Science.gov

Sample records for monetary system converging

  1. Transfer potentials shape and equilibrate monetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Robert; Braun, Dieter

    2003-04-01

    We analyze a monetary system of random money transfer on the basis of double entry bookkeeping. Without boundary conditions, we do not reach a price equilibrium and violate text-book formulas of economist's quantity theory ( MV= PQ). To match the resulting quantity of money with the model assumption of a constant price, we have to impose boundary conditions. They either restrict specific transfers globally or impose transfers locally. Both connect through a general framework of transfer potentials. We show that either restricted or imposed transfers can shape Gaussian, tent-shape exponential, Boltzmann-exponential, pareto or periodic equilibrium distributions. We derive the master equation and find its general time-dependent approximate solution. An equivalent of quantity theory for random money transfer under the boundary conditions of transfer potentials is given.

  2. Converging effects of cocaine addiction and sex on neural responses to monetary rewards.

    PubMed

    Konova, Anna B; Moeller, Scott J; Parvaz, Muhammad A; Froböse, Monja I; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2016-02-28

    There is some evidence that cocaine addiction manifests as more severe in women than men. Here, we examined whether these sex-specific differences in the clinical setting parallel differential neurobehavioral sensitivity to rewards in the laboratory setting. Twenty-eight (14 females/14 males) cocaine-dependent and 25 (11 females/14 males) healthy individuals completed a monetary reward task during fMRI. Results showed that the effects of cocaine dependence and sex overlapped in regions traditionally considered part of the mesocorticolimbic brain circuits including the hippocampus and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), as well as those outside of this circuit (e.g., the middle temporal gyrus). The nature of this 'overlap' was such that both illness and female sex were associated with lower activations in these regions in response to money. Diagnosis-by-sex interactions instead emerged in the frontal cortex, such that cocaine-dependent females exhibited lower precentral gyrus and greater inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) activations relative to cocaine-dependent males and healthy females. Within these regions modulated both by diagnosis and sex, lower activation in the hippocampus and PCC, and higher IFG activations, correlated with increased subjective craving during the task. Results suggest sex-specific differences in addiction extend to monetary rewards and may contribute to core symptoms linked to relapse. PMID:26809268

  3. Governance Challenges of Technological Systems Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The convergence of several technological systems (especially nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and robotics) has now been adopted as a strategic goal by several countries, most notably the United States and those of the European Union. The anticipated benefits and related fears of competitive disadvantage have brought together…

  4. Convergent strand array liquid pumping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A surface-tension liquid pumping system is provided by one or more arrays of converging solid monofilament fibers or metal wires (strands) spaced apart at an input end to gather liquid, and gathered close together at the opposite end where menisci forms between wetted strands to force liquid in the direction of convergence of the strands. The liquid pumping system is independent of gravity. It is illustrated as being used in a heat pump having a heating box to vaporize the liquid and a condensing chamber. Condensed liquid is returned by the pumping system to the heating box where it is again vaporized. A vapor tube carries the vapor to the condensing chamber. In that way, a closed system pumps heat from the heating box to the evaporating chamber and from there radiated to the atmosphere.

  5. The Convergence Coefficient across Political Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move. PMID:24385886

  6. How does money memorize social interactions? Understanding time-homogeneity in monetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Schmitt, Matthias; Schacker, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding how money shapes and memorizes our social interactions is central to modern life. There are many schools of thought on as to how monetary systems contribute to crises or boom/bust cycles and how monetary policy can try to avert them. We find that statistical physics gives a refreshing perspective. We analyze how credit mechanisms introduce non-locality and time-heterogeneity to the monetary memory. Motivated by an analogy to particle physics, locality and time-homogeneity can be imposed to monetary systems. As a result, a full reserve banking system is complemented with a bi-currency system of non-bank assets (``money'') and bank assets (``antimoney''). Payment can either be made by passing on money or by receiving antimoney. As a result, a free floating exchange rate between non-bank assets and bank assets is established. Interestingly, this monetary memory allows for credit creation by the simultaneous transfer of money and antimoney at a negotiated exchange rate. We analyze this novel mechanism of liquidity transfer in a model of random social interactions, yielding analytical results for all relevant distributions and the price of liquidity under the conditions of a fully transparent credit market.

  7. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  8. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  9. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  10. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-08-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  11. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  12. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  13. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  14. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  15. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  16. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  17. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  18. Spherically-Convergent, Advanced-Fuel Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. C.; Nebel, R. A.; Schauer, M. M.; Umstadter, K. R.

    1998-11-01

    Combining nonneutral electron confinement with spherical ion convergence leads to a cm sized reactor volume with high power density.(R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol.), to appear (1998); D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. of Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998). This concept is being investigated experimentally,(D. C. Barnes, T. B. Mitchell, and M. M. Schauer, Phys. Plasmas) 4, 1745 (1997). and results will be reported. We argue that D-D operation of such a system offers all the advantages of aneutronic fusion cycles. In particular, no breeding or large tritium inventory is required, and material problems seem tractable based on previous LWR experience. In addition the extremely small unit size leads to a massively modular system which is easily maintained and repaired, suggesting a very high availability. It may also be possible to operate such a system with low or aneutronic fuels. Preliminary work in this direction will be presented.

  19. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  20. Money, the Banking System and Monetary Policy in Canada: A Teaching Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Douglas C. A.; Staunton, Ted, Ed.

    One of a series of teaching units designed to introduce secondary school students to the Canadian economy, this handbook contains instructional materials on Canada's monetary system and policy. Material is organized and presented in terms of specific topic readings and illustrative activities. The topics covered in six sections are money, the…

  1. On two parabolic systems: Convergence and blowup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yamin

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation studies two parabolic systems. It consists of two parts. In part one (chapter one), we prove a convergence result, namely, the solution (AK,/ BK) of a system of chemical diffusion-reaction equations (with reaction rate K) converges to the solution (A, B) of a diffusion- instantaneous-reaction equation. To prove our main result, we use some L1 and L2 'energy' estimates and a compactness result due to Aubin (1). As a by-product we also prove that as K approaches infinity, the limit solution exhibits phase separation between A and B. In part two (chapter two), we study the blowup rate for a system of heat equations ut=/Delta u,/ vt=/Delta v in a bounded domain Ωtimes(0,T) coupled in the nonlinear Neumann boundary conditions [/partial u/over/partial n]=vp,/ [/partial v/over/partial n]=uq on ∂Omega×[ 0,T), where p>0,/ q>0,/ pq>1 and n is the exterior normal vector on ∂Omega. Under certain assumptions, we establish exact blowup rate which generalizes the corresponding results of some authors' recent work including Deng (2), Deng-Fila-Levine (3) and Hu-Yin (4). ftn (1) J. P. A scUBIN, Un theoreme de compacite, C. R. Acad. Sci., 256(1963), pp. 5042-5044. (2) K. D scENG, Blow-up rates for parabolic systems, Z. Angew. Math. Phys., 47(1996), No. 1, pp. 132-143. (3) K. D scENG, M. F scILA AND H. A. L scEVINE, On critical exponents for a system of heat equations coupled in the boundary conditions, Acta Math. Univ. Comenian. (N.S.), 36(1994), No. 2, pp. 169-192. (4) B. H scU scAND H. M. Y scIN, The profile near blowup time for solutions of the heat equation with a nonlinear boundary condition, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc., 346(1994), pp. 117-135.

  2. Convergence of Hamiltonian systems to billiards.

    PubMed

    Collas, Peter; Klein, David; Schwebler, Hans-Peter

    1998-06-01

    We examine in detail a physically natural and general scheme for gradually deforming a Hamiltonian to its corresponding billiard, as a certain parameter k varies from one to infinity. We apply this limiting process to a class of Hamiltonians with homogeneous potential-energy functions and further investigate the extent to which the limiting billiards inherit properties from the corresponding sequences of Hamiltonians. The results are mixed. Using theorems of Yoshida for the case of two degrees of freedom, we prove a general theorem establishing the "inheritability" of stability properties of certain orbits. This result follows naturally from the convergence of the traces of appropriate monodromy matrices to the billiard analog. However, in spite of the close analogy between the concepts of integrability for Hamiltonian systems and billiards, integrability properties of Hamiltonians in a sequence are not necessarily inherited by the limiting billiard, as we show by example. In addition to rigorous results, we include numerical examples of certain interesting cases, along with computer simulations. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779750

  3. Policy Borrowing and Transfer, and Policy Convergence: Justifications for the Adoption of the Bologna Process in the CEMAC Region and the Cameroonian Higher Education System through the LMD Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eta, Elizabeth Agbor

    2015-01-01

    The borrowing and transfer of policies, ideas and practices from one system to another may in part explain the convergence of educational systems. Using text documents as research material, this paper examines the adoption and transfer of Bologna Process (BP) ideas in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa (CEMAC) and in the…

  4. Convergence Results on Iteration Algorithms to Linear Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuande; Yang, Chuansheng; Yuan, Yubo

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the large scale linear systems, backward and Jacobi iteration algorithms are employed. The convergence is the most important issue. In this paper, a unified backward iterative matrix is proposed. It shows that some well-known iterative algorithms can be deduced with it. The most important result is that the convergence results have been proved. Firstly, the spectral radius of the Jacobi iterative matrix is positive and the one of backward iterative matrix is strongly positive (lager than a positive constant). Secondly, the mentioned two iterations have the same convergence results (convergence or divergence simultaneously). Finally, some numerical experiments show that the proposed algorithms are correct and have the merit of backward methods. PMID:24991640

  5. NASA information systems commonality and convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas H., Jr.; Preheim, Larry E.

    1991-01-01

    Efforts to identify high payback functions performed by the Office of Space Science Applications (OSSA) data systems package existing operationally proven implementations as system building blocks and foster their use in the OSSA environment. An overview is given of the current state of OSSA data systems and the major challenges facing system developers over the next five years. Current trends in system commonality are discussed, and development is examined in the context of system design. Central system engineering approaches to solving the commonality and interoperability challenges are described. Efforts to package three diverse building blocks and to foster their reuse are documented.

  6. Energy Systems Integration: A Convergence of Ideas

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Garrett, B.; MacMillan, S.; Rice, B.; Komomua, C.; O'Malley, M.; Zimmerle, D.

    2012-07-01

    Energy systems integration (ESI) enables the effective analysis, design, and control of these interactions and interdependencies along technical, economic, regulatory, and social dimensions. By focusing on the optimization of energy from all systems, across all pathways, and at all scales, we can better understand and make use of the co-benefits that result to increase reliability and performance, reduce cost, and minimize environmental impacts. This white paper discusses systems integration and the research in new control architectures that are optimized at smaller scales but can be aggregated to optimize energy systems at any scale and would allow replicable energy solutions across boundaries of existing and new energy pathways.

  7. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Leonid L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers – features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and ‘classical’ neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine – consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems

  8. Convergent evolution of neural systems in ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-02-15

    Neurons are defined as polarized secretory cells specializing in directional propagation of electrical signals leading to the release of extracellular messengers - features that enable them to transmit information, primarily chemical in nature, beyond their immediate neighbors without affecting all intervening cells en route. Multiple origins of neurons and synapses from different classes of ancestral secretory cells might have occurred more than once during ~600 million years of animal evolution with independent events of nervous system centralization from a common bilaterian/cnidarian ancestor without the bona fide central nervous system. Ctenophores, or comb jellies, represent an example of extensive parallel evolution in neural systems. First, recent genome analyses place ctenophores as a sister group to other animals. Second, ctenophores have a smaller complement of pan-animal genes controlling canonical neurogenic, synaptic, muscle and immune systems, and developmental pathways than most other metazoans. However, comb jellies are carnivorous marine animals with a complex neuromuscular organization and sophisticated patterns of behavior. To sustain these functions, they have evolved a number of unique molecular innovations supporting the hypothesis of massive homoplasies in the organization of integrative and locomotory systems. Third, many bilaterian/cnidarian neuron-specific genes and 'classical' neurotransmitter pathways are either absent or, if present, not expressed in ctenophore neurons (e.g. the bilaterian/cnidarian neurotransmitter, γ-amino butyric acid or GABA, is localized in muscles and presumed bilaterian neuron-specific RNA-binding protein Elav is found in non-neuronal cells). Finally, metabolomic and pharmacological data failed to detect either the presence or any physiological action of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine, acetylcholine or histamine - consistent with the hypothesis that ctenophore neural systems evolved

  9. Systems Harmonization and Convergence - the GIGAS Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, P. G.; Biancalana, A.; Coene, Y.; Uslander, T.

    2009-04-01

    0.1 Background The GIGAS1 Support Action promotes the coherent and interoperable development of the GMES, INSPIRE and GEOSS initiatives through their concerted adoption of standards, protocols, and open architectures. 0.2 Preparing for Coordinated Data Access The GMES Coordinated Data Access System is under design and implementation2. This objective has motivated the definition of the interoperability standards between the contributing missions. The following elements have been addressed with associated papers submitted to OGC: The EO Product Metadata has been based on the OGC Geographic Markup Language, addressing sensor characteristics for optical, radar and atmospheric products. Collection and service discovery: an ISO extension package for CSW ebRim has been proposed. Catalogue Service (CSW): an Earth Observation extension package of the CSW ebRim has been proposed. Feasibility Analysis and Order: an Order interface control document and an Earth Observation profile of the Sensor Planning Service have been proposed. Online Data Access: an Earth Observation profile of the Web Map Services (WMS) for visualization and evaluation purposes has been proposed. Identity (user) management: the objective in the long term is to allow for a single sign-on to the Coordinated Data Access system by users registered in the various Earth Observation ground segments by providing a federated identity across participating ground segments, exploiting OASIS standards. 0.3 The GIGAS proposed harmonization approach The approach proposed by GIGAS is based on three elements: Technology watch Comparative analysis Shaping of initiatives and standards This paper concentrates on the methodology for technology watch and comparative analysis. The complexity of the GIGAS scenario involving huge systems (i.e. GEOSS, INSPIRE, GMES etc.) entails the interaction with different heterogeneous partners, each with a specific competence, expertise and know-how. 0.3.1 Technology watch The methodology

  10. Convergence Time towards Periodic Orbits in Discrete Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Jesús; Porter, Mason A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the convergence towards periodic orbits in discrete dynamical systems. We examine the probability that a randomly chosen point converges to a particular neighborhood of a periodic orbit in a fixed number of iterations, and we use linearized equations to examine the evolution near that neighborhood. The underlying idea is that points of stable periodic orbit are associated with intervals. We state and prove a theorem that details what regions of phase space are mapped into these intervals (once they are known) and how many iterations are required to get there. We also construct algorithms that allow our theoretical results to be implemented successfully in practice. PMID:24736594

  11. Convergence time towards periodic orbits in discrete dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Jesús; Porter, Mason A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the convergence towards periodic orbits in discrete dynamical systems. We examine the probability that a randomly chosen point converges to a particular neighborhood of a periodic orbit in a fixed number of iterations, and we use linearized equations to examine the evolution near that neighborhood. The underlying idea is that points of stable periodic orbit are associated with intervals. We state and prove a theorem that details what regions of phase space are mapped into these intervals (once they are known) and how many iterations are required to get there. We also construct algorithms that allow our theoretical results to be implemented successfully in practice. PMID:24736594

  12. Representational System Predicate Use and Convergence in Counseling: Gloria Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, Mary Ann; Johnson, Marilyn

    1984-01-01

    Analayzed transcripts of Three Approaches to Psychotherapy (Shostrom, 1966) for counselor and client representational system predicate use. Although different patterns of predicate use emerged, only limited support for Neurolinguistic Programming theory was found. The findings of different patterns of predicate use were related to convergence and…

  13. A simple global asymptotic convergent observer for uncertain mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuxin

    2016-03-01

    A simple nonlinear observer is proposed for a class of uncertain nonlinear multiple-input-multiple-output mechanical systems whose dynamics are first-order differentiable. The proposed observer is constructed without any detailed model knowledge of the system and the observer gains are easily chosen. Another interesting features of the proposed observer include that it is more immune to noise and is high robust against parameters variations, and thus it is readily implemented. Lyapunov's direct method is employed to prove global asymptotic convergent observation. Extensive simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and improved performance of the proposed observer.

  14. Convergence of Topological Entanglement Entropy for Finite Size Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Clare; Herrera, Raul; Rezayi, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Quantum information theoretic concepts have been widely used to study topological phases of condensed matter, the prime examples of which are fractional quantum Hall states. Interest in these phases is driven in part by their potential use in fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. In particular, quantum entanglement has proven to be a useful tool to probe topological order. We present numerical studies for some model fractional quantum Hall states in spherical and toroidal geometries. We implement bipartitioning of the system with both orbital and real space cuts for small size systems. Additionally, we compare the topological entanglement entropies obtained from low-order Renyi entropies to the expected value to determine whether our results converge for small sizes. We extend these studies to generic Hamiltonians and discuss the prospect of obtaining the topological entanglement entropy from finite size calculations in these systems.

  15. Introduction to 'Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution'.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas J; Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the 'Cambrian explosion' arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to discuss

  16. Beyond assemblies: system convergence and multi-materiality.

    PubMed

    Wiscombe, Tom

    2012-03-01

    The architectural construction industry has become increasingly more specialized over the past 50 years, creating a culture of layer thinking over part-to-whole thinking. Building systems and technologies are often cobbled together in conflicting and uncorrelated ways, even when referred to as 'integrated', such as by way of building information modeling. True integration of building systems requires rethinking how systems and architectural morphologies can push and pull on one another, creating not only innovation in technology but in aesthetics. The revolution in composite materials, with unprecedented plasticity and performance features, opens up a huge range of possibilities for achieving this kind of convergence. Composites by nature fuse envelope and structure, but through various types of inflections, they can also be made to conduct air and fluids through cavities and de-laminations, as well as integrate lighting and energy systems. Assembly as we know it moves away from mineral materials and hardware and toward polymers and 'healing'. Further, when projected into the near-future realm of multi-materiality and 3D manufacturing, possibilities for embedding systems and creating gradients of rigidity and opacity open up, pointing to an entirely new realm of architectural thinking. PMID:22345384

  17. Homology and Convergence in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Nervous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeman, David

    Each year the meeting of the American Neuroscience Society attracts over 20,000 members, reflecting the explosion of interest in this field that has occurred over the past few decades. Researchers from many disciplines are focusing their skills on the investigation of every aspect of nervous systems, and neuroscience now encompasses the entire range of endeavour from the study of the single molecules that make up neural membranes to the non-invasive observation of neural function in animals behaving in their natural environments. Advances over the past three decades in our understanding of nervous systems are impressive and come from a multifaceted approach to the study of both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. An almost unexpected by-product of the parallel investigation of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems that is explored in this article is the emergent view of an intricate web of evolutionary homology and convergence exhibited in the structure and function of the nervous systems of these two large, paraphyletic groups of animals.

  18. The Influence of Climate Change in Active Convergent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarselli, S.; Simpson, G. H.; Allen, P. A.; Minelli, G.

    2006-12-01

    The link between tectonics, surface erosion, and climate in the evolution of mountain belts has been observed in several natural systems (Sinclair & Allen, 1992; Norris & Cooper, 1997; Pavlis et al., 1997; Willett et al., 2006) and numerous theoretical and applied studies have been carried out in the last several years ( Willett et al., 2002; Simpson, 2004 a, c). This relation is particularly sensitive in active convergent orogenic wedges where the efficiency of surface mass transport and climatic change controls the spatial distribution of deformation and sedimentation and degree of crustal thickening (Beaumont et al., 1992; Willett, 1999; Simpson, 2006). This study focus on the effect of climatic changes, leading to palaeogeographic changes, in an active convergent system. In particular, the effects produced by relative sea-level changes and efficiency of the erosional processes have been tested using a two dimensional mechanical model (Simpson, 2006). The model is suited to study deformation, erosion and sedimentation in fold-thrust belts and foreland basins. Two effects of the relative sea-level changes, and in particular in the case of the relative sea-level drop occurring during deformation, can be potentially important for the mechanical behavior of the surrounding crust. Firstly, gravitational water loads above the deforming rocks could be decreased. Secondly, the replacement of submarine with subaerial conditions could probably increase erosion rates, especially within the river system. Both effects would tend to amplify local deformation rates leading to a major pulse of deformation (Simpson, 2006) and to the formation of complex three dimensional deformation patterns (Simpson, 2004). Finally, this model has been used to evaluate the effect of the Messinian salinity crisis in the Mediterranean basin and in particular in the Northern Apennines evolution (Italy). References: Beaumont, C.; Fullsack, P. & Hamilton J., (1992). In: Thrust Tectonics (Ed by K

  19. How Financial Innovation Has Made Textbook Monetary Theory Obsolete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbody, John

    1988-01-01

    Argues that much of the monetary theory in economics textbooks has not changed in accordance with the facts of monetary history. Contends that by neglecting institutional changes in the monetary system in the 50 years since the publication of Keynes' General Theory, many textbooks are now in danger of seriously misleading their readers. (GEA)

  20. A convergent series expansion for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harabetian, E.

    1985-01-01

    The discontinuities piecewise analytic initial value problem for a wide class of conservation laws is considered which includes the full three-dimensional Euler equations. The initial interaction at an arbitrary curved surface is resolved in time by a convergent series. Among other features the solution exhibits shock, contact, and expansion waves as well as sound waves propagating on characteristic surfaces. The expansion waves correspond to he one-dimensional rarefactions but have a more complicated structure. The sound waves are generated in place of zero strength shocks, and they are caused by mismatches in derivatives.

