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Sample records for monitoring human exposure

  1. EVALUATION OF A PERSONAL NEPHELOMETER FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current particulate matter (PM) exposure studies are using continuous personal nephelometers (pDR-1000, MIE, Inc.) to measure human exposure to PM. The personal nephelometer is a passive sampler which uses light scattering technology to measure particles ranging in size from 0....

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT USING IMMUNOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of immunochemical technologies including, but not limited to, immunoassays is expanding to include various aspects of environmental analysis. Ultimately, the basis for environmental investigations is concern about human and ecological exposure to potentially toxic compoun...

  3. Estimating exposure and dose to characterize health risks: the role of human tissue monitoring in exposure assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, K; Callahan, M A; Bryan, E F

    1995-01-01

    Exposure assessment is an integral part of health risk characterization. Exposure assessments typically address three critical aspects of exposure: the number of people exposed to the environmental toxicant, at specific concentrations, for the time period of interest; the resulting dose; and the relative contribution of important sources and pathways to exposure/dose. Because historically both "point-of-contact" measurements and information about dose and related pharmacokinetic processes have been lacking, exposure assessments have had to rely on construction of "scenarios" to estimate exposure and dose. This could change, however, as advances in development of biologic markers of exposure and dose make it possible to measure and interpret toxicant concentrations in accessible human tissues. The increasing availability of "biomarkers," coupled with improvements in pharmacokinetic understanding, present opportunities to estimate ("reconstruct") exposure from measurements of dose and knowledge of intake and uptake parameters. Human tissue monitoring, however, is not a substitute for more traditional methods of measuring exposure, but rather a complementary approach. A combination of exposure measurements and dose measurements provides the most credible scientific basis for exposure assessment. PMID:7635107

  4. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  5. Environmental exposure modeling and monitoring of human pharmaceutical concentrations in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Versteeg, D.J.; Alder, A. C.; Cunningham, V. L.; Kolpin, D.W.; Murray-Smith, R.; Ternes, T.

    2005-01-01

    Human pharmaceuticals are receiving increased attention as environmental contaminants. This is due to their biological activity and the number of monitoring programs focusing on analysis of these compounds in various environmental media and compartments. Risk assessments are needed to understand the implications of reported concentrations; a fundamental part of the risk assessment is an assessment of environmental exposures. The purpose of this chapter is to provide guidance on the use of predictive tools (e.g., models) and monitoring data in exposure assessments for pharmaceuticals in the environment. Methods to predict environmental concentrations from equations based on first principles are presented. These equations form the basis of existing GIS (geographic information systems)-based systems for understanding the spatial distribution of pharmaceuticals in the environment. The pharmaceutical assessment and transport (PhATE), georeferenced regional exposure assessment tool for European rivers (GREAT-ER), and geographical information system (GIS)-ROUT models are reviewed and recommendations are provided concerning the design and execution of monitoring studies. Model predictions and monitoring data are compared to evaluate the relative utility of each approach in environmental exposure assessments. In summary, both models and monitoring data can be used to define representative exposure concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the environment in support of environmental risk assessments.

  6. Human tissue monitoring and specimen banking: opportunities for exposure assessment, risk assessment, and epidemiologic research.

    PubMed

    Lee, L W; Griffith, J; Zenick, H; Hulka, B S

    1995-04-01

    A symposium on Human Tissue Monitoring and Specimen Banking: Opportunities for Exposure Assessment, Risk Assessment, and Epidemiologic Research was held from 30 March to 1 April 1993 in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. There were 117 registered participants from 18 states and 5 foreign countries. The first 2 days featured 21 invited speakers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, various other government agencies, and universities in the United States, Canada, Germany, and Norway. The speakers provided a state-of-the-art overview of human exposure assessment techniques (especially applications of biological markers) and their relevance to human tissue specimen banking. Issues relevant to large-scale specimen banking were discussed, including program design, sample design, data collection, tissue collection, and ethical ramifications. The final group of presentations concerned practical experiences of major specimen banking and human tissue monitoring programs in the United States and Europe. The symposium addressed the utility and research opportunities afforded by specimen banking programs for future research needs in the areas of human exposure assessment, risk assessment, and environmental epidemiology. The third day of the symposium consisted of a small workshop convened to discuss and develop recommendations to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regarding applications and utility of large-scale specimen banking, biological monitoring, and biological markers for risk assessment activities. PMID:7635108

  7. A computerized bibliographic literature information system for total human exposure monitoring research

    SciTech Connect

    Dellarco, M.; Ott, W.; Wallace, L. ); Hunt, H. )

