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Sample records for molecules coherent control

  1. Towards coherent control of ultracold molecule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin L.

    This thesis details experimental and theoretical investigations advancing the use of closed-loop coherent control for state-selective ultracold molecule formation in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). To date, no efficient scheme to produce a robust sample of ultracold (T ≤ 1 mK) molecules in arbitrarily-prescribed bound states has been demonstrated. The research presented here addresses this problem through the first experimental union of the fields of ultracold matter and ultrafast coherent control. A promising technique for producing ultracold molecules is to synthesize them directly from trapped ultracold atoms via photoassociation. This thesis explores a new extension of this approach: the application of closed-loop coherent control techniques employing broadband femtosecond optical pulses to enhance the efficiency and state-selectivity of photoassociative ultracold molecule formation. The experiments presented here studied the effects of chirped femtosecond pulses on the formation of ultracold triplet a3 S+u molecules in 85Rb and 87Rb MOTs. The application of femtosecond pulses suppressed, rather than increased, the formation of 85Rb2 and 87Rb2 a3 S+u molecules in contrast to comparable cw illumination and background formation rates. Positively chirped pulses were more efficient than non-chirped pulses of equivalent energy and spectral character at stimulating this quenching phenomenon. These results indicated that this suppression effect was coherent in nature, suggesting that coherent control is likely to be useful for manipulating the dynamics of ultracold quantum molecular gases. Time-dependent two-surface model simulations were performed to study several intuitive dynamical schemes employing femtosecond optical pulses to stimulate the formation of ground singlet X1 S+g molecules. These simulations focused on optical manipulation of the collision process at short-to-intermediate range (R < 50A), where stabilization of ultracold molecules to deeply bound

  2. Coherent optimal control of photosynthetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, F.; Montangero, S.; Calarco, T.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that open-loop quantum optimal control techniques can provide efficient tools for the verification of various quantum coherent transport mechanisms in natural and artificial light-harvesting complexes under realistic experimental conditions. To assess the feasibility of possible biocontrol experiments, we introduce the main settings and derive optimally shaped and robust laser pulses that allow for the faithful preparation of specified initial states (such as localized excitation or coherent superposition, i.e., propagating and nonpropagating states) of the photosystem and probe efficiently the subsequent dynamics. With these tools, different transport pathways can be discriminated, which should facilitate the elucidation of genuine quantum dynamical features of photosystems and therefore enhance our understanding of the role that coherent processes may play in actual biological complexes.

  3. Coherent control of optically induced birefringence in azoaromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, C. R.; Neves, U. M.; Guedes, I.; Zilio, S. C.; Misoguti, L.

    2006-08-15

    Here we present the coherent control of two-photon induced birefringence in polymeric films containing Disperse Red 13 (DR13) azoaromatic molecules. Such control is achieved by enhancing and reducing the azochromophor cis-trans photoisomerization rate, which leads to the molecular orientation, inducing the birefringence. The dependence on chirp and phase mask of the birefringence signal was studied and modeled.

  4. Coherent Control of Ground State NaK Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zoe; Park, Jee Woo; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold dipolar molecules exhibit anisotropic, tunable, long-range interactions, making them attractive for the study of novel states of matter and quantum information processing. We demonstrate the creation and control of 23 Na40 K molecules in their rovibronic and hyperfine ground state. By applying microwaves, we drive coherent Rabi oscillations of spin-polarized molecules between the rotational ground state (J=0) and J=1. The control afforded by microwave manipulation allows us to pursue engineered dipolar interactions via microwave dressing. By driving a two-photon transition, we are also able to observe Ramsey fringes between different J=0 hyperfine states, with coherence times as long as 0.5s. The realization of long coherence times between different molecular states is crucial for applications in quantum information processing. NSF, AFOSR- MURI, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, DARPA-OLE

  5. Coherent Microwave Control of Ultracold 23Na 4K Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Sebastian A.; Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe Z.; Loh, Huanqian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate coherent microwave control of rotational and hyperfine states of trapped, ultracold, and chemically stable 23Na 40K molecules. Starting with all molecules in the absolute rovibrational and hyperfine ground state, we study rotational transitions in combined magnetic and electric fields and explain the rich hyperfine structure. Following the transfer of the entire molecular ensemble into a single hyperfine level of the first rotationally excited state, J =1 , we observe lifetimes of more than 3 s, comparable to those in the rovibrational ground state, J =0 . Long-lived ensembles and full quantum state control are prerequisites for the use of ultracold molecules in quantum simulation, precision measurements, and quantum information processing.

  6. Attosecond Coherent Control of the Photo-Dissociation of Oxygen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Felix; Ray, Dipanwita; Wright, Travis; Shivaram, Niranjan; Bocharova, Irina; Slaughter, Daniel; Ranitovic, Predrag; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten

    2016-05-01

    Attosecond Coherent Control has emerged in recent years as a technique to manipulate the absorption and ionization in atoms as well as the dissociation of molecules on an attosecond time scale. Single attosecond pulses and attosecond pulse trains (APTs) can coherently excite multiple electronic states. The electronic and nuclear wave packets can then be coupled with a second pulse forming multiple interfering quantum pathways. We have built a high flux extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source delivering APTs based on HHG that allows to selectively excite neutral and ion states in molecules. Our beamline provides spectral selectivity and attosecond interferometric control of the pulses. In the study presented here, we use APTs, generated by High Harmonic Generation in a high flux extreme ultraviolet light source, to ionize highly excited states of oxygen molecules. We identify the ionization/dissociation pathways revealing vibrational structure with ultra-high resolution ion 3D-momentum imaging spectroscopy. Furthermore, we introduce a delay between IR pulses and XUV/IR pulses to constructively or destructively interfere the ionization and dissociation pathways, thus, enabling the manipulation of both the O2+and the O+ ion yields with attosecond precision. Supported by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  7. Rotational coherence imaging and control for CN molecules through time-frequency resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Johan; Hulkko, Eero; Pettersson, Mika; Kiljunen, Toni

    2011-12-14

    Numerical wave packet simulations are performed for studying coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for CN radicals. Electronic coherence is created by femtosecond laser pulses between the X(2)Σ and B(2)Σ states. Due to the large energy separation of vibrational states, the wave packets are superpositions of rotational states only. This allows for a specially detailed inspection of the second- and third-order coherences by a two-dimensional imaging approach. We present the time-frequency domain images to illustrate the intra- and intermolecular interferences, and discuss the procedure to rationally control and experimentally detect the interferograms in solid Xe environment. PMID:22168710

  8. Coherent control of interfering wave packets in dissociating HD+ molecules: the role of phase and delay time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chaochao; Zhang, Lili; Qiu, Xuejun; Zhang, Xianzhou; Liu, Yufang

    2016-02-01

    The coherent control of interference between dissociating wave packets of the HD+ molecules generated by a pair of time-delayed and phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically studied by using the time-dependent quantum wave packet method. The density function in both coordinate and momentum representation are presented and discussed. It is demonstrated that the interference pattern is observed in both coordinate and momentum density functions. The interference undergoes a π-phase shift when the delay time between the two phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses is changed by half an optical period. In particular, the number of interference fringes, the fringe spacing in the R-dependent density distribution |ψ(R)|2, and the modulation period of the energy-dependent distribution of the fragments P(E) can be tuned by two phase-locked femtosecond pulses.

  9. Wave-Packet and Coherent Control Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Kenji

    2009-05-01

    This review summarizes progress in coherent control as well as relevant recent achievements, highlighting, among several different schemes of coherent control, wave-packet interferometry (WPI). WPI is a fundamental and versatile scenario used to control a variety of quantum systems with a sequence of short laser pulses whose relative phase is finely adjusted to control the interference of electronic or nuclear wave packets (WPs). It is also useful in retrieving quantum information such as the amplitudes and phases of eigenfunctions superposed to generate a WP. Experimental and theoretical efforts to retrieve both the amplitude and phase information are recounted. This review also discusses information processing based on the eigenfunctions of atoms and molecules as one of the modern and future applications of coherent control. The ultrafast coherent control of ultracold atoms and molecules and the coherent control of complex systems are briefly discussed as future perspectives.

  10. Coherent control of metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Wanare, Harshawardhan

    2009-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the possibility of dynamically controlling the response of metamaterials at optical frequencies using the well known phenomenon of coherent control. Our results predict a variety of effects ranging from dramatic reduction of losses associated with the resonant response of metamaterials to switchable ultraslow to superluminal propagation of pulses governed by the magnetic field of the incident wave. These effects, generic to all metamaterials having a resonant response, involve embedding the metamaterial in resonant dispersive coherent atomic/molecular media. These effects may be utilized for narrow band switching applications and detectors for radiation below predetermined cut-off frequencies.

  11. Coherent control of plasma dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Z-H; Hou, B; Lebailly, V; Nees, J A; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2015-01-01

    Coherent control of a system involves steering an interaction to a final coherent state by controlling the phase of an applied field. Plasmas support coherent wave structures that can be generated by intense laser fields. Here, we demonstrate the coherent control of plasma dynamics in a laser wakefield electron acceleration experiment. A genetic algorithm is implemented using a deformable mirror with the electron beam signal as feedback, which allows a heuristic search for the optimal wavefront under laser-plasma conditions that is not known a priori. We are able to improve both the electron beam charge and angular distribution by an order of magnitude. These improvements do not simply correlate with having the 'best' focal spot, as the highest quality vacuum focal spot produces a greatly inferior electron beam, but instead correspond to the particular laser phase front that steers the plasma wave to a final state with optimal accelerating fields. PMID:25975737

  12. Coherent controlization using superconducting qubits

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Nicolai; Melnikov, Alexey A.; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Briegel, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent controlization, i.e., coherent conditioning of arbitrary single- or multi-qubit operations on the state of one or more control qubits, is an important ingredient for the flexible implementation of many algorithms in quantum computation. This is of particular significance when certain subroutines are changing over time or when they are frequently modified, such as in decision-making algorithms for learning agents. We propose a scheme to realize coherent controlization for any number of superconducting qubits coupled to a microwave resonator. For two and three qubits, we present an explicit construction that is of high relevance for quantum learning agents. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal, taking into account loss, dephasing, and the cavity self-Kerr effect. PMID:26667893

  13. Nonlinear coherent spectroscopy in the single molecule limit (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potma, Eric O.

    2015-10-01

    Detecting coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals from signal molecules is a longstanding experimental challenge. Driving the vibrational CARS response with surface plasmon fields has proven notoriously difficult due to strong background contributions, unfavorable heat dissipation and the phase dispersion of the plasmon modes in the ensemble. In this work we overcome previous experimental limitations and demonstrate time-resolved, vibrational CARS from molecules in the low copy number limit, down to the single molecule level. Our measurements, which are performed under ambient and non-electronic resonance conditions, establish that the coherent response from vibrational modes of individual molecules can be studied experimentally, opening up a new realm of molecular spectroscopic investigations.

  14. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  15. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, Ilya; Efimov, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  16. Long Hyperfine Coherence Time of Ultracold Fermionic 23 Na40 K Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules created and trapped at sub uK temperatures allow the full control of the molecule's external and internal degrees of freedom down to a single hyperfine state. In particular, an ensemble of molecules all initialized in a single rotational and hyperfine state can be prepared and be coherently addressed using microwave fields. In this talk, we report on the observation of long coherence time between two hyperfine states of fermionic 23 Na40 K molecules in the ro-vibronic ground state (v = 0 , J = 0). A direct two-photon microwave transition via the J = 1 state is used to prepare a superposition of two lowest hyperfine states of J = 0 , and we perform Ramsey spectroscopy as a direct probe of phase coherence between these states. The fermionic nature of the molecules and the lack of electronic angular momentum in the ro-vibronic ground state heavily suppress the decoherence from collisions and external fields, respectively, and we observe long coherence times upto 0.5 sec for this hyperfine superposition state. The observed long coherence time is a crucial step for applications of trapped dipolar molecules in quantum information processing schemes.

  17. Quantum Zeno control of coherent dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Khripkov, C.; Vardi, A.

    2011-08-15

    We study the effect of dephasing on the coherent dissociation dynamics of an atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. We show that when phase-noise intensity is strong with respect to the inverse correlation time of the stimulated process, dissociation is suppressed via a Bose enhanced quantum Zeno effect. This is complementary to the quantum Zeno control of phase-diffusion in a bimodal condensate by symmetric noise [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 220403 (2008)] in that the controlled process here is phase formation and the required decoherence mechanism for its suppression is purely phase noise.

  18. Control over coherent light fields enables multidimensional coherent spectroscopy and multispectral coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Keith A.

    2012-02-01

    Using a combination of spatial and temporal shaping of optical laser fields, fully coherent spectroscopy and coherent control can be carried out to high order from optical to THz spectral ranges. A single beam with a single femtosecond pulse can be transformed into multiple beams and multiple pulses, reconfigurably under computer control with no human alignment needed, retaining full phase coherence among all the noncollinear fields. This enables multiple-quantum 2D and 3D Fourier transform optical spectroscopy of excitons and exciton-polaritons in inorganic quantum wells and microcavities, in organic J-aggregate films, and in inorganic/organic hybrid structures, the results of which will be discussed. Spatiotemporal shaping also enables coherent control over THz phonon-polariton waves in ferroelectric crystals. The THz waves can be coherently superposed to reach extremely large field amplitudes both in the host crystals and in free space, and the fields can be further enhanced in dipolar antenna and metamaterial structures, enabling highly nonlinear coherent spectroscopy and coherent control in the THz regime. Results from solid, liquid, and gas phases, including multiple-quantum rotational coherences in molecular gases and THz-induced phase transitions in crystalline solids, will be presented. Prospects for further generalization of the approach all the way to the hard x-ray regime will be discussed.

  19. Spin coherence in a Mn3 single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeywardana, Chathuranga; Mowson, Andrew M.; Christou, George; Takahashi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Spin coherence in single crystals of the spin S = 6 single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Mn3O(O2CEt)3(mpko)3]+ (abbreviated Mn3) has been investigated using 230 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Coherence in Mn3 was uncovered by significantly suppressing dipolar contribution to the decoherence with complete spin polarization of Mn3 SMMs. The temperature dependence of spin decoherence time (T2) revealed that the dipolar decoherence is the dominant source of decoherence in Mn3 and T2 can be extended up to 267 ns by quenching the dipolar decoherence.

  20. Observing a coherent superposition of an atom and a molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Mark R.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2006-11-15

    We demonstrate that it is possible, in principle, to perform a Ramsey-type interference experiment to exhibit a coherent superposition of a single atom and a diatomic molecule. This gedanken experiment, based on the techniques of Aharonov and Susskind [Phys. Rev. 155, 1428 (1967)], explicitly violates the commonly accepted superselection rule that forbids coherent superpositions of eigenstates of differing atom number. A Bose-Einstein condensate plays the role of a reference frame that allows for coherent operations analogous to Ramsey pulses. We also investigate an analogous gedanken experiment to exhibit a coherent superposition of a single boson and a fermion, violating the commonly accepted superselection rule forbidding coherent superpositions of states of differing particle statistics. In this case, the reference frame is realized by a multimode state of many fermions. This latter case reproduces all of the relevant features of Ramsey interferometry, including Ramsey fringes over many repetitions of the experiment. However, the apparent inability of this proposed experiment to produce well-defined relative phases between two distinct systems each described by a coherent superposition of a boson and a fermion demonstrates that there are additional, outstanding requirements to fully 'lift' the univalence superselection rule.

  1. Coherent Control of Quantum Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalleri, Andrea

    2011-10-05

    This talk addresses some recent work aimed at controlling the low-lying electrodynamics of quantum solids using strong field transients. The excitation of selected vibrational resonances to manipulate the many-body physics of one dimensional Mott Hubbard Insulators and to perturb competing orders in High-Tc superconductors is also covered. Finally, the speaker shows how the electrodynamics of layered superconductors can be driven through the orderparameter phase gradient, demonstrating ultrafast transistor action in a layered superconductor. Advances in the use of coherent optics, from tabletop sources to THz and x-ray free-electron lasers are also discussed.

  2. Core hole-electron correlation in coherently coupled molecules.

    PubMed

    Scholz, M; Holch, F; Sauer, C; Wiessner, M; Schöll, A; Reinert, F

    2013-07-26

    We study the core hole-electron correlation in coherently coupled molecules by energy dispersive near edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. In a transient phase, which exists during the transition between two bulk arrangements, 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylicacid-dianhydride multilayer films exhibit peculiar changes of the line shape and energy position of the x-ray absorption signal at the C K-edge with respect to the bulk and gas phase spectra. By a comparison to a theoretical model based on a coupling of transition dipoles, which is established for optical absorption, we demonstrate that the observed spectroscopic differences can be explained by an intermolecular delocalized core hole-electron pair. By applying this model we can furthermore quantify the coherence length of the delocalized core exciton. PMID:23931410

  3. Coherent Dynamics Following Strong Field Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim; Jackson, James; Levine, Benjamin; Dantus, Marcos

    2015-03-01

    Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon strong field ionization. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a ``bag of atoms'' during field induced ionization. We consider here to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, amounting to only a few hundred meVs, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). Ab initio calculations were performed to predict dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose that single electron ionization occurs within an optical cycle with the electron carrying away essentially all of the energy, leaving behind little internal energy in the cation. Evidence for this observation comes from coherent vibrational motion governed by the potential energy surface of the ground state of the cation. Subsequent fragmentation of the cation takes place as a result of further photon absorption modulated by one- and two-photon resonances, which provide sufficient energy to overcome the dissociation energy.

  4. Coherent (photon) vs incoherent (current) detection of multidimensional optical signals from single molecules in open junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Hua, Weijie; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-06-07

    The nonlinear optical response of a current-carrying single molecule coupled to two metal leads and driven by a sequence of impulsive optical pulses with controllable phases and time delays is calculated. Coherent (stimulated, heterodyne) detection of photons and incoherent detection of the optically induced current are compared. Using a diagrammatic Liouville space superoperator formalism, the signals are recast in terms of molecular correlation functions which are then expanded in the many-body molecular states. Two dimensional signals in benzene-1,4-dithiol molecule show cross peaks involving charged states. The correlation between optical and charge current signal is also observed.

  5. Coherent control of photoelectron wavepacket angular interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Baumert, T.

    2015-11-01

    Coherent control over photoelectron wavepackets, via the use of polarization-shaped laser pulses, can be understood as a time and polarization-multiplexed process, where the final (time-integrated) observable coherently samples all instantaneous states of the light-matter interaction. In this work, we investigate this multiplexing via computation of the observable photoelectron angular interferograms resulting from multi-photon atomic ionization with polarization-shaped laser pulses. We consider the polarization sensitivity of both the instantaneous and cumulative continuum wavefunction; the nature of the coherent control over the resultant photoelectron interferogram is thus explored in detail. Based on this understanding, the use of coherent control with polarization-shaped pulses as a methodology for a highly multiplexed coherent quantum metrology is also investigated, and defined in terms of the information content of the observable.

  6. Coherent phase control of the photodissociation of HOD

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, S.W.; Conaway, W.E.; Krause, J.L.

    1993-07-19

    A goal of chemical reaction dynamics is to control the course of reactions. We are examining the photodissocation of HOD, which is attractive for coherent control studies. A fixed frequency laser at 600 nm and its third harmonic at 200 nm is used to simultaneously and coherently photodissociate the rovibrationally excited parent molecules. Preliminary experiments focussed on confirming individual steps of the complex experiment; results are given of three-photon dissociation of H{sub 2}O, which gives confidence for the HOD three-photon dissociation.

  7. Control of Population Flow in Coherently Driven Quantum Ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fernandez, Ruth; Bergmann, Klaas; Ekers, Aigars; Yatsenko, Leonid P.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2005-07-22

    A technique for adiabatic control of the population flow through a preselected decaying excited level in a three-level quantum ladder is presented. The population flow through the intermediate or upper level is controlled efficiently and robustly by varying the pulse delay between a pair of partly overlapping coherent laser pulses. The technique is analyzed theoretically and demonstrated in an experiment with Na{sub 2} molecules.

  8. Attosecond vacuum UV coherent control of molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ranitovic, Predrag; Hogle, Craig W.; Rivière, Paula; Palacios, Alicia; Tong, Xiao-Ming; Toshima, Nobuyuki; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martin, Leigh; Martín, Fernando; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic light sources make it possible to access attosecond timescales, thus opening up the prospect of manipulating electronic wave packets for steering molecular dynamics. However, two decades after the birth of attosecond physics, the concept of attosecond chemistry has not yet been realized; this is because excitation and manipulation of molecular orbitals requires precisely controlled attosecond waveforms in the deep UV, which have not yet been synthesized. Here, we present a unique approach using attosecond vacuum UV pulse-trains to coherently excite and control the outcome of a simple chemical reaction in a deuterium molecule in a non-Born–Oppenheimer regime. By controlling the interfering pathways of electron wave packets in the excited neutral and singly ionized molecule, we unambiguously show that we can switch the excited electronic state on attosecond timescales, coherently guide the nuclear wave packets to dictate the way a neutral molecule vibrates, and steer and manipulate the ionization and dissociation channels. Furthermore, through advanced theory, we succeed in rigorously modeling multiscale electron and nuclear quantum control in a molecule. The observed richness and complexity of the dynamics, even in this very simplest of molecules, is both remarkable and daunting, and presents intriguing new possibilities for bridging the gap between attosecond physics and attochemistry. PMID:24395768

  9. Optics of a gas of coherently spinning molecules.

    PubMed

    Steinitz, Uri; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2014-01-10

    We consider the optical properties of a gas of molecules that are brought to fast unidirectional spinning by a pulsed laser field. It is shown that a circularly polarized probe light passing through the medium inverts its polarization handedness and experiences a frequency shift controllable by the sense and the rate of molecular rotation. Our analysis is supported by two recent experiments on the laser-induced rotational Doppler effect in molecular gases and provides a good qualitative and quantitative description of the experimental observations. PMID:24483895

  10. Goniometer Control System for Coherent Bremsstrahlung Production

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, Victor M

    2002-08-15

    A system for the generation of a high-intensity, quasi-monochromatic photon beam is discussed. The theory behind coherent bremsstrahlung photon beam production is analyzed and developed. The mechanics of a goniometer control system are presented. The software developed for remote control of the goniometer is also discussed. Finally, the results from various performance measurements are included.

  11. Controlling Casimir force via coherent driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Abbas, Muqaddar; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-04-01

    A four level atom-field configuration is used to investigate the coherent control of Casimir force between two identical plates made up of chiral atomic media and separated by vacuum of width d. The electromagnetic chirality-induced negative refraction is obtained via atomic coherence. The behavior of Casimir force is investigated using Casimir-Lifshitz formula. It is noticed that Casimir force can be switched from repulsive to attractive and vice versa via coherent control of the driving field. This switching feature provides new possibilities of using the repulsive Casimir force in the development of new emerging technologies, such as, micro-electro-mechanical and nano-electro-mechanical systems, i.e., MEMS and NEMS, respectively.

  12. Attosecond Coherent Control of Single and Double Photoionization in Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogle, C. W.; Tong, X. M.; Martin, L.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Ranitovic, P.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast high harmonic beams provide new opportunities for coherently controlling excitation and ionization processes in atoms, molecules, and materials on attosecond time scales by employing multiphoton two-pathway electron-wave-packet quantum interferences. Here we use spectrally tailored and frequency tuned vacuum and extreme ultraviolet harmonic combs, together with two phase-locked infrared laser fields, to show how the total single and double photoionization yields of argon can be coherently modulated by controlling the relative phases of both optical and electronic-wave-packet quantum interferences. This Letter is the first to apply quantum control techniques to double photoionization, which is a fundamental process where a single, high-energy photon ionizes two electrons simultaneously from an atom.

  13. Attosecond Coherent Control of Single and Double Photoionization in Argon.

    PubMed

    Hogle, C W; Tong, X M; Martin, L; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C; Ranitovic, P

    2015-10-23

    Ultrafast high harmonic beams provide new opportunities for coherently controlling excitation and ionization processes in atoms, molecules, and materials on attosecond time scales by employing multiphoton two-pathway electron-wave-packet quantum interferences. Here we use spectrally tailored and frequency tuned vacuum and extreme ultraviolet harmonic combs, together with two phase-locked infrared laser fields, to show how the total single and double photoionization yields of argon can be coherently modulated by controlling the relative phases of both optical and electronic-wave-packet quantum interferences. This Letter is the first to apply quantum control techniques to double photoionization, which is a fundamental process where a single, high-energy photon ionizes two electrons simultaneously from an atom. PMID:26551112

  14. Coherent control in simple quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prants, Sergey V.

    1995-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of two, three, and four-level quantum systems, simultaneously driven by concurrent laser pulses of arbitrary and different forms, is treated by using a nonperturbative, group-theoretical approach. The respective evolution matrices are calculated in an explicit form. General aspects of controllability of few-level atoms by using laser fields are treated analytically.

  15. Towards Coherent Control of Energetic Material Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. T.; McGrane, S. D.; Scharff, R. J.; Moore, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present direct optical initiation (DOI) of energetic materials using coherent control of localized energy deposition. DOI requires depositing energy into the material to produce a critical size hot spot, which allows propagation of the reaction and thereby initiation. The hot spot characteristics needed for growth to initiation can be studied using quantum controlled initiation (QCI). Achieving QCI in condensed phase energetic materials requires optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to coherently guide the energy flow along desired paths. As a test of our quantum control capabilities we have successfully demonstrated our ability to control the reaction pathway of the chemical system stilbene. An acousto-optical modulator based pulse shaper was used at 266 nm, in a shaped pump/supercontinuum probe technique, to enhance and suppress the relative yields of the cis- to trans-stilbene isomerization. The quantum control techniques tested in the stilbene experiments are currently being used to investigate QCI of the explosive hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB).

  16. Coherent control in hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chao; Sukharev, Maxim; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2013-05-01

    A quickly growing field of hybrid materials is emerging on the base of latest advancements in nanoplasmonic science. Here one merges plasmonics with atomic and molecular physics considering systems comprised of quantum emitters and metal nano-structures. Such systems exhibit a wide variety of new phenomena. It has long been realized that quantum control could be successfully applied to optically active nano-systems. In this paper we explore the ideas of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) applied to ensembles of atoms optically coupled to plasmonic systems. We demonstrate the implementation of STIRAP as a tool to control scattering, reflection, and transmission properties of hybrid systems. As an example we consider a core-shell silver nanowire with resonantly coupled layer of three-level atoms. A self-consistent model of Maxwell-Liouville-von Neumann equations is implemented that allows taking into account the collective effects between atoms. We show that both linear and nonlinear optical properties of atomic ensembles may be controlled by coupling to plasmonic nano-structures. The work is partially supported by NSF.

  17. Coherent control of photoionization of atomic barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Rekishu

    We present the results of our study on coherent control of photoionization of atomic barium. Our study focused on the understanding of the controllability, especially due to the effect of the coherent interaction between the atomic system and the laser field. The first half of the study investigates the mechanisms of the control behind the previously observed laser phase-insensitive product state control. The controllability of this excitation scheme, two-color two-photon resonantly enhanced excitation, was analyzed from two aspects, the role of ac Stark shift introduced by the strong laser field and the multi-pathway quantum mechanical interferences. We have analyzed the excitation scheme from the analysis of the photoelectron angular distribution measured using the excitation scheme and the monitoring of the intermediate state population. Analysis of the data as well as the numerical simulation showed clear understanding of the role of two mechanisms in the product state control reported. We also investigated the control of the phase lag during the product state control. We conducted the control of the phase lag in the study of asymmetric photoelectron angular distribution, which arises from the concurrent even-odd parity outgoing electron wave excitation. The phase lag was controlled in full range, 2pi, and the results were analyzed in terms of the role of autoionizing resonance structures as well as the nature of outgoing electron waves at different locations of the autoionizing resonances.

  18. Coherent spin control by electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing; Liu Renbao; Zhu Bangfen; Sham, L. J.; Steel, D. G.

    2011-05-15

    In coherent control, electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations usually cause coherence loss through irreversible spontaneous emission. However, since the dissipation via emission is essentially due to correlation of the fluctuations, when emission ends in a superposition of multiple final states, correlation between different pathways may build up if the 'which way' information is not fully resolved (i.e., the emission spectrum is broader than the transition energy range). Such correlation can be exploited for spin-flip control in a {Lambda}-type three-level system, which manifests itself as an all-optical spin echo in nonlinear optics with two orders of optical fields saved as compared with stimulated Raman processes. This finding represents a class of optical nonlinearity induced by electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations.

  19. Using Feedback for Coherent Control of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinacht, Thomas

    2001-05-01

    The control of atoms and molecules using coherent light fields has been a longstanding goal in chemical physics. I will discuss experiments which use a programmable pulse shaper to control the quantum state of electronic wavepackets in Rydberg atoms and nuclear dynamics in molecular liquids. The shape of Rydberg wavepackets was controlled by using tailored ultrafast laser pulses to excite a beam of cesium atoms. The quantum state of these atoms was measured using holographic techniques borrowed from optics. The experiments with molecular liquids involved the contstruction of an automated learning machine. A Genetic Algorithm directed the choice of shaped pulses which interacted with the molecular system inside a learning control loop. Analysis of successful pulse shapes that were found by the algorithm yield insight into the systems being controlled.

  20. Coherent atomic soliton molecules for matter-wave switching

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Chenyun; Berloff, Natalia G.; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Novoa, David; Carpentier, Alicia V.; Michinel, Humberto

    2011-05-15

    We discuss the dynamics of interacting dark-bright two-dimensional vector solitons in multicomponent immiscible bulk Bose-Einstein condensates. We describe matter-wave molecules without a scalar counterpart that can be seen as bound states of vector objects. We also analyze the possibility of using these structures as building blocks for the design of matter-wave switchers.

  1. Coherence in Rydberg Atoms: Measurement and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutteruf, Mary

    We demonstrate a variety of techniques for measuring and controlling dephasing and decoherence in alkali metal Rydberg atom systems. Specifically, we investigate the coherence of the spin-orbit interaction in individual atoms and of dipole-dipole resonant energy exchange between pairs of atoms. Rydberg atoms are a good model system for exploring decoherence because they are sensitive to noise in their environments. The phase coherence of wave packets encoded on the fine-structure Rydberg states of lithium atoms is measured using a population echo and preserved using pulsed and continuous dynamic decoupling techniques. Pulsed electric fields toggle the spin-orbit coupling, repeatedly flipping the state vector, and preventing the slow acquisition of phase noise in a bang-bang scheme. Continuous dynamic decoupling is implemented by driving population between the relevant electronic states with a resonant rf field. The energy spacing between the levels is locked to the rf frequency as long as the Rabi rate is much greater than the dephasing rate. We demonstrate a technique which reduces the average relative velocity between interacting potassium Rydberg atoms, extending the atom transit time and allowing us to control when all resonant energy exchange interactions in the ensemble begin and end. Velocity reduction is achieved without the use of a chopper wheel by exciting a small cylinder of atoms and allowing them to thermally expand prior to tuning them into resonance. Resonant energy transfer is explored further in a nearly frozen rubidium Rydberg gas. We observe enhancement in the transition signal when the probability amplitudes acquired on opposite sides of the resonance interfere constructively compared to the population transferred when remaining on either side of the resonance. This enhancement reflects the coherence of the energy exchange interaction and decays over 10 us microseconds. The observed coherence time is much longer than previously measured

  2. Coherent control of Rydberg states in silicon.

    PubMed

    Greenland, P T; Lynch, S A; van der Meer, A F G; Murdin, B N; Pidgeon, C R; Redlich, B; Vinh, N Q; Aeppli, G

    2010-06-24

    Laser cooling and electromagnetic traps have led to a revolution in atomic physics, yielding dramatic discoveries ranging from Bose-Einstein condensation to the quantum control of single atoms. Of particular interest, because they can be used in the quantum control of one atom by another, are excited Rydberg states, where wavefunctions are expanded from their ground-state extents of less than 0.1 nm to several nanometres and even beyond; this allows atoms far enough apart to be non-interacting in their ground states to strongly interact in their excited states. For eventual application of such states, a solid-state implementation is very desirable. Here we demonstrate the coherent control of impurity wavefunctions in the most ubiquitous donor in a semiconductor, namely phosphorus-doped silicon. In our experiments, we use a free-electron laser to stimulate and observe photon echoes, the orbital analogue of the Hahn spin echo, and Rabi oscillations familiar from magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As well as extending atomic physicists' explorations of quantum phenomena to the solid state, our work adds coherent terahertz radiation, as a particularly precise regulator of orbitals in solids, to the list of controls, such as pressure and chemical composition, already familiar to materials scientists. PMID:20577211

  3. Long-lived Electronic Coherence of Rydberg States in the Strong-Field Ionization of a Polyatomic Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin; Lozovoy, Vadim; Dantus, Marcos

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report on quantum coherent control of a large (>20 atoms) polyatomic molecule. In particular, we explore the time resolved dynamics of dicyclopentadiene when excited by a pair of phase-locked intense 800nm femtosecond pulses by monitoring changes in ion yield of the parent and fragments. Long-lived oscillations are observed for ~ 500 fs in the parent ion yield indicating the presence of long lived-electronic states. We take advantage of the long-lived electronic coherence to control the yield of different fragment ions. The presence of Rydberg states is further supported by ab initio calculations at the EOM-CCSD/6-31 +G** level of theory which identified five low-lying electronic states of neutral DCPD in the regions between 6.4 and 7.0 eV in vertical excitation energy. States of both pure Rydberg and mixed π --> π */Rydberg character are observed in this low energy region and are known to originate from ethylene. The multiphoton excitation of two or more Rydberg states, separated by the photon energy is the key to the observed long-lived electronic coherence in DCPD with a quantum beat at the difference frequency. Rydberg states are expected to have very similar potential energy surfaces and the Rydberg electron is relatively uncoupled to the nuclear dynamics, therefore supporting long electronic coherence time.

  4. Control of the entanglement between triple quantum dot molecule and its spontaneous emission fields via quantum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahrai, M.; Arzhang, B.; Taherkhani, D.; Boroojerdi, V. Tahmoorian Askari

    2015-03-01

    The time evolution of the quantum entropy in a coherently driven triple quantum dot molecule is investigated. The entanglement of the quantum dot molecule and its spontaneous emission field is coherently controlled by the gate voltage and the rate of an incoherent pump field. The degree of entanglement between a triple quantum dot molecule and its spontaneous emission fields is decreased by increasing the tunneling parameter.

  5. Certifying the quantumness of a generalized coherent control scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholak, Torsten; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-01

    We consider the role of quantum mechanics in a specific coherent control scenario, designing a "coherent control interferometer" as the essential tool that links coherent control to quantum fundamentals. Building upon this allows us to rigorously display the genuinely quantum nature of a generalized weak-field coherent control scenario (utilizing 1 vs. 2 photon excitation) via a Bell-CHSH test. Specifically, we propose an implementation of "quantum delayed-choice" in a bichromatic alkali atom photoionization experiment. The experimenter can choose between two complementary situations, which are characterized by a random photoelectron spin polarization with particle-like behavior on the one hand, and by spin controllability and wave-like nature on the other. Because these two choices are conditioned coherently on states of the driving fields, it becomes physically unknowable, prior to measurement, whether there is control over the spin or not.

  6. Certifying the quantumness of a generalized coherent control scenario.

    PubMed

    Scholak, Torsten; Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-28

    We consider the role of quantum mechanics in a specific coherent control scenario, designing a "coherent control interferometer" as the essential tool that links coherent control to quantum fundamentals. Building upon this allows us to rigorously display the genuinely quantum nature of a generalized weak-field coherent control scenario (utilizing 1 vs. 2 photon excitation) via a Bell-CHSH test. Specifically, we propose an implementation of "quantum delayed-choice" in a bichromatic alkali atom photoionization experiment. The experimenter can choose between two complementary situations, which are characterized by a random photoelectron spin polarization with particle-like behavior on the one hand, and by spin controllability and wave-like nature on the other. Because these two choices are conditioned coherently on states of the driving fields, it becomes physically unknowable, prior to measurement, whether there is control over the spin or not. PMID:25429946

  7. Certifying the quantumness of a generalized coherent control scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Scholak, Torsten Brumer, Paul

    2014-11-28

    We consider the role of quantum mechanics in a specific coherent control scenario, designing a “coherent control interferometer” as the essential tool that links coherent control to quantum fundamentals. Building upon this allows us to rigorously display the genuinely quantum nature of a generalized weak-field coherent control scenario (utilizing 1 vs. 2 photon excitation) via a Bell-CHSH test. Specifically, we propose an implementation of “quantum delayed-choice” in a bichromatic alkali atom photoionization experiment. The experimenter can choose between two complementary situations, which are characterized by a random photoelectron spin polarization with particle-like behavior on the one hand, and by spin controllability and wave-like nature on the other. Because these two choices are conditioned coherently on states of the driving fields, it becomes physically unknowable, prior to measurement, whether there is control over the spin or not.

  8. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di racting properties of a x-ray di racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  9. Spin-boson theory for charge photogeneration in organic molecules: Role of quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The charge photogeneration process in organic molecules is investigated by a quantum heat engine model, in which two molecules are modeled by a two-spin system sandwiched between two bosonic baths. The two baths represent the high-temperature photon emission source and the low-temperature phonon environment, respectively. We utilize the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group algorithm to investigate the quantum dynamics of the model. It is found that the transient energy current flowing through the two molecules exhibits two stages. In the first stage the energy current is of a coherent feature and represents the ultrafast delocalization of the charge-transfer state, and in the second stage a steady incoherent current is established. The power conversion efficiency is significantly high and may reach the maximum value of 93 % with optimized model parameters. The long-lived quantum entanglement between the two spins is found to be primarily responsible for the hyperefficiency.

  10. Coherent Control of the Optical Absorption in a Plasmonic Lattice Coupled to a Luminescent Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirruccio, Giuseppe; Ramezani, Mohammad; Rodriguez, Said Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the coherent control, i.e., phase-dependent enhancement and suppression, of the optical absorption in an array of metallic nanoantennas covered by a thin luminescent layer. The coherent control is achieved by using two collinear, counterpropagating, and phase-controlled incident waves with wavelength matching the absorption spectrum of dye molecules coupled to the array. Symmetry arguments shed light on the relation between the relative phase of the incident waves and the excitation efficiency of the optical resonances of the system. This coherent control is associated with a phase-dependent distribution of the electromagnetic near fields in the structure which enables a significant reduction of the unwanted dissipation in the metallic structures.

  11. Coherent Control of the Optical Absorption in a Plasmonic Lattice Coupled to a Luminescent Layer.

    PubMed

    Pirruccio, Giuseppe; Ramezani, Mohammad; Rodriguez, Said Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2016-03-11

    We experimentally demonstrate the coherent control, i.e., phase-dependent enhancement and suppression, of the optical absorption in an array of metallic nanoantennas covered by a thin luminescent layer. The coherent control is achieved by using two collinear, counterpropagating, and phase-controlled incident waves with wavelength matching the absorption spectrum of dye molecules coupled to the array. Symmetry arguments shed light on the relation between the relative phase of the incident waves and the excitation efficiency of the optical resonances of the system. This coherent control is associated with a phase-dependent distribution of the electromagnetic near fields in the structure which enables a significant reduction of the unwanted dissipation in the metallic structures. PMID:27015478

  12. Electron dynamics and its control in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2014-03-01

    The accessibility of few femtosecond or even attoseconds pulses opens the door to direct observation of electron dynamics. The idea to steer chemical reactions by localization of electronic wavepackets is intriguing, since electrons are directly involved in bond breaking and formation. The formation of a localized electronic wavepacket requires the superposition of two or more appropriate electronic states. Its guidance is only possible within the coherence time of the system and has to be synchronized with the vibrational molecular motions. In theoretical studies we elucidate the role of electron wavepacket motion for the control of molecular processes. We give three examples with direct connection to experiments. From our analysis, we extract the systems requirements defining the time window for intramolecular electronic coherence, the basis for efficient control. Based on these findings we map out a photoreaction that allows direct control by guiding electronic wavepackets. The carrier envelope of a femtosecond few cycle IR pulse is the control parameter that steers the photoreaction through a conical intersection.

  13. Coherence in the presence of absorption and heating in a molecule interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, J. P.; Eibenberger, S.; Mairhofer, L.; Cheng, X.; Asenbaum, P.; Arndt, M.; Walter, K.; Nimmrichter, S.; Hornberger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Matter-wave interferometry can be used to probe the foundations of physics and to enable precise measurements of particle properties and fundamental constants. It relies on beam splitters that coherently divide the wave function. In atom interferometers, such elements are often realised using lasers by exploiting the dipole interaction or through photon absorption. It is intriguing to extend these ideas to complex molecules where the energy of an absorbed photon can rapidly be redistributed across many internal degrees of freedom. Here, we provide evidence that center-of-mass coherence can be maintained even when the internal energy and entropy of the interfering particle are substantially increased by absorption of photons from a standing light wave. Each photon correlates the molecular center-of-mass wave function with its internal temperature and splits it into a superposition with opposite momenta in addition to the beam-splitting action of the optical dipole potential. PMID:26066053

  14. Coherence in the presence of absorption and heating in a molecule interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cotter, J P; Eibenberger, S; Mairhofer, L; Cheng, X; Asenbaum, P; Arndt, M; Walter, K; Nimmrichter, S; Hornberger, K

    2015-01-01

    Matter-wave interferometry can be used to probe the foundations of physics and to enable precise measurements of particle properties and fundamental constants. It relies on beam splitters that coherently divide the wave function. In atom interferometers, such elements are often realised using lasers by exploiting the dipole interaction or through photon absorption. It is intriguing to extend these ideas to complex molecules where the energy of an absorbed photon can rapidly be redistributed across many internal degrees of freedom. Here, we provide evidence that center-of-mass coherence can be maintained even when the internal energy and entropy of the interfering particle are substantially increased by absorption of photons from a standing light wave. Each photon correlates the molecular center-of-mass wave function with its internal temperature and splits it into a superposition with opposite momenta in addition to the beam-splitting action of the optical dipole potential. PMID:26066053

  15. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  16. Molecule-surface interactions probed by optimized surface-enhanced coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronine, Dmitri; Sinyukov, Alexander; Hua, Xia; Zhang, Guowan; Yang, Wenlong; Wang, Kai; Jha, Pankaj; Welch, George; Sokolov, Alexei; Scully, Marlan

    2012-06-01

    Nanoscale molecular sensing is carried out using a time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy with optimized laser pulse configurations. This novel technique combines the advantages of an improved spectral resolution, suppressed non-resonant background and near-field surface enhancement of the Raman signal. We detect two species of pyridine in a vicinity of aggregated gold nanoparticles and measure their vibrational dephasing times which reveal the effects of surface environment and molecule-surface interactions on the ultrafast molecular dynamics. This technique may be applied to a variety of artificial and biological systems and complex molecular mixtures and has a potential for nanophotonic sensing applications.

  17. Effects of spontaneously generated coherence on resonance fluorescence from triple quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Wang, Chun-Liang; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the spectrum of the resonance fluorescence from the lateral triple quantum dots controlled by voltage and obtain some interesting features such as controllable triple narrow peaks. In our system we use tunneling instead of coupling lasers, and the positions, widths and heights of the resonance fluorescence peaks can be controlled by tuning the tunneling couplings. We explain the observed spectrum with the transition properties of the dressed states generated by the coupling of the two tunneling and the laser field. These features can also be viewed as the effects of Spontaneously Generated Coherence between the close-lying levels in the dressed state picture of the tunneling couplings. And the scheme proposed here can permit the observation of Spontaneously Generated Coherence.

  18. Coherent Control of Collective Atomic Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, Collin M.

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis I explore the use of collective spin angular momentum as a platform for quantum information processing. In the limit of a large number of atoms, the collective variables of atomic systems have a natural connection to the bosonic algebra of light (known as the Holstein-Primakoff or HP approximation) where components of the collective spin angular momentum effectively act as quadratures, making them natural systems for coupling to light. I have sought to improve previous schemes for the spin squeezing of atomic ensembles, such as the proposal of Takeuchi et. al. based on coherent quantum feedback [39]. In this scheme a beam of linearly polarized light passes through the atomic ensemble (prepared in a coherent state), coupling to the atoms through a state-dependent index of refraction (the Faraday effect). The light is then passed through a wave-plate and reflected back through the atoms for a second pass. This double-pass scheme leads to an effective nonlinearity as the atomic fluctuations are mapped onto the light on the first pass and then back on to the atoms in the second pass. The light acts as a bus coupling each atom to each of the others. This nonlinear interaction forms a shearing of the atomic coherent state that results in squeezing. The light is entangled to the atoms through these interactions, and remains entangled as it escapes the system. This leads to decoherence of the atoms as the light is lost to the environment, reducing the amount of spin squeezing achieved. The first step towards improving the double-pass scheme was to add a quantum eraser step in which the light is disentangled from the squeezed atoms. By first measuring one quadrature of the light, and then performing a measurement-dependent rotation on the atomic ensemble, it is possible to decouple the atoms and light so that the loss of the light does not reduce the atomic squeezing. This results in an improvement of the rate of atomic spin squeezing. A complete model

  19. Coherent controllers for optical-feedback cooling of quantum oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    We study the cooling performance of optical-feedback controllers for open optical and mechanical resonators in the linear quadratic Gaussian setting of stochastic control theory. We utilize analysis and numerical optimization of closed-loop models based on quantum stochastic differential equations to show that coherent control schemes, where we embed the resonator in an interferometer to achieve all-optical feedback, can outperform optimal measurement-based feedback control schemes in the quantum regime of low steady-state excitation number. These performance gains are attributed to the coherent controller's ability to simultaneously process both quadratures of an optical probe field without measurement or loss of fidelity, and may guide the design of coherent feedback schemes for more general problems of robust nonlinear and robust control.

  20. Coherent Population Trapping with Controlled Interparticle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, H.; Günter, G.; Hofmann, C. S.; Giese, C.; Saliba, S. D.; Depaola, B. D.; Amthor, T.; Weidemüller, M.; Sevinçli, S.; Pohl, T.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate coherent population trapping in a strongly interacting ultracold Rydberg gas. Despite the strong van der Waals interactions and interparticle correlations, we observe the persistence of a resonance with subnatural linewidth at the single-particle resonance frequency as we tune the interaction strength. This narrow resonance cannot be understood within a mean-field description of the strong Rydberg-Rydberg interactions. Instead, a many-body density matrix approach, accounting for the dynamics of interparticle correlations, is shown to reproduce the observed spectral features.

  1. Coherent control of light interaction with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shraddha M.; Heitz, Julius J. F.; Roger, Thomas; Westerberg, Niclas; Faccio, Daniele

    2014-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of all-optical modulation of light in a graphene film. The graphene film is scanned across a standing wave formed by two counter-propagating laser beams in a Sagnac interferometer. Through a coherent absorption process the on-axis transmission is modulated with close to 80% efficiency. Furthermore we observe modulation of the scattered energy by mapping the off-axis scattered optical signal: scattering is minimized at a node of the standing wave pattern and maximized at an antinode. The results highlight the possibility to switch and modulate any given optical interaction with deeply sub-wavelength films.

  2. Stimulus control topography coherence theory: Foundations and extensions

    PubMed Central

    McIlvane, William J.; Dube, William V.

    2003-01-01

    Stimulus control topography refers to qualitative differences among members of a functional stimulus class. Stimulus control topography coherence refers to the degree of concordance between the stimulus properties specified as relevant by the individual arranging a reinforcement contingency (behavior analyst, experimenter, teacher, etc.) and the stimulus properties that come to control the behavior of the organism (experimental subject, student, etc.) that experiences those contingencies. This paper summarizes the rationale for analyses of discrimination learning outcomes in terms of stimulus control topography coherence and briefly reviews some of the foundational studies that led to this perspective. We also suggest directions for future research, including pursuit of conceptual and methodological challenges to a complete stimulus control topography coherence analysis of processes involved in discriminated and generalized operants. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5 PMID:22478402

  3. Quantum-field coherent control: Preparation of broken-symmetry entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Kral, Petr; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2005-08-15

    We show that entangled radiation-matter states with broken symmetries can be prepared by using nonclassical light in the coherent control techniques. We demonstrate the method by realizing the entanglement in degenerate continuum electronic momentum states of opposite directionality and discrete states of opposite handedness in chiral molecules. When the material system is excited simultaneously by classical light and quantum light in a state with several semiclassical phases, the interference conditions guide the system to such entangled radiation-matter states.

  4. Phase-controlled coherent population trapping in superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the influences of the-applied-field phases and amplitudes on the coherent population trapping behavior in superconducting quantum circuits. Based on the interactions of the microwave fields with a single Δ-type three-level fluxonium qubit, the coherent population trapping could be obtainable and it is very sensitive to the relative phase and amplitudes of the applied fields. When the relative phase is tuned to 0 or π, the maximal atomic coherence is present and coherent population trapping occurs. While for the choice of π/2, the atomic coherence becomes weak. Meanwhile, for the fixed relative phase π/2, the value of coherence would decrease with the increase of Rabi frequency of the external field coupled with two lower levels. The responsible physical mechanism is quantum interference induced by the control fields, which is indicated in the dressed-state representation. The microwave coherent phenomenon is present in our scheme, which will have potential applications in optical communication and nonlinear optics in solid-state devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11165008 and 11365009), the Foundation of Young Scientist of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20142BCB23011), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Jiangxi Provincial Department of Education (Grant No. GJJ13348).

  5. Control of atomic spin squeezing via quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuping; Ling, Yang; Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to generate and control atomic spin squeezing via atomic coherence induced by the strong coupling and probe fields in the Λ-type electromagnetically-induced-transparency configuration in an atomic ensemble. Manipulation of squeezing of the two components in the plane orthogonal to the mean atomic spin direction and generation of nearly perfect squeezing in either component can be achieved by varying the relative intensities of the coupling and probe fields. This method provides a flexible and convenient way to create and control atomic spin squeezing, which may find potential applications in high-precision atomic-physics measurement, quantum coherent control, and quantum information processing.

  6. Broadband standoff detection of large molecules by mid-infrared active coherent laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Neil A; Molero, Francisco; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-01-26

    A widely tunable active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS) has been demonstrated for standoff detection of broadband absorbers in the 1280 to 1318 cm-1 spectral region using an external cavity quantum cascade laser as a mid-infrared source. The broad tuning range allows detection and quantification of vapor phase molecules, such as dichloroethane, ethylene glycol dinitrate, and tetrafluoroethane. The level of confidence in molecular mixing ratios retrieved from interfering spectral measurements is assessed in a quantitative manner. A first qualitative demonstration of condensed phase chemical detection on nitroacetanilide has also been conducted. Detection performances of the broadband ACLaS have been placed in the context of explosive detection and compared to that obtained using distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers. PMID:25835851

  7. Frequency domain Fourier transform THz-EPR on single molecule magnets using coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schnegg, Alexander; Behrends, Jan; Lips, Klaus; Bittl, Robert; Holldack, Karsten

    2009-08-21

    Frequency domain Fourier transform THz electron paramagnetic resonance (FD-FT THz-EPR) based on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is presented as a novel tool to ascertain very large zero field splittings in transition metal ion complexes. A description of the FD-FT THz-EPR at the BESSY II storage ring providing CSR in a frequency range from 5 cm(-1) up to 40 cm(-1) at external magnetic fields from -10 T to +10 T is given together with first measurements on the single molecule magnet Mn(12)Ac where we studied DeltaM(S) = +/-1 spin transition energies as a function of the external magnetic field and temperature. PMID:19639156

  8. Coherent control of optical polarization effects in metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyedmohammad A; Plum, Eric; Shi, Jinhui; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    Processing of photonic information usually relies on electronics. Aiming to avoid the conversion between photonic and electronic signals, modulation of light with light based on optical nonlinearity has become a major research field and coherent optical effects on the nanoscale are emerging as new means of handling and distributing signals. Here we demonstrate that in slabs of linear material of sub-wavelength thickness optical manifestations of birefringence and optical activity (linear and circular birefringence and dichroism) can be controlled by a wave coherent with the wave probing the polarization effect. We demonstrate this in proof-of-principle experiments for chiral and anisotropic microwave metamaterials, where we show that the large parameter space of polarization characteristics may be accessed at will by coherent control. Such control can be exerted at arbitrarily low intensities, thus arguably allowing for fast handling of electromagnetic signals without facing thermal management and energy challenges. PMID:25755071

  9. Coherent control of optical polarization effects in metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedmohammad A.; Plum, Eric; Shi, Jinhui; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of photonic information usually relies on electronics. Aiming to avoid the conversion between photonic and electronic signals, modulation of light with light based on optical nonlinearity has become a major research field and coherent optical effects on the nanoscale are emerging as new means of handling and distributing signals. Here we demonstrate that in slabs of linear material of sub-wavelength thickness optical manifestations of birefringence and optical activity (linear and circular birefringence and dichroism) can be controlled by a wave coherent with the wave probing the polarization effect. We demonstrate this in proof-of-principle experiments for chiral and anisotropic microwave metamaterials, where we show that the large parameter space of polarization characteristics may be accessed at will by coherent control. Such control can be exerted at arbitrarily low intensities, thus arguably allowing for fast handling of electromagnetic signals without facing thermal management and energy challenges. PMID:25755071

  10. Coherent electron emission beyond Young-type interference from diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueny, H.; Makhoute, A.; Dubois, A.; Hansen, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    It has been known for more than 15 years that the differential cross section of electrons emitted from diatomic molecules during interaction with energetic charged particles oscillates as a function of electron momentum. The origin of the phenomenon is two-center interference, which naturally relates it back to the Young double-slit experiment. In addition to a characteristic frequency which can be described by lowest-order perturbation theories, the observation and origin of higher-order harmonics of the basic oscillation frequency has been much discussed. Here, we show that high harmonics of the fundamental Young-type oscillation frequency observed in electron spectra in fast ion-molecule collisions can be clearly exposed in numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within a one-dimensional model. Momentum distribution of the ejected electron is analyzed and shows that the phenomenon emerges when the charged particle beam collides with diatomic molecules with substantial large internuclear distance. Frequency spectra from nonperturbative calculations for electron emission from Rb2+ and Cs2+ exhibit a pronounced high-order oscillation in contrast to similar close-coupling calculations performed on H2 targets. The electron emission from these heavy molecules contains second- and third-order harmonics which are fully reproduced in an analytic model based on the Born series. Extending to triatomic molecular targets displays an increased range of harmonics. This suggests that electron emission spectra from new experiments on heavy diatomic and linear polyatomic molecular targets may provide a unique insight into competing coherent emission mechanisms and their relative strength.