  1. Convergent bacterial microbiotas in the fungal agricultural systems of insects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aylward, Frank O.; Suen, Garret; Biedermann, Peter H. W.; Adams, Aaron S.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Tringe, Susannah G.; Poulsen, Michael; Raffa, Kenneth F.; et al

    2014-11-18

    The ability to cultivate food is an innovation that has produced some of the most successful ecological strategies on the planet. Although most well recognized in humans, where agriculture represents a defining feature of civilization, species of ants, beetles, and termites have also independently evolved symbioses with fungi that they cultivate for food. Despite occurring across divergent insect and fungal lineages, the fungivorous niches of these insects are remarkably similar, indicating convergent evolution toward this successful ecological strategy. Here, we characterize the microbiota of ants, beetles, and termites engaged in nutritional symbioses with fungi to define the bacterial groups associatedmore » with these prominent herbivores and forest pests. Using culture-independent techniques and the in silico reconstruction of 37 composite genomes of dominant community members, we demonstrate that different insect-fungal symbioses that collectively shape ecosystems worldwide have highly similar bacterial microbiotas comprised primarily of the genera Enterobacter, Rahnella, and Pseudomonas. Although these symbioses span three orders of insects and two phyla of fungi, we show that they are associated with bacteria sharing high whole-genome nucleotide identity. Due to the fine-scale correspondence of the bacterial microbiotas of insects engaged in fungal symbioses, our findings indicate that this represents an example of convergence of entire host-microbe complexes.« less

  2. Convergent bacterial microbiotas in the fungal agricultural systems of insects

    SciTech Connect

    Aylward, Frank O.; Suen, Garret; Biedermann, Peter H. W.; Adams, Aaron S.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Tringe, Susannah G.; Poulsen, Michael; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Klepzig, Kier D.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2014-11-18

    The ability to cultivate food is an innovation that has produced some of the most successful ecological strategies on the planet. Although most well recognized in humans, where agriculture represents a defining feature of civilization, species of ants, beetles, and termites have also independently evolved symbioses with fungi that they cultivate for food. Despite occurring across divergent insect and fungal lineages, the fungivorous niches of these insects are remarkably similar, indicating convergent evolution toward this successful ecological strategy. Here, we characterize the microbiota of ants, beetles, and termites engaged in nutritional symbioses with fungi to define the bacterial groups associated with these prominent herbivores and forest pests. Using culture-independent techniques and the in silico reconstruction of 37 composite genomes of dominant community members, we demonstrate that different insect-fungal symbioses that collectively shape ecosystems worldwide have highly similar bacterial microbiotas comprised primarily of the genera Enterobacter, Rahnella, and Pseudomonas. Although these symbioses span three orders of insects and two phyla of fungi, we show that they are associated with bacteria sharing high whole-genome nucleotide identity. Due to the fine-scale correspondence of the bacterial microbiotas of insects engaged in fungal symbioses, our findings indicate that this represents an example of convergence of entire host-microbe complexes.

  3. Convergent Bacterial Microbiotas in the Fungal Agricultural Systems of Insects

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Garret; Biedermann, Peter H. W.; Adams, Aaron S.; Scott, Jarrod J.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Tringe, Susannah G.; Poulsen, Michael; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Klepzig, Kier D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to cultivate food is an innovation that has produced some of the most successful ecological strategies on the planet. Although most well recognized in humans, where agriculture represents a defining feature of civilization, species of ants, beetles, and termites have also independently evolved symbioses with fungi that they cultivate for food. Despite occurring across divergent insect and fungal lineages, the fungivorous niches of these insects are remarkably similar, indicating convergent evolution toward this successful ecological strategy. Here, we characterize the microbiota of ants, beetles, and termites engaged in nutritional symbioses with fungi to define the bacterial groups associated with these prominent herbivores and forest pests. Using culture-independent techniques and the in silico reconstruction of 37 composite genomes of dominant community members, we demonstrate that different insect-fungal symbioses that collectively shape ecosystems worldwide have highly similar bacterial microbiotas comprised primarily of the genera Enterobacter, Rahnella, and Pseudomonas. Although these symbioses span three orders of insects and two phyla of fungi, we show that they are associated with bacteria sharing high whole-genome nucleotide identity. Due to the fine-scale correspondence of the bacterial microbiotas of insects engaged in fungal symbioses, our findings indicate that this represents an example of convergence of entire host-microbe complexes. PMID:25406380

  4. Optimization of convergent collimators for pixelated SPECT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, Ricardo M.; Matela, Nuno; Conceicao, Raquel C.; Almeida, Pedro

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: The optimization of the collimator design is essential to obtain the best possible sensitivity in single photon emission computed tomography imaging. The aim of this work is to present a methodology for maximizing the sensitivity of convergent collimators, specifically designed to match the pitch of pixelated detectors, for a fixed spatial resolution value and to present some initial results using this approach. Methods: Given the matched constraint, the optimal collimator design cannot be simply found by allowing the highest level of septal penetration and spatial resolution consistent with the imposed restrictions, as it is done for the optimization of conventional collimators. Therefore, an algorithm that interactively calculates the collimator dimensions, with the maximum sensitivity, which respect the imposed restrictions was developed and used to optimize cone and fan beam collimators with tapered square-shaped holes for low (60-300 keV) and high energy radiation (300-511 keV). The optimal collimator dimensions were locally calculated based on the premise that each hole and septa of the convergent collimator should locally resemble an appropriate optimal matched parallel collimator. Results: The optimal collimator dimensions, calculated for subcentimeter resolutions (3 and 7.5 mm), common pixel sizes (1.6, 2.1, and 2.5 mm), and acceptable septal penetration at 140 keV, were approximately constant throughout the collimator, despite their different hole incidence angles. By using these input parameters and a less strict septal penetration value of 5%, the optimal collimator dimensions and the corresponding mass per detector area were calculated for 511 keV. It is shown that a low value of focal distance leads to improvements in the average sensitivity at a fixed source-collimator distance and resolution. The optimal cone beam performance outperformed that of other optimal collimation geometries (fan and parallel beam) in imaging objects close to the

  5. Artificial insemination of pigs reared under smallholder production system in northeastern India: success rate, genetic improvement, and monetary benefit.

    PubMed

    Kadirvel, Govindasamy; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Das, Anubrata; Bujarbaruah, Kamal Malla; Venkatasubramanian, Venkatasamy; Ngachan, Shishom Vanao

    2013-02-01

    The study investigated the success rate, genetic improvement, and monetary benefit of artificial insemination (AI) technology in smallholder backyard pig production system. The pig production system was studied, and performance of nondescript and crossbred pigs under the traditional system was evaluated. Litter size and growth rate of crossbred pig was significantly (P < 0.05) higher compared to the nondescript pigs. Non-availability of superior germplasm to produce crossbred pigs and high mating cost were the major constraints observed in the study in addition to indiscriminate mating and non-availability of breeding boar. For genetic improvement of nondescript local pigs and to produce crossbred pigs, AI delivery mechanism was developed in participatory mode including farmers, village leaders, and key persons in 36 villages. The information system was designed in such a way that AI was carried out at the doorstep of the farmer upon request. A total of 167 estrus sow/gilts were artificially inseminated, and a farrowing rate of 78.44 % was obtained with a mean litter size of 7.86 ± 0.65 following AI, which did not differ significantly from natural service. However, the growth rate of crossbred piglets obtained through AI was significantly higher than the growth rate of piglets born out of natural service. The tribal farmers were benefited by AI in several ways: (1) timely availability of superior germplasm to produce crossbred piglets; (2) saved the mating cost of INR 1,000-1,200 and transport of cost (INR 300-400) of female to the boar premises and (3) controlled mating to prevent inbreeding. The present study clearly demonstrates the feasibility and potential benefit of AI technique to smallholder backyard pig production system in tribal rural areas. In addition to genetic improvement of nondescript local pigs, this technology can help in overcoming breeding constraints in smallholder backyard pig production for increasing productivity. PMID:23065391

  6. Personal Construct Theory and Systemic Therapies: Parallel or Convergent Trends?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feixas, Guillem

    1990-01-01

    Explores similarities between Kelly's Personal Construct Theory (PCT) and systemic therapies. Asserts that (1) PCT and systemic therapies share common epistemological stance, constructivism; (2) personal construct systems possess properties of open systems; and (3) PCT and systemic therapies hold similar positions on relevant theoretical and…

  7. All-around convergent view acquisition system using ellipsoidal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Gentaro; Yendo, Tomohiro; Tehrani, Mehrdad Panahpour; Fujii, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Masayuki

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new image acquisition system for FTV (Free-viewpoint TV). The proposed system can capture the dynamic scene from all-around views. The proposed system consists of two ellipsoidal mirrors, a high-speed camera, and a rotating aslope mirror. As for two ellipsoidal mirrors, the size and the ellipticity are mutually different. The object is set in the focus of ellipsoidal mirror. The size of this system is smaller than that of early system since ellipsoidal mirrors can reduce virtual images. High-speed camera can acquire multi viewpoint images by mirror scanning. Here, we simulated this system with ray tracing and confirmed the principle.

  8. Confluence and convergence: team effectiveness in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Porter-OʼGrady, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Complex adaptive systems require nursing leadership to rethink organizational work and the viability and effectiveness of teams. Much of emergent thinking about complexity and systems and organizations alter the understanding of the nature and function of teamwork and the configuration and leadership of team effort. Reflecting on basic concepts of complexity and their application to team formation, dynamics, and outcomes lays an important foundation for effectively guiding the strategic activity of systems through the focused tactical action of teams. Basic principles of complexity, their impact on teams, and the fundamental elements of team effectiveness are explored. PMID:25474670

  9. Perceived Satisfaction of a Computerized Vocational Counseling System as a Function of Monetary Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.; Springer, Thomas P.

    1986-01-01

    Compared 61 college students' satisfaction with DISCOVER, a computer assisted guidance system, relative to the amount of money paid for such a service. No significant differences were found. (Author/BL)

  10. Optimal discrete-time LQR problems for parabolic systems with unbounded input: Approximation and convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract approximation and convergence theory for the closed-loop solution of discrete-time linear-quadratic regulator problems for parabolic systems with unbounded input is developed. Under relatively mild stabilizability and detectability assumptions, functional analytic, operator techniques are used to demonstrate the norm convergence of Galerkin-based approximations to the optimal feedback control gains. The application of the general theory to a class of abstract boundary control systems is considered. Two examples, one involving the Neumann boundary control of a one-dimensional heat equation, and the other, the vibration control of a cantilevered viscoelastic beam via shear input at the free end, are discussed.

  11. Converging Higher Education Systems in a Global Setting: The Example of France and India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkington, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparative survey between the French and Indian higher education systems. In spite of their respective idiosyncratic features, we show that the two countries have both evolved comprehensively toward a knowledge-based society, in order to ensure the prosperity of their citizens. Secondly, we single out a threefold convergence between…

  12. Convergent Validity Evidence regarding the Validity of the Chilean Standards-Based Teacher Evaluation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelices, Maria Veronica; Taut, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes convergent validity evidence regarding the mandatory, standards-based Chilean national teacher evaluation system (NTES). The study examined whether NTES identifies--and thereby rewards or punishes--the "right" teachers as high- or low-performing. We collected in-depth teaching performance data on a sample of 58 teachers who…

  13. Human Systems Engineering: A Learning Model Designed To Converge Education, Business, and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Karen L.

    The Human Systems Engineering (HSE) Model was created to facilitate collaboration among education, business, and industry. It emphasized the role of leaders who converge with others to accomplish their goals while paying attention to the key elements that create successful partnerships. The partnership of XXsys Technologies, Inc., University of…

  14. Convergent synthesis of the HIJKLM ring system of ciguatoxin CTX3C.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Hiroyoshi; Nishiuma, Naoki; Abe, Takashi; Kadota, Isao

    2011-09-01

    The HIJKLM ring system of ciguatoxin CTX3C was synthesized in a convergent manner. The key steps were a conjugate addition/alkylation sequence, spiroacetalization, intramolecular allylation, ring-closing metathesis, and hydrogenation to form the 36-α-methyl substituent. PMID:21805971

  15. Converging Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Calculations with Respect to Basis and System Size in Protein Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Neubauer, Thomas J.; Caulkins, Bethany G.; Mueller, Leonard J.; Beran, Gregory J. O.

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio chemical shielding calculations greatly facilitate the interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts in biological systems, but the large sizes of these systems requires approximations in the chemical models used to represent them. Achieving good convergence in the predicted chemical shieldings is necessary before one can unravel how other complex structural and dynamical factors affect the NMR measurements. Here, we investigate how to balance trade-offs between using a better basis set or a larger cluster model for predicting the chemical shieldings of the substrates in two representative examples of protein-substrate systems involving different domains in tryptophan synthase: the N-(4′-trifluoromethoxybenzoyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F9) ligand which binds in the α active site, and the 2-aminophenol (2AP) quinonoid intermediate formed in the β active site. We first demonstrate that a chemically intuitive three-layer, locally dense basis model that uses a large basis on the substrate, a medium triple-zeta basis to describe its hydrogen-bonding partners and/or surrounding van derWaals cavity, and a crude basis set for more distant atoms provides chemical shieldings in good agreement with much more expensive large basis calculations. Second, long-range quantum mechanical interactions are important, and one can accurately estimate them as a small-basis correction to larger-basis calculations on a smaller cluster. The combination of these approaches enables one to perform density functional theory NMR chemical shift calculations in protein systems that are well-converged with respect to both basis set and cluster size. PMID:25993979

  16. Convergent method of and apparatus for distributed control of robotic systems using fuzzy logic

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John T.; Driessen, Brian J.; Kwok, Kwan S.

    2002-01-01

    A decentralized fuzzy logic control system for one vehicle or for multiple robotic vehicles provides a way to control each vehicle to converge on a goal without collisions between vehicles or collisions with other obstacles, in the presence of noisy input measurements and a limited amount of compute-power and memory on board each robotic vehicle. The fuzzy controller demonstrates improved robustness to noise relative to an exact controller.

  17. Systems theory and the ethics of human enhancement: a framework for NBIC convergence.

    PubMed

    Khushf, George

    2004-05-01

    Representatives from government and the private sector recommend a major, cooperative initiative directed toward using NBIC (nano-, bio-, info-, and cogno-) technologies for human enhancement. By appropriately seeding the convergence of NBIC domains, they believe that the rate of development can be both accelerated and simultaneously channeled to avoid adverse risk and advance human good. However, to accomplish these goals, leaders of the convergence efforts identified as a major intellectual barrier the "development of a hierarchical architecture for integrating science across many scales, disciplines, and data modalities." Such a holistic framework requires a radical rethinking of the nature of science and engineering, and, beyond this, is also necessary for addressing their normative ethical and societal implications. In the first part of this essay, I consider the claim that a new view of science and engineering is needed. After reviewing the central features of a classical view of science, I consider aspects of the nano-revolution, showing why the classical conception is inappropriate and how a systems-oriented perspective is responsive to the character of this new science. I then consider how both science and engineering are transformed, calling into question older dichotomies between pure and applied domains. With the reworking of this distinction comes opportunities for rethinking the relation between science and the humanities more generally, which is necessary if we are to more appropriately address normative ethical aspects of the convergence initiative. After providing this groundwork for the needed hierarchical architecture, I consider a useful example of how a systems perspective might guide NBIC convergence. In the 1960s-1990s George Engel advocated a systems-theoretic model as an alternative to a more reductionistic "biomedical model" in medicine, and he did it for the exact same reasons as those advocated by the leaders of the NBIC convergence

  18. Rigorous approximation of stationary measures and convergence to equilibrium for iterated function systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatolo, Stefano; Monge, Maurizio; Nisoli, Isaia

    2016-07-01

    We study the problem of the rigorous computation of the stationary measure and of the rate of convergence to equilibrium of an iterated function system described by a stochastic mixture of two or more dynamical systems that are either all uniformly expanding on the interval, either all contracting. In the expanding case, the associated transfer operators satisfy a Lasota–Yorke inequality, we show how to compute a rigorous approximations of the stationary measure in the L 1 norm and an estimate for the rate of convergence. The rigorous computation requires a computer-aided proof of the contraction of the transfer operators for the maps, and we show that this property propagates to the transfer operators of the IFS. In the contracting case we perform a rigorous approximation of the stationary measure in the Wasserstein–Kantorovich distance and rate of convergence, using the same functional analytic approach. We show that a finite computation can produce a realistic computation of all contraction rates for the whole parameter space. We conclude with a description of the implementation and numerical experiments. All the authors were partially supported by ICTP and by EU Marie-Curie IRSES Brazilian–European partnership in Dynamical Systems (FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IRSES 318999 BREUDS), SG thanks The Leverhulme Trust for support through Network Grant IN-2014-021.

  19. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Convergence Insufficiency En Español Read in Chinese What is convergence insufficiency? Convergence insufficiency is the ...

  20. International Monetary Fund sacrifices higher growth, employment, spending, and public investment in health systems in order to keep inflation unnecessarily low.

    PubMed

    Rowden, Rick

    2010-01-01

    The International Monetary Fund's response to evidence on the impact of its programs on public health fails to address the fundamental criticisms about its policies. The IMF's demand for borrowers to achieve extremely low inflation targets is founded on very little empirical evidence in the peer-reviewed literature. The low-inflation policies privilege international creditors over domestic debtors and short-term priorities over long-term development goals, and contain high social costs, referred to by economists as a "sacrifice ratio." For example, governments' raising of interest rates to bring down inflation undermines the ability of domestic firms to expand production and employment and thus "sacrifices" higher economic growth and higher tax revenues and unnecessarily constrains domestic health spending. During financial crisis, most countries seek to lower interest rates to stimulate the economy, the opposite of the IMF's general advice. Perversely, compliance with IMF policies has become a prerequisite for receiving donor aid. Critiques of the IMF express significant concerns that IMF fiscal and monetary policies are unduly restrictive. Health advocates must weigh in on such matters and pressure their finance ministries, particularly in the G7, to take steps at the level of the IMF Executive Board to revisit and modify its policy framework on deficits and inflation. Such reforms are crucial to enable countries to generate more domestic resources while the global health community searches for ways to support strengthening health system capacity. PMID:20440977

  1. Multi-views storage model and access methods of conversation history in converged IP messaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meilian; Yang, Dong; Zhou, Xing

    2013-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the requirements of conversation history storage in CPM (Converged IP Messaging) system, a Multi-views storage model and access methods of conversation history are proposed. The storage model separates logical views from physical storage and divides the storage into system managed region and user managed region. It simultaneously supports conversation view, system pre-defined view and user-defined view of storage. The rationality and feasibility of multi-view presentation, the physical storage model and access methods are validated through the implemented prototype. It proves that, this proposal has good scalability, which will help to optimize the physical data storage structure and improve storage performance.

  2. Can systems biology help to separate evolutionary analogies (convergent homoplasies) from homologies?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Malcolm S; Notar, Julia C

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evolutionary analogies (homoplasies) of many kinds occur in diverse phylogenetic clades/lineages on both the animal and plant branches of the Tree of Life. Living organisms whose last common ancestors lived millions to hundreds of millions of years ago have later converged morphologically, behaviorally or at other levels of functionality (from molecular genetics through biochemistry, physiology and other organismic processes) as a result of long term strong natural selection that has constrained and channeled evolutionary processes. This happens most often when organisms belonging to different clades occupy ecological niches, habitats or environments sharing major characteristics that select for a relatively narrow range of organismic properties. Systems biology, broadly defined, provides theoretical and methodological approaches that are beginning to make it possible to answer a perennial evolutionary biological question relating to convergent homoplasies: Are at least some of the apparent analogies actually unrecognized homologies? This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of important aspects of this topic area. It also provides a resource describing many homoplasies that may be fruitful subjects for systems biological research. PMID:25620424

  3. Improved convergence in the three-nucleon system at very low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.

    2004-11-01

    Neutron-deuteron scattering in the context of "pion-less" effective field theory at very low energies is investigated to next-to-next-to-leading order. Convergence is improved by fitting the two-nucleon contact interactions to the tail of the deuteron wave-function, a procedure known as Z-parameterisation and extended here to the three-nucleon system. The improvement is particularly striking in the doublet-S-wave (triton) channel, where better agreement to potential-model calculations and better convergence from order to order in the power counting is achieved for momenta as high as ˜120 MeV. Investigating the cut-off dependence of the phase-shifts, one confirms numerically the analytical finding that the first momentum-dependent three-body force enters at N 2LO. The other partial waves converge also substantially faster. Effective-range parameters of the nd-system are determined, e.g., for the quartet-S-wave scattering length a=[6.35±0.02] fm, which compares favourably both in magnitude and uncertainty with recent high-precision potential-model determinations. Differential cross-sections up to E≈15 MeV agree with data.

