemistry, the philosophies underlying its practice, and the teaching of the subject also are discussed. (DT)

  4. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  5. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  6. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the point of

  7. Single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1995-09-15

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required for individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed before-hand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Strange skyrmion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-01

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  9. Strange skyrmion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-20

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  10. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  11. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed. PMID:25638443

  12. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  13. Molecules in interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Hjalmarson, A.; Rydbeck, O. E. H.

    The physical conditions and chemical compositions of the gas in interstellar clouds are reviewed in light of the importance of interstellar clouds for star formation and the origin of life. The Orion A region is discussed as an example of a giant molecular cloud where massive stars are being formed, and it is pointed out that conditions in the core of the cloud, with a kinetic temperature of about 75 K and a density of 100,000-1,000,000 molecules/cu cm, may support gas phase ion-molecule chemistry. The Taurus Molecular Clouds are then considered as examples of cold, dark, relatively dense interstellar clouds which may be the birthplaces of solar-type stars and which have been found to contain the heaviest interstellar molecules yet discovered. The molecular species identified in each of these regions are tabulated, including such building blocks of biological monomers as H2O, NH3, H2CO, CO, H2S, CH3CN and H2, and more complex species such as HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2CN.

  14. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  15. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  16. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  17. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  18. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  19. Single Molecule Transcription Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Galburt, Eric A.; Grill, Stephan W.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Single molecule optical trapping assays have now been applied to a great number of macromolecular systems including DNA, RNA, cargo motors, restriction enzymes, DNA helicases, chromosome remodelers, DNA polymerases and both viral and bacterial RNA polymerases. The advantages of the technique are the ability to observe dynamic, unsynchronized molecular processes, to determine the distributions of experimental quantities and to apply force to the system while monitoring the response over time. Here, we describe the application of these powerful techniques to study the dynamics of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19426807

  20. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  1. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  2. Covalent Chemistry beyond Molecules.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juncong; Zhao, Yingbo; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-03-16

    Linking molecular building units by covalent bonds to make crystalline extended structures has given rise to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), thus bringing the precision and versatility of covalent chemistry beyond discrete molecules to extended structures. The key advance in this regard has been the development of strategies to overcome the "crystallization problem", which is usually encountered when attempting to link molecular building units into covalent solids. Currently, numerous MOFs and COFs are made as crystalline materials in which the large size of the constituent units provides for open frameworks. The molecular units thus reticulated become part of a new environment where they have (a) lower degrees of freedom because they are fixed into position within the framework; (b) well-defined spatial arrangements where their properties are influenced by the intricacies of the pores; and (c) ordered patterns onto which functional groups can be covalently attached to produce chemical complexity. The notion of covalent chemistry beyond molecules is further strengthened by the fact that covalent reactions can be carried out on such frameworks, with full retention of their crystallinity and porosity. MOFs are exemplars of how this chemistry has led to porosity with designed metrics and functionality, chemically-rich sequences of information within their frameworks, and well-defined mesoscopic constructs in which nanoMOFs enclose inorganic nanocrystals and give them new levels of spatial definition, stability, and functionality. PMID:26863450

  3. Self-assembly of phenylalanine-based molecules.

    PubMed

    German, Helen W; Uyaver, Sahin; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2015-03-01

    Using molecular dynamics, we study the self-assembly of phenylalanine with charged end-groups at various temperatures and concentrations. As in the case of diphenylalanine, we observe the formation of nanotubes; however, phenylalanine aggregates in layers of four, not six, molecules. The observed aggregates are consistent with recent experimental measurements of fibrils obtained from mice with phenylketonuria. We investigate the stability and the mechanism by which these tubular structures form and discuss potential toxicity mechanisms. PMID:25347763

  4. Molecules in the Spotlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  5. Emerging small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Staels, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Pharmacological lowering of LDL-C levels using statins reduces cardiovascular risk. However, a substantial residual risk persists especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because of the inverse association observed in epidemiological studies of HDL-C with the risk for cardiovascular diseases, novel therapeutic strategies to raise HDL-C levels or improve HDL functionality are developed as complementary therapy for cardiovascular diseases. However, until now most therapies targeting HDL-C levels failed in clinical trials because of side effects or absence of clinical benefits. This chapter will highlight the emerging small molecules currently developed and tested in clinical trials to pharmacologically modulate HDL-C and functionality including new CETP inhibitors (anacetrapib, evacetrapib), novel PPAR agonists (K-877, CER-002, DSP-8658, INT131 and GFT505), LXR agonists (ATI-111, LXR-623, XL-652) and RVX-208. PMID:25523004

  6. Biochips - Can molecules compute?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, J. B.

    1984-02-01

    In recent years the possibility has been considered to build 'biochip' computers, in which the silicon transistors of present machines would be replaced by large organic molecules or genetically engineered proteins. Two major advantages of such biochips over current devices would be related to vastly increased densities of computing elements, and entirely new styles of data processing, suited to such high-level tasks as pattern recognition and context-dependent analysis. The limitations of the semiconductor chip with respect to the density of elementary units due to size considerations and heat development could be overcome by making use of molecular switches. Attention is given to soliton switching, soliton logic, bulk molecular devices, analog biochips, 'intelligent' switches based on the employment of enzymes, robot vision, questions of biochip fabrication, protein engineering, and a strategy for the development of biochips.

  7. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  8. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  9. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  10. Electrochromic graphene molecules.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K; Sykora, Milan

    2015-04-28

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystalline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes and their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current, but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using a modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here, these were found to be E1,ox(0) = 0.77 ± 0.01 V and E2,ox(0) = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red(0) = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be nonideal. The nonideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes are attributed to strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling, GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component. PMID:25768313

  11. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  12. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  13. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  14. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1987-10-07

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photons are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions. 3 figs.

  15. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  16. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  17. Adsorption kinetics of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Burde, Jared T; Calbi, M Mercedes

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption dynamics of diatomic molecules on solid surfaces is examined by using a Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. Equilibration times at increasing loadings are obtained, and explained based on the elementary processes that lead to the formation of the adsorbed film. The ability of the molecules to change their orientation accelerates the overall uptake and leads to competitive kinetic behaviour between the different orientations. The dependence of the equilibration time on coverage follows the same decreasing trend obtained experimentally for ethane adsorption on closed-end carbon nanotube bundles. The exploration of molecule-molecule interaction effects on this trend provides relevant insights to understand the kinetic behaviour of other species, from simpler molecules to larger polyatomic molecules, adsorbing on surfaces with different binding strength. PMID:24654004

  18. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26657007

  19. Trapping Single Molecules by Dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzel, Ralph; Calander, Nils; Chiragwandi, Zackary; Willander, Magnus; Bier, Frank F.

    2005-09-01

    We have trapped single protein molecules of R-phycoerythrin in an aqueous solution by an alternating electric field. A radio frequency voltage is applied to sharp nanoelectrodes and hence produces a strong electric field gradient. The resulting dielectrophoretic forces attract freely diffusing protein molecules. Trapping takes place at the electrode tips. Switching off the field immediately releases the molecules. The electric field distribution is computed, and from this the dielectrophoretic response of the molecules is calculated using a standard polarization model. The resulting forces are compared to the impact of Brownian motion. Finally, we discuss the experimental observations on the basis of the model calculations.

  20. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  1. Electrical Transport through Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. N.; Chang, Shun-Chi; Williams, Stan

    2003-03-01

    We investigate electrical transport properties of single organic molecules using electromigration break junctions[1]. A self-assembled monolayer of various organic molecules such as 1,4-di(phenylethynyl-4'-methanethiol)benzene was grown on narrow metal wires, and single or a few molecules were incorporated into the junctions which were created by applying a large voltage and breaking the wires. The transport properties of these molecules were then measured at low temperatures. Latest experimental results will be discussed. [1] Park, J. et al, Nature, 417, 722 (2002); Liang W. et al, Nature, 417, 725 (2002).

  2. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  3. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  4. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Dutta, Partha; Dahlman, James E; Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F; Kauffman, Kevin J; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Anderson, Daniel G; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE(-/-) mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  5. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  6. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  7. Proregenerative Properties of ECM Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Plantman, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic injuries to the nervous system, regrowing axons encounter a complex microenvironment where mechanisms that promote regeneration compete with inhibitory processes. Sprouting and axonal regrowth are key components of functional recovery but are often counteracted by inhibitory molecules. This review covers extracellular matrix molecules that support neuron axonal outgrowth. PMID:24195084

  8. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  9. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities. PMID:25221867

  10. Magnetoassociation of KRb Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Tyler; Perreault, John; Shewmon, Ruth; Jin, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    I will discuss experiments in which we study the creation of ^40K^87Rb Feshbach molecules via magnetoassociation. We measure the molecule number as a function of the magnetic-field sweep rate through the interspecies Feshbach resonance and explore the dependence of association on the initial atom gas conditions. This study of the Feshbach molecule creation process may be relevant to the production of ultracold polar molecules, where magnetoassociated Feshbach molecules can be a crucial first step [1].[4pt] [1] K.-K. Ni, S. Ospelkaus, M. H. G. de Miranda, A. Peer, B. Neyenhuis, J. J. Zirbel, S. Kotochigova, P. S. Julienne, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, Science, 2008, 322, 231- 235.

  11. Magnetoassociation of KRb Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Tyler; Perreault, John; Shewmon, Ruth; Jin, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    I will discuss experiments in which we study the creation of ^40K^87Rb Feshbach molecules via magnetoassociation. We measure the molecule number as a function of the magnetic-field sweep rate through the interspecies Feshbach resonance and explore the dependence of association on the initial atom gas conditions. This study of the Feshbach molecule creation process may be relevant to the production of ultracold polar molecules, where magnetoassociated Feshbach molecules can be a crucial first step [1].[4pt] [1] K.-K. Ni, S. Ospelkaus, M. H. G. de Miranda, A. Peer, B. Neyenhuis, J. J. Zirbel, S. Kotochigova, P. S. Julienne, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, Science, 2008, 322, 231-235.

  12. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A; Branton, Daniel

    2013-07-23

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule's outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤ 0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  13. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  14. Impact of neural cell adhesion molecule deletion on regeneration after mouse spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saini, Vedangana; Loers, Gabriele; Kaur, Gurcharan; Schachner, Melitta; Jakovcevski, Igor

    2016-07-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important functional roles in development of the nervous system. We investigated the influence of a constitutive ablation of NCAM on the outcome of spinal cord injury. Transgenic mice lacking NCAM (NCAM-/-) were subjected to severe compression injury of the lower thoracic spinal cord using wild-type (NCAM+/+) littermates as controls. According to the single-frame motion analysis, the NCAM-/- mice showed reduced locomotor recovery in comparison to control mice at 3 and 6 weeks after injury, indicating an overall positive impact of NCAM on recovery after injury. Also the Basso Mouse Scale score was lower in NCAM-/- mice at 3 weeks after injury, whereas at 6 weeks after injury the difference between genotypes was not statistically significant. Worse locomotor function was associated with decreased monoaminergic and cholinergic innervation of the spinal cord caudal to the injury site and decreased axonal regrowth/sprouting at the site of injury. Astrocytic scar formation at the injury site, as assessed by immunohistology for glial fibrillary acidic protein at and around the lesion site was increased in NCAM-/- compared with NCAM+/+ mice. Migration of cultured monolayer astrocytes from NCAM-/- mice was reduced as assayed by scratch wounding. Numbers of Iba-1 immunopositive microglia were not different between genotypes. We conclude that constitutive NCAM deletion in young adult mice reduces recovery after spinal cord injury, validating the hypothesized beneficial role of this molecule in recovery after injury. PMID:27178448

  15. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powell, David R.; Gay, Jason P.; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V.; Lanthorn, Thomas H.; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  16. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; Gay, Jason P; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  17. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  18. Adhesion Molecules Associated with Female Genital Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Xi; Carrascosa, José Manuel; Cabré, Eduard; Dern, Olga; Sumoy, Lauro; Requena, Gerard; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines that can elicit mucosal immune responses in the female genital tract against sexually transmitted infections have been hampered by an inability to measure immune responses in these tissues. The differential expression of adhesion molecules is known to confer site-dependent homing of circulating effector T cells to mucosal tissues. Specific homing molecules have been defined that can be measured in blood as surrogate markers of local immunity (e.g. α4β7 for gut). Here we analyzed the expression pattern of adhesion molecules by circulating effector T cells following mucosal infection of the female genital tract in mice and during a symptomatic episode of vaginosis in women. While CCR2, CCR5, CXCR6 and CD11c were preferentially expressed in a mouse model of Chlamydia infection, only CCR5 and CD11c were clearly expressed by effector T cells during bacterial vaginosis in women. Other homing molecules previously suggested as required for homing to the genital mucosa such as α4β1 and α4β7 were also differentially expressed in these patients. However, CD11c expression, an integrin chain rarely analyzed in the context of T cell immunity, was the most consistently elevated in all activated effector CD8+ T cell subsets analyzed. This molecule was also induced after systemic infection in mice, suggesting that CD11c is not exclusive of genital tract infection. Still, its increase in response to genital tract disorders may represent a novel surrogate marker of mucosal immunity in women, and warrants further exploration for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27272720

  19. Relative Sizes of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This computer graphic depicts the relative complexity of crystallizing large proteins in order to study their structures through x-ray crystallography. Insulin is a vital protein whose structure has several subtle points that scientists are still trying to determine. Large molecules such as insuline are complex with structures that are comparatively difficult to understand. For comparison, a sugar molecule (which many people have grown as hard crystals in science glass) and a water molecule are shown. These images were produced with the Macmolecule program. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  20. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  1. Organic heterocyclic molecules become superalkalis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Naaresh; Giri, Santanab

    2016-09-21

    An organic molecule which behaves like a superalkali has been designed from an aromatic heterocyclic molecule, pyrrole. Using first-principles calculation and a systematic two-step approach, we can have superalkali molecules with a low ionization energy, even lower than that of Cs. Couple cluster (CCSD) calculation reveals that a new heterocycle, C3N2(CH3)5 derived from a well-known aromatic heterocycle, pyrrole (C4H5N) has an ionization energy close to 3.0 eV. A molecular dynamics calculation on C3N2(CH3)5 reveals that the structure is dynamically stable. PMID:27530344

  2. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  3. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT. PMID:27221947

  4. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-05-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT.

  5. Persistently Active Microbial Molecules Prolong Innate Immune Tolerance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingfang; Varley, Alan W.; Munford, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Measures that bolster the resolution phase of infectious diseases may offer new opportunities for improving outcome. Here we show that inactivation of microbial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can be required for animals to recover from the innate immune tolerance that follows exposure to Gram-negative bacteria. When wildtype mice are exposed to small parenteral doses of LPS or Gram-negative bacteria, their macrophages become reprogrammed (tolerant) for a few days before they resume normal function. Mice that are unable to inactivate LPS, in contrast, remain tolerant for several months; during this time they respond sluggishly to Gram-negative bacterial challenge, with high mortality. We show here that prolonged macrophage reprogramming is maintained in vivo by the persistence of stimulatory LPS molecules within the cells' in vivo environment, where naïve cells can acquire LPS via cell-cell contact or from the extracellular fluid. The findings provide strong evidence that inactivation of a stimulatory microbial molecule can be required for animals to regain immune homeostasis following parenteral exposure to bacteria. Measures that disable microbial molecules might enhance resolution of tissue inflammation and help restore innate defenses in individuals recovering from many different infectious diseases. PMID:23675296

  6. Generation of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Andrew; Haruyama, Naoto; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, and equipment required for successful generation of transgenic mice using pronuclear injection. The experimental methods and practical tips given here will help guide beginners in understanding what is required and what to avoid in these standard protocols for efficiently generating transgenic mice. PMID:19283729

  7. Moving Molecules and Mothball Madness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, John

    1993-01-01

    Describes concrete demonstrations on the states of matter. In the first demonstration, students represent molecules; and, in the second demonstration, moth balls are heated to produce a change of state. (PR)

  8. Surface chemistry of deuterated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1983-03-01

    The chemical composition of grain mantles is calculated in order to determine the concentration of deuterated molecules relative to their hydrogenated counterparts in grain mantles. The computation takes into account reactions involving deuterium in the gas phase and on grain surfaces. The results show that the abundance of deuterium molecules in grain mantles is much higher than expected on the basis of the cosmic abundance ratio of D to H. HDCO has a relatively high abundance in grain mantles as compared to other deuterated molecules, due to the fact that H abstraction from HDCO has a lower activation barrier than D abstraction. The infrared characteristics of the calculated grain mantles are discussed and observational tests of the model calcultions are suggested. The contribution of grain surface chemistry to the concentration of molecules in the gas phase is briefly considered.

  9. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  10. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  11. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A.; Branton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule’s outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  12. Single-Molecule DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efcavitch, J. William; Thompson, John F.

    2010-07-01

    The ability to detect single molecules of DNA or RNA has led to an extremely rich area of exploration of the single most important biomolecule in nature. In cases in which the nucleic acid molecules are tethered to a solid support, confined to a channel, or simply allowed to diffuse into a detection volume, novel techniques have been developed to manipulate the DNA and to examine properties such as structural dynamics and protein-DNA interactions. Beyond the analysis of the properties of nucleic acids themselves, single-molecule detection has enabled dramatic improvements in the throughput of DNA sequencing and holds promise for continuing progress. Both optical and nonoptical detection methods that use surfaces, nanopores, and zero-mode waveguides have been attempted, and one optically based instrument is already commercially available. The breadth of literature related to single-molecule DNA analysis is vast; this review focuses on a survey of efforts in molecular dynamics and nucleic acid sequencing.

  13. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  14. Collisional decoherence of polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kai; Stickler, Benjamin A.; Hornberger, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The quantum state of motion of a large and rotating polar molecule can lose coherence through the collisions with gas atoms. We show how the associated quantum master equation for the center of mass can be expressed in terms of the orientationally averaged differential and total scattering cross sections, for which we provide approximate analytic expressions. The master equation is then utilized to quantify collisional decoherence in a interference experiment with polar molecules.

  15. Nanochannel Based Single Molecule Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Lesoine, John F.; Venkataraman, Prahnesh A.; Maloney, Peter C.; Dumont, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the fluorescence from a single molecule hundreds of times without surface immobilization. The approach is based on the use of electroosmosis to repeatedly drive a single target molecule in a fused silica nanochannel through a stationary laser focus. Single molecule fluorescence detected during the transit time through the laser focus is used to repeatedly reverse the electrical potential controlling the flow direction. Our method does not rely on continuous observation and therefore is less susceptible to fluorescence blinking than existing fluorescence-based trapping schemes. The variation in the turnaround times can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient on a single molecule level. We demonstrate the ability to recycle both proteins and DNA in nanochannels and show that the procedure can be combined with single-pair Förster energy transfer. Nanochannel-based single molecule recycling holds promise for studying conformational dynamics on the same single molecule in solution and without surface tethering. PMID:22662745

  16. Overexpression of Thioredoxin in Transgenic Mice Attenuates Focal Ischemic Brain Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yasushi; Mitsui, Akira; Nishiyama, Akira; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Sono, Hiroshi; Gon, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Yodoi, Junji

    1999-03-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) plays important biological roles both in intra- and extracellular compartments, including in regulation of various intracellular molecules via thiol redox control. We produced TRX overexpressing mice and confirmed that there were no anatomical and physiological differences between wild-type (WT) mice and TRX transgenic (Tg) mice. In the present study we subjected mice to focal brain ischemia to shed light on the role of TRX in brain ischemic injury. At 24 hr after middle cerebral artery occlusion, infarct areas and volume were significantly smaller in Tg mice than in WT mice. Moreover neurological deficit was ameliorated in Tg mice compared with WT mice. Protein carbonyl content, a marker of cellular protein oxidation, in Tg mice showed less increase than did that of WT mice after the ischemic insult. Furthermore, c-fos expression in Tg mice was stronger than in WT mice 1 hr after ischemia. Our results suggest that transgene expression of TRX decreased ischemic neuronal injury and that TRX and the redox state modified by TRX play a crucial role in brain damage during stroke.

  17. Anti-Ebola Activity of Diazachrysene Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Selaković, Života; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima N; Wells, Jay; Šegan, Sandra; Panchal, Rekha G; Šolaja, Bogdan A

    2015-06-12

    Herein we report on a diazachrysene class of small molecules that exhibit potent antiviral activity against the Ebola (EBOV) virus. The antiviral compounds are easily synthesized, and the most active compounds have excellent in vitro activity (0.34-0.70 μM) and are significantly less lipophilic than their predecessors. The three most potent diazachrysene antivirals do not exhibit any toxicity in vivo and protected 70-90% of the mice at 10 mg/kg following EBOV challenge. Together, these studies suggest that diazachrysenes are a promising class of compounds for hit to lead optimization and as potential Ebola therapeutics. PMID:27622742

  18. Combining single-molecule manipulation and single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Juan Carlos; Das, Dibyendu Kumar; Manning, Harris W; Lang, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    Single molecule force manipulation combined with fluorescence techniques offers much promise in revealing mechanistic details of biomolecular machinery. Here, we review force-fluorescence microscopy, which combines the best features of manipulation and detection techniques. Three of the mainstay manipulation methods (optical traps, magnetic traps and atomic force microscopy) are discussed with respect to milestones in combination developments, in addition to highlight recent contributions to the field. An overview of additional strategies is discussed, including fluorescence based force sensors for force measurement in vivo. Armed with recent exciting demonstrations of this technology, the field of combined single-molecule manipulation and single-molecule detection is poised to provide unprecedented views of molecular machinery. PMID:25255052

  19. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules. PMID:26760444

  20. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  1. Generation and analysis of mice lacking the chemokine fractalkine.

    PubMed

    Cook, D N; Chen, S C; Sullivan, L M; Manfra, D J; Wiekowski, M T; Prosser, D M; Vassileva, G; Lira, S A

    2001-05-01

    Fractalkine (CX(3)CL1) is the first described chemokine that can exist either as a soluble protein or as a membrane-bound molecule. Both forms of fractalkine can mediate adhesion of cells expressing its receptor, CX(3)CR1. This activity, together with its expression on endothelial cells, suggests that fractalkine might mediate adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium during inflammation. Fractalkine is also highly expressed in neurons, and its receptor, CX(3)CR1, is expressed on glial cells. To determine the biologic role of fractalkine, we used targeted gene disruption to generate fractalkine-deficient mice. These mice did not exhibit overt behavioral abnormalities, and histologic analysis of their brains did not reveal any gross changes compared to wild-type mice. In addition, these mice had normal hematologic profiles except for a decrease in the number of blood leukocytes expressing the cell surface marker F4/80. The cellular composition of their lymph nodes did not differ significantly from that of wild-type mice. Similarly, the responses of fractalkine(-/-) mice to a variety of inflammatory stimuli were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. PMID:11287620

  2. Generation and Analysis of Mice Lacking the Chemokine Fractalkine

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Donald N.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Sullivan, Lee M.; Manfra, Denise J.; Wiekowski, Maria T.; Prosser, Dina M.; Vassileva, Galya; Lira, Sergio A.

    2001-01-01

    Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is the first described chemokine that can exist either as a soluble protein or as a membrane-bound molecule. Both forms of fractalkine can mediate adhesion of cells expressing its receptor, CX3CR1. This activity, together with its expression on endothelial cells, suggests that fractalkine might mediate adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium during inflammation. Fractalkine is also highly expressed in neurons, and its receptor, CX3CR1, is expressed on glial cells. To determine the biologic role of fractalkine, we used targeted gene disruption to generate fractalkine-deficient mice. These mice did not exhibit overt behavioral abnormalities, and histologic analysis of their brains did not reveal any gross changes compared to wild-type mice. In addition, these mice had normal hematologic profiles except for a decrease in the number of blood leukocytes expressing the cell surface marker F4/80. The cellular composition of their lymph nodes did not differ significantly from that of wild-type mice. Similarly, the responses of fractalkine−/− mice to a variety of inflammatory stimuli were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. PMID:11287620

  3. Electron Collisions with Large Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKoy, Vincent

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, interest in electron-molecule collisions has increasingly shifted to large molecules. Applications within the semiconductor industry, for example, require electron collision data for molecules such as perfluorocyclobutane, while almost all biological applications involve macromolecules such as DNA. A significant development in recent years has been the realization that slow electrons can directly damage DNA. This discovery has spurred studies of low-energy collisions with the constituents of DNA, including the bases, deoxyribose, the phosphate, and larger moieties assembled from them. In semiconductor applications, a key goal is development of electron cross section sets for plasma chemistry modeling, while biological studies are largely focused on understanding the role of localized resonances in inducing DNA strand breaks. Accurate calculations of low-energy electron collisions with polyatomic molecules are computationally demanding because of the low symmetry and inherent many-electron nature of the problem; moreover, the computational requirements scale rapidly with the size of the molecule. To pursue such studies, we have adapted our computational procedure, known as the Schwinger multichannel method, to run efficiently on highly parallel computers. In this talk, we will present some of our recent results for fluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry and for constituents of DNA and RNA. In collaboration with Carl Winstead, California Institute of Technology.

  4. Spectroscopic modeling of water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylo, R. I.; Okhrimenko, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    This research is devoted to the vibrational spectroscopy inverse problem solution that gives a possibility to design a molecule and make conclusions about its geometry. The valence angle finding based on the usage of inverse spectral vibrational spectroscopy problem is a well-known task. 3N-matrix method was chosen to solve the proposed task. The usage of this method permits to make no assumptions about the molecule force field, besides it can be applied to molecules of matter in liquid state. Anharmonicity constants assessment is an important part of the valence angle finding. The reduction to zero vibrations is necessary because used matrix analytical expression were found in the harmonic approach. In order to find the single-valued inverse spectral problem of vibrational spectroscopy solution a shape parameter characterizing "mixing" of ω1 and ω2 vibrations forms must be found. The minimum of such a function Υ called a divergence parameter was found. This function characterizes method's accuracy. The valence angle assessment was reduced to the divergence parameter minimization. The β value concerning divergence parameter minimum was interpreted as the desired valence angle. The proposed method was applied for water molecule in liquid state: β = (88,8 ±1,7)° . The found angle fits the water molecule nearest surrounding tetrahedral model including hydrogen bond curvature in the first approximation.

  5. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  6. A New Class of Pluripotent Stem Cell Cytotoxic Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Gwendoline Tze Wei; Seng, Eng Khuan; Guo, Xu Ming; Tan, Cherine Mei Fong; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Lee, Joel Mun Kin

    2014-01-01

    A major concern in Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC)-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of teratoma formation from contaminating undifferentiated cells. Removal of undifferentiated cells from differentiated cultures is an essential step before PSC-based cell therapies can be safely deployed in a clinical setting. We report a group of novel small molecules that are cytotoxic to PSCs. Our data indicates that these molecules are specific and potent in their activity allowing rapid eradication of undifferentiated cells. Experiments utilizing mixed PSC and primary human neuronal and cardiomyocyte cultures demonstrate that up to a 6-fold enrichment for specialized cells can be obtained without adversely affecting cell viability and function. Several structural variants were synthesized to identify key functional groups and to improve specificity and efficacy. Comparative microarray analysis and ensuing RNA knockdown studies revealed involvement of the PERK/ATF4/DDIT3 ER stress pathway. Surprisingly, cell death following ER stress induction was associated with a concomitant decrease in endogenous ROS levels in PSCs. Undifferentiated cells treated with these molecules preceding transplantation fail to form teratomas in SCID mice. Furthermore, these molecules remain non-toxic and non-teratogenic to zebrafish embryos suggesting that they may be safely used in vivo. PMID:24647085

  7. A new class of pluripotent stem cell cytotoxic small molecules.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark; Phoon, Chee Wee; Goh, Gwendoline Tze Wei; Seng, Eng Khuan; Guo, Xu Ming; Tan, Cherine Mei Fong; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Lee, Joel Mun Kin

    2014-01-01

    A major concern in Pluripotent Stem Cell (PSC)-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of teratoma formation from contaminating undifferentiated cells. Removal of undifferentiated cells from differentiated cultures is an essential step before PSC-based cell therapies can be safely deployed in a clinical setting. We report a group of novel small molecules that are cytotoxic to PSCs. Our data indicates that these molecules are specific and potent in their activity allowing rapid eradication of undifferentiated cells. Experiments utilizing mixed PSC and primary human neuronal and cardiomyocyte cultures demonstrate that up to a 6-fold enrichment for specialized cells can be obtained without adversely affecting cell viability and function. Several structural variants were synthesized to identify key functional groups and to improve specificity and efficacy. Comparative microarray analysis and ensuing RNA knockdown studies revealed involvement of the PERK/ATF4/DDIT3 ER stress pathway. Surprisingly, cell death following ER stress induction was associated with a concomitant decrease in endogenous ROS levels in PSCs. Undifferentiated cells treated with these molecules preceding transplantation fail to form teratomas in SCID mice. Furthermore, these molecules remain non-toxic and non-teratogenic to zebrafish embryos suggesting that they may be safely used in vivo. PMID:24647085

  8. Room temperature single molecule microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Enderlein, G.; Semin, D.J.; Keller, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    We have developed three capabilities to image the locations of and interrogate immobilized single fluorescent molecules: near-field scanning optical, confocal scanning optical, and wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy. Each microscopy has its own advantages. Near-field illumination can beat the diffraction limit. Confocal microscopy has high brightness and temporal resolution. Wide-field has the quickest (parallel) imaging capability. With confocal microscopy, we have verified that single fluorescent spots in our images are due to single molecules by observing photon antibunching. Using all three microscopies, we have observed that xanthene molecules dispersed on dry silica curiously exhibit intensity fluctuations on millisecond to minute time scales. We are exploring the connection between the intensity fluctuations and fluctuations in individual photophysical parameters. The fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G on silica fluctuate. The complex nature of the intensity and lifetime fluctuations is consistent with a mechanism that perturbs more than one photophysical parameter.

  9. Guidance molecules in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nasarre, Patrick; Potiron, Vincent; Drabkin, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Guidance molecules were first described in the nervous system to control axon outgrowth direction. They are also widely expressed outside the nervous system where they control cell migration, tissue development and establishment of the vascular network. In addition, they are involved in cancer development, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. This review is primarily focused on their functions in lung cancer and their involvement in lung development is also presented. Five guidance molecule families and their corresponding receptors are described, including the semaphorins/neuropilins/plexins, ephrins and Eph receptors, netrin/DCC/UNC5, Slit/Robo and Notch/Delta. In addition, the possibility to target these molecules as a therapeutic approach in cancer is discussed. PMID:20139699

  10. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  11. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 knockout abrogates radiation induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S

    1997-06-10

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  12. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-15

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  13. Phase structure of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Böhm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-06-01

    Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E -fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

  14. Orbital molecules in electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, J. Paul

    2015-04-01

    Orbital molecules are made up of coupled orbital states on several metal ions within an orbitally ordered (and sometimes also charge-ordered) solid such as a transition metal oxide. Spin-singlet dimers are known in many materials, but recent discoveries of more exotic species such as 18-electron heptamers in AlV{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnetic 3-atom trimerons in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have shown that orbital molecules constitute a general new class of quantum electronic states in solids.

  15. Dipolar molecules in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Sowiński, Tomasz; Dutta, Omjyoti; Hauke, Philipp; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-03-16

    We study the extended Bose-Hubbard model describing an ultracold gas of dipolar molecules in an optical lattice, taking into account all on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions, including occupation-dependent tunneling and pair tunneling terms. Using exact diagonalization and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz, we show that these terms can destroy insulating phases and lead to novel quantum phases. These considerable changes of the phase diagram have to be taken into account in upcoming experiments with dipolar molecules. PMID:22540482

  16. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  17. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π–π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  18. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-09-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π-π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes.