  11. Theory of coherent polarization anisotropy in time-resolved two-photon ionization of isolated molecules. Effects of Coriolis couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Nomura, Y.; Fujimura, Y.

    1987-09-01

    Effects of vibration-rotation (Coriolis) couplings on the coherent polarization anisotropy are theoretically studied in a time-resolved two-photon ionization of a symmetric top molecule. This polarization anisotropy originates from a coherent excitation of the resonant rovibronic molecular eigenstates (rovibronic coherence) whose zeroth order states are mixed through the Coriolis coupling. Expressions for the time-dependent degree of polarization after the coherent excitation of the rovibronic states produced by the Coriolis coupling are derived as a function of the delay time in the pump-probe two-photon ionization. Model calculations of the time-dependent degree of polarization as well as the probabilities of the two-photon ionization are performed to demonstrate the Coriolis coupling effects in the low excess energy regions of the resonant intermediate state. It is shown that oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent degree of polarization should be observed as a result of the creation of the rovibronic coherence. It is demonstrated that oscillations of the degree of polarization involve both contribution of the purely rotational J-coherence and that of the rovibronic coherence in the resonant manifold when the rotational branches are coherently excited and the characteristic rotation-vibration interaction energy is larger than a typical free rotational energy under jet-cooled condition.

  12. Understanding and controlling laser-matter interactions: From solvated dye molecules to polyatomic molecules in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Arkaprabha

    The goal of my research is to obtain a better understanding of the various processes that occur during and following laser-matter interactions from both the physical and chemical point of view. In particular I focused my research on understanding two very important aspects of laser-matter interaction; 1) Intense laser-matter interactions for polyatomic molecules in the gas phase in order to determine to what extent processes like excitation, ionization and fragmentation can be controlled by modifying the phase and amplitude of the laser field according to the timescales for electronic, vibrational and rotational energy transfer. 2) Developing pulse shaping based single beam methods aimed at studying solvated molecules in order to elucidate processes like inhomogeneous broadening, solvatochromic shift and to determine the electronic coherence lifetimes of solvated molecules. The effect of the chirped femtosecond pulses on fluorescence and stimulated emission from solvated dye molecules was studied and it was observed that the overall effect depends quadratically on pulse energy, even where excitation probabilities range from 0.02 to 5%, in the so-called "linear excitation regime". The shape of the chirp dependence is found to be independent of the energy of the pulse. It was found that the chirp dependence reveals dynamics related to solvent rearrangement following excitation and also depends on electronic relaxation of the chromophore. Furthermore, the chirped pulses were found to be extremely sensitive to solvent environment and that the complementary phases having the opposite sign provide information about the electronic coherence lifetimes. Similar to chirped pulses, the effects of a phase step on the excitation spectrum and the corresponding changes to the stimulated emission spectrum were also studied and it was found that the coherent feature on the spectrum is sensitive to the dephasing time of the system. Therefore a single phase scanning method can

  13. Control of coherent backscattering by breaking optical reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Y.; Redding, B.; Popoff, S. M.; Cao, H.

    2016-02-01

    Reciprocity is a universal principle that has a profound impact on many areas of physics. A fundamental phenomenon in condensed-matter physics, optical physics, and acoustics, arising from reciprocity, is the constructive interference of quantum or classical waves which propagate along time-reversed paths in disordered media, leading to, for example, weak localization and metal-insulator transition. Previous studies have shown that such coherent effects are suppressed when reciprocity is broken. Here we experimentally show that by tuning a nonreciprocal phase we can coherently control complex coherent phenomena, rather than simply suppress them. In particular, we manipulate coherent backscattering of light, also known as weak localization. By utilizing a magneto-optical effect, we control the interference between time-reversed paths inside a multimode fiber with strong mode mixing, observe the optical analog of weak antilocalization, and realize a continuous transition from weak localization to weak antilocalization. Our results may open new possibilities for coherent control of waves in complex systems.

  14. Controllable coherent perfect absorption in a composite film.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Gupta, Shourya; Martin, O J F; Gupta, S Dutta; Agarwal, G S

    2012-01-16

    We exploit the versatility provided by metal-dielectric composites to demonstrate controllable coherent perfect absorption (CPA) or anti-lasing in a slab of heterogeneous medium. The slab is illuminated by coherent light from both sides, at the same angle of incidence and the conditions required for CPA are investigated as a function of the different system parameters. Our calculations clearly elucidate the role of absorption as a necessary prerequisite for CPA. We further demonstrate the controllability of the CPA frequency to the extent of having the same at two distinct frequencies even in presence of dispersion, rendering the realization of anti-lasers more flexible. PMID:22274478

  15. Injectable controlled release depots for large molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schwendeman, Steven P.; Shah, Ronak B.; Bailey, Brittany A.; Schwendeman, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable, injectable depot formulations for long-term controlled drug release have improved therapy for a number of drug molecules and led to over a dozen highly successful pharmaceutical products. Until now, success has been limited to several small molecules and peptides, although remarkable improvements have been accomplished in some of these cases. For example, twice-a-year depot injections with leuprolide are available compared to the once-a-day injection of the solution dosage form. Injectable depots are typically prepared by encapsulation of the drug in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), a polymer that is used in children every day as a resorbable suture material, and therefore, highly biocompatible. PLGAs remain today as one of the few “real world” biodegradable synthetic biomaterials used in US FDA-approved parenteral long-acting-release (LAR) products. Despite their success, there remain critical barriers to the more widespread use of PLGA LAR products, particularly for delivery of more peptides and other large molecular drugs, namely proteins. In this review, we describe key concepts in the development of injectable PLGA controlled-release depots for peptides and proteins, and then use this information to identify key issues impeding greater widespread use of PLGA depots for this class of drugs. Finally, we examine important approaches, particularly those developed in our research laboratory, toward overcoming these barriers to advance commercial LAR development. PMID:24929039

  16. Coherent control of birefringence and optical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Seyedmohammad A.; Plum, Eric; Shi, Jinhui; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-07-01

    We show that polarization effects due to anisotropy and chirality affecting a wave propagating through a thin slab of material can be controlled by another electromagnetic wave. No nonlinearity of the metamaterial slab is required and the control can be exercised at arbitrarily low intensities. In proof-of-principle experiments with anisotropic and chiral microwave metamaterials, we show that manifestations of linear and circular birefringence and dichroism can be modulated by the control wave from their maximum value to zero.

  17. Coherent control of quantum dynamics in laser kicked molecular rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitter, Martin; Milner, Valery

    2016-05-01

    We investigate experimentally the dynamics of true quantum kicked rotors - oxygen and nitrogen molecules subject to a sequence of more than 20 ultrashort laser pulses with peak intensities exceeding 1013 W/ cm2 per pulse. Using state-resolved rotational Raman spectroscopy, we show that the centrifugal distortion is the main obstacle in reaching high rotational states, as it results in the coherent oscillations of rotational population similar to Bloch oscillations in condensed matter. We demonstrate that the timing of the individual pulses can be optimized to partially mitigate the centrifugal limit and produce broader rotational wave packets with higher degrees of rotational coherence. Progress towards the experimental observation of Anderson localization in laser-kicked molecular rotors will be discussed.

  18. Gas biology: tiny molecules controlling metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Mayumi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Morikawa, Takayuki; Hishiki, Takako; Yukutake, Yoshinori; Suematsu, Makoto

    2012-11-15

    It has been recognized that gaseous molecules and their signaling cascades play a vital role in alterations of metabolic systems in physiologic and pathologic conditions. Contrary to this awareness, detailed mechanisms whereby gases exert their actions, in particular in vivo, have been unclear because of several reasons. Gaseous signaling involves diverse reactions with metal centers of metalloproteins and thiol modification of cysteine residues of proteins. Both the multiplicity of gas targets and the technical limitations in accessing local gas concentrations make dissection of exact actions of any gas mediator a challenge. However, a series of advanced technologies now offer ways to explore gas-responsive regulatory processes in vivo. Imaging mass spectrometry combined with quantitative metabolomics by capillary-electrophoresis/mass spectrometry reveals spatio-temporal profiles of many metabolites. Comparing the metabolic footprinting of murine samples with a targeted deletion of a specific gas-producing enzyme makes it possible to determine sites of actions of the gas. In this review, we intend to elaborate on the ideas how small gaseous molecules interact with metabolic systems to control organ functions such as cerebral vascular tone and energy metabolism in vivo. PMID:22516267

  19. USING COHERENT WATER JETS TO CONTROL OIL SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of coherent water streams to induce a surface current in water and thus control a floating oil slick was examined at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT). The objective of the tests ...

  20. Non-Markovian response of ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules in a condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.; Xu, J.; Xu, R. X.; Yan, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    Results of a theoretical study on non-Markov response for femtosecond laser-driven coherent ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules embedded in a condensed phase are presented. Coherent ring currents are generated by coherent excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerated π-electronic excited states. The coherent electronic dynamical behaviors are strongly influenced by interactions between the electronic system and phonon bath in a condensed phase. Here, the bath correlation time is not instantaneous but should be taken to be a finite time in ultrashort time-resolved experiments. In such a case, Markov approximation breaks down. A hierarchical master equation approach for an improved semiclassical Drude dissipation model was adopted to examine the non-Markov effects on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents of (P)-2,2'-biphenol in a condensed phase. Time evolution of the coherent ring current derived in the hierarchical master equation approach was calculated and compared with those in the Drude model in the Markov approximation and in the static limit. The results show how non-Markovian behaviors in quantum beat signals of ring currents depend on the Drude bath damping constant. Effects of temperatures on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents are also clarified.

  1. Non-Markovian response of ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules in a condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.; Xu, J.; Xu, R. X.; Yan, Y. J.

    2013-12-07

    Results of a theoretical study on non-Markov response for femtosecond laser-driven coherent ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules embedded in a condensed phase are presented. Coherent ring currents are generated by coherent excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerated π-electronic excited states. The coherent electronic dynamical behaviors are strongly influenced by interactions between the electronic system and phonon bath in a condensed phase. Here, the bath correlation time is not instantaneous but should be taken to be a finite time in ultrashort time-resolved experiments. In such a case, Markov approximation breaks down. A hierarchical master equation approach for an improved semiclassical Drude dissipation model was adopted to examine the non-Markov effects on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents of (P)-2,2{sup ′}-biphenol in a condensed phase. Time evolution of the coherent ring current derived in the hierarchical master equation approach was calculated and compared with those in the Drude model in the Markov approximation and in the static limit. The results show how non-Markovian behaviors in quantum beat signals of ring currents depend on the Drude bath damping constant. Effects of temperatures on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents are also clarified.

  2. Non-Markovian response of ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules in a condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Mineo, H; Lin, S H; Fujimura, Y; Xu, J; Xu, R X; Yan, Y J

    2013-12-01

    Results of a theoretical study on non-Markov response for femtosecond laser-driven coherent ring currents in chiral aromatic molecules embedded in a condensed phase are presented. Coherent ring currents are generated by coherent excitation of a pair of quasi-degenerated π-electronic excited states. The coherent electronic dynamical behaviors are strongly influenced by interactions between the electronic system and phonon bath in a condensed phase. Here, the bath correlation time is not instantaneous but should be taken to be a finite time in ultrashort time-resolved experiments. In such a case, Markov approximation breaks down. A hierarchical master equation approach for an improved semiclassical Drude dissipation model was adopted to examine the non-Markov effects on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents of (P)-2,2'-biphenol in a condensed phase. Time evolution of the coherent ring current derived in the hierarchical master equation approach was calculated and compared with those in the Drude model in the Markov approximation and in the static limit. The results show how non-Markovian behaviors in quantum beat signals of ring currents depend on the Drude bath damping constant. Effects of temperatures on ultrafast coherent electronic ring currents are also clarified. PMID:24320379

  3. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; McGuyer, B. H.; Apfelbeck, F.; Lee, C.-H.; Majewska, I.; Moszynski, R.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2016-07-01

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold 88Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter–wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics.

  4. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M; McGuyer, B H; Apfelbeck, F; Lee, C-H; Majewska, I; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2016-07-01

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold (88)Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter-wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics. PMID:27383945

  5. Coherence times of precise depth controlled NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhang, Jian; You, Jie; Li, Yan; Guo, Guoping; Feng, Fupan; Song, Xuerui; Lou, Liren; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Guanzhong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the depth dependence of coherence times of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers through precise depth control using oxidative etching at 580 °C in air. By successive nanoscale etching, NV centers could be brought close to the diamond surface step by step, which enabled us to track the evolution of the number of NV centers remaining in the chip and to study the depth dependence of coherence times of NV centers with diamond etching. Our results showed that the coherence times of NV centers declined rapidly with the depth reduction in the last about 22 nm before they finally disappeared, which revealed a critical depth for the influence of a rapid fluctuating surface spin bath. Moreover, by using the slow etching method combined with low-energy nitrogen implantation, NV centers with depths shallower than the initially implanted depths can be generated, which are preferred for detecting external spins with higher sensitivity.

  6. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla

  7. Coherent feedback control of a single qubit in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masashi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Engineering desired operations on qubits subjected to the deleterious effects of their environment is a critical task in quantum information processing, quantum simulation and sensing. The most common approach relies on open-loop quantum control techniques, including optimal-control algorithms based on analytical or numerical solutions, Lyapunov design and Hamiltonian engineering. An alternative strategy, inspired by the success of classical control, is feedback control. Because of the complications introduced by quantum measurement, closed-loop control is less pervasive in the quantum setting and, with exceptions, its experimental implementations have been mainly limited to quantum optics experiments. Here we implement a feedback-control algorithm using a solid-state spin qubit system associated with the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond, using coherent feedback to overcome the limitations of measurement-based feedback, and show that it can protect the qubit against intrinsic dephasing noise for milliseconds. In coherent feedback, the quantum system is connected to an auxiliary quantum controller (ancilla) that acquires information about the output state of the system (by an entangling operation) and performs an appropriate feedback action (by a conditional gate). In contrast to open-loop dynamical decoupling techniques, feedback control can protect the qubit even against Markovian noise and for an arbitrary period of time (limited only by the coherence time of the ancilla), while allowing gate operations. It is thus more closely related to quantum error-correction schemes, although these require larger and increasing qubit overheads. Increasing the number of fresh ancillas enables protection beyond their coherence time. We further evaluate the robustness of the feedback protocol, which could be applied to quantum computation and sensing, by exploring a trade-off between information gain and decoherence protection, as measurement of the ancilla-qubit correlation

  8. Multiphoton coherent control in complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Control of multiphoton transitions is demonstrated for a multilevel system by generalizing the instantaneous phase of any chirped pulse as individual terms of a Taylor series expansion. In the case of a simple two-level system, all odd terms in the series lead to population inversion while the even terms lead to self-induced transparency. The results hold for multiphoton transitions that do not have any lower-order photon resonance or any intermediate virtual state dynamics within the laser pulse width. PMID:17396157

  9. Tunneling induced dark states and the controllable resonance fluorescence spectrum in quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Qin, Li; Liu, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Optical spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing and manipulating quantum dots (QDs), has been used to investigate the resonance fluorescence spectrum from linear triple quantum dot molecules controlled by tunneling, using atomic physics methods. Interesting features such as quenching and narrowing of the fluorescence are observed. In such molecules the tunneling between the quantum dots can also induce a dark state. The results are explained by the transition properties of the dressed states generated by the coupling of the laser and the tunneling. Unlike the atomic system, in such quantum dot molecules quantum coherence can be induced using tunneling, requiring no coupling lasers, which will allow tunneling controllable quantum dot molecules to be applied to quantum optics and photonics.

  10. Nonlocal Nuclear Spin Quieting in Quantum Dot Molecules: Optically Induced Extended Two-Electron Spin Coherence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Colin M.; Ross, Aaron M.; Kim, Danny; Gammon, Daniel; Bracker, Allan S.; Sham, L. J.; Steel, Duncan G.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the extension of coherence between all four two-electron spin ground states of an InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) via nonlocal suppression of nuclear spin fluctuations in two vertically stacked quantum dots (QDs), while optically addressing only the top QD transitions. Long coherence times are revealed through dark-state spectroscopy as resulting from nuclear spin locking mediated by the exchange interaction between the QDs. Line shape analysis provides the first measurement of the quieting of the Overhauser field distribution correlating with reduced nuclear spin fluctuations.

  11. Nonlocal Nuclear Spin Quieting in Quantum Dot Molecules: Optically Induced Extended Two-Electron Spin Coherence Time.

    PubMed

    Chow, Colin M; Ross, Aaron M; Kim, Danny; Gammon, Daniel; Bracker, Allan S; Sham, L J; Steel, Duncan G

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the extension of coherence between all four two-electron spin ground states of an InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) via nonlocal suppression of nuclear spin fluctuations in two vertically stacked quantum dots (QDs), while optically addressing only the top QD transitions. Long coherence times are revealed through dark-state spectroscopy as resulting from nuclear spin locking mediated by the exchange interaction between the QDs. Line shape analysis provides the first measurement of the quieting of the Overhauser field distribution correlating with reduced nuclear spin fluctuations. PMID:27563998

  12. Controlled Tethering Molecules via Crystal Surface Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.; Zheng, Joseph X.; Chen, William Y.

    2004-03-01

    So far, almost all experiments in tethering chain molecules onto substrates are via "grafting to" or "grafting from" polymerizations in addition to physical absorption. Issues concerning the uniformity of the tethered chain density and the molecular weight distribution of the chains tethered by polymerization always undermine the properties experimentally observed. We proposed a novel design to precisely control the tethering density of polystyrene (PS) brushes on a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) lamellar crystal basal surface using PEO-b-PS or PLLA-b-PS diblock copolymers. As the crystallization temperature (Tc) increased in either a PEO-b-PS/mixed solution (chrolobenzene/octane) or a PLLA-b-PS/amyl acetate solution, the PEO or PLLA lamellar thickness (d) increased, and correspondingly, the number of folds per PEO or PLLA block was reduced. The reduced tethered density (Σ*) of the PS brushes thus increased. At an onset where the PS brushes are overcrowded within the solution, a drastic slope change in the relationship between (d)-1 and Tc occurs in both cases at a Σ* between 3 - 4. This illustrates that the weak to intermediate interaction changes of the PS brushes with their neighbors may be universally represented.

  13. Quantum coherence and entanglement control for atom-cavity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Wenchong

    Coherence and entanglement play a significant role in the quantum theory. Ideal quantum systems, "closed" to the outside world, remain quantum forever and thus manage to retain coherence and entanglement. Real quantum systems, however, are open to the environment and are therefore susceptible to the phenomenon of decoherence and disentanglement which are major hindrances to the effectiveness of quantum information processing tasks. In this thesis we have theoretically studied the evolution of coherence and entanglement in quantum systems coupled to various environments. We have also studied ways and means of controlling the decay of coherence and entanglement. We have studied the exact qubit entanglement dynamics of some interesting initial states coupled to a high-Q cavity containing zero photon, one photon, two photons and many photons respectively. We have found that an initially correlated environmental state can serve as an enhancer for entanglement decay or generation processes. More precisely, we have demonstrated that the degree of entanglement, including its collapse as well as its revival times, can be significantly modified by the correlated structure of the environmental modes. We have also studied dynamical decoupling (DD) technique --- a prominent strategy of controlling decoherence and preserving entanglement in open quantum systems. We have analyzed several DD control methods applied to qubit systems that can eliminate the system-environment coupling and prolong the quantum coherence time. Particularly, we have proposed a new DD sequence consisting a set of designed control operators that can universally protected an unknown qutrit state against colored phase and amplitude environment noises. In addition, in a non-Markovian regime, we have reformulated the quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to incorporate the effect of the external control fields. Without any assumptions on the system-environment coupling and the size of environment, we have

  14. Enhancing coherent transport in a photonic network using controllable decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggerstaff, Devon N.; Heilmann, René; Zecevik, Aidan A.; Gräfe, Markus; Broome, Matthew A.; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; White, Andrew G.; Kassal, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Transport phenomena on a quantum scale appear in a variety of systems, ranging from photosynthetic complexes to engineered quantum devices. It has been predicted that the efficiency of coherent transport can be enhanced through dynamic interaction between the system and a noisy environment. We report an experimental simulation of environment-assisted coherent transport, using an engineered network of laser-written waveguides, with relative energies and inter-waveguide couplings tailored to yield the desired Hamiltonian. Controllable-strength decoherence is simulated by broadening the bandwidth of the input illumination, yielding a significant increase in transport efficiency relative to the narrowband case. We show integrated optics to be suitable for simulating specific target Hamiltonians as well as open quantum systems with controllable loss and decoherence.

  15. Enhancing coherent transport in a photonic network using controllable decoherence.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, Devon N; Heilmann, René; Zecevik, Aidan A; Gräfe, Markus; Broome, Matthew A; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; White, Andrew G; Kassal, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Transport phenomena on a quantum scale appear in a variety of systems, ranging from photosynthetic complexes to engineered quantum devices. It has been predicted that the efficiency of coherent transport can be enhanced through dynamic interaction between the system and a noisy environment. We report an experimental simulation of environment-assisted coherent transport, using an engineered network of laser-written waveguides, with relative energies and inter-waveguide couplings tailored to yield the desired Hamiltonian. Controllable-strength decoherence is simulated by broadening the bandwidth of the input illumination, yielding a significant increase in transport efficiency relative to the narrowband case. We show integrated optics to be suitable for simulating specific target Hamiltonians as well as open quantum systems with controllable loss and decoherence. PMID:27080915

  16. Enhancing coherent transport in a photonic network using controllable decoherence

    PubMed Central

    Biggerstaff, Devon N.; Heilmann, René; Zecevik, Aidan A.; Gräfe, Markus; Broome, Matthew A.; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; White, Andrew G.; Kassal, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Transport phenomena on a quantum scale appear in a variety of systems, ranging from photosynthetic complexes to engineered quantum devices. It has been predicted that the efficiency of coherent transport can be enhanced through dynamic interaction between the system and a noisy environment. We report an experimental simulation of environment-assisted coherent transport, using an engineered network of laser-written waveguides, with relative energies and inter-waveguide couplings tailored to yield the desired Hamiltonian. Controllable-strength decoherence is simulated by broadening the bandwidth of the input illumination, yielding a significant increase in transport efficiency relative to the narrowband case. We show integrated optics to be suitable for simulating specific target Hamiltonians as well as open quantum systems with controllable loss and decoherence. PMID:27080915

  17. Coherent control of plasmonic nanoantennas using optical eigenmodes

    PubMed Central

    Kosmeier, Sebastian; De Luca, Anna Chiara; Zolotovskaya, Svetlana; Di Falco, Andrea; Dholakia, Kishan; Mazilu, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has seen subwavelength focusing of the electromagnetic field in the proximity of nanoplasmonic structures with various designs. However, a shared issue is the spatial confinement of the field, which is mostly inflexible and limited to fixed locations determined by the geometry of the nanostructures, which hampers many applications. Here, we coherently address numerically and experimentally single and multiple plasmonic nanostructures chosen from a given array, resorting to the principle of optical eigenmodes. By decomposing the light field into optical eigenmodes, specifically tailored to the nanostructure, we create a subwavelength, selective and dynamic control of the incident light. The coherent control of plasmonic nanoantennas using this approach shows an almost zero crosstalk. This approach is applicable even in the presence of large transmission aberrations, such as present in holographic diffusers and multimode fibres. The method presents a paradigm shift for the addressing of plasmonic nanostructures by light. PMID:23657743

  18. Coherent Terahertz Control of Vertical Transport in Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vänskä, O.; Tittonen, I.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.

    2015-03-01

    Coherent-control protocols are introduced to selectively transport electrons, excitons, or pure two-particle correlations through semiconductor interfaces. The scheme is tested in a double-quantum-well structure where a sequence of terahertz pulses is applied to induce the vertical excitation transfer between the wells. Using a microscopic theory, it is shown that efficient and highly selective transfer can be realized even in the presence of the unavoidable scattering and dephasing processes.

  19. Coherent control of long-range photoinduced electron transfer by stimulated X-ray Raman processes.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-09-01

    We show that X-ray pulses resonant with selected core transitions can manipulate electron transfer (ET) in molecules with ultrafast and atomic selectivity. We present possible protocols for coherently controlling ET dynamics in donor-bridge-acceptor (DBA) systems by stimulated X-ray resonant Raman processes involving various transitions between the D, B, and A sites. Simulations presented for a Ru(II)-Co(III) model complex demonstrate how the shapes, phases and amplitudes of the X-ray pulses can be optimized to create charge on demand at selected atoms, by opening up otherwise blocked ET pathways. PMID:27559082

  20. Spectroscopy and quantum control of cryogenically buffered polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, David

    2016-05-01

    Cold polyatomic molecules offer rich possibilities for precision measurement, quantum control, and tests of fundamental symmetries. While manipulating, cooling, and detecting atoms and certain diatomic molecules at the single quantum state level is now possible, analogous tools for controlling polyatomic molecules lag far behind. Buffer gas cooling has emerged as a versatile tool for cooling such molecules. We will present recent demonstrations of state-specific and enantiomer-specific preparation of chiral molecules, and novel sensitive and ultra-specific chemical analysis techniques enabled by the combination of modern microwave spectroscopy techniques and the broad applicability of cryogenically buffered molecular samples.

  1. Atomic-Scale Control of Electron Transport through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. F.; Kröger, J.; Berndt, R.; Vázquez, H.; Brandbyge, M.; Paulsson, M.

    2010-04-01

    Tin-phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on Ag(111) were contacted with the tip of a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. Orders-of-magnitude variations of the single-molecule junction conductance were achieved by controllably dehydrogenating the molecule and by modifying the atomic structure of the surface electrode. Nonequilibrium Green’s function calculations reproduce the trend of the conductance and visualize the current flow through the junction, which is guided through molecule-electrode chemical bonds.

  2. Coherent terahertz polarization control through manipulation of electron trajectories.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haidan; Lindenberg, Aaron M

    2009-07-10

    The dynamics of ionized electrons in a plasma can be controlled by synthetic optical fields composed of the fundamental and the second harmonic of femtosecond optical pulses with an arbitrary phase and polarization. We show here that the plasma-emitted half-cycle THz radiation directly reflects the two-dimensional trajectories of the electrons through polarization sensitive THz emission spectroscopy. As a result, we find that the THz polarization smoothly rotates through 2pi radians as the relative phase between the two pulses is adjusted, providing a new means of coherently controlling the polarization of light at THz frequencies. PMID:19659205

  3. Coherent Terahertz Polarization Control through Manipulation of Electron Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Haidan; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2009-07-10

    The dynamics of ionized electrons in a plasma can be controlled by synthetic optical fields composed of the fundamental and the second harmonic of femtosecond optical pulses with an arbitrary phase and polarization. We show here that the plasma-emitted half-cycle THz radiation directly reflects the two-dimensional trajectories of the electrons through polarization sensitive THz emission spectroscopy. As a result, we find that the THz polarization smoothly rotates through 2pi radians as the relative phase between the two pulses is adjusted, providing a new means of coherently controlling the polarization of light at THz frequencies.

  4. High resolution atomic coherent control via spectral phase manipulation of an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Matthew C; Cruz, Flavio C; Marian, Adela; Ye, Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution. PMID:16712153

  5. High Resolution Atomic Coherent Control via Spectral Phase Manipulation of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Cruz, Flavio C.; Marian, Adela; Ye Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  6. Electric Field Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy in a Single Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyazin, Alexander S.; van den Berg, Johan W. G.; Osorio, Edgar A.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos P.; Leijnse, Martin; Wegewijs, Maarten R.; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    We have measured quantum transport through an individual Fe$_4$ single-molecule magnet embedded in a three-terminal device geometry. The characteristic zero-field splittings of adjacent charge states and their magnetic field evolution are observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecule retains its magnetic properties, and moreover, that the magnetic anisotropy is significantly enhanced by reversible electron addition / subtraction controlled with the gate voltage. Single-molecule magnetism can thus be electrically controlled.

  7. Electric field controlled magnetic anisotropy in a single molecule.

    PubMed

    Zyazin, Alexander S; van den Berg, Johan W G; Osorio, Edgar A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos P; Leijnse, Martin; Wegewijs, Maarten R; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    We have measured quantum transport through an individual Fe(4) single-molecule magnet embedded in a three-terminal device geometry. The characteristic zero-field splittings of adjacent charge states and their magnetic field evolution are observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecule retains its magnetic properties and, moreover, that the magnetic anisotropy is significantly enhanced by reversible electron addition/subtraction controlled with the gate voltage. Single-molecule magnetism can thus be electrically controlled. PMID:20687519

  8. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  9. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  10. Focus on coherent control of complex quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, Birgitta; Milburn, Gerard

    2015-10-01

    The rapid growth of quantum information sciences over the past few decades has fueled a corresponding rise in high profile applications in fields such as metrology, sensors, spintronics, and attosecond dynamics, in addition to quantum information processing. Realizing this potential of today’s quantum science and the novel technologies based on this requires a high degree of coherent control of quantum systems. While early efforts in systematizing methods for high fidelity quantum control focused on isolated or closed quantum systems, recent advances in experimental design, measurement and monitoring, have stimulated both need and interest in the control of complex or large scale quantum systems that may also be coupled to an interactive environment or reservoir. This focus issue brings together new theoretical and experimental work addressing the formulation and implementation of quantum control for a broad range of applications in quantum science and technology today.

  11. Coherent control of atomic tunneling in a driven triple well

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Gengbiao; Hai Wenhua; Xie Qiongtao

    2011-01-15

    Coherent control of quantum tunneling is investigated for a single atom held in a driven triple-well potential without tight-binding approximation. In the high-frequency regime within or without multiphoton resonance, we find the analytical solutions and their numerical correspondences, including the special Floquet states of invariant populations and the non-Floquet states of slowly varying populations. The Floquet quasienergy spectrum exhibits anticrossings and crossings for different values of the driving parameters, which are associated with different tunneling properties described by the non-Floquet states. Applying the presented results, we suggest a scheme for transporting a single atom between nonadjacent wells or between adjacent wells.

  12. Prospect of detection and recognition of single biological molecules using ultrafast coherent dynamics in quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Conventional plasmonic sensors are based on the intrinsic resonances of metallic nanoparticles. In such sensors wavelength shift of such resonances are used to detect biological molecules. Recently we introduced ultra-sensitive timedomain nanosensors based on the way variations in the environmental conditions influence coherent dynamics of hybrid systems consisting of metallic nanoparticles and quantum dots. Such dynamics are generated via interaction of these systems with a laser field, generating quantum coherence and coherent exciton-plasmon coupling. These sensors are based on impact of variations of the refractive index of the environment on such dynamics, generating time-dependent changes in the emission of the QDs. In this paper we study the impact of material properties of the metallic nanoparticles on this process and demonstrate the key role played by the design of the quantum dots. We show that Ag nanoparticles, even in a simple spherical shape, may allow these sensors to operate at room temperature, owing to the special properties of quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems that may allow coherent effects utilized in such sensors happen in the presence of the ultrafast polarization dephasing of quantum dots.

  13. Coherent control of atomic transport in spinor optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mischuck, Brian; Deutsch, Ivan H.; Jessen, Poul S.

    2010-02-15

    Coherent transport of atoms trapped in an optical lattice can be controlled by microwave-induced spin flips that correlate with site-to-site hopping. We study the controllability of homogeneous one-dimensional systems of noninteracting atoms in the absence of site addressability. Given these restrictions, we construct a deterministic protocol to map an initially localized Wannier state to a wave packet that is coherently distributed over n sites. As an example, we consider a one dimensional quantum walk in the presence of both realistic photon scattering and inhomogeneous broadening of the microwave transition due to the optical lattice. Using composite pulses to suppress errors, fidelities of over 95% can be achieved for a 25-step walk. We extend the protocol for state preparation to analytic solutions for arbitrary unitary maps given homogeneous systems and in the presence of time-dependent uniform forces. Such control is important for applications in quantum information processing, such as quantum computing and quantum simulations of condensed matter phenomena.

  14. Physics of lateral triple quantum-dot molecules with controlled electron numbers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Shim, Yun-Pil; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2012-11-01

    We review the recent progress in theory and experiments with lateral triple quantum dots with controlled electron numbers down to one electron in each dot. The theory covers electronic and spin properties as a function of topology, number of electrons, gate voltage and external magnetic field. The orbital Hund's rules and Nagaoka ferromagnetism, magnetic frustration and chirality, interplay of quantum interference and electron-electron interactions and geometrical phases are described and related to charging and transport spectroscopy. Fabrication techniques and recent experiments are covered, as well as potential applications of triple quantum-dot molecule in coherent control, spin manipulation and quantum computation. PMID:23072742

  15. Quantum phase gate and controlled entanglement with polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Eric; Keller, Arne; Atabek, Osman; Milman, Perola

    2007-03-15

    We propose an alternative scenario for the generation of entanglement between rotational quantum states of two polar molecules. This entanglement arises from dipole-dipole interaction, and is controlled by a sequence of laser pulses simultaneously exciting both molecules. We study the efficiency of the process, and discuss possible experimental implementations with cold molecules trapped in optical lattices or in solid matrices. Finally, various entanglement detection procedures are presented, and their suitability for these two physical situations is analyzed.

  16. Density functional theory based direct comparison of coherent tunneling and electron hopping in redox-active single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastlunger, Georg; Stadler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    To define the conductance of single-molecule junctions with a redox functionality in an electrochemical cell, two conceptually different electron transport mechanisms, namely, coherent tunneling and vibrationally induced hopping, compete with each other, where implicit parameters of the setup such as the length of the molecule and the applied gate voltage decide which mechanism is the dominant one. Although coherent tunneling is most efficiently described within Landauer theory and the common theoretical treatment of electron hopping is based on Marcus theory, both theories are adequate for the processes they describe without introducing accuracy-limiting approximations. For a direct comparison, however, it has to be ensured that the crucial quantities obtained from electronic structure calculations, i.e., the transmission function T (E ) in Landauer theory and the transfer integral V , the reorganization energy λ , and the driving force Δ G0 in Marcus theory, are derived from similar grounds, as pointed out by Nitzan and coworkers in a series of publications. In this paper our framework is a single-particle picture, for which we perform density functional theory calculations for the conductance corresponding to both transport mechanisms for junctions with the central molecule containing one, two, or three Ruthenium centers, from which we extrapolate our results in order to define the critical length of the transition point of the two regimes which we identify at 5.76nm for this type of molecular wire. We also discuss trends in the dependence on an electrochemically induced gate potential.

  17. Automated alignment method for coherence-controlled holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, Zbynek; Slaby, Tomas; Kvasnica, Lukas; Lostak, Martin; Krizova, Aneta; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    A coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) was developed particularly for quantitative phase imaging and measurement of live cell dynamics, which is the proper subject of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). CCHM in low-coherence mode extends DHM in the study of living cells. However, this advantage is compensated by sensitivity of the system to easily become misaligned, which is a serious hindrance to wanted performance. Therefore, it became clear that introduction of a self-correcting system is inevitable. Accordingly, we had to devise a theory of a suitable control and design an automated alignment system for CCHM. The modulus of the reconstructed holographic signal was identified as a significant variable for guiding the alignment procedures. From this, we derived the original basic realignment three-dimensional algorithm, which encompasses a unique set of procedures for automated alignment that contains processes for initial and advanced alignment as well as long-term maintenance of microscope tuning. All of these procedures were applied to a functioning microscope and the tested processes were successfully validated. Finally, in such a way, CCHM is enabled to substantially contribute to study of biology, particularly of cancer cells in vitro.

  18. Coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations for optimal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. D.; Scharff, R. J.; Greenfield, M.; Moore, D. S.

    2009-10-01

    While the means to selectively excite a single vibrational mode using ultrafast pulse shaping are well established, the subsequent problem of selectively exciting multiple vibrational modes simultaneously has been largely neglected. The coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations has applications in control of chemistry, chemical detection and molecular vibrational quantum information processing. Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that multiple vibrational modes can be selectively excited with the concurrent suppression of multiple interfering modes by orders of magnitude. While the mechanism of selectivity is analogous to that of single mode selectivity, the interferences required to select multiple modes require complicated non-intuitive pulse trains. Additionally, we show that selective detection can be achieved by the optimal pulse shape, even when the nature of the interfering species is varied, suggesting that optimized detection should be practical in real world applications. Experimental measurements of the multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra (CARS) and CARS decay times of toluene, acetone, cis-stilbene and nitromethane liquids are reported, along with optimizations attempting to selectively excite nitromethane in a mixture of the four solvents. The experimental implementation exhibits a smaller degree of signal to background enhancement than predicted, which is primarily attributed to the single objective optimization methodology and not to fundamental limitations.

  19. Controlled Ensembles of Formaldehyde Molecules at Ultracold Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppenfeld, Martin; Prehn, Alexander; Ibrügger, Martin; Glöckner, Rosa; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Applications of ultracold molecules such as quantum information processing and quantum controlled chemistry require the preparation of ultracold molecule ensembles with a high level of control over all molecular degrees of freedom. Due to the inability to apply standard atom cooling techniques such as laser cooling to most molecule species, developing new methods is essential. We present a toolbox of techniques developed in our group for controlling molecules. A microstructured electric trap allows us to trap molecules in predominantly homogeneous electric fields with trapping times of up to a minute. Optical pumping on a vibrational transition allows us to transfer the population from a large number of rotational states to a single rotational M-sublevel. Our experiment provides excellent conditions for precision spectroscopy and investigation of ultracold collisions.

  20. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  1. Coherent control of optical information with matter wave dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Naomi S; Garner, Sean R; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in manipulating matter with light, and light with matter. Resonant laser fields interacting with cold, dense atom clouds provide a particularly rich system. Such light fields interact strongly with the internal electrons of the atoms, and couple directly to external atomic motion through recoil momenta imparted when photons are absorbed and emitted. Ultraslow light propagation in Bose-Einstein condensates represents an extreme example of resonant light manipulation using cold atoms. Here we demonstrate that a slow light pulse can be stopped and stored in one Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequently revived from a totally different condensate, 160 mum away; information is transferred through conversion of the optical pulse into a travelling matter wave. In the presence of an optical coupling field, a probe laser pulse is first injected into one of the condensates where it is spatially compressed to a length much shorter than the coherent extent of the condensate. The coupling field is then turned off, leaving the atoms in the first condensate in quantum superposition states that comprise a stationary component and a recoiling component in a different internal state. The amplitude and phase of the spatially localized light pulse are imprinted on the recoiling part of the wavefunction, which moves towards the second condensate. When this 'messenger' atom pulse is embedded in the second condensate, the system is re-illuminated with the coupling laser. The probe light is driven back on and the messenger pulse is coherently added to the matter field of the second condensate by way of slow-light-mediated atomic matter-wave amplification. The revived light pulse records the relative amplitude and phase between the recoiling atomic imprint and the revival condensate. Our results provide a dramatic demonstration of coherent optical information processing with matter wave dynamics. Such quantum control may find

  2. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2010-12-06

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  3. Ultrafast coherent optical control of a single diamond spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, L. C.; Heremans, F. J.; Awschalom, D. D.; Burkard, G.

    2013-03-01

    As an optically addressable solid-state electronic spin, the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has great promise for applications in quantum information science and metrology. At temperatures below ~ 10 K, the NV center's optical fine structure facilitates coherent coupling between the electronic spin and light, providing the means for all-optical spin control and other applications in quantum optics. Here, using ultrafast optical pump-probe techniques, we investigate the interplay of orbital, vibrational, and spin dynamics on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds. These techniques provide a flexible and powerful probe of orbital dynamics in the NV center's optically excited state, and enable optical spin control with sub-picosecond resolution. Work supported by AFOSR, ARO, and DARPA.

  4. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  5. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Y; Habuka, S; Okuyama, H; Hatta, S; Aruga, T; Frederiksen, T; Paulsson, M; Ueba, H

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  6. Measurement of a weak transition moment using Coherent Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antypas, Dionysios

    We have developed a two-pathway Coherent Control technique for measurements of weak optical transition moments. We demonstrate this technique through a measurement of the transition moment of the highly-forbidden magnetic dipole transition between the 6s2S 1/21/2 and 7s2S 1/21/2 states in atomic Cesium. The experimental principle is based on a two-pathway excitation, using two phase-coherent laser fields, a fundamental field at 1079 nm and its second harmonic at 539.5 nm. The IR field induces a strong two-photon transition, while the 539.5 nm field drives a pair of weak one-photon transitions: a Stark-induced transition of controllable strength as well as the magnetic dipole transition. Observations of the interference between these transitions for different Stark-induced transition amplitudes, allow a measurement of the ratio of the magnetic dipole to the Stark-induced moment. The interference between the transitions is controlled by modulation of the phase-delay between the two optical fields. Our determination of the magnetic dipole moment is at the 0.4% level and in good agreement with previous measurements, and serves as a benchmark for our technique and apparatus. We anticipate that with further improvement of the apparatus detection sensitivity, the demonstrated scheme can be used for measurements of the very weak Parity Violation transition moment on the Cesium 6s2 S1/2→7s2 S1/2 transition.

  7. Microscopy beyond the diffraction limit using actively controlled single molecules

    PubMed Central

    MOERNER, W.E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this short review, the general principles are described for obtaining microscopic images with resolution beyond the optical diffraction limit with single molecules. Although it has been known for several decades that single-molecule emitters can blink or turn on and off, in recent work the addition of on/off control of molecular emission to maintain concentrations at very low levels in each imaging frame combined with sequential imaging of sparse subsets has enabled the reconstruction of images with resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Single-molecule active control microscopy provides a powerful window into information about nanoscale structures that was previously unavailable. PMID:22582796

  8. Coherent control of the Goos-Haenchen shift

    SciTech Connect

    Ziauddin; Qamar, Sajid; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2010-02-15

    The behavior of the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shifts in the reflected and transmitted light beam which is incident on a cavity containing an intracavity medium of three-level or four-level atoms with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is discussed. We report a coherent control of the GH shift in a fixed configuration or device via superluminal and subluminal wave propagation. For superluminal wave propagation, we observe negative GH shifts in the reflected part of the incident light whereas the shifts are positive in the transmitted light beam. This corresponds to the negative group index of the cavity in the former case and positive group index of the cavity in the latter. For subluminal wave propagation, the behavior of the GH shifts in the reflected light changes and positive shifts appear; however, the GH shifts in the transmitted light remains positive. The corresponding group index of the cavity is positive in both cases.

  9. Label-Free Fluctuation Spectroscopy Based on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering from Bulk Water Molecules.

    PubMed

    Rabasovic, M D; Sisamakis, E; Wennmalm, S; Widengren, J

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) and molecules can be analyzed by inverse fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (iFCS) as they pass through an open detection volume, displacing fractions of the fluorescence-emitting solution in which they are dissolved. iFCS does not require the NPs or molecules to be labeled. However, fluorophores in μm-mm concentrations are needed for the solution signal. Here, we instead use coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from plain water molecules as the signal from the solution. By this fully label-free approach, termed inverse CARS-based correlation spectroscopy (iCARS-CS), NPs that are a few tenths of nm in diameter and at pM concentrations can be analyzed, and their absolute volumes/concentrations can be determined. Likewise, lipid vesicles can be analyzed as they diffuse/flow through the detection volume by using CARS fluctuations from the surrounding water molecules. iCARS-CS could likely offer a broadly applicable, label-free characterization technique of, for example, NPs, small lipid exosomes, or microparticles in biomolecular diagnostics and screening, and can also utilize CARS signals from biologically relevant media other than water. PMID:26819085

  10. Coherence-Modulated Third Harmonic Generation for Second Hyper-Raman Spectroscopy of Molecules at an Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillman, Kevin; Wilson, Jesse; Bartels, Randy; Levinger, Nancy

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a method of probing the low-frequency (sub-1000 cm-1) vibrational modes of molecules at interfaces using third-harmonic generation (THG). The THG process is enhanced at an interface due to the differences in the third-order nonlinear susceptibilities of the materials. We have used this method to collect low-frequency second hyper-Raman spectra from BGO, BaF2 and CdWO4 crystals. In addition, we have observed coherent second hyper-Raman scattering arising from CCl4 molecules at the liquid-glass interface. We are presently extending these techniques to observe resonant second hyper-Raman scattering from dye molecules adsorbed on gold nanoparticles in order to gain surface enhancement effects. We aim to use this method to characterize the environment at interfaces of reverse micelle systems. The development of this method is significant because we can sensitively probe the low-frequency vibrational modes of only those molecules at an interface.

  11. Toward Quantum Processing in Molecules: A THz-Bandwidth Coherent Memory for Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustard, Philip J.; Lausten, Rune; England, Duncan G.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2013-08-01

    The unusual features of quantum mechanics are enabling the development of technologies not possible with classical physics. These devices utilize nonclassical phenomena in the states of atoms, ions, and solid-state media as the basis for many prototypes. Here we investigate molecular states as a distinct alternative. We demonstrate a memory for light based on storing photons in the vibrations of hydrogen molecules. The THz-bandwidth molecular memory is used to store 100-fs pulses for durations up to ˜1ns, enabling ˜104 operational time bins. The results demonstrate the promise of molecules for constructing compact ultrafast quantum photonic technologies.

  12. Coherent Control of Molecular Torsion and the Active-space Decomposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Shane Matthew

    This dissertation discusses schemes and applications for the strong-field control of molecular torsions as well as introduces the active-space decomposition method. In the first part, a route to realize general control over the torsional motions of a class of biaryl compounds is proposed. Torsion in biaryl compounds--molecules with two aromatic moieties connected by a bond about which the barrier to rotation is small--mediates the electronic coupling between the two rings in the molecule. Thus, by controlling the torsion angle, one also controls the electron transfer and transport rates, the absorption and emission spectra, and the molecule's chirality. In our scheme, a non-resonant half-cycle pulse interacts with the permanent dipole of only one moiety of the pre-oriented biaryl compound. In the non-adiabatic regime, coherent motion is initiated by the half-cycle pulse. In the adiabatic regime, the torsion angle is tuned by the pulse. By properly choosing the parameters and polarization of the half-cycle pulse, we show that free internal rotation can be started or that the molecular chirality can be inverted. Then, with the aid of optimal control theory, we design "deracemizing" control pulses, i.e., control pulses that convert a racemic mixture into an enantiopure mixture. Finally, we explore the potential for this type of control in a single-molecule pulling experiment. In the second part, we describe the active space decomposition method for computing excited states of molecular dimers. In this method, the dimer's wavefunction is expressed as a linear combination of direct products of orthogonal localized monomer states. The adiabatic dimer states are found by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in this direct product space. Matrix elements between direct product states are computed directly, without ever explicitly forming the dimer wavefunction, thus enabling calculations of dimers with active space sizes that would be otherwise impossible. The decomposed

  13. Theory of femtosecond coherent double-pump single-molecule spectroscopy: Application to light harvesting complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lipeng; Zhao, Yang; Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2015-04-28

    We develop a first principles theoretical description of femtosecond double-pump single-molecule signals of molecular aggregates. We incorporate all singly excited electronic states and vibrational modes with significant exciton-phonon coupling into a system Hamiltonian and treat the ensuing system dynamics within the Davydov D{sub 1} Ansatz. The remaining intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes are treated as a heat bath and their effect is accounted for through lineshape functions. We apply our theory to simulate single-molecule signals of the light harvesting complex II. The calculated signals exhibit pronounced oscillations of mixed electron-vibrational (vibronic) origin. Their periods decrease with decreasing exciton-phonon coupling.

  14. Flexible coherent control of plasmonic spin-Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shiyi; Zhong, Fan; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Li, Jensen

    2015-01-01

    The surface plasmon polariton is an emerging candidate for miniaturizing optoelectronic circuits. Recent demonstrations of polarization-dependent splitting using metasurfaces, including focal-spot shifting and unidirectional propagation, allow us to exploit the spin degree of freedom in plasmonics. However, further progress has been hampered by the inability to generate more complicated and independent surface plasmon profiles for two incident spins, which work coherently together for more flexible and tunable functionalities. Here by matching the geometric phases of the nano-slots on silver to specific superimpositions of the inward and outward surface plasmon profiles for the two spins, arbitrary spin-dependent orbitals can be generated in a slot-free region. Furthermore, motion pictures with a series of picture frames can be assembled and played by varying the linear polarization angle of incident light. This spin-enabled control of orbitals is potentially useful for tip-free near-field scanning microscopy, holographic data storage, tunable plasmonic tweezers, and integrated optical components. PMID:26415636

  15. Flexible coherent control of plasmonic spin-Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shiyi; Zhong, Fan; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Li, Jensen

    2015-09-01

    The surface plasmon polariton is an emerging candidate for miniaturizing optoelectronic circuits. Recent demonstrations of polarization-dependent splitting using metasurfaces, including focal-spot shifting and unidirectional propagation, allow us to exploit the spin degree of freedom in plasmonics. However, further progress has been hampered by the inability to generate more complicated and independent surface plasmon profiles for two incident spins, which work coherently together for more flexible and tunable functionalities. Here by matching the geometric phases of the nano-slots on silver to specific superimpositions of the inward and outward surface plasmon profiles for the two spins, arbitrary spin-dependent orbitals can be generated in a slot-free region. Furthermore, motion pictures with a series of picture frames can be assembled and played by varying the linear polarization angle of incident light. This spin-enabled control of orbitals is potentially useful for tip-free near-field scanning microscopy, holographic data storage, tunable plasmonic tweezers, and integrated optical components.

  16. Flexible coherent control of plasmonic spin-Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shiyi; Zhong, Fan; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Li, Jensen

    2015-01-01

    The surface plasmon polariton is an emerging candidate for miniaturizing optoelectronic circuits. Recent demonstrations of polarization-dependent splitting using metasurfaces, including focal-spot shifting and unidirectional propagation, allow us to exploit the spin degree of freedom in plasmonics. However, further progress has been hampered by the inability to generate more complicated and independent surface plasmon profiles for two incident spins, which work coherently together for more flexible and tunable functionalities. Here by matching the geometric phases of the nano-slots on silver to specific superimpositions of the inward and outward surface plasmon profiles for the two spins, arbitrary spin-dependent orbitals can be generated in a slot-free region. Furthermore, motion pictures with a series of picture frames can be assembled and played by varying the linear polarization angle of incident light. This spin-enabled control of orbitals is potentially useful for tip-free near-field scanning microscopy, holographic data storage, tunable plasmonic tweezers, and integrated optical components. PMID:26415636

  17. Controlled release of fragrant molecules with visible light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuozhi; Johns, Valentine K; Liao, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Controlled release of odorous molecules is the key to digital scent technology which will add another dimension to electronics. Photorelease is a cold mechanism that promises better temporal and spatial control than thermal release. Herein we report a novel material composed of an acid-sensitive polymer carrying a fragrant aldehyde and a reversible metastable-state photoacid. It releases the fragrant molecule under visible light, and stops releasing it after the light is turned off. A metastable-state photoacid with a fast reverse-reaction rate was developed to quickly stop the release after irradiation. Both the carrier polymer and the photoacid can be reused after all the fragrant molecules have been released. The material combines the advantages of visible-light activity, fast on/off rate, easy preparation, and recyclability, and thus is promising for digital scent technology. PMID:25284277

  18. Time-delayed quantum coherent Pyragas feedback control of photon squeezing in a degenerate parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Manuel; Hein, Sven M.; Lehnert, Judith; Schöll, Eckehard; Hughes, Stephen; Knorr, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherent feedback control is a measurement-free control method fully preserving quantum coherence. In this paper we show how time-delayed quantum coherent feedback can be used to control the degree of squeezing in the output field of a cavity containing a degenerate parametric oscillator. We focus on the specific situation of Pyragas-type feedback control where time-delayed signals are fed back directly into the quantum system. Our results show how time-delayed feedback can enhance or decrease the degree of squeezing as a function of time delay and feedback strength.

  19. Method and apparatus for single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system under software control

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Salapura, Valentina

    2010-11-02

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system under software control in order to monitor the behavior of a memory coherence mechanism. Single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system is made possible by adding one or more step registers. By accessing these step registers, one or more coherence requests are processed by the multiprocessor system. The step registers determine if the snoop unit will operate by proceeding in a normal execution mode, or operate in a single-step mode.