  4. Extreme variability in convergence to structural balance in frustrated dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajeev; Dasgupta, Subinay; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2014-01-01

    In many complex systems, heterogeneous connections can subject constituent elements to conflicting influences, resulting in frustration. Here we show numerically that an initially frustrated system can achieve structural balance by a link adaptation process inspired by Hebb's principle, with interaction strengths evolving in accordance with the dynamical states of its components. In the presence of fluctuations the time required to converge to the balanced state exhibits large dispersion characterized by a bimodal distribution, pointing to an intriguing problem in the study of evolving energy landscapes.

  5. On the basis set convergence of electron-electron entanglement measures: helium-like systems.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    A systematic investigation of three different electron-electron entanglement measures, namely the von Neumann, the linear and the occupation number entropy at full configuration interaction level has been performed for the four helium-like systems hydride, helium, Li(+) and Be(2+) using a large number of different basis sets. The convergence behavior of the resulting energies and entropies revealed that the latter do in general not show the expected strictly monotonic increase upon increase of the one-electron basis. Overall, the three different entanglement measures show good agreement among each other, the largest deviations being observed for small basis sets. The data clearly demonstrates that it is important to consider the nature of the chemical system when investigating entanglement phenomena in the framework of Gaussian type basis sets: while in case of hydride the use of augmentation functions is crucial, the application of core functions greatly improves the accuracy in case of cationic systems such as Li(+) and Be(2+). In addition, numerical derivatives of the entanglement measures with respect to the nucleic charge have been determined, which proved to be a very sensitive probe of the convergence leading to qualitatively wrong results (i.e., the wrong sign) if too small basis sets are used. PMID:24790952

  6. On the basis set convergence of electron–electron entanglement measures: helium-like systems

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic investigation of three different electron–electron entanglement measures, namely the von Neumann, the linear and the occupation number entropy at full configuration interaction level has been performed for the four helium-like systems hydride, helium, Li+ and Be2+ using a large number of different basis sets. The convergence behavior of the resulting energies and entropies revealed that the latter do in general not show the expected strictly monotonic increase upon increase of the one–electron basis. Overall, the three different entanglement measures show good agreement among each other, the largest deviations being observed for small basis sets. The data clearly demonstrates that it is important to consider the nature of the chemical system when investigating entanglement phenomena in the framework of Gaussian type basis sets: while in case of hydride the use of augmentation functions is crucial, the application of core functions greatly improves the accuracy in case of cationic systems such as Li+ and Be2+. In addition, numerical derivatives of the entanglement measures with respect to the nucleic charge have been determined, which proved to be a very sensitive probe of the convergence leading to qualitatively wrong results (i.e., the wrong sign) if too small basis sets are used. PMID:24790952

  7. Parameter estimation in nonlinear distributed systems - Approximation theory and convergence results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory is described for Galerkin approximations applied to inverse problems involving nonlinear distributed parameter systems. Parameter estimation problems are considered and formulated as the minimization of a least-squares-like performance index over a compact admissible parameter set subject to state constraints given by an inhomogeneous nonlinear distributed system. The theory applies to systems whose dynamics can be described by either time-independent or nonstationary strongly maximal monotonic operators defined on a reflexive Banach space which is densely and continuously embedded in a Hilbert space. It is demonstrated that if readily verifiable conditions on the system's dependence on the unknown parameters are satisfied, and the usual Galerkin approximation assumption holds, then solutions to the approximating problems exist and approximate a solution to the original infinite-dimensional identification problem.

  8. Introduction to ‘Homology and convergence in nervous system evolution’

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The origin of brains and central nervous systems (CNSs) is thought to have occurred before the Palaeozoic era 540 Ma. Yet in the absence of tangible evidence, there has been continued debate whether today's brains and nervous systems derive from one ancestral origin or whether similarities among them are due to convergent evolution. With the advent of molecular developmental genetics and genomics, it has become clear that homology is a concept that applies not only to morphologies, but also to genes, developmental processes, as well as to behaviours. Comparative studies in phyla ranging from annelids and arthropods to mammals are providing evidence that corresponding developmental genetic mechanisms act not only in dorso–ventral and anterior–posterior axis specification but also in segmentation, neurogenesis, axogenesis and eye/photoreceptor cell formation that appear to be conserved throughout the animal kingdom. These data are supported by recent studies which identified Mid-Cambrian fossils with preserved soft body parts that present segmental arrangements in brains typical of modern arthropods, and similarly organized brain centres and circuits across phyla that may reflect genealogical correspondence and control similar behavioural manifestations. Moreover, congruence between genetic and geological fossil records support the notion that by the ‘Cambrian explosion’ arthropods and chordates shared similarities in brain and nervous system organization. However, these similarities are strikingly absent in several sister- and outgroups of arthropods and chordates which raises several questions, foremost among them: what kind of natural laws and mechanisms underlie the convergent evolution of such similarities? And, vice versa: what are the selection pressures and genetic mechanisms underlying the possible loss or reduction of brains and CNSs in multiple lineages during the course of evolution? These questions were addressed at a Royal Society meeting to

  9. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. Objectives: We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. Methods: For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Conclusions: Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Citation: Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that

  10. Load Segmentation for Convergence of Distribution Automation and Advanced Metering Infrastructure Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamulaparthy, Balakrishna; KS, Swarup; Kommu, Rajagopal

    2014-12-01

    Distribution automation (DA) applications are limited to feeder level today and have zero visibility outside of the substation feeder and reaching down to the low-voltage distribution network level. This has become a major obstacle in realizing many automated functions and enhancing existing DA capabilities. Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) systems are being widely deployed by utilities across the world creating system-wide communications access to every monitoring and service point, which collects data from smart meters and sensors in short time intervals, in response to utility needs. DA and AMI systems convergence provides unique opportunities and capabilities for distribution grid modernization with the DA system acting as a controller and AMI system acting as feedback to DA system, for which DA applications have to understand and use the AMI data selectively and effectively. In this paper, we propose a load segmentation method that helps the DA system to accurately understand and use the AMI data for various automation applications with a suitable case study on power restoration.

  11. Hydrogeological system of erosional convergent margins and its influence on tectonics and interplate seismogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Grevemeyer, I.; Sahling, H.; Barckhausen, U.; Hensen, C.; Wallmann, K.; Weinrebe, W.; Vannucchi, P.; von Huene, R.; McIntosh, K.

    2008-03-01

    Fluid distribution in convergent margins is by most accounts closely related to tectonics. This association has been widely studied at accretionary prisms, but at half of the Earth's convergent margins, tectonic erosion grinds down overriding plates, and here fluid distribution and its relation to tectonics remain speculative. Here we present a new conceptual model for the hydrological system of erosional convergent margins. The model is based largely on new data and recently published observations from along the Middle America Trench offshore Nicaragua and Costa Rica, and it is consistent with observations from other erosional margins. The observations indicate that erosional margins possess previously unrecognized distinct hydrogeological systems: Most fluid contained in the sediment pores and liberated by early dehydration reactions drains from the plate boundary through a fractured upper plate to seep at the seafloor across the slope, rather than migrating along the décollement toward the deformation front as described for accretionary prisms. The observations indicate that the relative fluid abundance across the plate-boundary fault zone and fluid migration influence long-term tectonics and the transition from aseismic to seismogenic behavior. The segment of the plate boundary where fluid appears to be more abundant corresponds to the locus of long-term tectonic erosion, where tectonic thinning of the overriding plate causes subsidence and the formation of the continental slope. This correspondence between observations indicates that tectonic erosion is possibly linked to the migration of overpressured fluids into the overriding plate. The presence of overpressured fluids at the plate boundary is compatible with the highest flow rates estimated at slope seeps. The change from aseismic to seismogenic behavior along the plate boundary of the erosional margin begins where the amount of fluid at the fault declines with depth, indicating a control on interplate

  12. Quantitative recurrence statistics and convergence to an extreme value distribution for non-uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M. P.; Rabassa, P.; Sterk, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    For non-uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems we consider the time series of maxima along typical orbits. Using ideas based upon quantitative recurrence time statistics we prove convergence of the maxima (under suitable normalization) to an extreme value distribution, and obtain estimates on the rate of convergence. We show that our results are applicable to a range of examples, and include new results for Lorenz maps, certain partially hyperbolic systems, and non-uniformly expanding systems with sub-exponential decay of correlations. For applications where analytic results are not readily available we show how to estimate the rate of convergence to an extreme value distribution based upon numerical information of the quantitative recurrence statistics. We envisage that such information will lead to more efficient statistical parameter estimation schemes based upon the block-maxima method.

  13. Educational System Development and Convergence: A Literature Review and Propositional Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inkeles, Alex; Sirowy, Larry

    Structural convergence theory seeks to determine whether as nations industrialize they move toward common ways of organizing, arranging, and defining the institutional subsystems in their social structures. A related concern is whether the characteristics of these institutional subsystems themselves promote or retard convergence. National…

  14. Higher Order Factor Convergence and Divergence of Two Distinct Personality Systems: Cattell's HSPQ and Jackson's PRF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesselroade, John B.; Bates, Paul B.

    1975-01-01

    Seeks empirical evidence of convergence of concepts measured by two personality inventories--Cattell's High School Personality Questionnaire and Jackson's Personality Research Form. Implication of the levels of factor convergence obtained in relation to theory building and prediction are discussed. (RC)

  15. Convergent Adaptation in Small Groups: Understanding Professional Development Activities through a Complex Systems Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Susan; Liu, Lei; Goh, Sao-Ee

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of individual or group adaptation can provide valuable information for constructing professional development strategies to increase chances of instructional success. This paper reports on an exploratory study that identifies indicators of convergent vs. non-convergent adaptation in two cases of teachers working together…

  16. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bittleston, Leonora S; Pierce, Naomi E; Ellison, Aaron M; Pringle, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent interactions in a comparative context is likely to facilitate prediction of the ecological roles of organisms (including microbes) in multispecies interactions and selective pressures acting in poorly understood or newly discovered multispecies systems. We illustrate the concept of convergent interactions with examples: vertebrates and their gut bacteria; ectomycorrhizae; insect-fungal-bacterial interactions; pitcher-plant food webs; and ants and ant-plants. PMID:26858111

  17. Systems genetics identifies a convergent gene network for cognition and neurodevelopmental disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael R; Shkura, Kirill; Langley, Sarah R; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Srivastava, Prashant; Hill, W David; Rackham, Owen J L; Davies, Gail; Harris, Sarah E; Moreno-Moral, Aida; Rotival, Maxime; Speed, Doug; Petrovski, Slavé; Katz, Anaïs; Hayward, Caroline; Porteous, David J; Smith, Blair H; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hocking, Lynne J; Starr, John M; Liewald, David C; Visconti, Alessia; Falchi, Mario; Bottolo, Leonardo; Rossetti, Tiziana; Danis, Bénédicte; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Foerch, Patrik; Grote, Alexander; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Becker, Albert J; Kaminski, Rafal M; Deary, Ian J; Petretto, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Genetic determinants of cognition are poorly characterized, and their relationship to genes that confer risk for neurodevelopmental disease is unclear. Here we performed a systems-level analysis of genome-wide gene expression data to infer gene-regulatory networks conserved across species and brain regions. Two of these networks, M1 and M3, showed replicable enrichment for common genetic variants underlying healthy human cognitive abilities, including memory. Using exome sequence data from 6,871 trios, we found that M3 genes were also enriched for mutations ascertained from patients with neurodevelopmental disease generally, and intellectual disability and epileptic encephalopathy in particular. M3 consists of 150 genes whose expression is tightly developmentally regulated, but which are collectively poorly annotated for known functional pathways. These results illustrate how systems-level analyses can reveal previously unappreciated relationships between neurodevelopmental disease-associated genes in the developed human brain, and provide empirical support for a convergent gene-regulatory network influencing cognition and neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:26691832

  18. Algorithms in nature: the convergence of systems biology and computational thinking

    PubMed Central

    Navlakha, Saket; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2011-01-01

    Computer science and biology have enjoyed a long and fruitful relationship for decades. Biologists rely on computational methods to analyze and integrate large data sets, while several computational methods were inspired by the high-level design principles of biological systems. Recently, these two directions have been converging. In this review, we argue that thinking computationally about biological processes may lead to more accurate models, which in turn can be used to improve the design of algorithms. We discuss the similar mechanisms and requirements shared by computational and biological processes and then present several recent studies that apply this joint analysis strategy to problems related to coordination, network analysis, and tracking and vision. We also discuss additional biological processes that can be studied in a similar manner and link them to potential computational problems. With the rapid accumulation of data detailing the inner workings of biological systems, we expect this direction of coupling biological and computational studies to greatly expand in the future. PMID:22068329

  19. Sharp Convergence Rate of the Glimm Scheme for General Nonlinear Hyperbolic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Fabio; Marson, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Consider a general strictly hyperbolic, quasilinear system, in one space dimesion u_t+A(u) u_x=0,quadquadquadquadquadquad(1) where {u mapsto A(u), uinΩsubset{mathbb{R}}^N} , is a smooth matrix-valued map. Given an initial datum u(0, ·) with small total variation, let u( t, ·) be the corresponding (unique) vanishing viscosity solution of (1) obtained as a limit of solutions to the viscous parabolic approximation u t + A( u) u x = μ u xx , as μ → 0. For every T ≥ 0, we prove the a-priori bound left\\|u^{\\varepsilon}(T,\\cdot)-u(T,\\cdot)right\\|_{{mathbb{L}^1}}=o(1)\\cdotsqrt{\\varepsilon} |log{\\varepsilon}|quadquadquadquadquadquad(1) for an approximate solution {u^{\\varepsilon}} of (1) constructed by the Glimm scheme, with mesh size {Δ x = Δ t = {\\varepsilon}} , and with a suitable choice of the sampling sequence. This result provides for general hyperbolic systems the same type of error estimates valid for Glimm approximate solutions of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws u t + F( u) x = 0 satisfying the classical Lax or Liu assumptions on the eigenvalues λ k ( u) and on the eigenvectors r k ( u) of the Jacobian matrix A( u) = DF( u). The estimate (2) is obtained introducing a new wave interaction functional with a cubic term that controls the nonlinear coupling of waves of the same family and at the same time decreases at interactions by a quantity that is of the same order of the product of the wave strength times the change in the wave speeds. This is precisely the type of errors arising in a wave tracing analysis of the Glimm scheme, which is crucial to control in order to achieve an accurate estimate of the convergence rate as (2).

  20. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... insufficiency? Symptoms of convergence insufficiency include diplopia (double vision) and headaches when reading. Many patients will complain that they have difficulty concentrating on near work (computer, reading, etc.) and that the written word blurs ...

  1. Semi-discrete approximations to nonlinear systems of conservation laws; consistency and L(infinity)-stability imply convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1988-01-01

    A convergence theory for semi-discrete approximations to nonlinear systems of conservation laws is developed. It is shown, by a series of scalar counter-examples, that consistency with the conservation law alone does not guarantee convergence. Instead, a notion of consistency which takes into account both the conservation law and its augmenting entropy condition is introduced. In this context it is concluded that consistency and L(infinity)-stability guarantee for a relevant class of admissible entropy functions, that their entropy production rate belongs to a compact subset of H(loc)sup -1 (x,t). One can now use compensated compactness arguments in order to turn this conclusion into a convergence proof. The current state of the art for these arguments includes the scalar and a wide class of 2 x 2 systems of conservation laws. The general framework of the vanishing viscosity method is studied as an effective way to meet the consistency and L(infinity)-stability requirements. How this method is utilized to enforce consistency and stability for scalar conservation laws is shown. In this context we prove, under the appropriate assumptions, the convergence of finite difference approximations (e.g., the high resolution TVD and UNO methods), finite element approximations (e.g., the Streamline-Diffusion methods) and spectral and pseudospectral approximations (e.g., the Spectral Viscosity methods).

  2. Novel, spherically-convergent ion systems for neutron source and fusion energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. C.; Nebel, R. A.; Ribe, F. L.; Schauer, M. M.; Schranck, L. S.; Umstadter, K. R.

    1999-06-01

    Combining spherical convergence with electrostatic or electro-magnetostatic confinement of a nonneutral plasma offers the possibility of high fusion gain in a centimeter-sized system. The physics principles, scaling laws, and experimental embodiments of this approach are presented. Steps to development of this approach from its present proof-of-principle experiments to a useful fusion power reactor are outlined. This development path is much less expensive and simpler, compared to that for conventional magnetic confinement and leads to different and useful products at each stage. Reactor projections show both high mass power density and low to moderate wall loading. This approach is being tested experimentally in PFX-I (Penning Fusion eXperiment-Ions), which is based on the following recent advances: 1) Demonstration, in PFX (our former experiment), that it is possible to combine nonneutral electron plasma confinement with nonthermal, spherical focussing; 2) Theoretical development of the POPS (Periodically Oscillating Plasma Sphere) concept, which allows spherical compression of thermal-equilibrium ions; 3) The concept of a massively-modular approach to fusion power, and associated elimination of the critical problem of extremely high first wall loading. PFX-I is described. PFX-I is being designed as a small (<1.5 cm) spherical system into which moderate-energy electrons (up to 100 kV) are injected. These electrons are magnetically insulated from passing to the sphere and their space charge field is then used to spherically focus ions. Results of initial operation with electrons only are presented. Deuterium operation can produce significant neutron output with unprecedented efficiency (fusion gain Q).

  3. The changing context of Western European healthcare systems: convergence versus divergence in nursing problematics.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Ada; Camus, Didier; Desaulles, Cécile; Kuhne, Nicolas

    2006-10-01

    Many countries reorganizing their health services are drawn toward similar reform programs and tend to experience what seem to be similar problems relating to implementation outcomes. One such problem is the major crisis within the nursing profession relating to the labor market, working conditions and level of autonomy. This research examines the thesis that the profile of nursing problems is global (the 'convergence' thesis) by comparing the changing hospital contexts nursing has been confronting in 20 Western European countries between 1990 and 2001. The analysis indicates that in spite of growing convergence, the divergence in patient care processes, workforce composition and resources allocated for care is still rather remarkable and that similarity or divergence between countries changes over time. This contextual variability highlights why problems such as the crisis of the nursing profession must be analysed from a divergent rather than a convergent perspective. PMID:16782252

  4. Fuzzy optimal swarm of autonomous aircrafts for target determination and convergence control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Zach D.

    The thesis project proposes analytical and theoretical algorithms for a networked swarm of autonomous vehicles, such as those used in planet exploration, and to be used in target location determination and convergence, an algorithm of this type could be used in an Autonomous Stratospheric Aircraft (ASA), thus having the possibility of being used for the exploration of a planet as well as many other applications. Upon locating an unknown location of a specified target, the algorithm would then swarm and eventually converge upon the location. There are two similar, but fundamentally different algorithms proposed in this project. These algorithms are capable of locating and converging upon multiple targeted locations simultaneously. This project is inspired by the current thought of NASA in the search of life on Mars, which is "Follow the Water" [18], where the targeted location would be the targeted source of water. These algorithms make use of combining a modified Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm with fuzzy variables for increased intelligence.

  5. Chemodiversity in Selaginella: a reference system for parallel and convergent metabolic evolution in terrestrial plants

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Noel, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Early plants began colonizing the terrestrial earth approximately 450 million years ago. Their success on land has been partially attributed to the evolution of specialized metabolic systems from core metabolic pathways, the former yielding structurally and functionally diverse chemicals to cope with a myriad of biotic and abiotic ecological pressures. Over the past two decades, functional genomics, primarily focused on flowering plants, has begun cataloging the biosynthetic players underpinning assorted classes of plant specialized metabolites. However, the molecular mechanisms enriching specialized metabolic pathways during land plant evolution remain largely unexplored. Selaginella is an extant lycopodiophyte genus representative of an ancient lineage of tracheophytes. Notably, the lycopodiophytes diverged from euphyllophytes over 400 million years ago. The recent completion of the whole-genome sequence of an extant lycopodiophyte, S. moellendorffii, provides new genomic and biochemical resources for studying metabolic evolution in vascular plants. 400 million years of independent evolution of lycopodiophytes and euphyllophytes resulted in numerous metabolic traits confined to each lineage. Surprisingly, a cadre of specialized metabolites, generally accepted to be restricted to seed plants, have been identified in Selaginella. Initial work suggested that Selaginella lacks obvious catalytic homologs known to be involved in the biosynthesis of well-studied specialized metabolites in seed plants. Therefore, these initial functional analyses suggest that the same chemical phenotypes arose independently more commonly than anticipated from our conventional understanding of the evolution of metabolism. Notably, the emergence of analogous and homologous catalytic machineries through convergent and parallel evolution, respectively, seems to have occurred repeatedly in different plant lineages. PMID:23717312

  6. Monetary Policy after August 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertler, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author describes conceptually how to think about the dramatic changes in monetary policy since the sub-prime crisis of August 2007. He also discusses how to incorporate these changes and related economic concepts in the teaching of an undergraduate class in macroeconomics. A distinction is made between conventional and…

  7. A Monetary Policy Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengwiler, Yvan

    2004-01-01

    The author presents a computer game that puts the player in the role of a central bank governor. The game is a stochastic simulation of a standard reduced form macro model, and the user interacts with this simulation by manipulating the interest rate. The problem the player faces is in many ways quite realistic--just as a real monetary authority,…

  8. Geomorphological analysis of the drainage system on the active convergent system in Azerbaijan, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh Firouz, Amaneh; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Giachetta, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    profiles are related to active fault systems.