  19. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π-π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  20. Urinary volatile molecules vary in males of the 2 European subspecies of the house mouse and their hybrids.

    PubMed

    Mucignat-Caretta, C; Redaelli, M; Orsetti, A; Perriat-Sanguinet, M; Zagotto, G; Ganem, G

    2010-10-01

    Mice recognize other mice by identifying chemicals that confer a molecular signature to urinary marks. Such molecules may be involved in species recognition, and previous behavioral studies have related divergence of sexual preference between 2 subspecies of the house mouse (Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus) to urinary odors. To characterize the differences between odors of males of the 2 subspecies and their first-generation offspring, the urinary volatile molecules were examined via gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Seven molecules were present in the samples from mice of at least one group. Their quantity varied among groups: M. m. domesticus showed a quantitatively richer panel of odorants in their urine when compared with M. m. musculus. The hybrids showed a more complex picture that was not directly related to one or the other parental subspecies. These quantitative differences may contribute to the specificity of the odorant bouquet of the 2 subspecies. PMID:20530376

  1. Monitoring Molecules: Insights and Progress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In August, 2014, neuroscientists and physical scientists gathered together on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles to discuss how to monitor molecules in neuroscience. This field has seen significant growth since its inception in the 1970s. Here, the advances in this field are documented, including its advance into understanding the actions that specific neurotransmitters mediate during behavior. PMID:25514501

  2. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  3. Nanodevices for Single Molecule Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, H. G.; Stavis, S. M.; Samiee, K. T.

    During the last two decades, biotechnology research has resulted in progress in fields as diverse as the life sciences, agriculture and healthcare. While existing technology enables the analysis of a variety of biological systems, new tools are needed for increasing the efficiency of current methods, and for developing new ones altogether. Interest has grown in single molecule analysis for these reasons.

  4. Dialkylresorcinols as bacterial signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Brameyer, Sophie; Kresovic, Darko; Bode, Helge B.; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that bacteria communicate via small diffusible molecules, a process termed quorum sensing. The best understood quorum sensing systems are those that use acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) for communication. The prototype of those systems consists of a LuxI-like AHL synthase and a cognate LuxR receptor that detects the signal. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR receptors, yet lack any LuxI-type synthase, and thus these receptors are referred to as LuxR orphans or solos. In addition to the well-known AHLs, little is known about the signaling molecules that are sensed by LuxR solos. Here, we describe a novel cell–cell communication system in the insect and human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica. We identified the LuxR homolog PauR to sense dialkylresorcinols (DARs) and cyclohexanediones (CHDs) instead of AHLs as signals. The DarABC synthesis pathway produces the molecules, and the entire system emerged as important for virulence. Moreover, we have analyzed more than 90 different Photorhabdus strains by HPLC/MS and showed that these DARs and CHDs are specific to the human pathogen P. asymbiotica. On the basis of genomic evidence, 116 other bacterial species are putative DAR producers, among them many human pathogens. Therefore, we discuss the possibility of DARs as novel and widespread bacterial signaling molecules and show that bacterial cell–cell communication goes far beyond AHL signaling in nature. PMID:25550519

  5. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M; Schweizer, W Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-07-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  6. Engineering crystals of dendritic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lukin, Oleg; Schubert, Dirk; Müller, Claudia M.; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Gramlich, Volker; Schneider, Julian; Dolgonos, Grygoriy; Shivanyuk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A detailed single-crystal X-ray study of conformationally flexible sulfonimide-based dendritic molecules with systematically varied molecular architectures was undertaken. Thirteen crystal structures reported in this work include 9 structures of the second-generation dendritic sulfonimides decorated with different aryl groups, 2 compounds bearing branches of both second and first generation, and 2 representatives of the first generation. Analysis of the packing patterns of 9 compounds bearing second-generation branches shows that despite their lack of strong directive functional groups there is a repeatedly reproduced intermolecular interaction mode consisting in an anchor-type packing of complementary second-generation branches of neighbouring molecules. The observed interaction tolerates a wide range of substituents in meta- and para-positions of the peripheral arylsulfonyl rings. Quantum chemical calculations of the molecule-molecule interaction energies agree at the qualitative level with the packing preferences found in the crystalline state. The calculations can therefore be used as a tool to rationalize and predict molecular structures with commensurate and non-commensurate branches for programming of different packing modes in crystal. PMID:19549870

  7. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  8. Cold collisions between boson or fermion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically investigate collisions between electrostatically trapped cold polar molecules and compare boson and fermion isotopes. Evaporative cooling seems possible for fermion molecules as the ratio of the collision loss cross section to the elastic collision cross section (R) gets smaller as the molecular temperature T lowers. With boson molecules, R gets larger as T lowers, which makes evaporative cooling difficult. The elastic collision cross section between fermion molecules can be larger than that for boson molecules with certain conditions.

  9. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  10. Host microbiota modulates development of social preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arentsen, Tim; Raith, Henrike; Qian, Yu; Forssberg, Hans; Heijtz, Rochellys Diaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence indicates that the indigenous gut microbiota exerts long-lasting programming effects on brain function and behaviour. Objective In this study, we used the germ-free (GF) mouse model, devoid of any microbiota throughout development, to assess the influence of the indigenous microbiota on social preference and repetitive behaviours (e.g. self-grooming). Methods and results Using the three-chambered social approach task, we demonstrate that when adult GF mice were given a choice to spend time with a novel mouse or object, they spent significantly more time sniffing and interacting with the stimulus mouse compared to conventionally raised mice (specific pathogen-free, SPF). Time spent in repetitive self-grooming behaviour, however, did not differ between GF and SPF mice. Real-time PCR–based gene expression analysis of the amygdala, a key region that is part of the social brain network, revealed a significant reduction in the mRNA levels of total brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), BDNF exon I-, IV-, VI-, IX-containing transcripts, and NGFI-A (a signalling molecule downstream of BDNF) in GF mice compared to SPF mice. Conclusion These results suggest that differential regulation of BDNF exon transcripts in the amygdala by the indigenous microbes may contribute to the altered social development of GF mice. PMID:26679775

  11. Incretin-like effects of small molecule trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Susanne; Wang, Haiyan; Uhles, Sabine; Cole, Nadine; Alvarez-Sanchez, Ruben; Künnecke, Basil; Ullmer, Christoph; Matile, Hugues; Bedoucha, Marc; Norcross, Roger D.; Ottaway-Parker, Nickki; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Conde Knape, Karin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hoener, Marius C.; Sewing, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes and obesity are emerging pandemics in the 21st century creating worldwide urgency for the development of novel and safe therapies. We investigated trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) as a novel target contributing to the control of glucose homeostasis and body weight. Methods We investigated the peripheral human tissue distribution of TAAR1 by immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of a small molecule TAAR1 agonist on insulin secretion in vitro using INS1E cells and human islets and on glucose tolerance in C57Bl6, and db/db mice. Body weight effects were investigated in obese DIO mice. Results TAAR1 activation by a selective small molecule agonist increased glucose-dependent insulin secretion in INS1E cells and human islets and elevated plasma PYY and GLP-1 levels in mice. In diabetic db/db mice, the TAAR1 agonist normalized glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test. Sub-chronic treatment of diet-induced obese (DIO) mice with the TAAR1 agonist resulted in reduced food intake and body weight. Furthermore insulin sensitivity was improved and plasma triglyceride levels and liver triglyceride content were lower than in controls. Conclusions We have identified TAAR1 as a novel integrator of metabolic control, which acts on gastrointestinal and pancreatic islet hormone secretion. Thus TAAR1 qualifies as a novel and promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:26844206

  12. Antinuclear antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Teague, P. O.; Friou, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Seven-week-old and 16-week-old A/Jax mice were injected with viable spleen cells or homogenates of spleen cells obtained from older syngeneic mice which either had autoimmune anti-deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) antibody in their sera or lacked this activity. None of the 7-week-old recipients developed detectable anti-DNP antibody. However, most of the animals in the 16-week-old group developed this autoantibody. The viability of the cells and the presence of or absence of anti-DNP antibody in the donor's sera did not appear to influence the autoimmune response of these recipients. When viable thymus cells which were obtained from young A/Jax mice were transferred to groups of older syngeneic animals that had developed anti-DNP antibody spontaneously, the anti-DNP decreased or disappeared from the sera of most recipients. Untreated controls did not show this variation. When 36-week-old A/Jax mice which lacked anti-DNP antibody were injected with thymus or spleen cells obtained from young donors, none of the recipients or untreated controls developed anti-DNP antibody. After specific immunization with DNP, however, the control animals began to produce autoimmune anti-DNP antibody while the animals treated with thymus or spleen cells remained unresponsive. These observations support the hypothesis that in A/Jax mice: (1) autoimmunity to DNP may result from failure of normal homeostasis mechanisms which allow proliferation of autoimmune cells; (2) the number of cells with autoimmune potential may increase during ageing; (3) the efficiency of the homeostasis system may decrease during ageing as the result of microbial or genetic factors; and (4) cells which participate in homeostasis are found in the thymus and spleen of young mice and may be the thymus dependent lymphocytes. PMID:5307745

  13. X(3872): charmonium or molecule?

    SciTech Connect

    Nefediev, A. V.

    2011-05-23

    A theoretical analysis of the recent experimental data from the Belle and BABAR Collaborations on the charmonium state X(3872) is performed. The analysis takes into account the proximity of an S-wave mesonic threshold and a possible presence of molecule component in the resonance wave function, finite width of the molecule constituents, and a possible interference in the final state. In particular, a model-independent approach is formulated, based on the Flatte parametrisation of near-threshold observables as well as on the Weinberg analysis of the nature of weakly bound systems generalised to the case of unstable constituents. Conclusion is made that the X(3872) is generated dynamically by a strong coupling of the bare {chi}{sub c1} charmonium to the DD-bar* hadronic channel, with a large admixture of the DD-bar* molecular component.

  14. Electrochemical detection of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Fan, F R; Bard, A J

    1995-02-10

    The electrochemical behavior of a single molecule can be observed by trapping a small volume of a dilute solution of the electroactive species between an ultramicroelectrode tip with a diameter of approximately 15 nanometers and a conductive substrate. A scanning electrochemical microscope was used to adjust the tip-substrate distance ( approximately 10 nanometers), and the oxidation of [(trimethylammonio)methyl] ferrocene (Cp(2)FeTMA(+)) to Cp(2)FeTMA(2+) was carried out. The response was stochastic, and anodic current peaks were observed as the molecule moved into and out of the electrode-substrate gap. Similar experiments were performed with a solution containing two redox species, ferrocene carboxylate (Cp(2)FeCOO(-)) and Os(bpy)(3)(2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl). PMID:17813918

  15. Bioactive molecules from sea hares.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, H; Sakai, R; Jimbo, M

    2006-01-01

    Sea hares, belonging to the order Opisthobranchia, subclass Gastropoda, are mollusks that have attracted many researchers who are interested in the chemical defense mechanisms of these soft and "shell-less" snails. Numbers of small molecules of dietary origin have been isolated from sea hares and some have ecologically relevant activities, such as fish deterrent activity or toxicity. Recently, however, greater attention has been paid to biomedically interesting sea hare isolates such as dolastatins, a series of antitumor peptide/macrolides isolated from Dolabella auricularia. Another series of bioactive peptide/macrolides, as represented by aplyronines, have been isolated from sea hares in Japanese waters. Although earlier studies indicated the potent antitumor activity of aplyronines, their clinical development has never been conducted because of the minute amount of compound available from the natural source. Recent synthetic studies, however, have made it possible to prepare these compounds and analogs for a structure-activity relationship study, and started to uncover their unique action mechanism towards their putative targets, microfilaments. Here, recent findings of small antitumor molecules isolated from Japanese sea hares are reviewed. Sea hares are also known to produce cytotoxic and antimicrobial proteins. In contrast to the small molecules of dietary origin, proteins are the genetic products of sea hares and they are likely to have some primary physiological functions in addition to ecological roles in the sea hare. Based on the biochemical properties and phylogenetic analysis of these proteins, we propose that they belong to one family of molecule, the "Aplysianin A family," although their molecular weights are apparently divided into two groups. Interestingly, the active principles in Aplysia species and Dolabella auricularia were shown to be L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a flavin enzyme that oxidizes an alpha-amino group of the substrate with

  16. Metabolome progression during early gut microbial colonization of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Marcobal, Angela; Yusufaly, Tahir; Higginbottom, Steven; Snyder, Michael; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Mias, George I

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome has been implicated directly in host health, especially host metabolic processes and development of immune responses. These are particularly important in infants where the gut first begins being colonized, and such processes may be modeled in mice. In this investigation we follow longitudinally the urine metabolome of ex-germ-free mice, which are colonized with two bacterial species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Bifidobacterium longum. High-throughput mass spectrometry profiling of urine samples revealed dynamic changes in the metabolome makeup, associated with the gut bacterial colonization, enabled by our adaptation of non-linear time-series analysis to urine metabolomics data. Results demonstrate both gradual and punctuated changes in metabolite production and that early colonization events profoundly impact the nature of small molecules circulating in the host. The identified small molecules are implicated in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolic processes, and offer insights into the dynamic changes occurring during the colonization process, using high-throughput longitudinal methodology. PMID:26118551

  17. Metabolome progression during early gut microbial colonization of gnotobiotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Yusufaly, Tahir; Higginbottom, Steven; Snyder, Michael; Sonnenburg, Justin L.; Mias, George I.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome has been implicated directly in host health, especially host metabolic processes and development of immune responses. These are particularly important in infants where the gut first begins being colonized, and such processes may be modeled in mice. In this investigation we follow longitudinally the urine metabolome of ex-germ-free mice, which are colonized with two bacterial species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Bifidobacterium longum. High-throughput mass spectrometry profiling of urine samples revealed dynamic changes in the metabolome makeup, associated with the gut bacterial colonization, enabled by our adaptation of non-linear time-series analysis to urine metabolomics data. Results demonstrate both gradual and punctuated changes in metabolite production and that early colonization events profoundly impact the nature of small molecules circulating in the host. The identified small molecules are implicated in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolic processes, and offer insights into the dynamic changes occurring during the colonization process, using high-throughput longitudinal methodology. PMID:26118551

  18. Class I and class II major histocompatibility molecules play a role in bone marrow-derived macrophage development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Simske, S. J.; Beharka, A. A.; Balch, S.; Luttges, M. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play significant roles in T cell development and immune function. We show that MHCI- and MHCII-deficient mice have low numbers of macrophage precursors and circulating monocytes, as well as abnormal bone marrow cell colony-stimulating factor type 1 secretion and bone composition. We suggest that MHCI and MHCII molecules play a significant role in macrophage development.

  19. Simple molecules as complex systems.

    PubMed

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Arendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H2(16)O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an "ultra-small-world" property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  20. Molecules in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.; Shull, J.M.

    1984-05-15

    We present calculations of the formation of astrophysically interesting molecules (H/sub 2/, HD, LiH, and HeH/sup +/) by gas-phase reactions during the postrecombination epoch (redshifts z = 300-30). In standard Friedmann cosmological models, H/sub 2//Hroughly-equal10/sup -6/, HD/H/sub 2/roughly-equal10/sup -4.5/, and LiH/H/sub 2/roughly-equal10/sup -6.5/. These molecules may dominate the cooling and trigger the collapse of primordial gas clouds. The dipole rotational transitions of HD and LiH are particularly important at high density and low temperature. Additional molecules form during spherical collapse of these clouds, their rotational cooling keeps the gas temperature between 400 and 1500 K over 12 decades of density increase until the H/sub 2/ lines become optically thick. The existence of molecular coolants at high redshift has significant implications for the first generation of stars and for thermal instabilities in intergalactic matter.

  1. Simple molecules as complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H216O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an “ultra-small-world” property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  2. A single-molecule diode

    PubMed Central

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current–voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur–gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current–voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current–voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. PMID:15956208

  3. Functional molecules in electronic circuits.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Nicolas; Grunder, Sergio; Mayor, Marcel

    2007-08-01

    Molecular electronics is a fascinating field of research contributing to both fundamental science and future technological achievements. A promising starting point for molecular devices is to mimic existing electronic functions to investigate the potential of molecules to enrich and complement existing electronic strategies. Molecules designed and synthesized to be integrated into electronic circuits and to perform an electronic function are presented in this article. The focus is set in particular on rectification and switching based on molecular devices, since the control over these two parameters enables the assembly of memory units, likely the most interesting and economic application of molecular based electronics. Both historical and contemporary solutions to molecular rectification are discussed, although not exhaustively. Several examples of integrated molecular switches that respond to light are presented. Molecular switches responding to an electrochemical signal are also discussed. Finally, supramolecular and molecular systems with intuitive application potential as memory units due to their hysteretic switching are highlighted. Although a particularly attractive feature of molecular electronics is its close cooperation with neighbouring disciplines, this article is written from the point of view of a chemist. Although the focus here is largely on molecular considerations, innovative contributions from physics, electro engineering, nanotechnology and other scientific disciplines are equally important. However, the ability of the chemist to correlate function with structure, to design and to provide tailor-made functional molecules is central to molecular electronics. PMID:17637951

  4. Characteristic changes in carbohydrate profile in the kidneys of hereditary nephrotic mice (ICGN strain).

    PubMed

    Tamura, K; Manabe, N; Uchio, K; Miyamoto, M; Yamaguchi, M; Ogura, A; Yamamoto, Y; Nagano, N; Furuya, Y; Miyamoto, H

    2000-04-01

    The ICR-derived glomerulonephritis (ICGN) mice consist of heterozygous and homozygous groups and are considered to be a good model for human idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. To reveal changes in cell-surface carbohydrate construction, 24 lectins were applied to kidney sections of 10-, 30- and 50-week-old male heterozygous and homozygous ICGN mice and age-matched male ICR mice. Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), which specifically binds to alpha-D-galactopyranosyl groups, showed positive staining in the glomeruli of ICGN mice, but not in those of ICR mice. Positive BSL-I staining was observed only in distal tubules of homozygous ICGN mice. Lectin blotting for BSL-I demonstrated characteristic glycoproteins (45, 58 and 64 kD) in ICGN but not in ICR mice, and the levels of these molecules augmented in homozygous ICGN mice with the progression of renal failure. Moreover, succinylated wheat germ agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, Aleuria aurantia lectin and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I showed positive staining only in the glomeruli of homozygous ICGN mice, but not in those of heterozygous ICGN or ICR mice. The staining intensities of Ricinus communis agglutinin-I, Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E and -L, Lens culinaris agglutinin and Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECL) in the glomeruli of homozygous ICGN mice were stronger than those of heterozygous ICGN and ICR mice. In conclusion, lectin histochemistry provided useful information for the diagnosis and prognosis of nephrotic lesions. Characteristic BSL-I binding glycoproteins may be pathogenic factors which cause renal disease in ICGN mice and are good tools to investigate the molecular mechanism of renal disorders in ICGN mice. PMID:10823724

  5. A crucial role of L-selectin in C protein-induced experimental polymyositis of mice

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Kyosuke; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Matsushita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Okiyama, Naoko; Dernedde, Jens; Weinhart, Marie; Haag, Rainer; Tedder, Thomas F.; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of adhesion molecules in C protein-induced myositis (CIM), a murine model for polymyositis (PM). Methods CIM was induced in wild type mice, L-selectin-deficient (L-selectin-/-) mice, ICAM-1-deficient (ICAM-1-/-) mice, and both L-selectin- and ICAM-1-deficient (L-selectin-/-ICAM-1-/-) mice. The severity of myositis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and mRNA expression in the inflamed muscles were examined. The effect of dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS), a synthetic inhibitor that suppresses the function of L-selectin and endothelial P-selectin, was also examined. Results L-selectin-/- mice and L-selectin-/-ICAM-1-/- mice developed significantly less severe myositis compared to wild type mice, while ICAM-1 deficiency did not inhibit the development of myositis. L-selectin-/- mice transferred with wild type T cells developed myositis. Wild type mice treated with dPGS significantly diminished the severity of myositis compared to control-treated wild type mice. Conclusions These data indicate that L-selectin plays a major role in the development of CIM, whereas ICAM-1 plays a lesser, if any, role in the development of CIM. L-selectin-targeted therapy may be a candidate for the treatment of PM. PMID:24644046

  6. Exploration of target molecules for molecular imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higashikawa, Kei; Akada, Naoki; Yagi, Katsuharu; Watanabe, Keiko; Kamino, Shinichiro; Kanayama, Yousuke; Hiromura, Makoto; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could discriminate each inflamed area of IBD model mice clearly. {sup {yields}18}F-FDG PET could not discriminate the difference of pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors expression was different by pathogenic mechanism. {yields} Cytokines and cytokine receptors would be new target molecules for IBD imaging. -- Abstract: Molecular imaging technology is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the efficacy evaluation of various drug therapies for it. However, it is difficult to elucidate directly the relationships between the responsible molecules and IBD using existing probes. Therefore, the development of an alternative probe that is able to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism and provide information on the appropriate guidelines for treatment is earnestly awaited. In this study, we investigated pathognomonic molecules in the intestines of model mice. The accumulation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in the inflamed area of the intestines of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)- or indomethacin (IND)-induced IBD model mice was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and autoradiography to confirm the inflamed area. The results suggested that the inflammation was selectively induced in the colons of mice by the administration of DSS, whereas it was induced mainly in the ilea and the proximal colons of mice by the administration of IND. To explore attractive target molecules for the molecular imaging of IBD, we evaluated the gene expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors in the inflamed area of the intestines of both model mice. We found that the expression levels of cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly increased during the progression of IBD, whereas the expression levels were decreased as the mucosa began to heal. In particular, the expression levels of these molecules had already changed before the symptoms of IBD appeared. In

  7. Small-molecule inhibitors of ricin and Shiga toxins.

    PubMed

    Wahome, Paul G; Robertus, Jon D; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the successes and continuing challenges associated with the identification of small-molecule inhibitors of ricin and Shiga toxins, members of the RNA N-glycosidase family of toxins that irreversibly inactivate eukaryotic ribosomes through the depurination of a conserved adenosine residue within the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) of 28S rRNA. Virtual screening of chemical libraries has led to the identification of at least three broad classes of small molecules that bind in or near the toxin's active sites and thereby interfere with RNA N-glycosidase activity. Rational design is being used to improve the specific activity and solubility of a number of these compounds. High-throughput cell-based assays have also led to the identification of small molecules that partially, or in some cases, completely protect cells from ricin- and Shiga-toxin-induced death. A number of these recently identified compounds act on cellular proteins associated with intracellular trafficking or pro-inflammatory/cell death pathways, and one was reported to be sufficient to protect mice in a ricin challenge model. PMID:22006183

  8. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause pregnancy complications in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Mimura, Kazuya; Morishita, Yuki; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Ogura, Toshinobu; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Aoshima, Hisae; Shishido, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Yuichi; Mayumi, Tadanori; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Norio; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Yanagihara, Itaru; Saito, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials has raised concerns about their potential risks to human health. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles can cross the placenta barrier in pregnant mice and cause neurotoxicity in their offspring, but a more detailed understanding of the effects of nanoparticles on pregnant animals remains elusive. Here, we show that silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm and 35 nm, respectively, can cause pregnancy complications when injected intravenously into pregnant mice. The silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were found in the placenta, fetal liver and fetal brain. Mice treated with these nanoparticles had smaller uteri and smaller fetuses than untreated controls. Fullerene molecules and larger (300 and 1,000 nm) silica particles did not induce these complications. These detrimental effects are linked to structural and functional abnormalities in the placenta on the maternal side, and are abolished when the surfaces of the silica nanoparticles are modified with carboxyl and amine groups.

  9. Mice and Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Shively; Thompson, Charles L.

    Observations and experiments with mice, developed and tested at the Pennsylvania Advancement School with underachieving boys in grades seven and eight, are described in this teachers' guide which includes copies of student worksheets for exercises needing them. In addition to lists of materials and procedural suggestions, ideas for guiding…

  10. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1%(which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  11. MICE Construction Status

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2008-02-21

    MICE, the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, is an approved experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. In this paper, we briefly review the aims of the experiment, give an overview of the system, and indicate the design and/or construction status of the various major subsystems that comprise the experiment. First beam is expected in January 2008.

  12. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  13. Immunotherapy toxic in obese mice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    New research shows immunotherapy can cause lethal inflammation in both young and aged mice that are obese. Restricting calories in aged mice protected them from toxicity, and giving young obese mice a drug for autoimmune disease prevented the fatal reactions. PMID:25583780

  14. [Oncogenesis in transgenic mice].

    PubMed

    Shvemberger, I N; Ermilov, A N

    1994-01-01

    Oncogenesis in transgenic mice is at present a model, most adequately reflecting the natural conditions of tumor development. One of more important traits of this model is that it allows to study malignant growth simultaneously at all the structure-function levels in the context of the whole organism. This paper is a review of results of a series of experiments in which the localization of tumors was dependent or independent on the tissue specificity of a promoter, as well as development of multiple tumors with the use of viral regulatory sequences in genetic constructions. It has been shown that although a transgene is expressed in most of the tissues, tumors develop in some particular tissues only. These observations are interpreted by some authors in favour of the concept of multistep cancerogenesis. In this view, of primary importance are the results of studies on oncogenesis in transgenic mice, which contradict this concept and are regarded by their authors as an evidence of the possibility of a one-step transformation of normal cell into malignant one. The analysis of the obtained material enabled us to put forward an assumption that the key role in oncogenesis is played not only by certain genetic disturbances, but also by multi-level homeostatic mechanisms. Apparently, it is just the transgenic mice with cellular or viral oncogenes in their genome that represent a more adequate model for the detection of certain molecular-biological mechanisms underlying these disturbances. Also, of much importance is abundant material accumulated by now on oncogenesis of transgenic mice which shows a possibility of the effective use of various genetic constructions with prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulatory sequences, a possibility to induce not only tumors of some particular tissues, but also multiple hyperplastic and neoplastic changes in one and the same mouse. Development of tumors in such transgenic mice can be regarded as a model of different types of cancer disease

  15. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  16. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  17. Nanoelectronics of a DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.; Lyra, M. L.; Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the nanoelectronic properties of a double-strand quasiperiodic DNA molecule, modeled by a tight-binding effective Hamiltonian, which includes contributions from the nucleobasis system as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our theoretical approach makes use of Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, to investigate the electronic density of states, the electronic transmissivity, and the current-voltage characteristic curves of sequences of a DNA finite segment.We compared the electronic transport found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  18. Differential effect of HLA class-I versus class-II transgenes on human T and B cell reconstitution and function in NRG mice

    PubMed Central

    Majji, Sai; Wijayalath, Wathsala; Shashikumar, Soumya; Pow-Sang, Luis; Villasante, Eileen; Brumeanu, Teodor D.; Casares, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice expressing Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I or II transgenes have been generated, but the role of class I vs class II on human T and B cell reconstitution and function has not been investigated in detail. Herein we show that NRG (NOD.RagKO.IL2RγcKO) mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules (DRAG mice) and those co-expressing HLA-DR4 and HLA-A2 molecules (DRAGA mice) did not differ in their ability to develop human T and B cells, to reconstitute cytokine-secreting CD4 T and CD8 T cells, or to undergo immunoglobulin class switching. In contrast, NRG mice expressing only HLA-A2 molecules (A2 mice) reconstituted lower numbers of CD4 T cells but similar numbers of CD8 T cells. The T cells from A2 mice were deficient at secreting cytokines, and their B cells could not undergo immunoglobulin class switching. The inability of A2 mice to undergo immunoglobulin class switching is due to deficient CD4 helper T cell function. Upon immunization, the frequency and cytotoxicity of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in DRAGA mice was significantly higher than in A2 mice. The results indicated a multifactorial effect of the HLA-DR4 transgene on development and function of human CD4 T cells, antigen-specific human CD8 T cells, and immunoglobulin class switching. PMID:27323875

  19. Differential effect of HLA class-I versus class-II transgenes on human T and B cell reconstitution and function in NRG mice.

    PubMed

    Majji, Sai; Wijayalath, Wathsala; Shashikumar, Soumya; Pow-Sang, Luis; Villasante, Eileen; Brumeanu, Teodor D; Casares, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice expressing Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I or II transgenes have been generated, but the role of class I vs class II on human T and B cell reconstitution and function has not been investigated in detail. Herein we show that NRG (NOD.RagKO.IL2RγcKO) mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules (DRAG mice) and those co-expressing HLA-DR4 and HLA-A2 molecules (DRAGA mice) did not differ in their ability to develop human T and B cells, to reconstitute cytokine-secreting CD4 T and CD8 T cells, or to undergo immunoglobulin class switching. In contrast, NRG mice expressing only HLA-A2 molecules (A2 mice) reconstituted lower numbers of CD4 T cells but similar numbers of CD8 T cells. The T cells from A2 mice were deficient at secreting cytokines, and their B cells could not undergo immunoglobulin class switching. The inability of A2 mice to undergo immunoglobulin class switching is due to deficient CD4 helper T cell function. Upon immunization, the frequency and cytotoxicity of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in DRAGA mice was significantly higher than in A2 mice. The results indicated a multifactorial effect of the HLA-DR4 transgene on development and function of human CD4 T cells, antigen-specific human CD8 T cells, and immunoglobulin class switching. PMID:27323875

  20. Early Growth Response Protein 1 Promotes Restenosis by Upregulating Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Vein Graft

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kui; Cao, Jian; Dong, Ran; Du, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To verify the relationship between Egr-1 and vein graft restenosis and investigate the related mechanisms. Methods. Mouse vein graft models were established in Egr-1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. The vein grafts in the mice were taken for pathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. The endothelial cells (ECs) were stimulated by using a computer-controlled cyclic stress unit. BrdU staining and PCR were used to detect ECs proliferation activity and Egr-1 and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, respectively. Western-blot analysis was also used to detect expression of Egr-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) proteins. Results. The lumens of vein grafts in Egr-1 KO mice were wider than in WT mice. ECs proliferation after mechanical stretch stimulation was suppressed by Egr-1 knockout (P < 0.05). Both in vein grafts and ECs from WT mice after mechanical stretch stimulation, mRNA expression and protein of Egr-1 and ICAM-1 showed increases (P < 0.05). However, ICAM-1 expression was significantly suppressed in ECs from Egr-1 knockout mice (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Egr-1 may promote ECs proliferation and result in vein graft restenosis by upregulating the expression of ICAM-1. As a key factor of vein graft restenosis, it could be a target for the prevention of restenosis after CABG surgery. PMID:24386503

  1. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  2. Spin squeezing a cold molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we present a concrete proposal for spin squeezing the cold ground-state polar paramagnetic molecule OH, a system currently under fine control in the laboratory. In contrast to existing work, we consider a single, noninteracting molecule with angular momentum greater than 1 /2 . Starting from an experimentally relevant effective Hamiltonian, we identify an adiabatic regime where different combinations of static electric and magnetic fields can be used to realize the single-axis twisting Hamiltonian of Kitagawa and Ueda [M. Kitagawa and M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. A 47, 5138 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevA.47.5138], the uniform field Hamiltonian proposed by Law et al. [C. K. Law, H. T. Ng, and P. T. Leung, Phys. Rev. A 63, 055601 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.63.055601], and a model of field propagation in a Kerr medium considered by Agarwal and Puri [G. S. Agarwal and R. R. Puri, Phys. Rev. A 39, 2969 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevA.39.2969]. We then consider the situation in which nonadiabatic effects are quite large and show that the effective Hamiltonian supports spin squeezing even in this case. We provide analytical expressions as well as numerical calculations, including optimization of field strengths and accounting for the effects of field misalignment. Our results have consequences for applications such as precision spectroscopy, techniques such as magnetometry, and stereochemical effects such as the orientation-to-alignment transition.

