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Sample records for moltox oxygen process

  1. Air separation by the Moltox process. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.

    1981-04-01

    Results are described of a development program on a new and energy-saving process for air separation. The Moltox process involves reversibly reacting oxygen in air with a recirculating salt solution, such that oxygen is extracted without depressurizing the remaining nitrogen. Energy savings of approximately 50% are indicated for this process compared to conventional cryogenic air separation. The development program consisted of design, construction, and operation of a 6 liter/minute pilot plant; optimization of the process flowsheet through computer modelling; investigation of engineering aspects of the process including corrosion, safety, and NO/sub x/ generation; and an economic comparison to conventional cryogenic practice. All objectives were satisfactorily achieved except for continuous operation of the pilot plant, and the modifications necessary to achieve that have been identified. Economically the Moltox process shows a substantial advantage over large scale cryogenic plants which are powered by fuel vice electricity.

  2. Corrosion study in the chemical air separation (MOLTOX trademark ) process

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Doohee; Wong, Kai P.; Archer, R.A.; Cassano, A.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents the results of studies aimed at solving the corrosion problems encountered during operation of the MOLTOX{trademark} pilot plant. These studies concentrated on the screening of commercial and developmental alloys under conditions simulating operation conditions in this high temperature molten salt process. Process economic studies were preformed in parallel with the laboratory testing to ensure that an economically feasible solution would be achieved. In addition to the above DOE co-funded studies, Air Products and Chemicals pursued proprietary studies aimed at developing a less corrosive salt mixture which would potentially allow the use of chemurgically available alloys such as stainless steels throughout the system. These studies will not be reported here; however, the results of corrosion tests in the new less corrosive salt mixtures are reported. Because our own studies on salt chemistry impacts heavily on the overall process and thereby has an influence on the experimental work conducted under this contract, some of the studies discussed here were impacted by our own proprietary data. Therefore, the reasons behind some of the experiments presented herein will not be explained because that information is proprietary to Air Products. 14 refs., 42 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Novel Membranes and Processes for Oxygen Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Haiqing

    2011-11-15

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a membrane process that produces air containing 25-35% oxygen, at a cost of $25-40/ton of equivalent pure oxygen (EPO2). Oxygen-enriched air at such a low cost will allow existing air-fueled furnaces to be converted economically to oxygen-enriched furnaces, which in turn will improve the economic and energy efficiency of combustion processes significantly, and reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration from flue gases throughout the U.S. manufacturing industries. During the 12-month Concept Definition project: We identified a series of perfluoropolymers (PFPs) with promising oxygen/nitrogen separation properties, which were successfully made into thin film composite membranes. The membranes showed oxygen permeance as high as 1,200 gpu and oxygen/nitrogen selectivity of 3.0, and the permeance and selectivity were stable over the time period tested (60 days). We successfully scaled up the production of high-flux PFP-based membranes, using MTR's commercial coaters. Two bench-scale spiral-wound modules with countercurrent designs were made and parametric tests were performed to understand the effect of feed flow rate and pressure, permeate pressure and sweep flow rate on the membrane module separation properties. At various operating conditions that modeled potential industrial operating conditions, the module separation properties were similar to the pure-gas separation properties in the membrane stamps. We also identified and synthesized new polymers [including polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs) and polyimides] with higher oxygen/nitrogen selectivity (3.5-5.0) than the PFPs, and made these polymers into thin film composite membranes. However, these membranes were susceptible to severe aging; pure-gas permeance decreased nearly six-fold within two weeks, making them impractical for industrial applications of oxygen enrichment. We tested the effect of oxygen-enriched air on NO{sub x} emissions using a

  4. A modified sulfate process to lunar oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    A modified sulfate process which produces oxygen from iron oxide-bearing minerals in lunar soil is under development. Reaction rates of ilmenite in varying strength sulfuric acid have been determined. Quantitative conversion of ilmenite to ferrous sulfate was observed over a range of temperatures and concentrations. Data has also been developed on the calcination of by-product sulfates. System engineering for overall operability and simplicity has begun, suggesting that a process separating the digestion and sulfate dissolution steps may offer an optimum process.

  5. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  6. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    Due to its large reserves, coal is expected to continue to play an important role in the future. However, specific and absolute CO2 emissions are among the highest when burning coal for power generation. Therefore, the capture of CO2 from power plants may contribute significantly in reducing global CO2 emissions. This review deals with the oxyfuel process, where pure oxygen is used for burning coal, resulting in a flue gas with high CO2 concentrations. After further conditioning, the highly concentrated CO2 is compressed and transported in the liquid state to, for example, geological storages. The enormous oxygen demand is generated in an air-separation unit by a cryogenic process, which is the only available state-of-the-art technology. The generation of oxygen and the purification and liquefaction of the CO2-enriched flue gas consumes significant auxiliary power. Therefore, the overall net efficiency is expected to be lowered by 8 to 12 percentage points, corresponding to a 21 to 36% increase in fuel consumption. Oxygen combustion is associated with higher temperatures compared with conventional air combustion. Both the fuel properties as well as limitations of steam and metal temperatures of the various heat exchanger sections of the steam generator require a moderation of the temperatures during combustion and in the subsequent heat-transfer sections. This is done by means of flue gas recirculation. The interdependencies among fuel properties, the amount and the temperature of the recycled flue gas, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the combustion atmosphere are investigated. Expected effects of the modified flue gas composition in comparison with the air-fired case are studied theoretically and experimentally. The different atmosphere resulting from oxygen-fired combustion gives rise to various questions related to firing, in particular, with regard to the combustion mechanism, pollutant reduction, the risk of corrosion, and the properties of the fly

  7. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process for recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide. The process consists the steps of: introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water and which is divided into a recycle portion and a tailgas portion; converting substantially all sulfur species in the recycle portion of the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide to thereby form condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; removing water from the recycle portion of the condenser; and moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried recycle condenser, as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace.

  8. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, the process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising (1) the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and (2) an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; (b) combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (c) introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; (d) subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (e) introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water; (f) converting substantially all sulfur species in the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide, to thereby form a condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; (g) removing water from the condenser effluent from step (f); and (h) moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried condenser effluent from step (g), as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace in step (a) above.

  9. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, I.C.; Baker, R.W.

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible. 1 figure

  10. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C.

    1984-01-01

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  11. Absorption process for producing oxygen and nitrogen and solution therefor

    DOEpatents

    Roman, Ian C.; Baker, Richard W.

    1990-09-25

    Process for the separation and purification of oxygen and nitrogen is disclosed which utilizes solutions of oxygen carriers to selectively absorb oxygen from a gaseous stream, leaving nitrogen as a byproduct. In the process, an oxygen carrier capable of reversibly binding molecular oxygen is dissolved in a solvent solution, which absorbs oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous feed stream such as atmospheric air and desorbs oxygen to a gaseous product stream. The feed stream is maintained at a sufficiently high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, while the product stream is maintained at a sufficiently low oxygen pressure to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. In an alternate mode of operation, the carrier solution is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature and high oxygen pressure to keep the oxygen carrier in its oxygenated form during absorption, and at a sufficiently high temperature to keep the carrier in its deoxygenated form during desorption. Under such conditions, exceptionally high oxygen concentrations on the order of 95% to 99% are obtained, as well as a long carrier lifetime in excess of 3 months, making the process commercially feasible.

  12. Nanoparticulate-catalyzed oxygen transfer processes

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Andrew T.; Breitkopf, Richard C.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticulates of oxygen transfer materials that are oxides of rare earth metals, combinations of rare earth metals, and combinations of transition metals and rare earth metals are used as catalysts in a variety of processes. Unexpectedly large thermal efficiencies are achieved relative to micron sized particulates. Processes that use these catalysts are exemplified in a multistage reactor. The exemplified reactor cracks C6 to C20 hydrocarbons, desulfurizes the hydrocarbon stream and reforms the hydrocarbons in the stream to produce hydrogen. In a first reactor stage the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate mixed rare earth metal oxide to crack larger hydrocarbon molecules. In a second stage, the steam and hydrocarbon are passed through particulate material that desulfurizes the hydrocarbon. In a third stage, the hydrocarbon and steam are passed through a heated, mixed transition metal/rare earth metal oxide to reform the lower hydrocarbons and thereby produce hydrogen. Stages can be alone or combined. Parallel reactors can provide continuous reactant flow. Each of the processes can be carried out individually.

  13. Efficiency evaluation of oxygen enrichment in energy conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bomelburg, H.J.

    1983-12-01

    The extent to which energy conversion efficiencies can be increased by using oxygen or oxygen-enriched air for combustion was studied. Combustion of most fuels with oxygen instead of air was found to have five advantages: increases combustion temperature and efficiency, improves heat transfer at high temperatures, reduces nitrous oxide emissions, permits a high ration of exhaust gas recirculation and allows combustion of certain materials not combustible in air. The same advantages, although to a lesser degree, are apparent with oxygen-enriched air. The cost-effectiveness of the process must necessarily be improved by about 10% when using oxygen instead of air before such use could become justifiable on purely economic terms. Although such a modest increase appears to be attainable in real situations, this study ascertained that it is not possible to generally assess the economic gains. Rather, each case requires its own evaluation. For certain processes industry has already proven that the use of oxygen leads to more efficient plant operation. Several ideas for essentially new applications are described. Specifically, when oxygen is used with exhaust gas recirculation in external or internal combustion engines. It appears also that the advantages of pulse combustion can be amplified further if oxygen is used. When burning wet fuels with oxygen, direct steam generation becomes possible. Oxygen combustion could also improve processes for in situ gasification of coals, oil shales, peats, and other wet fuels. Enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding methods might also become more effective if oxygen is used. The cold energy contained in liquid oxygen can be substantially recovered in the low end of certain thermodynamic cycles. Further efforts to develop certain schemes for using oxygen for combustion appear to be justified from both the technical and economic viewpoints.

  14. Dopamine, Neurochemical Processes, and Oxygen Toxicity at Pressure.

    PubMed

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lavoute, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    All mammals, including man, exposed to breathing gas mixtures at high pressures exhibit central nervous system disturbances, which differ according to the gas used. With the use of compressed air, the increased oxygen partial pressure induces hyperoxic disturbances that consist of epileptic seizures that occur, on average, after 30 min exposure to 2.8 ATA in man or to 5 ATA in rats. Increased oxygen partial pressure induces reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species production that could be related to neurotransmitter changes reported for the preepileptic phase or at pressures that produce epileptic seizures. In rats, oxygen pressures lower than 5 ATA induce a decrease of dopamine release in the stratum that could be due to disturbances of neurotransmitter regulatory processes that are different from those implicated for hyperbaric oxygen-induced epileptic seizures. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1339-1344, 2016. PMID:27347895

  15. Oxygen production on the Lunar materials processing frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenberg, Barbara H.

    1992-01-01

    During the pre-conceptual design phase of an initial lunar oxygen processing facility, it is essential to identify and compare the available processes and evaluate them in order to ensure the success of such an endeavor. The focus of this paper is to provide an overview of materials processing to produce lunar oxygen as one part of a given scenario of a developing lunar occupation. More than twenty-five techniques to produce oxygen from lunar materials have been identified. While it is important to continue research on any feasible method, not all methods can be implemented at the initial lunar facility. Hence, it is necessary during the pre-conceptual design phase to evaluate all methods and determine the leading processes for initial focus. Researchers have developed techniques for evaluating the numerous proposed methods in order to suggest which processes would be best to go to the Moon first. As one section in this paper, the recent evaluation procedures that have been presented in the literature are compared and contrasted. In general, the production methods for lunar oxygen fall into four categories: thermochemical, reactive solvent, pyrolytic, and electrochemical. Examples from two of the four categories are described, operating characteristics are contrasted, and terrestrial analogs are presented when possible. In addition to producing oxygen for use as a propellant and for life support, valuable co-products can be derived from some of the processes. This information is also highlighted in the description of a given process.

  16. Methane Post-Processing for Oxygen Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art United States Atmospheric Revitalization carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is based on the Sabatier reaction process, which recovers approximately 50% of the oxygen (O2) from crew metabolic CO2. Oxygen recovery from carbon dioxide is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing of methane to recover hydrogen with the Umpqua Research Company Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) has the potential to further close the Atmospheric Revitalization oxygen loop. The PPA decomposes methane into hydrogen and hydrocarbons, predominantly acetylene, and a small amount of solid carbon. The hydrogen must then be purified before it can be recycled for additional oxygen recovery. Long duration testing and evaluation of a four crew-member sized PPA and a discussion of hydrogen recycling system architectures are presented.

  17. Automation and control of off-planet oxygen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.; Schooley, L. S.; Cellier, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the automation and control of off-planet production processes. First, a general approach to process automation and control is discussed from the viewpoint of translating human process control procedures into automated procedures. Second, the control issues for the automation and control of off-planet oxygen processes are discussed. Sensors, instruments, and components are defined and discussed in the context of off-planet applications, and the need for 'smart' components is clearly established.

  18. Processing of metal and oxygen from lunar deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Constance F.

    1992-01-01

    On the moon, some whole rocks may be ores for abundant elements, such as oxygen, but beneficiation will be important if metallic elements are sought from raw lunar dirt. In the extraction process, a beneficiated metallic ore, such as an oxide, sulfide, carbonate, or silicate mineral, is converted to reduced metal. A variety of plausible processing technologies, which includes recovery of meteoritic iron, and processing of lunar ilmenite, are described in this report.

  19. Oxygen production processes on the Moon: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Carrier, W. David, III

    1991-01-01

    The production of oxygen on the Moon utilizing indigenous material is paramount to a successful lunar colonization. Several processes were put forth to accomplish this. The lunar liquid oxygen (LLOX) generation schemes which have received the most study to date are those involving: (1) the reduction of ilmenite (FeTiO3) by H2, C, CO, CH4, CO-Cl2 plasma; (2) magma electrolysis, both unadulterated and fluoride-fluxed, and (3) several others, including carbo-chlorination, HF acid leaching, fluorine extraction, magma oxidation, and vapor pyrolysis. The H2 reduction of ilmenite and magma electrolysis processes have received the most study to date. At this stage of development, they both appear feasible schemes with various pros and cons. However, all processes should be addressed at least at the onset of the considerations. It is ultimatley the energy requirements of the entire process, including the acquisition of feedstock, which will determine the mode of oxygen productions. There is an obvious need for considerably more experimentation and study. Some of these requisite studies are in progress, and several of the most studied and feasible processes for winning oxygen from lunar materials are reviewed.

  20. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    2001-01-09

    A high-yield process for converting lignin into reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline compositions of high quality is provided. The process is a two-stage catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage of the process, a lignin feed material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction, followed by a selective hydrocracking reaction which utilizes a superacid catalyst to produce a high oxygen-content depolymerized lignin product mainly composed of alkylated phenols, alkylated alkoxyphenols, and alkylbenzenes. In the second stage of the process, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to an exhaustive etherification reaction, optionally followed by a partial ring hydrogenation reaction, to produce a reformulated, partially oxygenated/etherified gasoline product, which includes a mixture of substituted phenyl/methyl ethers, cycloalkyl methyl ethers, C.sub.7 -C.sub.10 alkylbenzenes, C.sub.6 -C.sub.10 branched and multibranched paraffins, and alkylated and polyalkylated cycloalkanes.

  1. Processing lunar soils for oxygen and other materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Christian W.; Gibson, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of lunar materials are excellent candidates for lunar oxygen production: ilmenite and silicates such as anorthite. Both are lunar surface minable, occurring in soils, breccias, and basalts. Because silicates are considerably more abundant than ilmenite, they may be preferred as source materials. Depending on the processing method chosen for oxygen production and the feedstock material, various useful metals and bulk materials can be produced as byproducts. Available processing techniques include hydrogen reduction of ilmenite and electrochemical and chemical reductions of silicates. Processes in these categories are generally in preliminary development stages and need significant research and development support to carry them to practical deployment, particularly as a lunar-based operation. The goal of beginning lunar processing operations by 2010 requires that planning and research and development emphasize the simplest processing schemes. However, more complex schemes that now appear to present difficult technical challenges may offer more valuable metal byproducts later. While they require more time and effort to perfect, the more complex or difficult schemes may provide important processing and product improvements with which to extend and elaborate the initial lunar processing facilities. A balanced R&D program should take this into account. The following topics are discussed: (1) ilmenite--semi-continuous process; (2) ilmenite--continuous fluid-bed reduction; (3) utilization of spent ilmenite to produce bulk materials; (4) silicates--electrochemical reduction; and (5) silicates--chemical reduction.

  2. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, M.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Jansen, H. G.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Werner, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects in the order of about 26‰ became obvious, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original 18O signature of the material appeared to have little or no influence.

  3. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, M.; Werner, R. A.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Jansen, H. G.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Neubert, R. E. M.

    2011-02-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio-chemical compounds to

  4. Redox Processes in Neurodegenerative Disease Involving Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2012-01-01

    Much attention has been devoted to neurodegenerative diseases involving redox processes. This review comprises an update involving redox processes reported in the considerable literature in recent years. The mechanism involves reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, usually in the brain. There are many examples including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, prions, Down’s syndrome, ataxia, multiple sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and Tardive Dyskinesia. Evidence indicates a protective role for antioxidants, which may have clinical implications. A multifaceted approach to mode of action appears reasonable. PMID:23730253

  5. Reactive oxygen species in development and infection processes.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Robert; Tudzynski, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules that affect vegetative and pathogenic processes in pathogenic fungi. There is growing evidence that ROS are not only secreted during the interaction of host and pathogen but also involved in tightly controlled intracellular processes. The major ROS producing enzymes are NADPH oxidases (Nox). Recent investigations in fungi revealed that Nox-activity is responsible for the formation of infection structures, cytoskeleton architecture as well as interhyphal communication. However, information about the localization and site of action of the Nox complexes in fungi is limited and signaling pathways and intracellular processes affected by ROS have not been fully elucidated. This review focuses on the role of ROS as signaling molecules in fungal "model" organisms: it examines the role of ROS in vegetative and pathogenic processes and gives special attention to Nox complexes and their function as important signaling hubs. PMID:27039026

  6. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon; Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R.; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-15

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye.

  7. Oxygen-producing inert anodes for SOM process

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B

    2014-02-25

    An electrolysis system for generating a metal and molecular oxygen includes a container for receiving a metal oxide containing a metallic species to be extracted, a cathode positioned to contact a metal oxide housed within the container; an oxygen-ion-conducting membrane positioned to contact a metal oxide housed within the container; an anode in contact with the oxygen-ion-conducting membrane and spaced apart from a metal oxide housed within the container, said anode selected from the group consisting of liquid metal silver, oxygen stable electronic oxides, oxygen stable crucible cermets, and stabilized zirconia composites with oxygen stable electronic oxides.

  8. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  9. Oxygen Sensitivity of Anammox and Coupled N-Cycle Processes in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    PubMed Central

    Kalvelage, Tim; Jensen, Marlene M.; Contreras, Sergio; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Lam, Phyllis; Günter, Marcel; LaRoche, Julie; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient measurements indicate that 30–50% of the total nitrogen (N) loss in the ocean occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This pelagic N-removal takes place within only ∼0.1% of the ocean volume, hence moderate variations in the extent of OMZs due to global warming may have a large impact on the global N-cycle. We examined the effect of oxygen (O2) on anammox, NH3 oxidation and NO3− reduction in 15N-labeling experiments with varying O2 concentrations (0–25 µmol L−1) in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZs. Our results show that O2 is a major controlling factor for anammox activity in OMZ waters. Based on our O2 assays we estimate the upper limit for anammox to be ∼20 µmol L−1. In contrast, NH3 oxidation to NO2− and NO3− reduction to NO2− as the main NH4+ and NO2− sources for anammox were only moderately affected by changing O2 concentrations. Intriguingly, aerobic NH3 oxidation was active at non-detectable concentrations of O2, while anaerobic NO3− reduction was fully active up to at least 25 µmol L−1 O2. Hence, aerobic and anaerobic N-cycle pathways in OMZs can co-occur over a larger range of O2 concentrations than previously assumed. The zone where N-loss can occur is primarily controlled by the O2-sensitivity of anammox itself, and not by any effects of O2 on the tightly coupled pathways of aerobic NH3 oxidation and NO3− reduction. With anammox bacteria in the marine environment being active at O2 levels ∼20 times higher than those known to inhibit their cultured counterparts, the oceanic volume potentially acting as a N-sink increases tenfold. The predicted expansion of OMZs may enlarge this volume even further. Our study provides the first robust estimates of O2 sensitivities for processes directly and indirectly connected with N-loss. These are essential to assess the effects of ocean de-oxygenation on oceanic N-cycling. PMID:22216239

  10. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian

    2011-05-10

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  11. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoek; Pim , Aristidou; Aristos , Rush; Brian

    2007-06-19

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  12. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian

    2014-09-09

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  13. Fermentation process using specific oxygen uptake rates as a process control

    DOEpatents

    Van Hoek, Pim; Aristidou, Aristos; Rush, Brian J.

    2016-08-30

    Specific oxygen uptake (OUR) is used as a process control parameter in fermentation processes. OUR is determined during at least the production phase of a fermentation process, and process parameters are adjusted to maintain the OUR within desired ranges. The invention is particularly applicable when the fermentation is conducted using a microorganism having a natural PDC pathway that has been disrupted so that it no longer functions. Microorganisms of this sort often produce poorly under strictly anaerobic conditions. Microaeration controlled by monitoring OUR allows the performance of the microorganism to be optimized.

  14. Singlet Oxygen Formation during the Charging Process of an Aprotic Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Wandt, Johannes; Jakes, Peter; Granwehr, Josef; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Eichel, Rüdiger-A

    2016-06-01

    Aprotic lithium-oxygen (Li-O2 ) batteries have attracted considerable attention in recent years owing to their outstanding theoretical energy density. A major challenge is their poor reversibility caused by degradation reactions, which mainly occur during battery charge and are still poorly understood. Herein, we show that singlet oxygen ((1) Δg ) is formed upon Li2 O2 oxidation at potentials above 3.5 V. Singlet oxygen was detected through a reaction with a spin trap to form a stable radical that was observed by time- and voltage-resolved in operando EPR spectroscopy in a purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell. According to our estimate, a lower limit of approximately 0.5 % of the evolved oxygen is singlet oxygen. The occurrence of highly reactive singlet oxygen might be the long-overlooked missing link in the understanding of the electrolyte degradation and carbon corrosion reactions that occur during the charging of Li-O2 cells. PMID:27145532

  15. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  16. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  17. Effect of bottom water oxygenation on oxygen consumption and benthic biogeochemical processes at the Crimean Shelf (Black Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtschlag, A.; Janssen, F.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Holtappels, M.; Struck, U.; Jessen, G.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxia occurs where oxygen concentrations fall below a physiological threshold of many animals, usually defined as <63 µmol L-1. Oxygen depletion can be caused by anthropogenic influences, such as global warming and eutrophication, but as well occurs naturally due to restricted water exchange in combination with high nutrient loads (e.g. upwelling). Bottom-water oxygen availability not only influences the composition of faunal communities, but is also one of the main factors controlling sediment-water exchange fluxes and organic carbon degradation in the sediment, usually shifting processes towards anaerobic mineralization pathways mediated by microorganisms. The Black Sea is one of the world's largest meromictic marine basins with an anoxic water column below 180m. The outer shelf edge, where anoxic waters meet the seafloor, is an ideal natural laboratory to study the response of benthic ecosystems to hypoxia, including benthic biogeochemical processes. During the MSM 15/1 expedition with the German research vessel MARIA S. MERIAN, the NW area of the Black Sea (Crimean Shelf) was studied. The study was set up to investigate the influence of bottom water oxygenation on, (1) the respective share of fauna-mediated oxygen uptake, microbial respiration, or re-oxidation of reduced compounds formed in the deeper sediments for the total oxygen flux and (2) on the efficiency of benthic biogeochemical cycles. During our study, oxygen consumption and pathways of organic carbon degradation were estimated from benthic chamber incubations, oxygen microprofiles measured in situ, and pore water and solid phase profiles measured on retrieved cores under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic water column conditions. Benthic oxygen fluxes measured in Crimean Shelf sediments in this study were comparable to fluxes from previous in situ and laboratory measurements at similar oxygen concentrations (total fluxes -8 to -12 mmol m-2 d-1; diffusive fluxes: -2 to -5 mmol m-2 d-1) with oxygen

  18. Gettering layer for oxygen accumulation in the initial stage of SIMOX processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Xin; Kögler, Reinhard; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Möller, Wolfhard; Wang, Xi; Gerlach, Jürgen W.

    2009-05-01

    A cavity layer or nano-bubble layer introduced by He implantation before the oxygen implantation collects the implanted oxygen and increases the oxygen concentration. The average size and density of the oxygen precipitates formed in the initial stage of the separation-by-implanted-oxygen (SIMOX) process is conform with the size and density of the cavities pre-formed by He implantation and annealing. The gettering ability of the cavity layer for oxygen is directly related to the area of the internal surface of the cavities. A nano-bubble layer accumulates oxygen in a very narrow range occurring between the damage maximum, DP, and the mean projected ion range, RP. Such a nano-bubble layer is most efficient in oxygen gettering due to their larger area of the internal surface and the small size of the oxide precipitates initially formed at the bubbles.

  19. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-11-22

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figs.

  20. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  1. The reaction pathways of the oxygen plasma pulse in the hafnium oxide atomic layer deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Hyeongtag; Won, Youngdo

    2008-09-22

    The plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process for the HfO{sub 2} thin film is modeled as simple reactions between Hf(OH){sub 3}NH{sub 2} and reactive oxygen species. The density functional theory calculation was performed for plausible reaction pathways to construct the reaction profile. While the triplet molecular oxygen is unlikely to form a reactive complex, the singlet molecular oxygen forms the stable adduct that goes through the transition state and completes the reaction pathway to the products. Either two singlet or two triplet oxygen atoms make the singlet adduct complex, which follows the same pathway to the product as the singlet molecular oxygen reacts.

  2. Influence of the dissociation process of oxygen on the electron swarm parameters in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, S.; Ushiroda, S.; Kondo, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous theoretical studies assumed that the energy loss of a colliding electron has a discrete value for dissociative excitation of molecular oxygen. In the calculation of the rate coefficients for oxygen atom yields using the Boltzmann equation, the previous reports have used discrete energy loss values of 6.1 eV for {ital A}{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub {ital u}} and 8.4 eV for {ital B}{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}{sub {ital u}}. In this paper, we take account of the fact that the excitation to {ital B}{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}{sub {ital u}} has a continuum energy loss spectrum and describe the effects on calculated swarm parameters that are important in the simulation of ozonizer discharges. It can be seen that the use of a continuum electron energy-loss spectrum as opposed to a discrete electron energy loss associated with excitation to the {ital B}{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}{sub {ital u}} state makes no significant difference in the calculated values of electron swarm parameters in oxygen. We also calculate the ozone yield as a function of {ital E}/{ital N} obtained from the analysis of the energy balance equation. In this case, the partial cross section for dissociation via {ital B}{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}{sub {ital u}} assuming a continuum electron energy-loss spectrum can have significant effects on the atomic oxygen yields at different {ital E}/{ital N}.