    1988-01-01

    Total human exposure monitoring is a new concept that seeks to determine, with known precision and accuracy, the pollutant concentrations actually reaching people through the food they eat, the water they drink, and the air they breath regardless of whether people are located indoors, outdoors, or in-transit. Such monitoring provides the key information needed to protect public health and to make risk assessment through representative samples of the general population, using personal monitors to measure air exposure and making direct measurements of contaminants in food, drinking water, and breath. This paper discusses the new field which also includes: surveys of what people do, where, and when, called human activity patterns, special models designed to predict human exposures from activity pattern data, and studies of the pollutant concentrations found in the small physical microenvironments that people visit, such as in-transit vehicles (for example, buses, automobiles, trains, and subways); indoor settings (for example, schools, auditoriums, stores, churches, offices, and homes); and outdoor settings(for example, sidewalks, intersections, outdoor parking areas, street canyons).

  8. Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph V.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring is the coordination of environmental (air, water, land, and crops) monitoring networks to collect systematically pollutant exposure data for a specific receptor, usually man. (Author/BB)

  9. HUMAN EXPOSURE AIR MONITORING: EXAMPLES FROM THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US-EPA and North Carolina Central University (NCCU) have a cross-pollination agenda to help share research opportunities between the two institutions. This presentation provides NCCU with an understanding of current air monitoring research the US EPA is involved in and some o...

  10. Immunoassays and Biosensors for Monitoring Environmental and Human Exposure to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Kim, Hee-Joo; Mccoy, Mark R.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript describes some of the early work on pyrethroid insecticides in the Casida laboratory and briefly reviews the development and application of immunochemical approaches for the detection of pyrethroid insecticides and their metabolites for monitoring environmental and human exposure. Multiple technologies can be combined to enhance the sensitivity and speed of immunochemical analysis. The pyrethroid assays are used to illustrate the use of some of these immunoreagents such as antibodies, competitive mimics, and novel binding agents such as phage-displayed peptides. We also illustrate reporters such as fluorescent dyes, chemiluminescent compounds, and luminescent lanthanide nanoparticles, as well as the application of magnetic separation, and automatic instrumental systems, biosensor and novel immunological technologies. These new technologies alone and in combination result in an improved ability to determine both if effective levels of pyrethroids are being used in the field as well as evaluate possible contamination. PMID:21105656

  11. HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS/METHODS: DEVELOP AND TEST IMMUNOCHEMICAL AND OTHER SCREENING TECHNIQUES FOR USE IN EXPOSURE MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    More data are needed to accurately determine the impact of pesticides on human health, especially for infants and young children. One of the ways to reduce uncertainties in the assessment of human exposure to pesticides, and other environmental contaminants, is through extensive...

  12. An Immunoassay for Monitoring Environmental and Human Exposure to the Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether BDE-47

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Gee, Shirley J.; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Bennett, Deborah; Nishioka, Marcia G.; Blum, Arlene; Fishman, Elana; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a selective competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to monitor environmental and human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether BDE-47 that is used as a flame retardant. 2,2’,4,4’-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) a dominant PBDE congener of toxicological concern, was the target analyte. To achieve effective hapten presentation on the carrier protein for antibody production, immunizing haptens with a rigid double-bonded hydrocarbon linker introduced at different positions on the target molecule were synthesized as well as coating haptens that mimic a characteristic fragment of the molecule. Rabbit antisera produced against each immunizing antigen were screened against competitive hapten coating antigens. Under optimized competitive indirect ELISA conditions, the linear detection range in the assay buffer that includes 50% dimethyl sulfoxide was 0.35 - 8.50 μg/L with an IC50 value of 1.75 μg/L for BDE-47. Little or no cross-reactivity (< 6%) was observed to related PBDE congeners containing the BDE-47 moiety and other halogenated compounds. Using a magnetic particle-based competitive direct ELISA increased the sensitivity by 10-fold over the indirect ELISA. The ELISA provided quantitative results when performed on small volume/weight samples such as dust, furniture foam, and blood/serum following sample preparation, suggesting a convenient screening tool. PMID:19921894

  13. Human exposure monitoring and evaluation in the Arctic: the importance of understanding exposures to the development of public health policy.