  20. EDITORIAL: Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics Quantum control theory for coherence and information dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza; Tannor, David

    2011-08-01

    Precisely characterizing and controlling the dynamics of realistic open quantum systems has emerged in recent years as a key challenge across contemporary quantum sciences and technologies, with implications ranging from physics, chemistry and applied mathematics to quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum engineering. Quantum control theory aims to provide both a general dynamical-system framework and a constructive toolbox to meet this challenge. The purpose of this special issue of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is to present a state-of-the-art account of recent advances and current trends in the field, as reflected in two international meetings that were held on the subject over the last summer and which motivated in part the compilation of this volume—the Topical Group: Frontiers in Open Quantum Systems and Quantum Control Theory, held at the Institute for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (ITAMP) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA), from 1-14 August 2010, and the Safed Workshop on Quantum Decoherence and Thermodynamics Control, held in Safed (Israel), from 22-27 August 2010. Initial developments in quantum control theory date back to (at least) the early 1980s, and have been largely inspired by the well-established mathematical framework for classical dynamical systems. As the above-mentioned meetings made clear, and as the burgeoning body of literature on the subject testifies, quantum control has grown since then well beyond its original boundaries, and has by now evolved into a highly cross-disciplinary field which, while still fast-moving, is also entering a new phase of maturity, sophistication, and integration. Two trends deserve special attention: on the one hand, a growing emphasis on control tasks and methodologies that are specifically motivated by QIP, in addition and in parallel to applications in more traditional areas where quantum coherence is nevertheless vital (such as, for instance

  1. Statistical properties in Young's interference pattern formed with a radially polarized beam with controllable spatial coherence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijun; Wang, Fei; Chen, Yahong; Li, Zhenhua; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-11-17

    Experimental generation of a radially polarized (RP) beam with controllable spatial coherence (i.e., partially coherent RP beam) was reported recently [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 051108 (2012)]. In this paper, we carry out theoretical and experimental studies of the statistical properties in Young's two-slit interference pattern formed with a partially coherent RP beam. An approximate analytical expression for the cross-spectral density matrix of a partially coherent RP beam in the observation plane is obtained, and it is found that the statistical properties, such as the intensity, the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization, are strongly affected by the spatial coherence of the incident beam. Our experimental results are consistent with the theoretical predictions, and may be useful in some applications, where light field with special statistical properties are required. PMID:25402110

  2. Attosecond-Recollision-Controlled Selective Fragmentation of Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua; Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S.; Kartashov, Daniil; Xu, Huailiang; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Control over various fragmentation reactions of a series of polyatomic molecules (acetylene, ethylene, 1,3-butadiene) by the optical waveform of intense few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated experimentally. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the responsible mechanism is inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals by recolliding electron wave packets, whose recollision energy in few-cycle ionizing laser pulses strongly depends on the optical waveform. Our work demonstrates an efficient and selective way of predetermining fragmentation and isomerization reactions in polyatomic molecules on subfemtosecond time scales.

  3. Attosecond-recollision-controlled selective fragmentation of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua; Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S; Kartashov, Daniil; Xu, Huailiang; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2012-12-14

    Control over various fragmentation reactions of a series of polyatomic molecules (acetylene, ethylene, 1,3-butadiene) by the optical waveform of intense few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated experimentally. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the responsible mechanism is inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals by recolliding electron wave packets, whose recollision energy in few-cycle ionizing laser pulses strongly depends on the optical waveform. Our work demonstrates an efficient and selective way of predetermining fragmentation and isomerization reactions in polyatomic molecules on subfemtosecond time scales. PMID:23368312

  4. Vacuum-Assisted Generation and Control of Atomic Coherences at X-Ray Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeg, Kilian P.; Wille, Hans-Christian; Schlage, Kai; Guryeva, Tatyana; Schumacher, Daniel; Uschmann, Ingo; Schulze, Kai S.; Marx, Berit; Kämpfer, Tino; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Röhlsberger, Ralf; Evers, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    The control of light-matter interaction at the quantum level usually requires coherent laser fields. But already an exchange of virtual photons with the electromagnetic vacuum field alone can lead to quantum coherences, which subsequently suppress spontaneous emission. We demonstrate such spontaneously generated coherences (SGC) in a large ensemble of nuclei operating in the x-ray regime, resonantly coupled to a common cavity environment. The observed SGC originates from two fundamentally different mechanisms related to cooperative emission and magnetically controlled anisotropy of the cavity vacuum. This approach opens new perspectives for quantum control, quantum state engineering and simulation of quantum many-body physics in an essentially decoherence-free setting.

  5. Effects of bonding type and interface geometry on coherent transport through the single-molecule magnet Mn12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungwha; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; García-Suárez, Víctor M.; Ferrer, Jaime

    2010-03-01

    We examine theoretically coherent electron transport through the single-molecule magnet Mn12 , bridged between Au(111) electrodes, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method and the density-functional theory. We analyze the effects of bonding type, molecular orientation, and geometry relaxation on the electronic properties and charge and spin transport across the single-molecule junction. We consider nine interface geometries leading to five bonding mechanisms and two molecular orientations: (i) Au-C bonding, (ii) Au-Au bonding, (iii) Au-S bonding, (iv) Au-H bonding, and (v) physisorption via van der Waals forces. The two molecular orientations of Mn12 correspond to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule aligned perpendicular [hereafter denoted as orientation (1)] or parallel [orientation (2)] to the direction of electron transport. We find that the electron transport is carried by the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level in all the cases that we have simulated. Relaxation of the junction geometries mainly shifts the relevant occupied molecular levels toward the Fermi energy as well as slightly reduces the broadening of the LUMO level. As a result, the current slightly decreases at low bias voltage. Our calculations also show that placing the molecule in the orientation (1) broadens the LUMO level much more than in the orientation (2) due to the internal structure of the Mn12 . Consequently, junctions with the former orientation yield a higher current than those with the latter. Among all of the bonding types considered, the Au-C bonding gives rise to the highest current (about one order of magnitude higher than the Au-S bonding), for a given distance between the electrodes. The current through the junction with other bonding types decreases in the order of Au-Au, Au-S, and Au-H. Importantly, the spin-filtering effect in all the nine geometries stays robust and their ratios of the majority-spin to the minority-spin transmission coefficients are

  6. Control of coherent structure in coaxial swirling turbulent jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjoong

    excitation in the present work. Consequently, the knowledge gained from this research could benefit the fluid dynamic community by increasing the fundamental understanding of turbulent swirling flows and their effective control for the formation and breakdown of coherent structure.

  7. Coherent cancellation of geometric phase for the OH molecule in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Marin, S.; Kleinert, M.

    2014-05-01

    The OH molecule in its ground state presents a versatile platform for precision measurement and quantum information processing. These applications vitally depend on the accurate measurement of transition energies between the OH levels. Significant sources of systematic errors in these measurements are shifts based on the geometric phase arising from the magnetic and electric fields used for manipulating OH. In this article, we present these geometric phases for fields that vary harmonically in time, as in the Ramsey technique. Our calculation of the phases is exact within the description provided by our recent analytic solution of an effective Stark-Zeeman Hamiltonian for the OH ground state. This Hamiltonian has been shown to model experimental data accurately. We find that the OH geometric phases exhibit rich structure as a function of the field rotation rate. Remarkably, we find rotation rates where the geometric phase accumulated by a specific state is zero, or where the relative geometric phase between two states vanishes. We expect these findings to be of importance to precision experiments on OH involving time-varying fields. More specifically, our analysis quantitatively characterizes an important item in the error budget for precision spectroscopy of ground-state OH.

  8. Coherent phase control of internal conversion in pyrazine.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Robert J; Hu, Zhan; Seideman, Tamar; Singha, Sima; Sukharev, Maxim; Zhao, Youbo

    2015-04-14

    Shaped ultrafast laser pulses were used to study and control the ionization dynamics of electronically excited pyrazine in a pump and probe experiment. For pump pulses created without feedback from the product signal, the ion growth curve (the parent ion signal as a function of pump/probe delay) was described quantitatively by the classical rate equations for internal conversion of the S2 and S1 states. Very different, non-classical behavior was observed when a genetic algorithm (GA) employing phase-only modulation was used to minimize the ion signal at some pre-determined target time, T. Two qualitatively different control mechanisms were identified for early (T < 1.5 ps) and late (T > 1.5 ps) target times. In the former case, the ion signal was largely suppressed for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the ion signal produced by the GA-optimized pulse and a transform limited (TL) pulse coalesced. In contrast, for T > 1.5 ps, the ion growth curve followed the classical rate equations for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the quantum yield for the GA-optimized pulse was much smaller than for a TL pulse. We interpret the first type of behavior as an indication that the wave packet produced by the pump laser is localized in a region of the S2 potential energy surface where the vertical ionization energy exceeds the probe photon energy, whereas the second type of behavior may be described by a reduced absorption cross section for S0 → S2 followed by incoherent decay of the excited molecules. Amplitude modulation observed in the spectrum of the shaped pulse may have contributed to the control mechanism, although this possibility is mitigated by the very small focal volume of the probe laser. PMID:25877582

  9. Coherent phase control of internal conversion in pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Robert J.; Hu, Zhan; Seideman, Tamar; Singha, Sima; Sukharev, Maxim; Zhao, Youbo

    2015-04-01

    Shaped ultrafast laser pulses were used to study and control the ionization dynamics of electronically excited pyrazine in a pump and probe experiment. For pump pulses created without feedback from the product signal, the ion growth curve (the parent ion signal as a function of pump/probe delay) was described quantitatively by the classical rate equations for internal conversion of the S2 and S1 states. Very different, non-classical behavior was observed when a genetic algorithm (GA) employing phase-only modulation was used to minimize the ion signal at some pre-determined target time, T. Two qualitatively different control mechanisms were identified for early (T < 1.5 ps) and late (T > 1.5 ps) target times. In the former case, the ion signal was largely suppressed for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the ion signal produced by the GA-optimized pulse and a transform limited (TL) pulse coalesced. In contrast, for T > 1.5 ps, the ion growth curve followed the classical rate equations for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the quantum yield for the GA-optimized pulse was much smaller than for a TL pulse. We interpret the first type of behavior as an indication that the wave packet produced by the pump laser is localized in a region of the S2 potential energy surface where the vertical ionization energy exceeds the probe photon energy, whereas the second type of behavior may be described by a reduced absorption cross section for S0 → S2 followed by incoherent decay of the excited molecules. Amplitude modulation observed in the spectrum of the shaped pulse may have contributed to the control mechanism, although this possibility is mitigated by the very small focal volume of the probe laser.

  10. Coherent phase control of internal conversion in pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Robert J. Singha, Sima; Zhao, Youbo; Hu, Zhan; Seideman, Tamar; Sukharev, Maxim

    2015-04-14

    Shaped ultrafast laser pulses were used to study and control the ionization dynamics of electronically excited pyrazine in a pump and probe experiment. For pump pulses created without feedback from the product signal, the ion growth curve (the parent ion signal as a function of pump/probe delay) was described quantitatively by the classical rate equations for internal conversion of the S{sub 2} and S{sub 1} states. Very different, non-classical behavior was observed when a genetic algorithm (GA) employing phase-only modulation was used to minimize the ion signal at some pre-determined target time, T. Two qualitatively different control mechanisms were identified for early (T < 1.5 ps) and late (T > 1.5 ps) target times. In the former case, the ion signal was largely suppressed for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the ion signal produced by the GA-optimized pulse and a transform limited (TL) pulse coalesced. In contrast, for T > 1.5 ps, the ion growth curve followed the classical rate equations for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the quantum yield for the GA-optimized pulse was much smaller than for a TL pulse. We interpret the first type of behavior as an indication that the wave packet produced by the pump laser is localized in a region of the S{sub 2} potential energy surface where the vertical ionization energy exceeds the probe photon energy, whereas the second type of behavior may be described by a reduced absorption cross section for S{sub 0} → S{sub 2} followed by incoherent decay of the excited molecules. Amplitude modulation observed in the spectrum of the shaped pulse may have contributed to the control mechanism, although this possibility is mitigated by the very small focal volume of the probe laser.

  11. Activation of coherent lattice phonon following ultrafast molecular spin-state photo-switching: A molecule-to-lattice energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Marino, A.; Cammarata, M.; Matar, S. F.; Létard, J.-F.; Chastanet, G.; Chollet, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Collet, E.

    2015-01-01

    We combine ultrafast optical spectroscopy with femtosecond X-ray absorption to study the photo-switching dynamics of the [Fe(PM-AzA)2(NCS)2] spin-crossover molecular solid. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping process switches the molecules from low spin to high spin (HS) states on the sub-picosecond timescale. The change of the electronic state (<50 fs) induces a structural reorganization of the molecule within 160 fs. This transformation is accompanied by coherent molecular vibrations in the HS potential and especially a rapidly damped Fe-ligand breathing mode. The time-resolved studies evidence a delayed activation of coherent optical phonons of the lattice surrounding the photoexcited molecules. PMID:26798836

  12. Activation of coherent lattice phonon following ultrafast molecular spin-state photo-switching: A molecule-to-lattice energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Marino, A; Cammarata, M; Matar, S F; Létard, J-F; Chastanet, G; Chollet, M; Glownia, J M; Lemke, H T; Collet, E

    2016-03-01

    We combine ultrafast optical spectroscopy with femtosecond X-ray absorption to study the photo-switching dynamics of the [Fe(PM-AzA)2(NCS)2] spin-crossover molecular solid. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping process switches the molecules from low spin to high spin (HS) states on the sub-picosecond timescale. The change of the electronic state (<50 fs) induces a structural reorganization of the molecule within 160 fs. This transformation is accompanied by coherent molecular vibrations in the HS potential and especially a rapidly damped Fe-ligand breathing mode. The time-resolved studies evidence a delayed activation of coherent optical phonons of the lattice surrounding the photoexcited molecules. PMID:26798836

  13. Theoretical analysis of controllability of interference phenomena between partially coherent fields in the intensity matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiki, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the controllability of interference phenomena between partially coherent fields by introducing the Wigner distribution function (WDF) and entropy, which is defined using the intensity matrix [H. Gamo, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 47, 976 (1957)]. The analytical derivation of the WDF and entropy is presented for a partially coherent imaging system consisting of two pinholes illuminated by a circular source. It is shown that the WDF, defined in the 4D space–spatial frequency region, and entropy can be useful tools to understand how one can freely and quantitatively control the interference when any optical components in the partially coherent imaging system are changed.

  14. Comprehension through explanation as the interaction of the brain's coherence and cognitive control networks.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jarrod; Schunn, Christian D

    2015-01-01

    Discourse comprehension processes attempt to produce an elaborate and well-connected representation in the reader's mind. A common network of regions including the angular gyrus, posterior cingulate, and dorsal frontal cortex appears to be involved in constructing coherent representations in a variety of tasks including social cognition tasks, narrative comprehension, and expository text comprehension. Reading strategies that require the construction of explicit inferences are used in the present research to examine how this coherence network interacts with other brain regions. A psychophysiological interaction analysis was used to examine regions showing changed functional connectivity with this coherence network when participants were engaged in either a non-inferencing reading strategy, paraphrasing, or a strategy requiring coherence-building inferences, self-explanation. Results of the analysis show that the coherence network increases in functional connectivity with a cognitive control network that may be specialized for the manipulation of semantic representations and the construction of new relations among these representations. PMID:26557066

  15. Comprehension through explanation as the interaction of the brain’s coherence and cognitive control networks

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jarrod; Schunn, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    Discourse comprehension processes attempt to produce an elaborate and well-connected representation in the reader’s mind. A common network of regions including the angular gyrus, posterior cingulate, and dorsal frontal cortex appears to be involved in constructing coherent representations in a variety of tasks including social cognition tasks, narrative comprehension, and expository text comprehension. Reading strategies that require the construction of explicit inferences are used in the present research to examine how this coherence network interacts with other brain regions. A psychophysiological interaction analysis was used to examine regions showing changed functional connectivity with this coherence network when participants were engaged in either a non-inferencing reading strategy, paraphrasing, or a strategy requiring coherence-building inferences, self-explanation. Results of the analysis show that the coherence network increases in functional connectivity with a cognitive control network that may be specialized for the manipulation of semantic representations and the construction of new relations among these representations. PMID:26557066

  16. Communication: Conditions for one-photon coherent phase control in isolated and open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spanner, Michael; Arango, Carlos A.; Brumer, Paul

    2010-10-21

    Coherent control of observables using the phase properties of weak light that induces one-photon transitions is considered. Measurable properties are shown to be categorizable as either class A, where control is not possible, or class B, where control is possible. Using formal arguments, we show that phase control in open systems can be environmentally assisted.

  17. Adhesion Molecules: Master Controllers of the Circulatory System.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric P; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Lee, Warren L; Downey, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript will review our current understanding of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) relevant to the circulatory system, their physiological role in control of vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, and their importance in pathophysiological (disease) processes such as acute lung injury, atherosclerosis, and pulmonary hypertension. This is a complex and rapidly changing area of research that is incompletely understood. By design, we will begin with a brief overview of the structure and classification of the major groups of adhesion molecules and their physiological functions including cellular adhesion and signaling. The role of specific CAMs in the process of platelet aggregation and hemostasis and leukocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration will be reviewed as examples of the complex and cooperative interplay between CAMs during physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of the endothelial glycocalyx and the glycobiology of this complex system related to inflammatory states such as sepsis will be reviewed. We will then focus on the role of adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of specific disease processes involving the lungs and cardiovascular system. The potential of targeting adhesion molecules in the treatment of immune and inflammatory diseases will be highlighted in the relevant sections throughout the manuscript. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:945-973, 2016. PMID:27065171

  18. The manipulation of massive ro-vibronic superpositions using time frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TFRCARS): from quantum control to quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadoyan, R.; Kohen, D.; Lidar, D. A.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2001-05-01

    Molecular ro-vibronic coherences, joint energy-time distributions of quantum amplitudes, are selectively prepared, manipulated, and imaged in time-frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TFRCARS) measurements using femtosecond laser pulses. The studies are implemented in iodine vapor, with its thermally occupied statistical ro-vibrational density serving as initial state. The evolution of the massive ro-vibronic superpositions, consisting of 10 3 eigenstates, is followed through two-dimensional images. The first- and second-order coherences are captured using time-integrated frequency-resolved CARS, while the third-order coherence is captured using time-gated frequency-resolved CARS. The Fourier filtering provided by time-integrated detection projects out single ro-vibronic transitions, while time-gated detection allows the projection of arbitrary ro-vibronic superpositions from the coherent third-order polarization. A detailed analysis of the data is provided to highlight the salient features of this four-wave mixing process. The richly patterned images of the ro-vibrational coherences can be understood in terms of phase evolution in rotation-vibration-electronic Hilbert space, using time-circuit diagrams. Beside the control and imaging of chemistry, the controlled manipulation of massive quantum coherences suggests the possibility of quantum computing. We argue that the universal logic gates necessary for arbitrary quantum computing - all single qubit operations and the two-qubit controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate - are available in time-resolved four-wave mixing in a molecule. The molecular rotational manifold is naturally "wired" for carrying out all single qubit operations efficiently, and in parallel. We identify vibronic coherences as one example of a naturally available two-qubit CNOT gate, wherein the vibrational qubit controls the switching of the targeted electronic qubit.

  19. Heterodyne coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by the phase control of its intrinsic background

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Wang Kai; Welch, George R.; Sokolov, Alexei V.

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond laser pulse shaping for precise control of the interference between the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal and the coherent nonresonant background generated within the same sample volume. Our technique is similar to heterodyne detection with the coherent background playing the role of the local oscillator field. In our experiment, we first apply two ultrashort (near-transform-limited) femtosecond pump and Stokes laser pulses to excite coherent molecular oscillations within a sample. After a short and controllable delay, we then apply a laser pulse that scatters off of these oscillations to produce the CARS signal. By making fine adjustments to the probe field spectral profile, we vary the relative phase between the Raman-resonant signal and the nonresonant background, and we observe a varying spectral interference pattern. These controlled variations of the measured pattern reveal the phase information within the Raman spectrum.

  20. Heterodyne coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by the phase control of its intrinsic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Wang, Kai; Welch, George R.; Sokolov, Alexei V.

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond laser pulse shaping for precise control of the interference between the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal and the coherent nonresonant background generated within the same sample volume. Our technique is similar to heterodyne detection with the coherent background playing the role of the local oscillator field. In our experiment, we first apply two ultrashort (near-transform-limited) femtosecond pump and Stokes laser pulses to excite coherent molecular oscillations within a sample. After a short and controllable delay, we then apply a laser pulse that scatters off of these oscillations to produce the CARS signal. By making fine adjustments to the probe field spectral profile, we vary the relative phase between the Raman-resonant signal and the nonresonant background, and we observe a varying spectral interference pattern. These controlled variations of the measured pattern reveal the phase information within the Raman spectrum.

  1. Quantum coherent π-electron rotations in a non-planar chiral molecule induced by using a linearly polarized UV laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, Hirobumi; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    We propose an ultrafast quantum switching method of π-electron rotations, which are switched among four rotational patterns in a nonplanar chiral aromatic molecule (P)-2,2’- biphenol and perform the sequential switching among four rotational patterns which are performed by the overlapped pump-dump laser pulses. Coherent π-electron dynamics are generated by applying the linearly polarized UV pulse laser to create a pair of coherent quasidegenerated excited states. We also plot the time-dependent π-electron ring current, and discussed ring current transfer between two aromatic rings.

  2. Electric field control of donor pair diatomic molecules in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baena, Alejandra; Saraiva, Andre; Calderón, María J.; Koiller, Belita

    2015-03-01

    Single donors are well-established building blocks for engineering electronic properties of semiconductors, acting effectively as giant hydrogen atoms. Donor pairs, analogous to effective hydrogen molecules, were recently investigated in the strongly interacting regime in silicon. In this regime, electric field control renders timid results. Pairs that are more distant are more susceptible to external fields, and may harbour single electron charge control. Theoretically, the molecular quantum mechanics analogy between a donor pair and the H2 molecule in vacuum is not as straightforward as it may seem. A detailed understanding of the electronic structure of these molecular systems is a current challenge. We analyze the lowest energy states within effective mass theory, including central cell corrected donor potential effects and the conduction band multiplicity in Si. The spectrum of ionized donor pairs and its response to an external electric field will be presented. We contemplate possible advantages of heteropolar diatomic molecules, e.g, Sb -As pairs, as more efficient elements for such devices and applications.

  3. Optimal coherent control of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering: Signal enhancement and background elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fang; Shuang, Feng; Shi, Junhui; Rabitz, Herschel; Wang, Haifeng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2012-04-01

    The ability to enhance resonant signals and eliminate the non-resonant background is analyzed for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The analysis is done at a specific frequency as well as for broadband excitation using femtosecond pulse-shaping techniques. An appropriate objective functional is employed to balance resonant signal enhancement against non-resonant background suppression. Optimal enhancement of the signal and minimization of the background can be achieved by shaping the probe pulse alone while keeping the pump and Stokes pulses unshaped. In some cases analytical forms for the probe pulse can be found, and numerical simulations are carried out for other circumstances. It is found that a good approximate optimal solution for resonant signal enhancement in two-pulse CARS is a superposition of linear and arctangent-type phases for the pump. The well-known probe delay method is shown to be a quasi-optimal scheme for broadband background suppression. The results should provide a basis to improve the performance of CARS spectroscopy and microscopy.

  4. Coherent control with a short-wavelength free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, K. C.; Allaria, E.; Callegari, C.; Cucini, R.; de Ninno, G.; di Mitri, S.; Diviacco, B.; Ferrari, E.; Finetti, P.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.; Mahne, N.; Penco, G.; Plekan, O.; Raimondi, L.; Rebernik, P.; Roussel, E.; Svetina, C.; Trovò, M.; Zangrando, M.; Negro, M.; Carpeggiani, P.; Reduzzi, M.; Sansone, G.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Gryzlova, E. V.; Strakhova, S. I.; Bartschat, K.; Douguet, N.; Venzke, J.; Iablonskyi, D.; Kumagai, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ueda, K.; Fischer, A.; Coreno, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) produce short-wavelength pulses with high intensity, ultrashort duration, well-defined polarization and transverse coherence, and have been utilized for many experiments previously possible only at long wavelengths: multiphoton ionization, pumping an atomic laser and four-wave mixing spectroscopy. However one important optical technique, coherent control, has not yet been demonstrated, because self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs have limited longitudinal coherence. Single-colour pulses from the FERMI seeded FEL are longitudinally coherent, and two-colour emission is predicted to be coherent. Here, we demonstrate the phase correlation of two colours, and manipulate it to control an experiment. Light of wavelengths 63.0 and 31.5 nm ionized neon, and we controlled the asymmetry of the photoelectron angular distribution by adjusting the phase, with a temporal resolution of 3 as. This opens the door to new short-wavelength coherent control experiments with ultrahigh time resolution and chemical sensitivity.

  5. Coherent phonon control via electron-lattice interaction in ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul Hoon; Shim, Je-Ho; Lee, Kyung Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Dong Eon

    2016-03-01

    The manipulation of coherent phonons in condensed systems has attracted fundamental interest, particularly for its applications to future devices. We demonstrate that a coherent phonon in Co/Pt nano-multilayer can be quantitatively controlled via electron-lattice coupling, specifically by changing the multilayer repeat number. To that end, systematic measurement of the time-resolved reflectivity and magneto-optical Kerr effect in Co/Pt multilayers was performed. The coherent phonon frequency was observed to be shifted with the change of the multilayer repeat number. This shift could be clearly explained based on the two-temperature model. Detailed analysis indicated that the lattice heat capacity and electron-lattice coupling strength are linearly dependent on the repeat number of the periodic multilayer structures. Accessing the control of coherent phonons using nanostructures opens a new avenue for advanced phonon-engineering applications.

  6. Coherent phonon optics in a chip with an electrically controlled active device

    PubMed Central

    Poyser, Caroline L.; Akimov, Andrey V.; Campion, Richard P.; Kent, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Phonon optics concerns operations with high-frequency acoustic waves in solid media in a similar way to how traditional optics operates with the light beams (i.e. photons). Phonon optics experiments with coherent terahertz and sub-terahertz phonons promise a revolution in various technical applications related to high-frequency acoustics, imaging, and heat transport. Previously, phonon optics used passive methods for manipulations with propagating phonon beams that did not enable their external control. Here we fabricate a phononic chip, which includes a generator of coherent monochromatic phonons with frequency 378 GHz, a sensitive coherent phonon detector, and an active layer: a doped semiconductor superlattice, with electrical contacts, inserted into the phonon propagation path. In the experiments, we demonstrate the modulation of the coherent phonon flux by an external electrical bias applied to the active layer. Phonon optics using external control broadens the spectrum of prospective applications of phononics on the nanometer scale. PMID:25652241

  7. Coherent phonon control via electron-lattice interaction in ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Hoon; Shim, Je-Ho; Lee, Kyung Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Dong Eon

    2016-01-01

    The manipulation of coherent phonons in condensed systems has attracted fundamental interest, particularly for its applications to future devices. We demonstrate that a coherent phonon in Co/Pt nano-multilayer can be quantitatively controlled via electron-lattice coupling, specifically by changing the multilayer repeat number. To that end, systematic measurement of the time-resolved reflectivity and magneto-optical Kerr effect in Co/Pt multilayers was performed. The coherent phonon frequency was observed to be shifted with the change of the multilayer repeat number. This shift could be clearly explained based on the two-temperature model. Detailed analysis indicated that the lattice heat capacity and electron-lattice coupling strength are linearly dependent on the repeat number of the periodic multilayer structures. Accessing the control of coherent phonons using nanostructures opens a new avenue for advanced phonon-engineering applications. PMID:26928846

  8. Herbert P. Broida Prize Talk: Experimental realization of coherent control of molecular dynamics and chemical reactions with feedback-optimized laser pulses--Quantum Control of Femtochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Gustav

    2009-05-01

    By using coherent control techniques we control the behavior of quantum systems on their natural fs-time scale by applying ultrashort coherent light fields in the wavelength range from the IR to the UV. These laser pulses can be variably shaped in space and time using a laser pulse shaper consisting of a liquid-crystal display. [1] Laser-optimized femtochemistry in the gas phase and liquid phase is one field in which this new technique is successfully employed. Automated optimization of branching ratios and total product yields of gas phase photodissociation reactions as well as chemically selective molecular excitation in the liquid phase is performed [2][3]. Structural changes of a molecule in the liquid phase have been controlled by laser-optimized photoisomerization of a cyanine dye molecule [4] and of retinal in bacteriorhodopsin [5]. So far, optimal control techniques have been restricted to gas phase and condensed phase optimization experiments. Recently we have demonstrated femtosecond laser-assisted catalytic reactions on a Pd(100) single crystal surface. By applying a closed-loop optimal control scheme, we manipulate these reactions and selectively optimize the ratio of different bond-forming reaction channels, in contrast to previous quantum control experiments aiming at bond-cleavage. The results represent a first step towards selective photocatalysis of molecules. [4pt] [1] T. Baumert et al, Appl. Phys. B 65, 779 (1997)[0pt] [2] A. Assion et al, Science 282, 919(1998); T. Brixner et al, J. Mod. Opt. 50, 539 (2003)[0pt] [3] T. Brixner et al, Nature, Vol. 414, 57 (2001) and J. Chem. Phys. 118, 3692 (2003)[0pt] [4] G. Krampert et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 068305 (2005)[0pt] [5] G. Vogt et al, Chem. Phys. Lett. 433, 211 (2006) P. Nuernberger et al, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9, 2470 (2007)

  9. Coherent Control of the Effective Susceptibility through Wave Mixing in a Duplicated Two-Level System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, F. A.; Bouchene, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the coherent control of the effective susceptibility of a duplicated two-level system. The control is obtained for a linearly polarized weak field in the presence of a much stronger orthogonally polarized field. For small optical depths, the effective susceptibility χeff behaves as χline2iϕ (χlin is the linear susceptibility, ϕ the phase shift) allowing coherent control of the optical response. For large optical depths, χeff≈χlin*, turning an absorber into an amplifier without affecting the dispersion.

  10. Central Coherence in Typically Developing Preschoolers: Does It Cohere and Does It Relate to Mindreading and Executive Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellicano, Elizabeth; Maybery, Murray; Durkin, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Background: Frith and Happe (1994) describe central coherence (CC) as the normal tendency to integrate individual elements into a coherent whole, a cognitive style which varies in the general population. Individuals with autism are at the extreme (weak) end of the continuum of coherence. There has been debate over whether CC is independent from…

  11. Harvesting, Coupling, and Control of Single-Exciton Coherences in Photonic Waveguide Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermillod, Q.; Jakubczyk, T.; Delmonte, V.; Delga, A.; Peinke, E.; Gérard, J.-M.; Claudon, J.; Kasprzak, J.

    2016-04-01

    We perform coherent nonlinear spectroscopy of individual excitons strongly confined in single InAs quantum dots (QDs). The retrieval of their intrinsically weak four-wave mixing (FWM) response is enabled by a one-dimensional dielectric waveguide antenna. Compared to a similar QD embedded in bulk media, the FWM detection sensitivity is enhanced by up to 4 orders of magnitude, over a broad operation bandwidth. Three-beam FWM is employed to investigate coherence and population dynamics within individual QD transitions. We retrieve their homogenous dephasing in a presence of low-frequency spectral wandering. Two-dimensional FWM reveals off-resonant Förster coupling between a pair of distinct QDs embedded in the antenna. We also detect a higher order QD nonlinearity (six-wave mixing) and use it to coherently control the FWM transient. Waveguide antennas enable us to conceive multicolor coherent manipulation schemes of individual emitters.

  12. Harvesting, Coupling, and Control of Single-Exciton Coherences in Photonic Waveguide Antennas.

    PubMed

    Mermillod, Q; Jakubczyk, T; Delmonte, V; Delga, A; Peinke, E; Gérard, J-M; Claudon, J; Kasprzak, J

    2016-04-22

    We perform coherent nonlinear spectroscopy of individual excitons strongly confined in single InAs quantum dots (QDs). The retrieval of their intrinsically weak four-wave mixing (FWM) response is enabled by a one-dimensional dielectric waveguide antenna. Compared to a similar QD embedded in bulk media, the FWM detection sensitivity is enhanced by up to 4 orders of magnitude, over a broad operation bandwidth. Three-beam FWM is employed to investigate coherence and population dynamics within individual QD transitions. We retrieve their homogenous dephasing in a presence of low-frequency spectral wandering. Two-dimensional FWM reveals off-resonant Förster coupling between a pair of distinct QDs embedded in the antenna. We also detect a higher order QD nonlinearity (six-wave mixing) and use it to coherently control the FWM transient. Waveguide antennas enable us to conceive multicolor coherent manipulation schemes of individual emitters. PMID:27152807

  13. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy for live-cell quantitative phase imaging in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lostak, M.; Collakova, J.; Slaby, T.; Krizova, A.; Vesely, P.; Chmelik, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the coherence controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM)1 and its ability to image the living cells in turbid media2. The CCHM method and its advantages are introduced. A 'coherence gate effect'3, that enables imaging in turbid media, occurs owing to the low coherence illumination in our setup. The coherence gate effect is briefly theoretically explained and comparison of images with different illumination sources is shown. After that, the possibility of imaging in turbid media is applied to investigation of cell reactions to cytopathic turbid emulsions. In our experiments we used human cancer cells treated by biologically active phospholipids (BAPs). Cellular events leading to cell death, that would otherwise remain hidden in turbid media, are clearly observable and according to them cell fate can be deduced.

  14. Temperature-dependent remote control of polarization and coherence intensity with sender's pure initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'dman, E. B.; Kuznetsova, E. I.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    We study the remote creation of the polarization and intensity of the first-order coherence (or coherence intensity) in long spin-1/2 chains with one-qubit sender and receiver. Therewith we use a physically motivated initial condition with the pure state of the sender and the thermodynamical equilibrium state of the other nodes. The main part of the creatable region is a one-to-one map of the initial state (control) parameters, except the small subregion twice covered by the control parameters, which appears owing to the chosen initial state. The polarization and coherence intensity behave differently in the state creation process. In particular, the coherence intensity cannot reach any significant value unless the polarization is large in long chains (unlike the short ones), but the opposite is not true. The coherence intensity vanishes with an increase in the chain length, while the polarization (by absolute value) is not sensitive to this parameter. We represent several characteristics of the creatable polarization and coherence intensity and describe their relation to the parameters of the initial state. The link to the eigenvalue-eigenvector parametrization of the receiver's state space is given.

  15. Temperature-dependent remote control of polarization and coherence intensity with sender's pure initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'dman, E. B.; Kuznetsova, E. I.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    We study the remote creation of the polarization and intensity of the first-order coherence (or coherence intensity) in long spin-1/2 chains with one-qubit sender and receiver. Therewith we use a physically motivated initial condition with the pure state of the sender and the thermodynamical equilibrium state of the other nodes. The main part of the creatable region is a one-to-one map of the initial state (control) parameters, except the small subregion twice covered by the control parameters, which appears owing to the chosen initial state. The polarization and coherence intensity behave differently in the state creation process. In particular, the coherence intensity cannot reach any significant value unless the polarization is large in long chains (unlike the short ones), but the opposite is not true. The coherence intensity vanishes with an increase in the chain length, while the polarization (by absolute value) is not sensitive to this parameter. We represent several characteristics of the creatable polarization and coherence intensity and describe their relation to the parameters of the initial state. The link to the eigenvalue-eigenvector parametrization of the receiver's state space is given.

  16. How to control the coherent oscillations in Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg dynamics of three-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiao-Ke

    2016-02-01

    Coherent pulse is used to control and measure the quantum state of three-level system in double quantum dots. We analyze the coherent oscillations in Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg (LZS) dynamics by the adiabatic-impulse model, which simplifies the applied pulse as an optical interference device. Under the designed “hat-shape” pulse, the sweeping speed through each avoid crossing can be tuned independently. The coherent oscillations in LZS dynamics of three-level system are optimized by the control pulse. Moreover, we can filter out the coherent oscillations with the unexpected frequency and only keep the coherent oscillations with the frequency we are interested in.

  17. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PH x (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible.

  18. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PHx (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible. PMID:26894452

  19. Strong field coherent control of molecular torsions—Analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwell, Benjamin A.; Ramakrishna, S.; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-08-14

    We introduce analytical models of torsional alignment by moderately intense laser pulses that are applicable to the limiting cases of the torsional barrier heights. Using these models, we explore in detail the role that the laser intensity and pulse duration play in coherent torsional dynamics, addressing both experimental and theoretical concerns. Our results suggest strategies for minimizing the risk of off-resonant ionization, noting the qualitative differences between the case of torsional alignment subject to a field-free torsional barrier and that of torsional alignment of a barrier-less system (equivalent to a 2D rigid rotor). We also investigate several interesting torsional phenomena, including the onset of impulsive alignment of torsions, field-driven oscillations in quantum number space, and the disappearance of an alignment upper bound observed for a rigid rotor in the impulsive torsional alignment limit.

  20. Strong field coherent control of molecular torsions--Analytical models.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Benjamin A; Ramakrishna, S; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-08-14

    We introduce analytical models of torsional alignment by moderately intense laser pulses that are applicable to the limiting cases of the torsional barrier heights. Using these models, we explore in detail the role that the laser intensity and pulse duration play in coherent torsional dynamics, addressing both experimental and theoretical concerns. Our results suggest strategies for minimizing the risk of off-resonant ionization, noting the qualitative differences between the case of torsional alignment subject to a field-free torsional barrier and that of torsional alignment of a barrier-less system (equivalent to a 2D rigid rotor). We also investigate several interesting torsional phenomena, including the onset of impulsive alignment of torsions, field-driven oscillations in quantum number space, and the disappearance of an alignment upper bound observed for a rigid rotor in the impulsive torsional alignment limit. PMID:26277138

  1. Contribution of the Gouy phase to two-pathway coherent control of the photoionization and photodissociation of vinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Barge, Vishal J.; Gordon, Robert J.; Hu Zhan

    2008-12-28

    The electric field of a light wave accumulates a {pi} phase shift as it passes through a focus. We show here how this effect, known as the Gouy phase, may be used to control the branching ratio of a unimolecular reaction when the products are formed with different numbers of photons. We demonstrate this control method for the ionization and dissociation of vinyl chloride, using absorption of 177 and 532 nm photons to induce a pair of interfering paths. Excellent agreement between the observed and calculated phase shift as a function of the axial coordinate of the laser focus indicates that fragmentation occurs via a ladder switching mechanism. The axial dependence of the modulation depth is evidence of loss of coherence at higher internal temperatures of the molecule.

  2. Coherent Control of Optically Generated and Detected Picosecond Surface Acoustic Phonons

    SciTech Connect

    David H. Hurley

    2006-11-01

    Coherent control of elementary optical excitations is a key issue in ultrafast materials science. Manipulation of electronic and vibronic excitations in solids as well as chemical and biological systems on ultrafast time scales has attracted a great deal of attention recently. In semiconductors, coherent control of vibronic excitations has been demonstrated for bulk acoustic and optical phonons generated in superlattice structures. The bandwidth of these approaches is typically fully utilized by employing a 1-D geometry where the laser spot size is much larger than the superlattice repeat length. In this presentation we demonstrate coherent control of optically generated picosecond surface acoustic waves using sub-optical wavelength absorption gratings. The generation and detection characteristics of two material systems are investigated (aluminum absorption gratings on Si and GaAs substrates).

  3. Coherent Control to Prepare an InAs Quantum Dot for Spin-Photon Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, L. A.; Truex, K.; Duan, L.-M.; Steel, D. G.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.; Sham, L. J.

    2014-03-01

    We optically generated an electronic state in a single InAs /GaAs self-assembled quantum dot that is a precursor to the deterministic entanglement of the spin of the electron with an emitted photon in the proposal of W. Yao, R.-B. Liu, and L. J. Sham [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 030504 (2005).]. A superposition state is prepared by optical pumping to a pure state followed by an initial pulse. By modulating the subsequent pulse arrival times and precisely controlling them using interferometric measurement of path length differences, we are able to implement a coherent control technique to selectively drive exactly one of the two components of the superposition to the ground state. This optical transition contingent on spin was driven with the same broadband pulses that created the superposition through the use of a two pulse coherent control sequence. A final pulse affords measurement of the coherence of this "preentangled" state.

  4. Coherent control to prepare an InAs quantum dot for spin-photon entanglement.

    PubMed

    Webster, L A; Truex, K; Duan, L-M; Steel, D G; Bracker, A S; Gammon, D; Sham, L J

    2014-03-28

    We optically generated an electronic state in a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot that is a precursor to the deterministic entanglement of the spin of the electron with an emitted photon in the proposal of W. Yao, R.-B. Liu, and L. J. Sham [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 030504 (2005). A superposition state is prepared by optical pumping to a pure state followed by an initial pulse. By modulating the subsequent pulse arrival times and precisely controlling them using interferometric measurement of path length differences, we are able to implement a coherent control technique to selectively drive exactly one of the two components of the superposition to the ground state. This optical transition contingent on spin was driven with the same broadband pulses that created the superposition through the use of a two pulse coherent control sequence. A final pulse affords measurement of the coherence of this "preentangled" state. PMID:24724666

  5. Electronic control of coherence in a two-dimensional array of photonic crystal surface emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J E; Childs, D T D; Ivanov, P; Stevens, B J; Babazadeh, N; Crombie, A J; Ternent, G; Thoms, S; Zhou, H; Hogg, R A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a semiconductor PCSEL array that uniquely combines an in-plane waveguide structure with nano-scale patterned PCSEL elements. This novel geometry allows two-dimensional electronically controllable coherent coupling of remote vertically emitting lasers. Mutual coherence of the PCSEL elements is verified through the demonstration of a two-dimensional Young's Slits experiment. In addition to allowing the all-electronic control of the interference pattern, this type of device offers new routes to power and brightness scaling in semiconductor lasers, and opportunities for all-electronic beam steering. PMID:26289621

  6. Electronic control of coherence in a two-dimensional array of photonic crystal surface emitting lasers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R. J. E.; Childs, D. T. D.; Ivanov, P.; Stevens, B. J.; Babazadeh, N.; Crombie, A. J.; Ternent, G.; Thoms, S.; Zhou, H.; Hogg, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a semiconductor PCSEL array that uniquely combines an in-plane waveguide structure with nano-scale patterned PCSEL elements. This novel geometry allows two-dimensional electronically controllable coherent coupling of remote vertically emitting lasers. Mutual coherence of the PCSEL elements is verified through the demonstration of a two-dimensional Young’s Slits experiment. In addition to allowing the all-electronic control of the interference pattern, this type of device offers new routes to power and brightness scaling in semiconductor lasers, and opportunities for all-electronic beam steering. PMID:26289621

  7. Cell cycle control of DNA joint molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Wild, Philipp; Matos, Joao

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of stable interactions between chromosomes underpins vital cellular processes such as recombinational DNA repair and bipolar chromosome segregation. On the other hand, timely disengagement of persistent connections is necessary to assure efficient partitioning of the replicated genome prior to cell division. Whereas great progress has been made in defining how cohesin-mediated chromosomal interactions are disengaged as cells prepare to undergo chromosome segregation, little is known about the metabolism of DNA joint molecules (JMs), generated during the repair of chromosomal lesions. Recent work on Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1, two conserved structure-selective endonucleases, revealed unforeseen links between JM-processing and cell cycle progression. Cell cycle kinases and phosphatases control Mus81 and Yen1/GEN1 to restrain deleterious JM-processing during S-phase, while safeguarding chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:26970388

  8. Controlling spins in adsorbed molecules by a chemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Chylarecka, Dorota; Kleibert, Armin; Müller, Kathrin; Iacovita, Cristian; Nolting, Frithjof; Jung, Thomas A.; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2010-01-01

    The development of chemical systems with switchable molecular spins could lead to the architecture of materials with controllable magnetic or spintronic properties. Here, we present conclusive evidence that the spin of an organometallic molecule coupled to a ferromagnetic substrate can be switched between magnetic off and on states by a chemical stimulus. This is achieved by nitric oxide (NO) functioning as an axial ligand of cobalt(II)tetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP) ferromagnetically coupled to nickel thin-film (Ni(001)). On NO addition, the coordination sphere of Co2+ is modified and a NO–CoTPP nitrosyl complex is formed, which corresponds to an off state of the Co spin. Thermal dissociation of NO from the nitrosyl complex restores the on state of the Co spin. The NO-induced reversible off–on switching of surface-adsorbed molecular spins observed here is attributed to a spin trans effect. PMID:20975713

  9. Optical control of nonradiative decay in polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, Maxim; Seideman, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    We propose an approach for elimination of radiationless transitions in the excited states of polyatomic molecules. Our method is based on the concept of electronically localized eigenstates of coupled vibronic Hamiltonians--the occurrence of stationary eigenfunctions of essentially pure electronic character in the (otherwise strongly mixed) spectra of excited manifold Hamiltonians of systems undergoing nonradiative decay. The origin of this phenomenon and its generality are explained within the framework of the theory of scars of unstable periodic orbits. Optimal control theory is combined with the notion of electronically localized states to prepare the system in an excited superposition that is immune to nonradiative decay. The approach is applied to suppress ultrafast radiationless transitions in two model systems that differ widely in coupling strength and electronic structure.

  10. Enabling coherent control of trapped ions with economical multi-laser frequency stabilization technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybarger, Warren Emanuel, Jr.

    A phase-locked scanning stability transfer cavity (SSTC) for transferring the absolute frequency stability of an iodine referenced He-Ne (master) laser to three otherwise uncalibrated (slave) lasers (at 844, 1033, & 1092 nm) of a trapped-Sr+ quantum information processing (QIP) apparatus is described. When locked, the 422 nm frequency-doubled Doppler-cooling laser exhibits an error of <1 MHz RMS for several hours, and similar stability is achieved with the other slave lasers. When unlocked, each slave laser drifts by a large fraction (or more) of the corresponding transition linewidth in minutes, thus making reliable laser cooling, ion state readout, and execution of QIP algorithms practically infeasible. The SSTC makes coherent control of Sr+ possible by addressing this problem, and the QIP apparatus is now sufficiently stable for single user operation. New single-ion experimental capabilities include ground state cooling, high-fidelity Rabi flopping, Ramsey interferometry, and sympathetic cooling of 88Sr+( 86Sr+) with 86Sr+( 88Sr+). A 2.5 msec coherence time has been achieved with the optical quoit encoded in a |5 2S 1/2> ↔ |4 2D5/2> quadrupole transition, a precision measurement of the isotope shift of the qubit transition in 86Sr+ relative to 88Sr+ is reported, and a single-ion heating rate consistent with results throughout the trapped-ion community is reported. The SSTC is simple to implement, uses no custom optics, and it has a higher scanning rate than previously demonstrated SSTC's. Phase-locked SSTC's are shown to have an advantage over the more common displacement-locked SSTC in the low finesse regime, and they are an attractive alternative to passively stable but complex optical references and diode lasers designed to address the same problem. The SSTC is useful in spectroscopic applications with other ion species, atoms, and molecules, in general. An appendix is dedicated to describing in detail an advanced trapped-ion quantum processor concept

  11. Complete Coherent Control of a Quantum Dot Strongly Coupled to a Nanocavity

    PubMed Central

    Dory, Constantin; Fischer, Kevin A.; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Sarmiento, Tomas; Rundquist, Armand; Zhang, Jingyuan L.; Kelaita, Yousif; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Strongly coupled quantum dot-cavity systems provide a non-linear configuration of hybridized light-matter states with promising quantum-optical applications. Here, we investigate the coherent interaction between strong laser pulses and quantum dot-cavity polaritons. Resonant excitation of polaritonic states and their interaction with phonons allow us to observe coherent Rabi oscillations and Ramsey fringes. Furthermore, we demonstrate complete coherent control of a quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity based quantum-bit. By controlling the excitation power and phase in a two-pulse excitation scheme we achieve access to the full Bloch sphere. Quantum-optical simulations are in good agreement with our experiments and provide insight into the decoherence mechanisms. PMID:27112420

  12. Complete Coherent Control of a Quantum Dot Strongly Coupled to a Nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Dory, Constantin; Fischer, Kevin A; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Sarmiento, Tomas; Rundquist, Armand; Zhang, Jingyuan L; Kelaita, Yousif; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Strongly coupled quantum dot-cavity systems provide a non-linear configuration of hybridized light-matter states with promising quantum-optical applications. Here, we investigate the coherent interaction between strong laser pulses and quantum dot-cavity polaritons. Resonant excitation of polaritonic states and their interaction with phonons allow us to observe coherent Rabi oscillations and Ramsey fringes. Furthermore, we demonstrate complete coherent control of a quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity based quantum-bit. By controlling the excitation power and phase in a two-pulse excitation scheme we achieve access to the full Bloch sphere. Quantum-optical simulations are in good agreement with our experiments and provide insight into the decoherence mechanisms. PMID:27112420

  13. Coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.-H.; Hou, B.; Gao, G.; Nees, J. A.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Lebailly, V.; Clarke, R.

    2015-05-15

    Plasmas generated by an intense laser pulse can support coherent structures such as large amplitude wakefield that can affect the outcome of an experiment. We investigate the coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation using a deformable mirror. The experimental outcome is directly used as feedback in an evolutionary algorithm for optimization of the phase front of the driving laser pulse. In this paper, we applied this method to two different experiments: (i) acceleration of electrons in laser driven plasma waves and (ii) self-compression of optical pulses induced by ionization nonlinearity. The manipulation of the laser wavefront leads to orders of magnitude improvement to electron beam properties such as the peak charge, beam divergence, and transverse emittance. The demonstration of coherent control for plasmas opens new possibilities for future laser-based accelerators and their applications.

  14. Coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Hou, B.; Gao, G.; Lebailly, V.; Nees, J. A.; Clarke, R.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmas generated by an intense laser pulse can support coherent structures such as large amplitude wakefield that can affect the outcome of an experiment. We investigate the coherent control of plasma dynamics by feedback-optimized wavefront manipulation using a deformable mirror. The experimental outcome is directly used as feedback in an evolutionary algorithm for optimization of the phase front of the driving laser pulse. In this paper, we applied this method to two different experiments: (i) acceleration of electrons in laser driven plasma waves and (ii) self-compression of optical pulses induced by ionization nonlinearity. The manipulation of the laser wavefront leads to orders of magnitude improvement to electron beam properties such as the peak charge, beam divergence, and transverse emittance. The demonstration of coherent control for plasmas opens new possibilities for future laser-based accelerators and their applications.

  15. Complete Coherent Control of a Quantum Dot Strongly Coupled to a Nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dory, Constantin; Fischer, Kevin A.; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Sarmiento, Tomas; Rundquist, Armand; Zhang, Jingyuan L.; Kelaita, Yousif; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-04-01

    Strongly coupled quantum dot-cavity systems provide a non-linear configuration of hybridized light-matter states with promising quantum-optical applications. Here, we investigate the coherent interaction between strong laser pulses and quantum dot-cavity polaritons. Resonant excitation of polaritonic states and their interaction with phonons allow us to observe coherent Rabi oscillations and Ramsey fringes. Furthermore, we demonstrate complete coherent control of a quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity based quantum-bit. By controlling the excitation power and phase in a two-pulse excitation scheme we achieve access to the full Bloch sphere. Quantum-optical simulations are in good agreement with our experiments and provide insight into the decoherence mechanisms.

  16. Coherent control in quantum dot gain media using shaped pulses: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Akhilesh Kumar; Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi

    2015-11-16

    We present a numerical study of coherent control in a room temperature InAs/InP quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) using shaped ultra-short pulses. Both the gain and absorption regimes were analyzed for pulses with central wavelengths lying on either side of the inhomogeneously broadened gain spectrum. The numerical experiments predict that in the gain regime the coherent interactions between a QD SOA and a pulse can be controlled by incorporating a quadratic spectral phase (QSP) in the pulse profile. The sequential interaction with the gain medium of different spectral components of the pulse results in either suppression or enhancement of the coherent signatures on the pulse profile depending upon their proximity to the gain spectrum peak. In the absorption regime, positive QSP induces a negative chirp that adds up to that of a two photon absorption induced Kerr-like effect resulting in pulse compression while negative QSP enhances dispersive broadening of the pulse. PMID:26698476

  17. Optimal nonlinear coherent mode transitions in Bose-Einstein condensates utilizing spatiotemporal controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Yan, Julia; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-05-01

    Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) offer the potential to examine quantum behavior at large length and time scales, as well as forming promising candidates for quantum technology applications. Thus, the manipulation of BECs using control fields is a topic of prime interest. We consider BECs in the mean-field model of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE), which contains linear and nonlinear features, both of which are subject to control. In this work we report successful optimal control simulations of a one-dimensional GPE by modulation of the linear and nonlinear terms to stimulate transitions into excited coherent modes. The linear and nonlinear controls are allowed to freely vary over space and time to seek their optimal forms. The determination of the excited coherent modes targeted for optimization is numerically performed through an adaptive imaginary time propagation method. Numerical simulations are performed for optimal control of mode-to-mode transitions between the ground coherent mode and the excited modes of a BEC trapped in a harmonic well. The results show greater than 99 % success for nearly all trials utilizing reasonable initial guesses for the controls, and analysis of the optimal controls reveals primarily direct transitions between initial and target modes. The success of using solely the nonlinearity term as a control opens up further research toward exploring novel control mechanisms inaccessible to linear Schrödinger-type systems.

  18. Coherently controlled adiabatic passage to multiple continuum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2006-09-15

    We present a solution to the multichannel quantum control problem, where selective and complete population transfer from an initial bound state to M energetically degenerate continuum channels is achieved under loss-free conditions. The control is affected by adiabatic passage proceeding via N bound intermediate states, where even in the presence of real loss from these states, the control efficiency remains significant, about 40-50%. We illustrate the viability of the method by computationally controlling the CH{sub 3}(v)+I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})<-CH{sub 3}I{yields}CH{sub 3}(v)+I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) multichannel photodissociation process.