  3. Reaction kinetics for the oxygen hydrogenation process on Pt(111) derived from temperature-programmed XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, Lars-Åke

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen hydrogenation under ultra high vacuum conditions at the platinum surface was explored using temperature-programmed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Through modeling of the oxygen consumption, information on the reaction kinetics was obtained indicating that the reaction rate of the oxygen hydrogenation process depends on the hydrogen diffusion and on the lifetime of hydroxyl intermediates. The reaction rate is, however, enhanced when an autocatalytic process stabilizes the hydroxyl intermediates through hydrogen bonding to neighboring water molecules. The overall activation energy for the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen to form water was determined to be 0.20 eV with a frequency factor of only 103 s- 1.

  4. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  5. Poly (ethylene terephthalate) decomposition process in oxygen plasma; emission spectroscopic and surface analysis for oxygen-plasma reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Hiroki, Denbo; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2004-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy was applied to observe the reaction process of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) in an oxygen (O2) plasma generated by a microwave discharge. As the PET was exposed in the O2 plasma flow, light emitted from the PET surface was monitored. In the diagnosis measurement, several emission peaks assigned to the Hα atomic line at 652 nm, Hβ at 486 nm, OH (2Σ-->2Π) transition near 244-343 nm and CO (b3 Σ-->a3 Σ) near 283-370 nm were observed and measured at various discharge times. These results indicated that after the plasma etching, the PET sample was decomposed by the oxygen plasma reaction, and then, hydrogen abstraction and carbon oxidation processes. We also observed the time profile of oxygen atom, as the atom-emission intensity at 777 nm was monitored. As Hβ atomic and OH molecule lines appeared in the presence of PET, the O atom intensity was significantly reduced. In the surface analysis on Fourier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, it was found that for the PET surface treated by O2 plasma containing excited atomic oxygen species, ester bands were broken and carbonization formed on the PET surface. .

  6. The analysis and minimization of oxygen contamination in the powder processing of molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, K.

    1994-04-24

    Problems with MoSi{sub 2} include low-temperature fracture toughness, high-temperature creep resistance, and ``pest`` phenomena. Oxygen introduced by powder processing may be the cause of some of these problems. This study led to the following conclusions: Supplied powders have significant oxygen present prior to processing (up to 2.5 %), in the form of silica on the surface. This oxygen contamination did not increase by exposure to air at room temperature. An improved powder processing method was developed that uses glass encapsulation. Analysis of microstructures created from powders that contained 4900 to 24,100 ppM oxygen showed that the silica was transferred to the fully dense MoSi{sub 2} as SiO{sub 2} inclusions. A method of producing MoSi{sub 2} with less oxygen was attempted.

  7. Numerical Study of the Reduction Process in an Oxygen Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-02-01

    Based on computational fluid dynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, principles of transfer in metallurgy, and other principles, a multi-fluid model for a traditional blast furnace was established. The furnace conditions were simulated with this multi-fluid mathematical model, and the model was verified with the comparison of calculation and measurement. Then a multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace in the gasifier-full oxygen blast furnace process was established based on this traditional blast furnace model. With the established multi-fluid model for an oxygen blast furnace, the basic characteristics of iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace were summarized, including the changing process of the iron ore reduction degree and the compositions of the burden, etc. The study found that compared to the traditional blast furnace, the magnetite reserve zone in the furnace shaft under oxygen blast furnace condition was significantly reduced, which is conducive to the efficient operation of blast furnace. In order to optimize the oxygen blast furnace design and operating parameters, the iron ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace was researched under different shaft tuyere positions, different recycling gas temperatures, and different allocation ratios of recycling gas between the hearth tuyere and the shaft tuyere. The results indicate that these three factors all have a substantial impact on the ore reduction process in the oxygen blast furnace. Moderate shaft tuyere position, high recycling gas temperature, and high recycling gas allocation ratio between hearth and shaft could significantly promote the reduction of iron ore, reduce the scope of the magnetite reserve zone, and improve the performance of oxygen blast furnace. Based on the above findings, the recommendations for improvement of the oxygen blast furnace design and operation were proposed.

  8. SIMPLIFIED INJECTION OF OXYGEN GAS INTO AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District conducted a pilot investigation of the Simplox process at their Tapia Water Reclamation Facility in Calabasas, California. The Simplox process, developed by the Cosmodyne Division of Cordon International, involves covering an activated sl...

  9. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  10. Singlet molecular oxygen generated in dark biological process.

    PubMed

    Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2014-10-01

    Ultraweak chemiluminescence arising from biomolecules oxidation has been attributed to the radiative deactivation of singlet molecular oxygen [(1)O2] and electronically excited triplet carbonyl products involving dioxetane intermediates. As examples, we will discuss the generation of (1)O2 from lipid hydroperoxides, which involves a cyclic mechanism from a linear tetraoxide intermediate. The generation of (1)O2 in aqueous solution via energy transfer from the excited triplet acetone arising from the thermodecomposition of dioxetane a chemical source, and horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-methylpropanal, as an enzymatic source, will also be discussed. The approach used to unequivocally demonstrate the generation of (1)O2 in these reactions is the use of (18)O-labeled hydroperoxide / triplet dioxygen ((18)[(3)O2]), the detection of labeled compounds by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and the direct spectroscopic detection and characterization of (1)O2 light emission. Characteristic light emission at 1,270nm, corresponding to the singlet delta state monomolecular decay was observed. Using(18)[(3)O2], we observed the formation of (18)O-labeled (1)O2 ((18)[(1)O2]) by the chemical trapping of (18)[(1)O2]with the anthracene-9,10-diyldiethane-2,1-diyl disulfate disodium salt (EAS) and detected the corresponding (18)O-labeled EAS endoperoxide usingHPLC-MS/MS. The combined use of the thermolysis of a water-soluble naphthalene endoperoxide as a generator of (18)O labeled (1)O2 and the sensitivity of HPLC-MS/MS allowed the study of (1)O2reactivity toward biomolecules. Photoemission properties and chemical trapping clearly demonstrate that the production of hydroperoxide and excited carbonyls generates (18)[(1)O2], and points to the involvement of (1)O2 in physiological and pathophysiological mechanism. Supported by FAPESP (2012/12663-1), CAPES, INCT Redoxoma (FAPESP/CNPq/CAPES; 573530/2008-4), NAP Redoxoma (PRPUSP; 2011.1.9352.1.8), CEPID

  11. Molecular Oxygen and Reactive Oxygen Species in Bread-making Processes: Scarce, but Nevertheless Important.

    PubMed

    Decamps, Karolien; Joye, Iris J; De Vos, Dirk E; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    In bread making, O2 is consumed by flour constituents, yeast, and, optionally, some additives optimizing dough processing and/or product quality. It plays a major role especially in the oxidation/reduction phenomena in dough, impacting gluten network structure. The O2 level is about 7.2 mmol/kg dough, of which a significant part stems from wheat flour. We speculate that O2 is quickly lost to the atmosphere during flour hydration. Later, when the gluten network structure develops, some O2 is incorporated in dough through mixing-in of air. O2 is consumed by yeast respiration and in a number of reactions catalyzed by a wide range of enzymes present or added. About 60% of the O2 consumption in yeastless dough is ascribed to oxidation of fatty acids by wheat lipoxygenase activity. In yeasted dough, about 70% of the O2 in dough is consumed by yeast and wheat lipoxygenase. This would leave only about 30% for other reactions. The severe competition between endogenous (and added) O2-consuming systems impacts the gluten network. Moreover, the scarce literature data available suggest that exogenous oxidative enzymes but not those in flour may promote crosslinking of arabinoxylan in yeastless dough. In any case, dough turns anaerobic during the first minutes of fermentation. PMID:26055405

  12. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Louisiana shelf, in the northern Gulf of Mexico, receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year, except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers, where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e., primary production and water column respiration). With this experiment we show that below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes (advection and vertical diffusion) and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of the process of formation of sulfur compounds in oxygen gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    G.Ya. Gerasimov; T.M. Bogacheva

    2001-05-15

    A thermodynamic approach to the description of the behavior of the system fuel-oxidizer in oxygen gasification of coal is used to reveal the main mechanisms of the process of capture of sulfur by the mineral part of the coal and to determine the fundamental possibility of the process for coals from different coal fields.

  14. Oxygen and carbon requirements for biological nitrogen removal processes accomplishing nitrification, nitritation, and anammox.

    PubMed

    Daigger, Glen T

    2014-03-01

    The oxygen and carbon savings associated with novel nitrogen removal processes for the treatment of high ammonia, low biodegradable organic matter waste streams such as the recycle streams from the dewatering of anaerobically digested sludges are well documented.This understanding may lead some to think that similar oxygen savings are possible if novel processes such as nitritation/ denitritation and partial nitritation-deammonification are incorporated into main liquid stream processes where influent biodegradable organic matter is used to denitrify residual oxidized nitrogen (nitrite and nitrate). It is demonstrated that the net oxygen required for nitrogen removal is 1.71 mg O2/mg ammonia-nitrogen converted to nitrogen gas as long as influent biodegradable organic matter is used to denitrify residual oxidized nitrogen. Less oxygen is required to produce oxidized nitrogen with these novel processes, but less biodegradable organic matter is also required for oxidized nitrogen reduction to nitrogen gas, resulting in reduced oxygen savings for the oxidation of biodegradable organic matter. The net oxygen requirement is the same since the net electron transfer for the conversion of ammonia-nitrogen to nitrogen gas is the same. The biodegradable organic matter required to reduce the oxidized nitrogen to nitrogen gas is estimated for these processes based on standard biological process calculations. It is estimated to be in the range of 3.5 to 4.0 mg biodegradable COD/mg ammonia-nitrogen reduced to nitrogen gas for nitrification-denitrification, 2.0 to 2.5 for nitritation-denitritation, and 0.5 for partial nitritation-deammonification. The resulting limiting influent wastewater carbon-to-nitrogen ratios are estimated and can be used to guide the appropriate selection of biological nitrogen removal process given knowledge of the biological process influent wastewater carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Energy savings possible for mainstream processes incorporating these novel

  15. Properties of Aluminum Deposited by a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fueled Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D; Lee, D

    2001-06-12

    Aluminum coatings deposited by a HVOF process have been demonstrated and relevant coating properties evaluated according to two deposition parameters, the spray distance and the oxygen-to-fuel flow ratio. The coating porosity, surface roughness, and microhardness are measured. The coating properties are fairly insensitive to spray distance, the distance between the nozzle and the workpiece, and fuel ratios, the oxygen-to-fuel flow. Increasing the fuel content does appear to improve the process productivity in terms of surface roughness. Minimization of nozzle loading is discussed.

  16. Process for alternately steam reforming sulfur containing hydrocarbons that vary in oxygen content

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieur, R.R.; Setzer, H.J.; Hawkins, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    In the hydrotreating and steam reforming of an oxygen and sulfur bearing hydrocarbon fuel, the oxygen is first removed in an oxidizer containing a bed of platinum catalyst, the inlet temperature being well below 1000/sup 0/F and preferably on the order of 300/sup 0/F. The sulfur in the fuel does not harm the oxidizer catalyst and may be removed downstream by known hydrodesulfurization techniques prior to reforming. A process is described for removing oxygen from an oxygen and sulfur bearing hydrocarbon fuel, such as peak shared natural gas, upstream in the process so that sulfur can be removed later. The fuel and some hydrogen are introduced into an oxidizer at a temperature of 350/sup 0/F or less down to the minimum ignition temperature. The oxidizer consists of a platinum bed catalyst which catalyzes the oxidation of the oxygen to water with accompanying heat release to raise the exit gas temperature to less than 650/sup 0/F. The temperature desorbs the sulfur from the catalyst, and the exit gases are passed downstream to nickel subsulfide or molybdenum desfulfide catalysts where the hydrosulfurization process takes place. (BLM)

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTROLLING BOP (BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS) CHARGING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the basic oxygen process (BOP) hot metal charging emission control technology, conducted with a 900 kg pilot vessel designed for the experiments. Complete instrumentation was provided to measure the emissions, the effectiveness of the variou...

  18. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  19. Investigation of processes in system {open_quotes}uranium-water-oxygen-hydrogen{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V.N.; Laptev, N.N.; Akhlyustin, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The solutions of some kinetic equations of Uranium corrosion in Hydrogen, Oxygen and Water media are obtained. Corrosion processes on a surface of components made of uranium and its alloys depend not only by the surface state (degree of mechanical purity, chemical state, presence and nature of technological or hygienic covers, etc.) but also by presence and parameters of gaseous medium. A lot of interdependent reactions proceed in the system {open_quotes}uranium - hydrogen - water - oxygen{close_quotes}, and their depth and direction depend on initial gaseous medium, temperature, pressure, etc.

  20. Modelling Oxygen Dynamics in an Intermittently Stratified Estuary: Estimation of Process Rates Using Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsuk, M. E.; Stow, C. A.; Luettich, R. A.; Paerl, H. W.; Pinckney, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between bottom water dissolved oxygen concentration, vertical stratification, and temperature was investigated for the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina, a shallow, intermittently-mixed estuary using approximately 10 years of weekly/biweekly, mid-channel data. A generalized additive model (GAM) was used to initially explore the major relationships among observed variables. The results of this statistical model guided the specification of a process-based model of oxygen dynamics that is consistent with theory yet simple enough to be parameterized using available field data. The nonlinear optimization procedure employed allows for the direct estimation of microbial oxygen consumption and physical reoxygenation rates, including the effects of temperature and vertical stratification. These estimated rates may better represent aggregate system behaviour than closed chamber measurements made in the laboratory and in situ. The resulting model describes 79% of the variation in dissolved oxygen concentration and is robust when compared across separate locations and time periods. Model predictions suggest that the spatial extent and duration of hypoxia in the bottom waters of the Neuse are controlled by the balance between the net oxygen depletion rate and the frequency of vertical mixing events. During cool months, oxygen consumption rates remain low enough to keep oxygen concentration well above levels of concern even under extended periods of stratification. A concentration below 4 mg l -1is only expected under extended periods without vertical mixing when bottom water temperature exceeds 15 °C, while a concentration below 2 mg l -1is only expected when water temperature exceeds 20 °C. To incorporate the effects of parameter uncertainty, model error, and natural variability on model prediction, we used Monte Carlo simulation to generate distributions for the predicted number of days of hypoxia during the summer season. The expected number of days with

  1. Comparative metabolomics analysis of docosahexaenoic acid fermentation processes by Schizochytrium sp. under different oxygen availability conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Ren, Lu-Jing; Sun, Guan-Nan; Qu, Liang; Huang, He

    2013-05-01

    The intracellular metabolic profile characterization of Schizochytrium sp. throughout docosahexaenoic acid fermentation was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Metabolite profiles originating from Schizochytrium sp. under normal and limited oxygen supply conditions were distinctive and distinguished by principal components analysis (PCA). A total of more than 60 intracellular metabolites were detected and quantified with the levels of some metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism varying throughout both processes. Both fermentation processes were differentiated into three main phases by principal components analysis. Potential biomarkers responsible for distinguishing the different fermentation phases were identified as glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, and glucose. In addition, alanine, glutamic acid, glucose, inositol, ornithine, and galactose were found to make great contribution for dry cell weight and fatty acid composition during normal and limited oxygen supply fermentations. Furthermore, significantly higher levels of succinate and several amino acids in cells of limited oxygen supply fermentation revealed that they might play important roles in resisting oxygen deficiency and increasing DHA synthesis during the lipid accumulation. These findings provide novel insights into the metabolomic characteristics during docosahexaenoic acid fermentation processes by Schizochytrium sp. PMID:23586678

  2. Process for selection of Oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; Seibert, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H.sub.2 -producing algal mutant cells comprising: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas; (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light. (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H.sub.2 -producing mutants.

  3. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on Cu Corrosion in Single Wafer Cleaning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yukinari; Futatsuki, Takashi; Shiohara, Morio; Kondo, Seiichi; Saito, Shuichi

    2009-04-01

    We investigated Cu corrosion at the via bottom of multi-layered Cu interconnects that occurred after post-etching wet cleaning and caused via open failures. We found that oxygen was dissolved into de-ionized water (DIW) on the wafer edge from the air atmosphere during the rinse step after chemical cleaning and that Cu was oxidized due to the high oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the rinse DIW. To prevent Cu interconnects from being corroded, control of the dissolved oxygen and the ORP of the rinse DIW by decreasing the oxygen concentration of the atmosphere in the cleaning machine as well as by using H2 water is required. This will become indispensable in the cleaning process of the next generation Cu interconnects.

  4. Monitoring of singlet oxygen in the lower troposphere and processes of ozone depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iasenko, Egor; Chelibanov, Vladimir; Marugin, Alexander; Kozliner, Marat

    2016-04-01

    The processes of ozone depletion in the atmosphere are widely discussed now in a connection with the problem of a global climate changes. It is known fact that photolysis of ozone in the upper atmosphere is the source of metastable molecules of oxygen. But, metastable molecules of oxygen can be formed as a result of photo initiated heterogeneous oxidation of molecules adsorbed on the surface of natural aerosol particles. During the outdoor experiment, we observed a formation of Singlet oxygen (1Δg) at concentration level of 2 ... 5 ppb when ice crystals have been exposed to the sun light. In experiments, we used Analyzers of Singlet oxygen and Ozone (produced by JSC "OPTEC") that utilize solid-state chemiluminescence technology. We assumed that the singlet oxygen is formed in the active centers on the surface of ice crystals in the presence or absence of anthropogenic pollutants in the atmosphere. Identified efficiency of heterogeneous reaction of O2 (1Δg) formation suggests the importance of the additional channel O3 + O2 (1Δg) → 2O2 + O (3P) of atmospheric ozone removal comparable with other well known cycles of ozone depletion.

  5. Chlorination processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of chlorine to extract, reclaim, and purify metals has attractive possibilities for extraterrestrial processing of local planetary resources. While a complete cyclic process has been proposed for the recovery of metallurgically significant metals and oxygen, herein the chlorination step of the cycle is examined. An experimental apparatus for reacting refractory materials, such as ilmenite, in a microwave induced plasma is being built. Complex equilibria calculations reveal that stable refractory materials can, under the influence of a plasma, undergo chlorination and yield oxygen as a by-product. These issues and the potential advantages for plasma processing in space are reviewed. Also presented is a discussion of the complex equilibria program used in the analysis.

  6. Bio-physical processes contribution to oxygen budget in the ETNA OMZ: a model based analysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koku Apetcho, Eyram; Montes, Ivonne; Fennel, Katja; Schneider, Birgit; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the influence of physical processes on the oxygen distribution in the Eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and their contribution to the oxygen budget in the oxygen minimum layer. A validation of the model shows a realistic representation of the main features. An improvement of the relative weak velocity observed in the model by a combination of higher resolution and appropriate wind forcing is proposed. The model diagnostics reveals that oxygen supply is mainly driven by advection. However, the importance of small scale processes is highlighted and it is observed that they potentially could hinder oxygen supply and thus contribute to ongoing depletion of oxygen. The main consumption mechanisms found in this modeling study are remineralization of DON and the 2 stages of nitrification.

  7. Selectivity between Oxygen and Chlorine Evolution in the Chlor-Alkali and Chlorate Processes.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Rasmus K B; Cornell, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Chlorine gas and sodium chlorate are two base chemicals produced through electrolysis of sodium chloride brine which find uses in many areas of industrial chemistry. Although the industrial production of these chemicals started over 100 years ago, there are still factors that limit the energy efficiencies of the processes. This review focuses on the unwanted production of oxygen gas, which decreases the charge yield by up to 5%. Understanding the factors that control the rate of oxygen production requires understanding of both chemical reactions occurring in the electrolyte, as well as surface reactions occurring on the anodes. The dominant anode material used in chlorate and chlor-alkali production is the dimensionally stable anode (DSA), Ti coated by a mixed oxide of RuO2 and TiO2. Although the selectivity for chlorine evolution on DSA is high, the fundamental reasons for this high selectivity are just now becoming elucidated. This review summarizes the research, since the early 1900s until today, concerning the selectivity between chlorine and oxygen evolution in chlorate and chlor-alkali production. It covers experimental as well as theoretical studies and highlights the relationships between process conditions, electrolyte composition, the material properties of the anode, and the selectivity for oxygen formation. PMID:26879761

  8. Characterization of an oxygen plasma process for cleaning packaged semiconductor devices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to experimentally determine the operating {open_quotes}window{close_quotes} for an oxygen plasma cleaning process to be used on microelectronics components just prior to wire bonding. The process was being developed to replace one that used vapor degreasing with trichlorotrifluoroethane, an ozone-depleting substance. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used to generate data from which the oxygen plasma cleaning process could be characterized. Auger electron spectrophotometry was used to measure the contamination thickness on the dice after cleaning. An empirical equation correlating the contamination thickness on the die surface with the operating parameters of the plasma system was developed from the collected Auger data, and optimum settings for cleaning semiconductor devices were determined. Devices were also tested for undesirable changes in electrical parameters resulting from cleaning in the plasma system. An increase in leakage current occurred for bipolar transistors and diodes after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Although an increase in leakage current occurred, each device`s parameter remained well below the acceptable specification limit. Based upon the experimental results, the optimum settings for the plasma cleaning process were determined to be 200 watts of power applied for five minutes in an enclosure maintained at 0.7 torr. At these settings, all measurable contamination was removed without compromising the reliability of the devices.

  9. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Barger, Paul T.

    1996-01-01

    A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  10. Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Barger, P.T.

    1996-09-24

    A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

  11. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  12. Effect of shortening kraft pulping integrated with extended oxygen delignification on biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Chunyun; Hu, Huichao; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of shortening kraft pulping (KP) process integrated with extended oxygen delignification (OD) on the biorefinery process performance of eucalyptus. Data showed that using kraft pulps with high kappa number could improve the delignification efficiency of OD, reduce hexenuronic acid formation in kraft pulps. Pulp viscosity for a target kappa number of ∼10 was comparable to that obtained from conventional KP and OD process. The energy and alkali consumption in the integrated biorefinery process could be optimized when using a KP pulp with kappa number of ∼27. The process could minimize the overall methanol formation, but greater amounts of carbonate and oxalate were formed. The information from this study will be helpful to the future implementation of short-time KP integrated with extended OD process in actual pulp mill applications for biorefinery, aiming at further improvement in the biorefinery effectiveness of hardwood. PMID:26706725

  13. The role of oxygen in the photostimulation luminescence process of europium doped potassium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhiyan; Mazur, Thomas R.; Driewer, Joseph P.; Li, H. Harold

    2015-01-01

    A recent suggestion that europium doped potassium chloride (KCl:Eu2+) has the potential to significantly advance the state-of-the-art in radiation therapy dosimetry has generated a renewed interest in a classic storage phosphor material. The purposes of this work are to investigate the role of oxygen in the photostimulation luminescence (PSL) process and to determine if both increased PSL yield and improved temporal stability could be realized in KCl:Eu2+ by incorporating oxygen in the material fabrication process. Regardless of synthesis atmosphere, air or pure nitrogen, PSL amplitude shows a maximum at 1.0 mol % Eu. Depending on europium concentration, dosimeters fabricated in air exhibit stronger PSL by a factor of 2 to 4 compared to those made in N2. There is no change in PSL stimulation spectrum while noticeable shifts in both photoluminescence and PSL emission spectra are observed for air versus nitrogen. Almost all charge-storage centers are spatially correlated, suggesting oxygen’s stabilization role in the PSL process. However, oxygen alone does not improve material’s temporal stability in the first few hours post irradiation at room temperature, probably because a significant portion of radiation-induced holes are stored in the Vk centers which are mobile. PMID:25897274

  14. Dissolved oxygen regulation by logarithmic/antilogarithmic control to improve a wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Flores, Victor R; Sanchez, Edgar N; Béteau, Jean-François; Hernandez, Salvador Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the automation of a real activated sludge wastewater treatment plant, which is located at San Antonio Ajijic in Jalisco, Mexico. The main objective is to create an on-line automatic supervision system, and to regulate the dissolved oxygen concentration in order to improve the performances of the process treating municipal wastewater. An approximate mathematical model is determined in order to evaluate via simulations different control strategies: proportional integral (PI), fuzzy PI and PI Logarithm/Antilogarithm (PI L/A). The controlled variable is dissolved oxygen and the control input is the injected oxygen. Based on this evaluation, the PI L/A controller is selected to be implemented in the real process. After that, the implementation, testing and fully operation of the plant automation are described. With this system, the considered wastewater treatment plant save energy and improves the effluent quality; also, the process monitoring is done online and it is easily operated by the plant users. PMID:24617069

  15. Real-time observation of dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration in cerium oxides under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Kuo; Sun, Muhua; Huang, Qianming; Xu, Zhi E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn

    2015-11-23

    The dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration driven by the external electric field is directly observed at atomic scale in the cerium oxides (CeO{sub 2}) thin film by in-situ transmission electron microscopy method. When a bias voltage of a proper value is applied across the CeO{sub 2} film, the oxygen vacancies are formed near the interface of CeO{sub 2}/anode, followed by their migration along the direction of the external electric field. The structural modulation occurs in the [110] zone axis due to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The migration of oxygen vacancies results in the reversible structural transformation, i.e., releasing and storing oxygen processes in CeO{sub 2}, which is of great significance for the ionic and electronic applications of the cerium oxides materials, such as oxygen pump, gas sensor, resistive random access memory, etc.

  16. Real-time observation of dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration in cerium oxides under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Kuo; Sun, Muhua; Huang, Qianming; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic process of oxygen vacancy migration driven by the external electric field is directly observed at atomic scale in the cerium oxides (CeO2) thin film by in-situ transmission electron microscopy method. When a bias voltage of a proper value is applied across the CeO2 film, the oxygen vacancies are formed near the interface of CeO2/anode, followed by their migration along the direction of the external electric field. The structural modulation occurs in the [110] zone axis due to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The migration of oxygen vacancies results in the reversible structural transformation, i.e., releasing and storing oxygen processes in CeO2, which is of great significance for the ionic and electronic applications of the cerium oxides materials, such as oxygen pump, gas sensor, resistive random access memory, etc.