  9. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

    2014-09-15

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

  10. Cesaro-One Summability and Uniform Convergence of Solutions of a Sturm-Liouville System

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, R.S.; Tucker, D.H.

    1999-01-26

    Galerkin methods are used in separable Hilbert spaces to construct and compute L{sup 2} [0,{pi}] solutions to large classes of differential equations. In this note a Galerkin method is used to construct series solutions of a nonhomogeneous Sturm-Liouville problem defined on [0,{pi}]. The series constructed are shown to converge to a specified du Bois-Reymond function f in L{sup 2} [0,{pi}]. It is then shown that the series solutions can be made to converge uniformly to the specified du Bois-Reymond function when averaged by the Ces{'a}ro-one summability method. Therefore, in the Ces{'a}ro-one sense, every continuous function f on [0,{pi}] is the uniform limit of solutions of nonhomogeneous Sturm-Liouville problems.

  11. Molecular Evidence for Convergence and Parallelism in Evolution of Complex Brains of Cephalopod Molluscs: Insights from Visual Systems.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M A; Ogura, A; Ikeo, K; Shigeno, S; Moritaki, T; Winters, G C; Kohn, A B; Moroz, L L

    2015-12-01

    Coleoid cephalopods show remarkable evolutionary convergence with vertebrates in their neural organization, including (1) eyes and visual system with optic lobes, (2) specialized parts of the brain controlling learning and memory, such as vertical lobes, and (3) unique vasculature supporting such complexity of the central nervous system. We performed deep sequencing of eye transcriptomes of pygmy squids (Idiosepius paradoxus) and chambered nautiluses (Nautilus pompilius) to decipher the molecular basis of convergent evolution in cephalopods. RNA-seq was complemented by in situ hybridization to localize the expression of selected genes. We found three types of genomic innovations in the evolution of complex brains: (1) recruitment of novel genes into morphogenetic pathways, (2) recombination of various coding and regulatory regions of different genes, often called "evolutionary tinkering" or "co-option", and (3) duplication and divergence of genes. Massive recruitment of novel genes occurred in the evolution of the "camera" eye from nautilus' "pinhole" eye. We also showed that the type-2 co-option of transcription factors played important roles in the evolution of the lens and visual neurons. In summary, the cephalopod convergent morphological evolution of the camera eyes was driven by a mosaic of all types of gene recruitments. In addition, our analysis revealed unexpected variations of squids' opsins, retinochromes, and arrestins, providing more detailed information, valuable for further research on intra-ocular and extra-ocular photoreception of the cephalopods. PMID:26002349

  12. Variation in steroid hormone levels among Caribbean Anolis lizards: endocrine system convergence?

    PubMed

    Husak, Jerry F; Lovern, Matthew B

    2014-04-01

    Variation in aggression among species can be due to a number of proximate and ultimate factors, leading to patterns of divergent and convergent evolution of behavior among even closely related species. Caribbean Anolis lizards are well known for their convergence in microhabitat use and morphology, but they also display marked convergence in social behavior and patterns of aggression. We studied 18 Anolis species across six ecomorphs on four different Caribbean islands to test four main hypotheses. We hypothesized that species differences in aggression would be due to species differences in circulating testosterone (T), a steroid hormone implicated in numerous studies across vertebrate taxa as a primary determinant of social behavior; more aggressive species were expected to have higher baseline concentrations of T and corticosterone. We further hypothesized that low-T species would increase T and corticosterone levels during a social challenge. Within three of the four island assemblages studied we found differences in T levels among species within an island that differ in aggression, but in the opposite pattern than predicted: more aggressive species had lower baseline T than the least aggressive species. The fourth island, Puerto Rico, showed the pattern of baseline T levels among species we predicted. There were no patterns of corticosterone levels among species or ecomorphs. One of the two species tested increased T in response to a social challenge, but neither species elevated corticosterone. Our results suggest that it is possible for similarities in aggression among closely related species to evolve via different proximate mechanisms. PMID:24662425

  13. Modelling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dobešová, Anna; Klepáč, Václav; Kolman, Pavel; Bednářová, Petra

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to compare different approaches to modeling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism. For this purpose we built time-varying parameter VAR (TVP-VAR) model with stochastic volatility and VAR-DCC-GARCH model with conditional variance. The data from three European countries are included in the analysis: the Czech Republic, Germany and Slovakia. Results show that VAR-DCC-GARCH system captures higher volatility of observed variables but main trends and detected breaks are generally identical in both approaches.

  14. A convergent 2D finite-difference scheme for the Dirac–Poisson system and the simulation of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.; Heitzinger, C.; Markowich, P.A.

    2014-01-15

    We present a convergent finite-difference scheme of second order in both space and time for the 2D electromagnetic Dirac equation. We apply this method in the self-consistent Dirac–Poisson system to the simulation of graphene. The model is justified for low energies, where the particles have wave vectors sufficiently close to the Dirac points. In particular, we demonstrate that our method can be used to calculate solutions of the Dirac–Poisson system where potentials act as beam splitters or Veselago lenses.

  15. Convergence of Lax-Friedrichs and Godunov schemes for a nonstrictly hyperbolic system of conservation laws arising in oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djoufedie, George Noel; Felaco, Elisabetta; Rubino, Bruno; Sampalmieri, Rosella

    2016-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the compactness framework and the convergence theorem for the Lax-Friedrichs and Godunov schemes applied to a {2 × 2} system of non-strictly hyperbolic nonlinear conservation laws that arises from mathematical models for oil recovery. The presence of a degeneracy in the hyperbolicity of the system requires a careful analysis of the entropy functions, whose regularity is necessary to obtain the result. For this purpose, it is necessary to combine the classical techniques referring to a singular Euler-Poisson-Darboux equation with the compensated compactness method.

  16. 48 CFR 3045.508-3 - Quantitative and monetary control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quantitative and monetary control. 3045.508-3 Section 3045.508-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... control. Contracting officers shall require the contractor to provide the quantity and unit cost of...

  17. Convergence and Non-Convergence: stories of elderly who have attempted suicide and the Integrated Care System in Porto Alegre/RS, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Conte, Marta; Cruz, Claudia Weyne; da Silva, Carla Guimarães; de Castilhos, Nara Regina Moura; Nicolella, Alberto Domiziano Rita

    2015-06-01

    This article is the product of research undertaken in the city of Porto Alegre, in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul. The goal is to bring to light and discuss a little known phenomenon - attempted suicide by the elderly. Under-reporting of suicide attempts among this population makes it difficult to place this serious public health problem on the political agenda. As part of this study, we interviewed not only elderly persons who had attempted suicide, but also their family members and mental health and emergency and urgent service professionals. These interviews took place during the course of 2014. From a textual discourse analysis of the various reports, there emerged a category we will call Convergence and Non-Convergence, which deals with the relationship between the elderly population's need for care and the healthcare model in use. This study uses three short stories of individuals to question the biomedical model of serving risk situations, stressing the concept of an Expanded Clinic to provide integrated healthcare. This concept focuses on the different types of care and the uniqueness of each user, which often the biomedical model neglects. This study also highlights the need to develop a line of care for the elderly, with investments in continued education about active aging and care in times of crises, articulating a cross-sectorial network. PMID:26060952

  18. Mainstreaming nutrition metrics in household surveys--toward a multidisciplinary convergence of data systems.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Prabhu L; Ricketts, Katie D

    2014-12-01

    Since the 2008 food price crisis, food and nutrition security are back on the global development agenda, with particular emphasis on agricultural pathways toward improved nutrition. Parallel efforts are being promoted to improve the data and metrics for monitoring progress toward positive nutritional outcomes, especially for women and children. Despite the increased investment in tracking nutritional outcomes, these efforts are often made in silos, which create challenges for integrating nutritional data with other sectoral data, such as those related to agriculture. This paper proposes a minimum set of nutrition indicators to be included in nationally representative agricultural (and multitopic) household surveys. Building multisectoral convergence across existing surveys will allow us to better identify priority interventions and to monitor progress toward improved nutrition targets. PMID:25407161

  19. Along-strike variations of the partitioning of convergence across the Haiyuan fault system detected by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daout, S.; Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M.-P.; Barbot, S.; Tapponnier, P.; Peltzer, G.; Socquet, A.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    Oblique convergence across Tibet leads to slip partitioning with the coexistence of strike-slip, normal and thrust motion on major fault systems. A key point is to understand and model how faults interact and accumulate strain at depth. Here, we extract ground deformation across the Haiyuan Fault restraining bend, at the northeastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau, from Envisat radar data spanning the 2001-2011 period. We show that the complexity of the surface displacement field can be explained by the partitioning of a uniform deep-seated convergence. Mountains and sand dunes in the study area make the radar data processing challenging and require the latest developments in processing procedures for Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry. The processing strategy is based on a small baseline approach. Before unwrapping, we correct for atmospheric phase delays from global atmospheric models and digital elevation model errors. A series of filtering steps is applied to improve the signal-to-noise ratio across high ranges of the Tibetan plateau and the phase unwrapping capability across the fault, required for reliable estimate of fault movement. We then jointly invert our InSAR time-series together with published GPS displacements to test a proposed long-term slip-partitioning model between the Haiyuan and Gulang left-lateral Faults and the Qilian Shan thrusts. We explore the geometry of the fault system at depth and associated slip rates using a Bayesian approach and test the consistency of present-day geodetic surface displacements with a long-term tectonic model. We determine a uniform convergence rate of 10 [8.6-11.5] mm yr-1 with an N89 [81-97]°E across the whole fault system, with a variable partitioning west and east of a major extensional fault-jog (the Tianzhu pull-apart basin). Our 2-D model of two profiles perpendicular to the fault system gives a quantitative understanding of how crustal deformation is accommodated by the various branches of this

  20. Extrapolating surface structures to depth in transpressional systems: the role of rheology and convergence angle deduced from analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shang Yu; Neubauer, Franz; Cloetingh, Sierd; Willingshofer, Ernst; Sokoutis, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    The internal structure of major strike-slip faults is still poorly understood, particularly how the deep structure could be inferred from its surface expression (Molnar and Dayem, 2011 and references therein). Previous analogue experiments suggest that the convergence angle is the most influential factor (Leever et al., 2011). Further analogue modeling may allow a better understanding how to extrapolate surface structures to the subsurface geometry of strike-slip faults. Various scenarios of analogue experiments were designed to represent strike-slip faults in nature from different geological settings. As such key parameters, which are investigated in this study include: (a) the angle of convergence, (b) the thickness of brittle layer, (c) the influence of a rheological weak layer within the crust, and (d) influence of a thick and rheologically weak layer at the base of the crust. The latter aimed to simulate the effect of a hot metamorphic core complex or an alignment of uprising plutons bordered by a transtensional/transpressional strike-slip fault. The experiments are aimed to explain first order structures along major transcurrent strike-slip faults such as the Altyn, Kunlun, San Andrea and Greendale (Darfield earthquake 2010) faults. The preliminary results show that convergence angle significantly influences the overall geometry of the transpressive system with greater convergence angles resulting in wider fault zones and higher elevation. Different positions, densities and viscosities of weak rheological layers have not only different surface expressions but also affect the fault geometry in the subsurface. For instance, rheological weak material in the bottom layer results in stretching when experiment reaches a certain displacement and a buildup of a less segmented, wide positive flower structure. At the surface, a wide fault valley in the middle of the fault zone is the reflection of stretching along the velocity discontinuity at depth. In models with a

  1. Global diversity patterns and cross-taxa convergence in freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Tisseuil, Clement; Cornu, Jean-François; Beauchard, Olivier; Brosse, Sebastien; Darwall, William; Holland, Robert; Hugueny, Bernard; Tedesco, Pablo A; Oberdorff, Thierry

    2013-03-01

    Whereas global patterns and predictors of species diversity are well known for numerous terrestrial taxa, our understanding of freshwater diversity patterns and their predictors is much more limited. Here, we examine spatial concordance in global diversity patterns for five freshwater taxa (i.e. aquatic mammals, aquatic birds, fishes, crayfish and aquatic amphibians) and investigate the environmental factors driving these patterns at the river drainage basin grain. We find that species richness and endemism patterns are significantly correlated among taxa. We also show that cross-taxon congruence patterns are often induced by common responses of taxa to their contemporary and historical environments (i.e. convergent patterns). Apart from some taxa distinctiveness (i.e. fishes), the 'climate/productivity' hypothesis is found to explain the greatest variance in species richness and endemism patterns, followed by factors related to the 'history/dispersion' and 'area/environmental heterogeneity' hypotheses. As aquatic amphibians display the highest levels of congruency with other taxa, this taxon appears to be a good 'surrogate' candidate for developing global freshwater conservation planning at the river drainage basin grain. PMID:23173605

  2. Optimal control of unknown affine nonlinear discrete-time systems using offline-trained neural networks with proof of convergence.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Travis; Thumati, Balaje T; Jagannathan, S

    2009-01-01

    The optimal control of linear systems accompanied by quadratic cost functions can be achieved by solving the well-known Riccati equation. However, the optimal control of nonlinear discrete-time systems is a much more challenging task that often requires solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. In the recent literature, discrete-time approximate dynamic programming (ADP) techniques have been widely used to determine the optimal or near optimal control policies for affine nonlinear discrete-time systems. However, an inherent assumption of ADP requires the value of the controlled system one step ahead and at least partial knowledge of the system dynamics to be known. In this work, the need of the partial knowledge of the nonlinear system dynamics is relaxed in the development of a novel approach to ADP using a two part process: online system identification and offline optimal control training. First, in the system identification process, a neural network (NN) is tuned online using novel tuning laws to learn the complete plant dynamics so that a local asymptotic stability of the identification error can be shown. Then, using only the learned NN system model, offline ADP is attempted resulting in a novel optimal control law. The proposed scheme does not require explicit knowledge of the system dynamics as only the learned NN model is needed. The proof of convergence is demonstrated. Simulation results verify theoretical conjecture. PMID:19596551

  3. Do convergent developmental mechanisms underlie convergent phenotypes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Convergence is a pervasive evolutionary process, affecting many aspects of phenotype and even genotype. Relatively little is known about convergence in developmental processes, however, nor about the degree to which convergence in development underlies convergence in anatomy. A switch in the ecology of sea urchins from feeding to nonfeeding larvae illustrates how convergence in development can be associated with convergence in anatomy. Comparisons to more distantly related taxa, however, suggest that this association may be limited to relatively close phylogenetic comparisons. Similarities in gene expression during development provide another window into the association between convergence in developmental processes and convergence in anatomy. Several well-studied transcription factors exhibit likely cases of convergent gene expression in distantly related animal phyla. Convergence in regulatory gene expression domains is probably more common than generally acknowledged, and can arise for several different reasons. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Contrasting sedimentary processes along a convergent margin: the Lesser Antilles arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Michel; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Boudon, Georges

    2006-12-01

    Sedimentation processes occurring in an active convergent setting are well illustrated in the Lesser Antilles island arc. The margin is related to westward subduction of the North and/or the South America plates beneath the Caribbean plate. From east to west, the arc can be subdivided into several tectono-sedimentary depositional domains: the accretionary prism, the fore-arc basin, the arc platform and inter-arc basin, and the Grenada back-arc basin. The Grenada back-arc basin, the fore-arc basin (Tobago Trough) and the accretionary prism on the east side of the volcanic arc constitute traps for particles derived from the arc platform and the South American continent. The arc is volcanically active, and provides large volumes of volcaniclastic sediments which accumulate mainly in the Grenada basin by volcaniclastic gravity flows (volcanic debris avalanches, debris flows, turbiditic flows) and minor amounts by fallout. By contrast, the eastern side of the margin is fed by ash fallout and minor volcaniclastic turbidites. In this area, the dominant component of the sediments is pelagic in origin, or derived from South America (siliciclastic turbidites). Insular shelves are the locations of carbonate sedimentation, such as large platforms which develop in the Limestone Caribbees in the northern part of the margin. Reworking of carbonate material by turbidity currents also delivers lesser amounts to eastern basins of the margin. This contrasting sedimentation on both sides of the arc platform along the margin is controlled by several interacting factors including basin morphology, volcanic productivity, wind and deep-sea current patterns, and sea-level changes. Basin morphology appears to be the most dominant factor. The western slopes of the arc platform are steeper than the eastern ones, thus favouring gravity flow processes.

  5. Monetary Concepts of Male and Female Kindergartners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sarah L.; Fulton, Arlene M.

    This study examined the abilities of kindergarten children on the four tasks of McCarty's (1967) Monetary Concepts Task Test. The sample was composed of 96 kindergarten children in a rural Oklahoma community. Nearly equal numbers of boys and girls participated in the study. Monetary tasks measured were the ability to (1) identify coins as money,…

  6. Understanding the Need for Business Intelligence Systems: Technological Acceptance, Use, and Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Ashley R.

    2012-01-01

    DeLone and McLean first introduced a review of information systems success (ISS) literature and proposed the information success model in 1992. The contribution of technology use and acceptance and its influence toward ISS is an area of information systems research that has received significant attention from both researchers and practitioners.…

  7. Thermodynamic and kinematic characteristics of low-level convergent zones observed by the mobile integrated profiling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Haldun

    Thermodynamic and kinematic characteristics of convergent boundary zones (CBZs) over various geographic regions in a broad range of environmental conditions are investigated through analysis of the Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS), Doppler radar, atmospheric sounding, and surface data. The MIPS sensors provide very fine temporal kinematic and thermodynamic profiles of the atmospheric boundary layer ( ABL) and CBZ properties, including enhanced 915 MHz backscatter within the CBZ, an increase in integrated water vapor within the updrafts of the CBZ, variations in file convective boundary layer depth, and increases in ceilometer backscatter that are typically coincident with the arrival of cooler, moister air when the CBZs are associated with gust fronts, retrograding drylines, and shallow cold fronts. An analysis of over 50 gust frontal passages reveals that morphological structures and dynamical properties of gust fronts resemble laboratory simulated density currents and numerical simulations of outflow boundaries. Characteristics of a retrograding dryline and a shallow cold front sampled during IHOP 2002 project suggest a close resemblance to density currents. Gust frontal updrafts appear to be greatly affected by the adjacent boundary layer stability and interaction between the ambient shear and gust frontal circulation. Gust frontal updrafts were stronger and more vertically oriented when gust fronts were moving against the ambient flow. Interaction between gust fronts and horizontal convective rolls are investigated through radar derived wind field, Z reflectivity factors, and MIPS data sets. Convective initiation occurs more efficiently at intersection points between horizontal convective rolls and gust fronts when the HCR axes intersect the gust front at a large angle. In contrast, convection initiation was absent when HCRs were parallel to an approaching gust front which systematically encountered roll updrafts and downdrafts. A collision of two

  8. Dynamics of Convergent Migration and Mean Motion Resonances in Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchum, Jacob A.

    Recent observations of solar systems orbiting other stars show that exoplanets display an enormous range of physical properties and that planetary systems display a diverse set of architectures, which motivate further studies in planetary dynamics. Part of the richness of this dynamical problem arises from the intrinsic complexity of N-body systems, even in the absence of additional forces. The realm of physical behavior experienced by such systems is enormous, and includes mean motion resonances (MMR), secular interactions, and sensitive dependence on the initial conditions (chaos). Additional complications arise from other forces that are often present: During the early stages of evolution, circumstellar disks provide torques that influence orbital elements, and turbulent fluctuations act on young planets. Over longer time scales, solar systems are affected by tidal forces from both stars and planets, and by general relativistic corrections that lead to orbital precession. This thesis addresses a subset of these dynamical problems, including the capture rates of planets into MMR, collision probabilities for migrating rocky planets interacting with Jovian planets, and the exploration of the ``nodding'' phenomenon (where systems move in and out of MMR). This latter effect can have important implications for interpreting transit timing variations (TTV), a method to detect smaller planets due to their interaction with larger transiting bodies.