  19. Coherent control of the waveforms of recoilless γ-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Vagizov, Farit; Antonov, Vladimir; Radeonychev, Y V; Shakhmuratov, R N; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2014-04-01

    The concepts and ideas of coherent, nonlinear and quantum optics have been extended to photon energies in the range of 10-100 kiloelectronvolts, corresponding to soft γ-ray radiation (the term used when the radiation is produced in nuclear transitions) or, equivalently, hard X-ray radiation (the term used when the radiation is produced by electron motion). The recent experimental achievements in this energy range include the demonstration of parametric down-conversion in the Langevin regime, electromagnetically induced transparency in a cavity, the collective Lamb shift, vacuum-assisted generation of atomic coherences and single-photon revival in nuclear absorbing multilayer structures. Also, realization of single-photon coherent storage and stimulated Raman adiabatic passage were recently proposed in this regime. More related work is discussed in a recent review. However, the number of tools for the coherent manipulation of interactions between γ-ray photons and nuclear ensembles remains limited. Here we suggest and implement an efficient method to control the waveforms of γ-ray photons coherently. In particular, we demonstrate the conversion of individual recoilless γ-ray photons into a coherent, ultrashort pulse train and into a double pulse. Our method is based on the resonant interaction of γ-ray photons with an ensemble of nuclei with a resonant transition frequency that is periodically modulated in time. The frequency modulation, which is achieved by a uniform vibration of the resonant absorber, owing to the Doppler effect, renders resonant absorption and dispersion both time dependent, allowing us to shape the waveforms of the incident γ-ray photons. We expect that this technique will lead to advances in the emerging fields of coherent and quantum γ-ray photon optics, providing a basis for the realization of γ-ray-photon/nuclear-ensemble interfaces and quantum interference effects at nuclear γ-ray transitions. PMID:24670656

  20. Electroencephalographic coherence in Alzheimer's disease: comparisons with a control group and population norms.

    PubMed

    Knott, V; Mohr, E; Mahoney, C; Ilivitsky, V

    2000-01-01

    Previous research from independent laboratories has shown reduced electroencephalographic coherence in patients diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). This study added to this work by comparing interhemispheric and intrahemispheric coherence in nonmedicated DAT patients (n = 35) with that of a normal control group (n = 30), as well as with a data bank of population norms. Raw and Z-score transformed values showed reduced coherence, interhemispherically (in delta, theta, alpha, and beta bands) and intrahemispherically (delta and theta bands) in DAT patients with both comparison procedures. Discriminant analysis correctly classified 73% to 75% of patients. The results are discussed in relation to earlier research, "trait" versus "state" factors, the cholinergic system, and cognitive processes in dementia. PMID:10753001

  1. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet

    PubMed Central

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose–Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport. PMID:26852803

  2. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport.

  3. Coherent spin control of a nanocavity-enhanced qubit in diamond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Luozhou; Lu, Ming; Schroder, Tim; Chen, Edward H.; Walsh, Michael; Bayn, Igal; Goldstein, Jordan; Gaathon, Ophir; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Mower, Jacob; et al

    2015-01-28

    A central aim of quantum information processing is the efficient entanglement of multiple stationary quantum memories via photons. Among solid-state systems, the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond has emerged as an excellent optically addressable memory with second-scale electron spin coherence times. Recently, quantum entanglement and teleportation have been shown between two nitrogen-vacancy memories, but scaling to larger networks requires more efficient spin-photon interfaces such as optical resonators. Here we report such nitrogen-vacancy nanocavity systems in strong Purcell regime with optical quality factors approaching 10,000 and electron spin coherence times exceeding 200 µs using a silicon hard-mask fabrication process. This spin-photon interfacemore » is integrated with on-chip microwave striplines for coherent spin control, providing an efficient quantum memory for quantum networks.« less

  4. Coherent spin control of a nanocavity-enhanced qubit in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Luozhou; Lu, Ming; Schroder, Tim; Chen, Edward H.; Walsh, Michael; Bayn, Igal; Goldstein, Jordan; Gaathon, Ophir; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Mower, Jacob; Cotlet, Mircea; Markham, Matthew L.; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-28

    A central aim of quantum information processing is the efficient entanglement of multiple stationary quantum memories via photons. Among solid-state systems, the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond has emerged as an excellent optically addressable memory with second-scale electron spin coherence times. Recently, quantum entanglement and teleportation have been shown between two nitrogen-vacancy memories, but scaling to larger networks requires more efficient spin-photon interfaces such as optical resonators. Here we report such nitrogen-vacancy nanocavity systems in strong Purcell regime with optical quality factors approaching 10,000 and electron spin coherence times exceeding 200 µs using a silicon hard-mask fabrication process. This spin-photon interface is integrated with on-chip microwave striplines for coherent spin control, providing an efficient quantum memory for quantum networks.

  5. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet.

    PubMed

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport. PMID:26852803

  6. Coherent spin control of a nanocavity-enhanced qubit in diamond.

    PubMed

    Li, Luozhou; Schröder, Tim; Chen, Edward H; Walsh, Michael; Bayn, Igal; Goldstein, Jordan; Gaathon, Ophir; Trusheim, Matthew E; Lu, Ming; Mower, Jacob; Cotlet, Mircea; Markham, Matthew L; Twitchen, Daniel J; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    A central aim of quantum information processing is the efficient entanglement of multiple stationary quantum memories via photons. Among solid-state systems, the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond has emerged as an excellent optically addressable memory with second-scale electron spin coherence times. Recently, quantum entanglement and teleportation have been shown between two nitrogen-vacancy memories, but scaling to larger networks requires more efficient spin-photon interfaces such as optical resonators. Here we report such nitrogen-vacancy-nanocavity systems in the strong Purcell regime with optical quality factors approaching 10,000 and electron spin coherence times exceeding 200 μs using a silicon hard-mask fabrication process. This spin-photon interface is integrated with on-chip microwave striplines for coherent spin control, providing an efficient quantum memory for quantum networks. PMID:25629223

  7. Multi-wave coherent control of a solid-state single emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fras, F.; Mermillod, Q.; Nogues, G.; Hoarau, C.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Langbein, W.; Kasprzak, J.

    2016-03-01

    Coherent control of individual two-level systems is at the heart of any quantum information protocol. In solids, two-level systems generated by bound electron-hole excitonic states, trapped in semiconductor quantum dots, display a robust coupling with light, enabling their optical manipulation via avant-garde approaches of nonlinear spectroscopy. Here, we develop a novel toolbox for coherent control of a quantum dot exciton based on the nonlinear wave-mixing responses, which are enhanced by a photonic nanostructure. By employing three, short, resonant laser pulses, we show that we can manipulate, at will, the intrinsic coherence of the quantum dot dipole and therefore engineer the spectro-temporal shape of its coherent emission. Multi-pulse quantum control sequences, which have been successful in NMR spectroscopy and quantum computation, can now be applied to optically active solid-state quantum bits with application in high-order nonlinear spectroscopy, ultrafast quantum optoelectronics and spread spectrum technology at the single emitter level.

  8. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph H; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2011-11-18

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  9. Small-molecule control of protein degradation using split adaptors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted intracellular degradation provides a method to study the biological function of proteins and has numerous applications in biotechnology. One promising approach uses adaptor proteins to target substrates with genetically encoded degradation tags for proteolysis. Here, we describe an engineered split-adaptor system, in which adaptor assembly and delivery of substrates to the ClpXP protease depends on a small molecule (rapamycin). This degradation system does not require modification of endogenous proteases, functions robustly over a wide range of adaptor concentrations, and does not require new synthesis of adaptors or proteases to initiate degradation. We demonstrate the efficacy of this system in E. coli by degrading tagged variants of LacI repressor and FtsA, an essential cell-division protein. In the latter case, addition of rapamycin causes pronounced filamentation because daughter cells cannot divide. Strikingly, washing rapamycin away reverses this phenotype. Our system is highly modular, with clearly-defined interfaces for substrate binding, protease binding, and adaptor assembly, providing a clear path to extend this system to other degradation tags, proteases, or induction systems. Together, these new reagents should be useful in controlling protein degradation in bacteria. PMID:21866931

  10. Weak-field multiphoton femtosecond coherent control in the single-cycle regime.

    PubMed

    Chuntonov, Lev; Fleischer, Avner; Amitay, Zohar

    2011-03-28

    Weak-field coherent phase control of atomic non-resonant multiphoton excitation induced by shaped femtosecond pulses is studied theoretically in the single-cycle regime. The carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the pulse, which in the multi-cycle regime does not play any control role, is shown here to be a new effective control parameter that its effect is highly sensitive to the spectral position of the ultrabroad spectrum. Rationally chosen position of the ultrabroadband spectrum coherently induces several groups of multiphoton transitions from the ground state to the excited state of the system: transitions involving only absorbed photons as well as Raman transitions involving both absorbed and emitted photons. The intra-group interference is controlled by the relative spectral phase of the different frequency components of the pulse, while the inter-group interference is controlled jointly by the CEP and the relative spectral phase. Specifically, non-resonant two- and three-photon excitation is studied in a simple model system within the perturbative frequency-domain framework. The developed intuition is then applied to weak-field multiphoton excitation of atomic cesium (Cs), where the simplified model is verified by non-perturbative numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We expect this work to serve as a basis for a new line of femtosecond coherent control experiments. PMID:21451714

  11. Controlled Orientation of Polyconjugated Guest Molecules in Tunable Host Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Soegiarto, Airon C.; Comotti, Angiolina; Ward, Michael D.

    2010-12-07

    Linear conjugated guest molecules with high aspect ratios form inclusion compounds with guanidinium organodisulfonate (GDS) host frameworks in which organodisulfonate 'pillars' connect opposing GS sheets to generate lamellar architectures that reflect templating by the guest. Through judicious selection of pillars having adjustable lengths (l{sub S-S}, as measured by the separation between distal sulfur atoms) and guests of various lengths (l{sub g}), the framework architecture can be controlled systematically in a manner that enables regulation of the guest orientation and aggregation in the host framework. Inclusion compounds for which l{sub g}/l{sub S-S} {le} 0.9 exhibit a bilayer architecture with 1-D channels containing guests oriented parallel to the long axis of the pillar. Guests with values of l{sub g} comparable to l{sub S-S}, however, promote the formation of a brick architecture in which the guests and the pillar are arranged in a herringbone motif. Surprisingly, longer guests (l{sub g} = 1.25l{sub S-S}) favor the formation of the bilayer architecture despite their larger volume because the guests are forced to align end-to-end as single-file arrays due to the vertical constraints of the 1-D channels. Bithiophene and biphenyl guests (l{sub g} < l{sub S-S}) are exceptional, promoting bilayer structures in which turnstile rotations of the pillars afford an unusual motif in which the guests are isolated from one another. The ability to synthesize a large family of compounds based on a common supramolecular building block (the GS sheet) permits construction of a structural 'phase diagram' based on two simple molecular parameters, l{sub g} and l{sub S-S}, that can be used to sort the inclusion compounds according to their framework architectures and enable prediction of crystal structures for new host-guest combinations. The effects of these different framework architectures and packing motifs is manifested as bathochromic shifts in the absorption and

  12. Theory of nonlinear phononics for coherent light control of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Alaska; Cavalleri, Andrea; Georges, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    We present a microscopic theory for ultrafast control of solids with high-intensity terahertz frequency optical pulses. When resonant with selected infrared-active vibrations, these pulses transiently modify the crystal structure and lead to new collective electronic properties. The theory predicts the dynamical path taken by the crystal lattice using first-principles calculations of the energy surface and classical equations of motion, as well as symmetry considerations. Two classes of dynamics are identified. In the perturbative regime, displacements along the normal mode coordinate of symmetry-preserving Raman active modes can be achieved by cubic anharmonicities. This explains the light-induced insulator-to-metal transition reported experimentally in manganites. We predict a regime in which ultrafast instabilities that break crystal symmetry can be induced. This nonperturbative effect involves a quartic anharmonic coupling and occurs above a critical threshold, below which the nonlinear dynamics of the driven mode displays softening and dynamical stabilization.

  13. Inverse Doppler shift and control field as coherence generators for the stability in superluminal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, Fazal; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Khan, Salman

    2015-05-01

    A gain-based four-level atomic medium for the stability in superluminal light propagation using control field and inverse Doppler shift as coherence generators is studied. In regimes of weak and strong control field, a broadband and multiple controllable transparency windows are, respectively, identified with significantly enhanced group indices. The observed Doppler effect for the class of high atomic velocity of the medium is counterintuitive in comparison to the effect of the class of low atomic velocity. The intensity of each of the two pump fields is kept less than the optimum limit reported in [M. D. Stenner and D. J. Gauthier, Phys. Rev. A 67, 063801 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.063801] for stability in the superluminal light pulse. Consequently, superluminal stable domains with the generated coherence are explored.

  14. Optimal control of the population dynamics of the ground vibrational state of a polyatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Clercq, Ludwig E.; Botha, Lourens R.; Rohwer, Erich G.; Uys, Hermann; Du Plessis, Anton

    2011-03-01

    Simulating coherent control with femtosecond pulses on a polyatomic molecule with anharmonic splitting was demonstrated. The simulation mimicked pulse shaping of a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) and the interaction was described with the Von Neumann equation. A transform limited pulse with a fluence of 600 J/m2 produced 18% of the population in an arbitrarily chosen upper vibrational state, n =2. Phase only and amplitude only shaped pulse produced optimum values of 60% and 40% respectively, of the population in the vibrational state, n=2, after interaction with the ultra short pulse. The combination of phase and amplitude shaping produced the best results, 80% of the population was in the targeted vibrational state, n=2, after interaction. These simulations were carried out with all the population initially in the ground vibrational level. It was found that even at room temperatures (300 Kelvin) that the population in the selected level is comparable with the case where all population is initially in the ground vibrational state. With a 10% noise added to the amplitude and phase masks, selective excitation of the targeted vibrational state is still possible.

  15. Control of anisotropic interactions with microwaves in ultracold NaK molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zoe; Loh, Huanqian; Park, Jee Woo; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules offer long range anisotropic interactions, which can provide access to novel phases of condensed matter physics. The recent creation of fermionic NaK polar molecules in the ground hyperfine-rovibronic state, which is chemically stable, demonstrates an important step towards the study of new dipolar physics. To engineer dipolar interactions between molecules with large electric dipole moments, one can apply microwaves to mix the lowest and first excited rotational states. Hyperfine interaction in the first excited rotational state mixes nuclear spin and rotation, leading to states with rich character, which we map out by performing microwave spectroscopy. The admixed hyperfine character serves as a tool to engineer wide ranges of ``magic'' trap polarization angles, at which the lowest and first excited rotational states have matching polarizabilities. Finally, we demonstrate that we can access large dipole moments by coherently dressing the molecules with microwaves.

  16. Complete photoionization experiments via ultrafast coherent control with polarization multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Hockett, P; Wollenhaupt, M; Lux, C; Baumert, T

    2014-06-01

    Photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) obtained from ionization of potassium atoms using moderately intense femtosecond IR fields (∼10^{12}  W cm^{-2}) of various polarization states are shown to provide a route to "complete" photoionization experiments. Ionization occurs by a net three-photon absorption process, driven via the 4s→4p resonance at the one-photon level. A theoretical treatment incorporating the intrapulse electronic dynamics allows for a full set of ionization matrix elements to be extracted from 2D imaging data. 3D PADs generated from the extracted matrix elements are also compared to experimental, tomographically reconstructed, 3D photoelectron distributions, providing a sensitive test of their validity. Finally, application of the determined matrix elements to ionization via more complex, polarization-shaped, pulses is demonstrated, illustrating the utility of this methodology towards detailed understanding of complex ionization control schemes and suggesting the utility of such "multiplexed" intrapulse processes as powerful tools for measurement. PMID:24949763

  17. Quantum Coherent Feedback Control for Generation System of Optical Entangled State

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaojun; Li, Fang; Yu, Juan; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2015-01-01

    The non-measurement based coherent feedback control (CFC) is a control method without introducing any backaction noise into the controlled system, thus is specially suitable to manipulate various quantum optical systems for preparing nonclassical states of light. By simply tuning the transmissivity of an optical controller in a CFC loop attached to a non-degenerate optical parametric amplifier (NOPA), the quantum entanglement degree of the output optical entangled state of the system is improved. At the same time, the threshold pump power of the NOPA is reduced also. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with the theoretical expectation. PMID:26047357

  18. Nonresonant coherent control: Intersubband excitations manipulated by a nonresonant terahertz pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folpini, Giulia; Morrill, Drew; Somma, Carmine; Reimann, Klaus; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas; Biermann, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    We present an approach for controlling quantum coherences in condensed matter by interaction with a nonresonant optical control field. Coherent intersubband (IS) excitations of electrons in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells are manipulated by a strong nonresonant terahertz (THz) field as demonstrated by phase-resolved two-color two-dimensional spectroscopy. In the linear regime of IS response, we observe a THz-induced enhancement of the midinfrared (MIR) IS absorption and a dispersive perturbed free induction decay caused by a THz-induced blueshift of the IS polarization. In the regime of IS Rabi oscillations, the THz field causes pronounced phase shifts of the coherently emitted MIR field, while the IS Rabi frequency remains unaffected. Such behavior is accounted for by a full solution of the Maxwell-Bloch equations, treating the THz and MIR fields without approximations. Our control scheme paves the way for THz control of IS emitters and holds potential for an extension to other systems.

  19. Investigating the Use of Coherence Analysis on Mandibular Electromyograms to Investigate Neural Control of Early Oromandibular Behaviours: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeve, Roger W.; Price, Christiana M.

    2010-01-01

    An empirical method for investigating differences in neural control of jaw movement across oromandibular behaviours is to compute the coherence function for electromyographic signals obtained from mandibular muscle groups. This procedure has been used with adults but not extended to children. This pilot study investigated if coherence analysis…

  20. Optical Realization of Double-Continuum Fano Interference and Coherent Control in Plasmonic Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arju, Nihal; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Khanikaev, Alexander; Purtseladze, David; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-06-01

    Classical realization of a ubiquitous quantum mechanical phenomenon of double-continuum Fano interference using metasurfaces is experimentally demonstrated by engineering the near-field interaction between two bright and one dark plasmonic modes. The competition between the bright modes, one of them effectively suppressing the Fano interference for the orthogonal light polarization, is discovered. Coherent control of optical energy concentration and light absorption by the ellipticity of the incident light is theoretically predicted.

  1. Optical Realization of Double-Continuum Fano Interference and Coherent Control in Plasmonic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Arju, Nihal; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Khanikaev, Alexander; Purtseladze, David; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-06-12

    Classical realization of a ubiquitous quantum mechanical phenomenon of double-continuum Fano interference using metasurfaces is experimentally demonstrated by engineering the near-field interaction between two bright and one dark plasmonic modes. The competition between the bright modes, one of them effectively suppressing the Fano interference for the orthogonal light polarization, is discovered. Coherent control of optical energy concentration and light absorption by the ellipticity of the incident light is theoretically predicted. PMID:26196826

  2. Controllable optical bistability and multistability in asymmetric double quantum wells via spontaneously generated coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuan; Deng, Li; Chen, Aixi

    2015-02-15

    We investigate the nonlinear optical phenomena of the optical bistability and multistability via spontaneously generated coherence in an asymmetric double quantum well structure coupled by a weak probe field and a controlling field. It is shown that the threshold and hysteresis cycle of the optical bistability can be conveniently controlled only by adjusting the intensity of the SGC or the controlling field. Moreover, switching between optical bistability and multistability can be achieved. These studies may have practical significance for the preparation of optical bistable switching device.

  3. The Development of the Undulator Controls Module at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, A.D.; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    The Linac Coherent Light Source, LCLS, at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SNAL, is the first hard x-ray Free Electron Laser. The Undulator Controls Module, UCM, controls five cams and two translation stages that regulate the position of each of the 33 permanent undulator magnet segments within 10 microns. The UCM package, hardware and software, was designed and built by the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne. Important lessons were learned throughout the collaborative design, installation, testing, and commissioning periods that could be invaluable to future similar controls projects.

  4. Coherent control of radiation patterns of nonlinear multiphoton processes in nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Papoff, Francesco; McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the coherent control of light waves and currents in metallic nanospheres which applies independently of the nonlinear multiphoton processes at the origin of waves and currents. We derive conditions on the external control field which enable us to change the radiation pattern and suppress radiative losses or to reduce absorption, enabling the particle to behave as a perfect scatterer or as a perfect absorber. The control introduces narrow features in the response of the particles that result in high sensitivity to small variations in the local environment, including subwavelength spatial shifts. PMID:26155833

  5. Control of coherent excitation of neon in the extreme ultraviolet regime.

    PubMed

    Plenge, Jürgen; Wirsing, Andreas; Raschpichler, Christopher; Wassermann, Bernhard; Rühl, Eckart

    2011-01-01

    Coherent excitation of a superposition of Rydberg states in neon by the 13th harmonic of an intense 804 nm pulse and the formation of a wave packet is reported. Pump-probe experiments are performed, where the 3d-manifold of the 2p6-->2p5 (2P3/2) 3d [1/2]1- and 2p6-->2p5 (2P3/2) 3d [3/2]1-transitions are excited by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation pulse, which is centered at 20.05 eV photon energy. The temporal evolution of the excited state population is probed by ionization with a time-delayed 804 nm pulse. Control of coherent transient excitation and wave packet dynamics in the XUV-regime is demonstrated, where the spectral phase of the 13th harmonic is used as a control parameter. Modulation of the phase is achieved by propagation of the XUV-pulse through neon of variable gas density. The experimental results indicate that phase-shaped high-order harmonics can be used to control fundamental coherent excitation processes in the XUV-regime. PMID:22452090

  6. Coherent control of a transmon qubit with a nanowire-based Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T. W.; Petersson, K. D.; Kuemmeth, F.; Jespersen, T. S.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.; Marcus, C. M.

    2015-03-01

    Transmon qubits have taken great leaps towards realizing a quantum processor. Here we present measurements on a novel, gateable transmon. By tuning the electron density in a semiconducting nanowire Josephson junction we can control the qubit frequency from ~3 GHz to ~8 GHz. The transmon was embedded into an aluminum coplanar waveguide cavity for readout and qubit control. In the resonant regime we observe strong cavity-qubit coupling. In the dispersive regime we demonstrate coherent control on the Bloch sphere. The life- and coherence times were measured to T2* ~ 2T1 ~ 1 μ s. The coherence time was measured to almost 1 μs. Fast gate operations facilitate z-rotations as well as promising fast two-qubit operations in future multiple-qubit devices. These measurements open new possibilities for gateable superconducting qubits and promise a plausible system for Majorana hybrid devices. Research supported by Microsoft Station Q, Danish National Research Foundation, Villum Foundation, Lundbeck Foundation, and the European Commission.

  7. Entropic Elasticity Controls Nanomechanics of Single Tropocollagen Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Markus J.; Wong, Sophie Y.

    2007-01-01

    We report molecular modeling of stretching single molecules of tropocollagen, the building block of collagen fibrils and fibers that provide mechanical support in connective tissues. For small deformation, we observe a dominance of entropic elasticity. At larger deformation, we find a transition to energetic elasticity, which is characterized by first stretching and breaking of hydrogen bonds, followed by deformation of covalent bonds in the protein backbone, eventually leading to molecular fracture. Our force-displacement curves at small forces show excellent quantitative agreement with optical tweezer experiments. Our model predicts a persistence length ξp ≈ 16 nm, confirming experimental results suggesting that tropocollagen molecules are very flexible elastic entities. We demonstrate that assembly of single tropocollagen molecules into fibrils significantly decreases their bending flexibility, leading to decreased contributions of entropic effects during deformation. The molecular simulation results are used to develop a simple continuum model capable of describing an entire deformation range of tropocollagen molecules. Our molecular model is capable of describing different regimes of elastic and permanent deformation, without relying on empirical parameters, including a transition from entropic to energetic elasticity. PMID:17434941

  8. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  9. Ultrafast dynamics of coherent optical phonons in GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattices: thermal conductivity and coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Muneaki; Tominaga, Junji

    2012-03-01

    We report on the evaluation of lattice thermal conductivity of GeTe/Sb2Te3 superlattice (SL) by using a coherent phonon spectroscopy at various lattice temperatures. The time-resolved transient reflectivity obtained in amorphous and crystalline GeTe/Sb2Te3 SL films exhibits the coherent A1 optical modes at terahertz (THz) frequencies with picoseconds dephasing time. The relaxation time and frequency of the coherent A1 modes are used to compute the lattice thermal conductivity based on the Debye theory, including scattering by grain boundary and point defect, umklapp process, and phonon resonant scattering. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity in the amorphous SL film is less temperature dependent, due to the dominant phonon-defect scattering, while in the crystalline SL it is temperature dependent because of the main contributions from umklapp and phonon resonant scatterings. We argue the higher thermal conductivity in the GeTe/Sb2Te3 SL films than that in the Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy films implies that the phase change in GeTe/Sb2Te3 SL is not purely promoted by thermal process, i.e., lattice heating, but rather by nonthermal process, i.e., coherent lattice excitation, because the thermal process generally requires lower thermal conductivity.

  10. Controllable cavity linewidth narrowing via spontaneously generated coherence in a four level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Shan, Xiao-Nan; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    A scheme for cavity linewidth narrowing in a four-level atomic system with spontaneously generated coherence is proposed. The atomic system consists of three closely spaced excited levels, which decay to one common ground level. In such a system, spontaneously generated coherence can result in the appearance of two narrow transparency windows accomplished by steep normal dispersion. When the medium is embedded in a ring cavity, two ultranarrow transmission peaks locating close to the position of the transparency windows can be obtained simultaneously. The cavity linewidth narrowing is owing to the quantum interference between the three decay channels and can be controlled by the frequency splitting of the excited levels, requiring no coupling lasers.

  11. Isolation and Control of Spins in Silicon Carbide with Millisecond-Coherence Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christle, David J.; Falk, Abram L.; Andrich, Paolo; Klimov, Paul V.; Awschalom, David D.; Hassan, Jawad Ul; Son, Nguyen T.; Janzén, Erik; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    The elimination of defects from silicon carbide (SiC) has facilitated its move to the forefront of the optoelectronics and power-electronics industries. Nonetheless, because the electronic states of SiC defects can have sharp optical and spin transitions, they are increasingly recognized as a valuable resource for quantum-information and nanoscale-sensing applications. We demonstrate that individual electronic spin states of the divacancy defect in highly purified monocrystalline 4H-SiC can be isolated and coherently controlled. This defect has analogous behavior to the prominent nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, yet exists in a material amenable to modern growth and microfabrication techniques. We spectroscopically identify the different forms of divacancies, and show that divacancy spins exhibit an exceptionally long ensemble Hahn-echo coherence time that exceeds one millisecond. Funding by NSF, AFOSR MURI, and the Knut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Coherent control of single spins in silicon carbide at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Matthias; Lee, Sang-Yun; Rendler, Torsten; Son, Nguyen Tien; Fedder, Helmut; Paik, Seoyoung; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Sen; Booker, Ian; Denisenko, Andrej; Jamali, Mohammad; Momenzadeh, S Ali; Gerhardt, Ilja; Ohshima, Takeshi; Gali, Adam; Janzén, Erik; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Spins in solids are cornerstone elements of quantum spintronics. Leading contenders such as defects in diamond or individual phosphorus dopants in silicon have shown spectacular progress, but either lack established nanotechnology or an efficient spin/photon interface. Silicon carbide (SiC) combines the strength of both systems: it has a large bandgap with deep defects and benefits from mature fabrication techniques. Here, we report the characterization of photoluminescence and optical spin polarization from single silicon vacancies in SiC, and demonstrate that single spins can be addressed at room temperature. We show coherent control of a single defect spin and find long spin coherence times under ambient conditions. Our study provides evidence that SiC is a promising system for atomic-scale spintronics and quantum technology. PMID:25437256

  13. Spatiotemporal Coherent Control of Light through a Multiple Scattering Medium with the Multispectral Transmission Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounaix, Mickael; Andreoli, Daria; Defienne, Hugo; Volpe, Giorgio; Katz, Ori; Grésillon, Samuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-06-01

    We report the broadband characterization of the propagation of light through a multiple scattering medium by means of its multispectral transmission matrix. Using a single spatial light modulator, our approach enables the full control of both the spatial and spectral properties of an ultrashort pulse transmitted through the medium. We demonstrate spatiotemporal focusing of the pulse at any arbitrary position and time with any desired spectral shape. Our approach opens new perspectives for fundamental studies of light-matter interaction in disordered media, and has potential applications in sensing, coherent control, and imaging.

  14. Single pulse phase-control interferometric coherent anti-StokesRaman scattering spectroscopy (CARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sang-Hyun; Caster, Allison G.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-09-28

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS) experiments, usually the amplitude of the signal is measured and the phase information is lost. With a polarization- and phase-controlled pulse shaping technique, the relative phase between the resonant and non-resonant CARS signals is controlled, and spectral interferometry is performed without an interferometer. Both the real and imaginary parts of the background-free resonant CARS spectrum are measured via spectral interferometry between the resonant and non-resonant signals from the same sample. The resonant signal is amplified significantly by homodyne mixing with the non-resonant signal as a local oscillator, greatly improving the detection limit.

  15. Spatiotemporal Coherent Control of Light through a Multiple Scattering Medium with the Multispectral Transmission Matrix.

    PubMed

    Mounaix, Mickael; Andreoli, Daria; Defienne, Hugo; Volpe, Giorgio; Katz, Ori; Grésillon, Samuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-06-24

    We report the broadband characterization of the propagation of light through a multiple scattering medium by means of its multispectral transmission matrix. Using a single spatial light modulator, our approach enables the full control of both the spatial and spectral properties of an ultrashort pulse transmitted through the medium. We demonstrate spatiotemporal focusing of the pulse at any arbitrary position and time with any desired spectral shape. Our approach opens new perspectives for fundamental studies of light-matter interaction in disordered media, and has potential applications in sensing, coherent control, and imaging. PMID:27391722

  16. All-electrical coherent control of the exciton states in a single quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer de La Giroday, A.; Bennett, A. J.; Pooley, M. A.; Stevenson, R. M.; Sköld, N.; Patel, R. B.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity reversible transfer of quantum information from the polarization of photons into the spin state of an electron-hole pair in a semiconductor quantum dot. Moreover, spins are electrically manipulated on a subnanosecond time scale, allowing us to coherently control their evolution. By varying the area of the electrical pulse, we demonstrate phase-shift and spin-flip gate operations with near-unity fidelities. Our system constitutes a controllable quantum interface between flying and stationary qubits, an enabling technology for quantum logic in the solid state.

  17. Ultrafast Coherent Control of a Single Electron Spin in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2009-03-01

    Practical quantum information processing schemes require fast single-qubit operations. For spin-based qubits, this involves performing arbitrary coherent rotations of the spin state on timescales much faster than the spin coherence time. While we recently demonstrated the ability to initialize and monitor the evolution of single spins in quantum dots (QDs)ootnotetextM. H. Mikkelsen, J. Berezovsky, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, D. D. Awschalom, Nature Physics 3, 770 (2007); J. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, O. Gywat, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Science 314, 1916 (2006)., here we present an all-optical scheme for ultrafast manipulation of these states through arbitrary angles. The GaAs QDs are embedded in a diode structure to allow controllable charging of the QDs and positioned within a vertical optical cavity to enhance the small single spin signal. By applying off-resonant optical pulses, we coherently rotate a single electron spin in a QD up to π radians on picosecond timescales ootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, D. D. Awschalom, Science 320, 349 (2008)..We directly observe this spin manipulation using time-resolved Kerr rotation spectroscopy at T=10K. Measurements of the spin rotation as a function of laser detuning and intensity confirm that the optical Stark effect is the operative mechanism and the results are well-described by a model including the electron-nuclear spin interaction. Using short tipping pulses, this technique enables one to perform a large number of operations within the coherence time. This ability to perform arbitrary single-qubit operations enables sequential all-optical initialization, ultrafast control and detection of a single electron spin for quantum information purposes.

  18. Advantages of the coherent antistokes Raman scattering (CARS) in environmental monitoring and industrial process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Eberhard; de Vries, Thorsten; Darpel, H.; Anders, Angelika

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a fast method for the in-situ characterization of chemicals solved in water based on Coherent Antistokes Raman Scattering (CARS). In order to test the potential of CARS as a tool for the in-situ spectroscopy scanning and multiplex CARS techniques were investigated. Polarization CARS (PCARS) was used to reduce the nonvibrational resonant signal generated by the electron cloud of the solvent molecules. The spectra of some alcohols and pollutants such as pyridine, nitrate and sulfate were investigated. Computer simulations were applied for the evaluation of the CARS spectra. The most evident advantage of CARS in comparison with other Raman methods is the very short time to achieve a spectrum. The shortest time to get a spectrum is limited by the length of the laser pulse (e.g. 5 ns). In addition no sample preparation is necessary.

  19. Approximation of reachable sets for coherently controlled open quantum systems: Application to quantum state engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Lu, Dawei; Luo, Zhihuang; Laflamme, Raymond; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Precisely characterizing and controlling realistic quantum systems under noises is a challenging frontier in quantum sciences and technologies. In developing reliable controls for open quantum systems, one is often confronted with the problem of the lack of knowledge on the system controllability. The purpose of this paper is to give a numerical approach to this problem, that is, to approximately compute the reachable set of states for coherently controlled quantum Markovian systems. The approximation consists of setting both upper and lower bounds for system's reachable region of states. Furthermore, we apply our reachability analysis to the control of the relaxation dynamics of a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system. We implement some experimental tasks of quantum state engineering in this open system at a near optimal performance in view of purity: e.g., increasing polarization and preparing pseudopure states. These results demonstrate the usefulness of our theory and show interesting and promising applications of environment-assisted quantum dynamics.

  20. Effects of molecule anchoring and dispersion on nanoscopic friction under electrochemical control.

    PubMed

    de Wijn, A S; Fasolino, A; Filippov, A E; Urbakh, M

    2016-03-16

    The application of electric fields is a promising strategy for in situ control of friction. While there have recently been many experimental studies on friction under the influence of electric fields, theoretical understanding is very limited. Recently, we introduced a simple theoretical model for friction under electrochemical conditions that focused on the interaction of a force microscope tip with adsorbed molecules whose orientation was dependent on the applied electric field. Here we focus on the effects of anchoring of the molecules on friction. We show that anchoring affects the intensity and width of the peak in the friction that occurs near a reorientation transition of adsorbed molecules, and explain this by comparing the strength of molecule-molecule and molecule-tip interactions. We derive a dispersion relation for phonons in the layer of adsorbed molecules and demonstrate that it can be used to understand important features of the frictional response. PMID:26871411

  1. Pupil shaping and coherence control in an EUV mask-imaging microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2013-09-01

    We are investigating the effect of pupil-fill patterns and partial coherence settings on EUV reticle images on the new SEMATECH High-NA Actinic Reticle review Project (SHARP), to deepen our understanding of its performance, and improve the emulation of image formation in arbitrary printing tools. SHARP is an EUV mask microscope developed as the successor of the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). It is equipped with a unique, MEMS-based Fourier synthesis illuminator that generates arbitrary, customized pupil fill patterns to control the illumination partial coherence. The high-magnification objective lenses are an array of interchangeable Fresnel zoneplates with 4×NA values ranging from 0.25 to 0.625. We have used SHARP to inspect isolated and dense features with half pitch as low as 55 nm using lenses with a range of NA values, and common illumination patterns, such as annular, dipole and QUASAR™. We will show the effect of illumination on important, measured pattern parameters, including contrast, normalized image log-slope, and depth of focus. We have also studied the effect of partial coherence on the imaging of on multilayer roughness observed in bright mask regions, a topic important for expanding our understanding of the causes of LER.

  2. Influence of polymer-molecule/wall interactions on mobility control

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, J.L.; Klaus, E.E.; Fan, S.K.

    1981-10-01

    This study presents the results of a study of molecule/wall interactions on permeability modification of consolidated porous media by polymer solutions. The experiments were conducted with a newly developed low-shear porous media viscometer. The key for obtaining reproducible, steady-state results was to expose the porous medium to several hundred pore volumes of polymer solution to saturate it with polymer. The effective permeability during polymer flow and the residual permeability were determined for xanthan gum and polyacrylamide solutions in Berea sandstone, Bradford sandstone, filter papers, and Nuclepore filters. 25 refs.

  3. Coherent phase control of resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shian Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-11-04

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the quantum coherent control of the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by the phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse. Our theoretical results show that the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be effectively controlled, but the control efficiency depends on the laser repetition rate in real experiment due to the long lifetime and the short decoherence time of the excited state, and the larger laser repetition rate yields the lower control efficiency. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed in glass sample doped with Er{sup 3+} by utilizing the femtosecond lasers with low repetition rate of 1 kHz and high repetition rate of 80 MHz.

  4. Coherent dynamics of singlet fission controlled by nonlocal electron-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao

    2016-03-01

    Based on the Frenkel and charge transfer mixing model of singlet fission (SF), we incorporate both the local and nonlocal phonon baths into the Hamiltonian and adopt the algorithm of the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group to simulate the SF process in tetracene and pentacene. The endergonic SF is found to be facilitated by the robust quantum coherence, which concurrently gives rise to a notable quantum beating effect. Being controlled by the nonlocal electron-phonon coupling, the SF process is accelerated and the triplet yield manifests a nonlinear relationship with the singlet density.

  5. Coherent state transfer through a multi-channel quantum network: Natural versus controlled evolution passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Li, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Quantum state transfer (QST) is an important task in quantum information processing. In this study, we describe two approaches for the high-fidelity transfer of a quantum state between two opposite quantum dots attached to a multi-channel quantum network. First, we demonstrate that a high-efficiency QST can be achieved with the coherent time evolution of a quantum system without any external control. Second, we present an approach that uses an alternative mechanism for a high-fidelity QST. By adiabatically varying tunnel couplings, it is possible to implement the complete transmission of a quantum state based on this quantum mechanical mechanism.

  6. Dynamic control of coherent orbital-angular-momentum beams in turbid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, K. S.; Miller, J. K.; Cochenour, B. M.; Johnson, E. G.

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the propagation properties of two superimposed coherent orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes for use in underwater systems as an alternative to amplitude modulation. An OAM mode of l=+2 is interfered with OAM mode l=-1 from a λ = 540 nm laser source. These OAM modes are superimposed using a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer combined with diffractive optical elements. By manipulating the optical path length of one of the MZ legs, the interference of these beams can be temporally controlled. The spatial profile is maintained in a turbid environment up through 4.9 attenuation lengths for both cases.

  7. Coherent control of light-matter interactions in polarization standing waves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu; MacDonald, Kevin F; Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that standing waves formed by two coherent counter-propagating light waves can take a variety of forms, offering new approaches to the interrogation and control of polarization-sensitive light-matter interactions in ultrathin (subwavelength thickness) media. In contrast to familiar energy standing waves, polarization standing waves have constant electric and magnetic energy densities and a periodically varying polarization state along the wave axis. counterintuitively, anisotropic ultrathin (meta)materials can be made sensitive or insensitive to such polarization variations by adjusting their azimuthal angle. PMID:27514307

  8. Coherent control of light-matter interactions in polarization standing waves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xu; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that standing waves formed by two coherent counter-propagating light waves can take a variety of forms, offering new approaches to the interrogation and control of polarization-sensitive light-matter interactions in ultrathin (subwavelength thickness) media. In contrast to familiar energy standing waves, polarization standing waves have constant electric and magnetic energy densities and a periodically varying polarization state along the wave axis. counterintuitively, anisotropic ultrathin (meta)materials can be made sensitive or insensitive to such polarization variations by adjusting their azimuthal angle. PMID:27514307

  9. Generation and coherent control of pure spin currents via terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schüler, Michael Berakdar, Jamal

    2014-04-21

    We inspect the time and spin-dependent, inelastic tunneling in engineered semiconductor-based double quantum well driven by time-structured terahertz pulses. An essential ingredient is an embedded spin-active structure with vibrational modes that scatter the pulse driven carriers. Due to the different time scales of the charge and spin dynamics, the spin-dependent electron-vibron coupling may result in pure net spin current (with negligible charge current). Heating the vibrational site may affect the resulting spin current. Furthermore, by controlling the charge dynamics, the spin dynamics and the generated spin current can be manipulated and switched on and off coherently.

  10. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  11. Monitoring the Coherent Vibrational Control of Electronic Excitation Transfer Using Ultrafast Pump-Probe Polarization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Jason; Cina, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom in molecular energy-transfer complexes is a subject of current interest. We have proposed a method to use coherent nuclear motion to control the transfer of electronic excitation energy between donor and acceptor moieties in electronically coupled dimers. The underlying electronic and nuclear motion at the level of quantum mechanical amplitudes can be observed using nonlinear wave-packet interferometry(nl-WPI), a form of fluorescence-detected multidimensional electronic spectroscopy. In our control scheme, coherent nuclear motion is induced in the acceptor chromophore prior to direct electronic excitation of the donor. This nuclear motion affects the instantaneous resonance conditions between donor and acceptor moieties and thus affects subsequent energy transfer dynamics. We have developed the framework to simulate four-pulse nl-WPI experiments, and the pump-probe limit thereof, on energy-transfer systems after interaction with a control pulse that induces nuclear motion. We present simulations in the pump-probe limit from model energy-transfer systems subjected to prior impulsive vibrational excitation, and show how pulse polarization can be used to infer electronic dynamics from isotropically oriented dimers.

  12. Coherent detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, C. R.; Church, S.; Gaier, T.; Lai, R.; Ruf, C.; Wollack, E.

    2009-03-01

    Coherent systems offer significant advantages in simplicity, testability, control of systematics, and cost. Although quantum noise sets the fundamental limit to their performance at high frequencies, recent breakthroughs suggest that near-quantum-limited noise up to 150 or even 200 GHz could be realized within a few years. If the demands of component separation can be met with frequencies below 200 GHz, coherent systems will be strong competitors for a space CMB polarization mission. The rapid development of digital correlator capability now makes space interferometers with many hundreds of elements possible. Given the advantages of coherent interferometers in suppressing systematic effects, such systems deserve serious study.

  13. Motion and Form Coherence Detection in Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Relationship to Motor Control and 2:4 Digit Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Elizabeth; White, Sarah; Campbell, Ruth; Swettenham, John; Hansen, Peter; Ramus, Franck

    2006-01-01

    Children with autistic spectrum disorder and controls performed tasks of coherent motion and form detection, and motor control. Additionally, the ratio of the 2nd and 4th digits of these children, which is thought to be an indicator of foetal testosterone, was measured. Children in the experimental group were impaired at tasks of motor control,…

  14. Orientation detection of a single molecule using pupil filter with electrically controllable polarization pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Yoshiki, Keisuke; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a system for measuring the orientation of single molecules using a conventional wide-field fluorescence microscope with a polarization filter consisting of a polarizer and a compact polarization mode converter. The polarization filter electrically controls the pattern of polarization filtering. Since the polarization of the fluorescence from a single molecule highly depends on the angle between the observation direction and the molecular direction, polarization pattern filtering at the pupil plane of the objective lens allows the orientation of a single molecule to be visualized. Using this system, we demonstrated the orientation detection of single molecules.

  15. Phase-coherent transport and spin relaxation in InAs nanowires grown by molecule beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. B.; Guo, J. K.; Kang, N. E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn; Li, Sen; Fan, Dingxun; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Q. E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-04-27

    We report low-temperature magnetotransport studies of individual InAs nanowires grown by molecule beam epitaxy. At low magnetic fields, the magnetoconductance characteristics exhibit a crossover between weak antilocalization and weak localization by changing either the gate voltage or the temperature. The observed crossover behavior can be well described in terms of relative scales of the transport characteristic lengths extracted based on the quasi-one-dimensional theory of weak localization in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. The spin relaxation length extracted from the magnetoconductance data is found to be in the range of 80–100 nm, indicating the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling in the InAs nanowires. Moreover, the amplitude of universal conductance fluctuations in the nanowires is found to be suppressed at low temperatures due to the presence of strong spin-orbit scattering.

  16. Geometries for the coherent control of four-wave mixing in graphene multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shraddha M.; Lyons, Ashley; Roger, Thomas; Clerici, Matteo; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Faccio, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    Deeply sub-wavelength two-dimensional films may exhibit extraordinarily strong nonlinear effects. Here we show that 2D films exhibit the remarkable property of a phase-controllable nonlinearity, i.e., the amplitude of the nonlinear polarisation wave in the medium can be controlled via the pump beam phase and determines whether a probe beam will “feel” or not the nonlinearity. This is in stark contrast to bulk nonlinearities where propagation in the medium averages out any such phase dependence. We perform a series of experiments in multilayer graphene that highlight some of the consequences of the optical nonlinearity phase-dependence, such as the coherent control of nonlinearly diffracted beams, single-pump-beam induced phase-conjugation and the demonstration of a nonlinear mirror characterised by negative reflection. The observed phase sensitivity is not specific to graphene but rather is solely a result of the dimensionality and is therefore expected in all 2D materials.

  17. Geometries for the coherent control of four-wave mixing in graphene multilayers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shraddha M; Lyons, Ashley; Roger, Thomas; Clerici, Matteo; Zheludev, Nikolay I; Faccio, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Deeply sub-wavelength two-dimensional films may exhibit extraordinarily strong nonlinear effects. Here we show that 2D films exhibit the remarkable property of a phase-controllable nonlinearity, i.e., the amplitude of the nonlinear polarisation wave in the medium can be controlled via the pump beam phase and determines whether a probe beam will "feel" or not the nonlinearity. This is in stark contrast to bulk nonlinearities where propagation in the medium averages out any such phase dependence. We perform a series of experiments in multilayer graphene that highlight some of the consequences of the optical nonlinearity phase-dependence, such as the coherent control of nonlinearly diffracted beams, single-pump-beam induced phase-conjugation and the demonstration of a nonlinear mirror characterised by negative reflection. The observed phase sensitivity is not specific to graphene but rather is solely a result of the dimensionality and is therefore expected in all 2D materials. PMID:26486075

  18. Direct and Indirect Two-color Coherent Control in Bulk Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jinluo; Rioux, Julien; Sipe, John

    2012-02-01

    Using an empirical pseudopotential model for electron states and an adiabatic bond charge model for phonon states, we investigate the two-color direct and indirect coherent current injection with an incident optical field composed of a fundamental frequency and its second harmonic, and calculate the response tensors of the electron (hole) charge and spin currents. We show the current control for three different polarization scenarios: For co-circularly polarized beams, the direction of the charge current and the polarization direction of the spin current can be controlled by a relative-phase parameter; for the co-linearly and cross-linearly polarized beams, the current amplitude can be controlled by that parameter. For the indirect gap injection, the spectral dependence of the maximum swarm velocity shows that the direction of charge current reverses under an increase in photon energy.

  19. Coupling and control in coherently driven and asymmetrically synchronized hybrid electron-nuclear spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berec, V.

    2016-02-01

    We study the coupling and control adaptation of a hybrid electron-nuclear spin system using the laser mediated proton beam in MeV energy regime. The asymmetric control mechanism is based on exact optimization of both: the measure of exchange interaction and anisotropy of the hyperfine interaction induced in the resonance with optimal channeled protons (CP) superfocused field, allowing manipulation over arbitrary localized spatial centers while addressing only the electron spin. Using highly precise and coherent proton channeling regime we have obtained efficient pulse shaping separator technique aimed for spatio-temporal engineering of quantum states, introducing a method for control of nuclear spins, which are coupled via anisotropic hyperfine interactions in isolated electron spin manifold, without radio wave (RW) pulses. The presented method can be efficiently implemented in synchronized spin networks with the purpose to facilitate preservation and efficient transfer of experimentally observed quantum particle states, contributing to the overall background noise reduction.

  20. Pupil tracking optical coherence tomography for precise control of pupil entry position

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Nankivil, Derek; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Lujan, Brandon J.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    To maximize the collection efficiency of back-scattered light, and to minimize aberrations and vignetting, the lateral position of the scan pivot of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal scanner should be imaged to the center of the ocular pupil. Additionally, several retinal structures including Henle’s Fiber Layer (HFL) exhibit reflectivities that depend on illumination angle, which can be controlled by varying the pupil entry position of the OCT beam. In this work, we describe an automated method for controlling the lateral pupil entry position in retinal OCT by utilizing pupil tracking in conjunction with a 2D fast steering mirror placed conjugate to the retinal plane. We demonstrate that pupil tracking prevents lateral motion artifacts from impeding desired pupil entry locations, and enables precise pupil entry positioning and therefore control of the illumination angle of incidence at the retinal plane. We use our prototype pupil tracking OCT system to directly visualize the obliquely oriented HFL. PMID:26417510

  1. Highly conductive single-molecule wires with controlled orientation by coordination of metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Darwish, Nadim; Saletra, Wojciech J; Pérez-García, Lluïsa; Sanz, Fausto; Puigmartí-Luis, Josep; Amabilino, David B; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2014-08-13

    Porphyrin-based molecular wires are promising candidates for nanoelectronic and photovoltaic devices due to the porphyrin chemical stability and unique optoelectronic properties. An important aim toward exploiting single porphyrin molecules in nanoscale devices is to possess the ability to control the electrical pathways across them. Herein, we demonstrate a method to build single-molecule wires with metalloporphyrins via their central metal ion by chemically modifying both an STM tip and surface electrodes with pyridin-4-yl-methanethiol, a molecule that has strong affinity for coordination with the metal ion of the porphyrin. The new flat configuration resulted in single-molecule junctions of exceedingly high lifetime and of conductance 3 orders of magnitude larger than that obtained previously for similar porphyrin molecules but wired from either end of the porphyrin ring. This work presents a new concept of building highly efficient single-molecule electrical contacts by exploiting metal coordination chemistry. PMID:24978587

  2. Tobacco control, global health policy and development: towards policy coherence in global governance.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jeff

    2012-03-01

    The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) demonstrates the international political will invested in combating the tobacco pandemic and a newfound prominence for tobacco control within the global health agenda. However, major difficulties exist in managing conflicts with foreign and trade policy priorities, and significant obstacles confront efforts to create synergies with development policy and avoid tensions with other health priorities. This paper uses the concept of policy coherence to explore congruence and inconsistencies in objectives, policy, and practice between tobacco control and trade, development and global health priorities. Following the inability of the FCTC negotiations to satisfactorily address the relationship between trade and health, several disputes highlight the challenges posed to tobacco control policies by multilateral and bilateral agreements. While the work of the World Bank has demonstrated the potential contribution of tobacco control to development, the absence of non-communicable diseases from the Millennium Development Goals has limited scope to offer developing countries support for FCTC implementation. Even within international health, tobacco control priorities may be hard to reconcile with other agendas. The paper concludes by discussing the extent to which tobacco control has been pursued via a model of governance very deliberately different from those used in other health issues, in what can be termed 'tobacco exceptionalism'. The analysis developed here suggests that non-communicable disease (NCD) policies, global health, development and tobacco control would have much to gain from re-examining this presumption of difference. PMID:22345267

  3. Adiabatic coherent control in the anharmonic ion trap: Numerical analysis of vibrational anharmonicities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Babikov, Dmitri

    2011-02-15

    Anharmonicity of the quantized motional states of ions in a Paul trap can be utilized to address the state-to-state transitions selectively and control the motional modes of trapped ions coherently and adiabatically [Zhao and Babikov, Phys. Rev. A 77, 012338 (2008)]. In this paper we study two sources of the vibrational anharmonicity in the ion traps: the intrinsic Coulomb anharmonicity due to ion-ion interactions and the external anharmonicity of the trapping potential. An accurate numerical approach is used to compute energies and wave functions of vibrational eigenstates. The magnitude of the Coulomb anharmonicity is determined and shown to be insufficient for successful control. In contrast, anharmonicity of the trapping potential allows one to control the motion of ions very efficiently using the time-varying electric fields. Optimal control theory is used to derive the control pulses. One ion in a slightly anharmonic trap can be easily controlled. In the two- and three-ion systems the symmetric stretching mode is dark and cannot be controlled at all. The other two normal modes of the three-ion system can be controlled and used, for example, to encode a two-qubit system into the motional states of ions. A trap architecture that allows the necessary amount of vibrational anharmonicity to be achieved is proposed.