  17. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  18. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  19. Investigation on Carbon-Deposition Behavior from Heating Cycle Gas in Oxygen Blast Furnace Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhou; Wang, Jingsong; She, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shiyang; Xue, Qingguo

    2015-02-01

    Among the different ways to study carbon deposition in the ironmaking process, not much attention was paid to that of heating the gas mixture, especially cycle gas in an oxygen blast furnace. In this work, the carbon-deposition characteristics of heating 100 pct CO, CO-H2 gas mixture, and cycle gas in the oxygen blast furnace process were, respectively, experimentally and theoretically investigated. First, the thermodynamics on carbon-deposition reactions were calculated. Then, the impacts of discharging operation temperature, the proportion of CO/H2 in heating the CO-H2 gas mixture, and the CO2 concentration in heating the cycle gas of an oxygen blast furnace on the carbon deposition were tested and investigated. Furthermore, the carbon-deposition behaviors in heating the CO-H2 gas mixture were compared with the thermodynamic calculation results for discussing the role of H2. In addition, carbon deposition in heating cycle gas includes CO decomposition and a carbon-deposition reaction by hybrid of CO and H2; the possible roles of each were analyzed by comparing thermodynamic calculation and experimental results. The deposited carbon was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze the deposited carbon microstructure.

  20. A foundational methodology for determining system static complexity using notional lunar oxygen production processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nicholas James

    This thesis serves to develop a preliminary foundational methodology for evaluating the static complexity of future lunar oxygen production systems when extensive information is not yet available about the various systems under consideration. Evaluating static complexity, as part of a overall system complexity analysis, is an important consideration in ultimately selecting a process to be used in a lunar base. When system complexity is higher, there is generally an overall increase in risk which could impact the safety of astronauts and the economic performance of the mission. To evaluate static complexity in lunar oxygen production, static complexity is simplified and defined into its essential components. First, three essential dimensions of static complexity are investigated, including interconnective complexity, strength of connections, and complexity in variety. Then a set of methods is developed upon which to separately evaluate each dimension. Q-connectivity analysis is proposed as a means to evaluate interconnective complexity and strength of connections. The law of requisite variety originating from cybernetic theory is suggested to interpret complexity in variety. Secondly, a means to aggregate the results of each analysis is proposed to create holistic measurement for static complexity using the Single Multi-Attribute Ranking Technique (SMART). Each method of static complexity analysis and the aggregation technique is demonstrated using notional data for four lunar oxygen production processes.

  1. Platinum Partitioning at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Implications for Core Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Lanziroti, A.; Newville, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements) are tracers of silicate / metal interactions during planetary processes. Since most core-formation models involve some state of equilibrium between liquid silicate and liquid metal, understanding the partioning of highly siderophile elements (HSE) between silicate and metallic melts is a key issue for models of core / mantle equilibria and for core formation scenarios. However, partitioning models for HSE are still inaccurate due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variable like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. In this abstract, we describe a self-consistent set of experiments aimed at determining the valence of platinum, one of the HSE, in silicate melts. This is a key information required to parameterize the evolution of platinum partitioning with oxygen fugacity.

  2. Investigation of Nebular Processes Through Oxygen Isotopic Analysis of Primitive Meteorite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshin, Laurie

    2002-01-01

    As a direct result of support provided by this grant, precise and accurate determination of delta(18)O and delta(17)O in silicates (and other minerals) by ion microprobe (both IMS 6f and IMS 1270) are now being carried out in several laboratories, and these analyses, combined with application of laser fluorination techniques, have led to a proliferation of oxygen isotopic data in the past approx. 3 years. The applications of these techniques in cosmochemical research have been myriad, from understanding the most refractory objects in the nebula (CAIs) to the low temperature alteration processes on meteorite parent bodies. Here, we describe our progress in understanding the oxygen isotopic microdistributions in primitive meteorite materials, as directly supported by this Origins grant.

  3. CONTINUOUS PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE FROM URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE AND OXYGEN

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.B.; Bresee, J.C.; Ferris, L.M.

    1961-11-21

    A process for preparing UF/sub 6/ by reacting UF/sub 4/ and oxygen is described. The UF/sub 4/ and oxygen are continuously introduced into a fluidized bed of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ at a temperature of 600 to 900 deg C. The concentration of UF/sub 4/ in the bed is maintained below 25 weight per cent in order to avoid sintering and intermediate compound formation. By-product U0/sub 2/F/sub 2/ is continuously removed from the top of the bed recycled. In an alternative embodiment heat is supplied to the reaction bed by burning carbon monoxide in the bed. The product UF/sub 6/ is filtered to remove entrained particles and is recovered in cold traps and chemical traps. (AEC)

  4. Liquid-phase catalytic processing of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons to fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Chheda, Juben N; Huber, George W; Dumesic, James A

    2007-01-01

    Biomass has the potential to serve as a sustainable source of energy and organic carbon for our industrialized society. The focus of this Review is to present an overview of chemical catalytic transformations of biomass-derived oxygenated feedstocks (primarily sugars and sugar-alcohols) in the liquid phase to value-added chemicals and fuels, with specific examples emphasizing the development of catalytic processes based on an understanding of the fundamental reaction chemistry. The key reactions involved in the processing of biomass are hydrolysis, dehydration, isomerization, aldol condensation, reforming, hydrogenation, and oxidation. Further, it is discussed how ideas based on fundamental chemical and catalytic concepts lead to strategies for the control of reaction pathways and process conditions to produce H(2)/CO(2) or H(2)/CO gas mixtures by aqueous-phase reforming, to produce furan compounds by selective dehydration of carbohydrates, and to produce liquid alkanes by the combination of aldol condensation and dehydration/hydrogenation processes. PMID:17659519

  5. An experimental research on the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zengqiang; Sang, Fengting; Zhang, Yuelong; Hui, Xiaokang; Xu, Mingxiu; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Weili; Fang, Benjie; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi

    2014-12-01

    The O2(1Δ)/I2 mixing process is one of the most important steps in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Based on the chemical fluorescence method (CFM), a diagnostic system was set up to image electronically excited fluorescent I2(B3П0) by means of a high speed camera. An optimized data analysis approach was proposed to analyze the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams, employing a set of qualitative and quantitative parameters and a proper percentage boundary threshold of the fluorescence zone. A slit nozzle bank with supersonic parallel streams and a trip tab set for enhancing the mixing process were designed and fabricated. With the diagnostic system and the data analysis approach, the performance of the trip tab set was examined and is demonstrated in this work. With the mixing enhancement, the fluorescence zone area was enlarged 3.75 times. We have studied the mixing process under different flow conditions and demonstrated the mixing properties with different iodine buffer gases, including N2, Ar, He and CO2. It was found that, among the four tested gases, Ar had the best penetration ability, whilst He showed the best free diffusion ability, and both of them could be well used as the buffer gas in our experiments. These experimental results can be useful for designing and optimizing COIL systems.

  6. Oxygen isotope variation in primitive achondrites: The influence of primordial, asteroidal and terrestrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, R. C.; Franchi, I. A.; Gibson, J. M.; Benedix, G. K.

    2012-10-01

    similar oxygen isotope compositions to the brachinites. It remains unclear whether the brachinites and related olivine-rich achondrites are from a single or multiple parent bodies. The primitive achondrites and related samples represent material from at most only 18 parent bodies, compared to an estimated 65 for the iron meteorites. This suggests that asteroidal mantle material is underrepresented in the meteorite record. Early fragmentation of differentiated asteroids, followed by preferential destruction of their silicate-rich mantles, offers a possible explanation for this discrepancy. On an oxygen three-isotope diagram, primitive chondrule-bearing winonaites (Dho 1222, NWA 725, NWA 1052, NWA 1463, Mt. Morris (Wisconsin)) plot close to the Young & Russell (Y&R) slope 1 line, with more evolved samples extending away from it towards the CCAM line. A similar relationship is shown by the CR chondrites. The acapulcoite-lodranite clan plots between the slope 1 and CCAM lines. However, the precursor material to the clan may have had a composition close to the slope 1 line prior to parent body processing. These relationships support the view that primordial oxygen isotope variation in the early solar system is best represented by the slope 1 (Y&R) line.

  7. Coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon interstitial-free steel in a smelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Bao, Yan-ping; Yang, Quan; Zhao, Li-hua; Lin, Lu

    2015-12-01

    Low residual-free-oxygen before final de-oxidation was beneficial to improving the cleanness of ultra-low-carbon steel. For ultra-low-carbon steel production, the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen is a precondition for achieving low residual oxygen during the Ruhrstahl Heraeus (RH) decarburization process. In this work, we studied the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon steel during the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) endpoint and RH process using data statistics, multiple linear regressions, and thermodynamics computations. The results showed that the aluminum yield decreased linearly with increasing residual oxygen in liquid steel. When the mass ratio of free oxygen and carbon ([O]/[C]) in liquid steel before RH decarburization was maintained between 1.5 and 2.0 and the carbon range was from 0.030wt% to 0.040wt%, the residual oxygen after RH natural decarburization was low and easily controlled. To satisfy the requirement for RH decarburization, the carbon and free oxygen at the BOF endpoint should be controlled to be between 297 × 10-6 and 400 × 10-6 and between 574 × 10-6 and 775 × 10-6, respectively, with a temperature of 1695 to 1715°C and a furnace campaign of 1000 to 5000 heats.

  8. Process for selection of oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H{sub 2}

    DOEpatents

    Ghirardi, M.L.; Seibert, M.

    1999-02-16

    A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H{sub 2}-producing algal mutant cells comprises: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas and (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light; (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H{sub 2}-producing mutants. 5 figs.

  9. Basic investigation into the production of oxygen in a solid electrolyte process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1981-01-01

    Mission analyses indicated that by extracting oxygen from the Martian atmosphere, which consists primarily of carbon dioxide, the launch mass of a spacecraft can be reduced by such an amount that samples from the planet can be returned to earth. The solid electrolyte process for producing O2 from CO2 was investigated. A model of the thermodynamic and electrochemical processes in the electrolyte cell was postulated, thereby establishing the parameters influencing the effectiveness and efficiency of an in situ O2 production system. The major operating parameters were investigated over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Operating limits imposed by the solid electrolyte material, 8% yttria stabilized zirconia, were determined as a function of the operating temperature.

  10. Cold plasma processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.; Bullard, D.; Ortega, R.

    1990-01-01

    The utilization of a cold plasma in chlorination processing is described. Essential equipment and instruments were received, the experimental apparatus assembled and tested, and preliminary experiments conducted. The results of the latter lend support to the original hypothesis: a cold plasma can both significantly enhance and bias chemical reactions. In two separate experiments, a cold plasma was used to reduce TiCl4 vapor and chlorinate ilmenite. The latter, reacted in an argon-chlorine plasma, yielded oxygen. The former experiment reveals that chlorine can be recovered as HCl vapor from metal chlorides in a hydrogen plasma. Furthermore, the success of the hydrogen experiments has lead to an analysis of the feasibility of direct hydrogen reduction of metal oxides in a cold plasma. That process would produce water vapor and numerous metal by-products.

  11. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zayas Pérez, Teresa; Geissler, Gunther; Hernandez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculation and advanced oxidation processes (AOP) had been studied. The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions. For each of these processes, different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater. Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and low total suspended solids. The outcomes of coffee wastewater treatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD, color, and turbidity. It was found that a reduction in COD of 67% could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculation with lime and coagulant T-1. When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H2O2, a COD reduction of 86% was achieved, although only after prolonged UV irradiation. Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered, UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3, we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective, with an efficiency of color, turbidity and further COD removal of 87%, when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater. PMID:17918591

  12. Gene regulatory and metabolic adaptation processes of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T during oxygen depletion.

    PubMed

    Laass, Sebastian; Kleist, Sarah; Bill, Nelli; Drüppel, Katharina; Kossmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Klein, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Wittmann, Christoph; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the key to the ecological success of the marine Roseobacter clade bacteria. We investigated the metabolic adaptation and the underlying changes in gene expression of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) to anoxic life by a combination of metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome analyses. Time-resolved studies during continuous oxygen depletion were performed in a chemostat using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Formation of the denitrification machinery was found enhanced on the transcriptional and proteome level, indicating that D. shibae DFL12(T) established nitrate respiration to compensate for the depletion of the electron acceptor oxygen. In parallel, arginine fermentation was induced. During the transition state, growth and ATP concentration were found to be reduced, as reflected by a decrease of A578 values and viable cell counts. In parallel, the central metabolism, including gluconeogenesis, protein biosynthesis, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis was found transiently reduced in agreement with the decreased demand for cellular building blocks. Surprisingly, an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutanoate was observed during prolonged incubation under anoxic conditions. One possible explanation is the storage of accumulated metabolites and the regeneration of NADP(+) from NADPH during poly-3-hydroxybutanoate synthesis (NADPH sink). Although D. shibae DFL12(T) was cultivated in the dark, biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll was increased, possibly to prepare for additional energy generation via aerobic anoxygenic photophosphorylation. Overall, oxygen depletion led to a metabolic crisis with partly blocked pathways and the accumulation of metabolites. In response, major energy-consuming processes were reduced until the alternative respiratory denitrification machinery was operative. PMID:24648520

  13. Gene Regulatory and Metabolic Adaptation Processes of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T during Oxygen Depletion*

    PubMed Central

    Laass, Sebastian; Kleist, Sarah; Bill, Nelli; Drüppel, Katharina; Kossmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Klein, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Wittmann, Christoph; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the key to the ecological success of the marine Roseobacter clade bacteria. We investigated the metabolic adaptation and the underlying changes in gene expression of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T to anoxic life by a combination of metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome analyses. Time-resolved studies during continuous oxygen depletion were performed in a chemostat using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Formation of the denitrification machinery was found enhanced on the transcriptional and proteome level, indicating that D. shibae DFL12T established nitrate respiration to compensate for the depletion of the electron acceptor oxygen. In parallel, arginine fermentation was induced. During the transition state, growth and ATP concentration were found to be reduced, as reflected by a decrease of A578 values and viable cell counts. In parallel, the central metabolism, including gluconeogenesis, protein biosynthesis, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis was found transiently reduced in agreement with the decreased demand for cellular building blocks. Surprisingly, an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutanoate was observed during prolonged incubation under anoxic conditions. One possible explanation is the storage of accumulated metabolites and the regeneration of NADP+ from NADPH during poly-3-hydroxybutanoate synthesis (NADPH sink). Although D. shibae DFL12T was cultivated in the dark, biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll was increased, possibly to prepare for additional energy generation via aerobic anoxygenic photophosphorylation. Overall, oxygen depletion led to a metabolic crisis with partly blocked pathways and the accumulation of metabolites. In response, major energy-consuming processes were reduced until the alternative respiratory denitrification machinery was operative. PMID:24648520

  14. The confines of triple oxygen isotope exponents in elemental and complex mass-dependent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in triple isotope relationships, or Δ17O in the case of oxygen, have been increasingly used to study a range of problems including hydrological cycles, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, biogeochemical pathways and fluxes, and the Moon's origin in the geochemical and cosmochemical communities. A Δ17O value depends on the triple isotope exponent θ of involved reaction steps. However, the probabilistic distribution of the intrinsic and apparent θ values has not been examined for elemental processes and for processes that are out of equilibrium or bearing reservoir-transport complexities. A lack of knowledge on the confines of θ may hamper our understanding of the subtle differences among mass-dependent processes and may result in mischaracterization of a set of mass-dependent processes as being in violation of mass-dependent rules. Here we advocate a reductionist approach and explore θ confines starting from kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) within the framework of transition state theory (TST). The advantage of our KIE approach is that any elemental or composite, equilibrium or non-equilibrium process can be reduced to a set of KIEs with corresponding θKIE. We establish that the KIE between a reactant and a transition state (TS) is intrinsic. Given a range of KIEs known for Earth processes involving oxygen, we use a Monte Carlo calculation method and a range of oxygen-bonded molecular masses to obtain a distribution of θKIE values and subsequently that of θeq. Next, complexities are examined by looking into expected effects due to reaction progress, unbalanced fluxes, and reference frame. Finally, compounded reservoir-transport effects are examined using two simple processes - Rayleigh Distillation (RD) and Fractional Distillation (FD). Our results show that the apparent θ values between two species or two states of the same evolving species have much broader confines than the commonly used "canonical" confines of 0.51-0.53, particularly

  15. Decoupling the influence of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    is instructive and essential to decouple the effects of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen condition, in order to understand their contribution to the interannual variability of hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s. A conceptual bottom DO budget model is applied, using the vertical exchange time scale (VET) to quantify the physical condition and net oxygen consumption rate to quantify biological activities. By combining observed DO data and modeled VET values along the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay, the monthly net bottom DO consumption rate was estimated for 1985-2012. The DO budget model results show that the interannual variations of physical conditions accounts for 88.8% of the interannual variations of observed DO. The high similarity between the VET spatial pattern and the observed DO suggests that physical processes play a key role in regulating the DO condition. Model results also show that long-term VET has a slight increase in summer, but no statistically significant trend is found. Correlations among southerly wind strength, North Atlantic Oscillation index, and VET demonstrate that the physical condition in the Chesapeake Bay is highly controlled by the large-scale climate variation. The relationship is most significant during the summer, when the southerly wind dominates throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The seasonal pattern of the averaged net bottom DO consumption rate (B'20) along the main stem coincides with that of the chlorophyll-a concentration. A significant correlation between nutrient loading and B'20 suggests that the biological processes in April-May are most sensitive to the nutrient loading.

  16. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Oscillation of the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenthal, Hans-Juergen; Thiedemann, Uwe; Falkenreck, Udo; Schlueter, Jochen

    2010-04-01

    The oscillation of argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) converters is flow related and depends on the process parameters ( e.g., vessel geometry, melt fill height, process gas type and blowing rate, vessel tilting angle, as well as geometry, number, and arrangement of the side-wall nozzles). For a 120-ton AOD converter with seven submerged side-wall nozzles, plant tests, physical simulations on a 1:4 scale water model, and computational fluid dynamics simulations have been done. The investigations show that the penetration depth of an inert gas jet into the melt does not exceed approximately 0.4 m. The plumes are located close to the nozzle-side converter wall and induce a large-scale primary vortex as well as intensive surface movements; both are responsible for the oscillation. Several process mechanisms were investigated. The oscillation is highest in the last stage of the dynamic blow and is still high during the reduction stage. As the amount of inert gas increases, the vibration level also increases. Inert gas has a greater influence on the oscillation than oxygen. Tilting the converter around 8 deg clearly leads to more intensive oscillations. Increasing the blowing rate increases the forces and torques acting on the vessel, whereas the oscillation frequency remains nearly constant. A varying fill level does not influence the vibration level the same way as the blowing rate. The operational test shows, for example, that the maximum torque does not depend on the heat size when the latter varies between -8 pct and +21 pct of the nominal heat size. The water model test shows decreasing forces and torques with a rising fill level.

  17. Multi-pollutant treatment of crystalline cellulosic effluent: Function of dissolved oxygen on process control.

    PubMed

    Shanthi Sravan, J; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of crystalline cellulose based wastewater was carried out in periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR). Specific influence of dissolved oxygen on treatment of crystalline cellulosic (CC) wastewater was evaluated in three different microenvironments such as aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic. PDBR-aerobic biosystem documented relatively higher substrate degradation [2.63kgCOD/m(3)-day (92%)] in comparison to PDBR-anoxic [2.12kgCOD/m(3)-day (71%)] and PDBR-anaerobic [1.81kgCOD/m(3)-day (63%)], which is in accordance with the observed DO levels. Similarly, multipollutants viz., phosphates and nitrates removal was observed to be higher in aerobic followed by anoxic and anaerobic operations. Higher nitrate removal in aerobic operation might be attributed to the efficient denitrification carried out by the biocatalyst, which utilizes both nitrates and oxygen as oxidizing agents. Multiscan spectral profiles depicted reduction in color intensity in all three microenvironments that correlated with the substrate degradation observed. Despite the high organic load, PDBR functioned well without exhibiting process inhibition. PMID:27005787

  18. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  19. Vertical mixing processes in Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes and Lagoons, and the dissolved oxygen response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Emma; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Ranasinghe, Roshanka

    2006-08-01

    Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes and Lagoons (ICOLLs) are located on micro-tidal coasts (max. tidal range < 2 m) in temperate regions where the annual rainfall is non-seasonal. ICOLLs are generally shallow (<5 m depth) and are closed to the ocean due to the formation of an entrance bar for the majority of the year, when rainfalls are low. After periods of heavy rainfall, the super elevated water levels result in the natural or artificial breaching of the entrance bar. Due to their small size and absence of significant river inflows, ICOLLs exhibit strong temporal variations in their vertical density gradients, which can result in episodic density stratification. Such episodic stratification events may result in deterioration of the water quality including toxic algal blooms. This paper presents the results of field studies undertaken to determine the physical processes governing vertical mixing/stratification in ICOLLs and their implications on dissolved oxygen dynamics. Data from two contrasting ICOLLs located along the south-eastern coastline of Australia; (a) Wamberal Lagoon a small, shallower (˜2 m max. depth) frequently open ICOLL; and, (2) Smiths Lake, a larger, deeper (˜5 m max. depth) infrequently open ICOLL, are presented. The results indicated that Wamberal Lagoon was susceptible to periods of stratification during both the closed and the open states. During the closed state, periods of rainfall, low wind and/or high solar insolation led to short (<3 days) and irregular stratification events, whilst during the open state, stratification events occurred through a combination of rainfall, low winds and variations in tidal mixing. There was a tendency for dissolved oxygen to decrease, in the bottom waters, when the Buoyancy Frequency was >0.1 s -1. Smiths Lake demonstrated higher vertical stability and exhibited a tendency for persistent stratification, during both the closed and open states, primarily due to solar insolation (closed state) and

  20. Processes controlling mid-water column oxygen minima over the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxia; Hetland, Robert D.; DiMarco, Steven F.; Fennel, Katja

    2015-04-01

    We investigate distributions of dissolved oxygen over the Texas-Louisiana shelf using spatially highly resolved observations in combination with a regional circulation model with simple oxygen dynamics. The observations were collected using a towed, undulating CTD during the Mechanisms Controlling Hypoxia (MCH) program. Mid-water oxygen minimum layers (dissolved oxygen lower than 3.2 mL L-1) were detected in many transects. These oxygen minimum layers are connected with the bottom boundary layer and follow the pycnocline seaward as a tongue of low oxygen into the mid-water column. T-S diagrams highlighting the low oxygen minima in both observations and simulations imply direct connections between low-oxygen bottom water and the oxygen minimum layer. The dynamics of these oxygen minimum layers in the mid-water column are examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Convergence within the bottom boundary layer relative to density surfaces is calculated, results show that there is a convergence in the bottom boundary layer at the location where the pycnocline intersects the bottom. Buoyancy advection forced by bottom Ekman transport creates this convergent flow, and the corresponding low-oxygen intrusion. Similar intrusions of near-bottom water into the pycnocline are observed in other regions. The presence of hypoxia within the bottom boundary layer in the northern Gulf of Mexico creates a unique situation in which these intrusions are also associated with low dissolved oxygen.

  1. 2D Model for Diffusion of Oxygen with Biochemical Reaction During Biofilm Formation Process in Static Aqueous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puyate, Y. T.; Rim-Rukeh, A.

    A 2D model that describes diffusion of oxygen with biochemical reaction during biofilm formation process in static aqueous medium is presented. The analysis is based on X60 steel placed at the bottom of a container containing produced water inoculated with Leptothrix discophora (iron-oxidizing bacteria). These bacteria form biofilms on the exposed surfaces of the metal. The biofilm-microorganisms absorb oxygen from the produced water through biochemical reaction, resulting in transfer of oxygen from the bulk liquid phase to the biofilm. Predictions of the model are compared with experimental data and good agreement is obtained.

  2. From graphene to carbon nanotube: The oxygen effect on the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials on nickel foil during CVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yu-Ching; Wu, Hsuan-Chung; Hsieh, Chien-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated an oxygen-assisted ultralow-pressure (20 mTorr) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including multilayer graphene (MLG), double-layer graphene (DLG), single-layer graphene (SLG), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a Ni foil substrate. Oxygen is typically considered undesirable to synthesize carbon nanomaterials during the CVD process. However, our study provided evidence demonstrating that the growth of MLG, DLG, SLG, and CNTs can be maintained by adjusting the oxygen concentration during the CVD process; it also provided an easy way in controlling the layer of graphene. It was observed that oxygen played an important role in controlling the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials.

  3. Triple oxygen isotope data characterize oxidation processes that produce sulfate on Earth (and Mars?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J.; Kohl, I.; Coleman, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Tinto, a river in southwest Spain, has a long history of acid, iron and sulfate rich water resulting primarily from the oxidation of pyrite (ferrous iron sulfide). Its geochemistry and extremophile microbiology make it an exciting and ideal mars-analogue research site, as relatively recent discoveries have shown Mars to be rich in sulfates believed to have formed in an acidic environment. Current models for the oxidation pathways of pyrite sulfur to sulfate, and the microbial influences on those pathways are incomplete. Traditionally, studies have only focused on d18O as a tracer for the oxygen sources in sulfate and determination of the oxidation pathways. The d18O method has always been fraught with uncertainty due to isotope fractionation during oxygen incorporation from the two dominant sources, atmospheric oxygen and water. A relatively new method utilizing 17O measures the relationship between d17O/d18O. The average relationship has been defined as the Terrestrial Fractionation Line, with a slope of 0.52. Deviations from this relationship are represented as Cap delta 17O, the difference of delta 17O from the expected value. Cap17O values are useful because they depend only on the relationship between d17O/d18O, which remains constant during mass dependent fractionation. During O2 generation from solid BaSO4, some fractionation can occur due to incomplete oxygen yield. This can produce uncertainties in d17O and d18O, but Cap17O is dependent only on the d17O/d18O ratio and is therefore not affected. The relationship mentioned above between d17O/d18O (slope=0.52) is an average for terrestrial materials and it is becoming increasingly clear that process specific slopes can be defined. This offers an exciting opportunity to characterize potential biomarkers on Mars. If a biologically specific slope could be determined, then its signature will be preserved through subsequent mass dependent fractionation processes. Our approach is to use Río Tinto field and

  4. Nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, Thulwaneng; Waldron, Howard; Vichi, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in some OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations occur below the detection limit in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding dominant nitrogen loss mechanisms through modeling studies in the Benguela OMZ. The coupled physical-biogeochemical model for eastern boundary upwelling systems (BioEBUS) using the Southern Africa experiment (SAfE) nested configuration is applied in the Benguela to study nitrite dynamics. Model results show nitrite maxima associated with the Angola-Benguela front region. The maxima are linked to poleward nutrient rich, oxygen-depleted south Atlantic central water (SACW) from the Angola gyre which favour denitrification on the shelf during summer to autumn. Ventilation of the shelf during winter to spring by the equatorward well-aerated eastern south Atlantic central water (ESACW) results in depleted nitrite concentrations. In addition to local circulation, Hovmuller analyses suggest that both primary and secondary nitrite maxima are driven by shelf biogeochemical processes and offshore advection. Vertical depth profiles show nitrite maxima at 17°S and depletion at 23°S attributed to denitrification and anammox, respectively. Model results suggest nitrogen in the Benguela OMZ is lost to anammox, denitrification and offshore advection, with denitrification as the dominant loss mechanism rather than anammox as previously documented. These results are key to understanding feedback processes from nitrogen loss in the Benguela OMZ and its impact on related biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Experimental evaluation of the ignition process of carbon monoxide and oxygen in a rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and oxygen ignition boundaries were determined in a spark torch igniter as a function of propellant inlet temperatures. The oxygen temperature was varied from ambient to -258 F, and the carbon monoxide temperature was varied from ambient to -241 F. With the oxygen and carbon monoxide at -253 F and -219 F, respectively, they successfully ignited between mixture ratios of 2.42 and 3.10. Analysis of the results indicated that the lower ignition boundary was more sensitive to oxygen temperature than to carbon monoxide temperature. Another series of tests was performed in a small simulated rocket engine with oxygen at -197 F and carbon monoxide at -193 F. An oxygen/hydrogen flame was used to initiate combustion of the oxygen and carbon monoxide. Tests performed at the optimum operating mixture ratio of 0.55 obtained steady-state combustion in every test.