  9. Morphology, seismic characteristics and development of the sediment dispersal system along the Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Kan-Hsi; Su, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Ho-Shing; Chang, Jih-Hsin

    2015-12-01

    The sediment dispersal system along the convergent margin between Taiwan and Luzon links the terrestrial and shallow marine sediments from the source areas nearby Taiwan orogen to the ultimate sink in the northern Manila Trench. Using seismic reflection profiles and bathymetry mapping we determine three distinct morpho-tectonic features of the Penghu Submarine Canyon, deep-sea Penghu Channel and oceanic Manila Trench which are linearly interconnected to form a longitudinal sediment route. Seismic profiles show characteristic features of truncated strata along canyon walls and cut-and-fills in canyon bottom. Deformed and uplifted bathymetric ridges and troughs and volcanic intrusions with unstratified and chaotic seismic facies are associated with the Penghu Channel. The seismic facies of the trench wedge are characterized by sub-horizontal and conformable layers of sediment stacking upwards to the trench floor. The sediment wedge adjacent to the inner lower slope is deformed to blind folds and thrust faults as precursors of the accretionary prism. The most prominent seismic characteristics is wide-spread undulating reflectors on the seafloor along the west edge of the sediment dispersal system and the toe of the South China Sea Basin floor, suggesting a large sediment wave field with a turbidity currents origin. The location, orientation and geometry of this sediment routing system are mainly controlled by underlying tectonics in progressive changes from arc-continental collision in transition to subduction. The deep-sea Penghu Channel is formed by compression in transitional zone of the North Luzon Ridge region, neither subduction nor channel erosion. The sediments in northern Manila Trench are mainly transported by turbidity currents via the upslope deep-sea Penghu Channel and Penghu Canyon and trench axis is filled up to a flat-floor trench wedge without sediment ponding. A four-stage development of sediment dispersal system in Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin

  10. The Nervous System and Metabolic Dysregulation: Emerging Evidence Converges on Ketogenic Diet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruskin, David N.; Masino, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    A link between metabolism and brain function is clear. Since ancient times, epileptic seizures were noted as treatable with fasting, and historical observations of the therapeutic benefits of fasting on epilepsy were confirmed nearly 100 years ago. Shortly thereafter a high fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) debuted as a therapy to reduce seizures. This strict regimen could mimic the metabolic effects of fasting while allowing adequate caloric intake for ongoing energy demands. Today, KD therapy, which forces predominantly ketone-based rather than glucose-based metabolism, is now well-established as highly successful in reducing seizures. Cellular metabolic dysfunction in the nervous system has been recognized as existing side-by-side with nervous system disorders – although often with much less obvious cause-and-effect as the relationship between fasting and seizures. Rekindled interest in metabolic and dietary therapies for brain disorders complements new insight into their mechanisms and broader implications. Here we describe the emerging relationship between a KD and adenosine as a way to reset brain metabolism and neuronal activity and disrupt a cycle of dysfunction. We also provide an overview of the effects of a KD on cognition and recent data on the effects of a KD on pain, and explore the relative time course quantified among hallmark metabolic changes, altered neuron function and altered animal behavior assessed after diet administration. We predict continued applications of metabolic therapies in treating dysfunction including and beyond the nervous system. PMID:22470316

  11. Convergent dysregulation of frontal cortical cognitive and reward systems in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Ptáček, Radek; Kuželová, Hana; Mantione, Kirk J; Raboch, Jiří; Papezova, Hana; Kream, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    A substantive literature has drawn a compelling case for the functional involvement of mesolimbic/prefrontal cortical neural reward systems in normative control of eating and in the etiology and persistence of severe eating disorders that affect diverse human populations. Presently, we provide a short review that develops an equally compelling case for the importance of dysregulated frontal cortical cognitive neural networks acting in concert with regional reward systems in the regulation of complex eating behaviors and in the presentation of complex pathophysiological symptoms associated with major eating disorders. Our goal is to highlight working models of major eating disorders that incorporate complementary approaches to elucidate functionally interactive neural circuits defined by their regulatory neurochemical phenotypes. Importantly, we also review evidence-based linkages between widely studied psychiatric and neurodegenerative syndromes (e.g., autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson's disease) and co-morbid eating disorders to elucidate basic mechanisms involving dopaminergic transmission and its regulation by endogenously expressed morphine in these same cortical regions. PMID:23660852

  12. Impact of monetary policy changes on the Chinese monetary and stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yong; Luo, Yong; Xiong, Jie; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    The impact of monetary policy changes on the monetary market and stock market in China is investigated in this study. The changes of two major monetary policies, the interest rate and required reserve ratio, are analyzed in a study period covering seven years on the interbank monetary market and Shanghai stock market. We find that the monetary market is related to the macro economy trend and we also find that the monetary change surprises both of lowering and raising bring significant impacts to the two markets and the two markets respond to the changes differently. The results suggest that the impact of fluctuations is much larger for raising policy changes than lowering changes in the monetary market on policy announcing and effective dates. This is consistent with the “sign effect”, i.e. bad news brings a greater impact than good news. By studying the event window of each policy change, we also find that the “sign effect” still exists before and after each change in the monetary market. A relatively larger fluctuation is observed before the event date, which indicates that the monetary market might have a certain ability to predict a potential monetary change, while it is kept secret by the central bank before official announcement. In the stock market, we investigate how the returns and spreads of the Shanghai stock market index respond to the monetary changes. Evidences suggest the stock market is influenced but in a different way than the monetary market. The climbing of returns after the event dates for the lowering policy agrees with the theory that lowering changes can provide a monetary supply to boost the market and drive the stock returns higher but with a delay of 2 to 3 trading days on average. While in the bear market, the lowering policy brings larger volatility to the market on average than the raising ones. These empirical findings are useful for policymakers to understand how monetary policy changes impact the monetary and stock markets

  13. The Convergence of Systems and Reductionist Approaches in Complex Trait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Evan G.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Research into the genetic and environmental factors behind complex trait variation has traditionally been segregated into distinct scientific camps. The reductionist approach aims to decrypt phenotypic variability bit-by-bit, founded on the underlying hypothesis that genome-to-phenome relations are largely constructed from the additive effects of their molecular players. In contrast, the systems approach aims to examine large-scale interactions of many components simultaneously, on the premise that interactions in gene networks can be both linear and nonlinear. Both approaches are complementary, and they are becoming increasingly intertwined due to developments in gene editing tools, omics technologies, and population resources. Together, these strategies are beginning to drive the next era in complex trait research: paving the way to improve agriculture and towards more personalized medicine. PMID:26140590

  14. Convergent Evolution at the Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility System in Malus and Prunus

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Ana E.; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Iezzoni, Amy; van Nocker, Steve; Vieira, Cristina P.

    2015-01-01

    S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) has evolved once before the split of the Asteridae and Rosidae. This conclusion is based on the phylogenetic history of the S-RNase that determines pistil specificity. In Rosaceae, molecular characterizations of Prunus species, and species from the tribe Pyreae (i.e., Malus, Pyrus, Sorbus) revealed different numbers of genes determining S-pollen specificity. In Prunus only one pistil and pollen gene determine GSI, while in Pyreae there is one pistil but multiple pollen genes, implying different specificity recognition mechanisms. It is thus conceivable that within Rosaceae the genes involved in GSI in the two lineages are not orthologous but possibly paralogous. To address this hypothesis we characterised the S-RNase lineage and S-pollen lineage genes present in the genomes of five Rosaceae species from three genera: M. × domestica (apple, self-incompatible (SI); tribe Pyreae), P. persica (peach, self-compatible (SC); Amygdaleae), P. mume (mei, SI; Amygdaleae), Fragaria vesca (strawberry, SC; Potentilleae), and F. nipponica (mori-ichigo, SI; Potentilleae). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Malus and Prunus S-RNase and S-pollen genes belong to distinct gene lineages, and that only Prunus S-RNase and SFB-lineage genes are present in Fragaria. Thus, S-RNase based GSI system of Malus evolved independently from the ancestral system of Rosaceae. Using expression patterns based on RNA-seq data, the ancestral S-RNase lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in pistils only, while the ancestral S-pollen lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in tissues other than pollen. PMID:25993016

  15. Convergent evolution at the gametophytic self-incompatibility system in Malus and Prunus.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Bruno; Vieira, Jorge; Cunha, Ana E; Fonseca, Nuno A; Iezzoni, Amy; van Nocker, Steve; Vieira, Cristina P

    2015-01-01

    S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) has evolved once before the split of the Asteridae and Rosidae. This conclusion is based on the phylogenetic history of the S-RNase that determines pistil specificity. In Rosaceae, molecular characterizations of Prunus species, and species from the tribe Pyreae (i.e., Malus, Pyrus, Sorbus) revealed different numbers of genes determining S-pollen specificity. In Prunus only one pistil and pollen gene determine GSI, while in Pyreae there is one pistil but multiple pollen genes, implying different specificity recognition mechanisms. It is thus conceivable that within Rosaceae the genes involved in GSI in the two lineages are not orthologous but possibly paralogous. To address this hypothesis we characterised the S-RNase lineage and S-pollen lineage genes present in the genomes of five Rosaceae species from three genera: M. × domestica (apple, self-incompatible (SI); tribe Pyreae), P. persica (peach, self-compatible (SC); Amygdaleae), P. mume (mei, SI; Amygdaleae), Fragaria vesca (strawberry, SC; Potentilleae), and F. nipponica (mori-ichigo, SI; Potentilleae). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Malus and Prunus S-RNase and S-pollen genes belong to distinct gene lineages, and that only Prunus S-RNase and SFB-lineage genes are present in Fragaria. Thus, S-RNase based GSI system of Malus evolved independently from the ancestral system of Rosaceae. Using expression patterns based on RNA-seq data, the ancestral S-RNase lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in pistils only, while the ancestral S-pollen lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in tissues other than pollen. PMID:25993016

  16. Convergence analysis of combinations of different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a convergence analysis for combinations of different numerical methods for solving systems of differential equations. The author proves that combinations of two convergent linear multistep methods or Runge-Kutta methods produce a new convergent method of which the order is equal to the smaller order of the two original methods.

  17. The convergence of the greedy algorithm with respect to the Haar system in the space L{sub p}(0,1)

    SciTech Connect

    Livshits, Evgenii D

    2010-02-28

    The approximation properties of the X-greedy algorithm in the space L{sub p}(0,1) are studied. For 1 < p < 2 estimates for the rate of convergence of the X-greedy algorithm with respect to the Haar system are obtained that are close to optimal. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  18. Geodynamics of flat-slab subduction, sedimentary basin development, and hydrocarbon systems along the southern Alaska convergent plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzel, Emily S.

    Combining field-based geologic studies and numerical modeling provides a robust tool for evaluating the geodynamics of convergent margins. Southern Alaska is arguably the most tectonically active part of the convergent margin of western North America. This conceptual approach has been used to interpret the modern basin dynamics, as well as key stages in the Cenozoic development of this region, including spreading-ridge and flat-slab subduction. New macrofossil, palynological, and lithostratigraphic data for the Bear Lake Formation in the Bristol Bay retroarc basin allow us to construct the first chronostratigraphic framework for this formation, and indicate deposition during Middle and Late Miocene time in a regional transgressive estuarine depositional system. In the Cook Inlet forearc basin, new detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, rare earth element geochemistry, and clast compositional data from middle Eocene-Pliocene strata demonstrate the importance of sediment sources located in the retroarc region and along strike within the basin. The Yakutat microplate has recently been reinterpreted to represent buoyant crust that is presently subducting at a shallow angle beneath southern Alaska. Integration of stratigraphic, geochronologic, and thermochronologic data indicate that in the flat-slab region, exhumation initiated ca. 43 Ma and migrated inboard, magmatism ceased at ca. 32 Ma, and deposition in sedimentary basins ended by ca. 23 Ma. Sedimentary basins positioned along the western and northern perimeter of the flat-slab region record enhanced subsidence and sediment delivery from the flat-slab region beginning in late Oligocene and middle Miocene time respectively. The discrete contributions of unique driving forces for lithospheric deformation in western Canada and Alaska have not been quantified in detail, so their relative role in influencing deformation has remained unresolved. Using finite element models, we calculate a continuous strain rate and velocity

  19. Convergent Adaptations: Bitter Manioc Cultivation Systems in Fertile Anthropogenic Dark Earths and Floodplain Soils in Central Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, James Angus; Alves-Pereira, Alessandro; Junqueira, André Braga; Peroni, Nivaldo; Clement, Charles Roland

    2012-01-01

    Shifting cultivation in the humid tropics is incredibly diverse, yet research tends to focus on one type: long-fallow shifting cultivation. While it is a typical adaptation to the highly-weathered nutrient-poor soils of the Amazonian terra firme, fertile environments in the region offer opportunities for agricultural intensification. We hypothesized that Amazonian people have developed divergent bitter manioc cultivation systems as adaptations to the properties of different soils. We compared bitter manioc cultivation in two nutrient-rich and two nutrient-poor soils, along the middle Madeira River in Central Amazonia. We interviewed 249 farmers in 6 localities, sampled their manioc fields, and carried out genetic analysis of bitter manioc landraces. While cultivation in the two richer soils at different localities was characterized by fast-maturing, low-starch manioc landraces, with shorter cropping periods and shorter fallows, the predominant manioc landraces in these soils were generally not genetically similar. Rather, predominant landraces in each of these two fertile soils have emerged from separate selective trajectories which produced landraces that converged for fast-maturing low-starch traits adapted to intensified swidden systems in fertile soils. This contrasts with the more extensive cultivation systems found in the two poorer soils at different localities, characterized by the prevalence of slow-maturing high-starch landraces, longer cropping periods and longer fallows, typical of previous studies. Farmers plant different assemblages of bitter manioc landraces in different soils and the most popular landraces were shown to exhibit significantly different yields when planted in different soils. Farmers have selected different sets of landraces with different perceived agronomic characteristics, along with different fallow lengths, as adaptations to the specific properties of each agroecological micro-environment. These findings open up new avenues for

  20. Monetary reward suppresses anterior insula activity during social pain.

    PubMed

    Cristofori, Irene; Harquel, Sylvain; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François; Sirigu, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Social pain after exclusion by others activates brain regions also involved in physical pain. Here we evaluated whether monetary reward could compensate for the negative feeling of social pain in the brain. To address this question we used the unique technique of intracranial electroencephalography in subjects with drug resistant epilepsy. Specifically, we recorded theta activity from intracranial electrodes implanted in the insular cortex while subjects experienced conditions of social inclusion and exclusion associated with monetary gain and loss. Our study confirmed that theta rhythm in the insular cortex is the neural signature of social exclusion. We found that while monetary gain suppresses the effect of social pain in the anterior insula, there is no such effect in the posterior insula. These results imply that the anterior insula can use secondary reward signals to compensate for the negative feeling of social pain. Hence, here we propose that the anterior insula plays a pivotal role in integrating contingencies to update social pain feelings. Finally, the possibility to modulate the theta rhythm through the reward system might open new avenues of research for treating pathologies related to social exclusion. PMID:25964499

  1. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paula M; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a "kick start effect" over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the

  2. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Paula M.; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a “kick start effect” over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the

  3. Response Operators for Markov Processes in a Finite State Space: Radius of Convergence and Link to the Response Theory for Axiom A Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Using straightforward linear algebra we derive response operators describing the impact of small perturbations to finite state Markov processes. The results can be used for studying empirically constructed—e.g. from observations or through coarse graining of model simulations—finite state approximation of statistical mechanical systems. Recent results concerning the convergence of the statistical properties of finite state Markov approximation of the full asymptotic dynamics on the SRB measure in the limit of finer and finer partitions of the phase space are suggestive of some degree of robustness of the obtained results in the case of Axiom A system. Our findings give closed formulas for the linear and nonlinear response theory at all orders of perturbation and provide matrix expressions that can be directly implemented in any coding language, plus providing bounds on the radius of convergence of the perturbative theory. In particular, we relate the convergence of the response theory to the rate of mixing of the unperturbed system. One can use the formulas derived for finite state Markov processes to recover previous findings obtained on the response of continuous time Axiom A dynamical systems to perturbations, by considering the generator of time evolution for the measure and for the observables. A very basic, low-tech, and computationally cheap analysis of the response of the Lorenz '63 model to perturbations provides rather encouraging results regarding the possibility of using the approximate representation given by finite state Markov processes to compute the system's response.

  4. Monetary Shocks in Models with Inattentive Producers

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Fernando E.; Lippi, Francesco; Paciello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    We study models where prices respond slowly to shocks because firms are rationally inattentive. Producers must pay a cost to observe the determinants of the current profit maximizing price, and hence observe them infrequently. To generate large real effects of monetary shocks in such a model the time between observations must be long and/or highly volatile. Previous work on rational inattentiveness has allowed for observation intervals that are either constant-but-long (e.g. Caballero, 1989 or Reis, 2006) or volatile-but-short (e.g. Reis's, 2006 example where observation costs are negligible), but not both. In these models, the real effects of monetary policy are small for realistic values of the duration between observations. We show that non-negligible observation costs produce both of these effects: intervals between observations are infrequent and volatile. This generates large real effects of monetary policy for realistic values of the average time between observations. PMID:27516627

  5. Envisioning engineering education and practice in the coming intelligence convergence era — a complex adaptive systems approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    Some of the recent attempts for improving and transforming engineering education are reviewed. The attempts aim at providing the entry level engineers with the skills needed to address the challenges of future large-scale complex systems and projects. Some of the frontier sectors and future challenges for engineers are outlined. The major characteristics of the coming intelligence convergence era (the post-information age) are identified. These include the prevalence of smart devices and environments, the widespread applications of anticipatory computing and predictive / prescriptive analytics, as well as a symbiotic relationship between humans and machines. Devices and machines will be able to learn from, and with, humans in a natural collaborative way. The recent game changers in learnscapes (learning paradigms, technologies, platforms, spaces, and environments) that can significantly impact engineering education in the coming era are identified. Among these are open educational resources, knowledge-rich classrooms, immersive interactive 3D learning, augmented reality, reverse instruction / flipped classroom, gamification, robots in the classroom, and adaptive personalized learning. Significant transformative changes in, and mass customization of, learning are envisioned to emerge from the synergistic combination of the game changers and other technologies. The realization of the aforementioned vision requires the development of a new multidisciplinary framework of emergent engineering for relating innovation, complexity and cybernetics, within the future learning environments. The framework can be used to treat engineering education as a complex adaptive system, with dynamically interacting and communicating components (instructors, individual, small, and large groups of learners). The emergent behavior resulting from the interactions can produce progressively better, and continuously improving, learning environment. As a first step towards the realization of

  6. Convergence Is Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyeart, Mike; Staman, E. Michael; Valdes, Jose J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of convergence has evolved significantly during recent years. Today, "convergence" refers to the integration of the communications and computing resources and services that seamlessly traverse multiple infrastructures and deliver content to multiple platforms or appliances. Convergence is real. Those in higher education, and especially…

  7. 22 CFR 123.23 - Monetary value of shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monetary value of shipments. 123.23 Section 123... EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.23 Monetary value of shipments. Port Directors of U.S. Customs and... value of the export does not exceed the aggregate monetary value (not quantity) stated on the license...

  8. 22 CFR 123.23 - Monetary value of shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monetary value of shipments. 123.23 Section 123... EXPORT AND TEMPORARY IMPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.23 Monetary value of shipments. Port Directors of U... license when the total value of the export does not exceed the aggregate monetary value (not...

  9. 32 CFR 269.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 269... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Department shall, not later than 180 days after the enactment of...

  10. 46 CFR 506.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 506.3... PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Commission shall... each civil monetary penalty provided by law within the jurisdiction of the Commission by the...

  11. 49 CFR 1022.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 1022... TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 1022.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Board shall, immediately, and at...

  12. 46 CFR 506.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 506.3... PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Commission shall... each civil monetary penalty provided by law within the jurisdiction of the Commission by the...

  13. 32 CFR 269.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 269... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Department shall, not later than 180 days after the enactment of...

  14. 32 CFR 269.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 269... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Department shall, not later than 180 days after the enactment of...

  15. 46 CFR 506.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 506.3... PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Commission shall... each civil monetary penalty provided by law within the jurisdiction of the Commission by the...

  16. 32 CFR 269.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 269... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Department shall, not later than 180 days after the enactment of...

  17. 49 CFR 1022.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 1022... TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 1022.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Board shall, immediately, and at...

  18. 46 CFR 506.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 506.3... PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Commission shall... each civil monetary penalty provided by law within the jurisdiction of the Commission by the...

  19. 16 CFR 0.5 - Laws authorizing monetary claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laws authorizing monetary claims. 0.5... ORGANIZATION § 0.5 Laws authorizing monetary claims. The Commission is authorized to entertain monetary claims..., unless the adjudicative officer finds that the party has committed a willful violation of law...

  20. 16 CFR 0.5 - Laws authorizing monetary claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laws authorizing monetary claims. 0.5 Section 0.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.5 Laws authorizing monetary claims. The Commission is authorized to entertain monetary...

  1. 46 CFR 506.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 506.3... PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Commission shall... each civil monetary penalty provided by law within the jurisdiction of the Commission by the...

  2. 32 CFR 269.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 269... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Department shall, not later than 180 days after the enactment of...

  3. The Cauchy convergence of T and P-approximant templates for test-mass Kerr binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Edward K.

    2006-06-01

    In this work, we examine the Cauchy convergence of both post-Newtonian (T-approximant) and re-summed post-Newtonian (P-approximant) templates for the case of a test-mass orbiting a Kerr black hole along a circular equatorial orbit. The Cauchy criterion demands that the inner product between the n and n + 1 order approximation approaches unity, as we increase the order of approximation. In previous works, it has been shown that we achieve greater fitting factors and better parameter estimation using the P-approximant templates for both Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes. In this work, we show that the P-approximant templates also display a faster Cauchy convergence making them a superior template to the standard post-Newtonian templates.