  4. Tobacco control, global health policy and development: towards policy coherence in global governance

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) demonstrates the international political will invested in combating the tobacco pandemic and a newfound prominence for tobacco control within the global health agenda. However, major difficulties exist in managing conflicts with foreign and trade policy priorities, and significant obstacles confront efforts to create synergies with development policy and avoid tensions with other health priorities. This paper uses the concept of policy coherence to explore congruence and inconsistencies in objectives, policy, and practice between tobacco control and trade, development and global health priorities. Following the inability of the FCTC negotiations to satisfactorily address the relationship between trade and health, several disputes highlight the challenges posed to tobacco control policies by multilateral and bilateral agreements. While the work of the World Bank has demonstrated the potential contribution of tobacco control to development, the absence of non-communicable diseases from the Millennium Development Goals has limited scope to offer developing countries support for FCTC implementation. Even within international health, tobacco control priorities may be hard to reconcile with other agendas. The paper concludes by discussing the extent to which tobacco control has been pursued via a model of governance very deliberately different from those used in other health issues, in what can be termed ‘tobacco exceptionalism’. The analysis developed here suggests that non-communicable disease (NCD) policies, global health, development and tobacco control would have much to gain from re-examining this presumption of difference. PMID:22345267

  5. Nonparalytic botulinum molecules for the control of pain

    PubMed Central

    Mangione, Antonina S.; Obara, Ilona; Maiarú, Maria; Geranton, Sandrine M.; Tassorelli, Cristina; Ferrari, Enrico; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek; Hunt, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Local injections of botulinum toxins have been reported to be useful not only for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain and migraine but also to cause long-lasting muscle paralysis, a potentially serious side effect. Recently, a botulinum A-based molecule (“BiTox”) has been synthesized that retains neuronal silencing capacity without triggering muscle paralysis. In this study, we examined whether BiTox delivered peripherally was able to reduce or prevent the increased nociceptive sensitivity found in animal models of inflammatory, surgical, and neuropathic pain. Plasma extravasation and edema were also measured as well as keratinocyte proliferation. No motor deficits were seen and acute thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds were unimpaired by BiTox injections. We found reduced plasma extravasation and inflammatory edema as well as lower levels of keratinocyte proliferation in cutaneous tissue after local BiTox injection. However, we found no evidence that BiTox was transported to the dorsal root ganglia or dorsal horn and no deficits in formalin-elicited behaviors or capsaicin or formalin-induced c-Fos expression within the dorsal horn. In contrast, Bitox treatment strongly reduced A-nociceptor-mediated secondary mechanical hyperalgesia associated with either complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced joint inflammation or capsaicin injection and the hypersensitivity associated with spared nerve injury. These results imply that although local release of neuromodulators from C-fibers was inhibited by BiTox injection, C-nociceptive signaling function was not impaired. Taken together with recent clinical data the results suggest that BiTox should be considered for treatment of pain conditions in which A-nociceptors are thought to play a significant role. PMID:26761389

  6. Nonparalytic botulinum molecules for the control of pain.

    PubMed

    Mangione, Antonina S; Obara, Ilona; Maiarú, Maria; Geranton, Sandrine M; Tassorelli, Cristina; Ferrari, Enrico; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek; Hunt, Stephen P

    2016-05-01

    Local injections of botulinum toxins have been reported to be useful not only for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain and migraine but also to cause long-lasting muscle paralysis, a potentially serious side effect. Recently, a botulinum A-based molecule ("BiTox") has been synthesized that retains neuronal silencing capacity without triggering muscle paralysis. In this study, we examined whether BiTox delivered peripherally was able to reduce or prevent the increased nociceptive sensitivity found in animal models of inflammatory, surgical, and neuropathic pain. Plasma extravasation and edema were also measured as well as keratinocyte proliferation. No motor deficits were seen and acute thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds were unimpaired by BiTox injections. We found reduced plasma extravasation and inflammatory edema as well as lower levels of keratinocyte proliferation in cutaneous tissue after local BiTox injection. However, we found no evidence that BiTox was transported to the dorsal root ganglia or dorsal horn and no deficits in formalin-elicited behaviors or capsaicin or formalin-induced c-Fos expression within the dorsal horn. In contrast, Bitox treatment strongly reduced A-nociceptor-mediated secondary mechanical hyperalgesia associated with either complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced joint inflammation or capsaicin injection and the hypersensitivity associated with spared nerve injury. These results imply that although local release of neuromodulators from C-fibers was inhibited by BiTox injection, C-nociceptive signaling function was not impaired. Taken together with recent clinical data the results suggest that BiTox should be considered for treatment of pain conditions in which A-nociceptors are thought to play a significant role. PMID:26761389

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW A review of the coherent optical control of the exciton and spin states of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The spin of a carrier trapped in a self-assembled quantum dot has the potential to be a robust optically active qubit that is compatible with existing III-V semiconductor device technology. A key requirement for building a quantum processor is the ability to dynamically prepare, control and detect single quantum states. Here, experimental progress in the coherent optical control of single semiconductor quantum dots over the past decade is reviewed, alongside an introductory discussion of the basic principles of coherent control.

  8. Dataset on coherent control of fields and induced currents in nonlinear multiphoton processes in a nanosphere.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Ben; Papoff, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We model a scheme for the coherent control of light waves and currents in metallic nanospheres which applies independently of the nonlinear multiphoton processes at the origin of waves and currents. Using exact mathematical formulae, we calculate numerically with a custom fortran code the effect of an external control field which enable us to change the radiation pattern and suppress radiative losses or to reduce absorption, enabling the particle to behave as a perfect scatterer or as a perfect absorber. Data are provided in tabular, comma delimited value format and illustrate narrow features in the response of the particles that result in high sensitivity to small variations in the local environment, including subwavelength spatial shifts. PMID:26601699

  9. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    PubMed Central

    Di Liberto, M.; Comparin, T.; Kock, T.; Ölschläger, M.; Hemmerich, A.; Smith, C. Morais

    2014-01-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping-induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites. PMID:25501387

  10. Dataset on coherent control of fields and induced currents in nonlinear multiphoton processes in a nanosphere

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Ben; Papoff, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We model a scheme for the coherent control of light waves and currents in metallic nanospheres which applies independently of the nonlinear multiphoton processes at the origin of waves and currents. Using exact mathematical formulae, we calculate numerically with a custom fortran code the effect of an external control field which enable us to change the radiation pattern and suppress radiative losses or to reduce absorption, enabling the particle to behave as a perfect scatterer or as a perfect absorber. Data are provided in tabular, comma delimited value format and illustrate narrow features in the response of the particles that result in high sensitivity to small variations in the local environment, including subwavelength spatial shifts. PMID:26601699

  11. Coherent control of magnetization precession in electrically detected time domain ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wid, O.; Wahler, M.; Homonnay, N.; Richter, T.; Schmidt, G.

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate coherent control of time domain ferromagnetic resonance by all electrical excitation and detection. Using two ultrashort magnetic field steps with variable time delay we control the induction decay in yttrium iron garnet (YIG). By setting suitable delay times between the two steps the precession of the magnetization can either be enhanced or completely stopped. The method allows for a determination of the precession frequency within a few precession periods and with an accuracy much higher than can be achieved using fast fourier transformation. Moreover it holds the promise to massively increase precession amplitudes in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry (PIMM) using low amplitude finite pulse trains. Our experiments are supported by micromagnetic simulations which nicely confirm the experimental results.

  12. The artificial control of enhanced optical processes in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Choi, Bongseok; Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    Plasmon-enhanced optical processes in molecules have been extensively but individually explored for Raman scattering, fluorescence, and infrared light absorption. In contrast to recent progress in the interfacial control of hot electrons in plasmon-semiconductor hybrid systems, plasmon-molecule hybrid systems have remained to be a conventional scheme, mainly assuming electric-field enhancement. This was because it was difficult to control the plasmon-molecule interface in a well-controlled manner. We here experimentally substantiate an obvious change in artificially enhanced optical processes of fluorescence/Raman scattering in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance plasmo-photonic metasurfaces with/without a self-assembled monolayer of sub-nm thickness. These results indicate that the enhanced optical processes were successfully selected under artificial configurations without any additional chemical treatment that modifies the molecules themselves. Although Raman-scattering efficiency is generally weak in high-fluorescence-yield molecules, it was found that Raman scattering becomes prominent around the molecular fingerprint range on the metasurfaces, being enhanced by more than 2000 fold at the maximum for reference signals. In addition, the highly and uniformly enhancing metasurfaces are able to serve as two-way functional, reproducible, and wavelength-tunable platforms to detect molecules at very low densities, being distinct from other platforms reported so far. The change in the enhanced signals suggests that energy diagrams in fluorescent molecules are changed in the configuration that includes the metal-molecule interface, meaning that plasmon-molecule hybrid systems are rich in the phenomena beyond the conventional scheme.Plasmon-enhanced optical processes in molecules have been extensively but individually explored for Raman scattering, fluorescence, and infrared light absorption. In contrast to recent progress in the interfacial control of hot electrons

  13. All-optical control of a solid-state spin using coherent dark states.

    PubMed

    Yale, Christopher G; Buckley, Bob B; Christle, David J; Burkard, Guido; Heremans, F Joseph; Bassett, Lee C; Awschalom, David D

    2013-05-01

    The study of individual quantum systems in solids, for use as quantum bits (qubits) and probes of decoherence, requires protocols for their initialization, unitary manipulation, and readout. In many solid-state quantum systems, these operations rely on disparate techniques that can vary widely depending on the particular qubit structure. One such qubit, the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spin in diamond, can be initialized and read out through its special spin-selective intersystem crossing, while microwave electron spin resonance techniques provide unitary spin rotations. Instead, we demonstrate an alternative, fully optical approach to these control protocols in an NV center that does not rely on its intersystem crossing. By tuning an NV center to an excited-state spin anticrossing at cryogenic temperatures, we use coherent population trapping and stimulated Raman techniques to realize initialization, readout, and unitary manipulation of a single spin. Each of these techniques can be performed directly along any arbitrarily chosen quantum basis, removing the need for extra control steps to map the spin to and from a preferred basis. Combining these protocols, we perform measurements of the NV center's spin coherence, a demonstration of this full optical control. Consisting solely of optical pulses, these techniques enable control within a smaller footprint and within photonic networks. Likewise, this unified approach obviates the need for both electron spin resonance manipulation and spin addressability through the intersystem crossing. This method could therefore be applied to a wide range of potential solid-state qubits, including those which currently lack a means to be addressed. PMID:23610403

  14. Adsorbed states of chlorophenol on Cu(110) and controlled switching of single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, H.; Kitaguchi, Y.; Hattori, T.; Ueda, Y.; Ferrer, N. G.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.

    2016-06-01

    A molecular junction of substituted benzene (chlorophenol) is fabricated and controlled by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Prior to the junction formation, the bonding geometry of the molecule on the surface is characterized by STM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS shows that the OH group of chlorophenol is dissociated on Cu(110) and that the molecule is bonded nearly flat to the surface via an O atom, with the Cl group intact. We demonstrate controlled contact of an STM tip to the "available" Cl group and lift-up of the molecule while it is anchored to the surface via an O atom. The asymmetric bonding motifs of the molecule to the electrodes allow for reversible control of the junction.

  15. Adsorbed states of chlorophenol on Cu(110) and controlled switching of single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, H; Kitaguchi, Y; Hattori, T; Ueda, Y; Ferrer, N G; Hatta, S; Aruga, T

    2016-06-28

    A molecular junction of substituted benzene (chlorophenol) is fabricated and controlled by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Prior to the junction formation, the bonding geometry of the molecule on the surface is characterized by STM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS shows that the OH group of chlorophenol is dissociated on Cu(110) and that the molecule is bonded nearly flat to the surface via an O atom, with the Cl group intact. We demonstrate controlled contact of an STM tip to the "available" Cl group and lift-up of the molecule while it is anchored to the surface via an O atom. The asymmetric bonding motifs of the molecule to the electrodes allow for reversible control of the junction. PMID:27369529

  16. The artificial control of enhanced optical processes in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Choi, Bongseok; Miyazaki, Hideki T; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2016-06-01

    Plasmon-enhanced optical processes in molecules have been extensively but individually explored for Raman scattering, fluorescence, and infrared light absorption. In contrast to recent progress in the interfacial control of hot electrons in plasmon-semiconductor hybrid systems, plasmon-molecule hybrid systems have remained to be a conventional scheme, mainly assuming electric-field enhancement. This was because it was difficult to control the plasmon-molecule interface in a well-controlled manner. We here experimentally substantiate an obvious change in artificially enhanced optical processes of fluorescence/Raman scattering in fluorescent molecules on high-emittance plasmo-photonic metasurfaces with/without a self-assembled monolayer of sub-nm thickness. These results indicate that the enhanced optical processes were successfully selected under artificial configurations without any additional chemical treatment that modifies the molecules themselves. Although Raman-scattering efficiency is generally weak in high-fluorescence-yield molecules, it was found that Raman scattering becomes prominent around the molecular fingerprint range on the metasurfaces, being enhanced by more than 2000 fold at the maximum for reference signals. In addition, the highly and uniformly enhancing metasurfaces are able to serve as two-way functional, reproducible, and wavelength-tunable platforms to detect molecules at very low densities, being distinct from other platforms reported so far. The change in the enhanced signals suggests that energy diagrams in fluorescent molecules are changed in the configuration that includes the metal-molecule interface, meaning that plasmon-molecule hybrid systems are rich in the phenomena beyond the conventional scheme. PMID:27227964

  17. Coherent control of diamond defects for quantum information science and quantum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Peter

    Quantum mechanics, arguably one of the greatest achievements of modern physics, has not only fundamentally changed our understanding of nature but is also taking an ever increasing role in engineering. Today, the control of quantum systems has already had a far-reaching impact on time and frequency metrology. By gaining further control over a large variety of different quantum systems, many potential applications are emerging. Those applications range from the development of quantum sensors and new quantum metrological approaches to the realization of quantum information processors and quantum networks. Unfortunately most quantum systems are very fragile objects that require tremendous experimental effort to avoid dephasing. Being able to control the interaction between a quantum system with its local environment embodies therefore an important aspect for application and hence is at the focus of this thesis. Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond have recently attracted attention as a room temperature solid state spin system that expresses long coherence times. The electronic spin associated with NV centers can be efficiently manipulated, initialized and readout using microwave and optical techniques. Inspired by these extraordinary properties, much effort has been dedicated to use NV centers as a building block for scalable room temperature quantum information processing and quantum communication as well as a quantum sensing. In the first part of this thesis we demonstrate that by decoupling the spin from the local environment the coherence time of a NV quantum register can be extended by three order of magnitudes. Employing a novel dissipative mechanism in combination with dynamical decoupling, memory times exceeding one second are observed. The second part shows that, based on quantum control, NV centers in nano-diamonds provide a nanoscale temperature sensor with unprecedented accuracy enabling local temperature measurements in living biological cells

  18. Control of coherent information via on-chip photonic–phononic emitter–receivers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Heedeuk; Cox, Jonathan A.; Jarecki, Robert; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in integrated photonics has fostered numerous chip-scale sensing, computing and signal processing technologies. However, many crucial filtering and signal delay operations are difficult to perform with all-optical devices. Unlike photons propagating at luminal speeds, GHz-acoustic phonons moving at slower velocities allow information to be stored, filtered and delayed over comparatively smaller length-scales with remarkable fidelity. Hence, controllable and efficient coupling between coherent photons and phonons enables new signal processing technologies that greatly enhance the performance and potential impact of integrated photonics. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for coherent information processing based on travelling-wave photon–phonon transduction, which achieves a phonon emit-and-receive process between distinct nanophotonic waveguides. Using this device, physics—which supports GHz frequencies—we create wavelength-insensitive radiofrequency photonic filters with frequency selectivity, narrow-linewidth and high power-handling in silicon. More generally, this emit-receive concept is the impetus for enabling new signal processing schemes. PMID:25740405

  19. Swept source optical coherence tomography with external clocking using voltage controlled oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eung Je; Kim, Yong Pyung

    2011-05-01

    In this study, a beat signal recalibration method was developed for optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a high-speed wavelength-swept source. By adopting a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) modulated by a sinusoidal waveform as a trigger for the OCT system, the broadening of the beat frequency due to laser tuning rate variations was recalibrated. For this study, OCT based on a Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) laser at a sweep rate of 60.9 kHz was demonstrated. OCT images of 1500×409 pixels were obtained with the sensitivity of 100 dB. Temporal frequency variations in the FDML laser and OCT images obtained with the proposed technique were also described. When compared to a conventional recalibration method using optical components, swept source optical coherence tomography operated with a VCO clock exhibited superior performance and high stability. From the experimental results, it was demonstrated that the proposed method is sufficient to recalibrate the time-frequency variations in interferometry with a high-speed wavelength-swept source.

  20. Control of coherent information via on-chip photonic–phononic emitter–receivers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shin, Heedeuk; Cox, Jonathan A.; Jarecki, Robert; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T.

    2015-03-05

    We report that rapid progress in integrated photonics has fostered numerous chip-scale sensing, computing and signal processing technologies. However, many crucial filtering and signal delay operations are difficult to perform with all-optical devices. Unlike photons propagating at luminal speeds, GHz-acoustic phonons moving at slower velocities allow information to be stored, filtered and delayed over comparatively smaller length-scales with remarkable fidelity. Hence, controllable and efficient coupling between coherent photons and phonons enables new signal processing technologies that greatly enhance the performance and potential impact of integrated photonics. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for coherent information processing based on travelling-wave photon–phonon transduction,more » which achieves a phonon emit-and-receive process between distinct nanophotonic waveguides. Using this device, physics—which supports GHz frequencies—we create wavelength-insensitive radiofrequency photonic filters with frequency selectivity, narrow-linewidth and high power-handling in silicon. More generally, this emit-receive concept is the impetus for enabling new signal processing schemes.« less

  1. Control of coherent information via on-chip photonic–phononic emitter–receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Heedeuk; Cox, Jonathan A.; Jarecki, Robert; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T.

    2015-03-05

    We report that rapid progress in integrated photonics has fostered numerous chip-scale sensing, computing and signal processing technologies. However, many crucial filtering and signal delay operations are difficult to perform with all-optical devices. Unlike photons propagating at luminal speeds, GHz-acoustic phonons moving at slower velocities allow information to be stored, filtered and delayed over comparatively smaller length-scales with remarkable fidelity. Hence, controllable and efficient coupling between coherent photons and phonons enables new signal processing technologies that greatly enhance the performance and potential impact of integrated photonics. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for coherent information processing based on travelling-wave photon–phonon transduction, which achieves a phonon emit-and-receive process between distinct nanophotonic waveguides. Using this device, physics—which supports GHz frequencies—we create wavelength-insensitive radiofrequency photonic filters with frequency selectivity, narrow-linewidth and high power-handling in silicon. More generally, this emit-receive concept is the impetus for enabling new signal processing schemes.

  2. Sperm specific proteins-potential candidate molecules for fertility control

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Anil

    2004-01-01

    The increase in population growth rate warrants the development of additional contraceptive methods that are widely acceptable, free from side effects and less expensive. Immunocontraception, and in particular the targeting of antibodies to gamete-specific antigens implicated in sperm egg binding and fertilization, offers an attractive approach to control fertility. The development of a contraceptive vaccine based on sperm antigen represents a promising approach to contraception. In mammals, fertilization is completed by the direct interaction of sperm and egg, a process mediated primarily by sperm surface proteins. Sperm have proteins that are unique, cell specific, immunogenic and accessible to antibodies. A few of the sperm specific proteins have been isolated and characterized. The antibodies raised against the sperm specific antigens have proved to be extremely effective at reducing sperm-egg interaction in vitro; fertility trials in sub-human primates would eventually prove the effectiveness of the sperm antigens in terms of contraceptive efficacy. PMID:15012833

  3. Coherent control of wavepacket launch and evolution in molecular cations in strong-field regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov(1, 3), Dmitri; Moore Tibbetts(2, 3), Katharine; Tarazkar(2, 3), Maryam; Bohinsky(2, 3), Timothy; Matsika(2, 3), Spiridoula; Levis(2, 3), Robert

    2016-05-01

    The time-resolved dissociative ionization dynamics for a family of acetophenone radical cations has been studied in pump-probe experiments. Modifications of the relative fragment yield have been measured as a function of the pump laser wavelength from 790 nm to 1500 nm. In the case of tunnel ionization (1150 - 1500 nm pump), the time-resolved transients of the parent and fragment ions probed with a weak 790 nm pulse reveal an order-of-magnitude enhancement of the peak-to-peak amplitude oscillations, ~ 100 fs longer coherence time, and an order-of-magnitude increase in the ratio of parent to fragment ions, as compared to the case of multiphoton ionization (790 nm pump). The results are quantitatively explained with a model of wavepacket evolution on the ground (D0) and excited (D1 and D2) ionic potential energy surfaces, with the probe-induced and conical-intersection-related transitions between the surfaces. The theory predicts the periods of fragment-ratio oscillations, thus confirming the ability to prepare and manipulate multiple wavepackets in the vicinity of a conical intersection for polyatomic molecules on the time scale of picoseconds.

  4. Phase control of Goos-Hänchen shift via biexciton coherence in a multiple quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Nasehi, Rajab; Soleimani, H. Rahimpour; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-09-01

    The behavior of the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of the reflected and transmitted probe and signal pulses through a cavity containing four-level GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells with 15 periods of 17.5 nm GaAs wells and 15-nm Al0.3Ga0.7As barriers is theoretically discussed. The biexciton coherence set up by two coupling fields can induce the destructive interference to control the absorption and gain properties of probe field under appropriate conditions. It is realized that for the specific values of the intensities and the relative phase of applied fields, the simultaneous negative or positive GH shift in the transmitted and reflected light beam can be obtained via amplification in a probe light. It is found that by adjusting the controllable parameters, the GH shifts can be switched between the large positive and negative values in the medium. Moreover, the effect of exciton spin relaxation on the GH shift has also been discussed. We find that the exciton spin relaxation can manipulate the behavior of GH shift in the reflected and transmitted probe beam through the cavity. We show that by controlling the incident angles of probe beam and under certain conditions, the GH shifts in the reflected and transmitted probe beams can become either negative or positive corresponding to the superluminal or subluminal light propagation. Our proposed model may supply a new prospect in technological applications for the light amplification in optical sensors working on quantum coherence impacts in solid-state systems.

  5. Generation of large coherent states by bang-bang control of a trapped-ion oscillator.

    PubMed

    Alonso, J; Leupold, F M; Solèr, Z U; Fadel, M; Marinelli, M; Keitch, B C; Negnevitsky, V; Home, J P

    2016-01-01

    Fast control of quantum systems is essential to make use of quantum properties before they degrade by decoherence. This is important for quantum-enhanced information processing, as well as for pushing quantum systems towards the boundary between quantum and classical physics. 'Bang-bang' control attains the ultimate speed limit by making large changes to control fields much faster than the system can respond, but is often challenging to implement experimentally. Here we demonstrate bang-bang control of a trapped-ion oscillator using nanosecond switching of the trapping potentials. We perform controlled displacements with which we realize coherent states with up to 10,000 quanta of energy. We use these displaced states to verify the form of the ion-light interaction at high excitations far outside the usual regime of operation. These methods provide new possibilities for quantum-state manipulation and generation, alongside the potential for a significant increase in operational clock speed for trapped-ion quantum information processing. PMID:27046513

  6. Generation of large coherent states by bang–bang control of a trapped-ion oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, J.; Leupold, F. M.; Solèr, Z. U.; Fadel, M.; Marinelli, M.; Keitch, B. C.; Negnevitsky, V.; Home, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Fast control of quantum systems is essential to make use of quantum properties before they degrade by decoherence. This is important for quantum-enhanced information processing, as well as for pushing quantum systems towards the boundary between quantum and classical physics. ‘Bang–bang' control attains the ultimate speed limit by making large changes to control fields much faster than the system can respond, but is often challenging to implement experimentally. Here we demonstrate bang–bang control of a trapped-ion oscillator using nanosecond switching of the trapping potentials. We perform controlled displacements with which we realize coherent states with up to 10,000 quanta of energy. We use these displaced states to verify the form of the ion-light interaction at high excitations far outside the usual regime of operation. These methods provide new possibilities for quantum-state manipulation and generation, alongside the potential for a significant increase in operational clock speed for trapped-ion quantum information processing. PMID:27046513

  7. Strong-field spatiotemporal ultrafast coherent control in three-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, Barry D.; Suchowski, Haim; Silberberg, Yaron; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2010-06-15

    Simple analytical approaches for implementing strong field coherent control schemes are often elusive due to the complexity of the interaction between the intense excitation field and the system of interest. Here, we demonstrate control over multiphoton excitation in a three-level resonant system using simple, analytically derived ultrafast pulse shapes. We utilize a two-dimensional spatiotemporal control technique, in which temporal focusing produces a spatially dependent quadratic spectral phase, while a second, arbitrary phase parameter is scanned using a pulse shaper. In the current work, we demonstrate weak-to-strong field excitation of {sup 85}Rb, with a {pi} phase step and the quadratic phase as the chosen control parameters. The intricate dependence of the multilevel dynamics on these parameters is exhibited by mapping the data onto a two-dimensional control landscape. Further insight is gained by simulating the complete landscape using a dressed-state, time-domain model, in which the influence of individual shaping parameters can be extracted using both exact and asymptotic time-domain representations of the dressed-state energies.

  8. Generation of large coherent states by bang-bang control of a trapped-ion oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, J.; Leupold, F. M.; Solèr, Z. U.; Fadel, M.; Marinelli, M.; Keitch, B. C.; Negnevitsky, V.; Home, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Fast control of quantum systems is essential to make use of quantum properties before they degrade by decoherence. This is important for quantum-enhanced information processing, as well as for pushing quantum systems towards the boundary between quantum and classical physics. `Bang-bang' control attains the ultimate speed limit by making large changes to control fields much faster than the system can respond, but is often challenging to implement experimentally. Here we demonstrate bang-bang control of a trapped-ion oscillator using nanosecond switching of the trapping potentials. We perform controlled displacements with which we realize coherent states with up to 10,000 quanta of energy. We use these displaced states to verify the form of the ion-light interaction at high excitations far outside the usual regime of operation. These methods provide new possibilities for quantum-state manipulation and generation, alongside the potential for a significant increase in operational clock speed for trapped-ion quantum information processing.

  9. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy principle embodiment into Q-PHASE microscope: story of a successful technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lostak, M.; Chmelik, R.

    2016-03-01

    Curiously, the coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) was brought into the world owing to the endeavor of Chmelik's team at Brno University of Technology (BUT) to avoid scanning in confocal microscopy. As coherence gating seemed to be the way, the Leith & Upatnieks proposal of incoherent holography had been considered attractive. Their method made interference system free from strict dependence on both spatial and temporal coherence. Off axis holographic system proposed on such basis has been proved capable of coherence based depth discrimination in single wide-field shot in reflected-light arrangement. Consequently, extremely low-coherence holographic imaging had been found highly contributive also to the image quality depriving it from coherence artefacts and improving its transversal resolution. This is why CCHM promised high precision of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) in transmitted light set up that was realized for cell biology. However the cost of necessarily complicated optical design and need of very precise mechanics forced the team of prof Chmelik at BUT to search for a company capable of mastering the instrument. It was TESCAN ORSAY the highly successful scanning electron microscopes producer that finally took charge of the commercial design. Long-term collaboration of the company with BUT made possible both the CCHM technology successful transfer up to Q-PHASE microscope production as well as the company Light microscopy division reinforcement. This contribution merges views of CCHM technology author and the TESCAN development team.

  10. Coherent optical control of the spin of a single hole in an InAs/GaAs quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Godden, T M; Quilter, J H; Ramsay, A J; Wu, Yanwen; Brereton, P; Boyle, S J; Luxmoore, I J; Puebla-Nunez, J; Fox, A M; Skolnick, M S

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate coherent optical control of a single hole spin confined to an InAs/GaAs quantum dot. A superposition of hole-spin states is created by fast (10-100 ps) dissociation of a spin-polarized electron-hole pair. Full control of the hole spin is achieved by combining coherent rotations about two axes: Larmor precession of the hole spin about an external Voigt geometry magnetic field, and rotation about the optical axis due to the geometric phase shift induced by a picosecond laser pulse resonant with the hole-trion transition. PMID:22304289

  11. Air-breakdown coherent detection of terahertz using controlled optical bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chia-Yeh; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2013-03-01

    Detection of the electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) signal has been used in gas plasma for measurement of the symmetry-breaking THz transients. Previously, detection linearity with the THz field was accomplished by either mixing EFISH signal with a second harmonic component of an octave-spanning plasma supercontinuum or by addition of a high voltage DC bias across the plasma. Here we report a new method where controlled injection of the second harmonic signal provides the necessary bias for the coherent signal detection. This is accomplished simply by insertion of the BBO crystal in an optical path. The absence of high intensity or high voltage makes the detection scheme more viable for remote sensing.

  12. Control of Coherences and Optical Responses of Pigment-Protein Complexes by Plasmonic Nanoantennae.

    PubMed

    Caprasecca, Stefano; Guido, Ciro A; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-06-16

    The key for light-harvesting in pigment-protein complexes are molecular excitons, delocalized excited states comprising a superposition of excitations at different molecular sites. There is experimental evidence that the optical response due to such excitons can be largely affected by plasmonic nanoantennae. Here we employ a multiscale approach combining time-dependent density functional theory and polarizable classical models to study the optical behavior of the LH2 complex present in bacteria when interacting with a gold nanorod. The simulation not only reproduces the experiments but also explains their molecular origin. By tuning the chromophoric unit and selectively switching on/off the excitonic interactions, as well as by exploring different setups, we clearly show that the dramatic enhancement in the optical response, unexpectedly, is not accompanied by changes in the coherences. Instead polarization effects are dominant. These results can be used to design an optimal control of the light-harvesting process through plasmonic nanoantennae. PMID:27223268

  13. Coherent control of a single ²⁹Si nuclear spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Pla, Jarryd J; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A; Tan, Kuan Y; Dehollain, Juan P; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Jamieson, David N; Dzurak, Andrew S; Morello, Andrea

    2014-12-12

    Magnetic fluctuations caused by the nuclear spins of a host crystal are often the leading source of decoherence for many types of solid-state spin qubit. In group-IV semiconductor materials, the spin-bearing nuclei are sufficiently rare that it is possible to identify and control individual host nuclear spins. This Letter presents the first experimental detection and manipulation of a single ²⁹Si nuclear spin. The quantum nondemolition single-shot readout of the spin is demonstrated, and a Hahn echo measurement reveals a coherence time of T₂=6.3(7)  ms—in excellent agreement with bulk experiments. Atomistic modeling combined with extracted experimental parameters provides possible lattice sites for the ²⁹Si atom under investigation. These results demonstrate that single ²⁹Si nuclear spins could serve as a valuable resource in a silicon spin-based quantum computer. PMID:25541792

  14. Controllable preparation of two-mode entangled coherent states in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ying-Hua; Liu, Yong-Mei

    2014-11-01

    Although the multi-level structure of superconducting qubits may result in calculation errors, it can be rationally used to effectively improve the speed of gate operations. Utilizing a current-biased Josephson junction (λ-type rf-SQUID) as a tunable coupler for superconducting transmission line resonators (TLRs), under the large detuning condition, we demonstrate the controllable generation of entangled coherent states in circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED). The coupling between the TLRs and the qubit can be effectively regulated by an external bias current or coupling capacitor. Further investigations indicate that the maximum entangled state can be obtained through measuring the excited state of the superconducting qubits. Then, the influence of the TLR decay on the prepared entangled states is analyzed.

  15. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches. PMID:24145394

  16. Coherent control of broadband isolated attosecond pulses in a chirped two-color laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Pu; Zeng Zhinan; Zheng Yinghui; Lu Yingying; Liu Peng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2010-03-15

    A theoretical investigation is presented that uses a strong two-color laser field composed of a linearly chirped fundamental (900 nm) and its subharmonic (1800-nm) laser pulses to control coherently the broadband isolated attosecond pulses in high-order harmonic generations. After the subharmonic field is added, the intrinsic chirp of harmonic emission can be reduced significantly, and consequently, the temporal synchronization of harmonic emission with different photon energies at the level of the single-atom response can be realized. In addition, the scheme is robust against the carrier envelope phase variation to produce a twin pulse of stable sub-100-as duration, and the relative intensity of the twin pulses can be changed just by adjusting the relative time delay of the two driving pulses, which is of benefit in general pump-probe experiments.

  17. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches.

  18. Nanoscale Molecules Under Thermodynamic Control:" Digestive Ripening" or " Nanomachining"

    SciTech Connect

    Klabunde, Kenneth J.

    2015-06-04

    Overall Research Goals and Specific Objectives: Nanoscale materials are becoming ubiquitous in science and engineering, and are found widely in nature. However, their formation processes and uniquely high chemical reactivities are not understood well, indeed are often mysterious. Over recent years, a number of research teams have described nanoparticle synthesis, and aging, thermal treatment, or etching times have been mentioned. We have used the terms “digestive ripening” and “nanomachining” and have suggested that thermodynamics plays an important part in the size adjustment to monodisperse arrays being formed. Since there is scant theoretical understanding of digestive ripening, the overall goal in our research is to learn what experimental parameters (ligand used, temperature, solvent, time) are most important, how to control nanoparticle size and shape after initial crude nanoparticles have been synthesized, and gain better understanding of the chemical mechanism details. Specific objectives for the past twentynine months since the grant began have been to (1) Secure and train personnel;as of 2011, a postdoc Deepa Jose, female from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, India; Yijun Sun, a second year graduate student, female from China; and Jessica Changstrom, female from the USA, GK12 fellow (program for enhancing teaching ability) are actively carrying out research. (2) Find out what happens to sulfur bound hydrogen of thiol when it interacts with gold nanoparticles. Our findings are discussed in detail later. (3) Determine the effect of particle size, shape, and temperature on dodecyl thiol assited digestive ripening of gold nanoparticles. See our discussions later. (4) To understand in detail the ligand interaction in molecular clusters and nanoparticles (5) Determine the effect of chain length of amines on Au nanoparticle size under digestive ripening conditions (carbon chain length varied from 4-18). (6) Determine the catalytic activity

  19. Room temperature coherent control of defect spin qubits in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Koehl, William F; Buckley, Bob B; Heremans, F Joseph; Calusine, Greg; Awschalom, David D

    2011-11-01

    Electronic spins in semiconductors have been used extensively to explore the limits of external control over quantum mechanical phenomena. A long-standing goal of this research has been to identify or develop robust quantum systems that can be easily manipulated, for future use in advanced information and communication technologies. Recently, a point defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy centre has attracted a great deal of interest because it possesses an atomic-scale electronic spin state that can be used as an individually addressable, solid-state quantum bit (qubit), even at room temperature. These exceptional quantum properties have motivated efforts to identify similar defects in other semiconductors, as they may offer an expanded range of functionality not available to the diamond nitrogen-vacancy centre. Notably, several defects in silicon carbide (SiC) have been suggested as good candidates for exploration, owing to a combination of computational predictions and magnetic resonance data. Here we demonstrate that several defect spin states in the 4H polytype of SiC (4H-SiC) can be optically addressed and coherently controlled in the time domain at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 kelvin. Using optical and microwave techniques similar to those used with diamond nitrogen-vacancy qubits, we study the spin-1 ground state of each of four inequivalent forms of the neutral carbon-silicon divacancy, as well as a pair of defect spin states of unidentified origin. These defects are optically active near telecommunication wavelengths, and are found in a host material for which there already exist industrial-scale crystal growth and advanced microfabrication techniques. In addition, they possess desirable spin coherence properties that are comparable to those of the diamond nitrogen-vacancy centre. This makes them promising candidates for various photonic, spintronic and quantum information applications that merge quantum degrees of freedom with classical

  20. The use and manipulation of insect reproductive molecules for controlling insect populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use and manipulation of insect reproductive molecules, and the genes that encode them, provides a variety of methods to control insect fertility and thus a means of population control for insect pests. Towards this end, we first studied the yolk polypeptide gene from the caribfly, Anastrepha su...

  1. A stable pattern of EEG spectral coherence distinguishes children with autism from neuro-typical controls - a large case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The autism rate has recently increased to 1 in 100 children. Genetic studies demonstrate poorly understood complexity. Environmental factors apparently also play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies demonstrate increased brain sizes and altered connectivity. Electroencephalogram (EEG) coherence studies confirm connectivity changes. However, genetic-, MRI- and/or EEG-based diagnostic tests are not yet available. The varied study results likely reflect methodological and population differences, small samples and, for EEG, lack of attention to group-specific artifact. Methods Of the 1,304 subjects who participated in this study, with ages ranging from 1 to 18 years old and assessed with comparable EEG studies, 463 children were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 571 children were neuro-typical controls (C). After artifact management, principal components analysis (PCA) identified EEG spectral coherence factors with corresponding loading patterns. The 2- to 12-year-old subsample consisted of 430 ASD- and 554 C-group subjects (n = 984). Discriminant function analysis (DFA) determined the spectral coherence factors' discrimination success for the two groups. Loading patterns on the DFA-selected coherence factors described ASD-specific coherence differences when compared to controls. Results Total sample PCA of coherence data identified 40 factors which explained 50.8% of the total population variance. For the 2- to 12-year-olds, the 40 factors showed highly significant group differences (P < 0.0001). Ten randomly generated split half replications demonstrated high-average classification success (C, 88.5%; ASD, 86.0%). Still higher success was obtained in the more restricted age sub-samples using the jackknifing technique: 2- to 4-year-olds (C, 90.6%; ASD, 98.1%); 4- to 6-year-olds (C, 90.9%; ASD 99.1%); and 6- to 12-year-olds (C, 98.7%; ASD, 93.9%). Coherence loadings demonstrated reduced short-distance and reduced, as well as increased

  2. Electrically controllable plasmonic enhanced coherent random lasing from dye-doped nematic liquid crystals containing Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wan, Yuan; Shi, Lijie; Zhong, Haizheng; Deng, Luogen

    2016-08-01

    An electrically controllable plasmonic enhanced coherent random lasing from the dye-doped nematic liquid crystal containing Au nanoparticles is demonstrated. To achieve the optimal control of the RL properties, the polarization of the pump light should be parallel to the rubbing direction of the cells. The lasing output intensity is direction-dependent and the substantial output distributes in an angle range of 0°~30° deviating from the direction of the pump stripe. The coherent feedback associated with the coherent random lasing mainly originates from the cooperative effect of the enhanced localized electric field in the vicinity of Au nanoparticles and the multiple scattering caused by the fluctuations of the liquid crystal director and local dielectric tensor. PMID:27505729

  3. Coherent structures in plasma-actuator controlled supersonic jets: Axisymmetric and mixed azimuthal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitonde, D. V.; Samimy, M.

    2011-09-01

    High-fidelity simulations are employed to study the effect of eight localized arc filament plasma actuators placed around the periphery of a Mach 1.3 converging-diverging nozzle exit. Emphasis is placed on understanding the coherent structures generated by axisymmetric (m = 0), flapping or first mixed (m = ±1) and second mixed (m = ±2) modes, which are excited at the jet column-mode frequency corresponding to a Strouhal number based on jet diameter of 0.3. Baseline (no control) and constant excitation (actuators on continuously) cases are also simulated. Comparisons with experimental results indicate that the computational model reproduces the main features induced by the actuators. Furthermore, the mean flow exhibits many similarities with the theoretical predictions of Cohen and Wygnanski [J. Fluid Mech. 176, 221 (1987)]. Overall, the results indicate a complex coherent structure generation, evolution, and disintegration process. For m = ±1, the phase-averaged flow reveals successive distorted elliptic vortex rings with axes in the flapping plane but alternating on either side of the jet axis. This generates a chain of structures each of which interacts with its predecessor on one side of the major plane and its successor on the other. Through self and mutual induction, the leading segment of each loop is pinched and passes through the previous ring before rapidly breaking up. The m = ±2 mode yields elliptic structures with major axes of successive rings being aligned with the two symmetry planes, which are orthogonal to each other. The minor axis side is pulled downstream faster than the rest of the structure because of the higher velocity near the jet centerline and self-induced effects, yielding a horse-shoe shape when viewed in profile. The m = 0 mode exhibits axisymmetric roll-up events, with vortex ribs in the braid regions connecting successive large coherent structures. The constant excitation (with largest energy input) and baseline cases are similar

  4. Coherent beam control through inhomogeneous media in multi-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Hari Prasad

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has become a primary tool for high-resolution deep tissue imaging because of its sensitivity to ballistic excitation photons in comparison to scattered excitation photons. The imaging depth of multi-photon microscopes in tissue imaging is limited primarily by background fluorescence that is generated by scattered light due to the random fluctuations in refractive index inside the media, and by reduced intensity in the ballistic focal volume due to aberrations within the tissue and at its interface. We built two multi-photon adaptive optics (AO) correction systems, one for combating scattering and aberration problems, and another for compensating interface aberrations. For scattering correction a MEMS segmented deformable mirror (SDM) was inserted at a plane conjugate to the objective back-pupil plane. The SDM can pre-compensate for light scattering by coherent combination of the scattered light to make an apparent focus even at a depths where negligible ballistic light remains (i.e. ballistic limit). This problem was approached by investigating the spatial and temporal focusing characteristics of a broad-band light source through strongly scattering media. A new model was developed for coherent focus enhancement through or inside the strongly media based on the initial speckle contrast. A layer of fluorescent beads under a mouse skull was imaged using an iterative coherent beam control method in the prototype two-photon microscope to demonstrate the technique. We also adapted an AO correction system to an existing in three-photon microscope in a collaborator lab at Cornell University. In the second AO correction approach a continuous deformable mirror (CDM) is placed at a plane conjugate to the plane of an interface aberration. We demonstrated that this "Conjugate AO" technique yields a large field-of-view (FOV) advantage in comparison to Pupil AO. Further, we showed that the extended FOV in conjugate AO is maintained over a

  5. Coherence comes full circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation has revolutionized the study of molecules and materials. Talking to Nature Materials, Gerhard Materlik, CEO of the Diamond Light Source, discusses the many uses of synchrotron sources and free electron lasers.

  6. Structural analysis of RNA molecules involved in plasmid copy number control.

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, J; Polisky, B

    1983-01-01

    DNA replication of the plasmid ColE1 and its relatives is controlled mainly by a small plasmid-encoded transcript known as RNA11. We have studied the conformation of RNA1 molecules from two related but compatible plasmids, ColE1 and RSF1030, using T1 ribonuclease, S1 nuclease, cobra venom nuclease, and diethyl pyrocarbonate modification as probes for secondary structure. Both RNA1 molecules contain three double-stranded stems, three single-stranded loops, and an exposed 5' tail. All loops in both molecules show similar sensitivities to the probes used, as do stems 1 and 3. The region comprising stem 2 of each RNA1 molecule contains the most sequence differences as well as the most structural changes of any region in the two molecules. The structure of the RNA1 molecule encoded by a recessive high copy number mutant of ColE1 was also investigated. Structural alterations involving the first stem and loop of the molecule are proposed to be responsible for the inability of the mutant RNA1 to function in vivo. Images PMID:6194508

  7. Coherent control of single spins in a silicon carbide pn junction device at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Widmann, Matthias; Booker, Ian; Niethammer, Matthias; Ohshima, Takeshi; Gali, Adam; Son, Nguyen T.; Janzén, Erik; Wrachtrup, Joerg

    Spins in single defects have been studied for quantum information science and quantum metrology. It has been proven that spins of the single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond can be used as a quantum bit, and a single spin sensor operating at ambient conditions. Recently, there has been a growing interest in a new material in which color centers similar to NV centers can be created and whose electrical properties can also be well controlled, thus existing electronic devices can easily be adapted as a platform for quantum applications. We recently reported that single spins of negatively charged silicon vacancies in SiC can be coherently controlled and long-lived at room temperature. As a next step, we isolated single silicon vacancies in a SiC pn junction device and investigated how the change in Fermi level, induced by applying bias, alters the charge state of silicon vacancies, thus affects the spin state control. This study will allow us to envision quantum applications based on single defects incorporated in modern electronic devices.

  8. Geometries for the coherent control of four-wave mixing in graphene multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shraddha M.; Lyons, Ashley; Roger, Thomas; Clerici, Matteo; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Faccio, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Deeply sub-wavelength two-dimensional films may exhibit extraordinarily strong nonlinear effects. Here we show that 2D films exhibit the remarkable property of a phase-controllable nonlinearity, i.e., the amplitude of the nonlinear polarisation wave in the medium can be controlled via the pump beam phase and determines whether a probe beam will “feel” or not the nonlinearity. This is in stark contrast to bulk nonlinearities where propagation in the medium averages out any such phase dependence. We perform a series of experiments in multilayer graphene that highlight some of the consequences of the optical nonlinearity phase-dependence, such as the coherent control of nonlinearly diffracted beams, single-pump-beam induced phase-conjugation and the demonstration of a nonlinear mirror characterised by negative reflection. The observed phase sensitivity is not specific to graphene but rather is solely a result of the dimensionality and is therefore expected in all 2D materials. PMID:26486075

  9. Two-photon indirect optical injection and two-color coherent control in bulk silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. L.; Rioux, J.; Sipe, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Using an empirical pseudopotential description of electron states and an adiabatic bond charge model for phonon states in bulk silicon, we theoretically investigate two-photon indirect optical injection of carriers and spins and two-color coherent control of the motion of the injected carriers and spins. For two-photon indirect carrier and spin injection, we identify the selection rules of band edge transitions, the injection in each conduction band valley, and the injection from each phonon branch at 4 and 300 K. At 4 K, the TA-phonon-assisted transitions dominate the injection at low photon energies and the TO-phonon-assisted transitions at high photon energies. At 300 K, the former dominates at all photon energies of interest. The carrier injection shows anisotropy and linear-circular dichroism with respect to the light propagation direction. For light propagating along the <001> direction, the carrier injection exhibits valley anisotropy, and the injection into the Z conduction band valley is larger than that into the X and Y valleys. For σ- light propagating along the <001> (<111>) direction, the degree of spin polarization gives a maximum value about 20% (6%) at 4 K and -10% (20%) at 300 K, and at both temperature shows abundant structure near the injection edges due to contributions from different phonon branches. For two-color coherent current injection with an incident optical field composed of a fundamental frequency and its second harmonic, the response tensors of the electron (hole) charge and spin currents are calculated at 4 and 300 K. We show the current control for three different polarization scenarios: For cocircularly polarized beams, the direction of the charge current and the polarization direction of the spin current can be controlled by a relative-phase parameter; for the collinearly and cross-linearly polarized beams, the current amplitude can be controlled by that parameter. The spectral dependence of the maximum swarm velocity shows that

  10. Coherent control of population transfer in Rydberg atoms via chirped microwave pulses.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Juan J; Chu, Shih-I

    2007-09-27

    We present a comprehensive and ab initio nonperturbative investigation of the coherent population transfer among the 3D high-lying Rydberg hydrogen and alkali atomic states via linearly polarized chirped microwave pulses. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the dynamical evolution of Rydberg atoms is accurately and efficiently solved by means of the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method. For atomic H, the population transfer from n = 35 to 30 with nearly 100% efficiency is achieved by means of the sequential two-photon Deltan = -1 transitions. The calculation fully utilizes all of the available orbital angular momentum l states for a given n, and the interference pattern and population evolution dynamics of individual l states are analyzed in detail. It is shown that the coherent control of the population transfer from the high n to the low n states can be accomplished by the optimization of the chirping parameters and microwave field strength. Similar analysis is performed for the Na atom, where the alkali atomic structure is described by an accurate model potential. We found that while the global population transfer pattern is qualitatively similar, there are significant differences in the dynamical response of atomic H and Na to the chirped microwave fields. Due to the degeneracy of the l states (for a given n) in unperturbed atomic H, the population transfer involves significant coupling and interference among a number of low-lying l states. For the case of Na atoms, however, the population transfer from the n to (n - 1) state is dominated by a single channel, namely, from the |n,l = 0> to the |n - 1,l = 0> state. PMID:17722891

  11. Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Yuya; Habuka, Satoru; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Hatta, Shinichiro; Aruga, Tetsuya; Frederiksen, Thomas; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices. PMID:26665080

  12. Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Yuya; Habuka, Satoru; Hatta, Shinichiro; Aruga, Tetsuya; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices. PMID:26665080

  13. Coherent control of charge exchange in strong-field dissociation of LiF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Greg; Esry, Brett

    2016-05-01

    The alkali-metal-halides family of molecules are useful prototypes in the study of laser-assisted charge exchange. Typically these molecules possess a field-free crossing between the ionic and covalent diabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential curves, leading to Li+ + F- and Li + F in LiF. These channels are energetically well-separated from higher-lying potentials, and may be easily distinguished experimentally. Moreover, charge exchange involves non-adiabatic transitions between the ionic and covalent channels, thereby allowing the investigation of physics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The focus of this work is to control the preference between ionic and covalent dissociative products. We solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the nuclear motion in full dimensionality, and investigate a pump-probe scheme for charge-exchange control. The degree of control is investigated by calculating the kinetic-energy release spectrum as a function of pump-probe delay for the ionic and covalent fragments. This work is supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Coherent Control of Population Transfer via Linear Chirp in Liquid Solution: The Role of Motional Narrowing.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, Porscha L; Geva, Eitan

    2016-05-19

    The conditions under which linear chirp can be used to control population transfer between the electronic states of a chromophore dissolved in liquid solution are investigated. To this end, we model the chromophore as a two-state system with shifted electronic potential energy surfaces and a fluctuating electronic transition frequency. The fluctuations are described as an exponentially correlated Gaussian stochastic process, which can be characterized by the average fluctuation amplitude, σ, and correlation time, τc. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for an ensemble of stochastic histories, at different values of σ and τc, and under a wide range of pulse intensities and linear chirp coefficients. In the limit τc → ∞, we find that control diminishes rapidly as soon as σ exceeds the bandwidth of the pulse. However, we also find that control can be regained by reducing τc. We attribute this trend to motional narrowing, whereby decreasing τc narrows down the effective bandwidth of the solvent-induced fluctuations. The results suggest that the choice of methanol as a solvent in the actual experimental demonstration of chirp control by Cerullo et al. [ Chem. Phys. Lett. 1996 , 262 , 362 - 368 ] may have contributed to its success, due to the particularly short τc (∼20 fs) that the rapid librations of this hydrogen bonded liquid give rise to. The results also give rise to the rather surprising prediction that coherent control in liquid solution can be strongly dependent on the choice of solvent and be improved upon by choosing solvents that correspond to lower values of στc. PMID:26595412

  15. Composite microsphere-functionalized scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, Laura; Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Liu, Xeuwu; Ferrari, Mauro; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    Current tissue engineering strategies focus on restoring damaged tissue architectures using biologically active scaffolds. The ideal scaffold would mimic the extracellular matrix of any tissue of interest, promoting cell proliferation and de novo extracellular matrix deposition. A plethora of techniques have been evaluated to engineer scaffolds for the controlled and targeted release of bioactive molecules to provide a functional structure for tissue growth and remodeling, as well as enhance recruitment and proliferation of autologous cells within the implant. Recently, novel approaches using small molecules, instead of growth factors, have been exploited to regulate tissue regeneration. The use of small synthetic molecules could be very advantageous because of their stability, tunability, and low cost. Herein, we propose a chitosan-gelatin scaffold functionalized with composite microspheres consisting of mesoporous silicon microparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) for the controlled release of sphingosine-1-phospate, a small molecule of interest. We characterized the platform with scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy. Finally, the biocompatibility of this multiscale system was analyzed by culturing human mesenchymal stem cells onto the scaffold. The presented strategy establishes the basis of a versatile scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules and for culturing mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26977286

  16. Composite microsphere-functionalized scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfi, Laura; Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Liu, Xeuwu; Ferrari, Mauro; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    Current tissue engineering strategies focus on restoring damaged tissue architectures using biologically active scaffolds. The ideal scaffold would mimic the extracellular matrix of any tissue of interest, promoting cell proliferation and de novo extracellular matrix deposition. A plethora of techniques have been evaluated to engineer scaffolds for the controlled and targeted release of bioactive molecules to provide a functional structure for tissue growth and remodeling, as well as enhance recruitment and proliferation of autologous cells within the implant. Recently, novel approaches using small molecules, instead of growth factors, have been exploited to regulate tissue regeneration. The use of small synthetic molecules could be very advantageous because of their stability, tunability, and low cost. Herein, we propose a chitosan–gelatin scaffold functionalized with composite microspheres consisting of mesoporous silicon microparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) for the controlled release of sphingosine-1-phospate, a small molecule of interest. We characterized the platform with scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy. Finally, the biocompatibility of this multiscale system was analyzed by culturing human mesenchymal stem cells onto the scaffold. The presented strategy establishes the basis of a versatile scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules and for culturing mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26977286

  17. Coherent laser control in attosecond sum-frequency polarization beats using twin noisy driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanpeng; Gan, Chenli; Song, Jianping; Yu, Xiaojun; Ma, Ruiqiong; Ge, Hao; Li, Chuangshe; Lu, Keqing

    2005-02-01

    Based on the phase-conjugate polarization interference between two-pathway excitations, we obtained an analytic closed form for the second-order or fourth-order Markovian stochastic correlation of the V three-level sum-frequency polarization beat (SFPB) in attosecond scale. Novel interferometric oscillatory behavior is exposed in terms of radiation-radiation, radiation-matter, and matter-matter polarization beats. The phase-coherent control of the light beams in the SFPB is subtle. When the laser has broadband linewidth, the homodyne detected SFPB signal shows resonant-nonresonant cross correlation, a drastic difference for three Markovian stochastic fields, and the autocorrelation of the SFPB exhibits hybrid radiation-matter detuning terahertz damping oscillation. As an attosecond ultrafast modulation process, it can be extended intrinsically to any sum frequency of energy levels. It has been also found that the asymmetric behaviors of the polarization beat signals due to the unbalanced controllable dispersion effects between the two arms of interferometer do not affect the overall accuracy in case using the SFPB to measure the Doppler-free energy-level sum of two excited states.

  18. Coherent Phase Control of the Ionization and Dissociation of Vinyl Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Robert J.; Barge, Vishal J.; Hu, Zhan; Willig, Joyce

    2006-03-01

    Two-pathway quantum interference was used to control the photochemical reactions of vinyl chloride (C2H3Cl, VCl). A molecular beam of VCl was irradiated simultaneously with 532 and 177 nm laser light, produced from the second and sixth harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser. The relative phase of the visible and UV lasers was adjusted by passing them through a cell containing a variable pressure of hydrogen gas, and the parent and fragment (C2H3 and HCl) ions of VCl were detected with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The phase lags between different pairs of modulated ion signals depended on the location of the laser focus. This variation of the phase lags was produced by the axial spatial phase of the focused laser beam. A non-zero phase lag between the parent and fragment ions produced when the laser was focused in the center of the spectrometer slit is indicative of coherent control of the branching between ionization and dissociation.