  3. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the principal computational approaches and their accuracy for the study of electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. We include a number of examples from our work that illustrate the range of application. We show how full configuration interaction benchmark calculations were instrumental in improving the understanding of the computational requirements for obtaining accurate results for diatomic spectroscopy. With this understanding it is now possible to compute radiative lifetimes accurate to within 10% for systems involving first- and second-row atoms. We consider the determination of the infrared vibrational transition probabilities for the ground states of SiO and NO, based on a globally accurate dipole moment function. We show how we were able to assign the a(sup "5)II state of CO as the upper state in the recently observed emission bands of CO in an Ar matrix. We next discuss the assignment of the photoelectron detachment spectra of NO and the alkali oxide negative ions. We then present several examples illustrating the state-of-the-art in determining radiative lifetimes for valence-valence and valence-Rydberg transitions. We next compare the molecular spectroscopy of the valence isoelectronic B2, Al2, and AlB molecules. The final examples consider systems involving transition metal atoms, which illustrate the difficulty in describing states with different numbers of d electrons.

  4. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-11-06

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  5. New Breed of Mice May Improve Accuracy for Preclinical Testing of Cancer Drugs | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A new breed of lab animals, dubbed “glowing head mice,” may do a better job than conventional mice in predicting the success of experimental cancer drugs—while also helping to meet an urgent need for more realistic preclinical animal models. The mice were developed to tolerate often-used light-emitting molecules, such as luciferase from fireflies and green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish. These “optical reporters” are useful for monitoring the effect of experimental therapies in live animals over time because they emit an immediate and easily detected light signal showing whether a tumor inside the animal’s body is shrinking as desired.

  6. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  7. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  8. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  9. Mechanical studies on single molecules: general considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Elements of molecular biology * Advantages and drawbacks of single molecule studies * Order of magnitude of the relevant parameters at the single molecule level * Single molecule manipulation techniques * Comparison of the different techniques * DNA mechanical properties * Conclusion * Bibliography

  10. Enhanced Susceptibility to Citrobacter rodentium Infection in MicroRNA-155-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    John, Victoria; Walker, Alan W.; Hill, Jennifer L.; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Lawley, Trevor D.; Mastroeni, Pietro; Frankel, Gadi; Enright, Anton J.; Vigorito, Elena; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding molecules that control gene expression posttranscriptionally, with microRNA-155 (miR-155) one of the first to be implicated in immune regulation. Here, we show that miR-155-deficient mice are less able to eradicate a mucosal Citrobacter rodentium infection than wild-type C57BL/6 mice. miR-155-deficient mice exhibited prolonged colonization associated with a higher C. rodentium burden in gastrointestinal tissue and spread into systemic tissues. Germinal center formation and humoral immune responses against C. rodentium were severely impaired in infected miR-155-deficient mice. A similarly susceptible phenotype was observed in μMT mice reconstituted with miR-155-deficient B cells, indicating that miR-155 is required intrinsically for mediating protection against this predominantly luminal bacterial pathogen. PMID:23264052

  11. MICE Staging and Status

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2010-03-30

    Ionization cooling will be a key technique for a high-intensity Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a high-precision, staged accelerator experiment being performed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Its goal is the first demonstration, with 0.1% resolution, of the feasibility of reducing the transverse emittance of a beam of muons by ionization cooling in low-Z absorbers. MICE is being staged in the following steps: I. Creating and characterizing a beam of muons; II. Measuring their emittance; III. Systematic comparison of successive measurements; IV. Inserting absorber; V. Reaccelerating longitudinally; and VI. Complete '10%-cooling' test. Step I is currently in progress with Step II to commence next year; completion of Step VI is anticipated in approx2012.

  12. MICE Staging and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2010-03-01

    Ionization cooling will be a key technique for a high-intensity Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a high-precision, staged accelerator experiment being performed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Its goal is the first demonstration, with 0.1% resolution, of the feasibility of reducing the transverse emittance of a beam of muons by ionization cooling in low-Z absorbers. MICE is being staged in the following steps: I. Creating and characterizing a beam of muons; II. Measuring their emittance; III. Systematic comparison of successive measurements; IV. Inserting absorber; V. Reaccelerating longitudinally; and VI. Complete "10%-cooling" test. Step I is currently in progress with Step II to commence next year; completion of Step VI is anticipated in ˜2012.

  13. Small-molecule trkB agonists promote axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    English, Arthur W.; Liu, Kevin; Nicolini, Jennifer M.; Mulligan, Amanda M.; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-01-01

    Treatments with two-small molecule tropomyosin receptor kinase B (trkB) ligands, 7,8 dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) and deoxygedunin, were evaluated for their ability to promote the regeneration of cut axons in injured peripheral nerves in mice in which sensory and motor axons are marked by YFP. Peripheral nerves were cut and repaired with grafts from strain-matched, nonfluorescent donors and secured in place with fibrin glue. Lengths of profiles of regenerating YFP+ axons were measured 2 wk later from confocal images. Axon regeneration was enhanced when the fibrin glue contained dilutions of 500-nM solution of either small-molecule trkB agonist. In mice in which the neurotrophin receptor trkB is knocked out selectively in neurons, axon regeneration is very weak, and topical treatment with 7,8 DHF had no effect on axon regeneration. Similar treatments with deoxygedunin had only a modest effect. In conditional BDNF knockout mice, topical treatments with either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin resulted in a reversal of the poor regeneration found in controls and produced significant enhancement of regeneration. In WT mice treated with 2 wk of daily i.p. injections of either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin (5 mg/kg), regenerating axon profiles were nearly twice as long as in controls. Restoration of direct muscle responses evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation to pretransection levels over an 8-wk survival period was found only in the treated mice. Treatments with either small-molecule trkB agonist enhanced axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation after peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:24043773

  14. Small-molecule trkB agonists promote axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    English, Arthur W; Liu, Kevin; Nicolini, Jennifer M; Mulligan, Amanda M; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-10-01

    Treatments with two-small molecule tropomyosin receptor kinase B (trkB) ligands, 7,8 dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) and deoxygedunin, were evaluated for their ability to promote the regeneration of cut axons in injured peripheral nerves in mice in which sensory and motor axons are marked by YFP. Peripheral nerves were cut and repaired with grafts from strain-matched, nonfluorescent donors and secured in place with fibrin glue. Lengths of profiles of regenerating YFP(+) axons were measured 2 wk later from confocal images. Axon regeneration was enhanced when the fibrin glue contained dilutions of 500-nM solution of either small-molecule trkB agonist. In mice in which the neurotrophin receptor trkB is knocked out selectively in neurons, axon regeneration is very weak, and topical treatment with 7,8 DHF had no effect on axon regeneration. Similar treatments with deoxygedunin had only a modest effect. In conditional BDNF knockout mice, topical treatments with either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin resulted in a reversal of the poor regeneration found in controls and produced significant enhancement of regeneration. In WT mice treated with 2 wk of daily i.p. injections of either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin (5 mg/kg), regenerating axon profiles were nearly twice as long as in controls. Restoration of direct muscle responses evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation to pretransection levels over an 8-wk survival period was found only in the treated mice. Treatments with either small-molecule trkB agonist enhanced axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation after peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:24043773

  15. Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Leonor I.; Friedman, Lorraine

    1972-01-01

    Virulence and infectivity of nine strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were investigated in groups of mice which were inoculated intranasally or intravenously, and some of each were treated with corticosteroids. Fatal infections were not often seen among untreated mice, but mortality usually occurred when corticosteroids were given, regardless of the route of fungus inoculation. Prior treatment did not uniformly increase the incidence of infection, however; only in the case of intranasally inoculated mice was this effect seen. Most strains appeared to be more virulent when administered intravenously, with the exception of a single strain which, under the influence of corticosteroids, repeatedly displayed greatest virulence when given intranasally. All animals that died early in the course of the disease, irrespective of route of inoculation, always had acute pulmonary lesions and usually no other organ was involved. Animals which died later or were sacrificed always had chronic lung lesions. Whether or not chronically diseased animals had additional organ involvement correlated with how the organisms were administered; intravenously inoculated animals usually had extrapulmonary as well as pulmonary lesions, but lesions of those inoculated intranasally were almost exclusively pulmonary. Corticosteroids did not alter the histologic characteristics of either the acute or the chronic type of lesion, but the lesions of treated animals were usually more extensive. Most of the survivors appeared healthy even when infection was extensive. Images PMID:4637603

  16. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya

    2010-04-02

    The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can change dramatically even under constant laser excitation. The phenomenon is frequently called "blinking" and involves molecules switching between high and low intensity states.[1-3] In additional to spontaneous blinking, the fluorescence of some special fluorophores, such as cyanine dyes and photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, can be switched on and off by choice using a second laser. Recent single-molecule spectroscopy investigations have shed light on mechanisms of single molecule blinking and photoswitching. This ability to controllably switch single molecules led to the invention of a novel fluorescence microscopy with nanometer spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit.

  17. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans. PMID:26079769

  18. The role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in leucocyte recruitment induced by exogenous methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yang; Lei, Xi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite formed during glucose, protein and fatty acid metabolism. In hyperglycaemic conditions, increased MG level has been linked to the development of diabetes and its vascular complications at the macrovascular and microvascular levels where inflammation plays a role. To study the mechanism of MG-induced inflammation in vivo, we applied MG locally to healthy mice and used intravital microscopy to investigate the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in cremasteric microvasculature. Administration of MG (25 and 50 mg/kg) to the tissue dose-dependently induced leucocyte recruitment at 4·0–5·5 hr, with 84–92% recruited cells being neutrophils. Such MG treatment up-regulated the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, but not vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway contributed to MG-induced up-regulation of these adhesion molecules and leucocyte recruitment. The role of the up-regulated endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment was determined by applying specific functional blocking antibodies to MG-treated animals and observing changes in leucocyte recruitment parameters. Our data demonstrate that the up-regulation of P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contributes to the increased leucocyte rolling flux, reduced leucocyte rolling velocity, and increased leucocyte adhesion, respectively. Our results reveal the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in microvasculature, an inflammatory condition related to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:22681228

  19. Loss of cell adhesion molecule CHL1 improves homeostatic adaptation and survival in hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Sun, J; Rong, W; Zhao, T; Li, D H; Ding, X; Wu, L Y; Wu, K; Schachner, M; Xiao, Z C; Zhu, L L; Fan, M

    2013-01-01

    Close homologue of L1 (CHL1) is a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule that is critical for brain development and for the maintenance of neural circuits in adults. Recent studies revealed that CHL1 has diverse roles and is involved in the regulation of recovery after spinal cord injury. CHL1 expression was downregulated in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem after the induction of acute hypoxia (AH). In the current study, we sought to address the role of CHL1 in regulating homeostasis responses to hypoxia using CHL1-knockout (CHL1(-/-)) mice. We found that, compared with wild-type littermates, CHL1(-/-) mice showed a dramatically lower mortality rate and an augmented ventilatory response after they were subjected to AH. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that CHL1 was expressed in the carotid body (CB), the key oxygen sensor in rodents, and CHL1 expression level in the CB as assayed by western blot was decreased after hypoxic exposure. The number of glomus cells and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker for glomus cells) in the CB of CHL1(-/-) mice appeared to be increased compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. In addition, in the ex vivo CB preparation, hypoxia induced a significantly greater afferent nerve discharge in CHL1(-/-) mice compared with CHL1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, the arterial blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels of CHL1(-/-) mice were also significantly higher than those of CHL1(+/+) mice. Our findings first demonstrate that CHL1 is a novel intrinsic factor that is involved in CB function and in the ventilatory response to AH. PMID:23949217

  20. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  1. Photoluminescence of a Plasmonic Molecule.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da; Byers, Chad P; Wang, Lin-Yung; Hoggard, Anneli; Hoener, Ben; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Chang, Wei-Shun; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2015-07-28

    Photoluminescent Au nanoparticles are appealing for biosensing and bioimaging applications because of their non-photobleaching and non-photoblinking emission. The mechanism of one-photon photoluminescence from plasmonic nanostructures is still heavily debated though. Here, we report on the one-photon photoluminescence of strongly coupled 50 nm Au nanosphere dimers, the simplest plasmonic molecule. We observe emission from coupled plasmonic modes as revealed by single-particle photoluminescence spectra in comparison to correlated dark-field scattering spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the dimers is found to be surprisingly similar to the constituent monomers, suggesting that the increased local electric field of the dimer plays a minor role, in contradiction to several proposed mechanisms. Aided by electromagnetic simulations of scattering and absorption spectra, we conclude that our data are instead consistent with a multistep mechanism that involves the emission due to radiative decay of surface plasmons generated from excited electron-hole pairs following interband absorption. PMID:26165983

  2. Diamond Molecules Found in Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. M. K.; Dahl, J. E. P.; Liu, S. G.; Olmstead, M. M.; Buerki, P. R.; Gat, R.

    We recently reported [1,2] the discovery and isolation of new members of the hydrogen-terminated diamond series, ˜1 to ˜2 nm sized higher diamondoids from petroleum. Crystallographic studies [1,2] revealed a wealth of diamond molecules that are nanometer-sized rods, helices, discs, pyramids, etc. Highly rigid, well-defined, readily derivatizable structures make them valuable molecular building blocks for nanotechnology. We now produce certain higher diamondoids in gram quantities. Although more stable than graphite particles of comparable size, higher diamondoids are extraordinarily difficult to synthesize. Attempts to synthesize them were abandoned in the 1980's. We examined extracts of diamond-containing materials synthesized by CO2 laser-induced gas-phase synthesis [3] and commercial CVD in an attempt to detect diamantane to undecamantane. However, high-sensitivity GCMS detected no diamondoids in these materials.

  3. Nonadiabatic calculations on hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Since its infancy quantum mechanics has treated hydrogen molecule as a test bed. Contemporary spectroscopy is able to supply the dissociation energy (D0) of H2 with the accuracy of 3 . 7 .10-4cm-1 , while current theoretical predictions are 10-3cm-1 in error. Both the uncertainties are already smaller than the quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects contributing to D0, which poses a particular challenge to theoreticians. Undoubtedly, in order to increase the predictive power of theory one has to not only account for the multitude of the tiny relativistic and QED effects but, especially, significantly increase precision of the largest component of D0--the nonrelativistic contribution. We approach the problem of solving the Schroedinger equation, equipped with new methodology, with the target precision of D0 set at the level of 10-7cm-1 .

  4. New molecules for hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Skutella, T; Nitsch, R

    2001-02-01

    Pathfinding by developing axons towards their proper targets is an essential step in establishing appropriate neuronal connections. Recent work involving cell culture assays and molecular biology strategies, including knockout animals, strongly indicates that a complex network of guidance signals regulates the formation of hippocampal connections during development. Outgrowing axons are routed towards the hippocampal formation by specific expression of long-range cues, which include secreted class 3 semaphorins, netrin 1 and Slit proteins. Local membrane- or substrate-anchored molecules, such as ligands of the ephrin A subclass, provide layer-specific positional information. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal guidance during hippocampal development might be of importance in making therapeutic use of sprouting fibers, which are produced following the loss of afferents in CNS lesion. PMID:11164941

  5. Energy transfer mechanisms between molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Reliable rate coefficients for energy transfer and relaxation phenomena are needed in order to do the theoretical modeling which is necessary for accomplishing the following objectives: understanding and justifying proposed laser systems, determining limitations, identifying control parameters, and scaling to space-power requirements. Modeling also establishes the criteria to be followed for lasant selection. Lack of knowledge of rate coefficients is invariably the biggest obstacle to successful modeling. Existing theoretical methods are discussed, sources of error are identified, and transfer laser criteria suggested by the theory are listed. The emphasis is on vibrational-vibrational (V-V) energy transfer caused by both short range and long range interactions between molecules. Special attention is given to the importance of near-resonant collisional and dipole-dipole transfer. A technique is proposed for significantly improving the theoretical predictions of rate coefficients.

  6. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Rupp, B.

    1996-06-11

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an X-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the X-ray diffraction pattern. 4 figs.

  7. Electrorheological crystallization of proteins and other molecules

    DOEpatents

    Craig, George D.; Rupp, Bernhard

    1996-01-01

    An electrorheological crystalline mass of a molecule is formed by dispersing the molecule in a dispersion fluid and subjecting the molecule dispersion to a uniform electrical field for a period of time during which time an electrorheological crystalline mass is formed. Molecules that may be used to form an electrorheological crystalline mass include any organic or inorganic molecule which has a permanent dipole and/or which is capable of becoming an induced dipole in the presence of an electric field. The molecules used to form the electrorheological crystalline mass are preferably macromolecules, such as biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipoproteins and viruses. Molecules are crystallized by a method in which an electric field is maintained for a period of time after the electrorheological crystalline mass has formed during which time at least some of the molecules making up the electrorheological crystalline mass form a crystal lattice. The three dimensional structure of a molecule is determined by a method in which an electrorheological crystalline mass of the molecule is formed, an x-ray diffraction pattern of the electrorheological crystalline mass is obtained and the three dimensional structure of the molecule is calculated from the x-ray diffraction pattern.

  8. Deformation of DNA molecules by hydrodynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Lee, Yi-Kuen; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2003-12-01

    The motion of a DNA molecule in a solvent flow reflects the deformation of a nano/microscale flexible mass spring structure by the forces exerted by the fluid molecules. The dynamics of individual molecules can reveal both fundamental properties of the DNA and basic understanding of the complex rheological properties of long-chain molecules. In this study, we report the dynamics of isolated DNA molecules under homogeneous extensional flow. Hydrodynamic focusing generates homogeneous extensional flow with uniform velocity in the transverse direction. The deformation of individual DNA molecules in the flow was visualized with video fluorescence microscopy. A coil stretch transition was observed when the Deborah number (De) is larger than 0.8. With a sudden stopping of the flow, the DNA molecule relaxes and recoils. The longest relaxation time of T2 DNA was determined to be 0.63 s when scaling viscosity to 0.9 cP.

  9. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  10. Impaired conditioned taste aversion learning in spinophilin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Stafstrom-Davis, C A; Ouimet, C C; Feng, J; Allen, P B; Greengard, P; Houpt, T A

    2001-01-01

    Plasticity in dendritic spines may underlie learning and memory. Spinophilin, a protein enriched in dendritic spines, has the properties of a scaffolding protein and is believed to regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics affecting dendritic spine morphology. It also binds protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1), an enzyme that regulates dendritic spine physiology. In this study, we tested the role of spinophilin in conditioned taste aversion learning (CTA) using transgenic spinophilin knockout mice. CTA is a form of associative learning in which an animal rejects a food that has been paired previously with a toxic effect (e.g., a sucrose solution paired with a malaise-inducing injection of lithium chloride). Acquisition and extinction of CTA was tested in spinophilin knockout and wild-type mice using taste solutions (sucrose or sodium chloride) or flavors (Kool-Aid) paired with moderate or high doses of LiCl (0.15 M, 20 or 40 mL/kg). When sucrose or NaCl solutions were paired with a moderate dose of LiCl, spinophilin knockout mice were unable to learn a CTA. At the higher dose, knockout mice acquired a CTA but extinguished more rapidly than wild-type mice. A more salient flavor stimulus (taste plus odor) revealed similar CTA learning at both doses of LiCl in both knockouts and wild types. Sensory processing in the knockouts appeared normal because knockout mice and wild-type mice expressed identical unconditioned taste preferences in two-bottle tests, and identical lying-on-belly responses to acute LiCl. We conclude that spinophilin is a candidate molecule required for normal CTA learning. PMID:11584074

  11. Electrophysiology and metabolism of caveolin-3-overexpressing mice.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jan M; Horikawa, Yousuke T; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E; Vincent, Kevin P; Tyan, Leonid; Yu, Judith K; McCulloch, Andrew D; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Patel, Hemal H; Roth, David M

    2016-05-01

    Caveolin-3 (Cav-3) plays a critical role in organizing signaling molecules and ion channels involved in cardiac conduction and metabolism. Mutations in Cav-3 are implicated in cardiac conduction abnormalities and myopathies. Additionally, cardiac-specific overexpression of Cav-3 (Cav-3 OE) is protective against ischemic and hypertensive injury, suggesting a potential role for Cav-3 in basal cardiac electrophysiology and metabolism involved in stress adaptation. We hypothesized that overexpression of Cav-3 may alter baseline cardiac conduction and metabolism. We examined: (1) ECG telemetry recordings at baseline and during pharmacological interventions, (2) ion channels involved in cardiac conduction with immunoblotting and computational modeling, and (3) baseline metabolism in Cav-3 OE and transgene-negative littermate control mice. Cav-3 OE mice had decreased heart rates, prolonged PR intervals, and shortened QTc intervals with no difference in activity compared to control mice. Dobutamine or propranolol did not cause significant changes between experimental groups in maximal (dobutamine) or minimal (propranolol) heart rate. Cav-3 OE mice had an overall lower chronotropic response to atropine. The expression of Kv1.4 and Kv4.3 channels, Nav1.5 channels, and connexin 43 were increased in Cav-3 OE mice. A computational model integrating the immunoblotting results indicated shortened action potential duration in Cav-3 OE mice linking the change in channel expression to the observed electrophysiology phenotype. Metabolic profiling showed no gross differences in VO2, VCO2, respiratory exchange ratio, heat generation, and feeding or drinking. In conclusion, Cav-3 OE mice have changes in ECG intervals, heart rates, and cardiac ion channel expression. These findings give novel mechanistic insights into previously reported Cav-3 dependent cardioprotection. PMID:27023865

  12. Age and isolation influence steroids release and chemical signaling in male mice.

    PubMed

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Cavaggioni, Andrea; Redaelli, Marco; Da Dalt, Laura; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2014-05-01

    Social interactions in mice involve olfactory signals, which convey information about the emitter. In turn, the mouse social and physiological status may modify the release of chemical cues. In this study, the influences of age and social isolation on the endocrine response and the release of chemical signals were investigated in male CD1 mice, allocated into four groups: Young Isolated (from weaning till 60days; N=6), Adult Isolated (till 180days; N=6), Young Grouped (6 mice/cage; till 60days; N=18), Adult Grouped (6 mice/cage; till 180days; N=18). Mice were transferred in a clean cage to observe the micturition pattern and then sacrificed. Body and organs weights, serum testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, corticosterone and the ratio Major Urinary Protein/creatinine were measured. Urinary volatile molecules potentially involved in pheromonal communication were identified. Androgen secretion was greater in isolated mice (P<0.05), suggesting a greater reactivity of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal axis. Grouped mice presented a higher degree of adrenal activity, and young mice showed a higher serum corticosterone (P<0.05) suggesting a greater stimulation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal axis. The micturition pattern typical of dominant male, consisting in voiding numerous droplets, was observed in Young Isolated mice only, which showed a higher protein/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Urinary 2-s-butyl-thiazoline was higher in both Young and Adult Isolated mice (P<0.005). Young Isolated mice showed the most prominent difference in both micturition pattern and potentially active substance emission, while long term isolation resulted in a less extreme phenotype; therefore social isolation had a higher impact on young mice hormone and pheromone release. PMID:24525008

  13. Antiobesity Effect of a Small Molecule Repressor of RORγ

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mi Ra; He, Yuanjun; Khan, Tanya M.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A.; Unger, Thaddeus J.; White, David W.; Khan, Susan; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor RORγ is a key regulator for T helper 17 (TH17) cell differentiation, which regulates metabolic and circadian rhythm genes in peripheral tissues. Previously, it was shown that the small molecule inverse agonist of RORγ SR1555 [1-(4-((4′-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl) ethanone] suppressed TH17 differentiation and stimulated induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells. Here, we show that treatment of cultured pre-adipocyctes with SR1555 represses the expression of RORγ while leading to increased expression of FGF21 and adipoQ. Chronic administration of SR1555 to obese diabetic mice resulted in a modest reduction in food intake accompanied with significant reduction in fat mass, resulting in reduced body weight and improved insulin sensitivity. Analysis ex vivo of treated mice demonstrates that SR1555 induced expression of the thermogenic gene program in fat depots. Further studies in cultured cells showed that SR1555 inhibited activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and increased fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these results suggest that pharmacological repression of RORγ may represent a strategy for treatment of obesity by increasing thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, while inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase activity results in a reduction of serum free fatty acids, leading to improved peripheral insulin sensitivity. PMID:25904554

  14. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  15. Humanized hemato-lymphoid system mice

    PubMed Central

    Theocharides, Alexandre P.A.; Rongvaux, Anthony; Fritsch, Kristin; Flavell, Richard A.; Manz, Markus G.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, incrementally improved xenograft mouse models, supporting the engraftment and development of a human hemato-lymphoid system, have been developed and now represent an important research tool in the field. The most significant contributions made by means of humanized mice are the identification of normal and leukemic hematopoietic stem cells, the characterization of the human hematopoietic hierarchy, and their use as preclinical therapy models for malignant hematopoietic disorders. Successful xenotransplantation depends on three major factors: tolerance by the mouse host, correct spatial location, and appropriately cross-reactive support and interaction factors such as cytokines and major histocompatibility complex molecules. Each of these can be modified. Experimental approaches include the genetic modification of mice to faithfully express human support factors as non-cross-reactive cytokines, to create free niche space, the co-transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells, the implantation of humanized ossicles or other stroma, and the implantation of human thymic tissue. Besides the source of hematopoietic cells, the conditioning regimen and the route of transplantation also significantly affect human hematopoietic development in vivo. We review here the achievements, most recent developments, and the remaining challenges in the generation of pre-clinically-predictive systems for human hematology and immunology, closely resembling the human situation in a xenogeneic mouse environment. PMID:26721800

  16. Dependence of proteoglycan induced arthritis in BALB/c mice on the development of autoantibodies to high density proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Wooley, P H; Siegner, S W; Whalen, J D; Karvonen, R L; Fernández-Madrid, F

    1992-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunised with high or low density native human cartilage proteoglycans, or the respective core proteins obtained from chondroitin ABC lyase digestion. Mice injected with high density native proteoglycans developed arthritis whereas mice injected with low density proteoglycans or with core proteins did not. Analysis of the immune response by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot showed a stronger and more polyspecific response in animals injected with low density proteoglycans compared with mice with arthritis which had been injected with high density proteoglycans. Autoantibodies to mouse high density proteoglycans were only present in mice injected with native human high density proteoglycans, however. The data suggest that an arthritogenic epitope lies within the glycosaminoglycan rich region of the native proteoglycan molecule, which may induce an autoantibody response and subsequently arthritis in BALB/c mice. Images PMID:1417126

  17. Sensitization to and Challenge with Gliadin Induce Pancreatitis and Extrapancreatic Inflammation in HLA-DQ8 Mice: An Animal Model of Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Mi-Young; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Kim, Sun A; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to establish a pathogenetic mechanism of pancreatitis in celiac disease and IgG4-related disease using gluten-sensitive human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ8 transgenic mice. Methods Transgenic mice expressing HLA-DQ8 genes were utilized. Control mice were not sensitized but were fed gliadin-free rice cereal. Experimental groups consisted of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice; nonsensitized mice with cerulein hyperstimulation; and gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation. Results Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation showed significant inflammatory cell infiltrates, fibrosis and acinar atrophy compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. The immunohistochemical analysis showed greater IgG1-positive plasma cells in the inflammatory infiltrates of gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation compared with the control mice and the other experimental groups. Gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice with cerulein hyperstimulation or gliadin-sensitized and gliadin-challenged mice showed IgG1-stained inflammatory cell infiltrates in the extrapancreatic organs, including the bile ducts, salivary glands, kidneys, and lungs. Conclusions Gliadin-sensitization and cerulein hyperstimulation of gluten-sensitive HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice resulted in pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. This animal model suggests that chronic gliadin ingestion in a susceptible individual with the HLA-DQ8 molecule may be associated with pancreatitis and extrapancreatic inflammation. PMID:27114422

  18. Geochemical Origin of Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2013-04-01

    A model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules is presented. Rocks such as peridotites and basalts, which contain ferromagnesian minerals, evolve in the presence of water. Their hydrolysis is an exothermic reaction which generates heat and a release of H2 and of minerals with modified structures. The hydrogen reacts with the CO2 embedded inside the rock or with the CO2 of the environment to form CO in an hydrothermal process. With the N2 of the environment, and with an activation source arising from cosmic radiation, ferromagnesian rocks might evolve towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules, such as peptide like macromolecules which produce amino acids after acid hydrolysis. The reactions concerned are described. The production of hydrothermal CO is discussed in geological sites containing ferromagnesian silicate minerals and the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during Paleoarchaean Era is also discussed. It is concluded that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during Paleoarchaean Era and that macromolecular structures of biological relevance might consequently form during Archaean Eon, as a product of the chemical evolution of the rocks and of their mineral contents. This synthesis of abiotically formed biological molecules is consecutively discussed for meteorites and other planets such as Mars. This model for the geochemical origin of biological molecules has first been proposed in 2008 in the context of reactions involving catalysers such as kaolinite [Bassez 2008a] and then presented in conferences and articles [Bassez 2008b, 2009, 2012; Bassez et al. 2009a to 2012b]. BASSEZ M.P. 2008a Synthèse prébiotique dans les conditions hydrothermales, CNRIUT'08, Lyon 29-30/05/2008, Conf. and open access article:http://liris.cnrs.fr/~cnriut08/actes/ 29 mai 11h-12h40. BASSEZ M.P. 2008b Prebiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions, ISSOL'08, P2-6, Firenze-Italy, 24-29/08/2008. Poster at the

  19. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  20. Coordination programming of photofunctional molecules.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryota; Kusaka, Shinpei; Hayashi, Mikihiro; Nishikawa, Michihiro; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Our recent achievements relating to photofunctional molecules are addressed. Section 1 discloses a new concept of photoisomerization. Pyridylpyrimidine-copper complexes undergo a ring inversion that can be modulated by the redox state of the copper center. In combination with an intermolecular photoelectron transfer (PET) initiated by the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition of the Cu(I) state, we realize photonic regulation of the ring inversion. Section 2 reports on the first examples of heteroleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes. Conventional homoleptic bis(dipyrrinato)zinc(II) complexes suffered from low fluorescence quantum yields, whereas the heteroleptic ones feature bright fluorescence even in polar solvents. Section 3 describes our new findings on Pechmann dye, which was first synthesized in 1882. New synthetic procedures for Pechmann dye using dimethyl bis(arylethynyl)fumarate as a starting material gives rise to its new structural isomer. We also demonstrate potentiality of a donor-acceptor-donor type of Pechmann dye in organic electronics. PMID:23563859

  1. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  2. Staphylococcal enterotoxins bind H-2Db molecules on macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We screened a panel of monoclonal antibodies against selected macrophage cell surface molecules for their ability to inhibit enterotoxin binding to major histocompatibility complex class II-negative C2D (H-2b) macrophages. Two monoclonal antibodies, HB36 and TIB126, that are specific for the alpha 2 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I, blocked staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB, respectively) binding to C2D macrophages in a specific and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitory activities were haplotype-specific in that SEA and SEB binding to H-2k or H-2d macrophages was not inhibited by either monoclonal antibody. HB36, but not TIB126, inhibited enterotoxin-induced secretion of cytokines by H-2b macrophages. Lastly, passive protection of D-galactosamine-sensitized C2D mice by injection with HB36 antibody prevented SEB-induced death. Therefore, SEA and SEB binding to the alpha 2 domain of the H-2Db molecule induces biological activity and has physiological consequences.