  4. Neural markers of social and monetary rewards in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gadea, Maria Luz; Sigman, Mariano; Rattazzi, Alexia; Lavin, Claudio; Rivera-Rei, Alvaro; Marino, Julian; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    Recent theories of decision making propose a shared value-related brain mechanism for encoding monetary and social rewards. We tested this model in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and control children. We monitored participants' brain dynamics using high density-electroencephalography while they played a monetary and social reward tasks. Control children exhibited a feedback Error-Related Negativity (fERN) modulation and Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) source activation during both tasks. Remarkably, although cooperation resulted in greater losses for the participants, the betrayal options generated greater fERN responses. ADHD subjects exhibited an absence of fERN modulation and reduced ACC activation during both tasks. ASD subjects exhibited normal fERN modulation during monetary choices and inverted fERN/ACC responses in social options than did controls. These results suggest that in neurotypicals, monetary losses and observed disloyal social decisions induced similar activity in the brain value system. In ADHD children, difficulties in reward processing affected early brain signatures of monetary and social decisions. Conversely, ASD children showed intact neural markers of value-related monetary mechanisms, but no brain modulation by prosociality in the social task. These results offer insight into the typical and atypical developments of neural correlates of monetary and social reward processing. PMID:27464551

  5. Neural markers of social and monetary rewards in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gadea, Maria Luz; Sigman, Mariano; Rattazzi, Alexia; Lavin, Claudio; Rivera-Rei, Alvaro; Marino, Julian; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    Recent theories of decision making propose a shared value-related brain mechanism for encoding monetary and social rewards. We tested this model in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and control children. We monitored participants’ brain dynamics using high density-electroencephalography while they played a monetary and social reward tasks. Control children exhibited a feedback Error-Related Negativity (fERN) modulation and Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) source activation during both tasks. Remarkably, although cooperation resulted in greater losses for the participants, the betrayal options generated greater fERN responses. ADHD subjects exhibited an absence of fERN modulation and reduced ACC activation during both tasks. ASD subjects exhibited normal fERN modulation during monetary choices and inverted fERN/ACC responses in social options than did controls. These results suggest that in neurotypicals, monetary losses and observed disloyal social decisions induced similar activity in the brain value system. In ADHD children, difficulties in reward processing affected early brain signatures of monetary and social decisions. Conversely, ASD children showed intact neural markers of value-related monetary mechanisms, but no brain modulation by prosociality in the social task. These results offer insight into the typical and atypical developments of neural correlates of monetary and social reward processing. PMID:27464551

  6. Monetary Initiatives for Low-Stakes Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; Abedi, Jamal; Lee, Charlotte; Miyoshi, Judy; Mastergeorge, Anne

    2001-01-01

    Documents the findings of an experiment in which 12th-grade students taking a mathematics assessment were given monetary incentives to see whether such incentives would improve their performance. The study did not find that incentive increases performance. (Author/SLD)

  7. Chaotic dynamics in optimal monetary policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, O.; Mendes, V. M.; Mendes, D. A.; Sousa Ramos, J.

    2007-05-01

    There is by now a large consensus in modern monetary policy. This consensus has been built upon a dynamic general equilibrium model of optimal monetary policy as developed by, e.g., Goodfriend and King [ NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997 edited by B. Bernanke and J. Rotemberg (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1997), pp. 231 282], Clarida et al. [J. Econ. Lit. 37, 1661 (1999)], Svensson [J. Mon. Econ. 43, 607 (1999)] and Woodford [ Interest and Prices: Foundations of a Theory of Monetary Policy (Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press, 2003)]. In this paper we extend the standard optimal monetary policy model by introducing nonlinearity into the Phillips curve. Under the specific form of nonlinearity proposed in our paper (which allows for convexity and concavity and secures closed form solutions), we show that the introduction of a nonlinear Phillips curve into the structure of the standard model in a discrete time and deterministic framework produces radical changes to the major conclusions regarding stability and the efficiency of monetary policy. We emphasize the following main results: (i) instead of a unique fixed point we end up with multiple equilibria; (ii) instead of saddle-path stability, for different sets of parameter values we may have saddle stability, totally unstable equilibria and chaotic attractors; (iii) for certain degrees of convexity and/or concavity of the Phillips curve, where endogenous fluctuations arise, one is able to encounter various results that seem intuitively correct. Firstly, when the Central Bank pays attention essentially to inflation targeting, the inflation rate has a lower mean and is less volatile; secondly, when the degree of price stickiness is high, the inflation rate displays a larger mean and higher volatility (but this is sensitive to the values given to the parameters of the model); and thirdly, the higher the target value of the output gap chosen by the Central Bank, the higher is the inflation rate and its

  8. Analysis of integrated animal-fish production system under subtropical hill agro ecosystem in India: growth performance of animals, total biomass production and monetary benefit.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Pathak, K A; Bujarbaruah, K M; Vinod, K

    2009-03-01

    The present study assessed the benefits of integration of animals with fish production in optimizing the bio mass production from unit land in subtropical hill agro ecosystem. Hampshire pigs and Khaki Campbell ducks were integrated with composite fish culture. The pig and duck excreta were directly allowed into the pond and no supplementary feed was given to fish during the period of study. The average levels of N, P and K in dried pig and duck manure were 0.9, 0.7 and 0.6 per cent and 1.3, 0.6 and 0.5 per cent, respectively. The average body weight of pig and duck at 11 months age was 90 and 1.74 kg with an average daily weight gain of 333.33 and 6.44 g, respectively. The fish production in pig-fish and duck-fish systems were 2209 and 2964 kg/ha, respectively while the fish productivity in control pond was only 820 kg/ha. The total biomass (animal and fish) production was higher (p<0.05) in commercial feeding system compared to the traditional system, however the input/output ratio was 1:1.2 and 1:1.55 for commercial and traditional systems, respectively. It was inferred that the total biomass production per unit land was high (p<0.05) when animal and fish were integrated together. PMID:18622714

  9. Funny money: the attentional role of monetary feedback detached from expected value.

    PubMed

    Roper, Zachary J J; Vecera, Shaun P

    2016-10-01

    Stimuli associated with monetary reward can become powerful cues that effectively capture visual attention. We examined whether such value-driven attentional capture can be induced with monetary feedback in the absence of an expected cash payout. To this end, we implemented images of U.S. dollar bills as reward feedback. Participants knew in advance that they would not receive any money based on their performance. Our reward stimuli-$5 and $20 bill images-were thus dissociated from any practical utility. Strikingly, we observed a reliable attentional capture effect for the mere images of bills. Moreover, this finding generalized to Monopoly money. In two control experiments, we found no evidence in favor of nominal or symbolic monetary value. Hence, we claim that bill images are special monetary representations, such that there are strong associations between the defining visual features of bills and reward, probably due to a lifelong learning history. Together, we show that the motivation to earn cash plays a minor role when it comes to monetary rewards, while bill-defining visual features seem to be sufficient. These findings have the potential to influence human factor applications, such as gamification, and can be extended to novel value systems, such as the electronic cash Bitcoin being developed for use in mobile banking. Finally, our procedure represents a proof of concept on how images of money can be used to conserve expenditures in the experimental context. PMID:27245703

  10. Convergence of large-deviation estimators.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Christian M; Angeletti, Florian; Touchette, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    We study the convergence of statistical estimators used in the estimation of large-deviation functions describing the fluctuations of equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and manmade stochastic systems. We give conditions for the convergence of these estimators with sample size, based on the boundedness or unboundedness of the quantity sampled, and discuss how statistical errors should be defined in different parts of the convergence region. Our results shed light on previous reports of "phase transitions" in the statistics of free energy estimators and establish a general framework for reliably estimating large-deviation functions from simulation and experimental data and identifying parameter regions where this estimation converges. PMID:26651644

  11. Monetary Incentives and the Reform of Teacher Compensation: A Persistent Organizational Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen L.

    1995-01-01

    Examines conflicting values underlying debates about teacher compensation reform, highlighting a persistent dilemma: although school systems use monetary incentives to motivate teachers, they really do not want teachers who are primarily motivated by money. Examines teacher workforce composition, teacher values, and the history of merit pay. Some…

  12. Converging free energies of binding in cucurbit[7]uril and octa-acid host-guest systems from SAMPL4 using expanded ensemble simulations.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Jacob I; Shirts, Michael R

    2014-04-01

    Molecular containers such as cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and the octa-acid (OA) host are ideal simplified model test systems for optimizing and analyzing methods for computing free energies of binding intended for use with biologically relevant protein-ligand complexes. To this end, we have performed initially blind free energy calculations to determine the free energies of binding for ligands of both the CB7 and OA hosts. A subset of the selected guest molecules were those included in the SAMPL4 prediction challenge. Using expanded ensemble simulations in the dimension of coupling host-guest intermolecular interactions, we are able to show that our estimates in most cases can be demonstrated to fully converge and that the errors in our estimates are due almost entirely to the assigned force field parameters and the choice of environmental conditions used to model experiment. We confirm the convergence through the use of alternative simulation methodologies and thermodynamic pathways, analyzing sampled conformations, and directly observing changes of the free energy with respect to simulation time. Our results demonstrate the benefits of enhanced sampling of multiple local free energy minima made possible by the use of expanded ensemble molecular dynamics and may indicate the presence of significant problems with current transferable force fields for organic molecules when used for calculating binding affinities, especially in non-protein chemistries. PMID:24610238

  13. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  14. Investigations of different kilovoltage x-ray energy for three-dimensional converging stereotactic radiotherapy system: Monte Carlo simulations with CT data

    SciTech Connect

    Deloar, Hossain M.; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kawase, Takatsugu; Tsunoo, Takanori; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Ozaki, Masahiro; Saito, Kimiaki; Takagi, Shunji; Sato, Osamu; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Myojoyama, Atsushi; Sorell, Graham

    2006-12-15

    We are investigating three-dimensional converging stereotactic radiotherapy (3DCSRT) with suitable medium-energy x rays as treatment for small lung tumors with better dose homogeneity at the target. A computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for non-coplanar converging radiotherapy was simulated with BEAMnrc (EGS4) Monte-Carlo code for x-ray energy of 147.5, 200, 300, and 500 kilovoltage (kVp). The system was validated by comparing calculated and measured percentage of depth dose in a water phantom for the energy of 120 and 147.5 kVp. A thorax phantom and CT data from lung tumors (<20 cm{sup 3}) were used to compare dose homogeneities of kVp energies with MV energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV. Three non-coplanar arcs (0 deg. and {+-}25 deg. ) around the center of the target were employed. The Monte Carlo dose data format was converted to the XiO RTP format to compare dose homogeneity, differential, and integral dose volume histograms of kVp and MV energies. In terms of dose homogeneity and DVHs, dose distributions at the target of all kVp energies with the thorax phantom were better than MV energies, with mean dose absorption at the ribs (human data) of 100%, 85%, 50%, 30% for 147.5, 200, 300, and 500 kVp, respectively. Considering dose distributions and reduction of the enhanced dose absorption at the ribs, a minimum of 500 kVp is suitable for the lung kVp 3DCSRT system.

  15. An investigation of lithospheric structure and evolution in convergent orogenic systems using seismic receiver functions and surface wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Joshua A.

    Whether by accretion, magmatic addition, or refinement of more mafic lithologies, continental arcs are likely zones for the creation of "average" continental crust with intermediate silica content. This dissertation contains the results of broadband seismic studies carried out in two field areas, an active subduction zone and the remnants of an extinct arc, with the aim of understanding lithospheric evolution at convergent margins. The analytical techniques of receiver function calculation and surface wave tomography are applied to data sets collected above the Andean subduction zone in Chile and western Argentina and in the Coast Mountains Batholith of central British Columbia. We present the first in-depth comparison of receiver functions calculated using the high frequencies available in records of intermediate-depth local earthquakes with those calculated from the lower frequency data in records of larger teleseismic events. The comparison reveals that the lower crust beneath the Western Sierras Pampeanas contains a gradational velocity increase over ˜20km above a small velocity step at the Moho. Surface wave tomography confirms the existence of an unusually high velocity anomaly in the mantle above the slab and yields estimates of slab thickness on the order of 50 km. To the south of the flat slab region, we see evidence of active mantle wedge convection above the steep slab, but no evidence of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the subducting Nazca plate. In the Coast Mountains Batholith (CMB), receiver functions image a bright, continuous Moho throughout the study region. Combined with petrologic modeling, the receiver function data point toward convective removal of any ultramafic root that formed beneath the CMB. Low absolute shear wave velocities in the upper mantle resolved via surface wave analysis strengthen the case for root removal beneath the eastern section of the CMB. On the far western edge of the CMB, we find evidence of a partially

  16. 8 CFR 280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 280.53 Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act...

  17. 8 CFR 280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 280.53 Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act...

  18. 8 CFR 280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 280.53 Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act...

  19. 8 CFR 280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 280.53 Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment. Link to... requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, Pub. L. 101-410, 104 Stat....

  20. 77 FR 72915 - Civil Monetary Penalties; Adjustment for Inflation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...This final rule is being issued to adjust each civil monetary penalty provided by law within the jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce (the Department). The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, required the head of each agency to adjust its civil monetary penalties (CMP) for inflation no later than October 23,......

  1. 78 FR 14179 - Adjustments to Civil Monetary Penalty Amounts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Monetary Penalty Amounts, Release No. 33-8530 (Feb. 4, 2005) [70 FR 7606 (Feb. 14, 2005)]. The DCIA... Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule implements the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation... a rule adjusting for inflation the maximum amount of civil monetary penalties under the...

  2. 78 FR 44419 - Civil Monetary Penalties Inflation Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Final Rules on Civil Monetary Penalties Inflation Adjustments, 74 FR 31345 (July 1, 2009), amended by..., 74 FR 37161 (July 28, 2009) (collectively, ``2009 Adjustment''), Explanation and Justification for Final Rules on Inflation Adjustments for Civil Monetary Penalties, 70 FR 34633 (June 15, 2005)...

  3. 8 CFR 280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 280.53 Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act...

  4. 22 CFR 123.23 - Monetary value of shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monetary value of shipments. 123.23 Section 123.23 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.23 Monetary value of shipments. Port Directors of U.S. Customs...

  5. 22 CFR 123.23 - Monetary value of shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monetary value of shipments. 123.23 Section 123.23 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.23 Monetary value of shipments. Port Directors of U.S. Customs...

  6. 22 CFR 123.23 - Monetary value of shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monetary value of shipments. 123.23 Section 123.23 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.23 Monetary value of shipments. Port Directors of U.S. Customs...

  7. A Unified Framework for Monetary Theory and Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagos, Ricardo; Wright, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Search-theoretic models of monetary exchange are based on explicit descriptions of the frictions that make money essential. However, tractable versions of these models typically make strong assumptions that render them ill suited for monetary policy analysis. We propose a new framework, based on explicit micro foundations, within which macro…

  8. Incidental fear cues increase monetary loss aversion.

    PubMed

    Schulreich, Stefan; Gerhardt, Holger; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2016-04-01

    In many everyday decisions, people exhibit loss aversion-a greater sensitivity to losses relative to gains of equal size. Loss aversion is thought to be (at least partly) mediated by emotional--in particular, fear-related--processes. Decision research has shown that even incidental emotions, which are unrelated to the decision at hand, can influence decision making. The effect of incidental fear on loss aversion, however, is thus far unclear. In two studies, we experimentally investigated how incidental fear cues, presented during (Study 1) or before (Study 2) choices to accept or reject mixed gambles over real monetary stakes, influence monetary loss aversion. We find that the presentation of fearful faces, relative to the presentation of neutral faces, increased risk aversion-an effect that could be attributed to increased loss aversion. The size of this effect was moderated by psychopathic personality: Fearless dominance, in particular its interpersonal facet, but not self-centered impulsivity, attenuated the effect of incidental fear cues on loss aversion, consistent with reduced fear reactivity. Together, these results highlight the sensitivity of loss aversion to the affective context. PMID:26595436

  9. Optimal monetary policy and oil price shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormilitsina, Anna

    This dissertation is comprised of two chapters. In the first chapter, I investigate the role of systematic U.S. monetary policy in the presence of oil price shocks. The second chapter is devoted to studying different approaches to modeling energy demand. In an influential paper, Bernanke, Gertler, and Watson (1997) and (2004) argue that systematic monetary policy exacerbated the recessions the U.S. economy experienced in the aftermath of post World War II oil price shocks. In the first chapter of this dissertation, I critically evaluate this claim in the context of an estimated medium-scale model of the U.S. business cycle. Specifically, I solve for the Ramsey optimal monetary policy in the medium-scale dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model (henceforth DSGE) of Schmitt-Grohe and Uribe (2005). To model the demand for oil, I use the approach of Finn (2000). According to this approach, the utilization of capital services requires oil usage. In the related literature on the macroeconomic effects of oil price shocks, it is common to calibrate structural parameters of the model. In contrast to this literature, I estimate the parameters of my DSGE model. The estimation strategy involves matching the impulse responses from the theoretical model to responses predicted by an empirical model. For estimation, I use the alternative to the classical Laplace type estimator proposed by Chernozhukov and Hong (2003). To obtain the empirical impulse responses, I identify an oil price shock in a structural VAR (SVAR) model of the U.S. business cycle. The SVAR model predicts that, in response to an oil price increase, GDP, investment, hours, capital utilization, and the real wage fall, while the nominal interest rate and inflation rise. These findings are economically intuitive and in line with the existing empirical evidence. Comparing the actual and the Ramsey optimal monetary policy response to an oil price shock, I find that the optimal policy allows for more inflation, a

  10. The Convergence of Intelligences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Joachim

    Minsky (1985) argued an extraterrestrial intelligence may be similar to ours despite very different origins. ``Problem- solving'' offers evolutionary advantages and individuals who are part of a technical civilisation should have this capacity. On earth, the principles of problem-solving are the same for humans, some primates and machines based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques. Intelligent systems use ``goals'' and ``sub-goals'' for problem-solving, with memories and representations of ``objects'' and ``sub-objects'' as well as knowledge of relations such as ``cause'' or ``difference.'' Some of these objects are generic and cannot easily be divided into parts. We must, therefore, assume that these objects and relations are universal, and a general property of intelligence. Minsky's arguments from 1985 are extended here. The last decade has seen the development of a general learning theory (``computational learning theory'' (CLT) or ``statistical learning theory'') which equally applies to humans, animals and machines. It is argued that basic learning laws will also apply to an evolved alien intelligence, and this includes limitations of what can be learned efficiently. An example from CLT is that the general learning problem for neural networks is intractable, i.e. it cannot be solved efficiently for all instances (it is ``NP-complete''). It is the objective of this paper to show that evolved intelligences will be constrained by general learning laws and will use task-decomposition for problem-solving. Since learning and problem-solving are core features of intelligence, it can be said that intelligences converge despite very different origins.

  11. Extensional deformation structures within a convergent orogen: The Val di Lima low-angle normal fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, Luca; Molli, Giancarlo; Storti, Fabrizio; Muchez, Philippe; Swennen, Rudy; Torelli, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    A low-angle extensional fault system affecting the non metamorphic rocks of the carbonate dominated Tuscan succession is exposed in the Lima valley (Northern Apennines, Italy). This fault system affects the right-side-up limb of a kilometric-scale recumbent isoclinal anticline and is, in turn, affected by superimposed folding and late-tectonic high-angle extensional faulting. The architecture of the low-angle fault system has been investigated through detailed structural mapping and damage zone characterization. Pressure-depth conditions and paleofluid evolution of the fault system have been studied through microstructural, mineralogical, petrographic, fluid inclusion and stable isotope analyses. Our results show that the low-angle fault system was active during exhumation of the Tuscan succession at about 180°C and 5 km depth, with the involvement of low-salinity fluids. Within this temperature - depth framework, the fault zone architecture shows important differences related to the different lithologies involved in the fault system and to the role played by the fluids during deformation. In places, footwall overpressuring influenced active deformation mechanisms and favored shear strain localization. Our observations indicate that extensional structures affected the central sector of the Northern Apennines thrust wedge during the orogenic contractional history, modifying the fluid circulation through the upper crust and influencing its mechanical behavior.

  12. Convergence of millimeter-wave and photonic interconnect systems for very-high-throughput digital communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shu-Hao

    In the past, radio-frequency signals were commonly used for low-speed wireless electronic systems, and optical signals were used for high-speed wired communication systems. However, as the emergence of new millimeter-wave technology, which is capable of providing multi-gigabit transmission over a wireless radio-frequency channel, the borderline between radio-frequency and optical transport systems becomes blurred. As a result, there are ample opportunities to design and develop next-generation broadband systems by combining the advantages of these two technologies to overcome inherent limitations of various broadband end-to-end interconnects, such as signal generation, transportation, data recovery, and synchronization. For the transmission distances of a few centimeters to thousands of kilometers, the integration of radio-frequency electronics and photonics to build radio-over-fiber systems ushers in a new era of research opportunity for the upcoming very-high-throughput broadband services. Recent developments in radio-over-fiber systems have garnered momentum to be recognized as the most promising solution for the backhaul transmission of multi-gigabit wireless access networks, especially for the license-free, very-high-throughput 60-GHz band. Adopting radio-over-fiber systems in local-access or in-building networks can greatly extend 60-GHz signal reach by using ultra-low loss optical fibers. However, systems operating at such high frequency are difficult to generate in an old fashion way. In this dissertation, several novel techniques of homodyne and heterodyne optical-carrier suppressions for radio-over-fiber systems are investigated and various system architectures are designed to overcome these limitations of 60-GHz wireless access networks, bringing the dream of delivering multi-gigabit wireless services of any content, at anytime and anywhere closer to the reality. In addition to the advantages for the access networks, extremely high spectral efficiency

  13. The Convergence Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodzy, Janet; Grant, August E.; DeMars, Tony R.; Wilkinson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the Internet, social media, and digital technologies in the twenty-first century accelerated an evolution in journalism and communication that fit under the broad term of convergence. That evolution changed the relationship between news producers and consumers. It broke down the geographical boundaries in defining our communities,…

  14. Converging or Diverging Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Why does a lens magnify? Why does it shrink objects? Why does this happen? The activities that we propose here are useful in helping us to understand how lenses work, and they show that the same lens can have different magnification capabilities. A converging lens can also act as a diverging lens. (Contains 4 figures.)