  19. Precise control of coupling strength in photonic molecules over a wide range using nanoelectromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Han; Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Guoqiang; Deng, Jie; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya

    2016-04-01

    Photonic molecules have a range of promising applications including quantum information processing, where precise control of coupling strength is critical. Here, by laterally shifting the center-to-center offset of coupled photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, we demonstrate a method to precisely and dynamically control the coupling strength of photonic molecules through integrated nanoelectromechanical systems with a precision of a few GHz over a range of several THz without modifying the nature of their constituent resonators. Furthermore, the coupling strength can be tuned continuously from negative (strong coupling regime) to zero (weak coupling regime) and further to positive (strong coupling regime) and vice versa. Our work opens a door to the optimization of the coupling strength of photonic molecules in situ for the study of cavity quantum electrodynamics and the development of efficient quantum information devices.

  20. Precise control of coupling strength in photonic molecules over a wide range using nanoelectromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Han; Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Guoqiang; Deng, Jie; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya

    2016-01-01

    Photonic molecules have a range of promising applications including quantum information processing, where precise control of coupling strength is critical. Here, by laterally shifting the center-to-center offset of coupled photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, we demonstrate a method to precisely and dynamically control the coupling strength of photonic molecules through integrated nanoelectromechanical systems with a precision of a few GHz over a range of several THz without modifying the nature of their constituent resonators. Furthermore, the coupling strength can be tuned continuously from negative (strong coupling regime) to zero (weak coupling regime) and further to positive (strong coupling regime) and vice versa. Our work opens a door to the optimization of the coupling strength of photonic molecules in situ for the study of cavity quantum electrodynamics and the development of efficient quantum information devices. PMID:27097883

  1. Precise control of coupling strength in photonic molecules over a wide range using nanoelectromechanical systems

    PubMed Central

    Du, Han; Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Guoqiang; Deng, Jie; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya

    2016-01-01

    Photonic molecules have a range of promising applications including quantum information processing, where precise control of coupling strength is critical. Here, by laterally shifting the center-to-center offset of coupled photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, we demonstrate a method to precisely and dynamically control the coupling strength of photonic molecules through integrated nanoelectromechanical systems with a precision of a few GHz over a range of several THz without modifying the nature of their constituent resonators. Furthermore, the coupling strength can be tuned continuously from negative (strong coupling regime) to zero (weak coupling regime) and further to positive (strong coupling regime) and vice versa. Our work opens a door to the optimization of the coupling strength of photonic molecules in situ for the study of cavity quantum electrodynamics and the development of efficient quantum information devices. PMID:27097883

  2. Fast and automatic depth control of iterative bone ablation based on optical coherence tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Alexander; Pengel, Steffen; Bergmeier, Jan; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Laser surgery is an established clinical procedure in dental applications, soft tissue ablation, and ophthalmology. The presented experimental set-up for closed-loop control of laser bone ablation addresses a feedback system and enables safe ablation towards anatomical structures that usually would have high risk of damage. This study is based on combined working volumes of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Er:YAG cutting laser. High level of automation in fast image data processing and tissue treatment enables reproducible results and shortens the time in the operating room. For registration of the two coordinate systems a cross-like incision is ablated with the Er:YAG laser and segmented with OCT in three distances. The resulting Er:YAG coordinate system is reconstructed. A parameter list defines multiple sets of laser parameters including discrete and specific ablation rates as ablation model. The control algorithm uses this model to plan corrective laser paths for each set of laser parameters and dynamically adapts the distance of the laser focus. With this iterative control cycle consisting of image processing, path planning, ablation, and moistening of tissue the target geometry and desired depth are approximated until no further corrective laser paths can be set. The achieved depth stays within the tolerances of the parameter set with the smallest ablation rate. Specimen trials with fresh porcine bone have been conducted to prove the functionality of the developed concept. Flat bottom surfaces and sharp edges of the outline without visual signs of thermal damage verify the feasibility of automated, OCT controlled laser bone ablation with minimal process time.

  3. Molecular isomerization and fragmentation of polyatomic molecules controlled by inner-valence recollision-ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Doblhoff-Dier, K.; Roither, S.; Schöffler, M.; Kartashov, D.; Xu, H.; Rathje, T.; Paulus, G. G.; Baltuška, A.; Gräfe, S.; Kitzler, M.

    2014-04-01

    Control over various fragmentation reactions of a series of polyatomic molecules (acetylene, ethylene, 1,3-butadiene) by the optical waveform of intense few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated experimentally. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the responsible mechanism is inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals by recolliding electron wave packets.

  4. Selective inner-valence ionization of aligned polyatomic molecules for controlling molecular fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Doblhoff-Dier, K.; Xu, H.; Roither, S.; Iwasaki, A.; Schöffler, M.; Kartashov, D.; Yamanouchi, K.; Baltuška, A.; Gräfe, S.; Kitzler, M.

    2014-04-01

    We show experimentally and theoretically, using acetylene as an example, that the strong preponderance of ionization from specific molecular orbitals to the alignment of the molecular axis with respect to the laser polarization direction allows implementing a method for controlling fragmentation reactions of polyatomic molecules.

  5. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T; Puchner, Elias M; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-10-16

    There is growing interest in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, these engineered T cells can exhibit excessive activity that is difficult to control and can cause severe toxicity. We designed "ON-switch" CARs that enable small-molecule control over T cell therapeutic functions while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen-binding and intracellular signaling components assemble only in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate cell-autonomous recognition and user control. PMID:26405231

  6. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T.; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen binding and intracellular signaling components only assemble in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate both cell autonomous recognition and user control. PMID:26405231

  7. Changes in frontal EEG coherence across infancy predict cognitive abilities at age 3: The mediating role of attentional control.

    PubMed

    Whedon, Margaret; Perry, Nicole B; Calkins, Susan D; Bell, Martha Ann

    2016-09-01

    Theoretical perspectives of cognitive development have maintained that functional integration of the prefrontal cortex across infancy underlies the emergence of attentional control and higher cognitive abilities in early childhood. To investigate these proposed relations, we tested whether functional integration of prefrontal regions across the second half of the first year predicted observed cognitive performance in early childhood 1 year prior indirectly through observed attentional control (N = 300). Results indicated that greater change in left-but not right-frontal EEG coherence between 5 and 10 months was positively associated with attentional control, cognitive flexibility, receptive language, and behavioral inhibitory control. Specifically, a larger increase in coherence between left frontal regions was positively associated with accuracy on a visual search task at Age 2, and visual search accuracy was positively associated with receptive vocabulary, performance on a set-shifting task (DCCS), and delay of gratification at Age 3. Finally, the indirect effects from the change in left frontal EEG coherence to 3-year cognitive flexibility, receptive language, and behavioral inhibitory control were significant, suggesting that internally controlled attention is a mechanism through which early neural maturation influences children's cognitive development. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27441486

  8. Controlled self-assembly of small molecule probes and the related applications in bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Zhou, Huipeng; Chen, Jian; Shahzad, Sohail Anjum; Yu, Cong

    2016-02-15

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used in basic research, disease diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and the development of novel bioanalytical techniques. We mainly focus on the changes in fluorescence signal originated from the controlled self-assembly of small molecule probes, including aggregation caused quenching, aggregation induced emission, controlled turn-on of probe monomer emission, and the tunable monomer-excimer transition. Recent developments in the related bioanalytical techniques have been reviewed. PMID:26188711

  9. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; Wustmann, B.; Koesterke, I.; Schwarz, M.; Freitag, M.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Justus, M.; Seidel, W.; Ilgner, C.; Awari, N.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Laplace, Y.; Rajasekaran, S.; Zhang, L.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Schay, G.; Lorincz, I.; Rauscher, A. A.; Radu, I.; Mährlein, S.; Kim, T. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Wall, S.; Heberle, J.; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A.; Steiger, A.; Müller, A. S.; Helm, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T.; Michel, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Fisher, A. S.; Stojanovic, N.; Gensch, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.

  10. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    PubMed Central

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; Wustmann, B.; Koesterke, I.; Schwarz, M.; Freitag, M.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Justus, M.; Seidel, W.; Ilgner, C.; Awari, N.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Laplace, Y.; Rajasekaran, S.; Zhang, L.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Schay, G.; Lorincz, I.; Rauscher, A. A.; Radu, I.; Mährlein, S.; Kim, T. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Wall, S.; Heberle, J.; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A.; Steiger, A.; Müller, A. S.; Helm, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T.; Michel, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Fisher, A. S.; Stojanovic, N.; Gensch, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution. PMID:26924651

  11. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter.

    PubMed

    Green, B; Kovalev, S; Asgekar, V; Geloni, G; Lehnert, U; Golz, T; Kuntzsch, M; Bauer, C; Hauser, J; Voigtlaender, J; Wustmann, B; Koesterke, I; Schwarz, M; Freitag, M; Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Justus, M; Seidel, W; Ilgner, C; Awari, N; Nicoletti, D; Kaiser, S; Laplace, Y; Rajasekaran, S; Zhang, L; Winnerl, S; Schneider, H; Schay, G; Lorincz, I; Rauscher, A A; Radu, I; Mährlein, S; Kim, T H; Lee, J S; Kampfrath, T; Wall, S; Heberle, J; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A; Steiger, A; Müller, A S; Helm, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T; Michel, P; Cavalleri, A; Fisher, A S; Stojanovic, N; Gensch, M

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution. PMID:26924651

  12. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; et al

    2016-02-29

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields andmore » the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. In conclusion, we benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.« less

  13. Doping-controlled Coherent Electron-Phonon Coupling in Vanadium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Wang, Bin; Nag, Joyeeta; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-05-10

    Broadband femtosecond transient spectroscopy and density functional calculations reveal that substitutional tungsten doping of a VO2 film changes the coherent phonon response compared to the undoped film due to altered electronic and structural dynamics.

  14. Toward Controlled Hierarchical Heterogeneities in Giant Molecules with Precisely Arranged Nano Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Mingjun; Su, Hao; Zhang, Siyu; Yue, Kan; Dong, Xue-Hui; Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Shuo; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Lotz, Bernard; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Li, Yiwen; Cheng, Stephen Z D

    2016-01-27

    Herein we introduce a unique synthetic methodology to prepare a library of giant molecules with multiple, precisely arranged nano building blocks, and illustrate the influence of minute structural differences on their self-assembly behaviors. The T8 polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles are orthogonally functionalized and sequentially attached onto the end of a hydrophobic polymer chain in either linear or branched configuration. The heterogeneity of primary chemical structure in terms of composition, surface functionality, sequence, and topology can be precisely controlled and is reflected in the self-assembled supramolecular structures of these giant molecules in the condensed state. This strategy offers promising opportunities to manipulate the hierarchical heterogeneities of giant molecules via precise and modular assemblies of various nano building blocks. PMID:27163025

  15. Toward Controlled Hierarchical Heterogeneities in Giant Molecules with Precisely Arranged Nano Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herein we introduce a unique synthetic methodology to prepare a library of giant molecules with multiple, precisely arranged nano building blocks, and illustrate the influence of minute structural differences on their self-assembly behaviors. The T8 polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles are orthogonally functionalized and sequentially attached onto the end of a hydrophobic polymer chain in either linear or branched configuration. The heterogeneity of primary chemical structure in terms of composition, surface functionality, sequence, and topology can be precisely controlled and is reflected in the self-assembled supramolecular structures of these giant molecules in the condensed state. This strategy offers promising opportunities to manipulate the hierarchical heterogeneities of giant molecules via precise and modular assemblies of various nano building blocks. PMID:27163025

  16. Dynamic acousto-optic control of a strongly coupled photonic molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kapfinger, Stephan; Reichert, Thorsten; Lichtmannecker, Stefan; Müller, Kai; Finley, Jonathan J.; Wixforth, Achim; Kaniber, Michael; Krenner, Hubert J.

    2015-01-01

    Strongly confined photonic modes can couple to quantum emitters and mechanical excitations. To harness the full potential in quantum photonic circuits, interactions between different constituents have to be precisely and dynamically controlled. Here, a prototypical coupled element, a photonic molecule defined in a photonic crystal membrane, is controlled by a radio frequency surface acoustic wave. The sound wave is tailored to deliberately switch on and off the bond of the photonic molecule on sub-nanosecond timescales. In time-resolved experiments, the acousto-optically controllable coupling is directly observed as clear anticrossings between the two nanophotonic modes. The coupling strength is determined directly from the experimental data. Both the time dependence of the tuning and the inter-cavity coupling strength are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical calculations. The demonstrated mechanical technique can be directly applied for dynamic quantum gate operations in state-of-the-art-coupled nanophotonic, quantum cavity electrodynamic and optomechanical systems. PMID:26436203

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Compared With Colposcopy for Assessment of Vaginal Epithelial Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kathleen L.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Moench, Thomas R.; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Loza, Melissa L.; Wei, Jingna; Grady, James; Paull, Jeremy; Motamedi, Massoud; Rosenthal, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Colposcopy has been used to detect epithelial damage with vaginal microbicides. In animal models, optical coherence tomography (OCT) provided increased sensitivity over colposcopy in detecting epithelial injury. This randomized double-blinded clinical study compared OCT to colposcopy for the evaluation of epithelial injury in women using placebo or nonoxynol-9. Methods Thirty women aged 18–45 were randomized to use hydroxyethyl cellulose placebo or nonoxynol-9 vaginal gel twice daily for 5.5 days. Imaging with colposcopy and OCT was performed prior to product use, after the last dose, and 1 week later. Colposcopy was graded using standard criteria. OCT images were scored for epithelial integrity based on a published scoring system and measured for epithelial thickness. Results Colposcopy findings and OCT scores and epithelial thicknesses were similar between treatment groups at baseline. After treatment, there were significant differences between the nonoxynol-9 (1.37) and control group (1.15) OCT scores (p<0.001, indicating epithelial injury, and there was epithelial thinning in the nonoxynol-9 group (237μm) compared to the control group (292μm) (p=0.008). There were no significant posttreatment colposcopic differences in epithelial disruption between treatment groups, with only increased erythema noted after nonoxynol-9 use (p=0.02). Conclusion OCT detected epithelial disruption and thinning not identified by colposcopy. Vaginal epithelial thickness, a measure previously available only through biopsy, decreased after nonoxynol-9 use, a finding that may contribute to increased susceptibility to HIV after frequent use. OCT shows promise for the noninvasive clinical assessment of vaginal epithelial damage. Clinical Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry, www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm, R000006186. PMID:22105265

  18. Controlled degradation of hydrogels using multi-functional cross-linking molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Bouhadir, Kamal H; Mooney, David J

    2004-06-01

    Hydrogels, chemically cross-linked or physically entangled, have found a number of applications as novel delivery vehicles of drugs and cells. However, the narrow ranges of degradation rates and mechanical strength currently available from many hydrogels limits their applications. We have hypothesized that utilization of multi-functional cross-linking molecules to form hydrogels could provide a wider range and tighter control over the degradation rates and mechanical stiffness of gels than bi-functional cross-linking molecules. To address the possibility, we isolated alpha-L-guluronate residues of sodium alginate, and oxidized them to prepare poly(aldehyde guluronate) (PAG). Hydrogels were formed with either poly(acrylamide-co-hydrazide) (PAH) as a multi-functional cross-linking molecule or adipic acid dihydrazide (AAD) as a bi-functional cross-linking molecule. The initial properties and degradation behavior of both PAG gel types were monitored. PAG/PAH hydrogels showed higher mechanical stiffness before degradation and degraded more slowly than PAG/AAD gels, at the same concentration of cross-linking functional groups. The enhanced mechanical stiffness and prolonged degradation behavior could be attributed to the multiple attachment points of PAH in the gel at the same concentration of functional groups. This approach to regulating gel properties with multifunctional cross-linking molecules could be broadly used in hydrogels. PMID:14751730

  19. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia N. H.; Davies, David G.; Sauer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA) that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation. PMID:26610524

  20. Emission-Tunable Multicolor Graphene Molecules with Controllable Synthesis, Excellent Optical Properties, and Specific Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junwei; Huang, Yuli; Zhu, Haoyun; Huang, Wei; Wang, Weizhi

    2016-03-01

    Series of graphene molecules with varied emission colors have been prepared by oxidative cyclodehydrogenation using anhydrous ferric chloride (FeCl3) as the catalyst under mild conditions. By controlling the oxidation time in the initial step only, molecules with different fluorescence colors are conveniently obtained. New colors can be recorded evidently because of the stepwise and controllable process, which highly related to the conjugation length. Blue emissive starting compounds in the solid state can be transformed into orange upon brief oxidation, whereas green emissive oligomers are varied to red with an emission wavelength redshift about 123 nm. Cyclic voltammetry measurements performed can give the corresponding data, which verify the results drawn from the UV and PL spectroscope. The gradual change of conjugation length with tunable emission is confirmed in the MALDI-TOF study as well. Further characterizations indicate that the graphene molecules possess satisfactory optical properties, which are highly emissive both in solution and in the solid state because of the alkyl group. In addition, the good thermal stability and the self-assembly of graphene molecules suggest that they are promising candidates for high-tech applications. Furthermore, the fabricated field-effect transistors possess the nice performance, whose mobilities are about 0.57 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on-off ratio of 1 × 10(4) and 0.81 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with an on-off ratio of 1 × 10(3), respectively. PMID:26974338

  1. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926-1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface. PMID:26665087

  2. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926–1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface. PMID:26665087

  3. Quantum Nuclear Dynamics Pumped and Probed by Ultrafast Polarization Controlled Steering of a Coherent Electronic State in LiH.

    PubMed

    Nikodem, Astrid; Levine, R D; Remacle, F

    2016-05-19

    The quantum wave packet dynamics following a coherent electronic excitation of LiH by an ultrashort, polarized, strong one-cycle infrared optical pulse is computed on several electronic states using a grid method. The coupling to the strong field of the pump and the probe pulses is included in the Hamiltonian used to solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. The polarization of the pump pulse allows us to control the localization in time and in space of the nonequilibrium coherent electronic motion and the subsequent nuclear dynamics. We show that transient absorption, resulting from the interaction of the total molecular dipole with the electric fields of the pump and the probe, is a very versatile probe of the different time scales of the vibronic dynamics. It allows probing both the ultrashort, femtosecond time scale of the electronic coherences as well as the longer dozens of femtoseconds time scales of the nuclear motion on the excited electronic states. The ultrafast beatings of the electronic coherences in space and in time are shown to be modulated by the different periods of the nuclear motion. PMID:26928262

  4. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources.

    PubMed

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    Young's double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources. PMID:27021589

  5. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-03-01

    Young’s double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources.

  6. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    Young’s double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources. PMID:27021589

  7. Controlling rotational dynamics and alignment of molecule by infrared laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Arya, Urvashi; Tyagi, Ashish; Prasad, Vinod

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the effects of delayed infrared laser (IRL) pulse shape on the non-adiabatic rotational excitation and alignment of a polar molecule. We suggest a control scheme for choosing populations of molecular rotational states by wave packet interference. The rotational wave packets of polar molecule (here HBr) excited non-adiabatically by orienting pulse is controlled actually using the second delayed IRL pulse. By adjusting the time delay between the two laser pulses and the shape of delayed IRL pulse, constructive or destructive interference among these wave packets enables the population to be enhanced or repressed for the specific rotational state. We have used fourth order Runge-Kutta method to study the non-adiabatic rotational excitation (NAREX) dynamics. PMID:23220526

  8. Site-controlled quantum dots coupled to a photonic crystal molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Rigal, B.; Jarlov, C.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Calic, M.; Kapon, E.

    2015-10-05

    Two site-controlled quantum dots (QDs) were integrated in a photonic crystal molecule (PCM) formed by L3 nanocavities. A statistical analysis of the coupled cavity modes demonstrated the formation of bonding and anti-bonding delocalized PCM states. Excitonic transitions belonging to each QD were identified by scanning micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy. Co-polarization of the QDs photoluminescence with the coupled cavity modes provides evidence for the simultaneous coupling of two spatially separated QDs to the same PCM mode.

  9. Controlling electronic access to the spin excitations of a single molecule in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prueser, Henning; Ajibade, Afolabi; Gill, Tobias G.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Persson, Mats

    Spintronic phenomena can be utilized to create new devices with applications in data storage and sensing. Scaling these down to the single molecule level requires controlling the properties of the current-carrying orbitals to enable access to spin states through phenomena such as inelastic electron tunneling. Here we show that the spintronic properties of a tunnel junction containing a single molecule can be controlled by their coupling to the local environment. For tunneling through iron phthalocyanine (FePc) on an insulating copper nitride (Cu2N) monolayer above Cu(001), we find that spin transitions may be strongly excited depending on the binding site of the central Fe atom. Different interactions between the Fe and the underlying Cu or N atoms shift the Fe d-orbitals with respect to the Fermi energy, and control the relative strength of the spin excitations, an effect that can described in a simple co-tunneling model. This work demonstrates the importance of the atomic-scale environment in the development of single molecule spintronic devices.

  10. Quantum coherence controls the charge separation in a prototypical artificial light-harvesting system

    PubMed Central

    Andrea Rozzi, Carlo; Maria Falke, Sarah; Spallanzani, Nicola; Rubio, Angel; Molinari, Elisa; Brida, Daniele; Maiuri, Margherita; Cerullo, Giulio; Schramm, Heiko; Christoffers, Jens; Lienau, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The efficient conversion of light into electricity or chemical fuels is a fundamental challenge. In artificial photosynthetic and photovoltaic devices, this conversion is generally thought to happen on ultrafast, femto-to-picosecond timescales and to involve an incoherent electron transfer process. In some biological systems, however, there is growing evidence that the coherent motion of electronic wavepackets is an essential primary step, raising questions about the role of quantum coherence in artificial devices. Here we investigate the primary charge-transfer process in a supramolecular triad, a prototypical artificial reaction centre. Combining high time-resolution femtosecond spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory, we provide compelling evidence that the driving mechanism of the photoinduced current generation cycle is a correlated wavelike motion of electrons and nuclei on a timescale of few tens of femtoseconds. We highlight the fundamental role of the interface between chromophore and charge acceptor in triggering the coherent wavelike electron-hole splitting. PMID:23511467

  11. Electron beam controlled covalent attachment of small organic molecules to graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevich, Alexander; Kurasch, Simon; Lehtinen, Ossi; Reimer, Oliver; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Turchanin, Andrey; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The electron beam induced functionalization of graphene through the formation of covalent bonds between free radicals of polyaromatic molecules and C&z.dbd;C bonds of pristine graphene surface has been explored using first principles calculations and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We show that the energetically strongest attachment of the radicals occurs along the armchair direction in graphene to carbon atoms residing in different graphene sub-lattices. The radicals tend to assume vertical position on graphene substrate irrespective of direction of the bonding and the initial configuration. The ``standing up'' molecules, covalently anchored to graphene, exhibit two types of oscillatory motion - bending and twisting - caused by the presence of acoustic phonons in graphene and dispersion attraction to the substrate. The theoretically derived mechanisms are confirmed by near atomic resolution imaging of individual perchlorocoronene (C24Cl12) molecules on graphene. Our results facilitate the understanding of controlled functionalization of graphene employing electron irradiation as well as mechanisms of attachment of impurities via the processing of graphene nanoelectronic devices by electron beam lithography.The electron beam induced functionalization of graphene through the formation of covalent bonds between free radicals of polyaromatic molecules and C&z.dbd;C bonds of pristine graphene surface has been explored using first principles calculations and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We show that the energetically strongest attachment of the radicals occurs along the armchair direction in graphene to carbon atoms residing in different graphene sub-lattices. The radicals tend to assume vertical position on graphene substrate irrespective of direction of the bonding and the initial configuration. The ``standing up'' molecules, covalently anchored to graphene, exhibit two types of oscillatory motion - bending and twisting - caused

  12. Measuring the temperature dependence of individual two-level systems by direct coherent control.

    PubMed

    Lisenfeld, J; Müller, C; Cole, J H; Bushev, P; Lukashenko, A; Shnirman, A; Ustinov, A V

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a new method to directly manipulate the state of individual two-level systems (TLSs) in phase qubits. It allows one to characterize the coherence properties of TLSs using standard microwave pulse sequences, while the qubit is used only for state readout. We apply this method to measure the temperature dependence of TLS coherence for the first time. The energy relaxation time T1 is found to decrease quadratically with temperature for the two TLSs studied in this work, while their dephasing time measured in Ramsey and spin-echo experiments is found to be T1 limited at all temperatures. PMID:21231441

  13. Control of crystallographic orientation in diamond synthesis through laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi Qiang; Bai, Jaeil; Zhou, Yun Shen; Gao, Yi; Park, Jongbok; Guillemet, Thomas; Jiang, Lan; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Lu, Yong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic orientations determine the optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of crystals. Control of crystallographic orientations has been studied by changing the growth parameters, including temperature, pressure, proportion of precursors, and surface conditions. However, molecular dynamic mechanisms underlying these controls remain largely unknown. Here we achieved control of crystallographic orientations in diamond growth through a joint experimental and theoretical study of laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules (ethylene). Resonant vibrational excitation of the ethylene molecules using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser steers the chemical reactions and promotes proportion of intermediate oxide species, which results in preferential growth of {100}-oriented diamond films and diamond single crystals in open air. Quantum molecular dynamic simulations and calculations of chemisorption energies of radicals detected from our mass-spectroscopy experiment provide an in-depth understanding of molecular reaction mechanisms in the steering of chemical reactions and control of crystallographic orientations. This finding opens up a new avenue for controlled chemical vapor deposition of crystals through resonant vibrational excitations to steer surface chemistry. PMID:24694918

  14. Coherent control of ultracold {sup 85}Rb trap-loss collisions with nonlinearly frequency-chirped light

    SciTech Connect

    Pechkis, J. A.; Carini, J. L.; Rogers, C. E. III; Gould, P. L.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.

    2011-06-15

    We present results on coherent control of ultracold trap-loss collisions using 40-ns pulses of nonlinearly frequency-chirped light. The chirps, either positive or negative, sweep {approx}1 GHz in 100 ns and are centered at various detunings below the D{sub 2} line of {sup 85}Rb. At each center detuning, we compare the collisional rate constant {beta} for chirps that are linear in time, concave-down, and concave-up. For positive chirps, we find that {beta} generally depends very little on the shape of the chirp. For negative chirps, however, we find that {beta} can be enhanced by up to 50(20)% for the case of the concave-down shape. This occurs at detunings where the evolution of the wave packet is expected to be coherent. An enhancement at these detunings is also seen in quantum-mechanical simulations of the collisional process.

  15. A Bidirectional System for the Dynamic Small Molecule Control of Intracellular Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kuzin, Alexander P.; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B.; Kornhaber, Gregory J.; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano Thomas; Tong, Liang; Crews, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Small molecule control of intracellular protein levels allows temporal and dose-dependent regulation of protein function. Recently, we developed a method to degrade proteins fused to a mutant dehalogenase (HaloTag2) using small molecule hydrophobic tags (HyTs). Here, we introduce a complementary method to stabilize the same HaloTag2 fusion proteins, resulting in a unified system allowing bidirectional control of cellular protein levels in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. From a small molecule screen, we identified N-(3,5-dichloro-2-ethoxybenzyl)-2H-tetrazol-5-amine as a nanomolar HALoTag2 Stabilizer (HALTS1) that reduces the Hsp70:HaloTag2 interaction, thereby preventing HaloTag2 ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the HyT/HALTS system in probing the physiological role of therapeutic targets by modulating HaloTag2-fused oncogenic H-Ras, which resulted in either the cessation (HyT) or acceleration (HALTS) of cellular transformation. In sum, we present a general platform to study protein function, whereby any protein of interest fused to HaloTag2 can be either degraded 10-fold or stabilized 5-fold using two corresponding compounds. PMID:23978068

  16. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: theory versus experiment.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit. PMID:25833433

  17. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  18. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-15

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  19. Control of the size of the coherence area in entangled twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtfrerich, M. W.; Marino, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of a change in size and spatial profile of the pump beam in an atomic-based four-wave mixing process on the size of the coherence area of the generated entangled twin beams. We perform experiments and develop a theoretical model to obtain a measure of the linear extent or "radius" of the coherence area from noise measurements of the twin beams as a function of transmission through a variable size slit. Our results show that an increase in the size of the pump reduces the size of the coherence area. More interestingly, we find that the use of a flat-top pump beam of the same size as a Gaussian pump beam leads to a reduction by a factor of more than 2 in the linear extent of the coherence area. This in turn leads to an increase by a factor of more than 4 in the number of spatial modes that make up the twin beams and a resolution enhancement of the entangled images that can be generated with the four-wave mixing process.

  20. Decrease of Prefrontal-Posterior EEG Coherence: Loose Control during Social-Emotional Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiser, Eva M.; Schulter, Gunter; Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Fink, Andreas; Rominger, Christian; Papousek, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments we aimed to investigate if individual differences in state-dependent decreases or increases of EEG coherence between prefrontal and posterior cortical regions may be indicative of a mechanism modulating the impact social-emotional information has on an individual. Two independent samples were exposed to an emotional stimulation…

  1. Coherent electronic wave packet motion in C(60) controlled by the waveform and polarization of few-cycle laser fields.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Mignolet, B; Wachter, G; Skruszewicz, S; Zherebtsov, S; Süssmann, F; Kessel, A; Trushin, S A; Kling, Nora G; Kübel, M; Ahn, B; Kim, D; Ben-Itzhak, I; Cocke, C L; Fennel, T; Tiggesbäumker, J; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Lemell, C; Burgdörfer, J; Levine, R D; Remacle, F; Kling, M F

    2015-03-27

    Strong laser fields can be used to trigger an ultrafast molecular response that involves electronic excitation and ionization dynamics. Here, we report on the experimental control of the spatial localization of the electronic excitation in the C_{60} fullerene exerted by an intense few-cycle (4 fs) pulse at 720 nm. The control is achieved by tailoring the carrier-envelope phase and the polarization of the laser pulse. We find that the maxima and minima of the photoemission-asymmetry parameter along the laser-polarization axis are synchronized with the localization of the coherent electronic wave packet at around the time of ionization. PMID:25860740

  2. Electrostatic control over temperature-dependent tunnelling across a single-molecule junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Wang, Lejia; Del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potentials. The results show the temperature dependence of the current to vary strongly as a function of the gate voltage. Specifically, the current across the molecule exponentially increases in the Coulomb blockade regime and decreases at the charge degeneracy points, while remaining temperature-independent at resonance. Our observations can be well accounted for by a formal single-level tunnelling model where the temperature dependence relies on the thermal broadening of the Fermi distributions of the electrons in the leads.

  3. Electrostatic control over temperature-dependent tunnelling across a single-molecule junction.

    PubMed

    Garrigues, Alvar R; Wang, Lejia; Del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potentials. The results show the temperature dependence of the current to vary strongly as a function of the gate voltage. Specifically, the current across the molecule exponentially increases in the Coulomb blockade regime and decreases at the charge degeneracy points, while remaining temperature-independent at resonance. Our observations can be well accounted for by a formal single-level tunnelling model where the temperature dependence relies on the thermal broadening of the Fermi distributions of the electrons in the leads. PMID:27211787

  4. Electrostatic control over temperature-dependent tunnelling across a single-molecule junction

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Wang, Lejia; del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potentials. The results show the temperature dependence of the current to vary strongly as a function of the gate voltage. Specifically, the current across the molecule exponentially increases in the Coulomb blockade regime and decreases at the charge degeneracy points, while remaining temperature-independent at resonance. Our observations can be well accounted for by a formal single-level tunnelling model where the temperature dependence relies on the thermal broadening of the Fermi distributions of the electrons in the leads. PMID:27211787

  5. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  6. A high-speed, high-efficiency phase controller for coherent beam combining based on SPGD algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zh M; Liu, C L; Li, J F; Zhang, D Y

    2014-04-28

    A phase controller for coherent beam combining (CBC) of fibre lasers has been designed and manufactured based on a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The theoretical analysis shows that the iteration rate is higher than 1.9 MHz, and the average compensation bandwidth of CBC for 5 or 20 channels is 50 kHz or 12.5 kHz, respectively. The tests show that the phase controller ensures reliable phase locking of lasers: When the phases of five lasers are locked by the improved control strategy with a variable gain, the energy encircled in the target is increased by 23 times than that in the single output, the phase control accuracy is better than λ/20, and the combining efficiency is 92%. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  7. Understanding ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul

    2009-05-01

    The successful production of a dense sample of ultracold ground state KRb polar molecules [1] opens the door to a new era of research with dipolar gases and lattices of such species. This feat was achieved by first associating a K and a Rb atom to make a weakly bound Feshbach molecule and then coherently transferring the population to the ground vibrational level of the molecule. This talk focuses on theoretical issues associated with making and using ultracold polar molecules, using KRb as an example [2]. Full understanding of this species and the processes by which it is made requires taking advantage of accurate molecular potentials [3], ab initio calculations [4], and the properties of the long-range potential. A highly accurate model is available for KRb for all bound states below the ground state separated atom limit and could be constructed for other species. The next step is to develop an understanding of the interactions between polar molecules, and their control in the ultracold domain. Understanding long-range interactions and threshold resonances will be crucial for future work. [1] K.-K. Ni, et al, Science 322, 231(2008). [2] P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0812:1233. [3] Pashov et al., Phys. Rev. A76, 022511 (2007). [4] S. Kotochigova, et al., arXiv:0901.1486.

  8. Coherent optical neural networks that have optical-frequency-controlled behavior and generalization ability in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Hirose, A; Eckmiller, R

    1996-02-10

    Coherent optical neural networks that have optical-frequency-controlled behavior are proposed as sophisticated optical neural systems. The coherent optical neural-network system consists of an optical complex-valued neural network, a phase reference path, and coherent detectors for selfhomodyne detection. The learning process is realized by adjusting the delay time and the transparency of neural connections in the optical neural network with the optical frequency as a learning parameter. Generalization ability in frequency space is also analyzed. Information geometry in the learning process is discussed for obtaining a parameter range in which a reasonable generalization is realized in frequency space. It is found that there are error-function minima periodically both in the delay-time domain and the input-signal-frequency domain. Because of this reason, the initial connection delay should be within a certain range for a meaningful generalization. Simulation experiments demonstrate that a stable learning and a reasonable generalization in the frequency domain are successfully realized in a parameter range obtained in the theory. PMID:21069078

  9. Shifts in controls on the temporal coherence of throughfall chemical flux in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Sarah J.; Webster, Katherine E.; Loftin, Cynthia S.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Major ion and mercury (Hg) inputs to terrestrial ecosystems include both wet and dry deposition (total deposition). Estimating total deposition to sensitive receptor sites is hampered by limited information regarding its spatial heterogeneity and seasonality. We used measurements of throughfall flux, which includes atmospheric inputs to forests and the net effects of canopy leaching or uptake, for ten major ions and Hg collected during 35 time periods in 1999–2005 at over 70 sites within Acadia National Park, Maine to (1) quantify coherence in temporal dynamics of seasonal throughfall deposition and (2) examine controls on these patterns at multiple scales. We quantified temporal coherence as the correlation between all possible site pairs for each solute on a seasonal basis. In the summer growing season and autumn, coherence among pairs of sites with similar vegetation was stronger than for site-pairs that differed in vegetation suggesting that interaction with the canopy and leaching of solutes differed in coniferous, deciduous, mixed, and shrub or open canopy sites. The spatial pattern in throughfall hydrologic inputs across Acadia National Park was more variable during the winter snow season, suggesting that snow re-distribution affects net hydrologic input, which consequently affects chemical flux. Sea-salt corrected calcium concentrations identified a shift in air mass sources from maritime in winter to the continental industrial corridor in summer. Our results suggest that the spatial pattern of throughfall hydrologic flux, dominant seasonal air mass source, and relationship with vegetation in winter differ from the spatial pattern of throughfall flux in these solutes in summer and autumn. The coherence approach applied here made clear the strong influence of spatial heterogeneity in throughfall hydrologic inputs and a maritime air mass source on winter patterns of throughfall flux. By contrast, vegetation type was the most important influence on

  10. Selective Control over Fragmentation Reactions in Polyatomic Molecules Using Impulsive Laser Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua; Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Xu, Huailiang; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S.; Kartashov, Daniil; Erattupuzha, Sonia; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the possibility of using molecular alignment for controlling the relative probability of individual reaction pathways in polyatomic molecules initiated by electronic processes on the few-femtosecond time scale. Using acetylene as an example, it is shown that aligning the molecular axis with respect to the polarization direction of the ionizing laser pulse does not only allow us to enhance or suppress the overall fragmentation yield of a certain fragmentation channel but, more importantly, to determine the relative probability of individual reaction pathways starting from the same parent molecular ion. We show that the achieved control over dissociation or isomerization pathways along specific nuclear degrees of freedom is based on a controlled population of associated excited dissociative electronic states in the molecular ion due to relatively enhanced ionization contributions from inner valence orbitals.

  11. Control of biofilm-associated infections by signaling molecules and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina Maria; Gestal, Monica Cartelle; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2016-08-30

    As the severe infections caused by resistant pathogens and biofilm embedded bacteria continue to emerge, alternative antimicrobial strategies could represent a solution. Recent studies support the development of molecular approaches (through signaling molecules) aiming to fight infections by modulating the virulence, behavior and formation of resistance structures such as biofilms. The utilization of such formulations would offer the advantage of reducing the selection of resistant isolates, since most of the proposed molecules do not interfere with the population fitness if utilized in low amounts. Despite the promising results, these therapies are delaying to be applied in the clinical context mainly because of the following: (i) limited knowledge regarding their long and medium term effect, (ii) specific properties that make most of these molecules difficult to be utilized in pharmacological formulations, (iii) low stability, (iv) difficulty to reach a target within the host body, and (v) limited availability. For reducing most of these disadvantages, nanotechnology seem to offer the best option through the development of nanostructured materials and nanoparticles able to improve the efficiency of molecular virulence modulators and novel antimicrobial compounds and to ensure their targeted delivery and controlled release. PMID:26945736

  12. Electron beam controlled covalent attachment of small organic molecules to graphene.

    PubMed

    Markevich, Alexander; Kurasch, Simon; Lehtinen, Ossi; Reimer, Oliver; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Turchanin, Andrey; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The electron beam induced functionalization of graphene through the formation of covalent bonds between free radicals of polyaromatic molecules and C=C bonds of pristine graphene surface has been explored using first principles calculations and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. We show that the energetically strongest attachment of the radicals occurs along the armchair direction in graphene to carbon atoms residing in different graphene sub-lattices. The radicals tend to assume vertical position on graphene substrate irrespective of direction of the bonding and the initial configuration. The "standing up" molecules, covalently anchored to graphene, exhibit two types of oscillatory motion--bending and twisting--caused by the presence of acoustic phonons in graphene and dispersion attraction to the substrate. The theoretically derived mechanisms are confirmed by near atomic resolution imaging of individual perchlorocoronene (C24Cl12) molecules on graphene. Our results facilitate the understanding of controlled functionalization of graphene employing electron irradiation as well as mechanisms of attachment of impurities via the processing of graphene nanoelectronic devices by electron beam lithography. PMID:26757842

  13. Smart magnetic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to control the release of bio-active molecules.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Chiara; Lungaro, Lisa; Goranov, Vitaly; Riminucci, Alberto; Piñeiro-Redondo, Yolanda; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, José; Dediu, Valentin

    2014-10-01

    Thermo switchable magnetic hydrogels undoubtedly have a great potential for medical applications since they can behave as smart carriers able to transport bioactive molecules to a chosen part of the body and release them on demand via magneto-thermal activation. We report on the ability to modify the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) on demand from 32 °C to LCST ≥ 37 °C. This was achieved by the absorption of controlled amounts of magnetite nanoparticles on the polymer chains. We show, through the effect on cell viability, that the resulting magnetic PNIPAM is able to trap and to release bio-active molecules, such as cell growth factors. The activities of the released bio molecule are tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells culture. We demonstrate that the LCST of the magnetic PNIPAM can be reached remotely via inductive heating with an alternating magnetic field. This approach on magnetic PNIPAM clearly supports appealing applications in safe biomedicine. PMID:24477874

  14. Sustainable mesoporous carbons as storage and controlled-delivery media for functional molecules.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipendu; Payzant, E Andrew; Kumbhar, Amar S; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-06-26

    Here, we report the synthesis of surfactant-templated mesoporous carbons from lignin, which is a biomass-derived polymeric precursor, and their potential use as a controlled-release medium for functional molecules such as pharmaceuticals. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of lignin for chemical-activation-free synthesis of functional mesoporous carbon. The synthesized carbons possess the pore widths within the range of 2.5-12.0 nm. In this series of mesoporous carbons, our best result demonstrates a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 418 m(2)/g and a mesopore volume of 0.34 cm(3)/g, which is twice the micropore volume in this carbon. Because of the dominant mesoporosity, this engineered carbon demonstrates adsorption and controlled release of a representative pharmaceutical drug, captopril, in simulated gastric fluid. Large-scale utilization of these sustainable mesoporous carbons in applications involving adsorption, transport, and controlled release of functional molecules is desired for industrial processes that yield lignin as a coproduct. PMID:23731336

  15. Controlled delivery of bioactive molecules into live cells using the bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F.; Febvay, Sebastien; Clapham, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels are some of the largest pores in nature. In particular, MscL, with a pore diameter > 25 Å, allows passage of large organic ions and small proteins. Functional MscL reconstitution into lipids has been proposed for applications in vesicular-based drug release. Here we show that these channels can be functionally expressed in mammalian cells to afford rapid controlled uptake of membrane impermeable molecules. We first demonstrate that MscL gating in response to increased membrane tension is preserved in mammalian cell membranes. Molecular delivery is controlled by adopting an established method of MscL charge-induced activation. We then determine pore size limitations using fluorescently labeled model cargoes. Finally, we activate MscL to introduce the cell-impermeable bi-cyclic peptide phalloidin, a specific marker for actin filaments, into cells. We propose that MscL will be a useful tool for gated and controlled delivery of bioactive molecules into cells. PMID:22871809

  16. Quantum control of dressed state population for Li2 molecules by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhan, Wei-Shen; Wang, Shuo; Zai, Jing-Bo; Dang, Hai-Ping

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the Autler-Townes splitting in photoelectron spectra of \\text{L}{{\\text{i}}2} molecules steered by ultrashort laser pulses using the time-dependent wave-packet method. Structure of the Autler-Townes splitting was presented to analyze the information of a selective population of the dressed states. It was found that population transfer process, structure of photoelectron spectrum and pattern of Autler-Townes splitting can be controlled by adjusting the intensity, wavelength and delay time of laser pulses.

  17. Controlled-Release System of Small Molecules Triggered by the Photothermal Effect of Polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xiong, Linfeng; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel synthesis of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified polypyrrole (PPy) nanomaterials is demonstrated by combining reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and oxidative polymerization. Dye molecules with a heat-labile linker are used as a model drug and covalently anchored onto the PEGlated PPy nanomaterials via "click chemistry." The strong absorption of such PPy nanomaterials in the near-infrared region endows the system excellent photothermal effect, which can be used not only as efficient photothermal agents for photothermal therapy but also good controllers of a drug-release system by retro D-A reaction. PMID:26524109

  18. The controllable assembly of nanorods, nanowires and microwires of a perylenediimide molecule with photoswitching property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying; An, Boxing; Wang, Meng; Shi, Fangxiao; Wang, Qing; Gu, Yaxin; Niu, Wanyang; Fan, Zhaorong; Shang, Yanli; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Cong

    2015-07-01

    By using an electron donor-acceptor molecule that consists of a perylenediimide (PDI) core bonded with two ferrocene (Fc) units, well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed through simply adjusting the initial concentration of PDI-Fc in dichloromethane or CH2Cl2. Moreover, the two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were demonstrated in the microwire through controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. The assembly strategy via complementary donors and acceptors is of significance for constructing photoconductive systems and developing novel functional devices.

  19. Tibialis Anterior muscle coherence during controlled voluntary activation in patients with spinal cord injury: diagnostic potential for muscle strength, gait and spasticity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coherence estimation has been used as an indirect measure of voluntary neurocontrol of residual motor activity following spinal cord injury (SCI). Here intramuscular Tibialis Anterior (TA) coherence estimation was performed within specific frequency bands for the 10-60 Hz bandwidth during controlled ankle dorsiflexion in subjects with incomplete SCI with and without spasticity. Methods In the first cohort study 15 non-injured and 14 motor incomplete SCI subjects were recruited to evaluate TA coherence during controlled movement. Specifically 15-30 Hz EMG was recorded during dorsiflexion with: i) isometric activation at 50, 75 and 100% of maximal voluntary torque (MVT), ii) isokinetic activation at 60 and 120°/s and iii) isotonic dorsiflexion at 50% MVT. Following identification of the motor tasks necessary for measurement of optimal TA coherence a second cohort was analyzed within the 10-16 Hz, 15-30 Hz, 24-40 Hz and 40-60 Hz bandwidths from 22 incomplete SCI subjects, with and without spasticity. Results Intramuscular 40-60 Hz, but not 15-30 Hz TA, coherence calculated in SCI subjects during isometric activation at 100% of MVT was lower than the control group. In contrast only isometric activation at 100% of MVT 15-30 Hz TA coherence was higher in subjects with less severe SCI (AIS D vs. AIS C), and correlated functionally with dorsiflexion MVT. Higher TA coherence was observed for the SCI group during 120°/s isokinetic movement. In addition 15-30 Hz TA coherence calculated during isometric activation at 100% MVT or 120°/s isokinetic movement correlated moderately with walking function and time from SCI, respectively. Spasticity symptoms correlated negatively with coherence during isometric activation at 100% of MVT in all tested frequency bands, except for 15-30 Hz. Specifically, 10-16 Hz coherence correlated inversely with passive resistive torque to ankle dorsiflexion, while clinical measures of muscle hypertonia and spasm severity correlated

  20. Goal-directed control with cortical units that are gated by both top-down feedback and oscillatory coherence

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Robert R.; Grayden, David B.; Thomas, Doreen A.; Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony N.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is able to flexibly select behaviors that adapt to both its environment and its present goals. This cognitive control is understood to occur within the hierarchy of the cortex and relies strongly on the prefrontal and premotor cortices, which sit at the top of this hierarchy. Pyramidal neurons, the principal neurons in the cortex, have been observed to exhibit much stronger responses when they receive inputs at their soma/basal dendrites that are coincident with inputs at their apical dendrites. This corresponds to inputs from both lower-order regions (feedforward) and higher-order regions (feedback), respectively. In addition to this, coherence between oscillations, such as gamma oscillations, in different neuronal groups has been proposed to modulate and route communication in the brain. In this paper, we develop a simple, but novel, neural mass model in which cortical units (or ensembles) exhibit gamma oscillations when they receive coherent oscillatory inputs from both feedforward and feedback connections. By forming these units into circuits that can perform logic operations, we identify the different ways in which operations can be initiated and manipulated by top-down feedback. We demonstrate that more sophisticated and flexible top-down control is possible when the gain of units is modulated by not only top-down feedback but by coherence between the activities of the oscillating units. With these types of units, it is possible to not only add units to, or remove units from, a higher-level unit's logic operation using top-down feedback, but also to modify the type of role that a unit plays in the operation. Finally, we explore how different network properties affect top-down control and processing in large networks. Based on this, we make predictions about the likely connectivities between certain brain regions that have been experimentally observed to be involved in goal-directed behavior and top-down attention. PMID:25152715

  1. Control of coherence among the spins of a single electron and the three nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclei of a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Shimo-Oka, T.; Miwa, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Mizuochi, N.; Kato, H.; Yamasaki, S.; Jelezko, F.

    2015-04-13

    Individual nuclear spins in diamond can be optically detected through hyperfine couplings with the electron spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center; such nuclear spins have outstandingly long coherence times. Among the hyperfine couplings in the NV center, the nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the largest coupling strength. Nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the potential to perform fastest gate operations, providing highest fidelity in quantum computing. Herein, we report on the control of coherences in the NV center where all three nearest neighbor carbons are of the {sup 13}C isotope. Coherence among the three and four qubits are generated and analyzed at room temperature.

  2. High-harmonic generation from a coherent superposition of electronic states: Controlling interference patterns via short and long quantum orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bredtmann, Timm; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-09-01

    Laser pump-probe schemes are explored numerically from a molecular time-dependent Schrödinger equation for monitoring attosecond electron motion by high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) from a coherent superposition of electronic states. Varying the time delay between the probe and pump pulse on an attosecond time scale alters the HHG signal, leading to universal interference patterns. By using an extended three-step recollision model, we show that various regular interference patterns in the HHG spectra, including continuous harmonic frequency redshifts as a function of pump-probe delay, are related to interference between specific pairs of short or long quantum orbits. For small excited-state population (regime A), interferences are controlled by electron-tunneling times, whereas for equal populations (regime B), recollision time control dominates thus allowing for control of the HHG process by the pump-probe delay time and by electron-state populations. We show that each specific pattern is closely related to the interference between pairs of specific (short or long) quantum orbits originating from a specific electron bound state. One can generate a specific pattern by varying the populations in the coherent superposition, the laser intensity, wavelength, and ionization potential of the electronic states.

  3. Quantum control of ultracold NaK polar molecules in optical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Petrov, Alexander; Makrides, Constantinos; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    Selection of trapping conditions with ultracold molecules, where internal states experience identical trapping potentials, brings substantial benefits for the ultimate control of their internal degrees of freedom. Here we present our work on the control of NaK molecules, when they are subjected to both trapping laser light and external electric and magnetic fields. First, we calculated parallel and perpendicular polarizabilities using a coupled-cluster method at the CCSD level. This enables us to determine the differential Stark shifts of rotational levels of NaK as a function of orientation of external fields. The hyperfine and Zeeman structure of these rotational states was obtained using an effective spin Hamiltonian. We find that under the experimental conditions with NaK, the hyperfine sublevels of the J = 1 rotational state are significantly mixed by the trapping laser light so that the simplified model of Ref. for ``magic'' conditions can not be applied. Adding a modest static electric field, however, can minimize the mixing of magnetic sublevels and make it easier to find ``magic'' conditions. This work is supported by the ARO-MURI Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0476 and the NSF Grant No. PHY-1308573.

  4. Thermally controlled permeation of ionic molecules through synthetic nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    We present temperature-dependent ionic transport through an array of nanopores (cylindrical and conical) and a single conical nanopore functionalized with amine-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [PNIPAAM-NH2] brushes. For this purpose, nanopores are fabricated in heavy ion irradiated polyethylene terephthlate (PET) membranes by a controlled chemical track-etching technique, which leads to the generation of carboxyl (COOH) groups on the pore surface. End-functionalized polymer chains are immobilized onto the inner pore walls via a ‘grafting-to’ approach through the covalent linkage of surface COOH moieties with the terminal amine groups of the PNIPAAM molecules by using carbodiimide coupling chemistry. The success of the chemical modification reaction is corroborated by measuring the permeation flux of charged analytes across the multipore membranes in an aqueous solution, and for the case of single conical pore by measuring the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, which are dictated by the electrostatic interaction of the charged pore surface with the mobile ions in an electrolyte solution. The effective nanopore diameter is tuned by manipulating the environmental temperature due to the swelling/shrinking behaviour of polymer brushes attached to the inner nanopore walls, leading to a decrease/increase in the ionic transport across the membrane. This process should permit the thermal gating and controlled release of ionic drug molecules through the nanopores modified with thermoresponsive polymer chains across the membrane.

  5. Thermally controlled permeation of ionic molecules through synthetic nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    We present temperature-dependent ionic transport through an array of nanopores (cylindrical and conical) and a single conical nanopore functionalized with amine-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [PNIPAAM-NH2] brushes. For this purpose, nanopores are fabricated in heavy ion irradiated polyethylene terephthlate (PET) membranes by a controlled chemical track-etching technique, which leads to the generation of carboxyl (COOH) groups on the pore surface. End-functionalized polymer chains are immobilized onto the inner pore walls via a 'grafting-to' approach through the covalent linkage of surface COOH moieties with the terminal amine groups of the PNIPAAM molecules by using carbodiimide coupling chemistry. The success of the chemical modification reaction is corroborated by measuring the permeation flux of charged analytes across the multipore membranes in an aqueous solution, and for the case of single conical pore by measuring the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, which are dictated by the electrostatic interaction of the charged pore surface with the mobile ions in an electrolyte solution. The effective nanopore diameter is tuned by manipulating the environmental temperature due to the swelling/shrinking behaviour of polymer brushes attached to the inner nanopore walls, leading to a decrease/increase in the ionic transport across the membrane. This process should permit the thermal gating and controlled release of ionic drug molecules through the nanopores modified with thermoresponsive polymer chains across the membrane. PMID:22572395

  6. The controllable assembly of nanorods, nanowires and microwires of a perylenediimide molecule with photoswitching property

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ying; An, Boxing; Wang, Meng; Shi, Fangxiao; Wang, Qing; Gu, Yaxin; Niu, Wanyang; Fan, Zhaorong; Shang, Yanli; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Cong

    2015-07-15

    By using an electron donor–acceptor molecule that consists of a perylenediimide (PDI) core bonded with two ferrocene (Fc) units, well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed through simply adjusting the initial concentration of PDI-Fc in dichloromethane or CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Moreover, the two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were demonstrated in the microwire through controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. The assembly strategy via complementary donors and acceptors is of significance for constructing photoconductive systems and developing novel functional devices. - Graphical abstract: The two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were observed by controlling the white light on and off with different light intensities. - Highlights: • An electron donor–acceptor molecule (PDI-Fc) was synthesized. • Well-defined nanorods, nanowires and microwires of PDI-Fc were formed. • The two-ended devices based on individual microwire were fabricated. • Highly reproducible and sensitive photo response characteristics were observed.