  3. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  4. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from pomegranate.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and'no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications. PMID:24958333

  5. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and‘no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications. PMID:24958333

  6. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  7. Rotational Cooling of Trapped Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glöckner, Rosa; Prehn, Alexander; Englert, Barbara G. U.; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH3F ) by optically pumping the population of 16 M sublevels in the rotational states J =3 , 4, 5 and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J =4 , K =3 , M =4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby generating a translationally cold (≈30 mK ) and nearly pure state ensemble of about 106 molecules. Our scheme is extendable to larger sets of initial states, other final states, and a variety of molecule species, thus paving the way for internal-state control of ever-larger molecules.

  8. Aggregated Gas Molecules: Toxic to Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zuo, Guanghong; Chen, Jixiu; Gao, Yi; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The biological toxicity of high levels of breathing gases has been known for centuries, but the mechanism remains elusive. Earlier work mainly focused on the influences of dispersed gas molecules dissolved in water on biomolecules. However, recent studies confirmed the existence of aggregated gas molecules at the water-solid interface. In this paper, we have investigated the binding preference of aggregated gas molecules on proteins with molecular dynamics simulations, using nitrogen (N2) gas and the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain as the model system. Aggregated N2 molecules were strongly bound by the active sites of the SH3 domain, which could impair the activity of the protein. In contrast, dispersed N2 molecules did not specifically interact with the SH3 domain. These observations extend our understanding of the possible toxicity of aggregates of gas molecules in the function of proteins. PMID:23588597

  9. Rotational Cooling of Trapped Polyatomic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Rosa; Prehn, Alexander; Englert, Barbara G U; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the internal degrees of freedom is a key challenge for applications of cold and ultracold molecules. Here, we demonstrate rotational-state cooling of trapped methyl fluoride molecules (CH_{3}F) by optically pumping the population of 16 M sublevels in the rotational states J=3, 4, 5 and 6 into a single level. By combining rotational-state cooling with motional cooling, we increase the relative number of molecules in the state J=4, K=3, M=4 from a few percent to over 70%, thereby generating a translationally cold (≈30  mK) and nearly pure state ensemble of about 10^{6} molecules. Our scheme is extendable to larger sets of initial states, other final states, and a variety of molecule species, thus paving the way for internal-state control of ever-larger molecules. PMID:26684114

  10. Single molecule nanometry for biological physics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurement is a hallmark of physics but the small length scale (~ nanometer) of elementary biological components and thermal fluctuations surrounding them challenge our ability to visualize their action. Here, we highlight the recent developments in single molecule nanometry where the position of a single fluorescent molecule can be determined with nanometer precision, reaching the limit imposed by the shot noise, and the relative motion between two molecules can be determined with ~ 0.3 nm precision at ~ 1 millisecond time resolution, and how these new tools are providing fundamental insights on how motor proteins move on cellular highways. We will also discuss how interactions between three and four fluorescent molecules can be used to measure three and six coordinates, respectively, allowing us to correlate movements of multiple components. Finally, we will discuss recent progress in combining angstrom precision optical tweezers with single molecule fluorescent detection, opening new windows for multi-dimensional single molecule nanometry for biological physics. PMID:23249673

  11. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  12. A 3-terminal single molecule nanoscale amperometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hliwa, M.; Ami, S.; Joachim, C.

    2006-07-01

    A 3-terminal single molecule transducer is presented which is able to measure tunnel current intensities. The conformation of a pyrene-phenyl molecule is changed under an intramolecular inelastic current effect. This conformation change is detected by a third lateral electrode interacting also with the molecule. The full multi-channel electronic scattering matrix of the device is calculated taking into account the chemisorption of the molecule at one end and the details mechanics of the conformation change of this molecule. A semi-classical model is used to describe the intramolecular transduction effect between the electrons transferred through the molecule and its conformation change. It results a linear transduction curve between the input and the detection currents of the device for a range of tunnel current of interest for mono-molecular electronics.

  13. Formation of quantum-degenerate sodium molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Mukaiyama, T; Abo-Shaeer, J R; Chin, J K; Miller, D E; Ketterle, W

    2003-11-21

    Ultracold sodium molecules were produced from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate by ramping an applied magnetic field across a Feshbach resonance. More than 10(5) molecules were generated with a conversion efficiency of approximately 4%. Using laser light resonant with an atomic transition, the remaining atoms could be selectively removed, preventing fast collisional relaxation of the molecules. Time-of-flight analysis of the pure molecular sample yielded an instantaneous phase-space density greater than 20. PMID:14683282

  14. Circular DNA Molecules in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    The satellite DNA's from the embryos of five species of Drosophila (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. nasuta, D. virilis and D. hydei) have been analyzed for the presence of closed circular duplex DNA molecules, as determined by CsCl-EBr gradients. Circular DNA molecules were found in every species but D. melanogaster. Analyses of cell fractions from adult Drosophila and organ fractions from Drosophila larvae show that fractions containing mitochondria are highly enriched in these molecules. PMID:4643820

  15. A new interstellar molecule - Tricarbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, H. E.; Irvine, W. M.; Friberg, P.; Brown, R. D.; Godfrey, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    The C3O molecule, whose pure rotational spectrum has only recently been studied in the laboratory, has been detected in the cold, dark interstellar Taurus Molecular Cloud 1. Since C3O is the first interstelar carbon chain molecule to contain oxygen, its existence places an important new constraint on chemical schemes for cold interstellar clouds. The abundance of C3O can be understood in terms of purely gas-phase ion-molecule chemistry.

  16. 8-oxoguanine causes spontaneous de novo germline mutations in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Mizuki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Furuichi, Masato; Iwasaki, Yuki; Hokama, Masaaki; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Gondo, Yoichi; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-04-01

    Spontaneous germline mutations generate genetic diversity in populations of sexually reproductive organisms, and are thus regarded as a driving force of evolution. However, the cause and mechanism remain unclear. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) is a candidate molecule that causes germline mutations, because it makes DNA more prone to mutation and is constantly generated by reactive oxygen species in vivo. We show here that endogenous 8-oxoG caused de novo spontaneous and heritable G to T mutations in mice, which occurred at different stages in the germ cell lineage and were distributed throughout the chromosomes. Using exome analyses covering 40.9 Mb of mouse transcribed regions, we found increased frequencies of G to T mutations at a rate of 2 × 10-7 mutations/base/generation in offspring of Mth1/Ogg1/Mutyh triple knockout (TOY-KO) mice, which accumulate 8-oxoG in the nuclear DNA of gonadal cells. The roles of MTH1, OGG1, and MUTYH are specific for the prevention of 8-oxoG-induced mutation, and 99% of the mutations observed in TOY-KO mice were G to T transversions caused by 8-oxoG; therefore, we concluded that 8-oxoG is a causative molecule for spontaneous and inheritable mutations of the germ lineage cells.

  17. Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM or CD166) Modulates Bone Phenotype and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, R. Adam; Chitteti, Brahmananda R.; Egan, Patrick H.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Himes, Evan R.; Meijome, Tomas; Srour, Edward F.; Fuchs, Robyn K.; Kacena, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM/CD166), is expressed on osteoblasts (OB) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) residing in the hematopoietic niche, and may have important regulatory roles in bone formation. Because HSC numbers are reduced 77% in CD166−/− mice, we hypothesized that changes in bone phenotype and consequently the endosteal niche may partially be responsible for this alteration. Therefore, we investigated bone phenotype and OB function in CD166−/− mice. Although osteoclastic measures were not affected by loss of CD166, CD166−/− mice exhibited a modest increase in trabecular bone fraction (42%), and increases in osteoid deposition (72%), OB number (60%), and bone formation rate (152%). Cortical bone geometry was altered in CD166−/− mice resulting in up to 81% and 49% increases in stiffness and ultimate force, respectively. CD166−/− OB displayed elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization, and increased mRNA expression of Fra 1, ALP, and osteocalcin. Overall, CD166−/− mice displayed modestly elevated trabecular bone volume fraction with increased OB numbers and deposition of osteoid, and increased OB differentiation in vitro, possibly suggesting more mature OB are secreting more osteoid. This may explain the decline in HSC number in vivo because immature OB are mainly responsible for hematopoiesis enhancing activity. PMID:25730656

  18. Role of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Radiation-Induced Brain Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.-L.; Tu Ba; Li Yuqing; Wong, C. Shun

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pathogenesis of brain injury after irradiation (IR). Methods and Materials: We assessed the expression of ICAM-1 in mouse brain after cranial IR and determined the histopathologic and behavioral changes in mice that were either wildtype (+/+) or knockout (-/-) of the ICAM-1 gene after IR. Results: There was an early dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression after IR. Increased ICAM-1 immunoreactivity was observed in endothelia and glia of ICAM-1+/+ mice up to 8 months after IR. ICAM-1-/- mice showed no expression. ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar vascular abnormalities at 2 months after 10-17 Gy, and there was evidence for demyelination and inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis at 8 months after 10 Gy. After 10 Gy, irradiated ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar behavioral changes at 2-6 months in open field, light-dark chamber, and T-maze compared with age-matched genotype controls. Conclusion: There is early and late upregulation of ICAM-1 in the vasculature and glia of mouse brain after IR. ICAM-1, however, does not have a causative role in the histopathologic injury and behavioral dysfunction after moderate single doses of cranial IR.

  19. The individuality of mice.

    PubMed

    Lathe, R

    2004-12-01

    Mutant mice simulating human CNS disorders are used as models for therapeutic drug development. Drug evaluation requires a coherent correlation between behavioral phenotype and drug status. Variations in behavioral responses could mask such correlations, a problem highlighted by the three-site studies of Crabbe et al. (1999) and Wahlsten et al. (2003a). Factors contributing to variation are considered, focusing on differences between individual animals. Genetic differences due to minisatellite variation suggest that each mouse is genetically distinct. Effects during gestation, including maternal stress, influence later life behavior; while endocrine exchanges between fetus and parent, and between male and female fetuses dependent on intrauterine position, also contribute. Pre and perinatal nutrition and maternal attention also play a role. In adults, endocrine cyclicity in females is a recognized source of behavioral diversity. Notably, there is increasing recognition that groups of wild and laboratory mice have complex social structures, illustrated through consideration of Crowcroft (1966). Dominance status can markedly modify behavior in test paradigms addressing anxiety, locomotion and aggressiveness, to an extent comparable to mutation or drug status. Understanding how such effects amplify the behavioral spectrum displayed by otherwise identical animals will improve testing. PMID:15544575

  20. Incidence of Apoptosis in the Lymphoid Organs of Normal or Malaria Infected Mice is Decreased in CD18 and Urokinase - Receptor (UPAR, CD87) Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    da Laperrousaz, Chen; Vesin, Christian; Donati, Yves

    2001-01-01

    Incidence of apoptosis was investigated in the spleen and lymph nodes of +/+, CD18 -/- and urokinase receptor (uPAR, CD87) -/- mice, untreated or Plasmodium Berghei Anka (PbA) infected. In non infected mice, incidence of apoptosis was lower in the lymph nodes of CD18 -/- and uPAR -/- than in +/+ mice, as seen by FACS analysis to count the number of hypodiploid and Annexin-V binding cells. Infection of mice with PbA resulted in a marked increase in the size of spleen and lymph nodes 7–8 days after infection, which was slightly higher in uPAR -/- and CD18 -/- than in +/+ mice. PbA infection increased about 7 fold the incidence of apoptosis in the lymphoid organs of +/+, especially in the white pulp and germinal centers of the spleen and lymph nodes, while in contrast it was unchanged in PbA infected CD18 -/- or uPAR -/- mice. Serum IgG levels, and number of circulating leukocytes were significantly higher in both uPAR and CD18 -/- than in +/+ mice. These results indicate that the CD18 and uPAR surface molecules, which are known to be associated in the cell membrane, have an important influence upon the incidence of cell survival in both normal or stimulated lymphoid organs. PMID:11785668

  1. Production and Trapping of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    David, DeMille

    2015-04-21

    We report a set of experiments aimed at the production and trapping of ultracold polar molecules. We begin with samples of laser-cooled and trapped Rb and Cs atoms, and bind them together to form polar RbCs molecules. The binding is accomplished via photoassociation, which uses a laser to catalyze the sticking process. We report results from investigation of a new pathway for photoassociation that can produce molecules in their absolute ground state of vibrational and rotational motion. We also report preliminary observations of collisions between these ground-state molecules and co-trapped atoms.

  2. Small Molecule based Musculoskeletal Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Jiang, Tao; Gagnon, Keith A.; Nelson, Clarke; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and scientists working in the field of regenerative engineering are actively investigating a wide range of methods to promote musculoskeletal tissue regeneration. Small molecule-mediated tissue regeneration is emerging as a promising strategy for regenerating various musculoskeletal tissues and a large number of small molecule compounds have been recently discovered as potential bioactive molecules for musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. In this review, we summarize the recent literature encompassing the past four years in the area of small bioactive molecule for promoting repair and regeneration of various musculoskeletal tissues including bone, muscle, cartilage, tendon, and nerve. PMID:24405851

  3. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J; de la Moya, Santiago

    2015-09-21

    This article aims to show the identity of "circularly polarized luminescent active simple organic molecules" as a new concept in organic chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and non-aggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented. PMID:26136234

  4. Design of water molecule and its surrounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylo, R. I.; Okhrimenko, B. A.; Yablochkova, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen bonds and their fluctuations are one of the factors that determine the unique properties of water [1]. Building models of formation and rupture of hydrogen bonds due to non-eigen vibrations of a molecule of water is to a large extent determined by the availability of accurate information on the geometric structure of the water molecule. Geometric parameters of the water molecule have been well studied for the gaseous state. This was aided by the possibility of an experimental study of the regularities in the rotational spectra of molecules. However, some questions about the geometry of the water molecule in the liquid state remain unanswered. For example, many sources state that the valence angle of the water molecule decreases during the transition into the liquid state [2]. Based on the experimental data of molecular vibration spectra in D2O and H2O molecules [3], the authors have estimated valence angle of water in the liquid state. Consequently, the value of the valence angle of water in liquid state was determined to be (89 +/-2)°. A question of determination of libration vibrations of water molecule, as well as the analysis of its consequent inversion doubling, based on the new information on the equilibrium angle of the water molecules in the liquid state, constitutes an interest and is discussed in the present paper.

  5. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  6. Hybrid molecules synergistically acting against protein aggregation diseases.

    PubMed

    Korth, Carsten; Klingenstein, Ralf; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    An emerging common feature of the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the ability of many disease-associated protein aggregates to induce conversion of a normal counterpart conformer leading to an acceleration of disease progression. Curative pharmacotherapy has not been achieved so far despite successes in elucidating pathomechanisms. Here, we review the pharmaceutical strategy of generating hybrid compounds, i.e. compounds consisting of several independently acting moieties with synergistic effects, on key molecular players in AD and CJD. For prion diseases, we review hybrid compounds consisting of two different heterocyclic compounds, their synergistic effects on prion replication in a cell culture model and their ability to prolong survival of experimentally prion-infected mice in vivo. While a combination therapy of several antiprion compounds including quinacrine, clomipramine, simvastatin and tocopherol prolonged survival time to 10-25%, administration of hybrid compound quinpramine alone, a chimera of acridine and iminodibenzyl scaffolds, led to 10% survival time extension. For AD, we review a hybrid compound consisting of an Aβ recognizing D-peptide fused to a small molecule β-sheet breaker, an aminopyrazole. This molecule was able to diminish Aβ oligomers in cell culture and significantly decrease synaptotoxicity as measured by miniature excitatory postsynaptic responses in vitro. Hybrid compounds can dramatically increase potency of their single moieties and lead to novel functions when they act in a simultaneous or sequential manner thereby revealing synergistic properties. Their systematic generation combining different classes of compounds from peptides to small molecules has the potential to significantly accelerate drug discovery. PMID:24059335

  7. To B or not to B: Role of B cells in pathogenesis of arthritis in HLA transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Marshall; Smart, Michele; Luckey, David; Luthra, Harvinder; Taneja, Veena

    2011-01-01

    Population studies have shown that amongst all the genetic factors linked with autoimmune disease development, MHC class II genes are the most significant. Experimental autoimmune arthritis resembling human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be induced in susceptible strains of mice following immunization with type II collagen (CIA). We generated transgenic mice lacking endogenous class II molecules and expressing various HLA genes including RA-associated, HLA-DRB1*0401 and HLA-DQ8, and RA-resistant, DRB1*0402, genes. The HLA molecules in these mice are expressed on the cell surface and can positively select CD4+ T cells expressing various Vβ T cell receptors. Endogenous class II invariant chain is required for proper functioning of the class II transgene. Arthritis development in transgenic mice is CD4+ and B cells dependent. Studies in humanized mice showed that B cells are required as antigen presenting cells in addition to antibody producing cells for the development of CIA. The transgenic mice expressing *0401 and *0401/DQ8 genes developed sex-biased arthritis with predominantly females being affected, similar to that of human RA. Further, the transgenic mice produced autoantibodies like rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic antibodies. Antigen presentation by B cells leads to a sex specific immune response in DRB1*0401 mice suggesting a role of B cells and HLA-DR in rendering susceptibility to develop arthritis in females. PMID:21665435

  8. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  9. Subfertility with Defective Folliculogenesis in Female Mice Lacking Testicular Orphan Nuclear Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu-Min; Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Lee, Yi-Fen; Liu, Ning-Chun; Chang, Yu-Jia; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Xie, Shaozhen; Hung, Yao-Ching; Chang, Chawnshang

    2008-01-01

    Testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4 (TR4) plays essential roles for normal spermatogenesis in male mice. However, its roles in female fertility and ovarian function remain largely unknown. Here we found female mice lacking TR4 (TR4−/−) displayed subfertility and irregular estrous cycles. TR4−/− female mice ovaries were smaller with fewer or no preovulatory follicles and corpora lutea. After superovulation, TR4−/− female mice produced fewer oocytes, preovulatory follicles, and corpora lutea. In addition, more intensive granulosa apoptosis was found in TR4−/− ovaries. Functional analyses suggest that subfertility in TR4−/− female mice can be due to an ovarian defect with impaired folliculogenesis rather than a deficiency in pituitary gonadotropins. Molecular mechanism dissection of defective folliculogenesis found TR4 might induce LH receptor (LHR) gene expression via direct binding to its 5′ promoter. The consequence of reduced LHR expression in TR4−/− female mice might then result in reduced gonadal sex hormones via reduced expression of enzymes involved in steroidogenesis. Together, our results showed TR4 might play essential roles in normal folliculogenesis by influencing LHR signals. Modulation of TR4 expression and/or activation via its upstream signals or unidentified ligand(s) might allow us to develop small molecule(s) to control folliculogenesis. PMID:18174360

  10. Absence of nonhematopoietic MHC class II expression protects mice from experimental autoimmune myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Thelemann, Christoph; Haller, Sergio; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Kania, Gabriela; Rosa, Muriel; Eriksson, Urs; Rotman, Samuel; Reith, Walter; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a CD4(+) T-cell-mediated model of human inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathies. Heart-specific CD4(+) T-cell activation is dependent on autoantigens presented by MHC class II (MHCII) molecules expressed on professional APCs. In this study, we addressed the role of inflammation-induced MHCII expression by cardiac nonhematopoietic cells on EAM development. EAM was induced in susceptible mice lacking inducible expression of MHCII molecules on all nonhematopoietic cells (pIV-/- K14 class II transactivator (CIITA) transgenic (Tg) mice) by immunization with α-myosin heavy chain peptide in CFA. Lack of inducible nonhematopoietic MHCII expression in pIV-/- K14 CIITA Tg mice conferred EAM resistance. In contrast, cardiac pathology was induced in WT and heterozygous mice, and correlated with elevated cardiac endothelial MHCII expression. Control mice with myocarditis displayed an increase in infiltrating CD4(+) T cells and in expression of IFN-γ, which is the major driver of nonhematopoietic MHCII expression. Mechanistically, IFN-γ neutralization in WT mice shortly before disease onset resulted in reduced cardiac MHCII expression and pathology. These findings reveal a previously overlooked contribution of IFN-γ to induce endothelial MHCII expression in the heart and to progress cardiac pathology during myocarditis. PMID:26621778

  11. Thymic epithelium determines a spontaneous chronic neuritis in Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer zu Horste, Gerd; Mausberg, Anne K; Cordes, Steffen; El-Haddad, Houda; Partke, Hans-Joachim; Leussink, Verena I; Roden, Michael; Martin, Stephan; Steinman, Lawrence; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C

    2014-09-15

    The NOD mouse strain spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes. A deficiency in costimulatory molecules, such as B7-2, on the NOD genetic background prevents diabetes but instead triggers an inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. This constitutes a shift in the target of autoimmunity, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that NOD mice deficient for isoforms of ICAM-1, which comediate costimulatory functions, spontaneously develop a chronic autoimmune peripheral neuritis instead of diabetes. The disease is transferred by CD4(+) T cells, which infiltrate peripheral nerves together with macrophages and B cells and are autoreactive against peripheral myelin protein zero. These Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit unaltered numbers of regulatory T cells, but increased IL-17-producing T cells, which determine the severity, but not the target specificity, of autoimmunity. Ab-mediated ICAM-1 blockade triggers neuritis only in young NOD mice. Thymic epithelium from Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice features an altered expression of costimulatory molecules and induces neuritis and myelin autoreactivity after transplantation into nude mice in vivo. Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit a specifically altered TCR repertoire. Our findings introduce a novel animal model of chronic inflammatory neuropathies and indicate that altered expression of ICAM-1 on thymic epithelium shifts autoimmunity specifically toward peripheral nerves. This improves our understanding of autoimmunity in the peripheral nervous system with potential relevance for human diseases. PMID:25108020

  12. Impairment of novelty detection in mice targeted for the Chl1 gene.

    PubMed

    Pratte, Michel; Jamon, Marc

    2009-06-22

    A deficit in cell adhesion molecules including the human Chl1 (close homologue of the L1 cell adhesion molecule) gene may cause impairment of cognitive processes. Aberrant connectivity in the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been reported in mice lacking the CHL1 protein after Chl1 gene targeting. Previous studies have observed a deficit in the processing of novel information by CHL1-deficient mice. We investigated deficits in spatial discrimination and object discrimination in three groups of mice--Chl1(+/+), Chl1(+/-) and Chl1(-/-)--performing spatial and object novelty tasks. The results indicated that wild-type mice easily recognized objects that were either "displaced" or "substituted". Chl1(-/-) mice showed severe impairment of the capacity to react to both spatial and non-spatial novelty. Chl1(+/-) mice were severely restricted in their ability to detect spatial changes, but succeeded in novel object discrimination. A dose-dependent sensitivity of the organization of the CA3 layer to the CHL1 protein may explain this result. However, the observations suggest that a dysfunction of parts of the brain other than the hippocampus may be involved in the impairment. PMID:19303029

  13. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  14. Halogen bonds in biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Pascal; Hays, Franklin A.; Westhof, Eric; Ho, P. Shing

    2004-01-01

    Short oxygen–halogen interactions have been known in organic chemistry since the 1950s and recently have been exploited in the design of supramolecular assemblies. The present survey of protein and nucleic acid structures reveals similar halogen bonds as potentially stabilizing inter- and intramolecular interactions that can affect ligand binding and molecular folding. A halogen bond in biomolecules can be defined as a short CX···OY interaction (CX is a carbon-bonded chlorine, bromine, or iodine, and OY is a carbonyl, hydroxyl, charged carboxylate, or phosphate group), where the X···O distance is less than or equal to the sums of the respective van der Waals radii (3.27 Å for Cl···O, 3.37Å for Br···O, and 3.50 Å for I···O) and can conform to the geometry seen in small molecules, with the CX···O angle ≈165° (consistent with a strong directional polarization of the halogen) and the X···OY angle ≈120°. Alternative geometries can be imposed by the more complex environment found in biomolecules, depending on which of the two types of donor systems are involved in the interaction: (i) the lone pair electrons of oxygen (and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen and sulfur) atoms or (ii) the delocalized π -electrons of peptide bonds or carboxylate or amide groups. Thus, the specific geometry and diversity of the interacting partners of halogen bonds offer new and versatile tools for the design of ligands as drugs and materials in nanotechnology. PMID:15557000

  15. Halogen bonds in biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Pascal; Hays, Franklin A; Westhof, Eric; Ho, P Shing

    2004-11-30

    Short oxygen-halogen interactions have been known in organic chemistry since the 1950s and recently have been exploited in the design of supramolecular assemblies. The present survey of protein and nucleic acid structures reveals similar halogen bonds as potentially stabilizing inter- and intramolecular interactions that can affect ligand binding and molecular folding. A halogen bond in biomolecules can be defined as a short C-X...O-Y interaction (C-X is a carbon-bonded chlorine, bromine, or iodine, and O-Y is a carbonyl, hydroxyl, charged carboxylate, or phosphate group), where the X...O distance is less than or equal to the sums of the respective van der Waals radii (3.27 A for Cl...O, 3.37 A for Br...O, and 3.50 A for I...O) and can conform to the geometry seen in small molecules, with the C-X...O angle approximately 165 degrees (consistent with a strong directional polarization of the halogen) and the X...O-Y angle approximately 120 degrees . Alternative geometries can be imposed by the more complex environment found in biomolecules, depending on which of the two types of donor systems are involved in the interaction: (i) the lone pair electrons of oxygen (and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen and sulfur) atoms or (ii) the delocalized pi -electrons of peptide bonds or carboxylate or amide groups. Thus, the specific geometry and diversity of the interacting partners of halogen bonds offer new and versatile tools for the design of ligands as drugs and materials in nanotechnology. PMID:15557000

  16. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  17. Anti-apoptotic Molecule Bcl-2 Regulates the Differentiation, Activation, and Survival of Both Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts*

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Yuichi; Iwasawa, Mitsuyasu; Akiyama, Toru; Kadono, Yuho; Nakamura, Masaki; Oshima, Yasushi; Yasui, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Takumi; Hirose, Jun; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Bouillet, Philippe; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanaka, Sakae

    2009-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis by preventing cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Although several studies have indicated the importance of Bcl-2 in maintaining skeletal integrity, the detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Bcl-2−/− mice are growth-retarded and exhibit increased bone volume of the primary spongiosa, mainly due to the decreased number and dysfunction of osteoclasts. Osteoblast function is also impaired in Bcl-2−/− mice. Ex vivo studies on osteoblasts and osteoclasts showed that Bcl-2 promoted the differentiation, activation, and survival of both cell types. Because Bcl-2−/− mice die before 6 weeks of age due to renal failure and cannot be compared with adult wild type mice, we generated Bcl-2−/−Bim+/− mice, in which a single Bim allele was inactivated, and compared them with their Bcl-2+/−Bim+/− littermates. Loss of a single Bim allele restored normal osteoclast function in Bcl-2−/− mice but did not restore the impaired function of osteoblasts, and the mice exhibited osteopenia. These data demonstrate that Bcl-2 promotes the differentiation, activity, and survival of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The balance between Bcl-2 and Bim regulates osteoclast apoptosis and function, whereas other pro-apoptotic members are important for osteoblasts. PMID:19846553

  18. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... to mice that had already begun to lose pigment. They found that the vitiligo-prone mice did ... disorder at all, and 76 percent of normal pigment returned among the vitiligo-affected mice, essentially reversing ...

  19. Genetic Analysis of Mice Skin Exposed by Hyper-Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Rika; Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    In the space environment, physiological alterations, such as low bone density, muscle weakness and decreased immunity, are caused by microgravity and cosmic radiation. On the other hand, it is known that the leg muscles are hypertrophy by 2G-gravity. An understanding of the effects on human body from microgravity to hyper-gravity is very important. Recently, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started a project to detect the changes on gene expression and mineral metabolism caused by microgravity by analyzing the hair of astronauts who stay in the international Space Station (ISS) for a long time. From these results of human hair’s research, the genetic effects of human hair roots by microgravity will become clear. However, it is unclear how the gene expression of hair roots was effected by hypergravity. Therefore, in this experiment, we analyzed the effect on mice skin contained hair roots by comparing microgravity or hypergravity exposed mice. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the genetic effects on mice skin by microgravity or 2G-gravity. The samples were taken from mice exposed to space flight (FL) or hypergravity environment (2G) for 3-months, respectively. The extracted and amplified RNA from these mice skin was used to DNA microarray analysis. in this experiment, we analyzed the effect of gravity by using mice skin contained hair roots, which exposed space (FL) and hyper-gravity (2G) for 3 months and each control. By DNA microarray analysis, we found the common 98 genes changed in both FL and 2G. Among these 98 genes, the functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software. Next, we focused the one of the identified pathways and compared the effects on each molecules in this pathways by the different environments, such as FL and 2G. As the results, we could detect some interesting molecules, which might be depended on the gravity levels. In addition, to investigate

  20. Spin polarization effect for Fe2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi-Ying; Zhu, Zheng-He

    2006-07-01

    This paper uses the density functional theory (DFT)(B3p86) of Gaussian03 to optimize the structure of Fe2 molecule. The result shows that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state, which shows spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements for the first time. Meanwhile, we have not found any spin pollution because the wavefunction of the ground state does not mingle with wavefunctions with higher energy states. So, that the ground state for Fe2 molecule is a 9-multiple state is indicative of the spin polarization effect of Fe2 molecule of transition metal elements. That is, there exist 8 parallel spin electrons. The non-conjugated electron is greatest in number. These electrons occupy different spacious tracks, so that the energy of the Fe2 molecule is minimized. It can be concluded that the effect of parallel spin of the Fe2 molecule is larger than the effect of the conjugated molecule, which is obviously related to the effect of electron d delocalization. In addition, the Murrell-Sorbie potential functions with the parameters for the ground state and other states of Fe2 molecule are derived. Dissociation energy De for the ground state of Fe2 molecule is 2.8586ev, equilibrium bond length Re is 0.2124nm, vibration frequency ωe is 336.38 cm-1. Its force constants f2, f3, and f4 are 1.8615aJ.nm-2, -8.6704aJ.nm-3, 29.1676aJ.nm-4 respectively. The other spectroscopic data for the ground state of Fe2 molecule ωeχe,Be, αe are 1.5461 cm-1, 0.1339 cm-1, 7.3428×10-4 cm-1 respectively.

  1. Naphthylnitrobutadienes as pharmacologically active molecules: evaluation of the in vivo antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Giovanni; Fenoglio, Carla; Ognio, Emanuela; Aiello, Cinzia; Spinelli, Domenico; Mariggiò, Maria A; Maccagno, Massimo; Morganti, Stefano; Cordazzo, Cinzia; Viale, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    On the basis of our previous interesting results in vitro on the antiproliferative activity of (1E,3E)-1,4-bis(1-naphthyl)-2,3-dinitro-1,3-butadiene (1-Naph-DNB) we have designed and synthesized the new molecule methyl (2Z,4E)-2-methylsulphanyl-5-(1-naphthyl)-4-nitro-2,4-pentadienoate (1-Naph-NMCB) characterized by the same naphthylnitrobutadiene array but with a different functional group at one end of the diene system. This new molecule showed an in vitro antiproliferative activity more significant than that found for the original 1-Naph-DNB. In order to verify in vivo our in vitro results we have tested the antitumour activity of 1-Naph-DNB and 1-Naph-NMCB in several murine tumour models, namely the myelomonocytic P388 and the Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL in BDF1 mice, the melanoma B16 in C57Bl mice, the fibrosarcoma WEHI 164 in nude mice and, finally, the C51 colon cancer in Balb/c mice. In the case of 1-Naph-NMCB the analysis of the antitumour activity has been preceded by toxicological experiments on CD-1 mice, in order to determine the lethal (LD) and the maximal tolerated (MTD) doses together with the spectrum of histological alterations caused by its iv administration. The results obtained show that the modification of the original structure of 1-Naph-DNB according to the molecular-simplification strategy has led to an asymmetric nitrobutadiene array, i.e. that of 1-Naph-NMCB, endowed with an antitumour activity which is in some cases even better than that showed by the parental compound itself, together with differences in tumour selectivity and negligible histological toxic effects.A promising, versatile route to new, more active and/or safe nitrobutadiene derivatives has thus been positively tested. PMID:17572851

  2. The Distribution of Solubilized Molecules among Micelles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dennis J.