  6. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  7. Improved vitamin B(12) production by step-wise reduction of oxygen uptake rate under dissolved oxygen limiting level during fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze-Jian; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Li, Yong-Liang; Chu, Ju; Huang, Ming-Zhi; Zhuang, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Si-Liang

    2010-04-01

    Effects of different oxygen transfer rates (OTR) on the cell growth and vitamin B(12) biosynthesis of Pseudomonas denitrificans were first investigated under dissolved oxygen limiting conditions. The results demonstrated that high OTR accelerated cell growth and initial vitamin B(12) biosynthesis rate, while lower OTR was critical for higher productivity in the late fermentation process. The oxygen uptake rates (OUR) corresponded well with OTR. Based on the metabolic intermediate analysis, a step-wise OUR control strategy was proposed. The strategy was successfully implemented in scale-up to an industrial fermenter (120,000 l). A stable maximum vitamin B(12) production of 208 + or - 2.5 mg/l was achieved, which was increased by 17.3% compared with the control. Furthermore, the glucose consumption coefficient to vitamin B(12) was 34.4% lower than that of the control. An efficient and economical fermentation process based on OUR criterion was established for industrial vitamin B(12) fermentation by P. denitrificans. PMID:20022743

  8. Nitrogen Loss Processes and Nitrous Oxide Turnover in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and the maintenance of all ecosystems. For many ecosystems, both aquatic and terrestrial, nitrogen is the element most likely to limit the amount and rate of production. But just as ecosystems can suffer from too little nitrogen, they are also sensitive to too much nitrogen, which leads to eutrophication and structural changes in food webs. Thus the processes by which nitrogen is removed are as critical to our understanding of ecosystem function as are those by which it is added. Nitrogen loss processes in the open ocean have been the focus of research and discovery in recent years. Long thought to be dominated by the bacterial respiratory process of denitrification, N loss is now also known to occur by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). We now understand that the ratio of the two processes is controlled by the quality and quantity of organic matter supplied to the anoxic waters of the ocean's major oxygen deficient zones. Coastal environments are also major sites of N loss but excess N loading from land often ameliorates the direct dependence of anammox and denitrification on organic matter composition. The ratio is important partly because of side products: Denitrification is a significant source and sink for nitrous oxide (N2O), while anammox has no significant contribution to N2O biogeochemistry. With the anthropogenic flux of CFCs at least mostly under control, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are the greatest contribution to ozone destruction, and they also contribute to greenhouse warming. Both anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to N2O emissions, and natural sources are sensitive to anthropogenic forcing. Our direct measurements of N2O production and consumption in the ocean agree with modeling results that have implicated multiple microbial processes and complex physical and biological control of N2O fluxes in the ocean.

  9. Mechanism of the cathodic process coupled to the oxidation of iron monosulfide by dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Duinea, Mădălina I; Costas, Andreea; Baibarac, Mihaela; Chiriță, Paul

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the mechanism of iron monosulfide (FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen (O2(aq)). Synthetic FeS was reacted with O2(aq) for 6days and at 25°C. We have characterized the initial and reacted FeS surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that during the aqueous oxidation of FeS new solid phases (disulfide, polysulfide, elemental sulfur, ferric oxyhydroxides and Fe3O4) develop on the mineral surface. The results of potentiodynamic polarization experiments show that after 2days of FeS electrode immersion in oxygen bearing solution (OBS) at initial pH 5.1 and 25°C the modulus of cathodic Tafel slopes dramatically decreases, from 393mV/dec to 86mV/dec. This decrease is ascribed to the change of the mechanism of electron transfer from cathodic sites to O2 (mechanism of cathodic process). The oxidation current densities (jox) indicate that mineral oxidative dissolution is not inhibited by pH increase up to 6.7. Another conclusion, which emerges from the analysis of jox, is that the dissolved Fe(3+) does not intermediate the aqueous oxidation of FeS. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) show that after 2days of contact between electrode and OBS the properties of FeS/water interface change. From the analysis of the EIS, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDX data we can conclude that the change of FeS/water interface properties accompanies the formation of new solid phases on the mineral surface. The new characteristics of the surface layer and FeS/water interface do not cause the inhibition of mineral oxidation. PMID:26773612

  10. [Disturbances of oxygen-dependent processes in periodontal tissues under prolonged immobilization stress and ways of their pharmacological correction].

    PubMed

    Opanasenko, H B; Bratus', L V; Havenauskas, B L; Honchar, O O; Man'kovs'ka, I M; Nosar, V I; Frantsuzova, S B

    2013-01-01

    Influence of prolonged immobilization (6 h strict horizontal position of rats in the tight containers daily for 2 weeks) on oxygen tension, oxygen consumption, pro-/antioxidant balance, and energetic metabolism of soft and hard periodontal tissues has been investigated. It was established that prolonged immobilization stress resulted in marked decrease in the gum tissue PO2 (36%) and in the bone tissue oxygen consumption rate (46%) compared to control. It was also determined that prolonged stress led to a reduction in the gum mitochondrial respiration rate. The latter was more expressed in case of the NAD-dependent substrate oxidation than of the FAD- dependent one. It was determined that the prolonged stress results in intensification of peroxide processes and depletion of antioxidant protection of soft tissues of periodontum. It was found that Thiotriazolin and Actovegin have modified and diminished stress-induced disorders in the soft and hard periodontal tissues oxygen homeostasis under prolonged immobilization stress. PMID:23713346

  11. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  12. Mus308 Processes Oxygen and Nitrogen Ethylation DNA Damage in Germ Cells of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Comendador, Miguel A.; Sierra, L. María

    2010-01-01

    The D. melanogaster mus308 gene, highly conserved among higher eukaryotes, is implicated in the repair of cross-links and of O-ethylpyrimidine DNA damage, working in a DNA damage tolerance mechanism. However, despite its relevance, its possible role on the processing of different DNA ethylation damages is not clear. To obtain data on mutation frequency and on mutation spectra in mus308 deficient (mus308−) conditions, the ethylating agent diethyl sulfate (DES) was analysed in postmeiotic male germ cells. These data were compared with those corresponding to mus308 efficient conditions. Our results indicate that Mus308 is necessary for the processing of oxygen and N-ethylation damage, for the survival of fertilized eggs depending on the level of induced DNA damage, and for an influence of the DNA damage neighbouring sequence. These results support the role of mus308 in a tolerance mechanism linked to a translesion synthesis pathway and also to the alternative end-joinig system. PMID:20936147

  13. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed. PMID:25704155

  14. Modelling nitrite dynamics and associated feedback processes in the Benguela oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashifane, T. B.; Vichi, M.; Waldron, H. N.; Machu, E.; Garçonc, V.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nitrite dynamics in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) is a challenge as it represents an intermediary nitrogen species with a short turnover time. Nitrite is also reduced to nitrogen in OMZs, preventing its accumulation. This creates difficulties in detecting nitrite with colorimetric methods as concentrations may occur below detection limits in some regions. Nitrite concentrations are key to understanding intermediate nitrogen processes and their implication for nitrogen loss in OMZs. A coupled physical-biogeochemical model is applied in the Benguela OMZ to study nitrite dynamics and its associated feedback processes. Simulated results show occurrence of primary and secondary nitrite maxima in the Benguela shelf waters. The primary nitrite maxima in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification and nitrate assimilation as they occur in association with the nitracline. Secondary nitrite maxima accumulate in the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) OMZ and are attributed to denitrification. The secondary nitrite maxima are consumed by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) off Walvis Bay. Nitrite maxima are restricted to the shelf off Walvis Bay and advected offshore in the ABF region. Interchanges between the poleward South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the equatorward, well-aerated Eastern South Atlantic Central Water (ESACW) drive the seasonality of nitrogen processes in the Benguela. Subsequent nitrite reduction in the Benguela OMZ leads to nitrous oxide production, with high concentrations occurring in the ABF region as a result of nitrification and denitrification. Off Walvis Bay, nitrous oxide production is low since nitrite is consumed by anammox. Nitrous oxide production occurs in thermocline, intermediate and deeper water masses in the ABF region. High N fluxes in the Benguela are attributed to nitrification as compared to anammox and denitrification. Results from this study demonstrate the role of intermediate nitrogen species in nitrogen feedback

  15. Oxygen microprofile in the prepared sediments and its implication for the sediment oxygen consuming process in a heavily polluted river of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhai, Wanying; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) microprofiles of prepared sediments from 24 sampling sites in the Fuyang River were measured using a gold amalgam microelectrode in this study. The measured microprofiles can be divided into four types. In type I profiles, DO kept constant in the overlying water and decreased smoothly in the pore water; in type II profile, DO showed fluctuation in the pore water; in type III profiles, DO showed peak in the SWI; in type IV profiles, DO decreased obviously in the overlying water. Type I profiles indicated the absence of benthic organisms and thus the degradation of the sediment habitat. Type II and III profiles indicated the activity of benthic animal and epipelic algae, which is common in the healthy aquatic sediment. Type IV profiles indicated that the excessive accumulation of pollutants in the sediment and thus the serious sediment pollution. There are nine sites showing type I profile, three sites showing type II profile, nine sites showing type III profile, and three sites showing type IV profile in the Fuyang River. The dominance of type I and appearance of type IV indicated that sediment oxygen consumption processes in the Fuyang River were strongly influenced by the sediment pollutants release and the vanish of benthic organisms. The pharmacy, metallurgy, and curriery industries may contribute to the sediment deterioration and thus to the occurrence of type I and type IV oxygen profiles in the Fuyang River. PMID:26797955

  16. Study on the oxygenation process during the heat treatment of TFA-MOD YBCO thin films by in situ resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Timing; Xue, Yunran; Feng, Feng; Huang, Rongxia; Wu, Wei; Shi, Kai; Han, Zhenghe

    2013-11-01

    The oxygen content is one key factor to determine the properties of YBa2Cu3O6+y (YBCO) high temperature superconductors. In this study, YBCO thin films were produced by TFA-MOD method. The oxygenation process was carried out at 450 °C for 40 min, in various oxygen partial pressures from 0.01 to 1 atm. An in situ resistance measurement system was built up to record the resistance evolution during the whole heat treatment process. It was found that the resistance decreased exponentially and reached a saturate value in a few minutes during oxygen annealing. It was also found both the balanced resistance and the c-axis length of YBCO decreased with increasing oxygen partial pressure. A defect reaction was found to control the mechanism of the oxygenation process. A porosity assisted oxygen diffusion mechanism was proposed to explain the fast diffusion kinetics of oxygen in MOD YBCO thin films.

  17. On atmospheric loss of oxygen ions from earth through magnetospheric processes.

    PubMed

    Seki, K; Elphic, R C; Hirahara, M; Terasawa, T; Mukai, T

    2001-03-01

    In Earth's environment, the observed polar outflow rate for O(+) ions, the main source of oxygen above gravitational escape energy, corresponds to the loss of approximately 18% of the present-day atmospheric oxygen over 3 billion years. However, part of this apparent loss can actually be returned to the atmosphere. Examining loss rates of four escape routes with high-altitude spacecraft observations, we show that the total oxygen loss rate inferred from current knowledge is about one order of magnitude smaller than the polar O(+) outflow rate. This disagreement suggests that there may be a substantial return flux from the magnetosphere to the low-latitude ionosphere. Then the net oxygen loss over 3 billion years drops to approximately 2% of the current atmospheric oxygen content. PMID:11239148

  18. Electronic excitation and relaxation processes of oxygen vacancies in YSZ and their involvement in photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Takaaki; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2016-09-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) consists of zirconia and yttria and oxygen vacancies appear in accordance with the ratio of yttria. The oxygen vacancy would sometimes give annoyance, but it would be beneficial on other occasions, depending on its applications. Photoluminescence (PL) due to oxygen vacancies induced by photons with energies around 5.5 eV exhibits two decay time constants. As a possible reason for this, an oxygen vacancy changes its charging state from neutral to positive monovalent by losing an electron when YSZ is irradiated by ultraviolet photons. The PL decays either in a ms range or in a ns range, depending on whether the oxygen vacancies are neutral or positive monovalent.

  19. Role of Oxygen as Surface-Active Element in Linear GTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadaiah, Nirsanametla; Bag, Swarup

    2013-11-01

    Although the surface-active elements such as oxygen and sulfur have an adverse effect on momentum transport in liquid metals during fusion welding, such elements can be used beneficially up to a certain limit to increase the weld penetration in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The fluid flow pattern and consequently the weld penetration and width change due to a change in coefficient of surface tension from a negative value to a positive value. The present work is focused on the analysis of possible effects of surface-active elements to change the weld pool dimensions in linear GTA welding. A 3D finite element-based heat transfer and fluid flow model is developed to study the effect of surface-active elements on stainless steel plates. A velocity in the order of 180 mm/s due to surface tension force is estimated at an optimum concentration of surface-active elements. Further, the differential evolution-based global optimization algorithm is integrated with the numerical model to estimate uncertain model parameters such as arc efficiency, effective arc radius, and effective values of material properties at high temperatures. The effective values of thermal conductivity and viscosity are estimated to be enhanced nine and seven times, respectively, over corresponding room temperature values. An error analysis is also performed to find out the overall reliability of the computed results, and a maximum reliability of 0.94 is achieved.

  20. What processes control the oxygen isotopes of soil bio-available phosphate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Avner; Angert, Alon

    2015-06-01

    The biological availability of phosphorus (P) is considered to be the limiting factor for plant growth in many natural and agricultural soils. Recent studies demonstrated that valuable information on soil P dynamics can be gained from the stable oxygen isotopes of soil phosphate (δ18OP). However, to interpret this information correctly, our understanding of the processes that controls soil phosphate δ18OP values needs to be improved since most of the current data is based primarily on laboratory studies of pure microbial cultures and enzymatic assays and may not be relevant to soils. Here we designed a series of controlled soil incubation experiments to study the actual isotopic effects induced by abiotic reactions, biological uptake, microbial turnover and organic-P mineralization on soil phosphate δ18OP values. We used this data to estimate the role of these processes in mediating soil P availability. Our study was conducted on Mediterranean soils sampled from the same site during winter, spring and summer. The soils were incubated with various mineral and organic-P compounds and their bioavailable phosphate concentrations and δ18OP values were measured. We confirmed that the role of abiotic reactions on phosphate δ18OP values was negligible and that the δ18OP values of the added phosphate were rapidly driven towards isotopic equilibrium with soil water. We suggest this process was mediated by rapid microbial phosphate turnover. Yet, we did not detect the expected isotopic enrichment effect associated with phosphate biological uptake. In another set of incubation experiments we demonstrated that mineralization of phosphate from organic compounds, such as phospho-mono-ester (PME) and phosphor-di-ester (PDE), produced an offset from isotopic equilibrium, as a result of the strong isotopic fractionation associated with the mineralization process. However, the δ18OP values recorded by the mineralized phosphate were gradually driven back towards isotopic

  1. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  2. Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system for control of airborne microorganisms in meat processing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Serratia marcescens and lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were used to artificiall...

  3. Removing oxygen from a solvent extractant in an uranium recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Fred J.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Posey, Franz A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

  4. Method for oxygen reduction in a uranium-recovery process. [US DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, F.J.; Brown, G.M.; Posey, F.A.

    1981-11-04

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous iron and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

  5. Nanopore formation process in artificial cell membrane induced by plasma-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated morphological change of an artificial lipid bilayer membrane induced by oxygen radicals which were generated by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. Neutral oxygen species, O((3)Pj) and O2((1)Δg), were irradiated of a supported lipid bilayer existing under a buffer solution at various conditions of dose time and distances, at which the dose amounts of the oxygen species were calculated quantitatively. Observation using an atomic force microscope and a fluorescence microscope revealed that dose of the neutral oxygen species generated nanopores with the diameter of 10-50 nm in a phospholipid bilayer, and finally destructed the bilayer structure. We found that protrusions appeared on the lipid bilayer surface prior to the formation of nanopores, and we attributed the protrusions to the precursor of the nanopores. We propose a mechanism of the pore formation induced by lipid oxidation on the basis of previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:27216034

  6. BENTHIC-PELAGIC PROCESSES IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eutrophication caused by excess nutrients can exacerbate hypoxia by increasing bottom water and sediment respiration. However, in shallow sub-tropical estuaries, the euphotic zone often extends below the pycnocline allowing oxygen fluxes in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA. Measurements we...

  7. Numerical simulation of oxygen transport during the CZ silicon crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jyh-Chen; Teng, Ying-Yang; Wun, Wan-Ting; Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Hsueh-I.; Chen, Chi-Yung; Lan, Wen-Chieh

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the effect of the flow motion and heat transfer generated by the crystal and crucible rotation on the oxygen distribution inside the melt during Czochralski silicon crystal growth is investigated. When the crucible rotates in a direction opposite to the crystal rotation, Taylor-Proundman vortices appear in the region below the crystal. The diffusion of oxygen impurity from the crucible wall to the crystal-melt interface is suppressed by these Taylor-Proundman vortices, while heat transport from the crucible wall to the crystal-melt interface is blocked by the Taylor-Proundman vortices. With a higher crucible rotation rate, the size of the Taylor-Proundman vortices increases and the size of the buoyancy-thermocapillary vortices decreases. This causes the temperature at the crucible wall to rise and the evaporation of oxygen impurity on the free surface to decrease. Hence, the amount of oxygen impurity that diffuses into the melt towards the crystal-melt interface increases. The suppression from the Taylor-Proundman vortices is dominant for the smaller crucible rotation rate, while the enhancement from the oxygen impurity diffusion prevails for the higher crucible rotation rate. Therefore, there is an optimum combination of crucible and crystal rotation for obtaining the lowest oxygen concentration.

  8. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Ito, Taka; Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Valett, Jackie; Deutsch, Curtis

    2015-04-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  9. Anthropogenic processing of dust affects the oxygen content of the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, A.; Ito, T.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Valett, J.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the last several decades show a significant expansion of the tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, the underlying causes remain elusive, as the currently accepted effects of ocean warming and associated solubility decease cannot fully explain the observed oxygen trend. Here we show that anthropogenic pollution can change the pattern of biological productivity and oxygen trends consistent with observations in the tropics and extratropics. These effects are caused by the mobilization of iron in mineral dust by pollutants, where it is transported and deposited to the HNLC regions of the tropical pacific affecting primary productivity and oxygen consumption by bacterial respiration. In this study, it is shown that pollution-mobilized iron deposited to high latitude oceanic environments can profoundly impact subsurface oxygen and the extent of the OMZ through long-range oceanic transport. Together with the intensification of tropical upwelling since the 1990s associated with natural climate variability, our results can explain the expansion of the OMZ in the tropical Pacific in the late twentieth century. Unlike climate variability, however, anthropogenic pollution likely influences the long-term trends in marine biogeochemistry and further alters regional productivity and subsurface oxygen distributions with profound implications for marine habitats and nitrate inventory of the oceans.

  10. Influence of under pressure dissolved oxygen on trichloroethylene degradation by the H2O2/TiO2 process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The widespread use of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its frequent release into the environment has caused many environmental and health problems. In this study the degradation of TCE at different micromolar concentrations was investigated in a stainless steel reactor with various concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 at different oxygen pressures and three different pHs. Methods To examine the synergistic effect of under pressure oxygen on TCE degradation, the concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 as well as pH were first optimized, and then the experiments were performed under optimal conditions. Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (FID) was used to measure TCE concentrations. Results Results showed that the percentage of TCE degradation without pressurized oxygen was low and it increased with increasing pressure of oxygen at all initial concentrations of TCE. The degradation percentages without oxygen pressure were 48.27%, 51.22%, 58.13% and 64.33% for TCE concentrations of 3000, 1500, 300 and 150 μg/L respectively. At an oxygen pressure of 2.5 atmospheres (atm) the percent degradation of TCE reached 84.85%, 89.14%, 93.13% and 94.99% respectively for the aforementioned TCE concentrations. Conclusions The results of this study show that the application of dissolved oxygen under pressure increases the efficiency of the H2O2/TiO2 process on the degradation of TCE and can be used along with other oxidants as an effective method for the removal of this compound from aqueous solutions. PMID:24359702

  11. Mechanism of the photochemical process of singlet oxygen production by phenalenone.

    PubMed

    Segado, Mireia; Reguero, Mar

    2011-03-01

    Phenalenone (PN) is a very efficient singlet oxygen sensitiser in a wide range of solvents. This work uses ab initio quantum chemical calculations (CASSCF/CASPT2 protocol) to study the mechanism for populating the triplet state of PN responsible for this reaction, the (3)(π-π*) state. To describe in detail this reaction path, the singlet and triplet low-lying excited states of PN have been studied, the critical points of the potential energy surfaces corresponding to these states located and the vertical and adiabatic energies calculated. Our results show that, after the initial population of the S(2) excited state of (π-π*) character, the system undergoes an internal conversion to the (1)(n-π*) state. After populating the dark S(1) state, the system relaxes to the (1)(n-π*) minimum, but rapidly populates the triplet manifold through a very efficient intersystem crossing to the (3)(π-π*) state. Although the population of the minimum of this triplet state is strongly favoured, a conical intersection with the (3)(n-π*) surface opens an internal conversion channel to this state, a path accessible only at high temperatures. Radiationless deactivation processes are ruled out on the basis of the high-energy barriers found for the crossings between the excited states and the ground state. Our computational results satisfactorily explain the experimental findings and are in very good agreement with the experimental data available. In the case of the frequency of fluorescence, this is the first time that these data have been theoretically predicted in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21225064

  12. Modeling of Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer in Low-Temperature Oxygen-Fuel Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Y. G.; Shen, C. H.; Jia, L. B.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2014-01-01

    The low-temperature oxygen-fuel (LTOF) spray is a modification of high velocity oxygen fuel spray. In this process, the high-temperature gas is accelerated to supersonic speed through a Laval nozzle followed by a straight barrel. By injecting room temperature gas into the mixing chamber, the temperature of the gas can be controlled in a range of about 1000-2500 K, so that some oxygen and temperature-sensitive materials, such as titanium and copper, can avoid oxidation or decomposition during the spraying process. The purpose of this paper is to establish a 2-D mathematical model to simulate the supersonic gas dynamics and particles behavior in LTOF process. The temperature and velocity of the flow fields, and the trajectory and heating of in-flight particles are predicted for different operating parameters. The model is validated by experimental data in the literature. Effects of the mixing gas flow rates, particle sizes, and injection conditions on this process were investigated as well.

  13. Growth of oxygen bubbles during recharge process in zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Chen, Huicui; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang; Xing, Haoqiang

    2015-11-01

    Rechargeable zinc-air battery used for energy storage has a serious problem of charging capacity limited by oxygen bubble coalescence. Fast removal of oxygen bubbles adhered to the charging electrode surface is of great importance for improving the charging performance of the battery. Here we show that the law of oxygen bubble growth can be achieved by means of phase-field simulation, revealing two phenomena of bubble detachment and bubble coalescence located in the charging electrode on both sides. Hydrodynamic electrolyte and partial insulation structure of the charging electrode are investigated to solve the problem of oxygen bubble coalescence during charging. Two types of rechargeable zinc-air battery are developed on the basis of different tri-electrode configurations, demonstrating that the charging performance of the battery with electrolyte flow (Ⅰ) is better than that of the battery with the partially insulated electrode (Ⅱ), while the battery Ⅱ is superior to the battery Ⅰ in the discharging performance, cost and portability. The proposed solutions and results would be available for promoting commercial application of rechargeable zinc-air batteries or other metal-air batteries.

  14. Photocatalytic Reactive Oxygen Species Formation by Semiconductor-Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles. Toward Light-Induced Modulation of Biological Processes.

    PubMed

    Waiskopf, Nir; Ben-Shahar, Yuval; Galchenko, Michael; Carmel, Inbal; Moshitzky, Gilli; Soreq, Hermona; Banin, Uri

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor-metal hybrid nanoparticles manifest efficient light-induced spatial charge separation at the semiconductor-metal interface, as demonstrated by their use for hydrogen generation via water splitting. Here, we pioneer a study of their functionality as efficient photocatalysts for the formation of reactive oxygen species. We observed enhanced photocatalytic activity forming hydrogen peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxyl radicals upon light excitation, which was significantly larger than that of the semiconductor nanocrystals, attributed to the charge separation and the catalytic function of the metal tip. We used this photocatalytic functionality for modulating the enzymatic activity of horseradish peroxidase as a model system, demonstrating the potential use of hybrid nanoparticles as active agents for controlling biological processes through illumination. The capability to produce reactive oxygen species by illumination on-demand enhances the available peroxidase-based tools for research and opens the path for studying biological processes at high spatiotemporal resolution, laying the foundation for developing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27224678

  15. Fast Oxidation Processes in a Naturally Reduced Aquifer Zone Caused by Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Jemison, N. E.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Bush, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is quite common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. The naturally reduced zones are heterogeneously dispersed in such aquifers and are characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon and reduced phases, including iron sulfides and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases that are found in association with these natural reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Three field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO wherein groundwater associated with naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in these field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Small concentrations of nitrate were also observed in the previously nitrate-free groundwater, and Fe(II) decreased to the detection limit. These results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS) rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table, and seasonal variations

  16. Human Factors Process Task Analysis: Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure at the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA). HF PFMEA includes the following 10 steps: Describe mission; Define System; Identify human-machine; List human actions; Identify potential errors; Identify factors that effect error; Determine likelihood of error; Determine potential effects of errors; Evaluate risk; Generate solutions (manage error). The presentation also describes how this analysis was applied to a liquid oxygen pump acceptance test.