  15. Convergence of Arnoldi method

    SciTech Connect

    Nevanlinna, O.

    1994-12-31

    This note summarizes some results on (a monitored version of) the Arnoldi method in Hilbert spaces. The interest in working in infinite dimensional spaces comes partly from the fact that only then can one have meaningful asymptotical statements (which hopefully give some light to the convergence of Arnoldi in large dimensional problems with iteration indices far less than the dimension).

  16. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  17. No Case for Convergence: The Puerto Rican Spanish Verb System in a Language Contact Situation. Centro Working Papers 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pousada, Alicia; Poplack, Shana

    This study examines quantitatively the systems of tense, mood, and aspect in Puerto Rican Spanish spoken in the United States. In the community under investigation, code-switching is an integral part of the communicative repertoire; also, the codes tend to be switched at points around which the surface structures of Spanish and English map onto…

  18. India: population: shocking results; monetary incentives.

    PubMed

    Addressing a conference of Parliament members on population and development in New Delhi, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was reported to have informed the gathering that results of India's latest census "shocked us." The census counted a total national population of 683 million. It was 11 million more than officially anticipated. In her speech, Mrs. Gandhi was also reported to have reiterated that her government is totally committed to "voluntary family planning" and "firmly against compulsion." J.R.D. Tata, chairman of the Family Planning Foundation of India, proposed that the government raise monetary incentives for citizens voluntarily opting for vasectomy and tubectomy. He suggested that the present Rs. 200 for vasectomy and tubectomy be upped to Rs. 5000. He made the proposal in a call to the government to increase its outlay for the family planning program. PMID:12337557

  19. Effects of tilt angle of mirror-lamp system on shape of solid-liquid interface of silicon melt during floating zone growth using infrared convergent heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Mukter; Watauchi, Satoshi; Nagao, Masanori; Tanaka, Isao

    2016-01-01

    The tilt effects of the mirror-lamp (M-L) system on the shape of the interface of the silicon molten zone formed during growth using the infrared convergent heating floating zone method were studied at various positions of the M-L system. The stability and the interfaces of the molten zone formed in the tilted condition were compared with those in the no tilt condition. The molten zone appeared to be more stabilized in the tilted condition than in the no tilt condition. However, the conventional parameters characterizing the interface shape such as convexities (h/r), gap and zone length (L) were almost independent of the tilt angle (θ) of the M-L system and insufficient to discuss the tilting effects on the molten zone shape. The curvature of the solid-liquid interface was affected by the θ. New characterizing parameters such as the growth interface and triple point angles (δ and TPA, respectively) were effective to quantitatively describe the tilting effects on the interface shape. With increase of the θ, the δ was decreased and the TPA was increased in both the feed and crystal sides. A silicon crystal of 45 mm in diameter was grown successfully in the tilted condition.

  20. Somatic influences on subjective well-being and affective disorders: the convergence of thermosensory and central serotonergic systems

    PubMed Central

    Raison, Charles L.; Hale, Matthew W.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Wager, Tor D.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Current theories suggest that the brain is the sole source of mental illness. However, affective disorders, and major depressive disorder (MDD) in particular, may be better conceptualized as brain-body disorders that involve peripheral systems as well. This perspective emphasizes the embodied, multifaceted physiology of well-being, and suggests that afferent signals from the body may contribute to cognitive and emotional states. In this review, we focus on evidence from preclinical and clinical studies suggesting that afferent thermosensory signals contribute to well-being and depression. Although thermoregulatory systems have traditionally been conceptualized as serving primarily homeostatic functions, increasing evidence suggests neural pathways responsible for regulating body temperature may be linked more closely with emotional states than previously recognized, an affective warmth hypothesis. Human studies indicate that increasing physical warmth activates brain circuits associated with cognitive and affective functions, promotes interpersonal warmth and prosocial behavior, and has antidepressant effects. Consistent with these effects, preclinical studies in rodents demonstrate that physical warmth activates brain serotonergic neurons implicated in antidepressant-like effects. Together, these studies suggest that (1) thermosensory pathways interact with brain systems that control affective function, (2) these pathways are dysregulated in affective disorders, and (3) activating warm thermosensory pathways promotes a sense of well-being and has therapeutic potential in the treatment of affective disorders. PMID:25628593

  1. Acceleration of convergence of vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, A.; Ford, W. F.; Smith, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    A general approach to the construction of convergence acceleration methods for vector sequence is proposed. Using this approach, one can generate some known methods, such as the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the topological epsilon algorithm, and also some new ones. Some of the new methods are easier to implement than the known methods and are observed to have similar numerical properties. The convergence analysis of these new methods is carried out, and it is shown that they are especially suitable for accelerating the convergence of vector sequences that are obtained when one solves linear systems of equations iterative. A stability analysis is also given, and numerical examples are provided. The convergence and stability properties of the topological epsilon algorithm are likewise given.

  2. Acceleration of convergence of vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, A.; Ford, W. F.; Smith, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A general approach to the construction of convergence acceleration methods for vector sequence is proposed. Using this approach, one can generate some known methods, such as the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the topological epsilon algorithm, and also some new ones. Some of the new methods are easier to implement than the known methods and are observed to have similar numerical properties. The convergence analysis of these new methods is carried out, and it is shown that they are especially suitable for accelerating the convergence of vector sequences that are obtained when one solves linear systems of equations iteratively. A stability analysis is also given, and numerical examples are provided. The convergence and stability properties of the topological epsilon algorithm are likewise given.

  3. Traditional Chinese medicine ZHENG and Omics convergence: a systems approach to post-genomics medicine in a global world.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a comprehensive system of medical practice that has been used to diagnose, treat, and prevent illnesses for more than 3000 years. ZHENG (also known as "syndrome") differentiation remains the essence of TCM. In China, TCM shares equal status, and integrated with Western medicine in the healthcare system to treat many types of diseases. Yet, compared to biomolecular science and Western medicine, the ZHENG/TCM approach to diagnostics might appear unobjective, but offers at the same time long-standing clinical and phenotypic-rich insights. With the current globalization of life sciences and the arrival of "Big Data" research and development, these two silos of medical lore are rapidly coalescing. The applications of multi-omics strategies to TCM have begun to provide novel insights into the essence and molecular basis of TCM ZHENG. We searched the Chinese electronic databases and PubMed for published articles related to "Omics" and "TCM ZHENG" and observed a dramatic increase in studies over the past few years. In this article, we provide a timely synthesis of the lessons learned, and the emerging applications of omics science in TCM ZHENG research. We suggest that the global health scholarship and the field of "developing world Omics" can usefully draw from TCM, and vice versa. PMID:23837436

  4. Converging shocks for DSD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matignon, Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Modelling of pyrotechnic systems requires both, a good understanding and precise prediction capabilities of the dynamics of detonation. When using insensitive high explosives IHE (such as TATB-based explosives) the interaction of the detonation front with the confinement can lead to very different detonation velocities. One of the most popular engineering tools used to model this behaviour is the Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). In the DSD assumption, the detonation front propagates at a normal shock velocity (Dn) which depends only on its local curvature (κ). For divergent detonations, the DSD limit is very well established both experimentally and theoretically and one can easily propose a model (which obeys the 1D quasi-steady weakly curved detonation theory) to reproduce this behavior. We propose to extend the DSD theory to slightly convergent detonation fronts and to validate it against experimental data. Two series of experiments were carried out. The first series was designed to collect precise information regarding converging detonation. Usually, in such configurations, the detonation is non steady, making precise and simultaneous measurements of velocity and curvature difficult to achieve. The originality of the proposed setup is to drive a self similar convergent detonation at constant speed in an IHE rod by an external explosive tube of greater detonation velocity (allowing an accurate recording of both velocity and curvature). A wide range EOS/reaction rate model (inspired from previous works of Wescott et al.) was then calibrated to reproduce both the strong shock initiation and the newly extended (Dn- κ) law. This model can be used to perform either direct numerical simulation (DNS) on fine resolved mesh grid, or its reduced PZR model (DSD based) on a much coarser grid. This model was then successfully validated against the second series of experiments involving a detonation propagating around an obstacle and exhibiting a non steady converging front

  5. Fixing convergence of Gaussian belief propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason K; Bickson, Danny; Dolev, Danny

    2009-01-01

    Gaussian belief propagation (GaBP) is an iterative message-passing algorithm for inference in Gaussian graphical models. It is known that when GaBP converges it converges to the correct MAP estimate of the Gaussian random vector and simple sufficient conditions for its convergence have been established. In this paper we develop a double-loop algorithm for forcing convergence of GaBP. Our method computes the correct MAP estimate even in cases where standard GaBP would not have converged. We further extend this construction to compute least-squares solutions of over-constrained linear systems. We believe that our construction has numerous applications, since the GaBP algorithm is linked to solution of linear systems of equations, which is a fundamental problem in computer science and engineering. As a case study, we discuss the linear detection problem. We show that using our new construction, we are able to force convergence of Montanari's linear detection algorithm, in cases where it would originally fail. As a consequence, we are able to increase significantly the number of users that can transmit concurrently.

  6. Convergence Estimates for Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal

    1997-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of coupling between systems of equations is introduced. This analysis is then applied to problems in multidisciplinary analysis, sensitivity, and optimization. For the sensitivity and optimization problems both multidisciplinary and single discipline feasibility schemes are considered. In all these cases a "convergence factor" is estimated in terms of the Jacobians and Hessians of the system, thus it can also be approximated by existing disciplinary analysis and optimization codes. The convergence factor is identified with the measure for the "coupling" between the disciplines in the system. Applications to algorithm development are discussed. Demonstration of the convergence estimates and numerical results are given for a system composed of two non-linear algebraic equations, and for a system composed of two PDEs modeling aeroelasticity.

  7. Sediment dispersal system in the Taiwan-South China Sea collision zone along a convergent margin in the perspective of source to sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, K.; Yu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Through a large-scale examination of the morpho-sedimentary features on seafloor in the Taiwan-Luzon convergent margin, we determined the main sediment dispersal system which stretches from 23°N to 20°N and displays as an aligned linear sediment pathway, consisting of the Penghu Canyon, the deep-sea Penghu Channel and northern Manila Trench. The seafloor of South China Sea (SCS) north of 21°N are underlain by a triangle-shaped collision basin, resulting from oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and Chinese margin, and is mainly occupied by two juxtaposed slopes, the SCS and Kaoping slopes. The Penghu Canyon is located along the tilting basin axis where is the physiographic boundary separating the SCS and Kaoping slopes. Progressive subsidence of the basin floor from this nearby uplifted Taiwan orogen results in the linear basin axis deepening and tilting towards the open SCS, serving as a longitudinal sediment conduit. Two major tributary canyons of the Formosa and Kaoping and small channels and gullies on both slopes join into the axial Penghu Canyon and form a dendritic canyon drainage system in this collision basin. The canyon drainage system is characteristic of lateral sediment supply from flank slopes and axial sediment transport down-canyon following the tilting basin axis. The significance of the collision basin in term of source to sink is that terrestrial and shallow marine sediments derived from nearby Taiwan orogen, Chinese margin and the Taiwan Strait are transported to and accumulated in the collision basin, serving as a temporary sediment sink and the major marine transport route along the basin axis. The multi-sourced sediments in the collision basin are then delivered down-dip via the Penghu Canyon to the deep-sea Penghu Channel and ultimately to the final destination of the Manila Trench, representing a regional longitudinal sediment dispersal route along the convergent margin between Taiwan and Luzon. A comparison with other examples is a

  8. High diversity and morphological convergence among melanised fungi from rock formations in the Central Mountain System of Spain.

    PubMed

    Ruibal, C; Platas, G; Bills, G F

    2008-12-01

    Melanised fungi were isolated from rock surfaces in the Central Mountain System of Spain. Two hundred sixty six isolates were recovered from four geologically and topographically distinct sites. Microsatellite-primed PCR techniques were used to group isolates into genotypes assumed to represent species. One hundred and sixty three genotypes were characterised from the four sites. Only five genotypes were common to two or more sites. Morphological and molecular data were used to characterise and identify representative strains, but morphology rarely provided a definitive identification due to the scarce differentiation of the fungal structures or the apparent novelty of the isolates. Vegetative states of fungi prevailed in culture and in many cases could not be reliably distinguished without sequence data. Morphological characters that were widespread among the isolates included scarce micronematous conidial states, endoconidia, mycelia with dark olive-green or black hyphae, and mycelia with torulose, isodiametric or moniliform hyphae whose cells develop one or more transverse and/or oblique septa. In many of the strains, mature hyphae disarticulated, suggesting asexual reproduction by a thallic micronematous conidiogenesis or by simple fragmentation. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1, ITS2) and 5.8S rDNA gene were employed to investigate the phylogenetic affinities of the isolates. According to ITS sequence alignments, the majority of the isolates could be grouped among four main orders of Pezizomycotina: Pleosporales, Dothideales, Capnodiales, and Chaetothyriales. Ubiquitous known soil and epiphytic fungi species were generally absent from the rock surfaces. In part, the mycota of the rock surfaces shared similar elements with melanised fungi from plant surfaces and fungi described from rock formations in Europe and Antarctica. The possibility that some of the fungi were lichen mycobionts or lichen parasites could not be ruled out. PMID:20396580

  9. Convergent Lines of Descent: Symptoms, Patterns, Constellations, and the Emergent Interface of Systems Biology and Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Scheid, Volker

    2015-01-01

    During the first decade of the twenty-first century, a network composed of politicians, regulators, bioscientists, clinical researchers, and Chinese medicine specialists has emerged that seeks to bridge an imagined gulf between the modern West and ancient China in order to create a new type of personalized medicine. The central building block of this bridge is the Chinese medical concept of zheng 證/証, variously translated into English as syndrome, pattern, or type. My paper places side by side two different genealogies of how zheng assumed this central role. The first genealogy examines the process by means of which zheng came to be considered as something shared by both ancient China and cutting-edge biological science and, by extension, how it manages to hold together the entire institutional, political, and economic framework into which this bridge is embedded and which it co-creates. The second genealogy shows zheng to be central to a much older series of redefinitions of Chinese medicine and Chinese medical practice that extend from the eleventh century to the present. Read together, these two genealogies—neither of which should be seen as exhaustive—raise three important issues that are further discussed in the conclusion of the paper. First, I explore how the concept of zheng has come to tie a medical tradition derided by its adversaries for being a pseudoscience to one of the most cutting-edge fields of bioscience research. I ask what is at stake in this synthesis, for whom, and why, and how it transforms Chinese medicine and/or systems biology along the way. Second, I am interested in finding out how and why the very same concept can be at the heart of two apparently agonistic visions of Chinese medicine’s future as it is popularly imagined in China today. Finally, I insist that the medical humanities need to become actively involved in the construction of emergent articulations such as the ones I am exploring. Merely writing a history of the

  10. Examining marginal sequence similarities between bacterial type III secretion system components and Trypanosoma cruzi surface proteins: horizontal gene transfer or convergent evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Danielle C. F.; Silva, Richard C.; Ferreira, Renata C.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    The cell invasion mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi has similarities with some intracellular bacterial taxa especially regarding calcium mobilization. This mechanism is not observed in other trypanosomatids, suggesting that the molecules involved in this type of cell invasion were a product of (1) acquisition by horizontal gene transfer (HGT); (2) secondary loss in the other trypanosomatid lineages of the mechanism inherited since the bifurcation Bacteria-Neomura (1.9 billion to 900 million years ago); or (3) de novo evolution from non-homologous proteins via convergent evolution. Similar to T. cruzi, several bacterial genera require increased host cell cytosolic calcium for intracellular invasion. Among intracellular bacteria, the mechanism of host cell invasion of genus Salmonella is the most similar to T. cruzi. The invasion of Salmonella occurs by contact with the host's cell surface and is mediated by the type III secretion system (T3SS) that promotes the contact-dependent translocation of effector proteins directly into host's cell cytoplasm. Here we provide evidence of distant sequence similarities and structurally conserved domains between T. cruzi and Salmonella spp T3SS proteins. Exhaustive database searches were directed to a wide range of intracellular bacteria and trypanosomatids, exploring sequence patterns for comparison of structural similarities and Bayesian phylogenies. Based on our data we hypothesize that T. cruzi acquired genes for calcium mobilization mediated invasion by ancient HGT from ancestral Salmonella lineages. PMID:23967008

  11. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  12. Unpleasant odors increase aversion to monetary losses.

    PubMed

    Stancak, Andrej; Xie, Yuxin; Fallon, Nicholas; Bulsing, Patricia; Giesbrecht, Timo; Thomas, Anna; Pantelous, Athanasios A

    2015-04-01

    Loss aversion is the tendency to prefer avoiding losses over acquiring gains of equal nominal values. Unpleasant odors not only influence affective state but have also been shown to activate brain regions similar to those mediating loss aversion. Therefore, we hypothesized a stronger loss aversion in a monetary gamble task if gambles were associated with an unpleasant as opposed to pleasant odor. In thirty human subjects, unpleasant (methylmercaptan), pleasant (jasmine), and neutral (clean air) odors were presented for 4 s. At the same time, uncertain gambles offering an equal chance of gain or loss of a variable amount of money, or a prospect of an assured win were displayed. One hundred different gambles were presented three times, each time paired with a different odor. Loss aversion, risk aversion, and logit sensitivity were evaluated using non-linear fitting of individual gamble decisions. Loss aversion was larger when prospects were displayed in the presence of methylmercaptan compared to jasmine or clean air. Moreover, individual differences in changes in loss aversion to the unpleasant as compared to pleasant odor correlated with odor pleasantness but not with odor intensity. Skin conductance responses to losses during the outcome period were larger when gambles were associated with methylmercaptan compared to jasmine. Increased loss aversion while perceiving an unpleasant odor suggests a dynamic adjustment of loss aversion toward greater sensitivity to losses. Given that odors are biological signals of hazards, such adjustment of loss aversion may have adaptive value in situations entailing threat or danger. PMID:25711689

  13. Developmental exposure to terbutaline and chlorpyrifos: pharmacotherapy of preterm labor and an environmental neurotoxicant converge on serotonergic systems in neonatal rat brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, Justin E.; Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A. . E-mail: t.slotkin@duke.edu

    2005-03-01

    Developmental exposure to unrelated neurotoxicants can nevertheless produce similar neurobehavioral outcomes. We examined the effects of developmental exposure to terbutaline, a tocolytic {beta}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor agonist used to arrest preterm labor, and chlorpyrifos (CPF), a widely used organophosphate pesticide, on serotonin (5HT) systems. Treatments were chosen to parallel periods typical of human developmental exposures, terbutaline (10 mg/kg) on postnatal days (PN) 2-5 and CPF (5 mg/kg) on PN11-14, with assessments conducted on PN45, comparing each agent alone as well as sequential administration of both. Although neither treatment affected growth or viability, each elicited similar alterations in factors that are critical to the function of the 5HT synapse: 5HT{sub 1A} receptors, 5HT{sub 2} receptors, and the presynaptic 5HT transporter (5HTT). Either agent elicited global increases in 5HT receptors and the 5HTT in brain regions possessing 5HT cell bodies (midbrain, brainstem) as well as in the hippocampus, which contains 5HT projections. For both terbutaline and CPF, males were affected more than females, although there were some regional disparities in the sex selectivity between the two agents. Both altered 5HT receptor-mediated cell signaling, suppressing stimulatory effects on adenylyl cyclase and enhancing inhibitory effects. When animals were exposed sequentially to both agents, the outcomes were no more than additive and, for many effects, less than additive, suggesting convergence of the two agents on a common set of developmental mechanisms. Our results indicate that 5HT systems represent a target for otherwise unrelated neuroteratogens.