  7. A flexible metal–organic framework: Guest molecules controlled dynamic gas adsorption

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Li, Man -Rong; Wang, Hailong; Lu, Zhengliang; Chen, Banglin; Dai, Sheng; Yue, Yanfeng; Rabone, Jeremy A.; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Jihang; et al

    2015-04-13

    A flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) of [Zn3(btca)2(OH)2]·(guest)n (H2btca = 1,2,3-benzotriazole-5-carboxylic acid) that exhibits guest molecule-controlled dynamic gas adsorption is reported in which carbon dioxide molecules rather than N2, He, and Ar induce a structural transition with a corresponding appearance of additional steps in the isotherms. Physical insights into the dynamic adsorption behaviors of flexible compound 1 were detected by gas adsorption at different temperatures and different pressures and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular simulations. Interestingly, by taking advantage of the flexible nature inherent to the framework, this MOF material enables highly selective adsorption of CO2/N2, CO2/Ar, andmore » CO2/He of 36.3, 32.6, and 35.9, respectively, at 298 K. Furthermore, this class of flexible MOFs has potential applications for controlled release, molecular sensing, noble gas separation, smart membranes, and nanotechnological devices.« less

  8. A flexible metal–organic framework: Guest molecules controlled dynamic gas adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Li, Man -Rong; Wang, Hailong; Lu, Zhengliang; Chen, Banglin; Dai, Sheng; Yue, Yanfeng; Rabone, Jeremy A.; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Jihang; Fang, Youxing

    2015-04-13

    A flexible metal–organic framework (MOF) of [Zn3(btca)2(OH)2]·(guest)n (H2btca = 1,2,3-benzotriazole-5-carboxylic acid) that exhibits guest molecule-controlled dynamic gas adsorption is reported in which carbon dioxide molecules rather than N2, He, and Ar induce a structural transition with a corresponding appearance of additional steps in the isotherms. Physical insights into the dynamic adsorption behaviors of flexible compound 1 were detected by gas adsorption at different temperatures and different pressures and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular simulations. Interestingly, by taking advantage of the flexible nature inherent to the framework, this MOF material enables highly selective adsorption of CO2/N2, CO2/Ar, and CO2/He of 36.3, 32.6, and 35.9, respectively, at 298 K. Furthermore, this class of flexible MOFs has potential applications for controlled release, molecular sensing, noble gas separation, smart membranes, and nanotechnological devices.

  9. Controlled interference of association paths in the conversion of ultracold atoms into molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a proposal for controlling the conversion of ultracold atoms into molecules by fixing the phase difference between two oscillating magnetic fields. The scheme is based on the use of a magnetic Feshbach resonance with a field modulation that incorporates terms oscillating with frequencies corresponding to the main resonance and one of the subharmonics. The interference between the two association processes activated by the oscillating terms is controlled via the phase difference. As a result, significant increase or decrease of the effective interaction strength can be achieved. The realization of the proposal is feasible under standard technical conditions. In particular, the method is found to be robust against the effect of the sources of decoherence present in the practical setup. The applicability of the approach to deal with quadratic terms in the field modulation is discussed.

  10. Thermal control of sequential on-surface transformation of a hydrocarbon molecule on a copper surface.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeki; Haapasilta, Ville; Lindner, Benjamin D; Tahara, Kazukuni; Spijker, Peter; Buitendijk, Jeroen A; Pawlak, Rémy; Meier, Tobias; Tobe, Yoshito; Foster, Adam S; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    On-surface chemical reactions hold the potential for manufacturing nanoscale structures directly onto surfaces by linking carbon atoms in a single-step reaction. To fabricate more complex and functionalized structures, the control of the on-surface chemical reactions must be developed significantly. Here, we present a thermally controlled sequential three-step chemical transformation of a hydrocarbon molecule on a Cu(111) surface. With a combination of high-resolution atomic force microscopy and first-principles computations, we investigate the transformation process in step-by-step detail from the initial structure to the final product via two intermediate states. The results demonstrate that surfaces can be used as catalysing templates to obtain compounds, which cannot easily be synthesized by solution chemistry. PMID:27619070

  11. Nanolithographic control of the spatial organization of cellular adhesion receptors at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Schvartzman, Mark; Palma, Matteo; Sable, Julia; Abramson, Justin; Hu, Xian; Sheetz, Michael P.; Wind, Shalom J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to control the placement of individual molecules promises to enable a wide range of applications and is a key challenge in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Many biological interactions, in particular, are sensitive to the precise geometric arrangement of proteins. We have developed a technique which combines molecular-scale nanolithography with site-selective biochemistry to create biomimetic arrays of individual protein binding sites. The binding sites can be arranged in heterogeneous patterns of virtually any possible geometry with a nearly unlimited number of degrees of freedom. We have used these arrays to explore how the geometric organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) binding ligand RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) affects cell adhesion and spreading. Systematic variation of spacing, density and cluster size of individual integrin binding sites was used to elicit different cell behavior. Cell spreading assays on arrays of different geometric arrangements revealed a dramatic increase in spreading efficiency when at least 4 liganded sites were spaced within 60 nm or less, with no dependence on global density. This points to the existence of a minimal matrix adhesion unit for fibronectin defined in space and stoichiometry. Developing an understanding of the ECM geometries that activate specific cellular functional complexes is a critical step toward controlling cell behavior. Potential practical applications range from new therapeutic treatments to the rational design of tissue scaffolds that can optimize healing without scarring. More broadly, spatial control at the single-molecule level can elucidate factors controlling individual molecular interactions and can enable synthesis of new systems based on molecular-scale architectures. PMID:21319842

  12. Increasing the coherence time of Bose-Einstein-condensate interferometers with optical control of dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stickney, James A.; Zozulya, Alex A.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2007-06-15

    Atom interferometers using Bose-Einstein condensate that is confined in a waveguide and manipulated by optical pulses have been limited by their short coherence times. We present a theoretical model that offers a physically simple explanation for the loss of contrast and propose the method for increasing the fringe contrast by recombining the atoms at a different time. A simple, quantitatively accurate, analytical expression for the optimized recombination time is presented and used to place limits on the physical parameters for which the contrast may be recovered.

  13. Optimizing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by genetic algorithm controlled pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenlong; Sokolov, Alexei

    2010-10-01

    The hybrid coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has been successful applied to fast chemical sensitive detections. As the development of femto-second pulse shaping techniques, it is of great interest to find the optimum pulse shapes for CARS. The optimum pulse shapes should minimize the non-resonant four wave mixing (NRFWM) background and maximize the CARS signal. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to make a heuristic searching for optimized pulse shapes, which give the best signal the background ratio. The GA is shown to be able to rediscover the hybrid CARS scheme and find optimized pulse shapes for customized applications by itself.

  14. Creation and control of a single coherent attosecond xuv pulse by few-cycle intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Juan J.; Tong, X. M.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2006-08-01

    We present ab initio quantum and classical investigations on the production and control of a single attosecond pulse by using few-cycle intense laser pulses as the driving field. The high-harmonic-generation power spectrum is calculated by accurately and efficiently solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method. The time-frequency characteristics of the attosecond xuv pulse are analyzed in detail by means of the wavelet transform of the time-dependent induced dipole. To better understand the physical processes, we also perform classical trajectory simulation of the strong-field electron dynamics and electron returning energy map. We found that the quantum and classical results provide complementary and consistent information regarding the underlying mechanisms responsible for the production of the coherent attosecond pulse. For few-cycle (5fs) driving pulses, it is shown that the emission of the consecutive harmonics in the supercontinuum cutoff regime can be synchronized and locked in phase resulting in the production of a coherent attosecond pulse. Moreover, the time profile of the attosecond pulses can be controlled by tuning the carrier envelope phase.

  15. Coherent control of the dissociation probability of H2+ in ω-3ω two-color fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Han; Hu, Hongtao; Tong, Xiao-Min; Liu, Peng; Li, Ruxin; Sang, Robert T.; Litvinyuk, Igor V.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that the coherent control of unimolecular reactions by using a waveform-controlled laser fields can lead to a strong modulation on the yield of the reaction. By using a synthesized ω (1800-nm) and 3ω (600-nm) two-color laser field, the probability of photodissociation of H2+ can be strongly modulated by varying the relative phase between the two colors. The dissociation probability maximizes at different relative phases for protons with different kinetic energy, and such energy dependence can also be qualitatively reproduced by our simulation. We attribute the observed dissociation probability modulation to the interference between two different dissociation pathways which start from the same electronic states and end with the same kinetic energy.

  16. Optical system design and experimental evaluation of a coherent Doppler wind Lidar system for the predictive control of wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Leilei; Tauscher, Julian Asche; Beuth, Thorsten; Heussner, Nico; Fox, Maik; Babu, Harsha Umesh; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-09-01

    The control of wind turbine blade pitch systems by Lidar assisted wind speed prediction has been proposed to increase the electric power generation and reduce the mechanical fatigue load on wind turbines. However, the sticking point of such Lidar systems is the price. Hence, our objective is to develop a more cost efficient Lidar system to support the pitch control of horizontal axis wind turbines and therefore to reduce the material requirement, lower the operation and maintenance costs and decrease the cost of wind energy in the long term. Compared to the state of the art Lidar systems, a laser with a shorter coherence length and a corresponding fiber delay line is introduced for reducing the costs. In this paper we present the experimental evaluation of different sending and receiving optics designs for such a system from a free space laboratory setup.

  17. Ultracold polar molecules near quantum degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Ospelkaus, S; Ni, K K; de Miranda, M H G; Neyenhuis, B; Wang, D; Kotochigova, S; Julienne, P S; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2009-01-01

    We report the creation and characterization of a near quantum-degenerate gas of polar 40K-87Rb molecules in their absolute rovibrational ground state. Starting from weakly bound heteronuclear KRb Feshbach molecules, we implement precise control of the molecular electronic, vibrational, and rotational degrees of freedom with phase-coherent laser fields. In particular, we coherently transfer these weakly bound molecules across a 125 THz frequency gap in a single step into the absolute rovibrational ground state of the electronic ground potential. Phase coherence between lasers involved in the transfer process is ensured by referencing the lasers to two single components of a phase-stabilized optical frequency comb. Using these methods, we prepare a dense gas of 4 x 10(4) polar molecules at a temperature below 400 nK. This fermionic molecular ensemble is close to quantum degeneracy and can be characterized by a degeneracy parameter of T/T(F) = 3. We have measured the molecular polarizability in an optical dipole trap where the trap lifetime gives clues to interesting decay mechanisms. Given the large measured dipole moment of the KRb molecules of 0.5 Debye, the study of quantum degenerate molecular gases interacting via strong dipolar interactions is now within experimental reach. PACS numbers: 37.10.Mn, 37.10.Pq. PMID:20151553

  18. Enhancement of VUV and EUV generation by field-controlled resonance structures of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-06-01

    Below- and near-threshold harmonic generation provides a potential approach to achieve a high conversion efficiency of vacuum-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet sources for the advancement of spectroscopy. Here, we perform a time-dependent density functional theory study for the nonperturbative treatment of below- and near-threshold harmonic generation of CO and N2 diatomic molecules subject to short near-infrared laser pulses and aligned parallel to the laser field polarization. We find that with the use of different driving laser pulse shapes, we can control and enhance harmonic generation through the excited-state resonance structures. Depending on the pulse shape, the enhancement can reach five to seven orders of magnitude as compared to the reference sine-squared laser pulse of the same duration. The results for different driving laser intensities are also presented and discussed in detail.

  19. Insulator-protected mechanically controlled break junctions for measuring single-molecule conductance in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusubramanian, N.; Galan, E.; Maity, C.; Eelkema, R.; Grozema, F. C.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to fabricate insulated gold mechanically controlled break junctions (MCBJ) by coating the metal with a thin layer of aluminum oxide using plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 thickness deposited on the MCBJ devices was varied from 2 to 15 nm to test the suppression of leakage currents in deionized water and phosphate buffered saline. Junctions coated with a 15 nm thick oxide layer yielded atomically sharp electrodes and negligible conductance counts in the range of 1 to 10-4 G0 (1 G0 = 77 μS), where single-molecule conductances are commonly observed. The insulated devices were used to measure the conductance of an amphiphilic oligophenylene ethynylene derivative in deionized water.

  20. Enhancement of ultracold molecule formation by local control in the nanosecond regime

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carini, J. L.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.; Gould, P. L.

    2015-02-01

    We describe quantum simulations of ultracold 87Rb2 molecule formation using photoassociation (PA) with nanosecond-time-scale pulses of frequency chirped light. In particular, we compare the case of a linear chirp to one where the frequency evolution is optimized by local control (LC) of the phase, and find that LC can provide a significant enhancement. The resulting optimal frequency evolution corresponds to a rapid jump from the PA absorption resonance to a downward transition to a bound level of the lowest triplet state. We also consider the case of two frequencies and investigate interference effects. The assumed chirp parameters should be achievablemore » with nanosecond pulse shaping techniques and are predicted to provide a significant enhancement over recent experiments with linear chirps.« less

  1. Control of Optical Transitions with Magnetic Fields in Weakly Bound Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, B. H.; McDonald, M.; Iwata, G. Z.; Skomorowski, W.; Moszynski, R.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2015-07-01

    In weakly bound diatomic molecules, energy levels are closely spaced and thus more susceptible to mixing by magnetic fields than in the constituent atoms. We use this effect to control the strengths of forbidden optical transitions in 88Sr2 over 5 orders of magnitude with modest fields by taking advantage of the intercombination-line threshold. The physics behind this remarkable tunability is accurately explained with both a simple model and quantum chemistry calculations, and suggests new possibilities for molecular clocks. We show how mixed quantization in an optical lattice can simplify molecular spectroscopy. Furthermore, our observation of formerly inaccessible f -parity excited states offers an avenue for improving theoretical models of divalent-atom dimers.

  2. Enhancement of VUV and EUV generation by field-controlled resonance structures of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    Below- and near-threshold harmonic generation provides a potential approach to achieve a high conversion efficiency of vacuum-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet sources for the advancement of spectroscopy. Here we perform an all-electron time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) study for the nonperturbative treatment of below- and near-threshold harmonic generation of CO and N2 diatomic molecules subject to short near-infrared laser pulses and aligned parallel to the laser field polarization. We find that with the use of different driving laser pulse shapes we can control and enhance harmonic generation through the excited state resonance structures. Our analysis reveals several novel features where the HHG signal is enhanced, boosting the conversion efficiency on the microscopic level. Depending on the pulse shape, the enhancement can reach 5 to 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the reference sine-squared laser pulse of the same duration. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  3. Control of Optical Transitions with Magnetic Fields in Weakly Bound Molecules.

    PubMed

    McGuyer, B H; McDonald, M; Iwata, G Z; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2015-07-31

    In weakly bound diatomic molecules, energy levels are closely spaced and thus more susceptible to mixing by magnetic fields than in the constituent atoms. We use this effect to control the strengths of forbidden optical transitions in (88)Sr2 over 5 orders of magnitude with modest fields by taking advantage of the intercombination-line threshold. The physics behind this remarkable tunability is accurately explained with both a simple model and quantum chemistry calculations, and suggests new possibilities for molecular clocks. We show how mixed quantization in an optical lattice can simplify molecular spectroscopy. Furthermore, our observation of formerly inaccessible f-parity excited states offers an avenue for improving theoretical models of divalent-atom dimers. PMID:26274416

  4. Enhancement of ultracold molecule formation by local control in the nanosecond regime

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, J. L.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.; Gould, P. L.

    2015-02-01

    We describe quantum simulations of ultracold 87Rb2 molecule formation using photoassociation (PA) with nanosecond-time-scale pulses of frequency chirped light. In particular, we compare the case of a linear chirp to one where the frequency evolution is optimized by local control (LC) of the phase, and find that LC can provide a significant enhancement. The resulting optimal frequency evolution corresponds to a rapid jump from the PA absorption resonance to a downward transition to a bound level of the lowest triplet state. We also consider the case of two frequencies and investigate interference effects. The assumed chirp parameters should be achievable with nanosecond pulse shaping techniques and are predicted to provide a significant enhancement over recent experiments with linear chirps.

  5. Probability density function formalism for optical coherence tomography signal analysis: a controlled phantom study.

    PubMed

    Weatherbee, Andrew; Sugita, Mitsuro; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Popov, Ivan; Vitkin, Alex

    2016-06-15

    The distribution of backscattered intensities as described by the probability density function (PDF) of tissue-scattered light contains information that may be useful for tissue assessment and diagnosis, including characterization of its pathology. In this Letter, we examine the PDF description of the light scattering statistics in a well characterized tissue-like particulate medium using optical coherence tomography (OCT). It is shown that for low scatterer density, the governing statistics depart considerably from a Gaussian description and follow the K distribution for both OCT amplitude and intensity. The PDF formalism is shown to be independent of the scatterer flow conditions; this is expected from theory, and suggests robustness and motion independence of the OCT amplitude (and OCT intensity) PDF metrics in the context of potential biomedical applications. PMID:27304274

  6. Experimental demonstration of using divergence cost-function in SPGD algorithm for coherent beam combining with tip/tilt control.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chao; Luo, Wen; Tan, Yi; Liu, Hongmei; Mu, Jinbo; Li, Xinyang

    2013-10-21

    A novel approach of tip/tilt control by using divergence cost function in stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm for coherent beam combining (CBC) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally in a seven-channel 2-W fiber amplifier array with both phase-locking and tip/tilt control, for the first time to our best knowledge. Compared with the conventional power-in-the-bucket (PIB) cost function for SPGD optimization, the tip/tilt control using divergence cost function ensures wider correction range, automatic switching control of program, and freedom of camera's intensity-saturation. Homemade piezoelectric-ring phase-modulator (PZT PM) and adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC) are developed to correct piston- and tip/tilt-type aberrations, respectively. The PIB cost function is employed for phase-locking via maximization of SPGD optimization, while the divergence cost function is used for tip/tilt control via minimization. An average of 432-μrad of divergence metrics in open loop has decreased to 89-μrad when tip/tilt control implemented. In CBC, the power in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main lobe increases by 32 times, and the phase residual error is less than λ/15. PMID:24150347

  7. Role of the Gouy Phase in the Coherent Phase Control of the Photoionization and Photodissociation of Vinyl Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, Vishal J.; Hu, Zhan; Willig, Joyce; Gordon, Robert J.

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the Gouy phase of a focused laser beam may be used to control the photoinduced reactions of a polyatomic molecule. Quantum mechanical interference between one- and three-photon excitation of vinyl chloride produces a small phase lag between the dissociation and ionization channels on the axis of the molecular beam. Away from the axis, the Gouy phase introduces a much larger phase lag that agrees quantitatively with theory without any adjustable parameters.

  8. Using the binding site to control the magnetic and spintronic properties of a single magnetic molecule in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prueser, Henning; Gill, Tobias G.; Sharp, John; Fisher, Andrew J.; Persson, Mats; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2015-03-01

    Many proposals outline the use of single magnetic molecules in new applications in information technology and spintronics, with the intention of creating new devices based on phenomena that only manifest at the atomic scale. To create these devices it will be necessary to engineer the required properties, whether through controlling the molecule's chemical makeup or its interaction with the external surroundings. The latter may involve using interactions with the supporting substrate surface, which have been shown to not only modify the molecule properties but also create effects such as chirality. Here we utilize the surface interaction to modify the properties of FePc on copper nitride, a thin insulator, above bulk Cu(001). Using scanning tunneling microscopy we show that the interaction with the surface is defined by the binding site of the central Fe atom in the molecule. By performing elastic and inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and comparing the results to DFT modeling, we explore how coupling to the surface can be used to control the molecular orbitals and the accessibility of the spin excitations. This demonstrates the importance of controlling molecule-substrate coupling down to the atomic scale for the development of single molecule devices.

  9. Condensation of Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kai Leong; Huang, Shi-Di; Kaczorowski, Matthias; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Coherent structures are ubiquitous in turbulent flows and play a key role in transport. The most important coherent structures in thermal turbulence are plumes. Despite being the primary heat carriers, the potential of manipulating thermal plumes to transport more heat has been overlooked so far. Unlike some other forms of energy transport, such as electromagnetic or sound waves, heat flow in fluids is generally difficult to manipulate, as it is associated with the random motion of molecules and atoms. Here we report how a simple geometrical confinement can lead to the condensation of elementary plumes. The result is the formation of highly coherent system-sized plumes and the emergence of a new regime of convective thermal turbulence characterized by universal temperature profiles and significantly enhanced heat transfer. It is also found that the universality of the temperature profiles and heat transport originate from the geometrical properties of the coherent structures, i.e., the thermal plumes. Therefore, in contrast to the classical regime, boundary layers in this plume-controlled regime are being controlled, rather than controlling.

  10. Condensation of Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kai Leong; Huang, Shi-Di; Kaczorowski, Matthias; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-31

    Coherent structures are ubiquitous in turbulent flows and play a key role in transport. The most important coherent structures in thermal turbulence are plumes. Despite being the primary heat carriers, the potential of manipulating thermal plumes to transport more heat has been overlooked so far. Unlike some other forms of energy transport, such as electromagnetic or sound waves, heat flow in fluids is generally difficult to manipulate, as it is associated with the random motion of molecules and atoms. Here we report how a simple geometrical confinement can lead to the condensation of elementary plumes. The result is the formation of highly coherent system-sized plumes and the emergence of a new regime of convective thermal turbulence characterized by universal temperature profiles and significantly enhanced heat transfer. It is also found that the universality of the temperature profiles and heat transport originate from the geometrical properties of the coherent structures, i.e., the thermal plumes. Therefore, in contrast to the classical regime, boundary layers in this plume-controlled regime are being controlled, rather than controlling. PMID:26764994

  11. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield

    PubMed Central

    Purchase, R. L.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m−2 d−1 for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum–classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics

  12. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield.

    PubMed

    Purchase, R L; de Groot, H J M

    2015-06-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m(-2) d(-1) for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum-classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics. We

  13. Effect of Resonances on the Coherent Control of the Photoionization and Photodissociation of HI and DI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.; Fiss, J.A.; Gordon, R.J.; Suto, K.; Wada, R.; Seideman, T.

    1997-11-01

    The phase lag between the ionization and dissociation products of HI and DI molecules obtained by one- and three-photon excitation was measured as a function of excitation energy in the vicinity of a molecular resonance. The phase lag was observed to have an asymmetric profile with a deep minimum near the center of the resonance. A strong isotope effect was also observed. A theoretical analysis, using projection operators to partition the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, showed that a molecular phase is responsible for the energy dependence of the phase lag. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Numerical study of near-wall coherent structures and their control in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoppa, Wade; Hussain, Fazle

    Using direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow, we present a new method for skin friction reduction by prevention of streamwise vortex formation near the wall. Instability of lifted, vortex-free low-speed streaks (above a critical strength ωyc) is shown to generate new streamwise vortices, which dominate near-wall turbulence phenomena. This new vortex formation mechanism consists of: (i) instability-initiated streak waviness in the horizontal plane, (ii) generation of thin horizontal sheets of streamwise vorticity and induction of positive stretching ∂u/ϖx (i.e. positive VISA), inherent to streak waviness, and finally (iii) vorticity sheet collapse via stretching (rather than roll-up) into streamwise vortices. The instability mechanism is explained and its evolutionary dynamics are documented. Significantly, the 3D features of the (instantaneous) instability-generated vortices agree well with the coherent structures educed (i.e. ensemble-averaged) from fully turbulent flow, suggesting the prevalence of this mechanism.

  15. Design of Control Software for a High-Speed Coherent Doppler Lidar System for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanvalkenburg, Randal L.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The design of the software for a 2-micron coherent high-speed Doppler lidar system for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley Research Center is discussed in this paper. The specific strategy and design topology to meet the requirements of the system are reviewed. In order to attain the high-speed digitization of the different types of signals to be sampled on multiple channels, a carefully planned design of the control software is imperative. Samples of digitized data from each channel and their roles in data analysis post processing are also presented. Several challenges of extremely-fast, high volume data acquisition are discussed. The software must check the validity of each lidar return as well as other monitoring channel data in real-time. For such high-speed data acquisition systems, the software is a key component that enables the entire scope of CO2 measurement studies using commercially available system components.

  16. Controllable optical steady behavior from nonradiative coherence in GaAs quantum well driven by a single elliptically polarized field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhonghu; Chen, Ai-Xi; Bai, Yanfeng; Yang, Wen-Xing; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze theoretically the optical steady behavior in GaAs quantum well structure which interacts with a single elliptically polarized field (EPF) and a π-polarized probe field. Due to the existence of the robust nonradiative coherence, we demonstrate that the controllable optical steady behavior including multi-stability (OM) and optical bistability (OB) can be obtained. More interestingly, our numerical results also illustrate that tuning the phase difference between two components of polarized electric field of the EPF can realize the conversion between OB and OM. Our results illustrate the potential to utilize the optical phase for developing the new all-optical switching devices, as well as a guidance in the design for possible experimental implementations.

  17. Coherent combining of fiber-laser-pumped frequency converters using all fiber electro-optic modulator for active phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, P.; Durécu, A.; Canat, G.; Le Gouët, J.; Goular, D.; Lombard, L.

    2015-03-01

    Coherent beam combining (CBC) by active phase control could be useful for power scaling fiber-laser-pumped optical frequency converters like OPOs. However, a phase modulator operating at the frequency-converted wavelength is needed, which is non standard component. Fortunately, nonlinear conversion processes rely on a phase-matching condition correlating, not only the wave vectors of the coupled waves, but also their phases. This paper demonstrates that, using this phase correlation for indirect control of the phase, coherent combining of optical frequency converters is feasible using standard all-fibered electro-optic modulators. For the sake of demonstration, this new technique is experimentally applied twice for continuous wave second-harmonic-generator (SHG) combination: i) combining 2 SHG of 1.55-μm erbium-doped fiber amplifiers in PPLN crystals generating 775-nm beams; ii) combining 2 SHG of 1.064-μm ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers in LBO crystals generating 532-nm beams. Excellent CBC efficiency is achieved on the harmonic waves in both these experiments, with λ/20 and λ/30 residual phase error respectively. In the second experiment, I/Q phase detection is added on fundamental and harmonic waves to measure their phase variations simultaneously. These measurements confirm the theoretical expectations and formulae of correlation between the phases of the fundamental and harmonic waves. Unexpectedly, in both experiments, when harmonic waves are phase-locked, a residual phase difference remains between the fundamen tal waves. Measurements of the spectrum of these residual phase differences locate them above 50 Hz, revealing that they most probably originate in fast-varying optical path differences induced by turbulence and acoustic-waves on the experimental breadboard.

  18. Scalable coherent interface

    SciTech Connect

    Alnaes, K.; Kristiansen, E.H. ); Gustavson, D.B. ); James, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface (IEEE P1596) is establishing an interface standard for very high performance multiprocessors, supporting a cache-coherent-memory model scalable to systems with up to 64K nodes. This Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) will supply a peak bandwidth per node of 1 GigaByte/second. The SCI standard should facilitate assembly of processor, memory, I/O and bus bridge cards from multiple vendors into massively parallel systems with throughput far above what is possible today. The SCI standard encompasses two levels of interface, a physical level and a logical level. The physical level specifies electrical, mechanical and thermal characteristics of connectors and cards that meet the standard. The logical level describes the address space, data transfer protocols, cache coherence mechanisms, synchronization primitives and error recovery. In this paper we address logical level issues such as packet formats, packet transmission, transaction handshake, flow control, and cache coherence. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Abstract coherent categories.

    PubMed

    Rehder, B; Ross, B H

    2001-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the importance of the knowledge that interrelates features in people's mental representation of categories and that makes our conception of categories coherent. This article focuses on abstract coherent categories, coherent categories that are also abstract because they are defined by relations independently of any features. Four experiments demonstrate that abstract coherent categories are learned more easily than control categories with identical features and statistical structure, and also that participants induced an abstract representation of the category by granting category membership to exemplars with completely novel features. The authors argue that the human conceptual system is heavily populated with abstract coherent concepts, including conceptions of social groups, societal institutions, legal, political, and military scenarios, and many superordinate categories, such as classes of natural kinds. PMID:11550753

  20. Coherent control of D2/H2 dissociative ionization by a mid-infrared two-color laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanie, Vincent; Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Thiré, Nicolas; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Deng, Yunpei; Alnaser, Ali S.; Litvinyuk, Igor V.; Tong, Xiao-Min; Légaré, François

    2016-01-01

    Steering the electrons during an ultrafast photo-induced process in a molecule influences the chemical behavior of the system, opening the door to the control of photochemical reactions and photobiological processes. Electrons can be efficiently localized using a strong laser field with a well-designed temporal shape of the electric component. Consequently, many experiments have been performed with laser sources in the near-infrared region (800 nm) in the interest of studying and enhancing the electron localization. However, due to its limited accessibility, the mid-infrared (MIR) range has barely been investigated, although it allows to efficiently control small molecules and even more complex systems. To push further the manipulation of basic chemical mechanisms, we used a MIR two-color (1800 and 900 nm) laser field to ionize H2 and D2 molecules and to steer the remaining electron during the photo-induced dissociation. The study of this prototype reaction led to the simultaneous control of four fragmentation channels. The results are well reproduced by a theoretical model solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the molecular ion, identifying the involved dissociation mechanisms. By varying the relative phase between the two colors, asymmetries (i.e., electron localization selectivity) of up to 65% were obtained, corresponding to enhanced or equivalent levels of control compared to previous experiments. Experimentally easier to implement, the use of a two-color laser field leads to a better electron localization than carrier-envelope phase stabilized pulses and applying the technique in the MIR range reveals more dissociation channels than at 800 nm.

  1. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Bradly J.; Guenther, David C.

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  2. Miniature coherent velocimeter and altimeter (MCVA) for terminal descent control on lunar and planetary landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dan; Cardell, Greg; Szwaykowski, Piotr; Shaffat, Syed T.; Meras, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    While the overall architecture of an Entry Descent and Landing (EDL) system may vary depending on specific mission requirementsw, measurements of the rate vector with respect to the surface is a primary requirement for the Terminal Descent Control (TDC) phase of any controlled lander.

  3. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestner, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  4. Ongoing Activity in Temporally Coherent Networks Predicts Intra-Subject Fluctuation of Response Time to Sporadic Executive Control Demands

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Takayuki; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Ihara, Mizuki; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Kanno, Akitake; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Can ongoing fMRI BOLD signals predict fluctuations in swiftness of a person’s response to sporadic cognitive demands? This is an important issue because it clarifies whether intrinsic brain dynamics, for which spatio-temporal patterns are expressed as temporally coherent networks (TCNs), have effects not only on sensory or motor processes, but also on cognitive processes. Predictivity has been affirmed, although to a limited extent. Expecting a predictive effect on executive performance for a wider range of TCNs constituting the cingulo-opercular, fronto-parietal, and default mode networks, we conducted an fMRI study using a version of the color–word Stroop task that was specifically designed to put a higher load on executive control, with the aim of making its fluctuations more detectable. We explored the relationships between the fluctuations in ongoing pre-trial activity in TCNs and the task response time (RT). The results revealed the existence of TCNs in which fluctuations in activity several seconds before the onset of the trial predicted RT fluctuations for the subsequent trial. These TCNs were distributed in the cingulo-opercular and fronto-parietal networks, as well as in perceptual and motor networks. Our results suggest that intrinsic brain dynamics in these networks constitute “cognitive readiness,” which plays an active role especially in situations where information for anticipatory attention control is unavailable. Fluctuations in these networks lead to fluctuations in executive control performance. PMID:24901995

  5. Role of solvent environments in single molecule conductance used insulator-modified mechanically controlled break junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusubramanian, Nandini; Maity, Chandan; Galan Garcia, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Grozema, Ferdinand; van der Zant, Herre; Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Collaboration; Department of Chemical Engineering Collaboration

    We present a method for studying the effects of polar solvents on charge transport through organic/biological single molecules by developing solvent-compatible mechanically controlled break junctions of gold coated with a thin layer of aluminium oxide using plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD). The optimal oxide thickness was experimentally determined to be 15 nm deposited at ALD operating temperature of 300°C which yielded atomically sharp electrodes and reproducible single-barrier tunnelling behaviour across a wide conductance range between 1 G0 and 10-7 G0. The insulator protected MCBJ devices were found to be effective in various solvents such as deionized water, phosphate buffered saline, methanol, acetonitrile and dichlorobenzene. The yield of molecular junctions using such insulated electrodes was tested by developing a chemical protocol for synthesizing an amphipathic form of oligo-phenylene ethynylene (OPE3-PEO) with thioacetate anchoring groups. This work has further applications in studying effects of solvation, dipole orientation and other thermodynamic interactions on charge transport. Eu Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN). MOLECULAR-SCALE ELECTRONICS: ``MOLESCO'' Project Number 606728.

  6. Cell Death-Associated Molecular-Pattern Molecules: Inflammatory Signaling and Control

    PubMed Central

    Sangiuliano, Beatriz; Pérez, Nancy Marcela; Moreira, Dayson F.; Belizário, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis are different cellular death programs characterized in organs and tissues as consequence of microbes infection, cell stress, injury, and chemotherapeutics exposure. Dying and death cells release a variety of self-proteins and bioactive chemicals originated from cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. These endogenous factors are named cell death-associated molecular-pattern (CDAMP), damage-associated molecular-pattern (DAMP) molecules, and alarmins. Some of them cooperate or act as important initial or delayed inflammatory mediators upon binding to diverse membrane and cytosolic receptors coupled to signaling pathways for the activation of the inflammasome platforms and NF-κB multiprotein complexes. Current studies show that the nonprotein thiols and thiol-regulating enzymes as well as highly diffusible prooxidant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species released together in extracellular inflammatory milieu play essential role in controlling pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of CDAMP/DAMP and alarmins. Here, we provide an overview of these emerging concepts and mechanisms of triggering and maintenance of tissue inflammation under massive death of cells. PMID:25140116

  7. Fabrication of nickel and gold nanowires by controlled electrodeposition on deoxyribonucleic acid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun; Jin, Helena; Dai, Kun

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic and electrical nanowires are two important materials in the development of futuristic nanoelectronics, data storage media and nanosensors. Ni and Au nanowires with a diameter of a few tens of nanometres have been fabricated using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules as a template through nanoparticle-controlled electroless deposition (ELD). Nanowire precursors, 1-3 nm Pt(0)-DNA and 1.4 nm Au(0)-DNA, were assembled using two different methods. Chemical reduction was used to deposit Pt(0) particles on DNA which catalyzed Ni nanowire growth. Positively charged Au nanoparticles were directly assembled on phosphate groups of DNA which were stretched and anchored between micrometre-spaced electrodes. Electrical measurement has shown that Au nanowires, catalyzed by Au(0)-DNA in a subsequent ELD, are highly conductive and show linear I-V characteristics. The major factors for the resistivity of nanowires were discussed in detail. This work involves important aspects in the field of DNA-based self-assembly, such as DNA and surface interaction, DNA nanoparticle assembly and electrical property of fabricated nanowires.

  8. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  9. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2001-06-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  10. Nanostructured lipid carrier-loaded hyaluronic acid microneedles for controlled dermal delivery of a lipophilic molecule.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Gon; Jeong, Jae Han; Lee, Kyung Min; Jeong, Kyu Ho; Yang, Huisuk; Kim, Miroo; Jung, Hyungil; Lee, Sangkil; Choi, Young Wook

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were employed to formulate a lipophilic drug into hydrophilic polymeric microneedles (MNs). Hyaluronic acid (HA) was selected as a hydrophilic and bioerodible polymer to fabricate MNs, and nile red (NR) was used as a model lipophilic molecule. NR-loaded NLCs were consolidated into the HA-based MNs to prepare NLC-loaded MNs (NLC-MNs). A dispersion of NLCs was prepared by high-pressure homogenization after dissolving NR in Labrafil and mixing with melted Compritol, resulting in 268 nm NLCs with a polydispersity index of 0.273. The NLC dispersion showed a controlled release of NR over 24 hours, following Hixson-Crowell's cube root law. After mixing the NLC dispersion with the HA solution, the drawing lithography method was used to fabricate NLC-MNs. The length, base diameter, and tip diameter of the NLC-MNs were approximately 350, 380, and 30 μm, respectively. Fluorescence microscopic imaging of the NLC-MNs helped confirm that the NR-loaded NLCs were distributed evenly throughout the MNs. In a skin permeation study performed using a Franz diffusion cell with minipig dorsal skin, approximately 70% of NR was localized in the skin after 24-hour application of NLC-MNs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (z-series) of the skin at different depths showed strong fluorescence intensity in the epidermal layer, which appeared to spread out radially with the passage of time. This study indicated that incorporation of drug-loaded NLCs into MNs could represent a promising strategy for controlled dermal delivery of lipophilic drugs. PMID:24403833

  11. Adiabatic coherent control in the anharmonic ion trap: Proposal for the vibrational two-qubit system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Babikov, Dmitri

    2011-05-15

    A method for encoding a multiqubit system into the quantized motional states of ion string in an anharmonic linear trap is proposed. Control over this system is achieved by applying oscillatory electric fields (rf) shaped optimally for desired state-to-state transitions. Anharmonicity of the vibrational spectrum of the system plays a key role in this approach to the control and quantum computation, since it allows resolving different state-to-state transitions and addressing them selectively. The anharmonic trap architecture proposed earlier [Phys. Rev. A 83, 022305 (2011)] is explored here and the optimal control theory is used to derive pulses for a set of universal quantum gates. An accurate choice of pulse parameters allows deriving gates that are both accurate and simple. A practical realization of this approach seems to be within the reach of today's technology.

  12. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabled recognition of necrosis as the mechanism of cancer cells death after exposure to cytopathic turbid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Collakova, Jana; Krizova, Aneta; Kollarova, Vera; Dostal, Zbynek; Slaba, Michala; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) in low-coherence mode possesses a pronounced coherence gate effect. This offers an option to investigate the details of cellular events leading to cell death caused by cytopathic turbid emulsions. CCHM capacity was first assessed in model situations that showed clear images obtained with low coherence of illumination but not with high coherence of illumination. Then, the form of death of human cancer cells induced by treatment with biologically active phospholipids (BAPs) preparation was investigated. The observed overall retraction of cell colony was apparently caused by the release of cell-to-substratum contacts. This was followed by the accumulation of granules decorating the nuclear membrane. Then, the occurrence of nuclear membrane indentations signaled the start of damage to the integrity of the cell nucleus. In the final stage, cells shrunk and disintegrated. This indicated that BAPs cause cell death by necrosis and not apoptosis. An intriguing option of checking the fate of cancer cells caused by the anticipated cooperative effect after adding another tested substance sodium dichloroacetate to turbid emulsion is discussed on grounds of pilot experiments. Such observations should reveal the impact and mechanism of action of the interacting drugs on cell behavior and fate that would otherwise remain hidden in turbid milieu. PMID:26334859

  13. Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabled recognition of necrosis as the mechanism of cancer cells death after exposure to cytopathic turbid emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collakova, Jana; Krizova, Aneta; Kollarova, Vera; Dostal, Zbynek; Slaba, Michala; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscopy (CCHM) in low-coherence mode possesses a pronounced coherence gate effect. This offers an option to investigate the details of cellular events leading to cell death caused by cytopathic turbid emulsions. CCHM capacity was first assessed in model situations that showed clear images obtained with low coherence of illumination but not with high coherence of illumination. Then, the form of death of human cancer cells induced by treatment with biologically active phospholipids (BAPs) preparation was investigated. The observed overall retraction of cell colony was apparently caused by the release of cell-to-substratum contacts. This was followed by the accumulation of granules decorating the nuclear membrane. Then, the occurrence of nuclear membrane indentations signaled the start of damage to the integrity of the cell nucleus. In the final stage, cells shrunk and disintegrated. This indicated that BAPs cause cell death by necrosis and not apoptosis. An intriguing option of checking the fate of cancer cells caused by the anticipated cooperative effect after adding another tested substance sodium dichloroacetate to turbid emulsion is discussed on grounds of pilot experiments. Such observations should reveal the impact and mechanism of action of the interacting drugs on cell behavior and fate that would otherwise remain hidden in turbid milieu.

  14. Accurate and agile digital control of optical phase, amplitude and frequency for coherent atomic manipulation of atomic systems.

    PubMed

    Thom, Joseph; Wilpers, Guido; Riis, Erling; Sinclair, Alastair G

    2013-08-12

    We demonstrate a system for fast and agile digital control of laser phase, amplitude and frequency for applications in coherent atomic systems. The full versatility of a direct digital synthesis radiofrequency source is faithfully transferred to laser radiation via acousto-optic modulation. Optical beatnotes are used to measure phase steps up to 2π, which are accurately implemented with a resolution of ≤ 10 mrad. By linearizing the optical modulation process, amplitude-shaped pulses of durations ranging from 500 ns to 500 ms, in excellent agreement with the programmed functional form, are demonstrated. Pulse durations are limited only by the 30 ns rise time of the modulation process, and a measured extinction ratio of > 5 × 10(11) is achieved. The system presented here was developed specifically for controlling the quantum state of trapped ions with sequences of multiple laser pulses, including composite and bichromatic pulses. The demonstrated techniques are widely applicable to other atomic systems ranging across quantum information processing, frequency metrology, atom interferometry, and single-photon generation. PMID:23938787

  15. Coherent molecular transistor: Control through variation of the gate wave function

    SciTech Connect

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2014-03-21

    In quantum interference transistors (QUITs), the current through the device is controlled by variation of the gate component of the wave function that interferes with the wave function component joining the source and the sink. Initially, mesoscopic QUITs have been studied and more recently, QUITs at the molecular scale have been proposed and implemented. Typically, in these devices the gate lead is subjected to externally adjustable physical parameters that permit interference control through modifications of the gate wave function. Here, we present an alternative model of a molecular QUIT in which the gate wave function is directly considered as a variable and the transistor operation is discussed in terms of this variable. This implies that we specify the gate current as well as the phase of the gate wave function component and calculate the resulting current through the source-sink channel. Thus, we extend on prior works that focus on the phase of the gate wave function component as a control parameter while having zero or certain discrete values of the current. We address a large class of systems, including finite graphene flakes, and obtain analytic solutions for how the gate wave function controls the transistor.

  16. Generation of isolated ultra-short attosecond pulses by coherent control of the population of excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Li, Peng-Cheng; Liao, Sheng-Lun; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-01-01

    We present an ab-initio theoretical investigation of the enhancement of ultra-broad super-continuum harmonic spectra by coherently controlling the electron quantum paths of the helium atom and He+ ion. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved by means of the time-dependent generalized pseudo-spectral method, allowing non-uniform and optimal spatial grid discretization and accurate and efficient propagation of the wave function in space and time. The population of the first two low-lying excited states of He+ is selectively controlled by adding low intensity, high frequency laser pulses to a two color mid-infrared laser field. Although the intensity of the added field is weak, its high frequency makes the subsequent ionization probability from excited states become much larger than for the case of many photons (mid-IR filed), even though the intensity is smaller. We found that the intensity of the attosecond pulse generated by superposing a range of synchronized high harmonics is significantly enhanced by 20 orders of magnitude. Similar calculations have been performed for the neutral He atoms. We found that an intense and ultra-short isolated 18 as can be generated directly. To understand the underlying mechanism of such dramatic enhancement and the role of electron quantum paths, we perform wavelet time-frequency transform of high harmonic spectra. The results show that we can selectively control the domination of the two distinct long and short electron trajectories by controlling the population of different excited states.

  17. Incorporating real time velocity map image reconstruction into closed-loop coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallis, C. E.; Burwitz, T. G.; Andrews, P. R.; Zohrabi, M.; Averin, R.; De, S.; Bergues, B.; Jochim, Bethany; Voznyuk, A. V.; Gregerson, Neal; Gaire, B.; Znakovskaya, I.; McKenna, J.; Carnes, K. D.; Kling, M. F.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Wells, E.

    2014-11-01

    We report techniques developed to utilize three-dimensional momentum information as feedback in adaptive femtosecond control of molecular dynamics. Velocity map imaging is used to obtain the three-dimensional momentum map of the dissociating ions following interaction with a shaped intense ultrafast laser pulse. In order to recover robust feedback information, however, the two-dimensional momentum projection from the detector must be inverted to reconstruct the full three-dimensional momentum of the photofragments. These methods are typically slow or require manual inputs and are therefore accomplished offline after the images have been obtained. Using an algorithm based upon an "onion-peeling" (also known as "back projection") method, we are able to invert 1040 × 1054 pixel images in under 1 s. This rapid inversion allows the full photofragment momentum to be used as feedback in a closed-loop adaptive control scheme, in which a genetic algorithm tailors an ultrafast laser pulse to optimize a specific outcome. Examples of three-dimensional velocity map image based control applied to strong-field dissociation of CO and O2 are presented.

  18. Generating Molecular Rovibrational Coherence by Two-Photon Femtosecond Photoassociation of Thermally Hot Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rybak, Leonid; Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Amaran, Saieswari; Kosloff, Ronnie; Tomza, Michal; Moszynski, Robert; Koch, Christiane P.

    2011-12-30

    The formation of diatomic molecules with rotational and vibrational coherence is demonstrated experimentally in free-to-bound two-photon femtosecond photoassociation of hot atoms. In a thermal gas at a temperature of 1000 K, pairs of magnesium atoms, colliding in their electronic ground state, are excited into coherent superpositions of bound rovibrational levels in an electronically excited state. The rovibrational coherence is probed by a time-delayed third photon, resulting in quantum beats in the UV fluorescence. A comprehensive theoretical model based on ab initio calculations rationalizes the generation of coherence by Franck-Condon filtering of collision energies and partial waves, quantifying it in terms of an increase in quantum purity of the thermal ensemble. Our results open the way to coherent control of a binary reaction.

  19. Ultrafast coherent control of angular momentum during a one-photon excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, D. A.; Eppink, A. T. J. B.; Meerts, W. L.; Kimel, A. V.; Kirilyuk, A.; Rasing, Th.; Zande, W. J. van der

    2011-10-15

    The subpicosecond dynamics of angular momentum transfer in the excited rubidium 5p state is studied in real time by observing photoelectron angular distributions with velocity map imaging. Retrieving the populations of the degenerate Zeeman levels and reconstructing the angular momentum, we show that in the case of resonant excitation the angular momentum does not follow the momentary helicity of the electric field of the pulse. This is in contrast with off-resonant excitation where the angular momentum and pulse helicity are fully correlated. Our study shows how to generate and shape ultrashort pulses of orbital and spin angular momentum in a controllable way.

  20. Coherent control of the optical nonlinear and luminescence anisotropies in molecular thin films by multiphoton excitations.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Brasselet, Sophie; Zyss, Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Photoinduced orientational distributions are implemented with one- and two-photon absorption interference in polymer films containing chromophores that exhibit luminescent and nonlinear properties. The odd- and even-order parameters of the final distribution are probed by simultaneous measurement of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF). We show the possibility of engineering local SHG and TPF anisotropies by controlling the polarization states and intensities of the writing optical fields. Complex multipolar orders are modeled with an irreducible spherical tensor-based formalism jointly applied to the molecular polarizabilities and field tensors. PMID:15214309

  1. Method of controlling coherent synchroton radiation-driven degradation of beam quality during bunch length compression

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2012-07-10

    A method of avoiding CSR induced beam quality defects in free electron laser operation by a) controlling the rate of compression and b) using a novel means of integrating the compression with the remainder of the transport system: both are accomplished by means of dispersion modulation. A large dispersion is created in the penultimate dipole magnet of the compression region leading to rapid compression; this large dispersion is demagnified and dispersion suppression performed in a final small dipole. As a result, the bunch is short for only a small angular extent of the transport, and the resulting CSR excitation is small.

  2. Control of Assembly of Dihydropyridyl and Pyridyl Molecules via Directed Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization of two dihydropyridyl molecules, 1,4-bis(4-(3,5-dicyano-2,6-dipyridyl)dihydropyridyl)benzene ([C40H24N10]·2DMF, 1·2DMF; DMF = dimethylformamide) and 1,4-bis(4-(3,5-dicyano-2,6-dipyridyl)dihydropyridyl)phenylbenzene ([C46H28N10]·2DMF, 3·2DMF), and their respective oxidized pyridyl analogues, 1,4-bis(4-(3,5-dicyano-2,6-dipyridyl)pyridyl)benzene ([C40H20N10], 2) and 1,4-bis(4-(3,5-dicyano-2,6-dipyridyl)pyridyl)phenylbenzene ([C46H24N10]·DMF, 4·DMF), has been achieved under solvothermal conditions. The dihydropyridyl molecules are converted to their pyridyl products via in situ oxidative dehydrogenation in solution. The structures of the four molecules have been fully characterized by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. The oxidized pyridyl products, 2 and 4, are more elongated due to aromatization of the dihydropyridyl rings at each end of their parent molecules 1 and 3, respectively. The solid-state supramolecular structures of the pyridyl molecules are distinct from the dihydropyridyl molecules in terms of their hierarchical assembly via hydrogen bonding due to the loss of primary N–H hydrogen bond donors in the two electron oxidized tectons. Overall, the geometrically shorter molecules 1 and 3 display close-packed structures, whereas the more extended 2 and 4 assemble into more open supramolecular systems. PMID:26435703

  3. Reversible control of F(1)-ATPase rotational motion using a photochromic ATP analog at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Ei-Ichiro; Kamei, Takashi; Konno, Hiroki; Tamaoki, Nobuyuki; Hisabori, Toru

    2014-03-28

    Motor enzymes such as F1-ATPase and kinesin utilize energy from ATP for their motion. Molecular motions of these enzymes are critical to their catalytic mechanisms and were analyzed thoroughly using a single molecule observation technique. As a tool to analyze and control the ATP-driven motor enzyme motion, we recently synthesized a photoresponsive ATP analog with a p-tert-butylazobenzene tethered to the 2' position of the ribose ring. Using cis/trans isomerization of the azobenzene moiety, we achieved a successful reversible photochromic control over a kinesin-microtubule system in an in vitro motility assay. Here we succeeded to control the hydrolytic activity and rotation of the rotary motor enzyme, F1-ATPase, using this photosensitive ATP analog. Subsequent single molecule observations indicated a unique pause occurring at the ATP binding angle position in the presence of cis form of the analog. PMID:24607907

  4. Coherent control of H2+ ionization with intense XUV+IR fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Esry, B. D.

    2011-05-01

    We recently developed a method to calculate how the electron and nuclei of the H2+share the energy absorbed from an intense laser pulse. While neither the electron energy spectrum nor the nuclear energy spectrum showed much structure separately, their joint energy spectrum revealed considerable structure. It showed multiphoton absorption with the energy shared between the nuclei and the electron. A number of questions followed our initial results: Can the joint energy distribution be used to map the vibrational wave function? To what extent can we control the asymptotic energies of the ionization products? The model behind above Coulomb threshold explosion [PRL 97, 013003 (2006)] seems to give a consistent explanation for the calculated energy distributions. We present joint energy distributions of the ionization resulting from an IR+XUV pump-probe laser scheme. In this way, we may investigate the controllability of the asymptotic energies of the ionization fragments and explore the possibility of using the joint energy distribution to map the vibrational wave function. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Coherent control of the Goos-Hänchen shift via Fano interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaopeng; Yang, Wen-Xing; Zhu, Zhonghu

    2016-04-01

    A scheme of enhanced Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts in reflected and transmitted light beams is exploited in a cavity, where an asymmetric double AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well structure with resonant tunneling to a common continuum is employed as the intracavity medium. With the help of Fano-type interference induced by resonant tunneling, the generated GH shifts that contain a negative lateral shift in reflected light beam and a positive lateral shift in transmitted light beam are found to be significantly enhanced. More interestingly, these GH shifts in reflected and transmitted light beams are modulated by means of a control beam and external bias voltage, in which maximum negative shift of 1.86 mm and positive shift of 0.37 mm are achievable.

  6. Method and apparatus for control of coherent synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R; Tennant, Christopher

    2015-11-10

    A modulated-bending recirculating system that avoids CSR-driven breakdown in emittance compensation by redistributing the bending along the beamline. The modulated-bending recirculating system includes a) larger angles of bending in initial FODO cells, thereby enhancing the impact of CSR early on in the beam line while the bunch is long, and 2) a decreased bending angle in the final FODO cells, reducing the effect of CSR while the bunch is short. The invention describes a method for controlling the effects of CSR during recirculation and bunch compression including a) correcting chromatic aberrations, b) correcting lattice and CSR-induced curvature in the longitudinal phase space by compensating T.sub.566, and c) using lattice perturbations to compensate obvious linear correlations x-dp/p and x'-dp/p.