  17. Development of a Novel Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with an Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-31

    BOC, the world's second largest industrial gas company, has developed a novel high temperature sorption based technology referred to as CAR (Cyclic Autothermal Recovery) for oxygen production and supply to oxy-fuel boilers with flue gas recycle. This technology is based on sorption and storage of oxygen in a fixed bed containing mixed ionic and electronic conductor materials. The objective of the proposed work was to construct a CAR PDU that was capable of producing 10-scfm of oxygen, using steam or recycled flue gas as the sweep gas, and install it in the Combustion Test Facility. The unit was designed and fabricated at BOC/The Linde Group, Murray Hill, New Jersey. The unit was then shipped to WRI where the site had been prepared for the unit by installation of air, carbon dioxide, natural gas, nitrogen, computer, electrical and infrastructure systems. Initial experiments with the PDU consisted of flowing air into both sides of the absorption systems and using the air heaters to ramp up the bed temperatures. The two beds were tested individually to operational temperatures up to 900 C in air. The cycling process was tested where gases are flowed alternatively from the top then bottom of the beds. The PDU unit behaved properly with respect to flow, pressure and heat during tests. The PDU was advanced to the point where oxygen production testing could begin and integration to the combustion test facility could occur.

  18. Process for spinning flame retardant elastomeric compositions. [fabricating synthetic fibers for high oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having halogen containing polyols incorporated into the polymer chain, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives were developed. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and manufactured articles as well as nonelastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, and nylons, for high oxygen environments.

  19. Investigation of the Process of Methane-Oxygen Combustion in Steam Under the Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Bogomolov, A. R.; Azikhanov, S. S.; Shevyrev, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the article presented results of combustion methane-oxygen mixtures in the slightly superheated water steam under the atmospheric pressure. It is shown that exist dependence of flow rate combustible mixture and steam ratio (Gg.s./Gs) on the composition of the reacting mixture at the outlet of combustion chamber. There is a trend of increasing CO2 concentration in the reacting mixture at the outlet of combustion chamber with increase of Gg.s./Gs.

  20. Maximizing biomass concentration in baker's yeast process by using a decoupled geometric controller for substrate and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Rathore, Anurag S; Gomes, James

    2015-11-01

    Biomass production by baker's yeast in a fed-batch reactor depends on the metabolic regime determined by the concentration of glucose and dissolved oxygen in the reactor. Achieving high biomass concentration in turn is dependent on the dynamic interaction between the glucose and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taking this into account, we present in this paper the implementation of a decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) for maximizing biomass in a fed-batch yeast process. The decoupling is based on the inversion of 2×2 input-output matrix resulting from global linearization. The DIOLC was implemented online using a platform created in LabVIEW employing a TCP/IP protocol via the reactor's built-in electronic system. An improvement in biomass yield by 23% was obtained compared to that using a PID controller. The results demonstrate superior capability of the DIOLC and that the cumulative effect of smoother control action contributes to biomass maximization. PMID:26233328

  1. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  2. Interfacial oxidative processes of carbon electrodes and liners at low oxygen potentials -- An experimental method

    SciTech Connect

    James, B.J.; Welch, B.J.; Hyland, M.M.; Mittag, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Oxidative reactions of carbon are frequently characterized by an ignition temperature determined, for example, by correlation with thermogravimetric analysis. However, the heterogeneous nature of the carbon materials used for cathodes and liners makes this method insensitive. Ignition in furnace liners is further complicated by selective oxidation. An experimental approach has been developed using a low thermal mass furnace in which samples may be heated in an atmosphere with controlled oxygen partial pressures, similar to those that might exist in the cathode cavity of a reduction cell. Product gases are continuously sampled by a mass spectrometer for sensitive detection of oxides; a coupled thermogravimetric apparatus is also used in order to perform a continuous total materials balance. Results show slow reaction occurs well before accepted ignition temperature, the rate displaying a time/temperature interdependence. Above a certain temperature the oxygen partial pressure becomes the limiting factor (e.g. 600 C for a graphite/ECA mix sample). This paper presents a description of the method and apparatus used, preliminary results and comparison with reported ignition temperatures.

  3. [The influence of low partial oxygen pressure on the biolodical process of mesenchymal stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Berezovskyĭ, V Ia; Plotnikova, L M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Litovka, I H

    2014-01-01

    The influence of low partial oxygen pressure (Po2) on the amino acid composition in culture medium of human mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) lines 4BL has been studied. At 23 mm Hg (3% oxygen), a significant decrease (by 31%) in the concentration of proline and hydroxyproline was registered. Under these conditions, the concentration of serine and aspartic acid decreased by 45% compared to the control. Maximum consumption of free amino acids from the culture medium required for the synthesis of collagen (proline and hydroxyproline by 42%, serine and aspartic acid by 62%) was observed at a gas-phase Po2 of 38 mm Hg (5% O2). At Po2 76 mm Hg (10% O2), a lack of amino acids proline and hydroxyproline was only 21%, while that of glutamine and alanine amounted 12% compared to the control. This intensity ratio of consumption of amino acids may indicate that the maximum of MSC vital functions occurs at Po2 38 mm Hg. PMID:25095672

  4. Primary electron transfer processes in photosynthetic reaction centers from oxygenic organisms.

    PubMed

    Mamedov, Mahir; Govindjee; Nadtochenko, Victor; Semenov, Alexey

    2015-08-01

    This minireview is written in honor of Vladimir A. Shuvalov, a pioneer in the area of primary photochemistry of both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosyntheses (See a News Report: Allakhverdiev et al. 2014). In the present paper, we describe the current state of the formation of the primary and secondary ion-radical pairs within photosystems (PS) II and I in oxygenic organisms. Spectral-kinetic studies of primary events in PS II and PS I, upon excitation by ~20 fs laser pulses, are now available and reviewed here; for PS II, excitation was centered at 710 nm, and for PS I, it was at 720 nm. In PS I, conditions were chosen to maximally increase the relative contribution of the direct excitation of the reaction center (RC) in order to separate the kinetics of the primary steps of charge separation in the RC from that of the excitation energy transfer in the antenna. Our results suggest that the sequence of the primary electron transfer reactions is P680 → ChlD1 → PheD1 → QA (PS II) and P700 → A 0A/A 0B → A 1A/A 1B (PS I). However, alternate routes of charge separation in PS II, under different excitation conditions, are not ruled out. PMID:25648636

  5. Synthesis, processing and characterization of calcia-stabilized zirconia solid electrolytes for oxygen sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Minghua . E-mail: mzhou@nrcan.gc.ca; Ahmad, Aftab

    2006-04-13

    Precursor powders of calcia-stabilized zirconia (CSZ) solid electrolytes have been synthesized by a sol-gel method. The phase evolution of the precursor powders after thermal treatments at different temperatures were analysized by X-ray diffraction technique. Disc-shaped sensor elements were fabricated via uniaxial pressing of the calcined powders and subsequently sintered at 1650 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the microstructure of the sintered pellets. Platinum electrodes were applied to the sintered elements to produce potentiometric/electrochemical gas sensors. The electrical response of the gas sensors to oxygen and the complex impedance of the sensors in air were measured at various temperatures. Impedance analyses indicate that the sensor cell with 15 mol% CaO has much lower resistance (the sum of bulk and grain-boundary resistance) than the sensor cell with 22 mol% CaO. This is also reflected by the EMF responses of both sensor cells to various oxygen concentrations in the testing gas. The EMF deviation from the theoretical value of the CSZ sensor cell with 22 mol% CaO was larger than that of the CSZ sensor cell with 15 mol% CaO. The corrrelations between material compositions, microstructures of the sintered pellets and the electrical properties of the sensors are discussed.

  6. Origin of electrical improvement of amorphous TaInZnO TFT by oxygen thermo-pressure-induced process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Ahn, Byung; Rim, You Seung; Kim, Hyun Jae; Lim, Jun Hyung; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Park, Jin-Seong

    2014-03-01

    Novel amorphous oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (AOS-TFTs) have already stepped up as an alternative solution for application in mass-produced active matrix organic light-emitting diodes, as well as flexible and transparent electronics. However, the factors related to the device properties (mobility (μsat) and stability (ΔVth)) are still unclear. Since most factors are strongly related to oxygen elements, the versatile thermo-pressure-induced process (TPP) has been applied to improve novel TaInZnO TFT performances with regard to mobility and stability by controlling the oxygen pressure, resulting in the optimum values (improving μsat by 50% and ΔVth by 30%). It is found that the TPP may suppress the occupied trap states as well as increase the unoccupied trapping states in tantalum indium zinc oxide subgap states, depending on the oxygen pressure in TPP. In addition, the origin of the improvement is unveiled with x-ray photoemission and x-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XAS). The TPP in AOS-TFTs can effectively improve and be used to manipulate device properties such as mobility and stability easily. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and XAS as a defect state analyser may also provide understanding of the origins of device instability as well as evolutionary electrical improvement in AOS-TFTs.

  7. Investigations on the mechanism of oxygen-dependent plant processes: ethylene biosynthesis and cyanide-resistant respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Stegink, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Two oxygen-dependent plant processes were investigated. A cell-free preparation from pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska) was used to study ethylene biosynthesis from 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was investigated in studies with /sup 14/C-butyl gallate and other respiratory effectors. Ethylene biosynthesis was not due to a specific enzyme, or oxygen radicals. Rather, hydrogen peroxide, generated at low levels, coupled with endogenous manganese produced ethylene. /sup 14/C-butyl gallate bound specifically to mitochondria from cyanide-sensitive and -resistant higher plants and Neurospora crassa mitochondria. The amount of gallate bound was similar for all higher plant mitochondria. Rat liver mitochondria bound very little /sup 14/C-butyl gallate. Plant mitochondria in which cyanide-resistance was induced bound as much /sup 14/C-butyl gallate as before induction. However mitochondria from recently harvested white potato tubers did not bind the gallate. The observations suggest that an engaging factor couples with a gallate binding site in the mitochondrial membrane. With skunk cabbage spadix mitochondria the I/sub 5//sup 0/ for antimycin A inhibition of oxygen uptake was decreased by salicylhydroxamic acid pretreatment; this was also true for reverse order additions. No shift was observed with mung bean hypocotyl or Jerusalem artichoke tuber mitochondria.

  8. Multiple stable oxygen isotopic studies of atmospheric sulfate: A new quantitative way to understand sulfate formation processes in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles Chi-Woo

    2000-11-01

    Sulfate is an important trace species in the Earth's atmosphere because of its roles in numerous atmospheric processes. In addition to its inherent light-scattering properties, sulfate can serve as cloud condensation nucleus (CCN), affecting cloud formation as well as microphysical properties of clouds. Consequently, atmospheric sulfate species influence the global radiative energy balance. Sulfate is known to increase acidity of rainwater with negative consequences in both natural and urban environments. In addition, aerosol sulfate (<=2.5 μm) is respirable and poses a threat to human health as a potential carrier of toxic pollutants through the respiratory tract. Despite intense investigative effort, uncertainty regarding the relative significance of gas and aqueous phase oxidation pathways still remains. Acquisition of such information is important because the lifetime and transport of S(IV) species and sulfate aerosols are influenced by the oxidative pathways. In addition, sulfate formation processes affect the aerosol size distribution, which ultimately influences radiative properties of atmospheric aerosols. Therefore, the budgetary information of the sulfur cycle, as well as the radiative effects of sulfate on global climate variation, can be attained from better quantitative understanding of in situ sulfate formation processes in the atmosphere. Multiple stable oxygen isotopic studies of atmospheric sulfate are presented as a new tool to better comprehend the atmospheric sulfate formation processes. Coupled with isotopic studies, 35S radioactivity measurements have been utilized to assess contribution of sulfate from high altitude air masses. Atmospheric sulfate (aerosols and rainwater) samples have been collected from diverse environments. Laboratory experiments of gas and aqueous phase S(IV) oxidation by various oxidants, as well as biomass burning experiments, have also been conducted. The main isotopic results from these studies are as follows: (1

  9. Solution-processed PEDOT:PSS/graphene composites as the electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Yuan, Wenjing; Yao, Bowen; Li, Chun; Shi, Gaoquan

    2014-03-12

    Composites of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been prepared by solution mixing and applied as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) after treatment with concentrated H2SO4. The blending of rGO induces the conformational change of PEDOT chains from benzoid to quionoid structure and charge transfer from rGO to PEDOT. H2SO4 post-treatment can remove part of insulating PSS from the surface of the PEDOT:PSS/rGO composite film, resulting in a significant conductivity enhancement of the composite. This synergistic effect makes the H2SO4-treated PEDOT:PSS/rGO composite a promising catalyst for ORR. It exhibits enhanced electrocatalytic activity, better tolerance to a methanol crossover effect and CO poisoning, and longer durability than those of the platinum/carbon catalyst. PMID:24456474

  10. Combination air-blown and oxygen-blown underground coal gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, R.; Arri, L.E.; Gash, W.

    1987-05-05

    A method is described of underground coal gasification in a coal seam between linked injection and production wells comprising igniting coal located between the wells, injecting steam and oxygen into the coal seam through the injection well to maintain combustion between the wells thereby producing a medium-Btu gas. The Btu content of the gas is gradually decreased, switching to air injection into the coal seam through the injection well when the Btu content has reached a predetermined point thereby continuing combustion with the production of a low-Btu content gas suitable for consumption at facilities located on the surface in the vicinity of the seam for the production of utilities required at the seam.

  11. Modular continuous wavelet processing of biosignals: extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video signal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A novel method of extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video-based biosignal is described. The method comprises a novel modular continuous wavelet transform approach which includes: performing the transform, undertaking running wavelet archetyping to enhance the pulse information, extraction of the pulse ridge time–frequency information [and thus a heart rate (HRvid) signal], creation of a wavelet ratio surface, projection of the pulse ridge onto the ratio surface to determine the ratio of ratios from which a saturation trending signal is derived, and calibrating this signal to provide an absolute saturation signal (SvidO2). The method is illustrated through its application to a video photoplethysmogram acquired during a porcine model of acute desaturation. The modular continuous wavelet transform-based approach is advocated by the author as a powerful methodology to deal with noisy, non-stationary biosignals in general. PMID:27382479

  12. Oxygen and Metals Processing on the Moon: Will Materials Science Change Our Future in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an In-Situ Resource Utilization infrastructure on the lunar surface, the production of oxygen and metals by various technologies is under development within NASA projects. Such an effort reflects the ambition to change paradigms in space exploration to enable human presence for the long-term. Sustaining such presence involves the acceptance of a new concept in space activities; crews must be able to generate some of their consumables from local resources. The balance between accepting early development risks and reducing long-term mission risks is at the core of the technology development approach. We will present an overview of the technologies involved and present their possible impact on the future of human expansion in the solar system.

  13. Modular continuous wavelet processing of biosignals: extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video signal.

    PubMed

    Addison, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    A novel method of extracting heart rate and oxygen saturation from a video-based biosignal is described. The method comprises a novel modular continuous wavelet transform approach which includes: performing the transform, undertaking running wavelet archetyping to enhance the pulse information, extraction of the pulse ridge time-frequency information [and thus a heart rate (HRvid) signal], creation of a wavelet ratio surface, projection of the pulse ridge onto the ratio surface to determine the ratio of ratios from which a saturation trending signal is derived, and calibrating this signal to provide an absolute saturation signal (SvidO2). The method is illustrated through its application to a video photoplethysmogram acquired during a porcine model of acute desaturation. The modular continuous wavelet transform-based approach is advocated by the author as a powerful methodology to deal with noisy, non-stationary biosignals in general. PMID:27382479

  14. Oxygen at Nanomolar Levels Reversibly Suppresses Process Rates and Gene Expression in Anammox and Denitrification in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Northern Chile

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Frank J.; Thamdrup, Bo; De Brabandere, Loreto; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Don E.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O2 and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N2-producing processes of anammox and denitrification determine where this loss occurs. We studied experimentally how O2 at nanomolar levels affects anammox and denitrification rates and the transcription of nitrogen cycle genes in the anoxic OMZ off Chile. Rates of anammox and denitrification were reversibly suppressed, most likely at the enzyme level. Fifty percent inhibition of N2 and N2O production by denitrification was achieved at 205 and 297 nM O2, respectively, whereas anammox was 50% inhibited at 886 nM O2. Coupled metatranscriptomic analysis revealed that transcripts encoding nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), nitrite reductase (nirS), and nitric oxide reductase (norB) decreased in relative abundance above 200 nM O2. This O2 concentration did not suppress the transcription of other dissimilatory nitrogen cycle genes, including nitrate reductase (narG), hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo), and nitrite reductase (nirK). However, taxonomic characterization of transcripts suggested inhibition of narG transcription in gammaproteobacteria, whereas the transcription of anammox narG, whose gene product is likely used to oxidatively replenish electrons for carbon fixation, was not inhibited. The taxonomic composition of transcripts differed among denitrification enzymes, suggesting that distinct groups of microorganisms mediate different steps of denitrification. Sulfide addition (1 µM) did not affect anammox or O2 inhibition kinetics but strongly stimulated N2O production by denitrification. These results identify new O2 thresholds for delimiting marine nitrogen loss and highlight the utility of integrating biogeochemical and metatranscriptomic analyses. PMID:25352619

  15. Oxygen extraction from lunar materials - An experimental test of an ilmenite reduction process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction of ilmenite with hydrogen to produce water has been studied experimentally in order to evaluate the effectiveness of using a cold trap to improve yields in a continuous flow process. Yields were enhanced, but not to the degree observed in batch processing systems. The terrestrial simulant used in these studies contained traces of iron sulfide, which released H2S during processing with a deleterious effect on several components of the test system. More sophisticated testing should be undertaken to obtain kinetic data and attention given to the removal of sulfides in the pre-process beneficiation.

  16. Processes controlling dissolved oxygen and pH in the upper Willamette River basin, Oregon, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pogue, Ted R., Jr.; Anderson, Chauncey W.

    1995-01-01

    In July and August of 1994, the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) collected data to document the spatial extent and diel variability of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH levels in selected reaches of streams in the upper Willamette River Basin. These data were also collected to identify primary factors that control DO concentrations downstream from major point sources as well as to provide ODEQ with data to refine calibration of their steady-state DO and nutrient models for the upper Willamette River Basin. All of the reaches studied had diel variations in DO and pH. The magnitude of the diel variations in DO ranged from 0.2 to 3.9 milligrams per liter (7 to 50 percent-saturation units based on ambient water temperature and barometric pressure) and in pH from 0.3 to 1.4 units. However, of the reaches studied, only the Coast Fork Willamette River from river mile (RM) 21.7 to 12.5 and the Willamette River from RM 151 to 141.6 had field measured violations of State standards for DO and pH. DO concentration and pH in water depend on many factors. Data were collected to examine several major factors, including BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), carbonaceous BOD, nitrogenous BOD, and measures of photosynthetic activity. Of the four study reaches, only a short stretch of the Coast Fork Willamette River has potential for important levels of oxygen consumption from BOD or nitrification. Additionally, water-column primary-productivity measurements indicated that respiration and photosynthesis by free-floating algae did not explain the observed diel variations in DO in the study reaches. Results from a simple mathematical model incorporating measures of community respiration and net primary productivities indicated that periphyton are capable of producing a diel variation of the order of magnitude observed during the August study period. In the Willamette River near Peoria, the combined periphyton DO

  17. A Novel Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Sensor System for In-Situ Measurement and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Frank Uwe; Messerschmid, Ernst; Rogg, Markus

    2010-10-01

    In 1993 the oxygen partial pressure was firstly measured inside a plasma wind tunnel using conventional λ-probes. Since then, a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained in using these sensors in ground test facilities and space. However, these commercially available sensors were too large in scale and weight. Consequently, a new development of solid electrolyte sensors called FIPEX more feasible for space was initiated. Due to space driven benefits, interest arose to use FIPEX technique in terrestrial applications e.g. to monitor sputter plants for float glass coating. Therefore, the VacuSen® sensor was developed. The characterization of VacuSen® at nominal sensor temperature TS = 680° C resulted in a sensor current according to IS = bṡpO20ṡ8±0ṡ05 I[μA] in the operation range between ptot = 1ṡ10-3 to 5 Pa. From pulse width modulation (PWM) temperature control, additional information allows to measure ptot according to ptot = aṡRPWM0ṡ107±0ṡ005 thus enlarging the operation range to ptot = 1ṡ10-3 to 1ṡ105Pa. A one point calibration routine with air, ideally at ptot = 5 Pa in order to determine both calibration parameters a and b simultaneously, is proposed.

  18. Sliding mode control of dissolved oxygen in an integrated nitrogen removal process in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, C; Young, H; Antileo, C; Bornhardt, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a sliding mode controller (SMC) for dissolved oxygen (DO) in an integrated nitrogen removal process carried out in a suspended biomass sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The SMC performance was compared against an auto-tuning PI controller with parameters adjusted at the beginning of the batch cycle. A method for cancelling the slow DO sensor dynamics was implemented by using a first order model of the sensor. Tests in a lab-scale reactor showed that the SMC offers a better disturbance rejection capability than the auto-tuning PI controller, furthermore providing reasonable performance in a wide range of operation. Thus, SMC becomes an effective robust nonlinear tool to the DO control in this process, being also simple from a computational point of view, allowing its implementation in devices such as industrial programmable logic controllers (PLCs). PMID:19923760

  19. A Novel Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Sensor System for In-Situ Measurement and Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, Frank Uwe; Messerschmid, Ernst; Rogg, Markus

    2010-10-13

    In 1993 the oxygen partial pressure was firstly measured inside a plasma wind tunnel using conventional {lambda}-probes. Since then, a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained in using these sensors in ground test facilities and space. However, these commercially available sensors were too large in scale and weight. Consequently, a new development of solid electrolyte sensors called FIPEX more feasible for space was initiated. Due to space driven benefits, interest arose to use FIPEX technique in terrestrial applications e.g. to monitor sputter plants for float glass coating. Therefore, the VacuSen registered sensor was developed. The characterization of VacuSen registered at nominal sensor temperature T{sub S} = 680 deg. C resulted in a sensor current according to I{sub S} = b{center_dot}p{sub O2}{sup 0{center_dot}8{+-}0{center_dot}05} I[{mu}A] in the operation range between p{sub tot} = 1{center_dot}10{sup -3} to 5 Pa. From pulse width modulation (PWM) temperature control, additional information allows to measure ptot according to p{sub tot} = a{center_dot}RPWM{sup 0{center_dot}107{+-}0{center_dot}005} thus enlarging the operation range to p{sub tot} = 1{center_dot}10{sup -3} to 1{center_dot}10{sup 5} Pa. A one point calibration routine with air, ideally at p{sub tot} = 5 Pa in order to determine both calibration parameters a and b simultaneously, is proposed.

  20. High-strength wastewater treatment in a pure oxygen thermophilic process: 11-year operation and monitoring of different plant configurations.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, M C; Bertanza, G; Sordi, M; Pedrazzani, R

    2015-01-01

    This research was carried out on a full-scale pure oxygen thermophilic plant, operated and monitored throughout a period of 11 years. The plant treats 60,000 t y⁻¹ (year 2013) of high-strength industrial wastewaters deriving mainly from pharmaceuticals and detergents production and landfill leachate. Three different plant configurations were consecutively adopted: (1) biological reactor + final clarifier and sludge recirculation (2002-2005); (2) biological reactor + ultrafiltration: membrane biological reactor (MBR) (2006); and (3) MBR + nanofiltration (since 2007). Progressive plant upgrading yielded a performance improvement chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was enhanced by 17% and 12% after the first and second plant modification, respectively. Moreover, COD abatement efficiency exhibited a greater stability, notwithstanding high variability of the influent load. In addition, the following relevant outcomes appeared from the plant monitoring (present configuration): up to 96% removal of nitrate and nitrite, due to denitrification; low-specific biomass production (0.092 kgVSS kgCODremoved⁻¹), and biological treatability of residual COD under mesophilic conditions (BOD5/COD ratio = 0.25-0.50), thus showing the complementarity of the two biological processes. PMID:25746652

  1. Cold plasma processing of local planetary ores for oxygen and metallurgically important metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, D. C.; Bullard, D.; Ortega, R.

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of a cold or nonequilibrium plasma in chlorination processing is discussed. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was successfully chlorinated at temperatures between 700 and 900 C without the aid of carbon. In addition to these initial experiments, a technique was developed for determining the temperature of a specimen in a plasma. Development of that technique has required evaluating the emissivity of TiO2, ZrO2, and FeOTiO2 and analyzing the specimen temperature in a plasma as a function of both power absorbed by the plasma and the pressure of the plasma. The mass spectrometer was also calibrated with TiCl4 and CCl4 vapor.

  2. Role of DDL processes during electrolytic reduction of Cu(II) in a low oxygen environment.

    PubMed

    Brosky, Rebekah T; Pamukcu, Sibel

    2013-11-15

    Heavy metals typically accumulate in reduced bottom sediments after being discharged into waterways by industrial and municipal processes. A laboratory experiment was conducted in order to determine if abundance of clay in the bottom sediments of a Cu-contaminated aqueous ecosystem could enhance electrolytic reduction of the heavy metal. Cu(NO3)2 · 2.5H2O was added to simulate a moderately contaminated system with 650 μg Cu/ml kaolinite clay-water slurry. A constant electrical potential of 1.0 V/cm was applied across platinum wire electrodes inserted into the continuously stirred system for four days while the system ORP(2) was monitored and periodic sub-samples were taken for analysis. The electrical as well as the chemical results indicate that the quantity of Cu(II) being reduced to Cu(I), especially within the aqueous phase, is increased within the first 48 h of experimentation by the presence of kaolinite clay up to 0.05 mg clay/l slurry. PMID:24145069

  3. Deuterium and oxygen 18 in precipitation: Isotropic model, including mixed cloud processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciais, P.; Jouzel, J.

    1994-08-01

    Modeling the isotropic ratios of precipitation in cold regions meets the problem of `switching` from the vapor-liquid transition to the vapor-ice transition at the oneset of snow formation. The one-dimensional model (mixed cloud isotopic model (MCIM)) described in this paper focuses on the fractionation of water isotopes in mixed clouds, where both liquid droplets and ice crystals can coexist for a given range of temperatures. This feature is linked to the existence of specific saturation conditions within the cloud, allowing droplets to evaporate while the water vapor condensates onto ice crystals. The isotopic composition of the different airborne phases and the precipitation is calculated throughout the condensation history of an isolated air mass moving over the Antarctic ice sheet. The results of the MCIM are compared to surface snow data both for the isotopic ratios and the deuterium excesses. The sensitivity of the model is compared to previous one-dimensional models. Our main result is that accounting specifically for the microphysics of mixed stratiform clouds (Bergeron-Findesein process) does not invalidate the results of earlier modeling studies.