  14. Endogenous cortisol levels are associated with an imbalanced striatal sensitivity to monetary versus non-monetary cues in pathological gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yansong; Sescousse, Guillaume; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Pathological gambling is a behavioral addiction characterized by a chronic failure to resist the urge to gamble. It shares many similarities with drug addiction. Glucocorticoid hormones including cortisol are thought to play a key role in the vulnerability to addictive behaviors, by acting on the mesolimbic reward pathway. Based on our previous report of an imbalanced sensitivity to monetary versus non-monetary incentives in the ventral striatum of pathological gamblers (PGs), we investigated whether this imbalance was mediated by individual differences in endogenous cortisol levels. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and examined the relationship between cortisol levels and the neural responses to monetary versus non-monetary cues, while PGs and healthy controls were engaged in an incentive delay task manipulating both monetary and erotic rewards. We found a positive correlation between cortisol levels and ventral striatal responses to monetary versus erotic cues in PGs, but not in healthy controls. This indicates that the ventral striatum is a key region where cortisol modulates incentive motivation for gambling versus non-gambling related stimuli in PGs. Our results extend the proposed role of glucocorticoid hormones in drug addiction to behavioral addiction, and help understand the impact of cortisol on reward incentive processing in PGs. PMID:24723862

  15. Convergence of gut microbiomes in myrmecophagous mammals.

    PubMed

    Delsuc, Frédéric; Metcalf, Jessica L; Wegener Parfrey, Laura; Song, Se Jin; González, Antonio; Knight, Rob

    2014-03-01

    Mammals have diversified into many dietary niches. Specialized myrmecophagous (ant- and termite-eating) placental mammals represent a textbook example of evolutionary convergence driven by extreme diet specialization. Armadillos, anteaters, aardvarks, pangolins and aardwolves thus provide a model system for understanding the potential role of gut microbiota in the convergent adaptation to myrmecophagy. Here, we expand upon previous mammalian gut microbiome studies by using high-throughput barcoded Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the composition of gut microbiota in 15 species representing all placental myrmecophagous lineages and their close relatives from zoo- and field-collected samples. We confirm that both diet and phylogeny drive the evolution of mammalian gut microbiota, with cases of convergence in global composition, but also examples of phylogenetic inertia. Our results reveal specialized placental myrmecophages as a spectacular case of large-scale convergence in gut microbiome composition. Indeed, neighbour-net networks and beta-diversity plots based on UniFrac distances show significant clustering of myrmecophagous species (anteaters, aardvarks and aardwolves), even though they belong to phylogenetically distant lineages representing different orders. The aardwolf, which diverged from carnivorous hyenas only in the last 10 million years, experienced a convergent shift in the composition of its gut microbiome to become more similar to other myrmecophages. These results confirm diet adaptation to be a major driving factor of convergence in gut microbiome composition over evolutionary timescales. This study sets the scene for future metagenomic studies aiming at evaluating potential convergence in functional gene content in the microbiomes of specialized mammalian myrmecophages. PMID:24118574

  16. Convergent perturbation theory for lattice models with fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The standard perturbation theory in QFT and lattice models leads to the asymptotic expansions. However, an appropriate regularization of the path or lattice integrals allows one to construct convergent series with an infinite radius of the convergence. In the earlier studies, this approach was applied to the purely bosonic systems. Here, using bosonization, we develop the convergent perturbation theory for a toy lattice model with interacting fermionic and bosonic fields.

  17. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  18. Jewish medical ethics: monetary compensation for donating kidneys.

    PubMed

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2004-03-01

    The Israel Health Ministry is preparing legislation that would allow a person to receive monetary compensation in exchange for donating a kidney for a lifesaving transplant. Such a bill would be the first of its kind, and would seem to establish a policy that is in contrast with both existing international professional ethics and major Christian and Islamic religious ethics. In an attempt to investigate the extent to which such a bill would be consistent with traditional Jewish ethics, we reviewed the opinions of major traditional Jewish ethicists/halakhists, with emphasis on contemporary opinions, and found that compensating an organ donor for his or her time, discomfort, inconvenience, and recovery is fully consistent with traditional Jewish law and ethics. While non-altruistic sale of kidneys might be theoretically ethical from a Jewish perspective, ultimately its ethical status is inextricably connected to solving a series of pragmatic issues, such as creating a system that insures that potential vendors/donors are properly informed and not exploited, controlling and supervising medical screening and support of the donors to insure that their health is not permanently endangered, protecting minors and incompetents, and regulating payments so that they reasonably reflect compensation for pain and suffering. PMID:15055281

  19. Convergence studies in meshfree peridynamic simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seleson, Pablo; Littlewood, David J.

    2016-04-15

    Meshfree methods are commonly applied to discretize peridynamic models, particularly in numerical simulations of engineering problems. Such methods discretize peridynamic bodies using a set of nodes with characteristic volume, leading to particle-based descriptions of systems. In this article, we perform convergence studies of static peridynamic problems. We show that commonly used meshfree methods in peridynamics suffer from accuracy and convergence issues, due to a rough approximation of the contribution to the internal force density of nodes near the boundary of the neighborhood of a given node. We propose two methods to improve meshfree peridynamic simulations. The first method uses accuratemore » computations of volumes of intersections between neighbor cells and the neighborhood of a given node, referred to as partial volumes. The second method employs smooth influence functions with a finite support within peridynamic kernels. Numerical results demonstrate great improvements in accuracy and convergence of peridynamic numerical solutions, when using the proposed methods.« less

  20. Fractal aspects and convergence of Newton`s method

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, M.

    1996-12-31

    Newton`s Method is a widely established iterative algorithm for solving non-linear systems. Its appeal lies in its great simplicity, easy generalization to multiple dimensions and a quadratic local convergence rate. Despite these features, little is known about its global behavior. In this paper, we will explain a seemingly random global convergence pattern using fractal concepts and show that the behavior of the residual is entirely explicable. We will also establish quantitative results for the convergence rates. Knowing the mechanism of fractal generation, we present a stabilization to the orthodox Newton method that remedies the fractal behavior and improves convergence.

  1. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  2. Long-range dependence in interest rates and monetary policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    This Letter studies the dynamics of Brazilian interest rates for short-term maturities. The Letter employs developed techniques in the econophysics literature and tests for long-range dependence in the term structure of these interest rates for the last decade. Empirical results suggest that the degree of long-range dependence has changed over time due to changes in monetary policy, specially in the short-end of the term structure of interest rates. Therefore, we show that it is possible to identify monetary arrangements using these techniques from econophysics.

  3. The Convergence of European Business Cycles 1980--2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, P.

    2005-09-01

    The degree of convergence of the business cycles of the economies of the European Union is a key policy issue. In particular, a substantial degree of convergence is needed if the European Central Bank is to be capable of setting a monetary policy which is appropriate to the stage of the cycle of the Euro zone economies. I consider the annual rates of real GDP growth on a quarterly basis in the main economies of the EU (France, Germany, Italy, UK, Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands) over the period 1980Q1--2004Q4. An important empirical question is the degree to which the correlations between these growth rates contain true information rather than noise. The technique of random matrix theory is able to answer this question, and has been applied successfully in the physics journals to financial markets data. I find that the correlations between the growth rates of most of the core EU economies contain substantial amounts of true information, and exhibit considerable stability over time. Even in the late 1970s and early 1980s, these economies moved together closely over the course of the business cycle. There was a slight loosening at the time of German re-unification, but the economies have moved back into close synchronisation. The same result holds when Spain is added to the group of core EU countries. However, the problems of the German economy which arose from the early 1990s onwards has led to Germany becoming increasingly less synchronised with the rest of the core EU. Further, the results obtained with a data set of the converged EU core plus the UK show no real convergence between the UK and this group of economies.

  4. Some Observations on Grid Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, manuel D.

    2006-01-01

    It is claimed that current practices in grid convergence studies, particularly in the field of external aerodynamics, are flawed. The necessary conditions to properly establish grid convergence are presented. A theoretical model and a numerical example are used to demonstrate these ideas.

  5. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  6. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  7. Convergent flow stove

    SciTech Connect

    Engblom, D.W.

    1986-02-25

    An apparatus for burning combustible solid organic material such as wood is described in a environment in which combustion is directed downwardly. The apparatus consists of: A. A fuel chamber having a closed upper portion and a major dimension in the vertical direction such that the fuel chamber is generally upright, B. A combustion zone in the lower portion of the fuel chamber defined by a convergent outflow passage at the bottom of the fuel chamber and a pair of walls on opposite sides of the lower portion, the walls being sloped inwardly toward one another at the outflow passage, and the outflow passage comprising a gap between the walls, C. A Hearth element forming each the sloping wall, the hearth element including I. At least one row of spaced slots extending into the interior of the hearth element and a lateral air inlet channel connected to the slots of each row and a source of combustion air, and II. A flue outlet communicating with the outflow passage, the flue outlet including spaced, parallel tubes in the hearth element, with the tubes being juxtaposed the slots and extending perpendicular to the air inlet channels, D. Means connected to the flue outlet to permit exhaustion of flue gases from the apparatus, and E. means for loading fuel into the fuel chamber.

  8. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  9. Improving Mail Survey Response Rates through the Use of Monetary Incentive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Wesley J.; Wheelright, Lori A.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of the use of monetary incentives in mail survey data collection. Monetary incentives produces higher rates of return compared to mailings in which nonmonetary or no incentives are provided. The use of monetary incentives is more cost effective than other types of incentives and may be particularly valuable when…

  10. 46 CFR 506.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 506.3 shall be determined by increasing the maximum civil monetary... pursuant to § 506.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation adjustment. Maximum...

  11. 17 CFR Table IV to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Inflation Adjustments IV Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments Table IV to Subpart E U.S. Code citation Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustments Civil monetary penalty description...

  12. 32 CFR 269.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 269.3 shall be determined by... monetary penalty pursuant to § 269.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation...

  13. 32 CFR 269.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 269.3 shall be determined by... monetary penalty pursuant to § 269.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation...

  14. 32 CFR 269.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 269.3 shall be determined by... monetary penalty pursuant to § 269.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation...

  15. 46 CFR 506.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 506.3 shall be determined by increasing the maximum civil monetary... pursuant to § 506.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation adjustment. Maximum...

  16. 46 CFR 506.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 506.3 shall be determined by increasing the maximum civil monetary... pursuant to § 506.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation adjustment. Maximum...

  17. 46 CFR 506.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 506.3 shall be determined by increasing the maximum civil monetary... pursuant to § 506.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation adjustment. Maximum...

  18. 32 CFR 269.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 269.3 shall be determined by... monetary penalty pursuant to § 269.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation...

  19. It's Not Your Mother and Father's Monetary Policy Anymore: The Federal Reserve and Financial Crisis Relief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Andrew T.; Wood, William C.

    2011-01-01

    The recent financial crisis brought about dramatic changes in the way that the Federal Reserve, the nation's central bank, conducts monetary policy. One challenge for high school educators going forward will be to strike a balance between the teaching of traditional monetary policy and the teaching of the monetary policy used during these…

  20. 37 CFR 251.34 - Gifts and other things of monetary value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monetary value. 251.34 Section 251.34 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF... OF PROCEDURE Standards of Conduct § 251.34 Gifts and other things of monetary value. (a) Selected..., or any other thing of monetary value from a person or organization that has an interest that would...

  1. 17 CFR 143.8 - Inflation-adjusted civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... more than the greater of $1,000,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such violation..., not more than the greater of $110,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such...,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such violation; (C) Committed between...

  2. 17 CFR 143.8 - Inflation-adjusted civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... November 27, 1996 and October 22, 2000, not more than the greater of $110,000 or triple the monetary gain... October 22, 2004, not more than the greater of $120,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for... more than the greater of $130,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such...

  3. 17 CFR 143.8 - Inflation-adjusted civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., not more than the greater of $1,000,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such..., 2000, not more than the greater of $110,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such...,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such violation; (C) Committed between...

  4. 17 CFR 143.8 - Inflation-adjusted civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... November 27, 1996 and October 22, 2000, not more than the greater of $110,000 or triple the monetary gain... October 22, 2004, not more than the greater of $120,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for... more than the greater of $130,000 or triple the monetary gain to such person for each such...

  5. 46 CFR 506.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 506.3 shall be determined by increasing the maximum civil monetary... pursuant to § 506.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation adjustment. Maximum...

  6. 17 CFR Table IV to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Inflation Adjustments IV Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments Table IV to Subpart E U.S. Code citation Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustments Civil monetary penalty description...

  7. 32 CFR 269.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) The inflation adjustment under § 269.3 shall be determined by... monetary penalty pursuant to § 269.3 may not exceed 10 percent of such penalty. (d) Inflation...

  8. 14 CFR 13.305 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Inflation Adjustment § 13.305 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) Except for the... maximum civil monetary penalties set forth in paragraph (c) of this section, the inflation adjustment...) Inflation adjustment. Minimum and maximum civil monetary penalties within the jurisdiction of the FAA...

  9. 37 CFR 251.34 - Gifts and other things of monetary value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... monetary value. 251.34 Section 251.34 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF... OF PROCEDURE Standards of Conduct § 251.34 Gifts and other things of monetary value. (a) Selected..., or any other thing of monetary value from a person or organization that has an interest that would...

  10. Economic and Monetary Union: Issues Relating to Education for Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Ian

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes some key issues in debates about the introduction of economic and monetary union within the European Union, including some educational considerations. Describes a method used to teach undergraduates in the United Kingdom about the European Union. Discusses these issues in relation to citizenship education. (SLD)

  11. 8 CFR 1280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... penalties inflation adjustment. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 74630, December 1, 2011. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act...

  12. 8 CFR 1280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, Pub. L. 101-410, 104 Stat. 890, as amended by the...

  13. Exploring a Monetary Union among Nations through Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goma, Ophelia D.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a classroom project that employs various techniques of active learning including role-playing, collaborative group work and writing. The project explores the recent creation of the European Monetary Union (EMU) with special emphasis on the introduction of the euro. The project assumes that the Americas have begun preliminary…

  14. 75 FR 17555 - Department of Agriculture Civil Monetary Penalties Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... (62 FR 40924). USDA published its second round of inflation adjustments in the Federal Register on May 24, 2005, and those adjustments became effective on June 23, 2005 (70 FR 29573). All USDA CMP... civil monetary penalties required by the Act'' (62 FR 40924; July 31, 1997). USDA continues to...

  15. The Monetary Rewards of Migration Within the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Richard F., II

    This study focuses on the economic benefits derived by the migrant from migration. The report presents a methodology for computing monetary benefits, an estimate of these benefits, and implications of the findings for public policy. Included are a discussion of domestic migration and public policy, an economic theory of migration, an explanation…

  16. 77 FR 64431 - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board 49 CFR Part 1022 Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment Rule AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Surface Transportation Board (Board) is... reference Docket No. EP 716 and be in writing addressed to: Office of Proceedings, Surface...

  17. Using "The Merchant of Venice" in Teaching Monetary Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kish-Goodling, Donna M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" in an undergraduate course in monetary economics, focusing on the usury theme origins of usury laws, scholastic arguments on paying interest for using money, civil usury laws, and modern theories of interest. It is argued that the play provides an interesting vehicle for an…

  18. 8 CFR 1280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, Pub. L. 101-410, 104 Stat. 890, as amended by the...

  19. 76 FR 74720 - Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 38114). The rule adjusts for inflation the maximum amount of each statutory civil penalty... 46 CFR Part 506 RIN 3072-AC36 Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties; Correction AGENCY... Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt Collection Improvement Act...

  20. 78 FR 5760 - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 326 RIN 0710-AA66 Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation... Clean Water Act and the National Fishing Enhancement Act to account for inflation. The adjustment of civil penalties to account for inflation is required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation...

  1. 76 FR 74625 - Civil Monetary Penalties Inflation Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...This rule amends the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regulations to adjust for inflation certain civil monetary penalties assessed under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The adjusted penalties are calculated according to a statutory formula, and will be effective for violations occurring on or after the effective date. This rule also amends the Department of Justice (DOJ)......

  2. The BMW Model: A New Framework for Teaching Monetary Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bofinger, Peter; Mayer, Eric; Wollmershauser, Timo

    2006-01-01

    Although the IS/LM-AS/AD model is still the central tool of macroeconomic teaching in most macroeconomic textbooks, it has been criticized by several economists. Colander (1995) demonstrated that the framework is logically inconsistent, Romer (2000) showed that it is unable to deal with a monetary policy that uses the interest rate as its…

  3. Intelligence moderates neural responses to monetary reward and punishment.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Daniel R; DeYoung, Colin G; Gray, Jeremy R; Rustichini, Aldo

    2014-05-01

    The relations between intelligence (IQ) and neural responses to monetary gains and losses were investigated in a simple decision task. In 94 healthy adults, typical responses of striatal blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal after monetary reward and punishment were weaker for subjects with higher IQ. IQ-moderated differential responses to gains and losses were also found for regions in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and left inferior frontal cortex. These regions have previously been identified with the subjective utility of monetary outcomes. Analysis of subjects' behavior revealed a correlation between IQ and the extent to which choices were related to experienced decision outcomes in preceding trials. Specifically, higher IQ predicted behavior to be more strongly correlated with an extended period of previously experienced decision outcomes, whereas lower IQ predicted behavior to be correlated exclusively to the most recent decision outcomes. We link these behavioral and imaging findings to a theoretical model capable of describing a role for intelligence during the evaluation of rewards generated by unknown probabilistic processes. Our results demonstrate neural differences in how people of different intelligence respond to experienced monetary rewards and punishments. Our theoretical discussion offers a functional description for how these individual differences may be linked to choice behavior. Together, our results and model support the hypothesis that observed correlations between intelligence and preferences may be rooted in the way decision outcomes are experienced ex post, rather than deriving exclusively from how choices are evaluated ex ante. PMID:24523519

  4. Monetary Policy at Work: Lessons from the FOMC Transcripts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Roger W.

    1996-01-01

    Utilizes Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) transcripts to reveal how the Federal Reserve shapes monetary policy. Analysis of the documents shows the Committee examining a wide variety of indicators and approaches in an attempt to determine the appropriate time for a policy change. Inflationary pressures were a preeminent concern. (MJP)

  5. The Disparate Labor Market Impacts of Monetary Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Seth B.; Rodgers, William M., III

    2004-01-01

    Employing two widely used approaches to identify the effects of monetary policy, this paper explores the differential impact of policy on the labor market outcomes of teenagers, minorities, out-of-school youth, and less-skilled individuals. Evidence from recursive vector autoregressions and autoregressive distributed lag models that use…

  6. The Monetary Arena: Cornerstone for Life Cycle Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addicott, James W.; Julius, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Important elements of personal lifetime money management are outlined and discussed briefly, particularly as they apply to college and university faculty and staff. They include insurance (disability, health, life, retirement income); the changing monetary environment; taxes; inflation; sources of income; budgeting; risk; death and heirs. (MSE)

  7. The Valuation of Non-Monetary Consumption in Household Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Many social indicators are based on household consumption information. The valuation of non-monetary operations is crucial for the analysis of consumption surveys in developing countries because of the importance of own-consumption and transfers in kind. What are the price statistics used in the valuation of consumption indicators? How is the…

  8. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  9. Adaptation of the Monetary Choice Questionnaire to accommodate extreme monetary discounting in cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Towe, Sheri L; Hobkirk, Andréa L; Ye, Daniel G; Meade, Christina S

    2015-12-01

    Delay discounting, which refers to the phenomenon that rewards decrease in subjective value as the delay associated with their receipt increases, is a paradigm that has been used extensively in substance abuse research to understand impulsive decision making. One common measure to assess delay discounting is the Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ) developed by Kirby, Petry, and Bickel (1999). While the MCQ has great utility because of its simplicity and brief administration time, it is possible that the MCQ produces a ceiling effect in estimating delay discounting parameters in highly impulsive individuals. In the present study, we adapted the MCQ to attempt to address this ceiling effect by extending the original scale with 9 items, and we then compared scores on the original MCQ with the extended MCQ in a sample of active cocaine users. The ceiling effect, while observed in the original MCQ scores for over a quarter of the sample, was largely eliminated with the extended scale. Highly impulsive participants, whose scores on the extended scale exceeded the highest possible score on the original scale, had higher levels of sensation seeking compared to other participants, but not trait impulsivity. The extended MCQ may be useful in populations with high rates of impulsivity, where the original measure may underestimate discounting rates due to a ceiling effect. PMID:26191820

  10. Sustained Fixation Induced Changes in Phoria and Convergence Peak Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun H.; Vicci, Vincent R.; Han, Sang J.; Alvarez, Tara L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to investigate the influence of phoria adaptation on convergence peak velocity from responses located at different initial vergence positions. Methods Symmetrical 4° convergence step responses and near dissociated phoria (measured at 40 cm from the subject's midline) were recorded from six subjects with normal binocular vision using an infrared limbus tracking system with a haploscope. Two different sustained fixations (1° and 16° convergent rotation along the subject's midline) were used to study whether phoria had an influence on the peak velocity of convergence responses located at two initial vergence positions (1° or ‘far’ steps and 12° or ‘near’ steps). Results Phoria was significantly adapted after a sustained fixation task at near (16°) and far (1°) (p<0.002). A repeated measures ANOVA showed that convergence far steps were significantly faster than the near steps (p<0.03). When comparing convergence steps with the same initial vergence position, steps measured after near phoria adaptation were faster than responses after far adaptation (p<0.02). A regression analysis demonstrated that the change in phoria and the change in convergence peak velocity were significantly correlated for the far convergence steps (r = 0.97, p = 0.001). A weaker correlation was observed for the near convergence steps (r = 0.59, p = 0.20). Conclusion As a result of sustained fixation, phoria was adapted and the peak velocity of the near and far convergence steps was modified. This study has clinical considerations since prisms, which evoke phoria adaptation, can be prescribed to help alleviate visual discomfort. Future investigations should include a systematic study of how prisms may influence convergence and divergence eye movements for those prescribed with prisms within their spectacles. PMID:21698110