    1978-01-01

    Conflicting views have been put forward on the derivation of the distribution of solubilized molecules among micelles. This stems from failure to consider the arrangement of the solubilized molecules in the micelles. In the treatment presented enthalpy effects are ignored as they are not amenable to a simple general theory. (Author/BB)

  3. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  4. Direct recognition by alphabeta cytolytic T cells of Hfe, a MHC class Ib molecule without antigen-presenting function.

    PubMed

    Rohrlich, Pierre S; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Ginhoux, Florent; Firat, Hüseyin; Michel, Frédérique; Cochet, Madeleine; Laham, Nihay; Roth, Marie Paule; Pascolo, Steve; Nato, Faridabano; Coppin, Hélène; Charneau, Pierre; Danos, Olivier; Acuto, Oreste; Ehrlich, Rachel; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Lemonnier, François A

    2005-09-01

    Crystallographic analysis of human Hfe has documented an overall structure similar to classical (class Ia) MHC molecules with a peptide binding groove deprived of ligand. Thus, to address the question of whether alphabeta T cells could recognize MHC molecules independently of bound ligands, we studied human and mouse Hfe interactions with T lymphocytes. We provide formal evidence of direct cytolytic recognition of human Hfe by mouse alphabeta T cell receptors (TCR) in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and that this interaction results in ZAP-70 phosphorylation. Furthermore, direct recognition of mouse Hfe molecules by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was demonstrated in DBA/2 Hfe knockout mice. These CTLs express predominantly two T cell antigen receptor alpha variable gene segments (AV6.1 and AV6.6). Interestingly, in wild-type mice we identified a subset of CD8+ T cells positively selected by Hfe that expresses the AV6.1/AV6.6 gene segments. T cell antigen receptor recognition of MHC molecules independently of bound ligand has potential general implications in alloreactivity and identifies in the Hfe case a cognitive link supporting the concept that the immune system could be involved in the control of iron metabolism. PMID:16123136

  5. Energy Transfer Involving Diatomic Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, John Paul

    three colliding pairs, the experimental results lie between the results calculated for the same two sets of potential parameters. These parameters were those calculated to match the short range Lennard-Jones potential and a set obtained by a theoretical Thomas-Fermi treatment of the molecules.

  6. Modified sympathetic nerve regulation in AKAP5-null mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Tomita, Hirofumi; Ohba, Takayoshi; Nishizaki, Kimitaka; Ogata, Yoshiki; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Sawamura, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Osanai, Tomohiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Matsubara, Atsushi; Adachi, Takeshi; Ono, Kyoichi; Okumura, Ken; Murakami, Manabu

    2016-01-22

    Genetic analyses have revealed an important association between A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and the intracellular calcium modulating system. AKAP5, also known as AKAP79/150, is an anchoring protein between PKA and voltage-dependent calcium channels, ryanodine receptor-2, phospholamban and other molecules. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the physiological importance of AKAP5 in the creation of cardiac rhythm using AKAP5-null mice. ECG analysis showed a normal sinus rhythm and a decreased responsiveness to isoproterenol in AKAP5-null mice compared with wild-type mice. Analysis of heart rate variability revealed that the R-R interval was unstable in AKAP5-null mutants and that the low-frequency components had decreased, indicating that the tonus of the sympathetic nervous system was affected. Furthermore, the atrium of the AKAP5-null mice showed a decreased positive inotropic response to isoproterenol, indicating the involvement of AKAP5 in a PKA-dependent pathway. Thus, our present study revealed that AKAP5 plays a significant role in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activities. PMID:26713362

  7. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  8. Clarithromycin Attenuates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yi, Chin-ok; Heo, Rok Won; Song, Dae Hyun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kang, Ki Mun; Roh, Gu Seob; Lee, Jong Deog

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common and unavoidable complication of thoracic radiotherapy. The current study was conducted to evaluate the ability of clarithromycin (CLA) to prevent radiation-induced pneumonitis, oxidative stress, and lung fibrosis in an animal model. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control, irradiation only, irradiation plus CLA, and CLA only groups. Test mice received single thoracic exposures to radiation and/or oral CLA (100 mg/kg/day). Histopathologic findings and markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and oxidative stress were compared by group. On a microscopic level, CLA inhibited macrophage influx, alveolar fibrosis, parenchymal collapse, consolidation, and epithelial cell changes. The concentration of collagen in lung tissue was lower in irradiation plus CLA mice. Radiation-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF receptor 1, acetylated nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase 2, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were also attenuated by CLA. Expression levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1, transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor, and type I collagen in radiation-treated lungs were also attenuated by CLA. These findings indicate that CLA ameliorates the deleterious effects of thoracic irradiation in mice by reducing pulmonary inflammation, oxidative damage, and fibrosis. PMID:26114656

  9. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.; Kaplan, D.M.; / /IIT, Chicago

    2008-11-01

    Muon ionization cooling is the only practical method for preparing high-brilliance beams needed for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen with RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a particle identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. Plans for measurements of emittance and cooling are described.

  10. Chemical principles of single-molecule electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Neupane, Madhav; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-03-01

    The field of single-molecule electronics harnesses expertise from engineering, physics and chemistry to realize circuit elements at the limit of miniaturization; it is a subfield of nanoelectronics in which the electronic components are single molecules. In this Review, we survey the field from a chemical perspective and discuss the structure-property relationships of the three components that form a single-molecule junction: the anchor, the electrode and the molecular bridge. The spatial orientation and electronic coupling between each component profoundly affect the conductance properties and functions of the single-molecule device. We describe the design principles of the anchor group, the influence of the electronic configuration of the electrode and the effect of manipulating the structure of the molecular backbone and of its substituent groups. We discuss single-molecule conductance switches as well as the phenomenon of quantum interference and then trace their fundamental roots back to chemical principles.

  11. Relationships between dipole moments of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shilin; Bernath, Peter F

    2015-02-14

    The dipole moment is one of the most important physical properties of a molecule. We present a combination rule for the dipole moments of related diatomic molecules. For molecules AB, AX, BY, and XY from two different element groups in the periodic table, if their elements make a small parallelogram, reliable predictions can be obtained. Our approach is particularly useful for systems with heavy atoms. For a large set of molecules tested, the average difference of the prediction from experimental data is less than 0.2 debye (D). The dipole moments for heavy molecules such as GaCl, InBr, SrCl, and SrS, for which no experimental data are available at present, are predicted to be 3.17, 3.76, 3.85 and 11.54 D, respectively. PMID:25588998

  12. Extracting Models in Single Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presse, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule experiments can now monitor the journey of a protein from its assembly near a ribosome to its proteolytic demise. Ideally all single molecule data should be self-explanatory. However data originating from single molecule experiments is particularly challenging to interpret on account of fluctuations and noise at such small scales. Realistically, basic understanding comes from models carefully extracted from the noisy data. Statistical mechanics, and maximum entropy in particular, provide a powerful framework for accomplishing this task in a principled fashion. Here I will discuss our work in extracting conformational memory from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments on large biomolecules. One clear advantage of this method is that we let the data tend towards the correct model, we do not fit the data. I will show that the dynamical model of the single molecule dynamics which emerges from this analysis is often more textured and complex than could otherwise come from fitting the data to a pre-conceived model.

  13. Small-molecule-dependent split aptamer ligation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani K; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2011-08-17

    Here we describe the first use of small-molecule binding to direct a chemical reaction between two nucleic acid strands. The reported reaction is a ligation between two fragments of a DNA split aptamer using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Utilizing the split aptamer for cocaine, we demonstrate small-molecule-dependent ligation that is dose-dependent over a wide range of cocaine concentrations and is compatible with complex biological fluids such as human blood serum. Moreover, studies of split aptamer ligation at varying salt concentrations and using structurally similar analogues of cocaine have revealed new insight into the assembly and small-molecule binding properties of the cocaine split aptamer. The ability to translate the presence of a small-molecule target into the output of DNA ligation is anticipated to enable the development of new, broadly applicable small-molecule detection assays. PMID:21761903

  14. Single-Molecule Solvation-Shell Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, E.; Höbenreich, H.; Higgins, S. J.; van Zalinge, H.; Haiss, W.; Nichols, R. J.; Finch, C. M.; Grace, I.; Lambert, C. J.; McGrath, R.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new route to single-molecule sensing via solvation shells surrounding a current-carrying backbone molecule. As an example, we show that the presence of a water solvation shell “gates” the conductance of a family of oligothiophene-containing molecular wires, and that the longer the oligothiophene, the larger is the effect. For the longest example studied, the molecular conductance is over 2 orders of magnitude larger in the presence of a shell comprising just 10 water molecules. A first principles theoretical investigation of electron transport through the molecules, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, shows that water molecules interact directly with the thiophene rings, significantly shifting transport resonances and greatly increasing the conductance. This reversible effect is confirmed experimentally through conductance measurements performed in the presence of moist air and dry argon.

  15. The symmetry of single-molecule conduction.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-14

    We introduce the conductance point group which defines the symmetry of single-molecule conduction within the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown, either rigorously or to within a very good approximation, to correspond to a molecular-conductance point group defined purely in terms of the properties of the conducting molecule. This enables single-molecule conductivity to be described in terms of key qualitative chemical descriptors that are independent of the nature of the molecule-conductor interfaces. We apply this to demonstrate how symmetry controls the conduction through 1,4-benzenedithiol chemisorbed to gold electrodes as an example system, listing also the molecular-conductance point groups for a range of molecules commonly used in molecular electronics research. PMID:17115774

  16. Electronic and thermal properties of Biphenyl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, F. G.; Ojeda, J. H.; Duque, C. A.; Laroze, D.

    2015-11-01

    Transport properties of a single Biphenyl molecule coupled to two contacts are studied. We characterise this system by a tight-binding Hamiltonian. Based on the non-equilibrium Green's functions technique with a Landauer-Büttiker formalism the transmission probability, current and thermoelectrical power are obtained. We show that the Biphenyl molecule may have semiconductor behavior for certain values of the electrode-molecule-electrode junctions and different values of the angle between the two rings of the molecule. In addition, the density of states (DOS) is calculated to compare the bandwidths with the profile of the transmission probability. DOS allows us to explain the asymmetric shape with respect to the molecule's Fermi energy.

  17. Superresolution Imaging using Single-Molecule Localization

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, George; Davidson, Michael; Manley, Suliana; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Superresolution imaging is a rapidly emerging new field of microscopy that dramatically improves the spatial resolution of light microscopy by over an order of magnitude (∼10–20-nm resolution), allowing biological processes to be described at the molecular scale. Here, we discuss a form of superresolution microscopy based on the controlled activation and sampling of sparse subsets of photoconvertible fluorescent molecules. In this single-molecule based imaging approach, a wide variety of probes have proved valuable, ranging from genetically encodable photoactivatable fluorescent proteins to photoswitchable cyanine dyes. These have been used in diverse applications of superresolution imaging: from three-dimensional, multicolor molecule localization to tracking of nanometric structures and molecules in living cells. Single-molecule-based superresolution imaging thus offers exciting possibilities for obtaining molecular-scale information on biological events occurring at variable timescales. PMID:20055680

  18. Attachment of second harmonic-active moiety to molecules for detection of molecules at interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Salafsky, Joshua S.; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.

    2005-10-11

    This invention provides methods of detecting molecules at an interface, which comprise labeling the molecules with a second harmonic-active moiety and detecting the labeled molecules at the interface using a surface selective technique. The invention also provides methods for detecting a molecule in a medium and for determining the orientation of a molecular species within a planar surface using a second harmonic-active moiety and a surface selective technique.

  19. Progranulin Knockout Accelerates Intervertebral Disc Degeneration in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Ben; Cuellar, Jason; Richbourgh, Brendon; Jia, Tang-hong; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common degenerative disease, yet much is unknown about the mechanisms during its pathogenesis. Herein we investigated whether progranulin (PGRN), a chondroprotective growth factor, is associated with IVD degeneration. PGRN was detectable in both human and murine IVD. The levels of PGRN were upregulated in murine IVD tissue during aging process. Loss of PGRN resulted in an early onset of degenerative changes in the IVD tissue and altered expressions of the degeneration-associated molecules in the mouse IVD tissue. Moreover, PGRN knockout mice exhibited accelerated IVD matrix degeneration, abnormal bone formation and exaggerated bone resorption in vertebra with aging. The acceleration of IVD degeneration observed in PGRN null mice was probably due to the enhanced activation of NF-κB signaling and β-catenin signaling. Taken together, PGRN may play a critical role in homeostasis of IVD, and may serve as a potential molecular target for prevention and treatment of disc degenerative diseases. PMID:25777988

  20. Acetoacetate Accelerates Muscle Regeneration and Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoting; Meng, Jiao; Li, Li; Han, Wanhong; Li, Changyin; Zhong, Ran; Miao, Xuexia; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Dahai

    2016-01-29

    Acetoacetate (AA) is a ketone body and acts as a fuel to supply energy for cellular activity of various tissues. Here, we uncovered a novel function of AA in promoting muscle cell proliferation. Notably, the functional role of AA in regulating muscle cell function is further evidenced by its capability to accelerate muscle regeneration in normal mice, and it ameliorates muscular dystrophy in mdx mice. Mechanistically, our data from multiparameter analyses consistently support the notion that AA plays a non-metabolic role in regulating muscle cell function. Finally, we show that AA exerts its function through activation of the MEK1-ERK1/2-cyclin D1 pathway, revealing a novel mechanism in which AA serves as a signaling metabolite in mediating muscle cell function. Our findings highlight the profound functions of a small metabolite as signaling molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:26645687

  1. Antigen targeting to APC: from mice to veterinary species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, B; Poderoso, T; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J; Revilla, C

    2013-10-01

    Antigen delivery to receptors expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) has shown to improve immunogenicity of vaccines in mice. An enhancement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), helper T cell or humoral responses was obtained depending on the type of APC and the surface molecule targeted. Although this strategy is being also evaluated in livestock animals with promising results, some discrepancies have been found between species and pathogens. The genetic diversity of livestock animals, the different pattern of expression of some receptors among species, the use of different markers to characterize APC in large animals and sometimes the lack of reagents make difficult to compare results obtained in different species. In this review, we summarize the data available regarding antigen targeting to APC receptors in cattle, sheep and pig and discuss the results found in these animals in the context of what has been obtained in mice. PMID:23648645

  2. High Harmonic Generation from Rotationally Excited Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Robynne M.

    2011-12-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is understood through a three-step model. A strong laser field ionizes an atom or molecule. The free electron propagates in the laser field and may recombine with the atom or molecule leading to the generation of extreme ultraviolet or soft x-ray light at odd harmonics of the fundamental. Since the wavelength of the recombining electron is on the order of internuclear distances in molecules, HHG acts as a probe of molecular structure and dynamics. Conversely, control of the molecules leads to control of the properties (intensity, phase, and polarization) of the harmonic emission. Rotationally exciting molecules provides field-free molecular alignment at time intervals corresponding to fractions of the rotational period of the molecule. Alignment is necessary for understanding how the harmonic emission depends on molecular structure and alignment. Additionally, HHG acts as a probe of the rotational wavepackets. This thesis reports three experiments on HHG from rotationally excited molecules. Before we can use HHG as a probe of complex molecular dynamics or control harmonic properties through molecules, the harmonic emission from aligned, linear molecules must first be understood. To that end, the first experiment measures the intensity and phase of harmonics generated from N 2O and N2 near times of strong alignment revealing interferences during recombination. The second experiment demonstrates HHG as a sensitive probe of rotational wavepacket dynamics in CO2 and N2O, revealing new revival features not detected by any other probe. The final experiment focuses on understanding and controlling the polarization state of the harmonic emission. Generating elliptically polarized harmonics would be very useful for probing molecular and materials systems. We observe an elliptical dichroism in polarization-resolved measurements of the harmonic emission from aligned N2 and CO2 molecules, revealing evidence for electron-hole dynamics between the

  3. Search for complex organic molecules in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    It was 1969 when the first organic molecule in space, H2CO, was discovered. Since then many organic molecules were discovered by using the NRAO 11 m (upgraded later to 12 m), Nobeyama 45 m, IRAM 30 m, and other highly sensitive radio telescopes as a result of close collaboration between radio astronomers and microwave spectroscopists. It is noteworthy that many famous organic molecules such as CH3OH, C2H5OH, (CH3)2O and CH3NH2 were detected by 1975. Organic molecules were found in so-called hot cores where molecules were thought to form on cold dust surfaces and then to evaporate by the UV photons emitted from the central star. These days organic molecules are known to exist not only in hot cores but in hot corinos (a warm, compact molecular clump found in the inner envelope of a class 0 protostar) and even protoplanetary disks. As was described above, major organic molecules were known since 1970s. It was very natural that astronomers considered a relationship between organic molecules in space and the origin of life. Several astronomers challenged to detect glycine and other prebiotic molecules without success. ALMA is expected to detect such important materials to further consider the gexogenous deliveryh hypothesis. In this paper I summarize the history in searching for complex organic molecules together with difficulties in observing very weak signals from larger species. The awfully long list of references at the end of this article may be the most useful part for readers who want to feel the exciting discovery stories.

  4. Low energy positron interactions with biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanniarachchi, Indika L.

    Calculations of the positron density distribution which can be used for positrons bound to midsize and larger molecules have been tested for smaller molecules and subsequently applied to investigate the most likely e +e-- annihilation sites for positrons interacting with biological molecules containing C, H, O, and N. In order to allow consideration of positrons bound to extended molecules with regions of different character and no particular symmetry, atom-centered positron basis sets of Gaussian-type functions were developed for positrons bound to molecules containing O, N, C, H, Li, Na, and Be. Testing shows that there is no need to scale the positron basis functions to take into account different effective charges on the atoms in different molecules. Even at the HF level of theory the calculated positron and the contact density of e+LiH system is in qualitative agreement with the most accurate calculation was done in ECG method. Also it has been found that for larger biological molecules such as derivation of formaldehyde can leave out positron basis sets centered on H atoms and still get qualitatively acceptable contact density distribution. According to our results, the electronic and positronic wavefunctions have the most overlap in the regions of most negative electrostatic potential in the parent molecule, and we can expect that a positron bound to the molecule will be more likely to annihilate with one of the electrons in these regions. Also we find that the highest energy occupied electronic orbital often does not make the largest contribution to e+e -- annihilation, and that the energy liberated by subsequent electronic relaxation is sufficient to break the backbone in several places in di-peptides and other organic molecules.

  5. Study in Mice Links Key Signaling Molecule to Underlying Cause of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    MedlinePlus

    ... by mutations in a gene that codes for collagen, an abundant structural component of bone. This type ... linked to defects in enzymes that help process collagen to its mature form. These types of OI ...

  6. Impairment of social and emotional behaviors in Cadm1-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Yuki; Fujita, Eriko; Yu, Zhiling; Yamagata, Takanori; Momoi, Mariko Y; Momoi, Takashi; Onaka, Tatsushi

    2010-06-01

    Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, mediates synaptic cell adhesion. Missense mutations in the CADM1 gene have been identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients. In the present study, we examined emotional behaviors, social behaviors and motor performances in Cadm1-knockout (KO) mice. Cadm1-KO mice showed increased anxiety-related behavior in open-field and light-dark transition tests. Social behaviors of Cadm1-KO mice were impaired in social interaction, resident-intruder and social memory/recognition tests. Furthermore, motor coordination and gait of Cadm1-KO mice were impaired in rotarod and footprint tests. Our study demonstrates that CADM1 plays roles in regulating emotional behaviors, social behaviors and motor performances, and that CADM1 has important implications for psychiatric disorders with disruptions in social behavior, such as autism. PMID:20450890

  7. Loss of Vav2 Proto-Oncogene Causes Tachycardia and Cardiovascular Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Jerkic, Mirjana; López-Novoa, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The Vav family is a group of signal transduction molecules that activate Rho/Rac GTPases during cell signaling. Experiments using knockout mice have indicated that the three Vav proteins present in mammals (Vav1, Vav2, and Vav3) are essential for proper signaling responses in hematopoietic cells. However, Vav2 and Vav3 are also highly expressed in nonhematopoietic tissues, suggesting that they may have additional functions outside blood cells. Here, we report that this is the case for Vav2, because the disruption of its locus in mice causes tachycardia, hypertension, and defects in the heart, arterial walls, and kidneys. We also provide physiological and pharmacological evidence demonstrating that the hypertensive condition of Vav2-deficient mice is due to a chronic stimulation of the renin/angiotensin II and sympathetic nervous systems. Together, these results indicate that Vav2 plays crucial roles in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis in mice. PMID:17202406

  8. The gut microbiota influences blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Braniste, Viorica; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Kowal, Czeslawa; Anuar, Farhana; Abbaspour, Afrouz; Tóth, Miklós; Korecka, Agata; Bakocevic, Nadja; Ng, Lai Guan; Guan, Ng Lai; Kundu, Parag; Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Hultenby, Kjell; Nilsson, Harriet; Hebert, Hans; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty; Pettersson, Sven

    2014-11-19

    Pivotal to brain development and function is an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB), which acts as a gatekeeper to control the passage and exchange of molecules and nutrients between the circulatory system and the brain parenchyma. The BBB also ensures homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). We report that germ-free mice, beginning with intrauterine life, displayed increased BBB permeability compared to pathogen-free mice with a normal gut flora. The increased BBB permeability was maintained in germ-free mice after birth and during adulthood and was associated with reduced expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-5, which are known to regulate barrier function in endothelial tissues. Exposure of germ-free adult mice to a pathogen-free gut microbiota decreased BBB permeability and up-regulated the expression of tight junction proteins. Our results suggest that gut microbiota-BBB communication is initiated during gestation and propagated throughout life. PMID:25411471

  9. Weight Loss by Ppc-1, a Novel Small Molecule Mitochondrial Uncoupler Derived from Slime Mold

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Ogura, Masato; Homma, Miwako K.; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity. PMID:25668511

  10. Host-related carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 promotes metastasis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, A; Chan, C; Nouvion, A-L; Breton, V; Benlolo, S; DeMarte, L; Turbide, C; Brodt, P; Ferri, L; Beauchemin, N

    2013-02-14

    Liver metastasis is the predominant cause of colorectal cancer (CRC)-related mortality in developed countries. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is a cell adhesion molecule with reduced expression in early phases of CRC development and thus functions as a tumor growth inhibitor. However, CEACAM1 is upregulated in metastatic colon cancer, suggesting a bimodal role in CRC progression. To investigate the role of this protein in the host metastatic environment, Ceacam1(-/-) mice were injected intrasplenically with metastatic MC38 mouse CRC cells. A significant reduction in metastatic burden was observed in Ceacam1(-/-) compared with wild-type (WT) livers. Intravital microscopy showed decreased early survival of MC38 cells in Ceacam1(-/-) endothelial environment. Metastatic cell proliferation within the Ceacam1(-/-) livers was also diminished. Bone marrow-derived cell recruitment, attenuation of immune infiltrates and diminished CCL2, CCL3 and CCL5 chemokine production participated in the reduced Ceacam1(-/-) metastatic phenotype. Transplantations of WT bone marrow (BM) into Ceacam1(-/-) mice fully rescued metastatic development, whereas Ceacam1(-/-) BM transfer into WT mice showed reduced metastatic burden. Chimeric immune cell profiling revealed diminished recruitment of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to Ceacam1(-/-) metastatic livers and adoptive transfer of MDSCs confirmed the involvement of these immune cells in reduction of liver metastasis. CEACAM1 may represent a novel metastatic CRC target for treatment. PMID:22469976

  11. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Ogura, Masato; Homma, Miwako K; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Homma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity. PMID:25668511

  12. The adaptor molecule Trif contributes to murine host defense during Leptospiral infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Priya A; Devlin, Amy A; Miller, Jennifer C; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease and is caused by pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus, including Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans). Humans, domestic and wild animals are susceptible to acute or chronic infection. The innate immune response is a critical defense mechanism against Leptospira interrogans, and has been investigated in mouse models. Murine Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to be key factors in sensing and responding to L. interrogans infection. Specifically, TLR2, TLR4 and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 are essential for host defense against L. interrogans; however, the role of the TLR adaptor molecule TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon β (TRIF) in the response to L. interrogans has not been previously determined. In the present study, TRIF was found to play an important role during leptospiral infection. Following challenge with L. interrogans, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited delayed weight gain compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in L. interrogans burden in the kidneys, lungs, and blood at early time points (less than 7days post infection). Multiple components of the innate immune responses were dampened in response to leptospiral infection including transcription and production of cytokines, and the humoral response, which suggested that TRIF contributes to expression and production of cytokines important for the host defense against L. interrogans. PMID:27259371

  13. Transplantation of Tail Skin to Study Allogeneic CD4 T Cell Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simona W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of T cell responses and their consequences during allo-antigen recognition requires a model that enables one to distinguish between donor and host T cells, to easily monitor the graft, and to adapt the system in order to answer different immunological questions. Medawar and colleagues established allogeneic tail-skin transplantation in mice in 1955. Since then, the skin transplantation model has been continuously modified and adapted to answer specific questions. The use of tail-skin renders this model easy to score for graft rejection, requires neither extensive preparation nor deep anesthesia, is applicable to animals of all genetic background, discourages ischemic necrosis, and permits chemical and biological intervention. In general, both CD4+ and CD8+ allogeneic T cells are responsible for the rejection of allografts since they recognize mismatched major histocompatibility antigens from different mouse strains. Several models have been described for activating allogeneic T cells in skin-transplanted mice. The identification of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in different mouse strains including C57BL/6 mice was an important step toward understanding and studying T cell-mediated alloresponses. In the tail-skin transplantation model described here, a three-point mutation (I-Abm12) in the antigen-presenting groove of the MHC-class II (I-Ab) molecule is sufficient to induce strong allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation in C57BL/6 mice. Skin grafts from I-Abm12 mice on C57BL/6 mice are rejected within 12-15 days, while syngeneic grafts are accepted for up to 100 days. The absence of T cells (CD3-/- and Rag2-/- mice) allows skin graft acceptance up to 100 days, which can be overcome by transferring 2 x 104 wild type or transgenic T cells. Adoptively transferred T cells proliferate and produce IFN-γ in I-Abm12-transplanted Rag2-/- mice. PMID:25147005

  14. Experimental cryptosporidiosis in laboratory mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, D; Angus, K W; Snodgrass, D R; Tzipori, S

    1982-01-01

    Eight strains of laboratory mice were susceptible to subclinical infections with Cryptosporidium sp. at 1 to 4 days of age, but only a transient infection could be established at 21 days of age or older. Immunosuppression of 21-day-old mice failed to render them more susceptible to infection. Laboratory storage conditions for Cryptosporidium sp. were investigated by titration in 1- to 4-day-old mice. Storage by freezing with a variety of cryoprotectants was unsuccessful, but storage at 4 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline or 2.5% potassium dichromate was possible for 4 to 6 months. PMID:7141705

  15. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  16. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V.; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications.

  17. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy of Single Molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Benjamin W; Braun, Lukas; Pascual, Jose I; Franke, Katharina J

    2015-06-10

    The magnetism of single atoms and molecules is governed by the atomic scale environment. In general, the reduced symmetry of the surrounding splits the d states and aligns the magnetic moment along certain favorable directions. Here, we show that we can reversibly modify the magnetocrystalline anisotropy by manipulating the environment of single iron(II) porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Pb(111) with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. When we decrease the tip-molecule distance, we first observe a small increase followed by an exponential decrease of the axial anisotropy on the molecules. This is in contrast to the monotonous increase observed earlier for the same molecule with an additional axial Cl ligand ( Nat. Phys. 2013 , 9 , 765 ). We ascribe the changes in the anisotropy of both species to a deformation of the molecules in the presence of the attractive force of the tip, which leads to a change in the d level alignment. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of a precise tuning of the magnetic anisotropy of an individual molecule by mechanical control. PMID:25942560

  18. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  19. Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ferez, Rosario

    2016-05-01

    Ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecules are formed when a ground-state atom is bound to a Rydberg atom. The binding mechanism of these Rydberg molecules is based on the low-energy collisions between a Rydberg electron and a ground-state atom and leads to the unusual oscillatory behavior of the adiabatic potential energy curves. If the ground-state atom immersed into the Rydberg wave function is replaced by a heteronuclear diatomic molecule another type of polyatomic Rydberg molecules can form. In this case, the Rydberg electron is coupled to the internal states of the polar ground-state molecule. In this talk, we will explore the electronic structure and rovibrational properties of these ultralong-range polyatomic Rydberg molecule. For the second type of Rydberg molecules, the polar dimer is allowed to rotate in the electric fields generated by the Rydberg electron and Rydberg core as well as an additional external field. We will investigate the metamorphosis of the Born-Oppenheimer potential curves, essential for the binding mechanism, with varying electric field and analyze the resulting properties such as the vibrational structure and the alignment and orientation of the polar dimer.

  20. Giant molecules composed of polar molecules and atoms in mixed dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ran; Tan, Shina

    2014-05-01

    Two or three polar molecules, confined to one or two dimensions, can form stable bound states with a single atom living in three dimensions, if the molecule and the atom can interact resonantly such that their mixed dimensional scattering length is large. We call these bound states ``giant molecules'' since it's a molecule composed of smaller molecules and atoms. We study their properties using techniques including exact numerical solution, exact qunatum diffusion Monte Carlo (QMC), Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), and semiclassical approximation. These bound states have a hierarchical structure reminiscent of the celestial systems.