  4. Negative oxygen ion formation in reactive magnetron sputtering processes for transparent conductive oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Thomas; Ellmer, Klaus

    2012-11-15

    Reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering in Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixtures has been investigated with energy-resolved mass spectrometry. Different metal targets (Mg, Ti, Zn, In, InSn, and Sn), which are of importance for transparent conductive oxide thin film deposition, have been used to study the formation of negative ions, mainly high-energetic O{sup -}, which are supposed to induce radiation damage in thin films. Besides their energy distribution, the ions have been particularly investigated with respect to their intensity in comparison of the different target materials. To realize the comparability, various calibration factors had to be introduced. After their application, major differences in the negative ion production have been observed for the target materials. The intensity, especially of O{sup -}, differs by about two orders of magnitude. It is shown that this difference results almost exclusively from ions that gain their energy in the target sheath. Those may gain additional energy from the sputtering process or reflection at the target. Low-energetic negative ions are, however, less affected by changes of the target material. The results concerning O{sup -} formation are discussed in term of the sputtering rate from the target and are compared to models for negative ion formation.

  5. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  6. Processes controlling forms of phosphorus in surficial sediments from the eastern Arabian Sea impinged by varying bottom water oxygenation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, C. Prakash; Nath, B. Nagender

    2005-07-01

    The surficial sediments from the upper continental slope of the eastern Arabian Sea, impinged by the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, 150-1200 m water depth), show varying concentrations of the biogenic element phosphorus (P, 0.1-0.2%) in the northern and southern areas even though total organic carbon concentrations are relatively constant (TOC, 2-5%; Prakash Babu et al., 1999). To understand this discordance, 17 surface sediment samples from shelf, slope and deep sea of the eastern Arabian Sea were investigated using a five-step sequential extraction scheme to delineate the process responsible for P enrichment in OMZ. High fractions of organic phosphorus (P org 10-26%), biogenic phosphorus (P bio 36-48%), relatively low molar C org/P org ratios (322-447), and C org/P reactive ratios close to Redfield Ratio in OMZ sediments of the SE Arabian Sea suggest accumulation under high surface production and low residence time of labile forms of P due to high sedimentation rates. Despite higher productivity in surface waters, low fractions of P org (8-13%; less than deep-sea sediments of the study area 12-13%), P bio (25-33%), relatively high molar C org/P org ratios (341-508), and C org/P reactive ratios less than Redfield Ratio in OMZ sediments from the NE Arabian Sea may indicate a higher degree of regeneration and diagenetic transformation of labile forms of P to other phases. Authigenic phosphorus (P aut) fraction varies by a factor of 2-8 in sediments from the OMZ when compared to well-oxygenated deep-sea sediments of the study area. While the P total remains constant, significant P transformation seems to occur in NE Arabian Sea, which is suggested by high P aut fraction (˜50%) compared to low P aut fraction (10-39%) in the SE Arabian Sea sediments. Supply rates of phosphorus, variable rates of P dissolution under varying dissolved oxygen contents in the bottom waters, and early diagenetic transformation of P within the sediments seem to influence P geochemistry in

  7. The effect of gold nanoparticles on exchange processes in collision complexes of triplet and singlet oxygen molecules with excited eosin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryukhanov, V. V.; Minaev, B. M.; Tsibul'nikova, A. V.; Slezhkin, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied exchange processes in contact complexes of triplet eosin molecules with oxygen molecules in the triplet (3Σ{/g -}) and singlet (1Δ g ) states in thin polyvinylbutyral films in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Upon resonant excitation of surface plasmons in gold nanoparticles into the absorption band of eosin molecules-singlet oxygen sensitizers-we have obtained an increase in the intensity of the delayed fluorescence and an increase in the lifetime of the dye with simultaneous quenching of the luminescence of singlet oxygen. The kinetics of the delayed fluorescence of the dye as a result of singlet-triplet annihilation of triplet eosin molecules with singlet oxygen molecules has been investigated. To compare theoretical and experimental data, we have numerically simulated energy transfer processes. Rate constants of energy transfer and of singlet-triplet annihilation, as well as quenching constants of triplet states of the dye by molecular oxygen, have been calculated. Luminescence quantum yield 1Δ g of polyvinylbutyral has been estimated. We have analyzed quantum-chemically electronic mechanisms of singlet-triplet annihilation of oxygen and eosin.

  8. Effects of halogen doping on nanocarbon catalysts synthesized by a solution plasma process for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Wada, Yuta; Chiba, Satoshi; Kumagai, Sou; Lee, Hoonseung; Serizawa, Ai; Li, Oi Lun; Panomsuwan, Gasidit

    2016-08-01

    Halogen-doped carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were synthesized by a simple one-step solution plasma process at room temperature using a mixture of benzene (C6H6) and organics containing halogen atoms as the precursors (i.e., hexafluorobenzene (C6F6), hexachlorobenzene (C6Cl6), and hexabromobenzene (C6Br6)). The experimental results demonstrated that halogen doping, especially F and Cl, could lead to more efficient removal of residual hydrogen compared to carbon synthesized with pure benzene. This phenomenon was related to the different binding energies between hydrogen and halogens to form hydrogen halides. Their crystallinity and morphology did not change and remained the same as non-doped carbon. The electrochemical evaluation of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in an alkaline solution revealed that halogen doping did not play a significant role in shifting the onset potential for the ORR, while a slight enhancement in diffusion limited current density was observed at high overpotentials. Moreover, the electron transfer number involved in the ORR process determined from the Koutecky-Levich plot at -0.6 V was found to increase for halogen-doped carbons in the following order: F-CNPs > Br-CNPs > Cl-CNPs > CNPs. The improved ORR performance of F-CNPs could reasonably be attributed to the synergistic effects of specific bonding states between the halogen and carbon, structural defects and surface functional groups. Our results confirmed the validity of using halogen doping to improve the ORR catalytic activity of CNPs. PMID:27435811

  9. Phase mapping of aging process in InN nanostructures: oxygen incorporation and the role of the zinc blende phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, D.; Lozano, J. G.; Herrera, M.; Morales, F. M.; Ruffenach, S.; Briot, O.; García, R.

    2010-05-01

    Uncapped InN nanostructures undergo a deleterious natural aging process at ambient conditions by oxygen incorporation. The phases involved in this process and their localization is mapped by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-related techniques. The parent wurtzite InN (InN-w) phase disappears from the surface and gradually forms a highly textured cubic layer that completely wraps up a InN-w nucleus which still remains from the original single-crystalline quantum dots. The good reticular relationships between the different crystals generate low misfit strains and explain the apparent easiness for phase transformations at room temperature and pressure conditions, but also disable the classical methods to identify phases and grains from TEM images. The application of the geometrical phase algorithm in order to form numerical moiré mappings and RGB multilayered image reconstructions allows us to discern among the different phases and grains formed inside these nanostructures. Samples aged for shorter times reveal the presence of metastable InN:O zinc blende (zb) volumes, which act as the intermediate phase between the initial InN-w and the most stable cubic In2O3 end phase. These cubic phases are highly twinned with a proportion of 50:50 between both orientations. We suggest that the existence of the intermediate InN:O-zb phase should be seriously considered to understand the reason for the widely scattered reported fundamental properties of thought to be InN-w, as its bandgap or superconductivity.

  10. Online biochemical oxygen demand monitoring for wastewater process control--full-scale studies at Los Angeles Glendale wastewater plant, California.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, Reza; Zermeno, Miguel

    2008-04-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to determine whether or not it would be feasible to use the measured values of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) of wastewater obtained by an online instrument at the Los Angeles/Glendale Water Reclamation Plant (California) for controlling its activated sludge process. This investigation is part of a project to develop online BOD monitoring for process control in the City of Los Angeles wastewater treatment plants. Tests studied the Siepmann und Teutscher GmbH (ISCO-STIP Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska) BIOX-1010, which uses a bioreactor containing a culture of microbes from the wastewater to measure soluble BOD in 2 minutes. This rapid approximation to the operation of secondary treatment allows anticipation of system response. Calibration measurements allow the operators to find a conversion factor for the instrument's microprocessor to compute values of BOD that agree well with the standard 5-day BOD (BOD5) measurement, despite the differences in the details of the two testing methods. This instrument has recently been used at other wastewater treatment plants, at a number of airports in Europe and the United States to monitor runway runoff, and is also being used on waste streams at an increasing number of food processing plants. A comparison was made between the plant influent BOD values obtained by the BIOX-1010 online monitor from the end of August, 2000, to late January, 2001, and the individual and average values obtained for the same period using the standard BOD5, 20 degrees C test, to determine the effectiveness of the Biox-1010 to identify shock loads and their duration. Individual BOD estimates and averages over periods of overly high biological loads (shock loads) were compared, and the instrument readings were evaluated for their effectiveness in detecting shock loads. The results were highly satisfactory, so the instrument was used to trigger a shock-load warning alarm since late September, 2000. This allowed flow

  11. Processes for the "vital effect" of Porites corals as revealed by microanalysis of oxygen, carbon and boron isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, C.; Chaussidon, M.; France-Lanord, C.

    2003-04-01

    Since the discovery by Knutson et al. (1972) of annual banding in massive corals, they have intensively been used to provide paleoclimate reconstructions. The oxygen isotopic composition (18O) of coral aragonite skeletons is a function of sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) through the 18O of the seawater in which the carbonate precipitates and pH of the calcifying fluid. Carbon cycle in hermatypic corals is relatively complex because of the interaction between symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) and coral (Goreau, 19777). Coral 13C seems to be under influence of the ratio between algae photosynthesis and algae and coral respiration (Swart, 1983). The carbonate deposited by some foraminifera and scleractinian corals is depleted 13C and 18O relative to isotope equilibrium with ambient seawater. This deviation of the biogenic carbonate - water fractionation from the inorganic fractionation is called the "vital effect" (Urey et al., 1951). Different explanations for the vital effect are proposed: (1) McConnaughey (1989) attributes the coral disequilibria to kinetic effects. (2) Spero et al. (1997) and Zeebe (1999) consider that the carbonate depletion in 18O is due to [CO32-] or pH variations. The carbon isotopic disequilibrium would be due, in this case, to 13C depleted metabolic DIC incorporation coming from the respiration. The micrometer scale analysis by ion microprobe of B, C and O isotopic compositions can allow to better understand responsible process(es) of the vital effect and the existence of a great diversity in 18O - SST calibrations for differents colonies of the same species. These analyses show that 11B and 18O of coral skeleton have a great variability at micrometer scale (10 and 12 , respectively), whereas 13C have no so important variations and that all the values are in the range of 13C measured by "classical" method (acid digestion and mass spectrometry). Thus the in

  12. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO2 thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-01

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and capacitance-frequency (C-f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO2 thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C-V anomalous) is observed in the C-V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C-V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO2 interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60-0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti3+ ions. Both the C-V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO2 arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  13. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  14. Role of oxygen vacancies on the bias illumination stress stability of solution-processed zinc tin oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li-Chih; Chen, Jen-Sue E-mail: jsjeng@mail.nutn.edu.tw; Jeng, Jiann-Shing E-mail: jsjeng@mail.nutn.edu.tw

    2014-07-14

    Solution-processed ultra-thin (∼3 nm) zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) with a mobility of 8 cm{sup 2}/Vs are obtained with post spin-coating annealing at only 350 °C. The effect of light illumination (at wavelengths of 405 nm or 532 nm) on the stability of TFT transfer characteristics under various gate bias stress conditions (zero, positive, and negative) is investigated. It is found that the ΔV{sub th} (V{sub th}{sup stress} {sup 3400} {sup s − stress} {sup 0} {sup s}) window is significantly positive when ZTO TFTs are under positive bias stress (PBS, ΔV{sub th} = 9.98 V) and positive bias illumination stress (λ = 405 nm and ΔV{sub th} = 6.96 V), but ΔV{sub th} is slightly negative under only light illumination stress (λ = 405 nm and ΔV{sub th} = −2.02 V) or negative bias stress (ΔV{sub th} = −2.27 V). However, the ΔV{sub th} of ZTO TFT under negative bias illumination stress is substantial, and it will efficiently recover the ΔV{sub th} caused by PBS. The result is attributed to the photo-ionization and subsequent transition of electronic states of oxygen vacancies (i.e., V{sub o}, V{sub o}{sup +}, and V{sub o}{sup ++}) in ZTO. A detailed mechanism is discussed to better understand the bias stress stability of solution processed ZTO TFTs.

  15. Regulatory Effect of Low-Intensity Optical Radiation on Oxygenation of Blood Irradiated In Vivo and Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    For three series of blood samples, we have studied the effect of therapeutic doses of low-intensity optical radiation (LOR) on oxygenation parameters of blood irradiated in vivo, and also on the levels of some metabolites: lactate, glucose, cholesterol. The quality of blood oxygenation was assessed using three parameters: the partial pressure of oxygen pVO2, the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin SVO2, and the oxygen level in arterial and venous blood, varying under the influence of low-intensity optical radiation due to photodissociation of hemoglobin/ligand complexes. We have established that during photohemotherapy (PHT), including extracorporeal, supravascular, and intravenous blood irradiation, positive changes occur in the oxygenation parameters and the metabolite levels, while after the courses of PHT have been completed, the individual changes in such parameters in individual patients were both positive and negative. The regulatory effect of PHT was apparent in the tendency toward a decrease in high initial values and an increase in low initial values both for the oxygenation parameters and for the metabolites; but at the doses recommended for use, PHT had a regulatory but still not a normalizing effect.

  16. Different hydrodynamic processes regulated on water quality (nutrients, dissolved oxygen, and phytoplankton biomass) in three contrasting waters of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Long, Aimin; Huang, Hui; Yue, Weizhong

    2014-03-01

    The subtropical Hong Kong (HK) waters are located at the eastern side of the Pearl River Estuary. Monthly changes of water quality, including nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a) were routinely investigated in 2003 by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in three contrasting waters of HK with different prevailing hydrodynamic processes. The western, eastern, and southern waters were mainly dominated by nutrient-replete Pearl River discharge, the nutrient-poor coastal/shelf oceanic waters, and mixtures of estuarine and coastal seawater and sewage effluent of Hong Kong, respectively. Acting in response, the water quality in these three contrasting areas showed apparently spatial–temporal variation pattern. Nutrients usually decreased along western waters to eastern waters. In the dry season, the water column was strongly mixed by monsoon winds and tidal currents, which resulted in relatively low Chl-a (<5 μg l(−1)) and high bottom DO (>4 mg l(−1)), suggesting that mixing enhanced the buffering capacity of eutrophication in HK waters. However, in the wet season, surface Chl-a was generally >10 μg l(−1) in southern waters in summer due to halocline and thermohaline stratification, adequate nutrients, and light availability. Although summer hypoxia (DO <2 mg l(−1)) was episodically observed near sewage effluent site and in southern waters induced by vertical stratification, the eutrophication impacts in HK waters were not as severe as expected owing to P limitation and short water residence time in the wet season. PMID:24122158

  17. [Startup, stable operation and process failure of EBPR system under the low temperature and low dissolved oxygen condition].

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Li, Lu; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Xue-Fen; Liu, Juan-Li

    2015-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was started up and operated with alternating anaerobic/oxic (An/O) to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) under the condition of 13-16 degrees C. The results showed that under the condition of low temperature, the EBPR system was successfully started up in a short time (<6 d). The reactor achieved a high and stable phosphorus removal performance with an influent phosphate concentration of 20 mg x L(-1) and the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 2 mg x L(-1). The effluent phosphate concentration was lower than 0.5 mg x L(-1). It was found that decreasing DO had an influence on the steady operation of EBPR system. As DO concentration of aerobic phase decreased from 2 mg x L(-1) to 1 mg x L(-1), the system could still perform EBPR and the phosphorus removal efficiency was greater than 97.4%. However, the amount of phosphate released during anaerobic phase was observed to decrease slightly compared with that of 2 mg x L(-1) DO condition. Moreover, the phosphorus removal performance of the system deteriorated immediately and the effluent phosphate concentration couldn't meet the national integrated wastewater discharge standard when DO concentration was further lowered to 0.5 mg x L(-1). The experiments of increasing DO to recover phosphorus removal performance of the EBPR suggested the process failure resulted from low DO was not reversible in the short-term. It was also found that the batch tests of anoxic phosphorus uptake using nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors had an impact on the stable operation of EBPR system, whereas the resulting negative influence could be recovered within 6 cycles. In addition, the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) of the EBPR system remained stable and the sludge volume index (SVI) decreased to a certain extend in a long run, implying long-term low temperature and low DO condition favored the sludge sedimentation. PMID:26031088

  18. Improvement of electric and magnetic properties of patterned magnetic tunnel junctions by recovery of damaged layer using oxygen showering post-treatment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J. H.; Endoh, T.

    2015-05-01

    In order to recover the patterning damage and improve the electric and magnetic properties of the patterned magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), the novel post-treatment process using oxygen ions has been studied. Generally, the oxygen is known as an unsuitable gas for the MTJs patterning because it causes degradation of the patterned MTJs by over-oxidation of MgO. By the way, if the damaged layer could be oxidized selectively without over-oxidation of the damage-less area, oxygen can be the most effective gas to recover the patterning damage of the MTJs. In this study, for the selective oxidation, we proposed the non-reactive oxygen treatment scheme called the oxygen showering post-treatment process (OSP) using an ozone diffusion chamber. By the specific OSP conditions, 8 l/min of the flow rate, 250 °C of the temperature, and 30 s of the time, the magneto-resistance (MR) was increased from 103% to 110%, and the switching current was decreased from 41.1 μA to 31.6 μA when compared with reference data at the same resistance level. These results show that the electric and magnetic properties of the patterned MTJs by the OSP treatment have been improved compared to the reference sample. The improvement in electric and magnetic properties by the OSP treatment is assumed because the reference sample already contains slight patterning damages at the edge of the MTJs despite the optimized patterning process, and these damages have been oxidized by the OSP treatment. Moreover, by the OSP treatment, the proportion of the electric short fail was dramatically decreased from 1.51% to 0%, which is a remarkable improvement in terms of a successful commercialization of spintronic devices.

  19. Rapid changes in diatom silica surface charge density, silanol abundance, and oxygen isotope values elucidate silica maturation processes in biogenic silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenheft, W.; Dodd, J. P.; Sunderlin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen isotope values of biogenic silica are increasingly used as proxies of paleoenvironmental conditions. Numerous studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the diatom silica and the temperature/oxygen isotope value of the formation water; however, some studies have indicated that early diagenesis of biogenic silica may alter the oxygen isotope values by several permil. Quantification of the maturation process has proven difficult since the mechanisms that drive post-mortem changes in the silica oxygen isotope values have not been well characterized. New silica maturation data from marine diatoms, Stephanopyxis turris, cultured in a controlled laboratory experiment demonstrate rapid post-mortem decline in silica reactivity. A decrease in relative abundance of surface silanol groups coincides with a decrease in the surface charge density (excess proton concentration) of freshly harvested frustules. Over a maturation period of 20 days at 85ºC, S. turris samples in a 0.7 M NaCl solution at a pH of 8.0 demonstrate a rapid decrease in the surface charge density from -380 μmoles/g to -16 μmoles/g (Figure 1). FTIR analyses reveal a decrease in the abundance of silanol groups (Si-OH) in the diatom frustules occurs over the same time period. It is important to note that the surface charge density and silanol relative abundance appear to have an asymptotic change through time, indicating that further alteration/reactivity is greatly reduced. Preliminary data indicate that post-mortem increases in the oxygen isotope values of diatom silica observed here and in other studies are coincident with a reduction in the surface charge density and silanol abundance. These experiments demonstrate that rapid post-mortem alteration of biogenic silica is occurring and provide a possible mechanism for alteration of oxygen isotope values in biogenic silica.

  20. A new high-velocity oxygen fuel process for making finely structured and highly bonded inconel alloy layers from liquid feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. Q.; Roth, J.; Gandy, D. W.; Frederick, G. J.

    2006-12-01

    High-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray processes are used in applications requiring the highest density and adhesion strength, which are not achievable in most other thermal spray processes. Similar to other thermal spray processes, however, a normal HVOF process is unable to apply fine powders less than 10 µm via a powder feeder. The advantages of using smaller and even nanosized particles in a HVOF process include uniform microstructure, higher cohesion and adhesion, full density, lower internal stress, and higher deposition efficiency. In this work, a new process has been developed for HVOF forming of fine-grained Inconel 625 alloy layers using a liquid feedstock containing small alloy particles. Process investigations have shown the benefits of making single and duplex layered coatings with full density and high bond strength, which are attributed to the very high kinetic energy of particles striking on the substrates and the better melting of the small particles.

  1. Oxygen Isotopic Signature of 4.4-3.9 Ga Zircons as a Monitor of Differentiation Processes on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report oxygen isotopic compositions for 14 zircon grains from a sample of sawdust from lunar breccia 14321. The zircons range in age from approx.4.4 to 3.9 Ga and in U and Th content from a few to several hundred ppm. As such these grains represent a range of possible source rocks, from granophyric to mafic composition, and cover the total age range of the major initial lunar bombardment. Nevertheless, results show that the oxygen isotopic compositions of the zircons fall within a narrow range of (delta18)O of about 1 per mil and have (delta18)O values indistinguishable from those observed for terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalts confirming the coincidence of lunar and Earth oxygen isotopic compositions. In the (delta17)O vs. (delta18)O, coordinates data form a tight group with a limited trend on the terrestrial fractionation line. The zircon oxygen isotopes show minimal evidence of the extreme and variable mineral differentiation and element fractionation that have contributed to the formation of their parent rocks.

  2. Method for operating a production well in an oxygen driven in-situ combustion oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.G.

    1986-07-08

    A method is described for recovering viscous oil from a subterranean, viscous oil-containing formation penetrated by at least one injection well and one production well and having fluid communication therebetween comprising: a. establishing an in-situ combustion operation in the formation by injecting substantially pure oxygen into the formation via the injection well and recovering fluids including oil and an effluent gas from the formation via the production well; b. continuously injecting nitrogen at a predetermined low injection rate into the lower portion of the production well; c. continuously analyzing the effluent gas for oxygen concentration and monitoring the bottomhole temperature of the production well; d. increasing the injection rate of the nitrogen gas to a maximum rate in the event the oxygen concentration of the effluent gas increases to a predetermined concentration or the bottomhole temperature increases to a predetermined temperature indicating a hazardous condition; and e. continuing injection of the nitrogen at a maximum rate until the oxygen concentration of the effluent gas and the bottomhole temperature are reduced to a safe level.

  3. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME VI. BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  4. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon: Moessbauer Spectroscopy as a Process Monitor for Oxygen Production. Results from a Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R.V.; Schroder, C.; Graff, T.G.; Sanders, G.B.; Lee, K.A.; Simon, T.M.; Larson, W.E.; Quinn, J.W.; Clark, L.D.; Caruso, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Essential consumables like oxygen must to be produced from materials on the lunar surface to enable a sustained, long-term presence of humans on the Moon. The Outpost Precursor for ISRU and Modular Architecture (OPTIMA) field test on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, facilitated by the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) of the University of Hawaii at Hilo, was designed to test the implementation of three hardware concepts to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith: Precursor ISRU Lunar Oxygen Testbed (PILOT) developed by Lockheed Martin in Littleton, CO; Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) developed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, FL; and ROxygen developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. The three concepts differ in design, but all rely on the same general principle: hydrogen reduction of metal cations (primarily Fe2+) bonded to oxygen to metal (e.g., Fe0) with the production of water. The hydrogen source is residual hydrogen in the fuel tanks of lunar landers. Electrolysis of the water produces oxygen and hydrogen (which is recycled). We used the miniaturized M ssbauer spectrometer MIMOS II to quantify the yield of this process on the basis of the quantity of Fe0 produced. Iron M ssbauer spectroscopy identifies iron-bearing phases, determines iron oxidation states, and quantifies the distribution of iron between mineral phases and oxidation states. The oxygen yield can be calculated by quantitative measurements of the distribution of Fe among oxidation states in the regolith before and after hydrogen reduction. A M ssbauer spectrometer can also be used as a prospecting tool to select the optimum feedstock for the oxygen production plants (e.g., high total Fe content and easily reduced phases). As a demonstration, a MIMOS II backscatter spectrometer (SPESI, Germany) was mounted on the Cratos rover (NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH), which is one of

  5. Processes of chemoionization in the course of inflammation of a methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current gliding surface discharge in a closed chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artem'ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kossyi, I. A.; Misakyan, M. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2015-05-01

    Results are presented from experiments on the inflammation of a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current multielectrode spark-gap in a closed cylindrical chamber. It is shown that, in both the preflame and well-developed flame stages, the gas medium is characterized by a high degree of ionization ( n e ≈ 1012 cm-3) due to chemoionization processes and a high electron-neutral collision frequency (ν e0 ≈ 1012 s-1).

  6. A study of alternative methods for reclaiming oxygen from carbon dioxide and water by a solid-electrolyte process for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Two alternative technical approaches were studied for application of an electrochemical process using a solid oxide electrolyte (zirconia stabilized by yttria or scandia) to oxygen reclamation from carbon dioxide and water, for spacecraft life support systems. Among the topics considered are the advisability of proceeding to engineering prototype development and fabrication of a full scale model for the system concept, the optimum choice of method or approach to be carried into prototype development, and the technical problem areas which exist.