  7. Controlling the Spin Texture of Topological Insulators by Rational Design of Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Sebastian; Narayan, Awadhesh; Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Droghetti, Andrea; Rungger, Ivan; Hor, Yew S; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Jungkenn, Dominik; Stöckl, Johannes; Laux, Martin; Monti, Oliver L A; Aeschlimann, Martin; Cava, Robert J; Ruben, Mario; Mathias, Stefan; Sanvito, Stefano; Cinchetti, Mirko

    2015-09-01

    We present a rational design approach to customize the spin texture of surface states of a topological insulator. This approach relies on the extreme multifunctionality of organic molecules that are used to functionalize the surface of the prototypical topological insulator (TI) Bi2Se3. For the rational design we use theoretical calculations to guide the choice and chemical synthesis of appropriate molecules that customize the spin texture of Bi2Se3. The theoretical predictions are then verified in angular-resolved photoemission experiments. We show that, by tuning the strength of molecule-TI interaction, the surface of the TI can be passivated, the Dirac point can energetically be shifted at will, and Rashba-split quantum-well interface states can be created. These tailored interface properties-passivation, spin-texture tuning, and creation of hybrid interface states-lay a solid foundation for interface-assisted molecular spintronics in spin-textured materials. PMID:26262825

  8. Controlled gelation kinetics of cucurbit[7]uril-adamantane cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels with competing guest molecules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Hou, Shengzhen; Ma, Haili; Li, Xu; Tan, Yebang

    2016-01-01

    Gelation kinetics of hydrogels is closely linked to many applications such as the development of injectable and printable hydrogels. However, the control of gelation kinetics without compromising the structure and other properties of the hydrogels, remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate a method to control the gelation kinetics of cucurbit[7]uril-adamantane (CB[7]-AD) cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels by using competing guest molecules. The association between CB[7] and AD moieties on the polymer backbone was impeded by pre-occupying the CB[7] cavity with competing guest molecules. By using various guest molecules and concentrations, the gelation of the hydrogels could be varied from seconds to hours. The strong interaction of CB[7]-AD pair endue the hydrogels good mechanical properties and stability. Moreover, the binding of functionalized guest molecules of CB[7] moieties offers a facile approach for tailoring of the hydrogels’ scaffold. Combined with hydrogel injection and printing technology, this method offers an approach for the development of hydrogels with advanced temporal and spatial complexity. PMID:26846437

  9. Controlled gelation kinetics of cucurbit[7]uril-adamantane cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels with competing guest molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Hou, Shengzhen; Ma, Haili; Li, Xu; Tan, Yebang

    2016-02-01

    Gelation kinetics of hydrogels is closely linked to many applications such as the development of injectable and printable hydrogels. However, the control of gelation kinetics without compromising the structure and other properties of the hydrogels, remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate a method to control the gelation kinetics of cucurbit[7]uril-adamantane (CB[7]-AD) cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels by using competing guest molecules. The association between CB[7] and AD moieties on the polymer backbone was impeded by pre-occupying the CB[7] cavity with competing guest molecules. By using various guest molecules and concentrations, the gelation of the hydrogels could be varied from seconds to hours. The strong interaction of CB[7]-AD pair endue the hydrogels good mechanical properties and stability. Moreover, the binding of functionalized guest molecules of CB[7] moieties offers a facile approach for tailoring of the hydrogels’ scaffold. Combined with hydrogel injection and printing technology, this method offers an approach for the development of hydrogels with advanced temporal and spatial complexity.

  10. Controlled gelation kinetics of cucurbit[7]uril-adamantane cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels with competing guest molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Hou, Shengzhen; Ma, Haili; Li, Xu; Tan, Yebang

    2016-01-01

    Gelation kinetics of hydrogels is closely linked to many applications such as the development of injectable and printable hydrogels. However, the control of gelation kinetics without compromising the structure and other properties of the hydrogels, remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate a method to control the gelation kinetics of cucurbit[7]uril-adamantane (CB[7]-AD) cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels by using competing guest molecules. The association between CB[7] and AD moieties on the polymer backbone was impeded by pre-occupying the CB[7] cavity with competing guest molecules. By using various guest molecules and concentrations, the gelation of the hydrogels could be varied from seconds to hours. The strong interaction of CB[7]-AD pair endue the hydrogels good mechanical properties and stability. Moreover, the binding of functionalized guest molecules of CB[7] moieties offers a facile approach for tailoring of the hydrogels' scaffold. Combined with hydrogel injection and printing technology, this method offers an approach for the development of hydrogels with advanced temporal and spatial complexity. PMID:26846437

  11. Characteristic operator functions for quantum input-plant-output models and coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, John E.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the characteristic operator as the generalization of the usual concept of a transfer function of linear input-plant-output systems to arbitrary quantum nonlinear Markovian input-output models. This is intended as a tool in the characterization of quantum feedback control systems that fits in with the general theory of networks. The definition exploits the linearity of noise differentials in both the plant Heisenberg equations of motion and the differential form of the input-output relations. Mathematically, the characteristic operator is a matrix of dimension equal to the number of outputs times the number of inputs (which must coincide), but with entries that are operators of the plant system. In this sense, the characteristic operator retains details of the effective plant dynamical structure and is an essentially quantum object. We illustrate the relevance to model reduction and simplification definition by showing that the convergence of the characteristic operator in adiabatic elimination limit models requires the same conditions and assumptions appearing in the work on limit quantum stochastic differential theorems of Bouten and Silberfarb [Commun. Math. Phys. 283, 491-505 (2008)]. This approach also shows in a natural way that the limit coefficients of the quantum stochastic differential equations in adiabatic elimination problems arise algebraically as Schur complements and amounts to a model reduction where the fast degrees of freedom are decoupled from the slow ones and eliminated.

  12. Characteristic operator functions for quantum input-plant-output models and coherent control

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, John E.

    2015-01-15

    We introduce the characteristic operator as the generalization of the usual concept of a transfer function of linear input-plant-output systems to arbitrary quantum nonlinear Markovian input-output models. This is intended as a tool in the characterization of quantum feedback control systems that fits in with the general theory of networks. The definition exploits the linearity of noise differentials in both the plant Heisenberg equations of motion and the differential form of the input-output relations. Mathematically, the characteristic operator is a matrix of dimension equal to the number of outputs times the number of inputs (which must coincide), but with entries that are operators of the plant system. In this sense, the characteristic operator retains details of the effective plant dynamical structure and is an essentially quantum object. We illustrate the relevance to model reduction and simplification definition by showing that the convergence of the characteristic operator in adiabatic elimination limit models requires the same conditions and assumptions appearing in the work on limit quantum stochastic differential theorems of Bouten and Silberfarb [Commun. Math. Phys. 283, 491-505 (2008)]. This approach also shows in a natural way that the limit coefficients of the quantum stochastic differential equations in adiabatic elimination problems arise algebraically as Schur complements and amounts to a model reduction where the fast degrees of freedom are decoupled from the slow ones and eliminated.

  13. Quantum interference and control of the optical response in quantum dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, H. S.; Sanz, L.; Villas-Boas, J. M.; Alcalde, A. M.

    2013-11-25

    We discuss the optical response of a quantum molecule under the action of two lasers fields. Using a realistic model and parameters, we map the physical conditions to find three different phenomena reported in the literature: the tunneling induced transparency, the formation of Autler-Townes doublets, and the creation of a Mollow-like triplet. We found that the electron tunneling between quantum dots is responsible for the different optical regime. Our results not only explain the experimental results in the literature but also give insights for future experiments and applications in optics using quantum dots molecules.

  14. Associations between maternal sense of coherence and controlling feeding practices: The importance of resilience and support in families of preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Eli, Karin; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Mokoena, Lincoln; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Flodmark, Carl-Erik; Faith, Myles S; Nowicka, Paulina

    2016-10-01

    Sense of Coherence (SOC) measures an individual's positive, or salutogenic, orientation toward her/his capacities, environment, future, and life. SOC comprises three factors: comprehensibility (the sense of one's own life as ordered and understandable); manageability (the perception of available resources and skills to manage stressors); and meaningfulness (the overall sense that life is filled with meaning and purpose). In numerous studies, SOC has been associated with resilience to stress. However, associations between parental SOC and controlling feeding practices have yet to be studied. This study examines the validity of the SOC 13-item, 3-factor questionnaire, associations between SOC and maternal and child characteristics, and associations between SOC and use of pressuring or restrictive feeding, among mothers of 4-year-olds. 565 mothers (23.5% of foreign origin, 30.3% with overweight/obesity) recruited via the Swedish population registry (response rate: 65%), completed the SOC-13, the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ), and a background questionnaire. The validity of SOC-13 was examined using confirmatory factor analysis; associations with background characteristics and feeding practices were tested with structural equation modeling. SOC-13 validity testing showed acceptable fit (TLI = 0.93, CFI = 0.94, RMSEA = 0.06, SRMR = 0.04) after allowing one pair of error terms to correlate. The Cronbach's alpha for meaningfulness was 0.73, comprehensibility 0.76, and manageability 0.75. SOC increased with mothers' Swedish background and education, and decreased with higher BMI. Child gender, age, and BMI, were not associated with SOC. Lower SOC was associated with controlling practices and with concern about child weight and eating. The associations between SOC and feeding suggest that SOC-related parameters could inform childhood obesity research, and that prevention should address the socioeconomic barriers that parents face in building resilience to stress

  15. Convergent in situ assembly of injectable lipogel for enzymatically controlled and targeted delivery of hydrophilic molecules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Shi, Liyang; Guo, Xin; Gao, Jinxu; Ossipov, Dmitri

    2016-12-10

    Applications of liposomes are limited due to their rapid blood clearance and non-specific biodistribution. Surface modification of liposomes could overcome these disadvantages. However, direct coating of liposome surface may cause disruption of liposomes. Herein we present a "top-down" method to coat liposomes in situ with tumor (CD44 receptor) targeting polymer, hyaluronan (HA), by taking advantages of "click" type chemistries and enzymatic degradation. Liposomes entrapped within HA gel were stable without leaking of small cargo molecules from the interior of the liposomes. This injectable liposome-in-hydrogel (lipogel) drug delivery system can achieve sequential two-step release: (1) liposomes release from lipogel after HA degradation; (2) small molecules release from liposomes after the liposomes disruption (either before or after cellular uptake). Similarly to HA coating, this strategy could be used for in situ "top-down" modification of liposomes with other targeting biopolymers. Additionally, it provides the possibility to deliver different types of molecules from two compartments of the lipogel, i.e. large biomacromolecules from the exterior of liposomes and small hydrophilic molecules from the interior of liposomes, locally and systemically. PMID:27577897

  16. Cellular reprogramming for pancreatic β-cell regeneration: clinical potential of small molecule control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific breakthroughs in stem cell biology suggest that a sustainable treatment approach to cure diabetes mellitus (DM) can be achieved in the near future. However, the transplantation complexities and the difficulty in obtaining the stem cells from adult cells of pancreas, liver, bone morrow and other cells is a major concern. The epoch-making strategy of transcription-factor based cellular reprogramming suggest that these barriers could be overcome, and it is possible to reprogram any cells into functional β cells. Contemporary biological and analytical techniques help us to predict the key transcription factors needed for β-cell regeneration. These β cell-specific transcription factors could be modulated with diverse reprogramming protocols. Among cellular reprogramming strategies, small molecule approach gets proclaimed to have better clinical prospects because it does not involve genetic manipulation. Several small molecules targeting certain epigenetic enzymes and/or signaling pathways have been successful in helping to induce pancreatic β-cell specification. Recently, a synthetic DNA-based small molecule triggered targeted transcriptional activation of pancreas-related genes to suggest the possibility of achieving desired cellular phenotype in a precise mode. Here, we give a brief overview of treating DM by regenerating pancreatic β-cells from various cell sources. Through a comprehensive overview of the available transcription factors, small molecules and reprogramming strategies available for pancreatic β-cell regeneration, this review compiles the current progress made towards the generation of clinically relevant insulin-producing β-cells. PMID:24679123

  17. Laser-driven rotational dynamics of gas-phase molecules: Control and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaoming

    In this thesis, our work on developing new techniques to measure and enhance field-free molecular alignment and orientation is described. Non-resonant femtosecond laser pulses are used to align and orient rotationally-cold gas-phase molecules. The time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved to simulate the experimental results. A single-shot kHz velocity map imaging (VMI) spectrometer is developed for characterizing 1D and 3D alignment. Stimulated by a novel metric for 3D alignment proposed by Makhija et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85,033425 (2012)], a multi-pulse scheme to improve 3D alignment is demonstrated experimentally on difluoro-iodobenzene molecules and the best field-free 3D alignment is achieved. A degenerate four wave mixing probe is developed to overcome limitations in VMI measurement; experiments on different types of molecules show good agreement with computational results. Highly aligned linear molecules are used for high harmonic generation experiments. Due to the high degree of alignment, fractional revivals, variation of revival structure with harmonic order and the shape resonance and Cooper minimum in the photoionization cross section of molecular nitrogen are all observed directly in experiment for the first time. Enhanced orientation from rotationally cold heteronuclear molecules is also demonstrated. We follow the theory developed by Zhang et al. [Phys. Rev. A 83, 043410 (2011)] and demonstrate experimentally for the first time that for rotationally cold carbon monoxide an aligning laser pulse followed by a two-color laser pulse can increase field-free orientation level by almost a factor of three compared to using just the two-color pulse.

  18. Coherent perfect absorber based on metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate selective coherent perfect absorption based on interaction between bilayered asymmetrically split rings (ASRs) metamaterials and a standing wave formed by two coherent counter propagating beams. The selective coherent perfect absorbers with high absorption have been achieved depending on the phase difference between two coherent beams. The selective coherent control absorbers can be well designed by changing the thickness of the dielectric layer and the asymmetry of the ASRs. The coherently controlled metamaterials provide an opportunity to realize selective multiband absorption and ultrafast information processing.

  19. Orthodenticle Is Required for the Expression of Principal Recognition Molecules That Control Axon Targeting in the Drosophila Retina.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Pichaud, Franck

    2015-06-01

    Parallel processing of neuronal inputs relies on assembling neural circuits into distinct synaptic-columns and layers. This is orchestrated by matching recognition molecules between afferent growth cones and target areas. Controlling the expression of these molecules during development is crucial but not well understood. The developing Drosophila visual system is a powerful genetic model for addressing this question. In this model system, the achromatic R1-6 photoreceptors project their axons in the lamina while the R7 and R8 photoreceptors, which are involved in colour detection, project their axons to two distinct synaptic-layers in the medulla. Here we show that the conserved homeodomain transcription factor Orthodenticle (Otd), which in the eye is a main regulator of rhodopsin expression, is also required for R1-6 photoreceptor synaptic-column specific innervation of the lamina. Our data indicate that otd function in these photoreceptors is largely mediated by the recognition molecules flamingo (fmi) and golden goal (gogo). In addition, we find that otd regulates synaptic-layer targeting of R8. We demonstrate that during this process, otd and the R8-specific transcription factor senseless/Gfi1 (sens) function as independent transcriptional inputs that are required for the expression of fmi, gogo and the adhesion molecule capricious (caps), which govern R8 synaptic-layer targeting. Our work therefore demonstrates that otd is a main component of the gene regulatory network that regulates synaptic-column and layer targeting in the fly visual system. PMID:26114289

  20. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  1. A method for controlling the synthesis of stable twisted two-dimensional conjugated molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjun; Jia, Zhiyu; Xiao, Shengqiang; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic stabilization (π-electron delocalization through effective conjugation) and kinetic stabilization (blocking the most-reactive sites) are important considerations when designing stable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons displaying tunable optoelectronic properties. Here, we demonstrate an efficient method for preparing a series of stable two-dimensional (2D) twisted dibenzoterrylene-acenes. We investigated their electronic structures and geometries in the ground state through various experiments assisted by calculations using density functional theory. We find that the length of the acene has a clear effect on the photophysical, electrochemical, and magnetic properties. These molecules exhibit tunable ground-state structures, in which a stable open-shell quintet tetraradical can be transferred to triplet diradicals. Such compounds are promising candidates for use in nonlinear optics, field effect transistors and organic spintronics; furthermore, they may enable broader applications of 2D small organic molecules in high-performance electronic and optical devices. PMID:27181692

  2. A method for controlling the synthesis of stable twisted two-dimensional conjugated molecules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongjun; Jia, Zhiyu; Xiao, Shengqiang; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic stabilization (π-electron delocalization through effective conjugation) and kinetic stabilization (blocking the most-reactive sites) are important considerations when designing stable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons displaying tunable optoelectronic properties. Here, we demonstrate an efficient method for preparing a series of stable two-dimensional (2D) twisted dibenzoterrylene-acenes. We investigated their electronic structures and geometries in the ground state through various experiments assisted by calculations using density functional theory. We find that the length of the acene has a clear effect on the photophysical, electrochemical, and magnetic properties. These molecules exhibit tunable ground-state structures, in which a stable open-shell quintet tetraradical can be transferred to triplet diradicals. Such compounds are promising candidates for use in nonlinear optics, field effect transistors and organic spintronics; furthermore, they may enable broader applications of 2D small organic molecules in high-performance electronic and optical devices. PMID:27181692

  3. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  4. Carbon-based molecular devices: Fano effects controlled by the molecule length and the gate voltage.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Kuang, Y W; Liu, Y S; Zhang, D B; Shao, Z G; Yu, H L; Hong, X K; Feng, J F; Chen, X S; Wang, X F

    2016-08-25

    Fano effect is an important quantum phenomenon in mesoscopic systems, which arises from an interference between the localized state and the extended state. Here we observe an obvious Fano effect near the Fermi level in an all-carbon molecular device consisting of an acene molecule sandwiched between two zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) electrodes. By increasing the length of the molecule, an extended state gradually evolves into a localized state. With the aid of the nearby extended state, a Fano effect is achieved. Using a gate voltage, we can easily tune the Fano effect induced by the single-transmission channel. When the spin degree of freedom is involved, the all-carbon device can show a half-metallic property with positive or negative 100% spin polarization at the Fermi level under the gate voltage; meanwhile the spin thermoelectric effect can also be enhanced. PMID:27528438

  5. Controlled synthesis and inclusion ability of a hyaluronic acid derivative bearing beta-cyclodextrin molecules.

    PubMed

    Charlot, Aurélia; Heyraud, Alain; Guenot, Pierre; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2006-03-01

    A new synthetic route to beta-cyclodextrin-linked hyaluronic acid (HA-CD) was developed. This was based on the preparation of a HA derivative selectively modified with adipic dihydrazide (HA-ADH) and a beta-cyclodextrin derivative possessing an aldehyde function on the primary face, followed by their coupling by a reductive amination-type reaction. The CD-polysaccharide was fully characterized in terms of chemical integrity and purity by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The complexation ability of the grafted CD was further demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry using sodium adamantane acetate (ADAc) and Ibuprofen as model guest molecules. The thermodynamic parameters for the complexation of these negatively charged guest molecules by the beta-CD grafted on negatively charged HA were shown to be largely influenced by the ionic strength of the aqueous medium. PMID:16529430

  6. Enzyme molecule control of the substrate microflows and some problems of optical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, Yury M.; Netrebko, Alexei V.; Netrebko, Nina V.; Kroo, Stanislav V.; Chikishev, Andrey Y.; Sakodynskaya, Inna G.; Molodozhenya, Vladislav

    1999-05-01

    We studied the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that catalyses the hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh) -- cell neuromediator. After transfer of excitation ACh must be removed from the synaptic cleft in hundreds of microseconds. This is accomplished by removing of acetate (A) and choline (Ch) that are the products of 'cutting' of ACh by AChE. High activity of the enzyme is related with the large dipole moment of AChE that attracts positively charged molecules of ACh into active site (AS) and also with the fast removing of the reaction products from AS. One of the hypothesis accounting for the fast removing of A and Ch from the AS pocket presumes the existence of a 'back door' that allows them to leave the pocket without interference with the molecules of ACh that penetrate inside the AS. We made an attempt of verification of the 'back door' hypothesis by means of computational experiment for 2D and 3D spaces. We considered the problem of penetration of ACh and exit of the negatively charged A and positively charged Ch under the conditions of fluctuating potential relief of the AChE AS. For the laser spectroscopy we pose two problems: (a) determination of the dipole moment of AChE in the case this molecule is surrounded by ACh molecules by means of the electro-optical method and (b) detection of AS conformations related with functioning of the 'back door' (the ring-system of Trp84). We report on Raman spectroscopy study of the influence of crown-esters on amino groups.

  7. The control of tumor vessels: what you would not expect from a neural adhesion molecule

    PubMed Central

    Angiolini, Francesca; Cavallaro, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    The neural adhesion molecule L1 is involved in development and plasticity of the nervous system. We recently reported aberrant expression of L1 in the vasculature of various human tumor types. Genetic and functional inactivation of endothelial L1 in a mouse tumor model resulted in decreased tumor angiogenesis and promoted vascular normalization. Thus, endothelial L1 might represent a novel therapeutic target for vessel-targeted treatments of solid tumors. PMID:27308446

  8. Small Molecules that Modulate Quorum Sensing and Control Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Mattmann, Margrith E.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria use small molecule signals to access their local population densities in a process called quorum sensing (QS). Once a threshold signal concentration is reached, and therefore a certain number of bacteria have assembled, bacteria use QS to change gene expression levels and initiate behaviors that benefit the group. These group processes play central roles in both bacterial virulence and symbiosis, and can have significant impacts on human health, agriculture, and the environment. The dependence of QS on small molecule signals has inspired organic chemists to design non-native molecules that can intercept these signals and thereby perturb bacterial group behaviors. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been the target of many of these efforts due to its prevalence in human infections. P. aeruginosa uses at least two N-acyl L-homoserine lactone signals and three homologous LuxR-type receptors to initiate a range of pathogenic behaviors at high cell densities, including biofilm formation and the production of an arsenal of virulence factors. This review highlights recent chemical efforts to modulate LuxR-type receptor activity in P. aeruginosa, and offers insight into the development of receptor-specific ligands as potential anti-virulence strategies. PMID:20672805

  9. Coherence and Intramolecular Scattering in Molecular Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, U.

    2006-11-01

    In something akin to a double-slit experiment, it could be shown for the first time that electrons display characteristics of both waves- and particles at the same time and, with virtually the push of a button, can be switched back and forth between these states. The experiments provides evidence that disruption of the reflective symmetry of these molecules by introducing two different heavy isotopes, in this case N-14 and N-15, leads to a partial loss of coherence. The electrons begin to partially localise on one of the two, now distinguishable, atoms. The results could have implications for the building and control of "artificial molecules", which are made of semiconductor quantum dots and are a possible component of quantum computers.

  10. Mechanistic pathway for controlled extraction of guest molecule bound to herring sperm DNA using α-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, S. Syed; Ghosh, Prasun; Purkayastha, Pradipta

    2011-05-01

    trans-2-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]benzothiazole (DMASBT) is known to have dual emitting states where the locally excited (LE) state is responsible for fluorescence in less polar environment and in polar milieu fluorescence is from the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. This compound also undergoes minor groove binding to herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) evidenced by the absorption spectra before and after the binding process and an effect on DMASBT fluorescence by an anionic quencher. The binding occurs efficiently in a 1:1 manner, i.e. one guest molecule binds to one site on the hsDNA. Instead of following the DNA twist, the aromatic part seems to project outward. Thus, the bound molecule can be successfully extracted out from the DNA in a controlled way by the hydrophobic cavity of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD). The extraction starts even with a low concentration of α-CD and increases as the concentration is increased. Absorption, steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic methods have been employed to explore the mechanistic pathway of binding of DMASBT to hsDNA. The mechanistic approach toward controlled extraction of the guest molecules from hsDNA by α-CD is reported and is expected to serve a significant purpose in treatment of drug overdose.

  11. Coherent beamsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, W.L.

    1987-11-01

    The radiation coherently emitted by a high energy bunched beam suffering an arbitrarily large disruption in a collision with an idealized undisrupted beam is calculated. The near-luminal velocity of the beam - such that the emitted radiation moves very slowly with respect to the bunch - implies that only a small part of the bunch radiates coherently and necessitates a careful treatment of the disrupted beam phase space during emission. The angular distribution and spectral density are presented. It is found that most of the radiation is at wave lengths greater than or equal to the bunch length and that the total energy lost by the beam due to coherent effects should be negligible in high energy-high luminosity linear colliders. 4 refs.

  12. Controlling magnetic Feshbach resonances in polar open-shell molecules with nonresonant light.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał; González-Férez, Rosario; Koch, Christiane P; Moszynski, Robert

    2014-03-21

    Magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances for polar paramagnetic ground-state diatomics are too narrow to allow for magnetoassociation starting from trapped, ultracold atoms. We show that nonresonant light can be used to engineer the Feshbach resonances in their position and width. For nonresonant field intensities of the order of 10(9) W/cm(2), we find the width to be increased by 3 orders of magnitude, reaching a few Gauss. This opens the way for producing ultracold molecules with sizable electric and magnetic dipole moments and thus for many-body quantum simulations with such particles. PMID:24702365

  13. Fragmentation Control of a Polyatomic Molecule by fully determined Laser-Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Roither, S.; Schöffler, M.; Kartashov, D.; Xu, H.; Zhang, L.; Rathje, T.; Paulus, G. G.; Doblhoff-Dier, K.; Gräfe, S.; Bubin, S.; Atkinson, M.; Varga, K.; Yamanouchi, K.; Baltuška, A.; Kitzler, M.

    2013-03-01

    Strong-field control of acetylene fragmentation by fully determined few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated. The control mechanism is shown to be based on electron recollision and inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals.

  14. Coherent receiver employing nonlinear coherence detection for carrier tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Simon, M. K. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The concept of nonlinear coherence employed in carrier tracking to improve telecommunications efficiency is disclosed. A generic tracking loop for a coherent receiver is shown having seven principle feedback signals which may be selectively added and applied to a voltage controlled oscillator to produce a reference signal that is phase coherent with a received carrier. An eighth feedback signal whose nonrandom components are coherent with the phase detected and filtered carrier may also be added to exploit the sideband power of the received signal. A ninth feedback signal whose nonrandom components are also coherent with the quadrature phase detected and filtered carrier could be additionally or alternatively included in the composite feedback signal to the voltage controlled oscillator.

  15. Self-assembly in the mixtures of surfactant and dye molecule controlled via temperature and β-cyclodextrin recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Long, Panfeng; Dong, Renhao; Hao, Jingcheng

    2012-10-01

    A new ternary system of tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C(14)DMAO)/4-phenylazo benzoic acid (AzoH)/H(2)O was first investigated, and it was found that the self-assembly can be regulated via temperature and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) recognition. In the temperature regulated self-assembly, the self-assembled phase structural transition between wormlike micelles and multilamellar vesicles (onions) were determined by cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) images and (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR) spectra. The phase structural transition temperatures (PSTT) controlled by changing the amount of AzoH were measured by differential scanning calorimetry analysis. The self-assembled phase structural transition mechanism was discussed. It is argued that the self-assembled phase structural transition is the synergetic balance among the hydrophilic headgroup, steric structures of the hydrophobic chain, and membrane charge. β-CD molecules were used as controlling hands to modulate the phase structural transition of self-assembly of the C(14)DMAO/AzoH/H(2)O system in solution via snatching C(14)DMAO molecules. The phase structural transitions from the threadlike micellar phase to the lamellar phase and from the lamellar phase to the vesicular phase can each be controlled because of the β-CD molecular recognition. The phase structural transitions were confirmed by cryo-TEM observations and (2)H NMR measurements. The rheological properties were also investigated to display the importance in the phase structural transition. It was found that the dye molecule, AzoH, is harder to enclose by β-CD than by C(14)DMAO because of the lower complex stability constant (i.e., K(C(14)DMAO@β-CD) ≫ K(AzoH@β-CD). Therefore, the phase structural transition is mainly controlled by the inclusion of C(14)DMAO into the hydrophobic cavity of β-CD molecules. The phase structural transition controlled via temperature and β-CD may find potential applications such as in

  16. Controlled production of subradiant states of a diatomic molecule in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Yosuke; Saito, Yutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S

    2012-04-27

    We report the successful production of subradiant states of a two-atom system in a three-dimensional optical lattice starting from doubly occupied sites in a Mott insulator phase of a quantum gas of atomic ytterbium. We can selectively produce either a subradiant 1(g) state or a superradiant 0(u) state by choosing the excitation laser frequency. The inherent weak excitation rate for the subradiant 1(g) state is overcome by the increased atomic density due to the tight confinement in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Our experimental measurements of binding energies, linewidth, and Zeeman shift confirm the observation of subradiant levels of the 1(g) state of the Yb(2) molecule. PMID:22680859

  17. Magnetic-field Control of the Ultracold Chemistry of Simple Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, Brandon; Hazra, Jisha; Balakrishnan, Naduvalath; Bohn, John

    2016-05-01

    New experimental techniques continue to bring new molecular species into the ultracold regime. At these temperatures, modest external fields can significantly affect collisions. We theoretically explore the ultracold quantum chemistry of simple molecules, including the benchmark chemical reaction of F + H2. We find that resonances that exist in the van der Waals wells of entrance channels can be manipulated by magnetic fields, thus affecting the ability of the reactants to tunnel through the chemical barrier. We focus on the possibility of ultracold Fano-Feshbach resonances and their ability to affect the distribution of product states. We acknowledge support from the ARO MURI Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0476 and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  18. The HOMO Nodal Arrangement in Polychromophoric Molecules and Assemblies Controls the Interchromophoric Electronic Coupling.

    PubMed

    Talipov, Marat R; Navale, Tushar S; Rathore, Rajendra

    2015-11-23

    Triptycenes spontaneously assemble into two-dimensional networks in which long-range charge transport is facilitated by the extensive electronic coupling through the triptycene framework (intramolecularly) and by cofacial π-stacking (intermolecularly). While designing and synthesizing next-generation triptycenes containing polyaromatic chromophores, the electronic coupling amongst the chromophores was observed to be highly dependent on the nature and position of the substituents. Herein, we demonstrate using hexaalkoxytriptycenes that the electronic coupling amongst the chromophores is switched on and off by a simple repositioning of the substituents, which alters the nodal arrangement of the HOMOs of the individual chromophores. A visual inspection of the HOMOs can thus provide a ready evaluation of the electronic coupling in polychromophoric molecules/assemblies, and will serve as an important tool for the rational design of modern charge-transport materials. PMID:26425818

  19. Modeling torsional control of molecules with four-dimensional, two-dimensional, and one-dimensional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, L. H.

    2015-01-01

    Torsional control is studied theoretically using a four-dimensional (4D) model introduced recently [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 113004 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.113004 and Phys. Rev. A 87, 043403 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.043403] for calculating energy levels and eigenfunctions of nonrigid biphenyl-like molecules undergoing internal rotation and subject to a strong electric field. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved to determine the behavior of the molecule when submitted to a short laser pulse. Torsional alignment is investigated for four limiting hindering potentials and for several peak laser intensities. The results obtained with the 4D model are compared to those from already available 2D and 1D models. Similar results are found with the 4D and 2D model and are consistent with the molecule interacting the most with the electric field for the hindering potential displaying four minima with D2 d symmetry staggered equilibrium configurations. Molecular axis alignment is also investigated and it is found that the one arising with the 4D model starts deviating substantially from the one arising with a rigid rotator for a value of the peak laser intensity of 3 ×1013 W/cm 2.

  20. Control of optical bistability and third-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triangular quantum dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Si-Cong Tong, Cun-Zhu Zhang, Jin-Long; Shan, Xiao-Nan; Fu, Xi-Hong; Zeng, Yu-Gang; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2015-06-15

    The optical bistability of a triangular quantum dot molecules embedded inside a unidirectional ring cavity is studied. The type, the threshold and the hysteresis loop of the optical bistability curves can be modified by the tunneling parameters, as well as the probe laser field. The linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of the medium are also studied to interpret the corresponding results. The physical interpretation is that the tunneling can induce the quantum interference, which modifies the linear and the nonlinear response of the medium. As a consequence, the characteristics of the optical bistability are changed. The scheme proposed here can be utilized for optimizing and controlling the optical switching process.

  1. Coherence, Pseudo-Coherence, and Non-Coherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkvist, Nils Erik

    Analysis of the factors that make a text coherent or non-coherent suggests that total coherence requires cohesion not only on the textual surface but on the semantic level as well. Syntactic evidence of non-coherence includes lack of formal agreement blocking a potential cross-reference, anaphoric and cataphoric references that do not follow their…

  2. Coherently controlled emissions |4P3/2,1/2> ↔ |4S1/2> from a femtosecond Λ-type excitation scheme in potassium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentaris, D.; Damianos, D.; Papademetriou, G.; Lyras, A.; Steponkevičius, K.; Vaičaitis, V.; Efthimiopoulos, T.

    2016-07-01

    The combined excitation of high density potassium (K) vapour by 100 fs pump-coupling pulses is experimentally studied. The intense pump pulse excites the two-photon ? transition and internally generated emissions are initiated along the atomic paths: ? (path-1) and, ? (path-2). The temporally delayed coupling pulse coherently drives the ? transitions, in a Λ-type excitation scheme. The competing axial and conical emission components of the well-resolved ? transitions (D2 and D1 lines of K) are substantially enhanced and controlled, for appropriate detunings and pump-coupling temporal delays. The coherence relaxation time (CRT) of the two-photon excited ? state is determined by exploiting the temporal delay in the pulse sequence. The effect of the pulse delay and the fs pulse bandwidth on the system dynamics is discussed as well as the role of dephasing collisions between K and buffer gas atoms. The proposed scheme can be employed in radiative multi-level systems, for the direct estimation of coherence relaxation rates of various states.

  3. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    , CASMP2) to model nonadiabatic molecular processes of energetic molecules computationally. Synergism between experiment and theory establishes a coherent description of the nonadiabatic reactivity of energetic materials at a molecular level. Energetic systems discussed in this Account are nitramine- and furazan-based species. Both energetic species and their respective model systems, which are not energetic, are studied and discussed in detail. The model systems have similar molecular structures to those of the energetic species and help significantly in understanding the decomposition behavior of the larger and more complex energetic molecules. Our results for the above systems of interest confirm the existence of CIs and energy barriers on the PESs of interest. The presence of the CIs and barriers along the various reaction coordinates control the nonadiabatic behavior of the decomposition process. The detailed nature of the PESs and their CIs consequently differentiate the energetic systems from model systems. Energy barriers to the chemically relevant low-lying CIs of a molecule determine whether that molecule is more or less "energetic". PMID:20931955

  4. Single DNA molecules on freestanding and supported cationic lipid bilayers: diverse conformational dynamics controlled by the local bilayer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Christoph; Schwille, Petra; Petrov, Eugene P.

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental results on the interaction of DNA macromolecules with cationic lipid membranes with different properties, including freestanding membranes in the fluid and gel state, and supported lipid membranes in the fluid state and under conditions of fluid-gel phase coexistence. We observe diverse conformational dynamics of membrane-bound DNA molecules controlled by the local properties of the lipid bilayer. In case of fluid-state freestanding lipid membranes, the behaviour of DNA on the membrane is controlled by the membrane charge density: whereas DNA bound to weakly charged membranes predominantly behaves as a 2D random coil, an increase in the membrane charge density leads to membrane-driven irreversible DNA collapse and formation of subresolution-sized DNA globules. On the other hand, electrostatic binding of DNA macromolecules to gel-state freestanding membranes leads to completely arrested diffusion and conformational dynamics of membrane-adsorbed DNA. A drastically different picture is observed in case of DNA interaction with supported cationic lipid bilayers: When the supported bilayer is in the fluid state, membrane-bound DNA molecules undergo 2D translational Brownian motion and conformational fluctuations, irrespectively of the charge density of the supported bilayer. At the same time, when the supported cationic membrane shows fluid-gel phase coexistence, membrane-bound DNA molecules are strongly attracted to micrometre-sized gel-phase domains enriched with the cationic lipid, which results in 2D compaction of the membrane-bound macromolecules. This DNA compaction, however, is fully reversible, and disappears as soon as the membrane is heated above the fluid-gel coexistence. We also discuss possible biological implications of our experimental findings.

  5. Novel, Meso-Substituted Cationic Porphyrin Molecule for Photo-Mediated Larval Control of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Magaraggia, Michela; Lupidi, Giulio; Ouedraogo, Robert Kossivi; Coppellotti, Olimpia; Esposito, Fulvio; Fabris, Clara; Jori, Giulio; Habluetzel, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Background Control of the mosquito vector population is the most effective strategy currently available for the prevention of dengue fever and the containment of outbreaks. Photo-activated oxidants may represent promising tools for developing effective, safe and ecofriendly novel larvicides. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of the synthetic meso-substituted porphyrin meso-tri(N-methylpyridyl), meso-mono(N-tetradecylpyridyl)porphine (C14) as a photoactivatable larvicide against the dengue vector Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti. Methodology The photophysical and photochemical properties of the C14 molecule were assessed spectrophotometrically. Photomediated larvicidal efficacy, route of intake and site of action were determined on Ae. aegypti larvae by laboratory bioassays and fluorescence microscopy. Using powdered food pellet for laboratory rodents (a common larval food used in the laboratory) as a carrier for C14, loading-release dynamics, larvicidal efficacy and residual activity of the C14-carrier complex were investigated. Main Findings The C14 molecule was found to exert a potent photosensitizing activity on Ae. aegypti larvae. At irradiation intervals of 12 h and 1 h, at a light intensity of 4.0 mW/cm2, which is 50–100 times lower than that of natural sunlight, LC50 values of 0.1 µM (0.15 mg/l) and 0.5 µM (0.77 mg/l) were obtained, respectively. The molecule was active after ingestion by the larvae and caused irreversible, lethal damage to the midgut and caecal epithelia. The amphiphilic nature of C14 allowed a formulate to be produced that not only was as active against the larvae as C14 in solution, but also possessed a residual activity of at least two weeks, in laboratory conditions. Conclusions The meso-substituted synthetic porphyrin C14, thanks to its photo-sensitizing properties represents an attractive candidate for the development of novel photolarvicides for dengue vector control. PMID:22206031

  6. Measures of electronic-vibrational entanglement and quantum coherence in a molecular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatasescu, Mihaela

    2015-10-01

    We characterize both entanglement and quantum coherence in a molecular system by connecting the linear entropy of electronic-nuclear entanglement with Wigner-Yanase skew information measuring vibronic coherence and local quantum uncertainty on electronic energy. Linear entropy of entanglement and quantifiers of quantum coherence are derived for a molecular system described in a bipartite Hilbert space H =He l⨂Hv i b of finite dimension Ne l×Nv , and relations between them are established. For the specific case of the electronic-vibrational entanglement, we find the linear entropy of entanglement as having a more complex informational content than the von Neumann entropy. By keeping the information carried by the vibronic coherences in a molecule, linear entropy seizes vibrational motion in the electronic potentials as entanglement dynamics. We analyze entanglement oscillations in an isolated molecule, and show examples for the control of entanglement dynamics in a molecule through the creation of coherent vibrational wave packets in several electronic potentials by using chirped laser pulses.

  7. Review of tissue simulating phantoms with controllable optical, mechanical and structural properties for use in optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lamouche, Guy; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Curatolo, Andrea; Campbell, Gord; Pazos, Valérie; Sampson, David D.

    2012-01-01

    We review the development of phantoms for optical coherence tomography (OCT) designed to replicate the optical, mechanical and structural properties of a range of tissues. Such phantoms are a key requirement for the continued development of OCT techniques and applications. We focus on phantoms based on silicone, fibrin and poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels (PVA-C), as we believe these materials hold the most promise for durable and accurate replication of tissue properties. PMID:22741083

  8. Microstructural control of calcite via incorporation of intracrystalline organic molecules in shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Taiga; Suzuki, Michio; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2013-10-01

    It is widely accepted that organic substances regulate or influence the structure of biominerals, but its direct evidences are not plenty. Here we show that the crystallographic microstructures in biotic calcites arise from incorporated intracrystalline organic molecules (IOMs), through a comparison between biotic calcites in shells and synthetic ones with the IOMs extracted from the shells. Although the prismatic layers of a pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) and a pen shell (Atrina pectinata) morphologically resemble each other, the crystallographic features of constituent calcites are considerably different; in Pinctada, the IOMs are distributed inhomogeneously to form small-angle grain boundaries and associated crystal defects, whereas in Atrina, the IOMs are distributed almost homogeneously and defects are rare in the calcite crystals. We conducted in vitro calcite syntheses in the presence of the IOMs in EDTA-soluble extracts from the prisms. The IOMs in the extracts from Pinctada and Atrina were incorporated into synthetic calcites in a different manner, exhibiting defect-rich/free features as observed in the natural shells. With regard to amino acid compositions of the IOMs, the extract from Atrina has a higher proportion of acidic amino acids than that from Pinctada, implying that acidic proteins do not correlate directly to their affinity for calcium carbonate crystals.

  9. N-glycosylation controls the function of junctional adhesion molecule-A

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David W.; Tolbert, Caitlin E.; Graham, David M.; Wittchen, Erika; Bear, James E.; Burridge, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an adherens and tight junction protein expressed by endothelial and epithelial cells. JAM-A serves many roles and contributes to barrier function and cell migration and motility, and it also acts as a ligand for the leukocyte receptor LFA-1. JAM-A is reported to contain N-glycans, but the extent of this modification and its contribution to the protein’s functions are unknown. We show that human JAM-A contains a single N-glycan at N185 and that this residue is conserved across multiple mammalian species. A glycomutant lacking all N-glycans, N185Q, is able to reach the cell surface but exhibits decreased protein half-life compared with the wild- type protein. N-glycosylation of JAM-A is required for the protein’s ability to reinforce barrier function and contributes to Rap1 activity. We further show that glycosylation of N185 is required for JAM-A–mediated reduction of cell migration. Finally, we show that N-glycosylation of JAM-A regulates leukocyte adhesion and LFA-1 binding. These findings identify N-glycosylation as critical for JAM-A’s many functions. PMID:26224316

  10. The Prion Protein Controls Polysialylation of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 during Cellular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Wang, Hansen; Xi, Zhengrui; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Despite its multi-faceted role in neurodegenerative diseases, the physiological function of the prion protein (PrP) has remained elusive. On the basis of its evolutionary relationship to ZIP metal ion transporters, we considered that PrP may contribute to the morphogenetic reprogramming of cells underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). Consistent with this hypothesis, PrP transcription increased more than tenfold during EMT, and stable PrP-deficient cells failed to complete EMT in a mammalian cell model. A global comparative proteomics analysis identified the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) as a candidate mediator of this impairment, which led to the observation that PrP-deficient cells fail to undergo NCAM1 polysialylation during EMT. Surprisingly, this defect was caused by a perturbed transcription of the polysialyltransferase ST8SIA2 gene. Proteomics data pointed toward β-catenin as a transcriptional regulator affected in PrP-deficient cells. Indeed, pharmacological blockade or siRNA-based knockdown of β-catenin mimicked PrP-deficiency in regards to NCAM1 polysialylation. Our data established the existence of a PrP-ST8SIA2-NCAM signaling loop, merged two mature fields of investigation and offer a simple model for explaining phenotypes linked to PrP. PMID:26288071

  11. The Prion Protein Controls Polysialylation of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 during Cellular Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Wang, Hansen; Xi, Zhengrui; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Despite its multi-faceted role in neurodegenerative diseases, the physiological function of the prion protein (PrP) has remained elusive. On the basis of its evolutionary relationship to ZIP metal ion transporters, we considered that PrP may contribute to the morphogenetic reprogramming of cells underlying epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). Consistent with this hypothesis, PrP transcription increased more than tenfold during EMT, and stable PrP-deficient cells failed to complete EMT in a mammalian cell model. A global comparative proteomics analysis identified the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) as a candidate mediator of this impairment, which led to the observation that PrP-deficient cells fail to undergo NCAM1 polysialylation during EMT. Surprisingly, this defect was caused by a perturbed transcription of the polysialyltransferase ST8SIA2 gene. Proteomics data pointed toward β-catenin as a transcriptional regulator affected in PrP-deficient cells. Indeed, pharmacological blockade or siRNA-based knockdown of β-catenin mimicked PrP-deficiency in regards to NCAM1 polysialylation. Our data established the existence of a PrP-ST8SIA2-NCAM signaling loop, merged two mature fields of investigation and offer a simple model for explaining phenotypes linked to PrP. PMID:26288071

  12. Poly(ortho ester) nanoparticle-based targeted intraocular therapy for controlled release of hydrophilic molecules.

    PubMed

    Palamoor, Mallika; Jablonski, Monica M

    2013-02-01

    Development of an efficient intraocular drug delivery nanosystem remains the most difficult challenge to attain a prolonged therapeutic effect at the site of drug action. The purpose of this work was to develop a biodegradable, long-term sustained release, and biocompatible nanoparticulate system to treat various intraocular diseases. To attain the objectives, poly(ortho ester) (POE), a hydrophobic, surface erodible, and nontoxic polymer, was selected for fabrication of nanoparticles for the first time using a double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The influence of POE molecular weight on particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, drug content, in vitro release, degradation, in vitro cytotoxicity, and cell uptake studies was investigated. Drug-loaded nanoparticles had a spherical shape with an average particle diameter from 241 to 298 nm and zeta potential values from -8 to -11 mV. Encapsulation efficiency ranged between 21 and 63%, depending on the type of the water-soluble molecule used. Approximately 20-30% of the loaded drug was released over a period of 14 weeks. The drug release and degradation profiles of nanoparticles followed perfect zero-order kinetics confirming the POE-surface erosion mechanism. In vitro cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies revealed the cyto-compatible nature and nonendocytic behavior of POE nanoparticles. Collectively, POE nanoparticles are a very promising vehicle for sustained delivery of therapeutics to the back of the eye. PMID:23256649

  13. Dual-Responsive Viscoelastic Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Fluids to Control the Diffusion of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Cao, Yueying; Cao, Meiwen; Sun, Yawei; Wang, Jiqian; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-07-01

    A smart lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) system was prepared to control the diffusion rate of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules. The LLC system is composed of a nonionic surfactant (tetraethylene glycol monododecylether; C12 EO4 ) and an anionic azobenzene surfactant (Azo-surfactant). C12 EO4 was the main component of the LLC system. The Azo-surfactant, which can undergo photo-isomerization, played the role of trigger in this system. LLC gels formed in a solution comprised of Azo-surfactant (10 mm) and C12 EO4 (300 mm). The LLC gels became broken when more Azo-surfactant was added (e.g., up to 15 mm) and the viscoelasticity was lost. Surprisingly, when we used UV light to irradiate the 300 mm C12 EO4 /15 mm Azo-surfactant sample, the gel was recovered and high viscoelasticity was observed. However, under visible-light irradiation, the gel became broken again. The gel formation could also be triggered by heating the sample. On heating the 300 mm C12 EO4 /15 mm Azo-surfactant sample, the system thickened to a point at which typical gel behavior was registered. When the sample was cooled, the gel broke again. The LLC could be used for controlled release of hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules, and could be considered as a versatile vehicle for the delivery of actives in systems of practical importance. PMID:27028313

  14. Photo-controllable electro-optics of aerosil/7CB nanocomposite nematic doped with azo-bonded molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Y. G.; Hadjichristov, G. B.; Petrov, A. G.; Krishna Prasad, S.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the electro-optics of nanostructured nematic liquid crystal (LC) doped with a small amount of photoactive LC molecules can be efficiently controlled by light. In particular, the inclusion of 3 wt.% azobenzene LC 4-(4'-ethoxyphenylazo)phenyl hexanoate (EPH) into a gel nanocomposite material produced from nematic LC heptylcyanobiphenyl (7CB) and 3 wt.% hydrophilic silica nanoparticles of size ca. 7 nm (Aerosil 300) allows both the static (the transmittance versus the voltage) and the dynamic (amplitude-frequency electrooptic modulation) characteristics of thin films (25 μm) of such a complex LC system in an alternating-current electric field to be enhanced by UV light at a wavelength of 375 nm. This photo-effect that is reversed with white light is based on the photo-isomerization of the doped azobenzene molecules. The efficient photo control makes the considered EPH-doped Aerosil/7CB photo-responsive nematic nanocomposites attractive for specific electro-optic applications.

  15. Optimal control of ultrafast laser driven many-electron dynamics in a polyatomic molecule: N-methyl-6-quinolone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klamroth, Tillmann

    2006-04-01

    We report time-dependent configuration interaction singles calculations for the ultrafast laser driven many-electron dynamics in a polyatomic molecule, N-methyl-6-quinolone. We employ optimal control theory to achieve a nearly state-selective excitation from the S0 to the S1 state, on a time scale of a few (≈6) femtoseconds. The optimal control scheme is shown to correct for effects opposing a state-selective transition, such as multiphoton transitions and other, nonlinear phenomena, which are induced by the ultrashort and intense laser fields. In contrast, simple two-level π pulses are not effective in state-selective excitations when very short pulses are used. Also, the dependence of multiphoton and nonlinear effects on the number of states included in the dynamical simulations is investigated.

  16. Ultracold molecules from the bottom-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Liu, Lee R.; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules exhibit strong, long-range, and tunable dipole-dipole interactions that may be utilized for a wide range of studies in quantum simulation and quantum information processing. To realize the full potential of these studies, it is desirable to have a low entropy sample of ultracold polar molecules with full control over both internal and external states, as well as inter-particle interactions. We work toward this goal with a new, bottom-up approach using the highly polar NaCs molecule. The key steps of our scheme are trapping single Na and Cs atoms in optical dipole traps, cooling the atoms to their motional ground state using Raman sideband cooling, and finally coherently transferring them to ground state NaCs molecules via a two-photon process. This approach should enable creation of low entropy samples with full control over all degrees of freedom, as well as realizing the possibility of single-site read-out and manipulation of molecules.

  17. Biocompatible Mesoporous Nanotubular Structured Surface to Control Cell Behaviors and Deliver Bioactive Molecules.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kapil D; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Jin, Guang-Zhen; Singh, Rajendra K; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-12-01

    Biocompatible nanostructured surfaces control the cell behaviors and tissue integration process of medical devices and implants. Here we develop a novel biocompatible nanostructured surface based on mesoporous silica nanotube (MSNT) by means of an electrodeposition. MSNTs, replicated from carbon nanotubes of 25 nm × 1200 nm size, were interfaced in combination with fugitive biopolymers (chitosan or collagen) onto a Ti metallic substrate. The MSNT-biopolymer deposits uniformly covered the substrate with weight gains controllable by the electrodeposition conditions. Random nanotubular networks were generated successfully, which alongside the high mesoporosity provided unique nanotopological properties for the cell responses and the loading/delivery of biomolecules. Of note, the adhesion and spreading behaviors of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were significantly altered, revealing more rapid cell anchorage and extensive nanofilopodia development along the nanotubular networks. Furthermore, the nanotubular surface improved the loading capacity of biomolecules (dexamethasone and bovine serum albumin) up to 5-7 times. The release of the biomolecules was highly sustained, exhibiting a diffusion-controlled pattern over 15 days. The therapeutic efficacy of the delivered biomolecules was also confirmed in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. While in vivo performance and applicability studies are needed further, the current biocompatible nanostructured surface may be considered as a novel biointerfacing platform to control cellular behaviors and biomolecular delivery. PMID:26561865

  18. Integrated coherent matter wave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, C.; Boshier, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    An integrated coherent matter wave circuit is a single device, analogous to an integrated optical circuit, in which coherent de Broglie waves are created and then launched into waveguides where they can be switched, divided, recombined, and detected as they propagate. Applications of such circuits include guided atom interferometers, atomtronic circuits, and precisely controlled delivery of atoms. Here we report experiments demonstrating integrated circuits for guided coherent matter waves. The circuit elements are created with the painted potential technique, a form of time-averaged optical dipole potential in which a rapidly moving, tightly focused laser beam exerts forces on atoms through their electric polarizability. The source of coherent matter waves is a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We launch BECs into painted waveguides that guide them around bends and form switches, phase coherent beamsplitters, and closed circuits. These are the basic elements that are needed to engineer arbitrarily complex matter wave circuitry.

  19. Coherent acoustic phonons in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekorsy, T.; Taubert, R.; Hudert, F.; Bartels, A.; Habenicht, A.; Merkt, F.; Leiderer, P.; Köhler, K.; Schmitz, J.; Wagner, J.

    2008-02-01

    Phonons are considered as a most important origin of scattering and dissipation for electronic coherence in nanostructures. The generation of coherent acoustic phonons with femtosecond laser pulses opens the possibility to control phonon dynamics in amplitude and phase. We demonstrate a new experimental technique based on two synchronized femtosecond lasers with GHz repetition rate to study the dynamics of coherently generated acoustic phonons in semiconductor heterostructures with high sensitivity. High-speed synchronous optical sampling (ASOPS) enables to scan a time-delay of 1 ns with 100 fs time resolution with a frequency in the kHz range without a moving part in the set-up. We investigate the dynamics of coherent zone-folded acoustic phonons in semiconductor superlattices (GaAs/AlAs and GaSb/InAs) and of coherent vibration of metallic nanostructures of non-spherical shape using ASOPS.

  20. Coherent control of multiphoton dynamics and high-order-harmonic generation driven by two frequency-comb fields with a relative envelope delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Di; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Li, Fu-li

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the coherent control of multiphoton dynamics and a high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) process driven by two frequency-comb fields, via the interference of multiphoton transition paths by tuning the relative envelope delay between fields. The many-mode Floquet theorem is employed to provide a nonperturbative and exact treatment of the interaction between a quantum system and frequency-comb laser fields. The case of two frequency-comb fields with the same repetition frequency and the carrier frequencies of fundamental and second harmonics, respectively, is considered. Due to the coupling of the second harmonic controlling the frequency-comb laser field, multiphoton transitions involving both fundamental- and second-harmonic photons occur. Different multiphoton transition paths can be superpositioned when the matching condition for carrier-envelope-phase shifts is satisfied, offering the possibility of coherent control of HHG power spectra via the interference of paths by tuning the relative envelope delay between fields. The calculated HHG power spectra present both sub-cycle oscillation and multi-cycle modulation behavior when the relative envelope delay is varied. It is also found that, under the condition of multiphoton resonance, the HHG power spectra can be further enhanced by about 10 times via the interference of multiphoton transition paths by tuning the relative envelope delay.