  1. Molecules-in-Molecules: An Extrapolated Fragment-Based Approach for Accurate Calculations on Large Molecules and Materials.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, Nicholas J; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2011-05-10

    We present a new extrapolated fragment-based approach, termed molecules-in-molecules (MIM), for accurate energy calculations on large molecules. In this method, we use a multilevel partitioning approach coupled with electronic structure studies at multiple levels of theory to provide a hierarchical strategy for systematically improving the computed results. In particular, we use a generalized hybrid energy expression, similar in spirit to that in the popular ONIOM methodology, that can be combined easily with any fragmentation procedure. In the current work, we explore a MIM scheme which first partitions a molecule into nonoverlapping fragments and then recombines the interacting fragments to form overlapping subsystems. By including all interactions with a cheaper level of theory, the MIM approach is shown to significantly reduce the errors arising from a single level fragmentation procedure. We report the implementation of energies and gradients and the initial assessment of the MIM method using both biological and materials systems as test cases. PMID:26610128

  2. Line broadening of confined CO gas: from molecule-wall to molecule-molecule collisions with pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, J-M; Boulet, C; Auwera, J Vander; El Hamzaoui, H; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M

    2014-02-14

    The infrared absorption in the fundamental band of CO gas confined in porous silica xerogel has been recorded at room temperature for pressures between about 5 and 920 hPa using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. The widths of individual lines are determined from fits of measured spectra and compared with ab initio predictions obtained from requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. Good agreement is obtained from the low pressure regime where the line shapes are governed by molecule-wall collisions to high pressures where the influence of molecule-molecule interactions dominates. These results, together with those obtained with a simple analytical model, indicate that both mechanisms contribute in a practically additive way to the observed linewidths. They also confirm that a single collision of a molecule with a wall changes its rotational state. These results are of interest for the determination of some characteristics of the opened porosity of porous materials through optical soundings. PMID:24527910

  3. Understanding Polymer Properties through Imaging of Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei

    2008-03-01

    The unique advantage of Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is that it allows imaging of flexible polymer molecules, whose overall size and local curvature are below the optical resolution limit. The role of molecular visualization has grown to be especially profound with the synthesis of complex macromolecules whose structure is difficult to confirm using conventional techniques such as NMR and light scattering. This is especially true for molecules that are branched, heterogeneous, and polydisperse. Here, SPM images provide unambiguous proof of the molecular architecture along with accurate analysis of size, conformation, and ordering of molecules on surfaces. The unique advantage of SPM is that one obtains molecular dimensions in direct space. This offers more opportunities for statistical analysis including fractionation of molecules by size, branching topology, and chemical composition as well as sorting out the irrelevant species. Unlike molecular characterization of static molecules, it remains challenging to study molecules as they move and react on surfaces. We will discuss pioneering AFM studies of flowing monolayers one molecule at a time. Through use of AFM, the flow process was monitored over a broad range of length scales from the millimeter long precursor film all the way down to the movements of individual molecules within the film. Molecular imaging enabled independent measurements both the driving and frictional forces that control spreading rate. In these studies, one also discovered a new type of flow instability in polymer monolayers caused by flow-induced conformational transitions. Recently, molecular imaging has been successfully used to monitor adsorption-induced degradation of branched molecules. These experiments open an entirely new perspective in chemistry wherein the chemical bonds can be mechanically activated upon the physical contact of a macromolecule with a substrate. This research directly impacts coatings, lubrication, heterogeneous

  4. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives. PMID:26606461

  5. Photochemical restoration of visual responses in blind mice.

    PubMed

    Polosukhina, Aleksandra; Litt, Jeffrey; Tochitsky, Ivan; Nemargut, Joseph; Sychev, Yivgeny; De Kouchkovsky, Ivan; Huang, Tracy; Borges, Katharine; Trauner, Dirk; Van Gelder, Russell N; Kramer, Richard H

    2012-07-26

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are degenerative blinding diseases caused by the death of rods and cones, leaving the remainder of the visual system intact but largely unable to respond to light. Here, we show that AAQ, a synthetic small molecule photoswitch, can restore light sensitivity to the retina and behavioral responses in vivo in mouse models of RP, without exogenous gene delivery. Brief application of AAQ bestows prolonged light sensitivity on multiple types of retinal neurons, resulting in synaptically amplified responses and center-surround antagonism in arrays of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Intraocular injection of AAQ restores the pupillary light reflex and locomotory light avoidance behavior in mice lacking retinal photoreceptors, indicating reconstitution of light signaling to brain circuits. AAQ and related photoswitch molecules present a potential drug strategy for restoring retinal function in degenerative blinding diseases. PMID:22841312

  6. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom-molecule collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-04-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom-molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X1Σ+g ground state 85Rb2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom-molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85Rb2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 1011 cm-3.

  7. Phononic Molecules Studied by Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Fainstein, A.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaitre, A.

    2010-01-04

    An acoustic nanocavity can confine phonons in such a way that they act like electrons in an atom. By combining two of these phononic-atoms, it is possible to form a phononic 'molecule', with acoustic modes that are similar to the electronic states in a hydrogen molecule. We report Raman scattering experiments performed in a monolithic structure formed by a phononic molecule embedded in an optical cavity. The acoustic mode splitting becomes evident through both the amplification and change of selection rules induced by the optical cavity confinement. The results are in perfect agreement with photoelastic model simulations.

  8. Electron-impact-induced tryptophan molecule fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila G.; Vukstich, Vasyl S.; Papp, Alexander V.; Snegursky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The fragmentation of a gas-phase tryptophan molecule by a low-energy (<70 eV) electron impact was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Various positively charged fragments were observed and analyzed. A special attention was paid to the energy characteristics of the ionic fragment yield. The geometrical parameters of the initial molecule rearrangement were also analyzed. The fragmentation observed was due to either a simple bond cleavage or more complex reactions involving molecular rearrangements. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Stefan Matejcik, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  9. H2 molecules and the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. K.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses expected column densities of H2 in the intercloud medium and the possible use of molecules as indicators of intercloud physical conditions. Molecule formation by the H(-) process and on graphite grains is treated, and it is shown that the Barlow-Silk hypothesis of a 1-eV semichemical hydrogen-graphite bond leads to a large enhancement of the intercloud molecule-formation rate. Rotational-excitation calculations are presented for both cloud and intercloud conditions which show, in agreement with Jura (1975), that the presently observed optically thin H2 absorption components are more likely to originate in cold clouds than in the intercloud medium.

  10. Engineering biological systems with synthetic RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Joe C.; Bloom, Ryan J.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2011-01-01

    RNA molecules play diverse functional roles in natural biological systems. There has been growing interest in designing synthetic RNA counterparts for programming biological function. The design of synthetic RNA molecules that exhibit diverse activities, including sensing, regulatory, information processing, and scaffolding activities, has highlighted the advantages of RNA as a programmable design substrate. Recent advances in implementing these engineered RNA molecules as key control elements in synthetic genetic networks are highlighting the functional relevance of this class of synthetic elements in programming cellular behaviors. PMID:21925380

  11. Signaling Role of Prokineticin 2 on the Estrous Cycle of Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ling; Zhang, Chengkang; Li, Xiaohan; Gong, Shiaoching; Hu, Renming; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Crowley W. Jr., William F.; Hastings, Michael H.; Zhou, Qun-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The possible signaling role of prokineticin 2 (PK2) and its receptor, prokineticin receptor 2 (PKR2), on female reproduction was investigated. First, the expression of PKR2 and its co-localization with estrogen receptor (ERα) in the hypothalamus was examined. Sexually dimorphic expression of PKR2 in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus was observed. Compared to the male mice, there was more widespread PKR2 expression in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus in the female mice. The likely co-expression of PKR2 and ERα in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus was observed. The estrous cycles in female PK2-null, and PKR2-null heterozygous mice, as well as in PK2-null and PKR2-null compound heterozygous mice were examined. Loss of one copy of PK2 or PKR2 gene caused elongated and irregular estrous cycle in the female mice. The alterations in the estrous cycle were more pronounced in PK2-null and PKR2-null compound heterozygous mice. Consistent with these observations, administration of a small molecule PK2 receptor antagonist led to temporary blocking of estrous cycle at the proestrous phase in female mice. The administration of PKR2 antagonist was found to blunt the circulating LH levels. Taken together, these studies indicate PK2 signaling is required for the maintenance of normal female estrous cycles. PMID:24633064

  12. IL-1 receptor-antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout mice show anxiety-like behavior by aging.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Chisato; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kiyama, Yuji; Manabe, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-07-10

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) plays a critical role in stress responses, and its mRNA is induced in the brain by restraint stress. Previously, we reported that IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout (KO) mice, which lacked IL-1Ra molecules that antagonize the IL-1 receptor, showed anti-depression-like behavior via adrenergic modulation at the age of 8 weeks. Here, we report that IL-1Ra KO mice display an anxiety-like phenotype that is induced spontaneously by aging in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. This anxiety-like phenotype was improved by the administration of diazepam. The expression of the anxiety-related molecule glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was significantly reduced in 20-week-old but not in 11-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) was not altered between IL-1Ra KO mice and WT littermates at either 11 or 20 weeks old. Analysis of monoamine concentration in the hippocampus revealed that tryptophan, the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly increased in 20-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to littermate WT mice. These findings strongly suggest that the anxiety-like behavior observed in older mice was caused by the complicated alteration of monoamine metabolism and/or GR expression in the hippocampus. PMID:26002078

  13. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-06

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  14. Owls and larks in mice.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Martina; Wicht, Helmut; von Gall, Charlotte; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl) has been shown to be associated with several health risks. A number of studies show that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior, which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork, and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration. PMID:26029157

  15. Owls and Larks in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Martina; Wicht, Helmut; von Gall, Charlotte; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl) has been shown to be associated with several health risks. A number of studies show that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior, which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork, and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration. PMID:26029157

  16. Partial hepatectomy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nevzorova, Y A; Tolba, R; Trautwein, C; Liedtke, C

    2015-04-01

    The surgical procedure of two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH) in rodents was first described more than 80 years ago by Higgins and Anderson. Nevertheless, this technique is still a state-of-the-art method for the community of liver researchers as it allows the in-depth analysis of signalling pathways involved in liver regeneration and hepatocarcinogenesis. The importance of PH as a key method in experimental hepatology has even increased in the last decade due to the increasing availability of genetically-modified mouse strains. Here, we propose a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the implementation of PH in mice, which is based on our experience of more than 10 years. In particular, the SOP offers all relevant background information on the PH model and provides comprehensive guidelines for planning and performing PH experiments. We provide established recommendations regarding optimal age and gender of animals, use of appropriate anaesthesia and biometric calculation of the experiments. We finally present an easy-to-follow step-by-step description of the complete surgical procedure including required materials, critical steps and postoperative management. This SOP especially takes into account the latest changes in animal welfare rules in the European Union but is still in agreement with current international regulations. In summary, this article provides comprehensive information for the legal application, design and implementation of PH experiments. PMID:25835741

  17. Tamoxifen administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Jonathan; Littlewood, Trevor; Soucek, Laura

    2015-03-01

    The strategy of fusing a protein of interest to a hormone-binding domain (HBD) of a steroid hormone receptor allows fine control of the activity of the fused protein. Such fusion proteins are inactive in the absence of ligand, because they are complexed with a variety of intracellular polypeptides. Upon ligand binding, the receptor is released from its inhibitory complex and the fusion protein becomes functional. In the murine estrogen receptor (ER) fusion system, proteins are fused to the HBD of the ER. The system relies on the use of a mutant ER known as ER(TAM). Compared to the wild-type HBD, ER(TAM) has 1000-fold lower affinity for estrogen, yet remains responsive to activation by the synthetic steroid 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Because 4-OHT is expensive, animals can be treated with the cheaper precursor tamoxifen, which is converted into 4-OHT by a liver enzyme. Here we present an overview of the methods used to deliver tamoxifen to mice. The most used method is intraperitoneal injection, because the amount of administered compound can be better controlled, but delivery by oral gavage is also possible. For short-term and immediate-effect studies or when conversion of tamoxifen by the liver is to be avoided, 4-OHT can be used directly. PMID:25734062

  18. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Ertan Gökbayrak, Merve; Mutlu, Oguz; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. MATERIAL AND METHODS The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 µg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. RESULTS The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. CONCLUSIONS Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  19. Stereoelectronic switching in single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Timothy A.; Li, Haixing; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A new intersection between reaction chemistry and electronic circuitry is emerging from the ultraminiaturization of electronic devices. Over decades chemists have developed a nuanced understanding of stereoelectronics to establish how the electronic properties of molecules relate to their conformation; the recent advent of single-molecule break-junction techniques provides the means to alter this conformation with a level of control previously unimagined. Here we unite these ideas by demonstrating the first single-molecule switch that operates through a stereoelectronic effect. We demonstrate this behaviour in permethyloligosilanes with methylthiomethyl electrode linkers. The strong σ conjugation in the oligosilane backbone couples the stereoelectronic properties of the sulfur-methylene σ bonds that terminate the molecule. Theoretical calculations support the existence of three distinct dihedral conformations that differ drastically in their electronic character. We can shift between these three species by simply lengthening or compressing the molecular junction, and, in doing so, we can switch conductance digitally between two states.

  20. Dynamics of molecules in extreme rotational states

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liwei; Teitelbaum, Samuel W.; Robinson, Allison; Mullin, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed an optical centrifuge with a pulse energy that is more than 2 orders of magnitude larger than previously reported instruments. This high pulse energy enables us to create large enough number densities of molecules in extreme rotational states to perform high-resolution state-resolved transient IR absorption measurements. Here we report the first studies of energy transfer dynamics involving molecules in extreme rotational states. In these studies, the optical centrifuge drives CO2 molecules into states with J ∼ 220 and we use transient IR probing to monitor the subsequent rotational, translational, and vibrational energy flow dynamics. The results reported here provide the first molecular insights into the relaxation of molecules with rotational energy that is comparable to that of a chemical bond.

  1. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  2. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-27

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies. PMID:27070321

  3. Large molecules in diffuse interstellar clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of the presence of a substantial component of large molecules on the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds are explored, and detailed models of the zeta Persei and zeta Ophiuchi clouds are constructed. The major consequence is a reduction in the abundances of singly charged atomic species. The long-standing discrepancy between cloud densities inferred from rotational and fine-structure level populations and from the ionization balance can be resolved by postulating a fractional abundance of large molecules of 1 x 10 to the -7th for zeta Persei and 6 x 10 to the -7th for zeta Ophiuchi. If the large molecules are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) containing about 50 carbon atoms, they contain 1 percent of the carbon in zeta Persei and 7 percent in zeta Ophiuchi. Other consequences of the possible presence of PAH molecules are discussed. 23 references.

  4. Molecular junctions: Single-molecule contacts exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-05-01

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based method it is now possible to get an atomistic-level description of the most probable binding and contact configuration for single-molecule electrical junctions.

  5. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  6. Macronuclear gene-sized molecules of hypotrichs.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, D C; Anderson, R C; DuBois, M L; Prescott, D M

    1995-01-01

    The macronuclear genome of hypotrichous ciliates consists of DNA molecules of gene-sized length. A macronuclear DNA molecule contains a single coding region. We have analyzed the many hypotrich macronuclear DNA sequences sequenced by us and others. No highly conserved promoter sequences nor replication initiation sequences have been identified in the 5' nor in the 3' non-translated regions, suggesting that promoter function in hypotrichs may differ from other eukaryotes. The macronuclear genes are intron-poor; approximately 19% of the genes sequenced to date have one to three introns. Not all macronuclear DNA molecules may be transcribed; some macronuclear molecules may not have any coding function. Codon bias in hypotrichs is different in many respects from other ciliates and from other eukaryotes. PMID:7753617

  7. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    SciTech Connect

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-05-08

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  8. Laser Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schawlow, Arthur L.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys new laser techniques and a variety of spectroscopic experiments that can be used to detect, measure and study very small numbers of atoms on molecules. The range of applicability of these techniques is also included. (HM)

  9. Small Molecules from the Human Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Mohamed S.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in the use of genomics to guide natural product discovery and a recent emphasis on understanding the molecular mechanisms of microbiota-host interactions have converged on the discovery of natural products from the human microbiome. Here, we review what is known about small molecules produced by the human microbiota. Numerous molecules representing each of the major metabolite classes have been found that have a variety of biological activities, including immune modulation and antibiosis. We discuss technologies that will affect how microbiota-derived molecules are discovered in the future, and consider the challenges inherent in finding specific molecules that are critical for driving microbe-host and microbe-microbe interactions and their biological relevance. PMID:26206939

  10. Biological mechanisms, one molecule at a time

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed the development of tools that allow the observation and manipulation of single molecules. The rapidly expanding application of these technologies for investigating biological systems of ever-increasing complexity is revolutionizing our ability to probe the mechanisms of biological reactions. Here, we compare the mechanistic information available from single-molecule experiments with the information typically obtained from ensemble studies and show how these two experimental approaches interface with each other. We next present a basic overview of the toolkit for observing and manipulating biology one molecule at a time. We close by presenting a case study demonstrating the impact that single-molecule approaches have had on our understanding of one of life's most fundamental biochemical reactions: the translation of a messenger RNA into its encoded protein by the ribosome. PMID:21685361

  11. Single-Molecule Studies in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Live-cell single-molecule experiments are now widely used to study complex biological processes such as signal transduction, self-assembly, active trafficking, and gene regulation. These experiments' increased popularity results in part from rapid methodological developments that have significantly lowered the technical barriers to performing them. Another important advance is the development of novel statistical algorithms, which, by modeling the stochastic behaviors of single molecules, can be used to extract systemic parameters describing the in vivo biochemistry or super-resolution localization of biological molecules within their physiological environment. This review discusses recent advances in experimental and computational strategies for live-cell single-molecule studies, as well as a selected subset of biological studies that have utilized these new technologies.

  12. Water molecule conformation outside a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, F.; Gabbay, I.; March, N. H.

    1981-05-01

    The effect of a metal surface on the conformation of a water molecule has been analyzed by discussing two independent effects: (i) the screening of the proton-proton repulsion, (ii) the interaction of the lone-pair orbitals with the surface. Both effects tend to increase the HOH angle. However, the interaction between the lone-pairs with the surface is the dominant effect for a water molecule approaching the surface. In particular, for a chemisorbed state this interaction is responsible for the major part of the molecule deformation. We have estimated that for H 2O chemisorbed on Ru, the HOH angle must increase from the free molecule value of 104.5° by 3.1 ± 0.5° in good agreement with the experimental evidence.

  13. Polyatomic molecules under intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Jackson, James E; Levine, Benjamin G; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-12-11

    Interaction of intense laser pulses with atoms and molecules is at the forefront of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. It is the gateway to powerful new tools that include above threshold ionization, high harmonic generation, electron diffraction, molecular tomography, and attosecond pulse generation. Intense laser pulses are ideal for probing and manipulating chemical bonding. Though the behavior of atoms in strong fields has been well studied, molecules under intense fields are not as well understood and current models have failed in certain important aspects. Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon excitation. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a "bag of atoms" during field induced ionization. In this article we present a set of experiments and theoretical calculations exploring the behavior of a large collection of aryl alkyl ketones when irradiated with intense femtosecond pulses. Specifically, we consider to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The set of molecules studied is further divided into smaller sets, sorted by type and position of functional groups. The pump-probe time-delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, which amount to only a few hundred millielectronvolts, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to predict molecular dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose the

  14. Local delivery of gene-modifying triplex-forming molecules to epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Faye A.; Hu, Rong-Hua; Milstone, Leonard M.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are particularly suitable candidates for in situ gene correction. Intraperitoneal administration of a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) was shown previously to introduce DNA base changes in a reporter gene in skin, without identifying which cells had been targeted. We extend those previous experiments using two triplex-forming molecules (TFMs), a peptide nucleic acid (PNA-Antp) and a TFO (AG30), and two lines of transgenic mice that have the chromosomally integrated λsupFG1 shuttle-reporter transgene. Successful in vivo genomic modification occurs in epidermis and dermis in CD1 transgenic mice following either intraperitoneal or intradermal delivery of the PNA-Antennapedia conjugate. FITC-PNA-Antp accumulates in nuclei of keratinocytes and, after intradermal delivery of the PNA-Antp, chromosomally modified, keratin 5 positive basal keratinocytes persist for at least 10 days. In hairless (SKH1) mice with the λsupFG1 transgene, intradermal delivery of the TFO, AG30, introduces gene modifications in both tail and back skin and those chromosomal modifications persist in basal keratinocytes for 10 days. Hairless mice should facilitate comparison of various targeting agents and methods of delivery. Gene targeting by repeated local administration of oligonucleotides may prove clinically useful for judiciously selected disease-causing genes in the epidermis. PMID:23014335

  15. The MICE Run Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, or a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The new MICE Run Control has been developed to ensure proper sequencing of equipment and use of system resources to protect data quality. A description of this system, its implementation, and performance during recent muon beam data collection will be discussed.

  16. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of polar molecules with superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate cooperative phenomena and superradiance for vibrational transitions in polar molecule spectroscopy of high optical-depth samples. Such cooperativity comes from the build-up of inter-particle coherence through dipole-dipole interactions and leads to speed-up of decay processes. We compare our calculation to recent work and find very good agreement, suggesting that superradiant effects need to be taken into account in a wide variety of ultracold molecule experiments, including vibrational and rotational states.

  18. Entropy bottlenecks in ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, J. A.; Brauman, J. I.; Golden, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The significance of entropy bottlenecks in dissociation and recombination pathways in the prototype ionic system CH3 + CH3(+) has been investigated. Ion-molecule systems are shown to react through an entirely different dynamics than neutral systems, due to intrinsic differences in the shapes of the relevant potential surfaces. Consequences with regard to the interpretation of experimental rate parameters in the ion-molecule area are discussed.

  19. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ν{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ν{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  20. Spin-split states in aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsh, J.E. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-06-01

    A state where spin currents exist in the absence of external fields has recently been proposed to describe the low-temperature phase of chromium. It is proposed here that such a state may also describe the ground of aromatic molecules. It is argued that this point of view provides a more natural explanation for the large diamagnetic susceptibilities and NMR shifts observed in these molecules than the conventional viewpoint. The authors model suggests a new memory mechanism.

  1. Recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules

    DOEpatents

    Swansiger, W.A.

    1984-10-17

    This invention relates to the recovery of tritium from various tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium. More particularly, the invention relates to the recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium wherein the reaction is conducted in a reactor which permits the reaction to occur as a moving front reaction from the point where the tritium enters the reactor charged with uranium down the reactor until the uranium is exhausted.

  2. High Pathogenicity of Wild-Type Measles Virus Infection in CD150 (SLAM) Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sellin, Caroline I.; Davoust, Nathalie; Guillaume, Vanessa; Baas, Dominique; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2006-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease, associated in certain cases with infection of the central nervous system and development of a severe neurological disease. We have generated transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the human protein SLAM (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule), or CD150, recently identified as an MV receptor. In contrast to all other MV receptor transgenic models described so far, in these mice infection with wild-type MV strains is highly pathogenic. Intranasal infection of SLAM transgenic suckling mice leads to MV spread to different organs and the development of an acute neurological syndrome, characterized by lethargy, seizures, ataxia, weight loss, and death within 3 weeks. In addition, in this model, vaccine and wild-type MV strains can be distinguished by virulence. Furthermore, intracranial MV infection of adult transgenic mice generates a subclinical infection associated with a high titer of MV-specific antibodies in the serum. Finally, to analyze new antimeasles therapeutic approaches, we created a recombinant soluble form of SLAM and demonstrated its important antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results show the high susceptibility of SLAM transgenic mice to MV-induced neurological disease and open new perspectives for the analysis of the implication of SLAM in the neuropathogenicity of other morbilliviruses, which also use this molecule as a receptor. Moreover, this transgenic model, in allowing a simple readout of the efficacy of an antiviral treatment, provides unique experimental means to test novel anti-MV preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:16775330

  3. Chronic pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR leads to cardiac dysfunction in C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Barrick, Cordelia J.; Yu Ming; Chao, H.-H.; Threadgill, David W.

    2008-05-01

    Molecule-targeted therapies like those against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are becoming widely used in the oncology clinic. With improvements in treatment efficacy, many cancers are being treated as chronic diseases, with patients having prolonged exposure to several therapies that were previously only given acutely. The consequence of chronic suppression of EGFR activity may lead to unexpected toxicities like altered cardiac physiology, a common organ site for adverse drug effects. To explore this possibility, we treated C57BL/6J (B6) mice with two EGFR small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), irreversible EKB-569 and reversible AG-1478, orally for 3 months. In B6 female mice, chronic exposure to both TKIs depressed body weight gain and caused significant changes in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and cardiac function. No significant differences were observed in heart weight or cardiomyocyte size but histological analysis revealed an increase in fibrosis and in the numbers of TUNEL-positive cells in the hearts from treated female mice. Consistent with histological results, LV apoptotic gene expression was altered, with significant downregulation of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2l1. Although there were no significant differences in any of these endpoints in treated male mice, suggesting sex may influence susceptibility to TKI mediated toxicity, the LVs of treated male mice had significant upregulation of Egf, Erbb2 and Nppb over controls. Taken together, these data suggest that chronic dietary exposure to TKIs may result in pathological and physiological changes in the heart.

  4. Attenuated viral hepatitis in Trem1-/- mice is associated with reduced inflammatory activity of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kozik, Jan-Hendrik; Trautmann, Tanja; Carambia, Antonella; Preti, Max; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Krech, Till; Wiegard, Christiane; Heeren, Joerg; Herkel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    TREM1 (Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1) is a pro-inflammatory receptor expressed by phagocytes, which can also be released as a soluble molecule (sTREM1). The roles of TREM1 and sTREM1 in liver infection and inflammation are not clear. Here we show that patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection manifest elevated serum levels of sTREM1. In mice, experimental viral hepatitis induced by infection with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV)-WE was likewise associated with increased sTREM1 in serum and urine, and with increased TREM1 and its associated adapter molecule DAP12 in the liver. Trem1-/- mice showed accelerated clearance of LCMV-WE and manifested attenuated liver inflammation and injury. TREM1 expression in the liver of wild-type mice was mostly confined to infiltrating neutrophils, which responded to LCMV by secretion of CCL2 and TNF-α, and release of sTREM1. Accordingly, the production of CCL2 and TNF-α was decreased in the livers of LCMV-infected Trem1-/- mice, as compared to LCMV-infected wildtype mice. These findings indicate that TREM1 plays a role in viral hepatitis, in which it seems to aggravate the immunopathology associated with viral clearance, mainly by increasing the inflammatory activity of neutrophils. PMID:27328755

  5. Feshbach molecules from an atomic Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz, Thomas; Syassen, Niels; Bauer, Dominik; Hansis, Eberhard; Duerr, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2006-05-01

    Feshbach molecules from bosonic atomic species have proven to be very unstable with respect to inelastic collisions [1]. As a result, the typical lifetime observed for a cloud of ultracold ^87Rb2 molecules stored in an optical dipole trap is limited to a few ms.Here, we report on the observation of long-lived Feshbach molecules in an optical lattice. A BEC of ^87Rb atoms is loaded into the lowest Bloch band of a 3D optical lattice operated at a wavelength of 830 nm. By ramping up the lattice depth, the atomic gas enters the Mott insulator regime. A magnetic-field ramp through the Feshbach resonance at 1007 G creates molecules [2]. Lattice sites initially occupied with more than 2 atoms experience fast inelastic collisional losses. The observed lifetime of the remaining molecules is ˜100 ms, which is much longer than for a pure molecular sample in an optical dipole trap. Similar results have recently been reported in Ref.[3]. The increased lifetime is an important step on the route to a BEC of molecules in the vibrational ground state [4].[1] T. Mukaiyama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 180402 (2004) [2] S. D"urr et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 020406 (2004) [3] G. Thalhammer et al., cond-mat/0510755 [4] D. Jaksch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 040402 (2002)

  6. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  7. Quantum-classical lifetimes of Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, Andrej; Main, Jörg; Wunner, Günter

    2013-04-01

    A remarkable property of Rydberg atoms is the possibility of creating molecules formed by one highly excited atom and another atom in the ground state. The first realization of such a Rydberg molecule has opened an active field of physical investigations, and showed that its basic properties can be described within a simple model regarding the ground state atom as a small perturber that is bound by a low-energy scattering process with the Rydberg electron (Greene et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 2458). Besides the good agreement between theory and the experiment concerning the vibrational states of the molecule, the experimental observations yield the astonishing feature that the lifetime of the molecule is clearly reduced as compared to the bare Rydberg atom (Butscher et al 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 184004). With focus on this yet unexplained observation, we investigate in this paper the vibrational ground state of the molecule in a quantum-classical framework. We show that the Rydberg wavefunction is continuously detuned by the presence of the moving ground state atom and that the timescale on which the detuning significantly exceeds the natural linewidth is in good agreement with the observed reduced lifetimes of the Rydberg molecule.

  8. Laser-Assisted Single Molecule Refolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui; Marshall, Myles; Aleman, Elvin; Lamichhane, Rajan; Rueda, David

    2010-03-01

    In vivo, many RNA molecules can adopt multiple conformations depending on their biological context such as the HIV Dimerization Initiation Sequence (DIS) or the DsrA RNA in bacteria. It is quite common that the initial interaction between the two RNAs takes place via complementary unpaired regions, thus forming a so-called kissing complex. However, the exact kinetic mechanism by which the two RNA molecules reach the dimerized state is still not well understood. To investigate the refolding energy surface of RNA molecules, we have developed new technology based on the combination of single molecule spectroscopy with laser induced temperature jump kinetics, called Laser Assisted Single-molecule Refolding (LASR). LASR enables us to induce folding reactions of otherwise kinetically trapped RNAs at the single molecule level, and to characterize their folding landscape. LASR provides an exciting new approach to study molecular memory effects and kinetically trapped RNAs in general. LASR should be readily applicable to study DNA and protein folding as well.

  9. Building Diatomic and Triatomic Superatom Molecules.

    PubMed

    Champsaur, Anouck M; Velian, Alexandra; Paley, Daniel W; Choi, Bonnie; Roy, Xavier; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin

    2016-08-10

    In this study, we have developed a method to create Co6Se8 superatoms in which we program the metal-ligand bonds. We exclusively form the Co6Se8 core under simple reaction conditions with a facile separation of products that contain differential substitution of the core. The combination of Co2(CO)8 and PR3 with excess Se gives the differentially and directionally substituted superatoms, Co6Se8(CO)x(PR3)(6-x). The CO groups on the superatom can be exchanged quantitatively with phosphines and isonitriles. Substitution of the CO allows us to manipulate the type and length of chemical bridge between two redox-active superatomic centers in order to modulate intersuperatomic coupling. Linking two superatoms together allows us to form the simplest superatom molecule: a diatomic molecule. We extend the superatom molecule concept to link three superatoms together in a linear arrangement to form acyclic triatomic molecules. These superatom molecules have a rich electrochemical profile and chart a clear path to a whole family of superatom molecules with new and unusual collective properties. PMID:27410225

  10. Auxin biology revealed by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Robert, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    The plant hormone auxin regulates virtually every aspect of plant growth and development and unraveling its molecular and cellular modes of action is fundamental for plant biology research. Chemical genomics is the use of small molecules to modify protein functions. This approach currently rises as a powerful technology for basic research. Small compounds with auxin-like activities or affecting auxin-mediated biological processes have been widely used in auxin research. They can serve as a tool complementary to genetic and genomic methods, facilitating the identification of an array of components modulating auxin metabolism, transport and signaling. The employment of high-throughput screening technologies combined with informatics-based chemical design and organic chemical synthesis has since yielded many novel small molecules with more instantaneous, precise and specific functionalities. By applying those small molecules, novel molecular targets can be isolated to further understand and dissect auxin-related pathways and networks that otherwise are too complex to be elucidated only by gene-based methods. Here, we will review examples of recently characterized molecules used in auxin research, highlight the strategies of unraveling the mechanisms of these small molecules and discuss future perspectives of small molecule applications in auxin biology. PMID:24252105

  11. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  12. Vibrational Cooling of Photoassociated Homonuclear Cold Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passagem, Henry; Ventura, Paulo; Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we produce vibrationally cold homonuclear Rb molecules using spontaneous optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. In the first step, we use a photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the singlet ground state. Then in a second step, a 50 W broadband laser at 1071 nm, which bandwidth is about 2 nm, is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the excited state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels below ν = 35 . The molecules can be further cooled using a broadband light source near 685 nm. In order to obtain such broadband source, we have used a 5 mW superluminescent diode, which is amplified in a tapered amplifier using a double pass configuration. After the amplification, the spectrum is properly shaped and we end up with about 90 mW distributed in the 682-689 nm range. The final vibrational distribution is probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm operating at 4KHz. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  13. Quantitative Aspects of Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Raimund J.; Tahmasbi, Amir; Ram, Sripad; Lin, Zhiping; Ward, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a relatively new optical microscopy technique that allows the detection of individual molecules such as proteins in a cellular context. This technique has generated significant interest among biologists, biophysicists and biochemists, as it holds the promise to provide novel insights into subcellular processes and structures that otherwise cannot be gained through traditional experimental approaches. Single molecule experiments place stringent demands on experimental and algorithmic tools due to the low signal levels and the presence of significant extraneous noise sources. Consequently, this has necessitated the use of advanced statistical signal and image processing techniques for the design and analysis of single molecule experiments. In this tutorial paper, we provide an overview of single molecule microscopy from early works to current applications and challenges. Specific emphasis will be on the quantitative aspects of this imaging modality, in particular single molecule localization and resolvability, which will be discussed from an information theoretic perspective. We review the stochastic framework for image formation, different types of estimation techniques and expressions for the Fisher information matrix. We also discuss several open problems in the field that demand highly non-trivial signal processing algorithms. PMID:26167102

  14. Chapter 3: Small Molecules and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    “Big” molecules such as proteins and genes still continue to capture the imagination of most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians. “Small” molecules, on the other hand, are the molecules that most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians prefer to ignore. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that small molecules such as amino acids, lipids and sugars play a far more important role in all aspects of disease etiology and disease treatment than we realized. This particular chapter focuses on an emerging field of bioinformatics called “chemical bioinformatics” – a discipline that has evolved to help address the blended chemical and molecular biological needs of toxicogenomics, pharmacogenomics, metabolomics and systems biology. In the following pages we will cover several topics related to chemical bioinformatics. First, a brief overview of some of the most important or useful chemical bioinformatic resources will be given. Second, a more detailed overview will be given on those particular resources that allow researchers to connect small molecules to diseases. This section will focus on describing a number of recently developed databases or knowledgebases that explicitly relate small molecules – either as the treatment, symptom or cause – to disease. Finally a short discussion will be provided on newly emerging software tools that exploit these databases as a means to discover new biomarkers or even new treatments for disease. PMID:23300405

  15. Chemical Recycling of Molecules in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Hitomi

    2015-08-01

    Modeling is essential to understand the important physical and chemical processes that occur in cometary comae, especially the relationship between native and sibling molecules, such as, HCN and CN. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms observed in comets. The effects of photoelectrons that react via impacts are important to the overall ionization in the inner coma. We have found that many molecules undergo protonation reactions with primarily water, followed by electron recombination resulting in the original molecules in a vibrationally excited state. These excited molecules spontaneously emit photons back to the ground state. We identify this series of reactions as chemical “recycling.” We discuss the importance of this mechanism for HCN, NH3, and water in comets. We also identify other relevant processes in the collision-dominated, inner coma of a comet within a global modeling framework to better understand observations and in situ measurements of cometary species, especially relationships between native and sibling molecules for the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.Acknowledgements: We appreciate support from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under Grant No. 0908529. This program is partially supported by the MEXT Supported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, 2014-2018.