  7. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel, Low-Cost Oxygen Supply Process and its Integration with Oxy-Fuel Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Krish Krishnamurthy; Divy Acharya; Frank Fitch

    2008-09-30

    In order to achieve DOE targets for carbon dioxide capture, it is crucial not only to develop process options that will generate and provide oxygen to the power cycle in a cost-effective manner compared to the conventional oxygen supply methods based on cryogenic air separation technology, but also to identify effective integration options for these new technologies into the power cycle with carbon dioxide capture. The Linde/BOC developed Ceramic Autothermal Recovery (CAR) process remains an interesting candidate to address both of these issues by the transfer of oxygen from the air to a recycled CO{sub 2} rich flue-gas stream in a cyclic process utilizing the high temperature sorption properties of perovskites. Good progress was made on this technology in this project, but significant challenges remain to be addressed before CAR oxygen production technology is ready for commercial exploitation. Phase 1 of the project was completed by the end of September 2008. The two-bed 0.7 tons/day O2 CAR process development unit (PDU) was installed adjacent to WRI's pilot scale coal combustion test facility (CTF). Start-up and operating sequences for the PDU were developed and cyclic operation of the CAR process demonstrated. Controlled low concentration methane addition allowed the beds to be heated up to operational temperature (800-900 C) and then held there during cyclic operation of the 2-bed CAR process, in this way overcoming unavoidable heat losses from the beds during steady state operation. The performance of the PDU was optimized as much as possible, but equipment limitations prevented the system from fully achieving its target performance. Design of the flue gas recirculation system to integrate CAR PDU with the CTF and the system was completed and integrated tests successfully performed at the end of the period. A detailed techno-economic analysis was made of the CAR process for supplying the oxygen in oxy-fuel combustion retrofit option using AEP's 450 MW

  8. Dependence of fracture toughness of molybdenum laser welds on processing parameters and in-situ oxygen gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, L.E.; Jellison, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Fracture toughness properties have been determined for laser welds in different grades of molybdenum. The fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum was consistently less than the fracture toughness of welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum. These differences cannot be attributed to oxygen content, since the oxygen level was nominally the same for all grades of molybdenum examined in this program. Alloy additions of titanium by means of physically deposited coatings significantly improved the fracture toughness of welds in sintered molybdenum, whereas titanium additions to welds in vacuum arc remelted molybdenum decreased the fracture toughness slightly. Pulsed laser welds exhibited fine columnar structures and, in the case of sintered molybdenum, superior fracture toughness when compared with continuous wave laser welds. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Final report on the project entitled: Highly Preheated Combustion Air System with/without Oxygen Enrichment for Metal Processing Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Arvind Atreya

    2007-02-16

    This work develops and demonstrates a laboratory-scale high temperature natural gas furnace that can operate with/without oxygen enrichment to significantly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. The laboratory-scale is 5ft in diameter & 8ft tall. This furnace was constructed and tested. This report demonstrates the efficiency and pollutant prevention capabilities of this test furnace. The project also developed optical detection technology to control the furnace output.

  10. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  11. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  12. Enhancing dissolved oxygen control using an on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    An on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system was developed to optimize dissolved oxygen concentration in a bench-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process. In order to improve the performance of the control system, a self-adapted fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm and adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were employed. The proposed control system permits the on-line implementation of every operating strategy of the experimental system. A set of experiments involving variable hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent pH (pH), dissolved oxygen in the aerobic reactor (DO), and mixed-liquid return ratio (r) was carried out. Using the proposed system, the amount of COD in the effluent stabilized at the set-point and below. The improvement was achieved with optimum dissolved oxygen concentration because the performance of the treatment process was optimized using operating rules implemented in real time. The system allows various expert operational approaches to be deployed with the goal of minimizing organic substances in the outlet while using the minimum amount of energy. PMID:24052227

  13. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  14. Characterization of refractory matters in dyeing wastewater during a full-scale Fenton process following pure-oxygen activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Bae, Wookeun; Won, Hosik; Hwang, Byungho; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Chung, Jinwook; Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae

    2015-04-28

    Refractory pollutants in raw and treated dyeing wastewaters were characterized using fractional molecular weight cut-off, Ultraviolet-vis spectrophotometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS). Significant organics and color compounds remained after biological (pure-oxygen activated sludge) and chemical (Fenton) treatments at a dyeing wastewater treatment plant (flow rate ∼100,000m(3)/d). HPLC-ESI/MS analysis revealed that some organic compounds disappeared after the biological treatment but reappeared after the chemical oxidation process, and some of that were originally absent in the raw dyeing wastewater was formed after the biological or chemical treatment. It appeared that the Fenton process merely impaired the color-imparting bonds in the dye materials instead of completely degrading them. Nevertheless, this process did significantly reduce the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD, 66%) and color (73%) remaining after initial biological treatment which reduced SCOD by 53% and color by 13% in raw wastewater. Biological treatment decreased the degradable compounds substantially, in such a way that the following Fenton process could effectively remove recalcitrant compounds, making the overall hybrid system more economical. In addition, ferric ion inherent to the Fenton reaction effectively coagulated particulate matters not removed via biological and chemical oxidation. PMID:25682369

  15. Electrical Characteristics of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor with High-κ/Metal Gate Using Oxygen Scavenging Process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junil; Kim, Jang Hyun; Kwon, Dae Woong; Park, Euyhwan; Park, Taehyung; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Byung-gook

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely accepted that the mismatch of lattice constants between HfO2 and Si generates interface traps at the HfO2-Si interface, which causes the degradation of device performances. For better interface quality, very thin SiO2 film (< 2 nm) has been inserted as an interlayer (IL) between HfO2 and Si despite of the increase of EOT. In order to obtain both the better interface quality and the reduction of EOT, we used Ti metal on HfO2/IL SiO2 stack as a scavenging layer to absorb oxygens in the SiO2 and various annealing conditions were applied to optimize the thickness of the SiO2. As a result, we can effectively shrink the EOT from 3.55 nm to 1.15 nm while maintaining the same physical thickness of gate stacks. Furthermore, the diffusion of oxygen was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass Spectrometry (SIMS). PMID:27483842

  16. Processes of chemoionization in the course of inflammation of a methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current gliding surface discharge in a closed chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Artem’ev, K. V.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kossyi, I. A. Misakyan, M. A.; Popov, N. A.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2015-05-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the inflammation of a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture by a high-current multielectrode spark-gap in a closed cylindrical chamber. It is shown that, in both the preflame and well-developed flame stages, the gas medium is characterized by a high degree of ionization (n{sub e} ≈ 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}) due to chemoionization processes and a high electron-neutral collision frequency (ν{sub e0} ≈ 10{sup 12} s{sup −1})

  17. Theoretical Investigation of the Process of Steam-Oxygen Gasification of Coke-Ash Particles in a Fluidized Bed Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhman, B. B.

    2015-03-01

    The problem on the evolution of the state of an ensemble of reacting coke-ash particles in a fluidized-bed gas generator is considered. A kinetic equation for the distribution function of particles within small ranges of carbon concentration variation for the stages of surface and bulk reaction has been constructed and integrated. Boundary conditions ("matching" conditions) at the boundaries between these ranges are formulated. The influence of the granulometric composition of the starting coal, height, porosity, and of the bed temperature on the process of steam-oxygen gasification of coke-ash particles of individual sorts of fuel and of a binary coal mixture has been investigated.

  18. [Cytotoxic action of active forms of oxygen and mechanisms of development of a chronic process in the liver in liver disease].

    PubMed

    Loginov, A S; Matiushin, B N

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with the damaging action of active oxygen forms (AOF) on the cell, which is associated with impairments of membranous structures and their functional properties. Based on the results of their own investigations, the authors forward a concept of the stereotypic pattern of changes in the enzyme mechanisms of AOF utilization in chronic hepatic diseases of viral etiology. It is suggested that impaired hepatocytic AOF formation and inactivation may be metabolic mechanisms mediating the status and development of a chronic process in the liver in its viral damage. Promising approaches to treating oxidative impairments are also discussed. PMID:9082318

  19. Interface exchange processes in LaAlO3/Sr TiO3 induced by oxygen vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Malte; Lechermann, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role of defects in oxide heterostructures is crucial for future materials control and functionalization. We hence study the impact of oxygen vacancies (OVs) at variable concentrations on orbital and spin exchange in the LaAlO3/Sr TiO3 interface by first-principles many-body theory and real-space model-Hamiltonian techniques. Intricate interplay between the Hubbard U and Hund's coupling JH for OV-induced correlated states is demonstrated. Orbital polarization towards an effective eg state with predominant local antiferromagnetic alignment on Ti sites near OVs is contrasted with t2 g(x y ) states with ferromagnetic tendencies in the defect-free regions. Different magnetic phases are identified, giving rise to distinct net-moment behavior at low and high OV concentrations. This provides a theoretical basis for prospective tailored magnetism by defect manipulation in oxide interfaces.

  20. Effect of dissolved oxygen on elemental sulfur generation in sulfide and nitrate removal process: characterization, pathway, and microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti

    2016-03-01

    Microaerobic bioreactor treatment for enriched sulfide and nitrate has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to improve the efficiencies of elemental sulfur (S(0)) generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction. However, there is little detailed information for the effect and mechanism of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the variations of microbial community in sulfur generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction systems. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was employed to evaluate the variations of microbial community structures in a sulfide oxidation and nitrate reduction reactor under different DO conditions (DO 0-0.7 mg · L(-1)). Experimental results revealed that the activity of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) could be greatly stimulated in 0.1-0.3 mg-DO · L(-1). However, when the DO concentration was further elevated to more than 0.5 mg · L(-1), the abundance of NRB was markedly decreased, while the heterotrophic microorganisms, especially carbon degradation species, were enriched. The reaction pathways for sulfide and nitrate removal under microaerobic conditions were also deduced by combining batch experiments with functional species analysis. It was likely that the oxidation of sulfide to sulfur could be performed by both aerobic heterotrophic SOB and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification bacteria with oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptor, respectively. The nitrate could be reduced to nitrite by both autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification, and then the generated nitrite could be completely converted to nitrogen gas via heterotrophic denitrification. This study provides new insights into the impacts of microaerobic conditions on the microbial community functional structures of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing, and sulfur-producing bioreactors, which revealing the potential linkage between functional microbial communities and

  1. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  2. Sulfur degassing at Erta Ale (Ethiopia) and Masaya (Nicaragua) volcanoes: Implications for degassing processes and oxygen fugacities of basaltic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, J. M.; Fischer, T. P.; Sharp, Z. D.; King, P. L.; Wilke, M.; Botcharnikov, R. E.; Cottrell, E.; Zelenski, M.; Marty, B.; Klimm, K.; Rivard, C.; Ayalew, D.; Ramirez, C.; Kelley, K. A.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the relationship between sulfur and oxygen fugacity at Erta Ale and Masaya volcanoes. Oxygen fugacity was assessed utilizing Fe3+/∑Fe and major element compositions measured in olivine-hosted melt inclusions and matrix glasses. Erta Ale melts have Fe3+/∑Fe of 0.15-0.16, reflecting fO2 of ΔQFM 0.0 ± 0.3, which is indistinguishable from fO2 calculated from CO2/CO ratios in high-temperature gases. Masaya is more oxidized at ΔQFM +1.7 ± 0.4, typical of arc settings. Sulfur isotope compositions of gases and scoria at Erta Ale (δ34Sgas - 0.5‰; δ34Sscoria + 0.9‰) and Masaya (δ34Sgas + 4.8‰; δ34Sscoria + 7.4‰) reflect distinct sulfur sources, as well as isotopic fractionation during degassing (equilibrium and kinetic fractionation effects). Sulfur speciation in melts plays an important role in isotope fractionation during degassing and S6+/∑S is <0.07 in Erta Ale melt inclusions compared to >0.67 in Masaya melt inclusions. No change is observed in Fe3+/∑Fe or S6+/∑S with extent of S degassing at Erta Ale, indicating negligible effect on fO2, and further suggesting that H2S is the dominant gas species exsolved from the S2--rich melt (i.e., no redistribution of electrons). High SO2/H2S observed in Erta Ale gas emissions is due to gas re-equilibration at low pressure and fixed fO2. Sulfur budget considerations indicate that the majority of S injected into the systems is emitted as gas, which is therefore representative of the magmatic S isotope composition. The composition of the Masaya gas plume (+4.8‰) cannot be explained by fractionation effects but rather reflects recycling of high δ34S oxidized sulfur through the subduction zone.

  3. Low-Temperature Crystallization of PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3 Film Induced by High-Oxygen-Pressure Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sun, Jinglan; Lin, Tie; Ma, Jianhua; Chu, Junhao; Dho, Joonghoe

    2008-09-01

    A 300-nm-thick PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3 [PZT(30/70)] film was sputtered onto LaNiO3 (LNO)/Si(100) substrates at a substrate temperature of 200 °C and then annealed under an oxygen pressure of 4 MPa at 400 °C. The amorphous phase of the as-sputtered PZT(30/70) film was transformed to a highly (h00)-oriented perovskite phase by high-oxygen-pressure-processing (HOPP). The results of electrical measurements such as of polarization (P) as functions of applied electric field (E) (P-E hysteresis loops), the capacitance as functions of the applied dc electric field (C-E loops), and the dielectric constant (ɛr) and dissipation factor (tan δ) suggested that ferroelectric properties of PZT(30/70) films were largely improved by HOPP. We consider that HOPP is compatible with currently existing silicon-based technology, which is characterized by incorporating sputtering and a processing temperature limit of ˜450 °C. The P-E hyteresis loops obtained from a prototype of 128 ×128 uncooled infrared detector arrays prepared by HOPP supported the good ferroelectricity with a high pyroelectric coefficient.

  4. Processing of low carbon content interstellar ice analogues by cosmic rays: implications for the chemistry around oxygen-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Pilling, S.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Radiolysis of a homogeneous H2O:H2CO:CH3OH (100:2:0.8) ice mixture by fast heavy ions is performed in the laboratory in an attempt to simulate the interaction of cosmic rays with frozen surfaces at 15 K. Bombarded by 220-MeV 16O7 + ions, the ice layer is thin enough to be traversed by projectiles at approximately constant velocity and with charge states close to the equilibrium one. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) reveals that the molecular species formed are CH4, CO2, CO, HCO, HCOO- and CH3OCHO. The formation and dissociation cross-sections of all observed daughter molecules are determined. As a control procedure, a carbon budget is performed as the beam fluence increases. The observed radiation effects lead to a general observation that the destruction cross-sections of condensed gases by heavy ions are ruled by a power law that is a function of the electronic stopping power: σd ˜ Sn_e, where n is approximately 3/2. This relation is observed for the destruction of precursor H2CO molecules and for the formation of daughter species. The present results help our understanding of the chemical and physicochemical interactions induced by heavy cosmic rays in cold astrophysical environments with low carbon contents, such as those around oxygen-rich stars.

  5. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  6. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch out for splattering grease. It can catch fire. Keep children with oxygen away from the stove top and oven. Cooking ... under the bed. Keep liquids that may catch fire away from your oxygen. This includes cleaning products that contain oil, grease, ...

  7. Assessing the effect of natural attenuation on oxygen consumption processes in a sewage-contaminated aquifer by use of a natural-gradient tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathisen, P. P.; Kent, D. B.; Smith, R. L.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.; Metge, D. W.; Hess, K. M.; Leblanc, D. R.; Koch, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Processes associated with aquifer restoration subsequent to cessation of treated-sewage loading in a sand and gravel aquifer are being investigated at the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Site on Cape Cod, MA. Restoration has been slow because of significant oxygen depletion resulting from biogeochemical processes associated with residual sorbed pools of organic carbon, ammonium, and reduced metals in the aquifer. The in situ interaction of the physical, chemical, and biological processes governing oxygen consumption was examined by using a natural-gradient tracer test in fall 2001, 6 years after sewage disposal had been discontinued. Ground water with a high dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was withdrawn from an uncontaminated zone of the aquifer and re-injected with a conservative tracer, bromide, into an anoxic zone directly below a former sewage-effluent disposal bed where Fe and sulfide concentrations were below detection and the DO was less than 5 uM. An injection with negligible ammonium, a nitrate concentration of 22 uM, and DO of approximately 260 uM was maintained at approximately 15 L/hr for a period of 75 days. An array of multi-level samplers (MLS), placed at distances ranging from 1 to 7 m down-gradient from the injection well, was sampled prior to and throughout the 75-day injection, and during a 25-day period after the injection. Water samples from the MLS were analyzed for DO and a variety of aqueous constituents. The DO decreased from approximately 260 uM to 210 uM over 7 m of transport, indicating the presence of rate-limited oxygen consumption. An increase in nitrate from 22 to approximately 36 uM indicated the presence of rate-limited ammonium oxidation. However, this ammonium oxidation was not sufficient to account for all of the DO consumption. Further characterization of these processes was accomplished by use of PHREEQC, a one-dimensional, geochemical reactive transport model. The 1D model is based on an ion association model for aqueous

  8. Synthesis of boron and nitrogen co-doped graphene nano-platelets using a two-step solution process and catalytic properties for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jongwoo; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Sungjin

    2014-07-01

    Chemically modified graphenes (CMGs) show great promise for various applications owing to the feasibility of their low-cost mass production and good solution processability. Recently, hetero-atom-doped CMGs have been suggested as good candidate materials for electrochemical catalysts in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we synthesized B, N co-doped graphene nano-platelets (BN-rG-O) using a two-step solution process with sequential reaction of graphene oxide with borane tetrahydrofuran and hydrazine monohydrate. In the ORR measured in a basic medium (0.1 M KOH), BN-rG-O exhibits an onset potential of 0.81 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode), follows near four electron pathway, and shows excellent stability against methanol poisoning and during durability tests.

  9. Modeling and Numerical Investigation of the Process of Vapor-Oxygen Gasification of Solid Fuels in a Vertical Flow Reactor Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhman, B. B.

    2014-09-01

    With the use of the developed model, detailed information has been obtained on the working process in a flow reactor with single- and two-stage schemes of vapor-oxygen gasification of coals under a pressure of 3 MPa. The dependence of the ratios of mass flow rates O2/coal and H2O/coal on the type of fuel has been established and their optimal values for the "Shell" process have been found. At a given consumption ratio of gas coal and brown coal of brand B1, the optimum diameters of particles providing minimum combustible loss of the carbon mixture have been determined. It has been found that the content of methane in the syngas in the case of two-stage gasification is much higher than in the case of single-stage gasification.

  10. Electron Capture and Loss Processes in the Interaction of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine Atoms and Negative Ions with a MgO(100) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ustaze, S.; Verucchi, R.; Lacombe, S.; Guillemot, L.; Esaulov, V.A.

    1997-11-01

    A study of electron capture and loss processes during the scattering of H, O, and F atoms and anions on a MgO(100) surface is described. Large fractions of anions in the scattering of atoms are observed, indicating the existence of an efficient electron capture process. This is ascribed to a nonresonant, localized charge exchange mechanism between an atom and a MgO lattice oxygen anion. This charge transfer becomes possible because of anion level shifts in the Madelung field. The existence of an electron loss channel is demonstrated using incident anions and is ascribed to loss to the conduction band or Mg cations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had δ18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in δ18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that

  12. Attempts to comprehend Martian surface processes through interpretation of the oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Grady, Monica M.

    1992-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are known to contain trace quantities of a variety of secondary minerals such as carbonates, sulfates, and aluminosilicates. Since these constituents are thought to be mostly preterrestrial in origin, their study has the potential to provide rigorous constraints on the nature of martian weathering processes. However, this line of investigation is potentially complicated by the presence within the meteorite samples of any additional weathering products produced by terrestrial processes. Examination of such terrestrial components is important since weathering processes that affect meteorite samples following their fall to Earth might have some bearing on the nature of analogous processes at the surface of Mars. It is obviously necessary to try and distinguish which secondary components in SNC meteorites are terrestrial in origin from those that are preterrestrial. Herein consideration is made of the stable isotopic compositions of weathering products in two SNC meteorites: EET A79001 (a sample collected from Antarctica) and Nakhla (a fall from Egypt, 1911).

  13. Randomised trial of ambulatory oxygen in oxygen-dependent COPD.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Y; Lecours, R; Pelletier, C; Bégin, R; Maltais, F

    2005-06-01

    Long-term oxygen therapy may limit a patient's ability to remain active and may be detrimental to the rehabilitation process. This study aimed to determine the effect of ambulatory oxygen on quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease fulfilling the usual criteria of long-term oxygen therapy. In a 1-yr, randomised, three-period, crossover trial, 24 patients (mean age 68 yrs; mean arterial partial pressure of oxygen at rest 7.1 kPa (53 mmHg)) were allocated to one of the six possible sequences generated by three interventions: 1) standard therapy (home oxygen therapy with an oxygen concentrator only); 2) standard therapy plus as-needed ambulatory oxygen; and 3) standard therapy plus ambulatory compressed air. The comparison of ambulatory oxygen versus ambulatory compressed air was double blind. The main outcomes were quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire), exercise tolerance (6-min walk test) and daily duration of exposure to oxygen therapy. The trial was stopped prematurely after an interim analysis. On average, the patients used few ambulatory cylinders (7.5 oxygen cylinders versus 7.4 compressed air cylinders over a 3-month study period). Ambulatory oxygen had no effect on any of the outcomes. In conclusion, the current results do not support the widespread provision of ambulatory oxygen to patients with oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15929958

  14. Oxygen therapy and intraocular oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Jampol, L M

    1987-01-01

    When delivered to the corneal surface of rabbits or monkeys, 100% oxygen can significantly increase the pO2 in the aqueous humor. Under hyperbaric conditions (two atmospheres), an observed rise in the aqueous pO2 in rabbits breathing room air can be increased further by exposing the rabbit cornea to 100% oxygen. The high oxygen levels under hyperbaric conditions are mediated by intravascular and transcorneal delivery of oxygen. The increase in the pO2 levels in the aqueous can prevent sickling of intracameral human erythrocytes containing sickle hemoglobin. Thus, oxygen therapy transcorneally or systemically could potentially be used to treat a sickle cell hyphema. The exposure of rabbit eyes to 100% oxygen at the corneal surface is followed by autoregulation (constriction) of the iris vasculature. We could demonstrate no constriction in the eyes of two normal human volunteers or of four patients with chronic stable rubeosis iridis. Preretinal vitreous pO2 levels can be significantly raised by exposing monkeys to hyperbaric 100% oxygen. This procedure may be of value in treating acute, reversible ischemic inner retinal diseases. Transcorneal or vascular delivery of oxygen to the eye under normobaric or hyperbaric conditions may be effective in treating ischemic diseases of the anterior segment, such as anterior segment necrosis or rubeosis iridis, or ischemic inner retinal diseases. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 5 C FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 6 PMID:3447339

  15. Evaluation of reactive oxygen species generating AirOcare system for reducing airborne microbial populations in a meat processing plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microbial contamination of meat and meat products is of continuing concern to the meat industry and regulatory agencies. Air has been established as a source of microbial contamination in slaughter and processing facilities. The objective of this research was to determine the efficacy of reactiv...

  16. Melt processing of the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} superconductor in oxygen and argon atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J.; Chumbley, L.S.

    1992-08-01

    Solidification and subsequent annealing of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (2212) in oxygen and argon atmospheres were investigated in order to identify alternative processing routes for controlling microstructures and superconducting properties. In addition to 2212, several other phases formed on cooling in O{sub 2} and did not disappear upon subsequent annealing. Crystallization in Ar resulted in a divorced eutetic structure of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 3-x}Ca{sub x}O{sub y} and Cu{sub 2}O/CuO. The superconductor was formed on subsequent anneals. Samples melted in Ar and then annealed generally possessed a more uniform microstructure compared with samples that were melted in oxygen and annealed. Compositional measurements of the 2212 phase suggest that CaO segregation in the melt may be minimized with an overall composition such as Bi{sub 2.15}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.85}Cu{sub 2}O{sub y}.

  17. Melt processing of the Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub y] superconductor in oxygen and argon atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J. ); Chumbley, L.S. )

    1992-08-01

    Solidification and subsequent annealing of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub y] (2212) in oxygen and argon atmospheres were investigated in order to identify alternative processing routes for controlling microstructures and superconducting properties. In addition to 2212, several other phases formed on cooling in O[sub 2] and did not disappear upon subsequent annealing. Crystallization in Ar resulted in a divorced eutetic structure of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 3-x]Ca[sub x]O[sub y] and Cu[sub 2]O/CuO. The superconductor was formed on subsequent anneals. Samples melted in Ar and then annealed generally possessed a more uniform microstructure compared with samples that were melted in oxygen and annealed. Compositional measurements of the 2212 phase suggest that CaO segregation in the melt may be minimized with an overall composition such as Bi[sub 2.15]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub 0.85]Cu[sub 2]O[sub y].

  18. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  19. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species and Cellular Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Timothy P; Pan, Yi; Simon, M. Celeste

    2008-01-01

    Many organisms activate adaptive transcriptional programs to help them cope with decreased oxygen levels, or hypoxia, in their environment. These responses are triggered by various oxygen sensing systems in bacteria, yeast and metazoans. In metazoans, the hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) mediate the adaptive transcriptional response to hypoxia by upregulating genes involved in maintaining bioenergetic homeostasis. The HIFs in turn are regulated by HIF-specific prolyl hydroxlase activity, which is sensitive to cellular oxygen levels and other factors such as tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Establishing a role for ROS in cellular oxygen sensing has been challenging since ROS are intrinsically unstable and difficult to measure. However, recent advances in fluorescence energy transfer resonance (FRET)-based methods for measuring ROS are alleviating some of the previous difficulties associated with dyes and luminescent chemicals. In addition, new genetic models have demonstrated that functional mitochondrial electron transport and associated ROS production during hypoxia are required for HIF stabilization in mammalian cells. Current efforts are directed at how ROS mediate prolyl hydroxylase activity and hypoxic HIF stabilization. Progress in understanding this process has been enhanced by the development of the FRET-based ROS probe, an vivo prolyl hydroxylase reporter and various genetic models harboring mutations in components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:17893032

  1. Effects of dissolved oxygen on performance and microbial community structure in a micro-aerobic hydrolysis sludge in situ reduction process.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhao; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Xuelian; Qiao, Weimin; Jiang, Lu-Man; Pan, Wei; Zhou, Jijun

    2016-03-01

    A sludge process reduction activated sludge (SPRAS), with a sludge process reduction module composed of a micro-aerobic tank and a settler positioned before conventional activated sludge process, showed good performance of pollutant removal and sludge reduction. Two SPRAS systems were operated to investigate effects of micro-aeration on sludge reduction performance and microbial community structure. When dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the micro-aerobic tank decreased from 2.5 (SPH) to 0.5 (SPL) mg/L, the sludge reduction efficiency increased from 42.9% to 68.3%. Compared to SPH, activated sludge in SPL showed higher contents of extracellular polymeric substances and dissolved organic matter. Destabilization of floc structure in the settler, and cell lysis in the sludge process reduction module were two major reasons for sludge reduction. Illumina-MiSeq sequencing showed that microbial diversity decreased under high DO concentration. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi were the most abundant phyla in the SPRAS. Specific comparisons down to the class and genus level showed that fermentative, predatory and slow-growing bacteria in SPL community were more abundant than in SPH. The results revealed that micro-aeration in the SPRAS improved hydrolysis efficiency and enriched fermentative and predatory bacteria responsible for sludge reduction. PMID:26766160

  2. Enhanced Neuropeptide Y Synthesis During Intermittent Hypoxia in the Rat Adrenal Medulla: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species–Dependent Alterations in Precursor Peptide Processing

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Kalari, Apeksha; Dhingra, Rishi; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with recurrent apneas often leads to cardiovascular abnormalities. Previously, we showed that IH treatment elevates blood pressure and increases plasma catecholamines (CAs) in rats via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent enhanced synthesis and secretion from the adrenal medulla (AM). Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a sympathetic neurotransmitter that colocalizes with CA in the AM, has been implicated in blood pressure regulation during persistent stress. Here, we investigated whether IH facilitates NPY synthesis in the rat AM and assessed the role of ROS signaling. IH increased NPY-like immunoreactivity in many dopamine-β-hydroxylase–expressing chromaffin cells with a parallel increase in preproNPY mRNA and protein. IH increased the activities of proNPY-processing enzymes, which were due, in part, to elevated protein expression and increased proteolytic processing. IH increased ROS generation, and antioxidants reversed IH-induced increases in ROS, preproNPY, and its processing to bioactive NPY in the AM. IH treatment increased blood pressure and antioxidants and inhibition of NPY amidation prevented this response. These findings suggest that IH-induced elevation in NPY expression in the rat AM is mediated by ROS-dependent augmentation of preproNPY mRNA expression and proNPY-processing enzyme activities and contributes to IH-induced elevation of blood pressure. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1179–1190. PMID:20836657

  3. Low-temperature preparation of highly (100)-oriented Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 thin film by high oxygen-pressure processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. D.; Meng, X. J.; Sun, J. L.; Lin, T.; Chu, J. H.

    2005-06-01

    A method for thin-film fabrication employing high oxygen-pressure processing (HOPP) was developed. With this method, the highly (100) oriented Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT) thin film was fabricated at temperature as low as 400°C. HOPP is compatible to the ferroelectric PZT film integration with a readout integrated circuit. The sol-gel-derived PZT 50/50 thin film showed a well-saturated hysteresis loop at an applied electric field of 367kV /cm with Pr and Ec of 45μC/cm2 and 121kV/cm, respectively. Large electric leakage was attributed to remnant organic components, which was demonstrated by sputtered organic-free PZT films. The optimized Pr and Ec are of 26μC/cm2 and 93kV/cm under an applied electric field of 400kV/cm.

  4. Consider oxygen for hydrocarbon oxidations

    SciTech Connect

    Shahani, G.H.; Gunardson, H.H.; Easterbrook, N.C.

    1996-11-01

    A number of commodity petrochemicals are produced by the selective, catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons in the liquid and gas phase. These chemicals are the basic building blocks for a host of chemical intermediates. Producing each of these chemicals requires large volumes of air or tonnage quantities of oxygen for oxidation. This oxidation can be carried out using air, oxygen-enriched air, or pure oxygen. Many oxidation processes, such as that for making ethylene oxide, originally were implemented using air but have switched to oxygen. Other processes, such as for vinyl acetate, were developed as oxygen-based processes directly. Over the years, using pure oxygen has become an accepted practice in a number of petrochemical processes, such as those for acetaldehyde, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, vinyl acetate, and vinyl chloride. As the authors will discuss, using oxygen provides some significant advantages. So, the authors expect that the trend of existing air-based processes converting to oxygen will continue, while new processes based on oxygen will emerge.

  5. Reduction of N2O and NO generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) biological wastewater treatment process by using sludge alkaline fermentation liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yinguang

    2011-03-15

    This paper reported an efficient method to significantly reduce nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and nitric oxide (NO) generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) processes. It was found that by the use of waste-activated sludge alkaline fermentation liquid as the synthetic wastewater-carbon source, compared with the commonly used carbon source in the literature (e.g., acetic acid), the generation of N(2)O and NO was reduced by 68.7% and 50.0%, respectively, but the removal efficiencies of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were improved. Both N(2)O and NO were produced in the low dissolved oxygen (DO) stage, and the use of sludge fermentation liquid greatly reduced their generation from the denitrification. The presences of Cu(2+) and propionic acid in fermentation liquid were observed to play an important role in the reduction of N(2)O and NO generation. The analysis of the activities of denitrifying enzymes suggested that sludge fermentation liquid caused the significant decrease of both nitrite reductase activity to NO reductase activity ratio and NO reductase activity to N(2)O reductase activity ratio, which resulted in the lower generation of NO and N(2)O. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the number of glycogen accumulating bacteria, which was reported to be relevant to nitrous oxide generation, in sludge fermentation liquid reactor was much lower than that in acetic acid reactor. The quantitative detection of the nosZ gene, encoding nitrous oxide reductase, showed that the use of fermentation liquid increased the number of bacteria capable of reducing N(2)O to N(2). The feasibility of using sludge fermentation liquid to reduce NO and N(2)O generation in an anaerobic-low DO process was finally confirmed for a municipal wastewater. PMID:21322643

  6. The OXYGEN-15(ALPHA, GAMMA)NEON-19 Reaction Rate and the Rapid-Proton Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnus, Paul Vogt

    The energetics and the rates of the various nuclear reaction chains active in stars play a critical role in the stars' evolution and in the isotopic abundances resulting from this nucleosynthesis. One can therefore gain information about the structure and evolution of stars by examining these nuclear reaction chains and the resulting elemental and isotopic abundances. The abundances of a number of isotopes (e.g., 13C and ^ {15}N) point to the importance of explosive hydrogen burning which takes place on time scales which are short compared to the relevant beta-decay lifetimes. Explosive hydrogen burning is expected to occur at high temperatures (rm T>2times10^8K) in many astrophysical environments such as super-massive stars, accreting neutron stars, red giants with neutron star cores, novae, and supernovae. In these environments it is usually assumed that hydrogen burning occurs via the Hot-CNO (HCNO) cycle which is responsible for the observed abundance of 15N. At sufficiently high temperatures, however, the ^ {15}O(alpha,gamma)^{19 }Ne reaction can break the HCNO cycle and initiate a reaction chain called the rapid-proton capture (rp) process. The rp process transforms CNO nuclei to heavier nuclei (up to iron and nickel) by a chain of successive proton captures and beta decays. Hydrogen and helium-burning reactions, including the 15O( alpha,gamma)19Ne breakout reaction and the subsequent rp process, are thought to be the energy source for novae on the surface of accreting neutron stars and are possibly responsible for the unusual concentrations of heavy elements recently observed in novae. At astrophysically important temperatures, the 15O(alpha,gamma) 19Ne reaction rate is determined by the properties of several resonances just above the alpha-particle threshold in 19 Ne (Ecm<1.2 MeV). This thesis involves a series of experiments which determine the reaction rate for the 15O(alpha,gamma)^ {19}Ne reaction by measuring the properties of these resonances. The ^{15

  7. Phenol Decomposition Process by Pulsed-discharge Plasma above a Water Surface in Oxygen and Argon Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, Haruki; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    By-products from phenol by the exposure of pulsed-discharge plasma above a phenol aqueous solution are investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and the decomposition process of phenol is deduced. When Ar is used as a background gas, catechol, hydroquinone and 4-hydroxy-2-cyclohexene-1-on are produced, and no O3 is detected; therefore, active species such as OH, O, HO2, H2O2, which are produced from H2O in the discharge, can convert phenol into those by-products. When O2 is used as a background gas, formic acid, maleic acid, succinic acid and 4,6-dihydroxy-2,4-hexadienoic acid are produced in addition to catechol and hydroquinone. O3 is produced in the discharge plasma, so that phenol is probably decomposed into 4,6-dihydroxy-2,4-hexadienoic acid by 1,3-dipolar addition reaction with O3, and then 4,6-dihydroxy-2,4-hexadienoic acid can be decomposed into formic acid, maleic acid and succinic acid by 1,3-dipolar addition reaction with O3.

  8. Processes affecting oxygen isotope ratios of atmospheric and ecosystem sulfate in two contrasting forest catchments in Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Novak; Myron J. Mitchell; Iva Jackova; Frantisek Buzek; Jana Schweigstillova; Lucie Erbanova; Richard Prikryl; Daniela Fottova

    2007-02-15

    Sulfate aerosols are harmful as respirable particles. They also play a role as cloud condensation nuclei and have radiative effects on global climate. A combination of {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} data with catchment sulfur mass balances was used to constrain processes affecting S cycling in the atmosphere and spruce forests of the Czech Republic. Extremely high S fluxes via spruce throughfall and runoff were measured at Jezeri (49 and 80 kg S ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively). The second catchment, Na Lizu, was 10 times less polluted. In both catchments, {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} decreased in the following order: open-area precipitation {gt} throughfall {gt} runoff. The 180-SO{sub 4} values of throughfall exhibited a seasonal pattern at both sites, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. This seasonal pattern paralleled {delta}{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O values, which were offset by -18{per_thousand}. Sulfate in throughfall was predominantly formed by heterogeneous (aqueous) oxidation of SO{sub 2}. Wet-deposited sulfate in an open area did not show systematic {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} trends, suggesting formation by homogeneous (gaseous) oxidation and/or transport from large distances. The percentage of incoming S that is organically cycled in soil was similar under the high and the low pollution. High-temperature {sup 18}O-rich sulfate was not detected, which contrasts with North American industrial sites. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Numerical Simulation of the Interaction Between Supersonic Oxygen Jets and Molten Slag-Metal Bath in Steelmaking BOF Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Mingming; Kuang, Shibo; Zou, Zongshu

    2015-02-01

    The impinging of multiple jets onto the molten bath in the BOF steelmaking process plays a crucial role in reactor performance but is not clearly understood. This paper presents a numerical study of the interaction between the multiple jets and slag-metal bath in a BOF by means of the three-phase volume of fluid model. The validity of the model is first examined by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurement of time-averaged cavity dimensions through a scaled-down water model. The calculated results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental data. The mathematical model is then used to investigate the primary transport phenomena of the jets-bath interaction inside a 150-ton commercial BOF under steelmaking conditions. The numerical results show that the cavity profile and interface of slag/metal/gas remain unstable as a result of the propagation of surface waves, which, likely as a major factor, governs the generation of metal droplets and their initial spatiotemporal distribution. The total momentum transferred from the jets into the bath is consumed about a half to drive the movement of slag, rather than fully converted as the stirring power for the metal bath. Finally, the effects of operational conditions and fluid properties are quantified. It is shown that compared to viscosity and surface tension of the melts, operating pressure and lance height have a much more significant impact on the slag-metal interface behavior and cavity shape as well as the fluid dynamics in the molten bath.

  10. Effects of pH, Temperature, Dissolved Oxygen, and Flow Rate on Phosphorus Release Processes at the Sediment and Water Interface in Storm Sewer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan; Li, Mingyi; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and flow rate on the phosphorus (P) release processes at the sediment and water interface in rainwater pipes were investigated. The sampling was conducted in a residential storm sewer of North Li Shi Road in Xi Cheng District of Beijing on August 3, 2011. The release rate of P increased with the increase of pH from 8 to 10. High temperature is favorable for the release of P. The concentration of total phosphorus (TP) in the overlying water increased as the concentration of DO decreased. With the increase of flow rate from 0.7 m s−1 to 1.1 m s−1, the concentration of TP in the overlying water increased and then tends to be stable. Among all the factors examined in the present study, the flow rate is the primary influence factor on P release. The cumulative amount of P release increased with the process of pipeline runoff in the rainfall events with high intensities and shorter durations. Feasible measures such as best management practices and low-impact development can be conducted to control the P release on urban sediments by slowing down the flow rate. PMID:24349823

  11. Partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate using a pilot-scale continuous activated sludge process at low dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, YongYuan; Mirino, Markus W; Yuan, Yanlei

    2016-10-01

    Controlling of low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.1-0.5mg/L), a cost-effective strategy, was applied to a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic-oxic-anoxic process for partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate. High ammonium removal efficiency, stable nitrite accumulation rate and total nitrogen removal efficiency was higher than 95.0%, 90.0% and 66.4%, respectively, implying potential application of this process for nitrogen removal of mature landfill leachate. Efficient nitrite accumulation in the first oxic reactor depended on low DO conditions and sufficient alkalinity. However, operational limit was mainly decided by actual hydraulic retention time (AHRT) of the first oxic reactor and appeared with AHRT less than 13.9h under DO of 0.3-0.5mg/L. High-throughput sequencing analysis demonstrated significant change of bacterial diversity in the first oxic reactor after a long-term operation and dominant bacteria genus Nitrosomonas was shown to be responsible for NH4(+)-N removal and nitrite accumulation under low DO levels. PMID:27403860

  12. Oxygen-Concentrating Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    High-purity oxygen produced from breathing air or from propellantgrade oxygen in oxygen-concentrating cell. Operating economics of concentrator attractive: Energy consumption about 4 Wh per liter of oxygen, slightly lower than conventional electrochemical oxygen extractors.

  13. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... DO NOT use oil-based products, such as petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Ask your oxygen equipment provider about ... oxygen; Hypoxia - home oxygen; Hospice - home oxygen References American Thoracic Society. Why do I need oxygen therapy? ...

  14. Determining Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Systematics in Brines at Elevated p/T Conditions to Enhance Monitoring of CO2 Induced Processes in Carbon Storage Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, V.; Myrttinen, A.; Mayer, B.; Barth, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) are a powerful tool for inferring carbon sources and mixing ratios of injected and baseline CO2 in storage reservoirs. Furthermore, CO2 releasing and consuming processes can be deduced if the isotopic compositions of end-members are known. At low CO2 pressures (pCO2), oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of CO2 usually assume the δ18O of the water plus a temperature-dependent isotope fractionation factor. However, at very high CO2 pressures as they occur in CO2 storage reservoirs, the δ18O of the injected CO2 may in fact change the δ18O of the reservoir brine. Hence, changing δ18O of brine constitutes an additional tracer for reservoir-internal carbon dynamics and allows the determination of the amount of free phase CO2 present in the reservoir (Johnson et al. 2011). Further systematic research to quantify carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation between the involved inorganic carbon species (CO2, H2CO3, HCO3-, CO32-, carbonate minerals) and kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects during gas-water-rock interactions is necessary because p/T conditions and salinities in CO2 storage reservoirs may exceed the boundary conditions of typical environmental isotope applications, thereby limiting the accuracy of stable isotope monitoring approaches in deep saline formations (Becker et al. 2011). In doing so, it is crucial to compare isotopic patterns observed in laboratory experiments with artificial brines to similar experiments with original fluids from representative field sites to account for reactions of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with minor brine components. In the CO2ISO-LABEL project, funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research, multiple series of laboratory experiments are conducted to determine the influence of pressure, temperature and brine composition on the δ13C of DIC and the δ18O of brines in water-CO2-rock reactions with special focus placed on kinetics and stable oxygen and carbon isotope fractionation

  15. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  16. The observation research of the differences in cell death and reactive oxygen species in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, HuaBin; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Objective: To observe the differences of cell death and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the process of infecting Arabidopsis with avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), it will be of great importance to research the role of plant disease resistance and defense response. Methods: Using WT, AtrbohD and AtrbohF mutant as experimental materials, we discuss the impact of cell death and ROS on the leaves of Arabidopsis infected with avirulent Pst DC3000 (avrB, avrRps4), observed by spectral analysis and visualized by DAB and trypan blue stain. Results: When infected with avirulent Pst DC3000, both WT and AtrbohF mutant line behaved resistance that exhibited burst of ROS and HR occur, limit senescence and pathogen induced chlorotic cell death. Paradoxically, AtrbohD mutant behaved susceptible characters that exhibited a small quantity of ROS accumulated and enhanced cell death. Conclusion: After infection of Arabidopsis with avirulent Pst DC3000, WT exhibited more ROS accumulation than AtrbohF, and AtrbohD eliminated the majority of total ROS production. Although both WT and AtrbohF mutant exhibited HR occur, enhanced cell death in AtrbohD mutant.

  17. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  18. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-07-28

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270 °C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270 °C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270 °C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  19. Photochemical processes in doped argon-neon core-shell clusters: the effect of cage size on the dissociation of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Laarmann, T; Wabnitz, H; von Haeften, K; Möller, T

    2008-01-01

    The caging effect of the host environment on photochemical reactions of molecular oxygen is investigated using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and spectrally resolved fluorescence. Oxygen doped clusters are formed by coexpansion of argon and oxygen, by pickup of molecular oxygen or by multiple pickup of argon and oxygen by neon clusters. Sequential pickup provides radially ordered core-shell structures in which a central oxygen molecule is surrounded by argon layers of variable thickness inside large neon clusters. Pure argon and core-shell argon-neon clusters excited with approximately 12 eV monochromatic synchrotron radiation show strong fluorescence in the vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) spectral range. When the clusters are doped with O2, fluorescence in the visible (vis) spectral range is observed and the vuv radiation is found to be quenched. Energy-resolved vis fluorescence spectra show the 2 1Sigma+-->1 1Sigma+(ArO(1S)-->ArO(1D)) transition from argon oxide as well as the vibrational progression A '3Delta u(nu'=0)-->X 3Sigmag*(nu") of O2 indicating that molecular oxygen dissociates and occasionally recombines depending on the experimental conditions. Both the emission from ArO and O2 as well the vuv quenching by oxygen are found to depend on the excitation energy, providing evidence that the energy transfer from the photoexcited cluster to the embedded oxygen proceeds via the O2+ ground state. The O2+ decays via dissociative recombination and either reacts with Ar resulting in electronically excited ArO or it recombines to O2 within the Ar cage. Variation of the Ar layer thickness in O2-Ar-Ne core-shell clusters shows that a stable cage is formed by two solvation layers. PMID:18190199

  20. OXYGEN POISONING IN MAMMALS.

    PubMed

    Binger, C A; Faulkner, J M; Moore, R L

    1927-04-30

    1. Oxygen in concentrations of over 70 per cent of an atmosphere is poisonous to dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs and mice. 2. The poisonous effects manifest themselves in drowsiness, anorexia, loss of weight, increasing dyspnea, cyanosis and death from oxygen want. 3. The cause of oxygen want is a destructive lesion of the lungs. 4. The lesion may be characterized grossly as an hemorrhagic edema. Microscopically there is to be seen in varying degrees of intensity (a) capillary engorgement with hemorrhage, (b) the presence of interstitial and intraalveolar serum, (c) hypertrophy and desquamation of alveolar cells, (d) interstitial and alveolar infiltration of mononuclear cells. 5. The type of tissue reaction is not characteristic of an infectious process and no organisms have been recovered at autopsy from the heart's blood or from lung puncture. 6. The poisonous effects of inhalations of oxygen-rich mixtures do not appear to be related to impurities in the oxygen, nor are they related to faulty ventilation, excessive moisture or increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of the chambers in which the experimental animals were confined. PMID:19869294

  1. Novel nanostructured oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Alan James

    New government regulations and industry requirements for medical oxygen sensors require the development of alternate materials and process optimization of primary sensor components. Current oxygen sensors are not compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive. This work focused on two areas. First, was finding suitable readily available materials for the sensor anodes. Second was optimizing the processing of the sensor cathode membrane for reduced delamination. Oxygen sensors were made using tin (Sn) and bismuth (Bi) electrodes, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) electrolytes with platinum (Pt) and gold (Au) reference electrodes. Bi electrodes were fabricated by casting and pressing processes. Electrochemical characterization of the Sn and Bi electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and sensing characterization per BSEN ISO 21647:2009 at various oxygen percentages, 0%, 20.9% and 100% oxygen levels with an automated test apparatus. The Sn anode with both electrolyte solutions showed good oxygen sensing properties and performance in a sensor. This system shows promise for replacement of Pb electrodes as required by the RoHS Directive. The Bi anode with Au cathode in both KOH and CH3COOH electrolytes showed acceptable performance and oxygen sensing properties. The Bi anodes fabricated by separate manufacturing methods demonstrated effectiveness for use in medical oxygen sensors. Gold thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Flouroethylene Polymer (FEP) films. The FEP substrate temperature ranged from -77°C to 50°C. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and 4-point resistivity characterized the effects of substrate temperature to Au thin film particle size. XRD peak broadening and resistivity measurements showed a strong correlation of particle size to FEP substrate temperature. Particle size at 50°C was 594A and the -77°C particle size was 2.4 x 103A. Substrate

  2. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 1 of 6: Optical Sensors and Controls for Improved Basic Oxygen Furnace Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Allendorf; David Ottesen; Donald Hardesty

    2002-01-31

    The development of an optical sensor for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) off-gas composition and temperature in this Advanced Process Control project has been a laboratory spectroscopic method evolve into a pre-commercialization prototype sensor system. The sensor simultaneously detects an infrared tunable diode laser ITDL beam transmitted through the process off-gas directly above the furnace mouth, and the infrared greybody emission from the particulate-laden off-gas stream. Following developmental laboratory and field-testing, the sensor prototype was successfully tested in four long-term field trials at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore, MD> The resulting optical data were analyzed and reveal correlations with four important process variables: (1) bath turndown temperature; (2) carbon monoxide post-combustion control; (2) bath carbon concentration; and (4) furnace slopping behavior. The optical sensor measurement of the off-gas temperature is modestly correlated with bath turndown temperature. A detailed regression analysis of over 200 heats suggests that a dynamic control level of +25 Degree F can be attained with a stand-alone laser-based optical sensor. The ability to track off-gas temperatures to control post-combustion lance practice is also demonstrated, and may be of great use in optimizing post-combustion efficiency in electric furnace steelmaking operations. In addition to the laser-based absorption spectroscopy data collected by this sensor, a concurrent signal generated by greybody emission from the particle-laden off-gas was collected and analyzed. A detailed regression analysis shows an excellent correlation of a single variable with final bath turndown carbon concentration. Extended field trials in 1998 and early 1999 show a response range from below 0.03% to a least 0.15% carbon concentration with a precision of +0.0007%. Finally, a strong correlation between prolonged drops in the off-gas emission signal and furnace slopping events

  3. Monitoring oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  4. Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1998-01-01

    A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

  5. Dielectric relaxation and electrical conductivity in Bi 5NbO 10 oxygen ion conductors prepared by a modified sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jungang; Vaish, Rahul; Qu, Yuanfang; Krsmanovic, Dalibor; Varma, K. B. R.; Kumar, R. V.

    Crystalline Bi 5NbO 10 nanoparticles have been achieved through a modified sol-gel process using a mixture of ethylenediamine and ethanolamine as a solvent. The Bi 5NbO 10 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that well-dispersed 5-60 nm Bi 5NbO 10 nanoparticles were prepared through heat-treating the precursor at 650 °C and the high density pellets were obtained at temperatures lower than those commonly employed. The frequency and temperature dependence of the dielectric constant and the electrical conductivity of the Bi 5NbO 10 solid solutions were investigated in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz frequency range. Two distinct relaxation mechanisms were observed in the plots of dielectric loss and the imaginary part of impedance (Z″) versus frequency in the temperature range of 200-350 °C. The dielectric constant and the loss in the low frequency regime were electrode dependent. The ionic conductivity of Bi 5NbO 10 solid solutions at 700 °C is 2.86 Ω -1 m -1 which is in same order of magnitude for Y 2O 3-stabilized ZrO 2 ceramics at same temperature. These results suggest that Bi 5NbO 10 is a promising material for an oxygen ion conductor.

  6. Silver nanoparticles rapidly induce atypical human neutrophil cell death by a process involving inflammatory caspases and reactive oxygen species and induce neutrophil extracellular traps release upon cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liz, Rafael; Simard, Jean-Christophe; Leonardi, Laurien Bruna Araújo; Girard, Denis

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation is one of the major toxic effects reported in response to in vitro or in vivo nanoparticle (NP) exposure. Among engineered NPs, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are very attractive for the development of therapeutic strategies, especially because of their antimicrobial properties. In humans, neutrophils, key players in inflammation, are the most abundant blood leukocytes that spontaneously undergo apoptosis, a central cell death mechanism regulating inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AgNPs on neutrophil apoptosis. Transmission electronic microscopy reveals that AgNPs rapidly penetrate inside neutrophils. AgNPs induced atypical cell death where the cell volume increased and the cell surface expression of CD16 remained unaltered unlike apoptotic neutrophils where cell shrinkage and loss of CD16 are typically observed. The AgNP-induced atypical cell death is distinct from necrosis and reversed by a pancaspase inhibitor or by inhibitors of the inflammatory caspase-1 and caspase-4. In addition, AgNPs induced IL-1β production inhibited by caspase-1 and caspase-4 inhibitors and also induced caspase-1 activity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased by AgNPs and the atypical cell death was inhibited by the antioxidant n-acetylcysteine. Under similar experimental conditions, adhesion of neutrophils leads to neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release induced by AgNPs. However, this process was not reversed by caspase inhibitors. We conclude that AgNPs rapidly induced an atypical cell death in neutrophils by a mechanism involving caspase-1, -4 and ROS. However, in adherent neutrophils, AgNPs induced NET release and, therefore, are novel agents able to trigger NET release. PMID:26241783

  7. Oxygenated fraction and mass of organic aerosol from direct emission and atmospheric processing measured on the R/V Ronald Brown during TEXAQS/GoMACCS 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Takahama, S.; Liu, S.; Hawkins, L. N.; Covert, D. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2009-04-01

    masses. Organosulfate groups were found in GAM and SAM, accounting for 1% and 3% of OM, respectively. Two thirds of the OM and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) measured could be attributed to oil and wood combustion sources on the basis of mild or strong correlations to coemitted, nonvolatile trace metals, with the remaining one third being associated with atmospherically processed organic aerosol. The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) fraction (normalized by total condensation nuclei) had weak correlations to the alcohol and amine group fractions and mild correlation with O/C, also varying inversely with alkane group fraction. The chemical components that influenced f(RH) were sulfate, organic, and nitrate fraction, but this contrast is consistent with the size-distribution dependence of CCN counters and nephelometers.

  8. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. The results of the checkout, shakedown, and initial parametric tests are summarized.

  9. Integrated oxygen recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. Gene; Davenport, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Life Systems has conceptualized an innovative Integrated Oxygen Recovery System (IORS) applicable to advanced mission air revitalization. The IORS provides the capability to electrochemically generate metabolic oxygen (O2) and recover O2 from the space habitat atmosphere via a carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction process within a single assembly. To achieve this capability, the IORS utilizes a Solid Metal Cathode (SMC) water electrolysis unit that simultaneously serves as the Sabatier CO2 reduction reactor. The IORS enables two major life support systems currently baselined in closed loop air revitalization systems to be combined into one smaller, less complex system. This concept reduces fluidic and electrical interface requirements and eliminates a hydrogen (H2) interface. Life Systems is performing an evaluation of the IORS process directed at demonstrating performance and quantifying key physical characteristics including power, weight, and volume. Technical progress achieved during the first two months of the program is summarized.

  10. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.