  16. Bipolar Conductance Switching of Single Anthradithiophene Molecules.

    PubMed

    Borca, Bogdana; Schendel, Verena; Pétuya, Rémi; Pentegov, Ivan; Michnowicz, Tomasz; Kraft, Ulrike; Klauk, Hagen; Arnau, Andrés; Wahl, Peter; Schlickum, Uta; Kern, Klaus

    2015-12-22

    Single molecular switches are basic device elements in organic electronics. The pentacene analogue anthradithiophene (ADT) shows a fully reversible binary switching between different adsorption conformations on a metallic surface accompanied by a charge transfer. These transitions are activated locally in single molecules in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope . The switching induces changes between bistable orbital structures and energy level alignment at the interface. The most stable geometry, the "off" state, which all molecules adopt upon evaporation, corresponds to a short adsorption distance at which the electronic interactions of the acene rings bend the central part of the molecule toward the surface accompanied by a significant charge transfer from the metallic surface to the ADT molecules. This leads to a shift of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital down to the Fermi level (EF). In the "on" state the molecule has a flat geometry at a larger distance from the surface; consequently the interaction is weaker, resulting in a negligible charge transfer with an orbital structure resembling the highest occupied molecular orbital when imaged close to EF. The potential barrier between these two states can be overcome reversibly by injecting charge carriers locally into individual molecules. Voltage-controlled current traces show a hysteresis characteristic of a bipolar switching behavior. The interpretation is supported by first-principles calculations. PMID:26580569

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics of Atom-Molecule Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li-Bin; Liu, Jie

    2014-03-01

    The creation of ultracold molecules has opened up new possibilities for studies on molecular matter waves, strongly interacting superfluids, high-precision molecular spectroscopy and coherent molecular optics. In an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and a degenerate Fermi-Fermi or Fermi-Bose mixture, magnetic Feshbach resonance or optical photoassociation (PA) technique has been used to create not only diatomic molecules but also more complex molecules. In this chapter, we focus on many issues of nonlinear dynamics of atom-molecule systems. In Sec. 1, on the basis of the two-channelmean-field approach, we study the manybody effects on the Landau-Zener(LZ) picture of two-body molecular production through dramatically distorting the energy levels near the Feshbach resonance. In Sec. 2, we investigate the Feshbach resonance with modulation of an oscillating magnetic field. In Sec. 3, we include the nonlinear interparticle collisions and focus on the linear instability induced by the collisions and the adiabatic fidelity of the atom-trimer dark state in a stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). In Sec. 4, we theoretically investigate conversion problem from atom to N-body polyatomic molecule in an ultracold bosonic system by implementing the generalized STIRAP. In the last section, we discuss role of two-body interactions in the Feshbach conversion of fermionic atoms to bosonic molecules.

  18. Self-Assemblies of novel molecules, VECAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bijay; Kim, Hye-Young; Lee, Soojin; Novak, Brian; Moldovan, Dorel

    2015-03-01

    VECAR is a newly synthesized molecule, which is an amphiphilic antioxidant molecule that consists of two molecular groups, vitamin-E and Carnosine, linked by a hydrocarbon chain. The hydrocarbon chain is hydrophobic and both vitamin-E and Carnosine ends are hydrophilic. In the synthesis process, the length of the hydrophobic chain of VECAR molecules can vary from the shortest (n =0) to the longest (n =18), where n indicates the number of carbon atoms in the chain. We conducted MD simulation studies of self-assembly of VECAR molecules in water using GROMACS on LONI HPC resources. Our study shows that there is a strong correlation between the shape and atomistic structure of the self-assembled nano-structures (SANs) and the chain-length (n) of VECAR molecules. We will report the results of data analyses including the atomistic structure of each SANs and the dynamic and energetic mechanisms of their formation as function of time. In summary, both VECAR molecules of chain-length n =18 and 9 form worm-like micelles, which may be used as a drug delivery system. This research is supported by the Louisiana Board of Regents-RCS Grant (LEQSF(2012-15)-RD-A-19).

  19. Soft Landing of Complex Molecules on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2011-07-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile technique for identification and structural characterization of large molecules. The advent of soft ionization techniques such as electrospray (ESI) (1-2) has enabled ionization of a wide variety of complex molecules without significant \\fragmentation while non-thermal ion sources such as laser vaporization (3-4) and magnetron sputtering (5-6) have provided access to materials that cannot, currently, be produced through conventional techniques. Most mass spectrometry studies rely on ionization of a molecule of interest or a complex mixture followed by mass analysis. Alternatively, mass spectrometry may be used as a preparatory technique, in which mass-selected ions are deposited onto solid supports or into liquid materials (7-18). Preparatory mass spectrometry offers several unique advantages for deposition of complex molecules on substrates including the ability to generate high-purity uniform films (19-20), unprecedented selectivity and specificity of preparation of deposited species (11, 21-22), the ability to focus and pattern an ion beam (23-24), and flexibility in both ion formation (1, 3, 25-26) and mass selection (27-32) processes. This review will highlight applications of mass-selected deposition of complex molecules for selective immobilization of biological molecules and catalytically active complexes on substrates.

  20. Mechanism of cellular response to nanoscale aggregates of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yi

    This dissertation research focused on the illustration of the molecular mechanism of cellular response to nanoscale aggregates formed by small molecules. There are five chapters in this dissertation. Chapter 1 summarizes the current research on the evaluation of cell response (i.e., biocompatibility/cytotoxicity) to small molecular hydrogelators. Chapter 2 describes an interesting phenomenon that supramolecular hydrogelators consisting of N-terminated dipeptides, which exhibit selective inhibitory effects against cancer cells. This study calls for the development of a new approach for identification of protein targets of the hydrogelators. Chapter 3 describes the evaluation of interactions between cytosol proteins of a mammalian cell line and morphologically different nanoscale molecular aggregates formed by small peptidic molecules. Chapter 4 describes the research on the mechanism of a type of molecular aggregates, which cluster short microtubules to prevent the growth of microtubule. This unprecedented mechanism of "self-assembly to interfere with self-organization " contributes to inhibiting growth of cancer cells in several mammalian cell based assays and a xenograft tumor mice model. At the end, Chapter 5 reports a novel supramolecular hydrogelator, which consists of fluorene and the pentapeptide epitope (TIGYG) of potassium ion (K+) channels, to self-assemble in water to form the tunable, hierarchical nanostructures dictated by the concentration of K+. In conclusion, this dissertation research demonstrates a new approach for investigating cellular target and molecular mechanism of self-assembled aggregates formed by small peptide derivatives based hydrogelators, which will make contribution to the development of supramolecular hydrogelators as biomaterials. Moreover, the differential cytotoxicity of molecular aggregates illustrated in this research promises a new direction for developing anti-cancer drug based on interactions between molecular aggregates and

  1. Single Molecule Conductance of Oligothiophene Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Emma J.

    This thesis studies the electronic properties of small organic molecules based on the thiophene motif. If we are to build next-generation devices, advanced materials must be designed which possess requisite electronic functionality. Molecules present attractive candidates for these ad- vanced materials since nanoscale devices are particularly sought after. However, selecting a molecule that is suited to a certain electronic function remains a challenge, and characterization of electronic behavior is therefore critical. Single molecule conductance measurements are a powerful tool to determine properties on the nanoscale and, as such, can be used to investigate novel building blocks that may fulfill the design requirements of next-generation devices. Combining these conductance results with strategic chemical synthesis allows for the development of new families of molecules that show attractive properties for future electronic devices. Since thiophene rings are the fruitflies of organic semiconductors on the bulk scale, they present an intriguing starting point for building functional materials on the nanoscale, and therefore form the structural basis of all molecules studied herein. First, the single-molecule conductance of a family of bithiophene derivatives was measured. A broad distribution in the single-molecule conductance of bithiophene was found compared with that of a biphenyl. This increased breadth in the conductance distribution was shown to be explained by the difference in 5-fold symmetry of thiophene rings as compared to the 6-fold symmetry of benzene rings. The reduced symmetry of thiophene rings results in a restriction on the torsion angle space available to these molecules when bound between two metal electrodes in a junction, causing each molecular junction to sample a different set of conformers in the conductance measurements. By contrast, the rotations of biphenyl are essentially unimpeded by junction binding, allowing each molecular junction

  2. Myelin from MAG-deficient mice is a strong inhibitor of neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Ng, W P; Cartel, N; Li, C; Roder, J; Lozano, A

    1996-03-22

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) has potent neurite outgrowth inhibitory activity in vitro. To assess the importance of MAG in the neurite outgrowth inhibitory activity in CNS myelin, we used an in vitro bioassay to characterize neurite growth on CNS myelin derived from mice carrying a null mutation of the MAG gene. Myelin proteins from MAG-deficient mice inhibited neurite outgrowth to a similar degree to the wild-type CNS myelin. These results suggest that CNS myelin molecules other than MAG exert strong inhibitory effects on the growth of neurites. PMID:8724661

  3. Quantifying molecule-surface interactions using AFM-based single-molecule manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, F. S.; Wagner, C.; Temirov, R.; Fournier, N.; Green, M.; Esat, T.; Leinen, P.; Groetsch, A.; Ruiz, V. G.; Tkatchenko, A.; Li, C.; Muellen, K.; Rohlfing, M.

    2015-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy plays an important role in the investigation of molecular adsorption. Promising, is the possibility to probe the molecule-surface interaction while tuning its strength through AFM tip-induced single-molecule manipulation. Here, we outline a strategy to achieve quantitative understanding of such manipulation experiments. The example of qPlus sensor based PTCDA molecule lifting experiments is used to demonstrate how different aspects of the molecule-surface interaction, namely the short-range adsorption potential, the asymptotic van der Waals potential, local chemical bonds which are the source of the surface corrugation, and molecule-molecule interactions can be measured with SPM and interpreted by the help of force-field simulations.

  4. Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells for Aberrant Class II Expression in Exocrine Glands from Estrogen-Deficient Mice of Healthy Background

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Rieko; Nagaoka, Ai; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Yamada, Akiko; Yoshida, Satoko; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that aberrant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders, the precise mechanisms responsible for their tissue-specific expression remain unknown. Here we show that estrogen deficiency induces aberrant class II major histocompatibility complex expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Relatively modest but functionally significant expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II and class II transactivator molecules were observed in the exocrine glands of ovariectomized (Ovx) C57BL/6 (B6) mice, but were not seen in the exocrine glands of control B6 mice. We observed that the salivary dendritic cells adjacent to the apoptotic epithelial cells positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling, were activated in Ovx mice, but were not activated in control mice. We obtained evidence that the salivary gland cells express both interferon regulatory factor-1 and class II transactivator type IV molecules in Ovx mice. Salivary gland cells from Ovx mice were also capable of inducing the activation of antigen-specific T cells from OT-II transgenic mice. These findings indicate that estrogen deficiency initiates class II transactivator type IV mRNA expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suggesting that plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a pivotal role in gender-based autoimmune disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:19359524

  5. Novel Oxindole Sulfonamides and Sulfamides: EPZ031686, the First Orally Bioavailable Small Molecule SMYD3 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna H; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Smith, Sherri; Thomenius, Michael; Rioux, Nathalie; Munchhof, Michael; Mills, James E; Klaus, Christine; Totman, Jennifer; Riera, Thomas V; Raimondi, Alejandra; Jacques, Suzanne L; West, Kip; Foley, Megan; Waters, Nigel J; Kuntz, Kevin W; Wigle, Tim J; Scott, Margaret Porter; Copeland, Robert A; Smith, Jesse J; Chesworth, Richard

    2016-02-11

    SMYD3 has been implicated in a range of cancers; however, until now no potent selective small molecule inhibitors have been available for target validation studies. A novel oxindole series of SMYD3 inhibitors was identified through screening of the Epizyme proprietary histone methyltransferase-biased library. Potency optimization afforded two tool compounds, sulfonamide EPZ031686 and sulfamide EPZ030456, with cellular potency at a level sufficient to probe the in vitro biology of SMYD3 inhibition. EPZ031686 shows good bioavailability following oral dosing in mice making it a suitable tool for potential in vivo target validation studies. PMID:26985287

  6. Blockade of NF-κB using IκBκ dominant negative mice ameliorates cardiac hypertrophy in myotrophin overexpressed transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Young, David; Popovic, Zoran B.; Jones, W. Keith; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2008-01-01

    NF-κB is a ubiquitous transcription factor that regulates various kinds of genes including inflammatory molecules, macrophage infiltration factors, cell adhesion molecules, etc., in various disease processes including cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (HF). Previously, we have demonstrated that activation of NF-κB was required in myotrophin induced cardiac hypertrophy, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) human hearts. Moreover, our recent study using the myotrophin overexpressed transgenic mouse (Myo-Tg) model showed that shRNA-mediated knock down of NF-κB significantly attenuated cardiac mass associated with improved cardiac function. Although, it has been shown that NF-κB is substantially involved in cardiovascular remodeling, it is not clear whether the continuous blockade of NF-κB is effective in cardiovascular remodeling. To address this question, we took a genetic approach using IκBα triple mutant mice (3M) bred with Myo-Tg mice (a progressive hypertrophy/HF model). The double transgenic mice (Myo-3M) displayed an attenuated cardiac hypertrophy (9.8 ± 0.62 vs 5.4 ± 0.34, p<0.001) and improved cardiac function associated with significant inhibition of the NF-κB signaling cascade, hypertrophy marker gene expression, inflammatory and macrophage gene expression at 24 weeks of age compared to Myo-Tg mice. NF-κB-targeted gene array profiling displayed several important genes were significantly down regulated in Myo-3M mice compared to Myo-Tg mice. Furthermore, Myo-3M did not show any changes of apoptotic gene expression indicating that complete inhibition of NF-κB activation reduces further pro-inflammatory reactions without affecting susceptibility to apoptosis. Therefore, development of therapeutic strategies targeting NF-κB may provide an effective approach to prevent adverse cardiac pathophysiological consequences. PMID:18620706

  7. Electromechanical Properties of Single Molecule Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Christopher

    Understanding the interplay between the electrical and mechanical properties of single molecules is of fundamental importance for molecular electronics. The sensitivity of charge transport to mechanical fluctuations is a key problem in developing long lasting molecular devices. Furthermore, harnessing this response to mechanical perturbation, molecular devices which can be mechanically gated can be developed. This thesis demonstrates three examples of the unique electromechanical properties of single molecules. First, the electromechanical properties of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecular junctions are investigate. Counterintuitively, the conductance of this molecule is found to increase by more than an order of magnitude when stretched. This conductance increase is found to be reversible when the molecular junction is compressed. The current-voltage, conductance-voltage and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy characteristics are used to attribute the conductance increase to a strain-induced shift in the frontier molecular orbital relative to the electrode Fermi level, leading to resonant enhancement in the conductance. Next, the effect of stretching-induced structural changes on charge transport in DNA molecules is studied. The conductance of single DNA molecules with lengths varying from 6 to 26 base pairs is measured and found to follow a hopping transport mechanism. The conductance of DNA molecules is highly sensitive to mechanical stretching, showing an abrupt decrease in conductance at surprisingly short stretching distances, with weak dependence on DNA length. This abrupt conductance decrease is attributed to force-induced breaking of hydrogen bonds in the base pairs at the end of the DNA sequence. Finally, the effect of small mechanical modulation of the base separation on DNA conductance is investigated. The sensitivity of conductance to mechanical modulation is studied for molecules of different sequence and length. Sequences with purine-purine stacking

  8. Clusters of mobile molecules in supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Starr, Francis W.

    2005-07-01

    We study the spatially heterogeneous dynamics in water via molecular dynamics simulations using the extended simple point charge potential. We identify clusters formed by mobile molecules and study their properties. We find that these clusters grow in size and become more compact as temperature decreases. We analyze the probability density function of cluster size, and we study the cluster correlation length. We find that clusters appear to be characterized by a fractal dimension consistent with that of lattice animals. We relate the cluster size and correlation length to the configurational entropy, Sconf . We find that these quantities depend weakly on 1/Sconf . In particular, the linearity found between the cluster mass n* and 1/Sconf suggests that n* may be interpreted as the mass of the cooperatively rearranging regions that form the basis of the Adam-Gibbs approach to the dynamics of supercooled liquids. We study the motion of molecules within a cluster, and find that each molecule preferentially follows a neighboring molecule in the same cluster. Based on this finding we hypothesize that stringlike cooperative motion may be a general mechanism for molecular rearrangement of complex, as well as simple liquids. By mapping each equilibrium configuration onto its corresponding local potential energy minimum or inherent structure (IS), we are able to compare the mobile molecule clusters in the equilibrium system with the molecules forming the clusters identified in the transitions between IS. We find that (i) mobile molecule clusters obtained by comparing different system configurations and (ii) clusters obtained by comparing the corresponding IS are completely different for short time scales, but are the same on the longer time scales of diffusive motion.

  9. Automated Measurement of Pulmonary Emphysema and Small Airway Remodeling in Cigarette Smoke-exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laucho-Contreras, Maria E.; Taylor, Katherine L.; Mahadeva, Ravi; Boukedes, Steve S.; Owen, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    COPD is projected to be the third most common cause of mortality world-wide by 2020(1). Animal models of COPD are used to identify molecules that contribute to the disease process and to test the efficacy of novel therapies for COPD. Researchers use a number of models of COPD employing different species including rodents, guinea-pigs, rabbits, and dogs(2). However, the most widely-used model is that in which mice are exposed to cigarette smoke. Mice are an especially useful species in which to model COPD because their genome can readily be manipulated to generate animals that are either deficient in, or over-express individual proteins. Studies of gene-targeted mice that have been exposed to cigarette smoke have provided valuable information about the contributions of individual molecules to different lung pathologies in COPD(3-5). Most studies have focused on pathways involved in emphysema development which contributes to the airflow obstruction that is characteristic of COPD. However, small airway fibrosis also contributes significantly to airflow obstruction in human COPD patients(6), but much less is known about the pathogenesis of this lesion in smoke-exposed animals. To address this knowledge gap, this protocol quantifies both emphysema development and small airway fibrosis in smoke-exposed mice. This protocol exposes mice to CS using a whole-body exposure technique, then measures respiratory mechanics in the mice, inflates the lungs of mice to a standard pressure, and fixes the lungs in formalin. The researcher then stains the lung sections with either Gill’s stain to measure the mean alveolar chord length (as a readout of emphysema severity) or Masson’s trichrome stain to measure deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins around small airways (as a readout of small airway fibrosis). Studies of the effects of molecular pathways on both of these lung pathologies will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25651034

  10. Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors Improve Micturition Control in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Simonetto, Marialaura; Claus, Mirko; Ballabio, Maurizio; Caretta, Antonio; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Poor micturition control may cause profound distress, because proper voiding is mandatory for an active social life. Micturition results from the subtle interplay of central and peripheral components. It involves the coordination of autonomic and neuromuscular activity at the brainstem level, under the executive control of the prefrontal cortex. We tested the hypothesis that administration of molecules acting as reuptake inhibitors of serotonin, noradrenaline or both may exert a strong effect on the control of urine release, in a mouse model of overactive bladder. Mice were injected with cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg), to increase micturition acts. Mice were then given one of four molecules: the serotonin reuptake inhibitor imipramine, its metabolite desipramine that acts on noradrenaline reuptake, the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine or its active metabolite 4-hydroxy-duloxetine. Cyclophosphamide increased urine release without inducing overt toxicity or inflammation, except for increase in urothelium thickness. All the antidepressants were able to decrease the cyclophosphamide effects, as apparent from longer latency to the first micturition act, decreased number of urine spots and volume of released urine. These results suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors exert a strong and effective modulatory effect on the control of urine release and prompt to additional studies on their central effects on brain areas involved in the social and behavioral control of micturition. PMID:25812116

  11. The transcription factor ATF4 regulates glucose metabolism in mice through its expression in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Tatsuya; Hinoi, Eiichi; Jung, Dae Young; Kajimura, Daisuke; Ferron, Mathieu; Seo, Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.; Kim, Jason K.; Karsenty, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    The recent demonstration that osteoblasts have a role in controlling energy metabolism suggests that they express cell-specific regulatory genes involved in this process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a transcription factor that accumulates predominantly in osteoblasts, where it regulates virtually all functions linked to the maintenance of bone mass. Since Atf4–/– mice have smaller fat pads than littermate controls, we investigated whether ATF4 also influences energy metabolism. Here, we have shown, through analysis of Atf4–/–mice, that ATF4 inhibits insulin secretion and decreases insulin sensitivity in liver, fat, and muscle. Several lines of evidence indicated that this function of ATF4 occurred through its osteoblastic expression. First, insulin sensitivity is enhanced in the liver of Atf4–/– mice, but not in cultured hepatocytes from these mice. Second, mice overexpressing ATF4 in osteoblasts only [termed here α1(I)Collagen-Atf4 mice] displayed a decrease in insulin secretion and were insulin insensitive. Third, the α1(I)Collagen-Atf4 transgene corrected the energy metabolism phenotype of Atf4–/– mice. Fourth, and more definitely, mice lacking ATF4 only in osteoblasts presented the same metabolic abnormalities as Atf4–/– mice. Molecularly, ATF4 favored expression in osteoblasts of Esp, which encodes a product that decreases the bioactivity of osteocalcin, an osteoblast-specific secreted molecule that enhances secretion of and sensitivity to insulin. These results provide a transcriptional basis to the observation that osteoblasts fulfill endocrine functions and identify ATF4 as a regulator of most functions of osteoblasts. PMID:19726872

  12. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in ageing aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Biljes, Daniel; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Kadow, Stephanie; Diel, Patrick; Weigt, Carmen; Burkart, Volker; Esser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed homeostasis of glucose and lipid metabolism are dominant features of the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a severe metabolic disease. T2D prevalence increases with age. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a sensor of small molecules including dietary components. AHR has been identified as potential regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Epidemiologically, exposure to xenobiotic AHR ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to T2D. We assess here the potential role of the AHR in disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in young (age 2-5 months) and old (age > 1,5 years) AHR-deficient (AHR KO) mice. Fasted young wildtype (WT) and AHR-KO mice displayed similar blood glucose kinetics after challenge with intra-peritoneal glucose injection. However, old AHR-KO mice showed lower tolerance than WT to i.p. administered glucose, i.e. glucose levels rose higher and returned more slowly to normal levels. Old mice had overall higher insulin levels than young mice, and old AHR-KO had a somewhat disturbed insulin kinetic in the serum after glucose challenge. Surprisingly, young AHR-KO mice had significantly lower triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein values than WT, i.e., a dyslipidemic profile. With ageing, AHR-KO and WT mice did not differ in these lipid levels, except for slightly reduced levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. In conclusion, our findings in AHR KO mice suggest that AHR expression is relevant for the maintenance of glucose and lipid homeostasis in old mice. PMID:26664351

  13. Involvement of AMPK in regulating slow-twitch muscle atrophy during hindlimb unloading in mice.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Tatsuro; Goto, Ayumi; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Shingo; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Goto, Katsumasa

    2015-10-01

    AMPK is considered to have a role in regulating skeletal muscle mass. However, there are no studies investigating the function of AMPK in modulating skeletal muscle mass during atrophic conditions. In the present study, we investigated the difference in unloading-associated muscle atrophy and molecular functions in response to 2-wk hindlimb suspension between transgenic mice overexpressing the dominant-negative mutant of AMPK (AMPK-DN) and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Male WT (n = 24) and AMPK-DN (n = 24) mice were randomly divided into two groups: an untreated preexperimental control group (n = 12 in each group) and an unloading (n = 12 in each group) group. The relative soleus muscle weight and fiber cross-sectional area to body weight were decreased by ∼30% in WT mice by hindlimb unloading and by ∼20% in AMPK-DN mice. There were no changes in puromycin-labeled protein or Akt/70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase signaling, the indicators of protein synthesis. The expressions of ubiquitinated proteins and muscle RING finger 1 mRNA and protein, markers of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, were increased by hindlimb unloading in WT mice but not in AMPK-DN mice. The expressions of molecules related to the protein degradation system, phosphorylated forkhead box class O3a, inhibitor of κBα, microRNA (miR)-1, and miR-23a, were decreased only in WT mice in response to hindlimb unloading, and 72-kDa heat shock protein expression was higher in AMPK-DN mice than in WT mice. These results imply that AMPK partially regulates unloading-induced atrophy of slow-twitch muscle possibly through modulation of the protein degradation system, especially the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:26244519

  14. Mining for Molecules in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Scientists are using the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to go prospecting in a rich molecular cloud in our Milky Way Galaxy. They seek to discover new, complex molecules in interstellar space that may be precursors to life. The GBT and Molecules The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and some molecules it has discovered. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Clouds like this one are the raw material for new stars and planets. We know that complex chemistry builds prebiotic molecules in such clouds long before the stars and planets are formed. There is a good chance that some of these interstellar molecules may find their way to the surface of young planets such as the early Earth, and provide a head start for the chemistry of life. For the first time, we now have the capability to make a very thorough and methodical search to find all the chemicals in the clouds," said Anthony Remijan, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). In the past three years, Remijan and his colleagues have used the GBT to discover ten new interstellar molecules, a feat unequalled in such a short time by any other team or telescope. The scientists discovered those molecules by looking specifically for them. However, they now are changing their strategy and casting a wide net designed to find whatever molecules are present, without knowing in advance what they'll find. In addition, they are making their data available freely to other scientists, in hopes of speeding the discovery process. The research team presented its plan to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in St. Louis, MO. As molecules rotate and vibrate, they emit radio waves at specific frequencies. Each molecule has a unique pattern of such frequencies, called spectral lines, that constitutes a "fingerprint" identifying that molecule. Laboratory tests can determine the pattern of spectral lines that identifies a specific molecule. Most past discoveries came from identifying a molecule's pattern in

  15. The reaction dynamics of alkali dimer molecules and electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation presents the results from the crossed molecular beam studies on the dynamics of bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. The primary subjects include the interactions of alkali dimer molecules with simple molecules, and the inelastic scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with O2. The reaction of the sodium dimers with oxygen molecules is described in Chapter 2. Two reaction pathways were observed for this four-center molecule-molecule reaction, i.e. the formations of NaO2 + Na and NaO + NaO. NaO2 products exhibit a very anisotropic angular distribution, indicating a direct spectator stripping mechanism for this reaction channel. The NaO formation follows the bond breaking of O2, which is likely a result of a charge transfer from Na2 to the excited state orbital of O2-. The scattering of sodium dimers from ammonium and methanol produced novel molecules, NaNH3 and Na(CH3OH), respectively. These experimental observations, as well as the discussions on the reaction dynamics and the chemical bonding within these molecules, will be presented in Chapter 3. The lower limits for the bond dissociation energies of these molecules are also obtained. Finally, Chapter 4 describes the energy transfer between oxygen molecules and electronically excited sodium atoms.

  16. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode.

    PubMed

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Norata, Giuseppe D; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  17. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode

    PubMed Central

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S.; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L.; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  18. Towards coherent control of ultracold molecule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin L.

    This thesis details experimental and theoretical investigations advancing the use of closed-loop coherent control for state-selective ultracold molecule formation in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). To date, no efficient scheme to produce a robust sample of ultracold (T ≤ 1 mK) molecules in arbitrarily-prescribed bound states has been demonstrated. The research presented here addresses this problem through the first experimental union of the fields of ultracold matter and ultrafast coherent control. A promising technique for producing ultracold molecules is to synthesize them directly from trapped ultracold atoms via photoassociation. This thesis explores a new extension of this approach: the application of closed-loop coherent control techniques employing broadband femtosecond optical pulses to enhance the efficiency and state-selectivity of photoassociative ultracold molecule formation. The experiments presented here studied the effects of chirped femtosecond pulses on the formation of ultracold triplet a3 S+u molecules in 85Rb and 87Rb MOTs. The application of femtosecond pulses suppressed, rather than increased, the formation of 85Rb2 and 87Rb2 a3 S+u molecules in contrast to comparable cw illumination and background formation rates. Positively chirped pulses were more efficient than non-chirped pulses of equivalent energy and spectral character at stimulating this quenching phenomenon. These results indicated that this suppression effect was coherent in nature, suggesting that coherent control is likely to be useful for manipulating the dynamics of ultracold quantum molecular gases. Time-dependent two-surface model simulations were performed to study several intuitive dynamical schemes employing femtosecond optical pulses to stimulate the formation of ground singlet X1 S+g molecules. These simulations focused on optical manipulation of the collision process at short-to-intermediate range (R < 50A), where stabilization of ultracold molecules to deeply bound

  19. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antaris, Alexander L.; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K.; Alamparambil, Zita R.; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (~90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)--a clinically approved NIR-I dye--in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ~4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery.

  20. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging.

    PubMed

    Antaris, Alexander L; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K; Alamparambil, Zita R; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (∼90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)-a clinically approved NIR-I dye-in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ∼4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery. PMID:26595119

  1. TRAF molecules in cell signaling and in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R)-associated factor (TRAF) family of intracellular proteins were originally identified as signaling adaptors that bind directly to the cytoplasmic regions of receptors of the TNF-R superfamily. The past decade has witnessed rapid expansion of receptor families identified to employ TRAFs for signaling. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), T cell receptor, IL-1 receptor family, IL-17 receptors, IFN receptors and TGFβ receptors. In addition to their role as adaptor proteins, most TRAFs also act as E3 ubiquitin ligases to activate downstream signaling events. TRAF-dependent signaling pathways typically lead to the activation of nuclear factor-κBs (NF-κBs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), or interferon-regulatory factors (IRFs). Compelling evidence obtained from germ-line and cell-specific TRAF-deficient mice demonstrates that each TRAF plays indispensable and non-redundant physiological roles, regulating innate and adaptive immunity, embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, stress response, and bone metabolism. Notably, mounting evidence implicates TRAFs in the pathogenesis of human diseases such as cancers and autoimmune diseases, which has sparked new appreciation and interest in TRAF research. This review presents an overview of the current knowledge of TRAFs, with an emphasis on recent findings concerning TRAF molecules in signaling and in human diseases. PMID:23758787

  2. Small Molecule Immunosensing Using Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors utilize refractive index changes to sensitively detect mass changes at noble metal sensor surface interfaces. As such, they have been extensively applied to immunoassays of large molecules, where their high mass and use of sandwich immunoassay formats can result in excellent sensitivity. Small molecule immunosensing using SPR is more challenging. It requires antibodies or high-mass or noble metal labels to provide the required signal for ultrasensitive assays. Also, it can suffer from steric hindrance between the small antigen and large antibodies. However, new studies are increasingly meeting these and other challenges to offer highly sensitive small molecule immunosensor technologies through careful consideration of sensor interface design and signal enhancement. This review examines the application of SPR transduction technologies to small molecule immunoassays directed to different classes of small molecule antigens, including the steroid hormones, toxins, drugs and explosives residues. Also considered are the matrix effects resulting from measurement in chemically complex samples, the construction of stable sensor surfaces and the development of multiplexed assays capable of detecting several compounds at once. Assay design approaches are discussed and related to the sensitivities obtained. PMID:22163605

  3. Figuration and detection of single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevels, R.; Welch, G. R.; Cremer, P. S.; Hemmer, P.; Phillips, T.; Scully, S.; Sokolov, A. V.; Svidzinsky, A. A.; Xia, H.; Zheltikov, A.; Scully, M. O.

    2012-08-01

    Recent advances in the description of atoms and molecules based on Dimensional scaling analysis, developed by Dudley Herschbach and co-workers, provided new insights into visualization of molecular structure and chemical bonding. Prof. Herschbach is also a giant in the field of single molecule scattering. We here report on the engineering of molecular detectors. Such systems have a wide range of application from medical diagnostics to the monitoring of chemical, biological and environmental hazards. We discuss ways to identify preselected molecules, in particular, mycotoxin contaminants using coherent laser spectroscopy. Mycotoxin contaminants, e.g. aflatoxin B1 which is present in corn and peanuts, are usually analysed by time-consuming microscopic, chemical and biological assays. We present a new approach that derives from recent experiments in which molecules are prepared by one (or more) femtosecond laser(s) and probed by another set. We call this technique FAST CARS (femto second adaptive spectroscopic technique for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy). We propose and analyse ways in which FAST CARS can be used to identify preselected molecules, e.g. aflatoxin, rapidly and economically.

  4. The bound states of ultracold KRb molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul; Hanna, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Recently ultracold vibrational ground state ^40K^87Rb polar molecules have been made using magnetoassociation of two cold atoms to a weakly bound Feshbach molecule, followed by a two-color optical STIRAP process to transfer molecules to the molecular ground state [1]. We have used accurate potential energy curves for the singlet and triplet states of the KRb molecule [2] with coupled channels calculations to calculate all of the bound states of the ^40K^87Rb molecule as a function of magnetic field from the cold atom collision threshold to the v=0 ground state. We have also developed approximate models for understanding the changing properties of the molecular bound states as binding energy increases. Some overall conclusions from these calculations will be presented. [1] K.-K. Ni, S. Ospelkaus, M. H. G. de Miranda, A. Peer, B. Neyenhuis, J. J. Zirbel, S. Kotochigova, P. S. Julienne, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, Science, 2008, 322, 231--235. [2] A. Pashov, O. Docenko, M. Tamanis, R. Ferber, H. Kn"ockel, and E. Tiemann, Phys. Rev. A, 2007, 76, 022511.

  5. Mining for Molecules in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Scientists are using the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to go prospecting in a rich molecular cloud in our Milky Way Galaxy. They seek to discover new, complex molecules in interstellar space that may be precursors to life. The GBT and Molecules The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and some molecules it has discovered. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Clouds like this one are the raw material for new stars and planets. We know that complex chemistry builds prebiotic molecules in such clouds long before the stars and planets are formed. There is a good chance that some of these interstellar molecules may find their way to the surface of young planets such as the early Earth, and provide a head start for the chemistry of life. For the first time, we now have the capability to make a very thorough and methodical search to find all the chemicals in the clouds," said Anthony Remijan, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). In the past three years, Remijan and his colleagues have used the GBT to discover ten new interstellar molecules, a feat unequalled in such a short time by any other team or telescope. The scientists discovered those molecules by looking specifically for them. However, they now are changing their strategy and casting a wide net designed to find whatever molecules are present, without knowing in advance what they'll find. In addition, they are making their data available freely to other scientists, in hopes of speeding the discovery process. The research team presented its plan to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in St. Louis, MO. As molecules rotate and vibrate, they emit radio waves at specific frequencies. Each molecule has a unique pattern of such frequencies, called spectral lines, that constitutes a "fingerprint" identifying that molecule. Laboratory tests can determine the pattern of spectral lines that identifies a specific molecule. Most past discoveries came from identifying a molecule's pattern in

  6. Modelling the spectroscopic behaviour of hot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    At elevated temperatures the molecules absorb and emit light in a very complicated fashion which is hard to characterise on the basis of laboraroty measurement. Computed line lists of molecule transitions therefore provide a vital input for models of hot atmospheres. I will describe the calculation and use of such line lists including the BT2 water line list [1], which contains some 500 million distinct rotation-vibration transitions. This linelist proved crucial in the detection of water in extrasolar planet HD189733b and has been used extensively in atmospheric modelling. Illustrations will be given at the meeting. A new linelist for the ammonia molecule has just been completed [2] which shows that standard compilations for this molecule need to be improved. Progress on a more extensive linelist for hot ammonia and linelists for other molecules will be discussed at the meeting. [1] R.J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G.J. Harris and R.N. Tolchenov, Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 368, 1087-1094 (2006) [2] S.N. Yurchenko, R.J. Barber, A. Yachmenev, W. Theil, P. Jensen and J. Tennyson, J. Phys. Chem. A, 113, 11845-11855 (2009).

  7. Assembling Ultracold Polar Molecules From Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lee R.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Yu, Yichao; Zhang, Jessie T.; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules are promising candidates for studying quantum many-body phenomena and building quantum information systems, due to their long-range, anisotropic, and tunable interactions. This calls for a technique to create low entropy samples of ultracold polar molecules with a large dipole moment. The lowest entropy molecular gas to date was created from atomic quantum gases in bulk or in optical lattices. The entropy is limited by that of the constituent atomic gases. We propose a method that addresses this limitation by assembling sodium cesium (NaCs) molecules from individually manipulated atoms. First, we load single Na and Cs atoms in separate optical tweezers from MOTs. We will cool them to their motional ground state using Raman sideband cooling and then merge them into a single tweezer. The tweezer confinement provides enhanced wavefunction overlap between the atom pair and molecule states. Using coherent two-photon techniques, we will then transfer the atom pair into a molecule. Our method offers reduced apparatus complexity and cycle time, single-site manipulation and imaging resolution, and should be readily extended to different species.

  8. Fluorescence Detection of Single DNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhimin

    2015-09-01

    Single-molecule detection (SMD) and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) were conducted using Cy3- and Cy5-labeled single-strand DNAs (ssDNAs) either immobilized on substrates or encapsulated in microdroplets. High-quality fluorescent images were obtained using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). In the substrate system, deposition of a low concentration of fluorescence molecules on substrates through electrostatic adsorption showed that most of the fluorescence spots were single molecules, and the mean value of signal to noise ratio (S/N) reached 6.9 ± 0.34. smFRET analysis was conducted through immobilization of donor- and acceptor-labeled oligonucleotides on substrates. In the droplet system, fluorophor-labeled oligonucleotides were injected into T-type microfluidics. Single and double fluorophor-labeled DNA molecules encapsulated in droplets were detected, the FRET efficiency and inter-dye distance of a single donor-acceptor pair were measured accurately. smFRET was conducted detailedly in the tortuous channel for the first time. PMID:26215080

  9. Ultracold molecules from the bottom-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Liu, Lee R.; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules exhibit strong, long-range, and tunable dipole-dipole interactions that may be utilized for a wide range of studies in quantum simulation and quantum information processing. To realize the full potential of these studies, it is desirable to have a low entropy sample of ultracold polar molecules with full control over both internal and external states, as well as inter-particle interactions. We work toward this goal with a new, bottom-up approach using the highly polar NaCs molecule. The key steps of our scheme are trapping single Na and Cs atoms in optical dipole traps, cooling the atoms to their motional ground state using Raman sideband cooling, and finally coherently transferring them to ground state NaCs molecules via a two-photon process. This approach should enable creation of low entropy samples with full control over all degrees of freedom, as well as realizing the possibility of single-site read-out and manipulation of molecules.

  10. Ultracold polar molecules near quantum degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Ospelkaus, S; Ni, K K; de Miranda, M H G; Neyenhuis, B; Wang, D; Kotochigova, S; Julienne, P S; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2009-01-01

    We report the creation and characterization of a near quantum-degenerate gas of polar 40K-87Rb molecules in their absolute rovibrational ground state. Starting from weakly bound heteronuclear KRb Feshbach molecules, we implement precise control of the molecular electronic, vibrational, and rotational degrees of freedom with phase-coherent laser fields. In particular, we coherently transfer these weakly bound molecules across a 125 THz frequency gap in a single step into the absolute rovibrational ground state of the electronic ground potential. Phase coherence between lasers involved in the transfer process is ensured by referencing the lasers to two single components of a phase-stabilized optical frequency comb. Using these methods, we prepare a dense gas of 4 x 10(4) polar molecules at a temperature below 400 nK. This fermionic molecular ensemble is close to quantum degeneracy and can be characterized by a degeneracy parameter of T/T(F) = 3. We have measured the molecular polarizability in an optical dipole trap where the trap lifetime gives clues to interesting decay mechanisms. Given the large measured dipole moment of the KRb molecules of 0.5 Debye, the study of quantum degenerate molecular gases interacting via strong dipolar interactions is now within experimental reach. PACS numbers: 37.10.Mn, 37.10.Pq. PMID:20151553

  11. Biodistribution of Different Sized Nanodiamonds in Mice.

    PubMed

    Purtov, Konstantin; Petunin, Alexey; Inzhevatkin, Evgeny; Burov, Andrey; Ronzhin, Nikita; Puzyr, Alexey; Bondar, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    The particle size is one of critical parameters influencing the biodistribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) after their administration into the body. As DNDs are prone to aggregation, the difference between their sizes in aqueous and physiological solutions has to be taken into account. Radioactive I125-BSA molecules were covalently immobilized on DNDs divided in three fractions of different average size. The DND-BSAI125 conjugates were intravenously administrated into adult mice and the particle allocation in the animal's organs and blood was evaluated based on the radioactivity distribution. We conclude that most of the conjugates were taken from the bloodstream and trapped in the liver and spleen. The short-term distribution pattern for all DNDs was similar regardless of size and practically unchanged with time. No significant clearance of the particles was observed for 4 h, but the presence of DNDs was detected in the blood. It was found that the largest particles tend to accumulate more into the liver as compared to the smaller ones. However, the size effect was not well pronounced for the studied size range. PMID:26353614

  12. Abnormal hematopoiesis in Gab2 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Li, Geqiang; Wang, Zhengqi; Kang, Zizhen; Haviernikova, Eleonora; Rowe, Sara; Qu, Cheng-Kui; Tse, William; Shannon, Kevin M.

    2007-01-01

    Gab2 is an important adapter molecule for cytokine signaling. Despite its major role in signaling by receptors associated with hematopoiesis, the role of Gab2 in hematopoiesis has not been addressed. We report that despite normal numbers of peripheral blood cells, bone marrow cells, and c-Kit+Lin−Sca-1+ (KLS) cells, Gab2-deficient hematopoietic cells are deficient in cytokine responsiveness. Significant reductions in the number of colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C) in the presence of limiting cytokine concentrations were observed, and these defects could be completely corrected by retroviral complementation. In earlier hematopoiesis, Gab2-deficient KLS cells isolated in vitro responded poorly to hematopoietic growth factors, resulting in an up to 11-fold reduction in response to a cocktail of stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin. Gab2-deficient c-Kit+Lin− cells also demonstrate impaired activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and S6 in response to IL-3, which supports defects in activating the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K) and mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Associated with the early defects in cytokine response, competitive transplantation of Gab2−/− bone marrow cells resulted in defective long-term multilineage repopulation. Therefore, we demonstrate that Gab2 adapter function is intrinsically required for hematopoietic cell response to early-acting cytokines, resulting in defective hematopoiesis in Gab2-deficient mice. PMID:17374739

  13. Practical pathology of aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M.

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  14. Practical pathology of aging mice.

    PubMed

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  15. Maintenance of donor phenotype after full-thickness skin transplantation from mice with chronic proliferative dermatitis (cpdm/cpdm) to C57BL/Ka and nude mice and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Gijbels, M J; HogenEsch, H; Bruijnzeel, P L; Elliott, G R; Zurcher, C

    1995-12-01

    Chronic proliferative dermatitis is a spontaneous mutation in C57BL/Ka mice (cpdm/cpdm) and is characterized by epithelial hyperproliferation, infiltration by eosinophils and macrophages, and vascular dilatation. To elucidate whether these pathologic features are the result of a local (skin) process or a consequence of a systemic disorder, transplantations were performed of full-thickness grafts of affected skin from cpdm/cpdm mice and normal skin from control (C57BL/Ka) mice on the back of cpdm/cpdm, C57BL/Ka and athymic nude mice. After 3 months, the grafts maintained the histologic phenotype of the donor animal. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 continued to be expressed by basal keratinocytes of the cpdm/cpdm grafts after transplantation. In contrast, the basal keratinocytes of the C57BL/Ka grafts onto cpdm/cpdm mice remained negative for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 3 months after transplantation. An increased number of proliferating keratinocytes was present in the cpdm/cpdm skin-graft transplanted to nudes or to C57BL/Ka mice based on short-term bromodeoxyuridine labeling. The bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in the keratinocytes of the control C57BL/Ka skin grafts transplanted to cpdm/cpdm, nude, or C57BL/Ka mice was the same as in the keratinocytes of normal C57BL/Ka mice. This study demonstrates that the pathologic features found in the cpdm/cpdm mice are the result of a disorder in the epidermis or dermis and not due to a systemic defect. PMID:7490470

  16. Transient Expression of Proteins by Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  17. Transient expression of proteins by hydrodynamic gene delivery in mice.

    PubMed

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  18. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or coopted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host. PMID:22053884

  19. Ionizing radiation mediates expression of cell adhesion molecules in distinct histological patterns within the lung.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S

    1997-06-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration of the lung is a predominant histopathological change that occurs during radiation pneumonitis. Emigration of inflammatory cells from the circulation requires the interaction between cell adhesion molecules on the vascular endothelium and molecules on the surface of leukocytes. We studied the immunohistochemical pattern of expression of cell adhesion molecules in lungs from mice treated with thoracic irradiation. After X-irradiation, the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1; E-selectin) was primarily expressed in the pulmonary endothelium of larger vessels and minimally in the microvascular endothelium. Conversely, the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) was expressed in the pulmonary capillary endothelium and minimally in the endothelium of larger vessels. Radiation-mediated E-selectin expression was first observed at 6 h, whereas ICAM-1 expression initially increased at 24 h after irradiation. ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression persisted for several days. P-selectin is constitutively expressed in Weibel-Palade bodies in the endothelium, which moved to the vascular lumen within 30 min after irradiation. P-selectin was not detected in the pulmonary endothelium at 6 h after irradiation. The radiation dose required for increased cell adhesion molecule expression within the pulmonary vascular endothelium was 2 Gy, and expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression is increased in the pulmonary endothelium following thoracic irradiation. The pattern of expression of E-selectin, P-selectin, and ICAM-1 is distinct from one another. PMID:9187101

  20. Sample preparation for single molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allen, John R; Ross, Stephen T; Davidson, Michael W

    2013-11-21

    Single molecule localization-based optical nanoscopy was introduced in 2006, surpassing traditional diffraction-limited resolutions by an order of magnitude. Seven years later, this superresolution technique is continuing to follow a trend of increasing popularity and pervasiveness, with the proof-of-concept work long finished and commercial implementations now available. However one important aspect that tends to become lost in translation is the importance of proper sample preparation, with very few resources addressing the considerations that must be made when preparing samples for imaging with single molecule level sensitivity. Presented here is a an in-depth analysis of all aspects of sample preparation for single molecule superresolution, including both live and fixed cell preparation, choice of fluorophore, fixation and staining techniques, and imaging buffer considerations. PMID:24084850

  1. Complex molecules in the galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena-Torres, Miguel Angel; Martin-Pintado, Jesus; Martin, Sergio; Amo-Baladron, Arancha

    2007-04-01

    Recently the number of complex organic molecules observed in hot cores has been increased by observing the Sgr B2N hot core, located in the GC molecular clouds. But in the inner 200pc of the center of our Galaxy complex organic molecules seems to widespread distributed along the Galactic plane. Last year large aldehydes where observed in the cm range with the Green Bank Telescope. These molecules where detected not in the hot core, but in the envelope of the SgrB2 molecular clouds and in two different positions in SgrA molecular cloud. We have not reach the maximum in the chemical complexity that these molecular clouds can show up. The next step would be to detect the more complex esters and ethers observed in hot cores and to obtain a better estimation of the physical conditions of the aldehydes observing more transitions in the mm range.

  2. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, David

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  3. Protein folding at single-molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ferreon, Allan Chris M.; Deniz, Ashok A.

    2011-01-01

    The protein folding reaction carries great significance for cellular function and hence continues to be the research focus of a large interdisciplinary protein science community. Single-molecule methods are providing new and powerful tools for dissecting the mechanisms of this complex process by virtue of their ability to provide views of protein structure and dynamics without associated ensemble averaging. This review briefly introduces common FRET and force methods, and then explores several areas of protein folding where single-molecule experiments have yielded insights. These include exciting new information about folding landscapes, dynamics, intermediates, unfolded ensembles, intrinsically disordered proteins, assisted folding and biomechanical unfolding. Emerging and future work is expected to include advances in single-molecule techniques aimed at such investigations, and increasing work on more complex systems from both the physics and biology standpoints, including folding and dynamics of systems of interacting proteins and of proteins in cells and organisms. PMID:21303706

  4. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  5. X(3872) boson: Molecule or charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2005-12-01

    It has been argued that the mystery boson X(3872) is a molecule state consisting of primarily D{sup 0}D*{sup 0}+D{sup 0}D*{sup 0}. In contrast, apparent puzzles and potential difficulties have been pointed out for the charmonium assignment of X(3872). We examine several aspects of these alternatives by semiquantitative methods since quantitatively accurate results are often hard to reach on them. We point out that some of the observed properties of X(3872), in particular the binding and the production rates, are incompatible with the molecule interpretation. Despite puzzles and obstacles, X(3872) may fit more likely to the excited {sup 3}P{sub 1} charmonium than to the molecule after the mixing of cc with DD*+DD* is taken into account.

  6. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  7. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Dovbeshko, Galina I.; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu; Yuzyuk, Yury I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm-1) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  9. T Cell Cosignaling Molecules in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Mandy L

    2016-05-17

    The ultimate outcome of alloreactivity versus tolerance following transplantation is potently influenced by the constellation of cosignaling molecules expressed by immune cells during priming with alloantigen, and the net sum of costimulatory and coinhibitory signals transmitted via ligation of these molecules. Intense investigation over the last two decades has yielded a detailed understanding of the kinetics, cellular distribution, and intracellular signaling networks of cosignaling molecules such as the CD28, TNF, and TIM families of receptors in alloimmunity. More recent work has better defined the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which engagement of cosignaling networks serve to either dampen or augment alloimmunity. These findings will likely aid in the rational development of novel immunomodulatory strategies to prolong graft survival and improve outcomes following transplantation. PMID:27192567

  10. Prebiotically Important Molecules in Orion KL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Chuang, Yo-Ling

    Many interstellar, complex organic molecules are known to be prebiotically important and have essential functions in terrestrial biochemistry. Observations of complex organic molecular species in molecular clouds can thus enable us to test the origin of the primitive organic material found in the Solar System. Interstellar pyrimidine and glycine, the building block of nucleic acid and the simplest amino acid, respectively, are key molecules for astrobiology and were both detected in meteorites and comets. Although the formation of prebiotic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and their contribution to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life remains unsettled, the connection between interstellar organic chemistry, meteoritic pyrimidines and amino acids, and the emergence of life on the early Earth would be strengthened with the discovery of interstellar pyrimidine and glycine. We have therefore observed the Orion KL hot molecular core to search for interstellar pyrimidine and for the confirmation of interstellar glycine using the ALMA array. We will present some of the encouraging, positive results.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  12. Ionization of glycerin molecule by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Markush, P. P.; Kontrosh, E. E.

    2015-07-01

    The methods and results of studying the yield of positive ions produced due to direct and dissociative electron impact ionization of the glycerin molecule are described. The experiment is carried out using two independent setups, namely, a setup with a monopole mass spectrometer employing the method of crossing electron and molecular beams and a setup with a hypocycloidal electron spectrometer with the gas-filled cell. The mass spectra of the glycerin molecule are studied in the range of mass numbers of 10-95 amu at various temperatures. The energy dependences of the effective cross sections of the glycerin molecular ions produced by a monoenergetic electron beam are obtained and analyzed; using these dependences, the appearance energies of fragment ions are determined. The dynamics of the glycerin molecule fragment ions formation is investigated in the temperature range of 300-340 K.

  13. Small Molecules in the Treatment of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Filipe, Paulo

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical Research Psoriasis is an inflammatory systemic skin disease that affects various parts of the body requiring long-term management due to its chronic nature. Available treatment options include topical, systemic or biological therapies, which have long-term limitations associated to toxicity, tolerability and risk for adverse effects requiring its intermittent use and close monitoring. Small molecules modulate proinflammatory cytokines, selectively inhibit signaling pathways and showing potential to treat inflammatory diseases in patients not responding to conventional treatments. Presently, small molecules available are phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors or Janus kinase inhibitors. Other small molecules under development for psoriasis include fumaric acid esters, amygdalin analogs, protein kinase C inhibitors, mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, spleen protein kinase inhibitors, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonists, and A3 adenosine receptor agonists. These new treatment options represent important advances in the development of specific drugs to respond to the goals of treatment and improve patient quality of life. PMID:26255795

  14. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  15. Connexin channel permeability to cytoplasmic molecules.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    Connexin channels are known to be permeable to a variety of cytoplasmic molecules. The first observation of second messenger junctional permeability, made approximately 30 years ago, sparked broad interest in gap junction channels as mediators of intercellular molecular signaling. Since then, much has been learned about the diversity of connexin channels with regard to isoform diversity, tissue and developmental distribution, modes of channel regulation, assembly, expression, biochemical modification and permeability, all of which appear to be dynamically regulated. This information has expanded the potential roles of connexin channels in development, physiology and disease, and made their elucidation much more complex--30 years ago such an orchestra of junctional dynamics was unanticipated. Only recently, however, have investigators been able to directly address, in this more complex framework, the key issue: what specific biological molecules, second messengers and others, are able to permeate the various types of connexin channels, and how well? An important related issue, given the ever-growing list of connexin-related pathologies, is how these permeabilities are altered by disease-causing connexin mutations. Together, many studies show that a variety of cytoplasmic molecules can permeate the different types of connexin channels. A few studies reveal differences in permeation by different molecules through a particular type of connexin channel, and differences in permeation by a particular molecule through different types of connexin channels. This article describes and evaluates the various methods used to obtain these data, presents an annotated compilation of the results, and discusses the findings in the context of what can be inferred about mechanism of selectivity and potential relevance to signaling. The data strongly suggest that highly specific interactions take place between connexin pores and specific biological molecular permeants, and that those

  16. Chiral Molecules Revisited by Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    Chiral molecules have fascinated chemists for more than 150 years. While their physical properties are to a very good approximation identical, the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule can have completely different (bio)chemical activities. For example, the right-handed enantiomer of carvone smells of spearmint while the left-handed one smells of caraway. In addition, the active components of many drugs are of one specific handedness, such as in the case of ibuprofen. However, in nature as well as in pharmaceutical applications, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) remains a challenging task for analytical chemistry, despite its importance for modern drug development. We present here a new method of differentiating enantiomers of chiral molecules in the gas phase based on broadband rotational spectroscopy. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the combined quantity, μ_a μ_b μ_c, which is of opposite sign between enantiomers. It thus also provides information on the absolute configuration of the particular enantiomer. Furthermore, the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee. A significant advantage of our technique is its inherent mixture compatibility due to the fingerprint-like character of rotational spectra. In this contribution, we will introduce the technique and present our latest results on chiral molecule spectroscopy and enantiomer differentiation. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J.M. Doyle, Nature 497 (2013) 475-477 V.A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J.M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53 (2014) 1152-1155

  17. Measles Virus Infection of SLAM (CD150) Knockin Mice Reproduces Tropism and Immunosuppression in Human Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shinji; Ono, Nobuyuki; Seki, Fumio; Takeda, Makoto; Kura, Shinobu; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2007-01-01

    The human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, also called CD150), a regulator of antigen-driven T-cell responses and macrophage functions, acts as a cellular receptor for measles virus (MV), and its V domain is necessary and sufficient for receptor function. We report here the generation of SLAM knockin mice in which the V domain of mouse SLAM was replaced by that of human SLAM. The chimeric SLAM had an expected distribution and normal function in the knockin mice. Splenocytes from the SLAM knockin mice permitted the in vitro growth of a virulent MV strain but not that of the Edmonston vaccine strain. Unlike in vitro infection, MV could grow only in SLAM knockin mice that also lacked the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR). After intraperitoneal or intranasal inoculation, MV was detected in the spleen and lymph nodes throughout the body but not in the thymus. Notably, the virus appeared first in the mediastinal lymph node after intranasal inoculation. Splenocytes from MV-infected IFNAR−/− SLAM knockin mice showed suppression of proliferative responses to concanavalin A. Thus, MV infection of SLAM knockin mice reproduces lymphotropism and immunosuppression in human infection, serving as a useful small animal model for measles. PMID:17135325

  18. Amelioration of inflammation and tissue damage in sickle cell model mice by Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Keleku-Lukwete, Nadine; Suzuki, Mikiko; Otsuki, Akihito; Tsuchida, Kouhei; Katayama, Saori; Hayashi, Makiko; Naganuma, Eriko; Moriguchi, Takashi; Tanabe, Osamu; Engel, James Douglas; Imaizumi, Masue; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-09-29

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene, leading to the production of abnormally shaped red blood cells. Sickle cells are prone to hemolysis and thereby release free heme into plasma, causing oxidative stress and inflammation that in turn result in damage to multiple organs. The transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the antioxidant cell-defense system. Here we show that constitutive Nrf2 activation by ablation of its negative regulator Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) significantly improves symptoms in SCD model mice. SCD mice exhibit severe liver damage and lung inflammation associated with high expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules compared with normal mice. Importantly, these symptoms subsided after Nrf2 activation. Although hemolysis and stress erythropoiesis did not change substantially in the Nrf2-activated SCD mice, Nrf2 promoted the elimination of plasma heme released by sickle cells' hemolysis and thereby reduced oxidative stress and inflammation, demonstrating that Nrf2 activation reduces organ damage and segregates inflammation from prevention of hemolysis in SCD mice. Furthermore, administration of the Nrf2 inducer CDDO-Im (2-cyano-3, 12 dioxooleana-1, 9 diene-28-imidazolide) also relieved inflammation and organ failure in SCD mice. These results support the contention that Nrf2 induction may be an important means to protect organs from the pathophysiology of sickle cell-induced damage. PMID:26371321

  19. SIRT1 reduces endothelial activation without affecting vascular function in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Sokrates; Schäfer, Nicola; Breitenstein, Alexander; Besler, Christian; Winnik, Stephan; Lohmann, Christine; Heinrich, Kathrin; Brokopp, Chad E.; Handschin, Christoph; Landmesser, Ulf; Tanner, Felix C.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Matter, Christian M.

    2010-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, at least in part by causing endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory activation. The class III histone deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated in extension of lifespan. In the vasculature,SIRT1 gain-of-function using SIRT1 overexpression or activation has been shown to improve endothelial function in mice and rats via stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). However, the effects of SIRT1 loss-of-function on the endothelium in atherosclerosis remain to be characterized. Thus, we have investigated the endothelial effects of decreased endogenous SIRT1 in hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- mice. We observed no difference in endothelial relaxation and eNOS (Ser1177) phosphorylation between 20-week old male atherosclerotic ApoE-/- SIRT1+/- and ApoE-/- SIRT1+/+ mice. However, SIRT1 prevented endothelial superoxide production, inhibited NF-κB signaling, and diminished expression of adhesion molecules. Treatment of young hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- SIRT1+/- mice with lipopolysaccharide to boost NF-κB signaling led to a more pronounced endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 as compared to ApoE-/- SIRT1+/+ mice. In conclusion, endogenous SIRT1 diminishes endothelial activation in ApoE-/- mice, but does not affect endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. PMID:20606253

  20. Resistin-like molecule α decreases glucose tolerance during intestinal inflammation1

    PubMed Central

    Munitz, Ariel; Seidu, Luqman; Cole, Eric T; Ahrens, Richard; S, Simon P Hogan; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2008-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule α (Relm-α), is a secreted cysteine-rich protein belonging to a newly defined family of proteins including resistin, Relm-β and Relm-γ. Resistin was initially defined based on its insulin resistance activity, but the family members are highly upregulated in various inflammatory states, especially those involving intestinal inflammation. Herein, we report the role of Relm-α at baseline and following an experimental model of colitis. Relm-α was readily detected in the serum at baseline (4−5 ng/ml) and its level was regulated by energy uptake. Retnla−/− mice had decreased baseline circulating leptin levels but displayed normal glucose, glucose clearance and insulin levels. Following exposure to the oral innate trigger dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), a non-redundant pro-inflammatory role for Relm-α was uncovered as Retnla−/− mice were markedly protected from DSS-induced disease activity and histopathological features. Relm-α regulated eosinophil-directed cytokines (e.g. IL-5, CCL11/eotaxin-1 and CCL5/RANTES) ex vivo. Consistently, DSS-treated Retnla−/− mice displayed substantially decreased eosinophil accumulation and decreased phosphorylation of NFκB, ERK1/2 and p38 in macrophages and eosinophils. Following DSS exposure, serum level of Relm-α was upregulated and DSS-treated Retnla−/− mice were markedly protected from hyperglycemia induced by glucose injection independent of changes in insulin levels. Retnla−/− mice were protected from increases in gut hormone serum levels of gastric inhibitory polypeptide and peptide YY that were induced following DSS-treatment. These findings demonstrate a central pro-inflammatory role for Relm-α in the regulation of colonic inflammation and a novel link between colonic injury, glucose tolerance and energy intake. PMID:19201890