    PubMed Central

    Suk, William A; Avakian, Maureen D; Carpenter, David; Groopman, John D; Scammell, Madeleine; Wild, Christopher P

    2004-01-01

    Arctic indigenous peoples face significant challenges resulting from the contamination of Arctic air, water, and soil by persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, and radionuclides. International cooperative efforts among governments and research institutions are under way to collect the information needed by environmental health scientists and public health officials to address environmental contamination in the Arctic. However, the climatic, political, and cultural conditions of the land and its native populations combine to present a unique set of scientific and logistic challenges to addressing this important public health issue. Public health officials have the responsibility to respect the cultural traditions of indigenous communities, while simultaneously designing strategies that will reduce their exposure to environmental contaminants and rates of disease and dysfunction. Researchers can better understand the link between environmental exposures and disease through monitoring programs for both the subsistence diets and health status of the indigenous populations. We suggest that the incorporation of community-based participatory research methods into programs designed to assess biomarkers of contaminant exposure in children and adults may be a valuable addition to ongoing and newly developed research programs. This approach could serve as a model for international environmental health initiatives, because it involves the participation of the local communities and seeks to builds trust between all stakeholders. PMID:14757538

  14. Battery of monitoring tests for the detection of human population exposures to genotoxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S.; Chang, L.W.; Pereira, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    Environmental and occupational exposures of human populations to mutagenic chemicals have caused concern but have been difficult to document because rapid and sensitive techniques for assessing the effects of exposure have not been available. We are evaluating a battery of tests for the detection of exposure of human populations to known or suspected mutagens. Parallel laboratory studies using the same or analogous assays are being conducted with animals and are reported in an accompanying abstract. Exposed individuals are matched for age, sex and lifestyle factors with unexposed control individuals. Blood, urine and in males, semen are collected from both age groups simultaneously. The tests performed with these samples include cytogenetic analysis of lymphocytes for chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges, evaluation for DNA damage in lymphocytes by the alkaline elution technique, analysis of hemoglobin for alkylation, analysis of urine for excreted mutagens and analysis of semen for sperm count, abnormal morphology and Y chromosome non-disjunction. Our initial study is evaluating the effects of a formaldehyde exposure in a major hospital autopsy service. Environmental measurements show that individuals are exposed to transient levels of 1-5 ppm during certain activities with background levels of 0.1-0.5 ppm at other times. To date 19 exposed and 19 control subjects have been sampled a total of 101 times. The only difference indicated to date between exposed and control groups was an upward shift in the distribution of chromosome aberration rates for formaldehyde exposed subjects and alcohol consumers compared to non-drinkers.

  15. SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures to airborne particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in several populations in the US, Japan, and Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors, developed for human exposure biomonitoring studies were used to collect fine particles (<_ 1....

  16. Influence of Human Activity Patterns, particle composition, and residential air exchange rates on modeled distributions of PM 2.5 exposure compared with central-site monitoring data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central-site monitors do not account for factors such as outdoor-to-indoor transport and human activity patterns that influence personal exposures to ambient fine-particulate matter (PM2.5). We describe and compare different ambient PM2.5 exposure estimation...

  17. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) of the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) conducts research on exposure measurements, human activity patterns, exposure and dose models, and cumulative exposures critical for the Agency to make scientificall...

  19. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  20. Influence of human activity patterns, particle composition, and residential air exchange rates on modeled distributions of PM2.5 exposure compared with central-site monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Lisa K; Burke, Janet; Lunden, Melissa; Turpin, Barbara J; Rich, David Q; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Hodas, Natasha; Ökaynak, Halûk

    2013-01-01

    Central-site monitors do not account for factors such as outdoor-to-indoor transport and human activity patterns that influence personal exposures to ambient fine-particulate matter (PM(2.5)). We describe and compare different ambient PM(2.5) exposure estimation approaches that incorporate human activity patterns and time-resolved location-specific particle penetration and persistence indoors. Four approaches were used to estimate exposures to ambient PM(2.5) for application to the New Jersey Triggering of Myocardial Infarction Study. These include: Tier 1, central-site PM(2.5) mass; Tier 2A, the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model using literature-based air exchange rates (AERs); Tier 2B, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Aerosol Penetration and Persistence (APP) and Infiltration models; and Tier 3, the SHEDS model where AERs were estimated using the LBNL Infiltration model. Mean exposure estimates from Tier 2A, 2B, and 3 exposure modeling approaches were lower than Tier 1 central-site PM(2.5) mass. Tier 2A estimates differed by season but not across the seven monitoring areas. Tier 2B and 3 geographical patterns appeared to be driven by AERs, while seasonal patterns appeared to be due to variations in PM composition and time activity patterns. These model results demonstrate heterogeneity in exposures that are not captured by the central-site monitor. PMID:23321856

  1. Immunologic methods for monitoring carcinogen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santella, Regina M.; Perera, Frederica P.; Zhang, Yu J.; Chen, Chen J.; Young, Tie L.

    1993-03-01

    Immunologic methods have been developed for monitoring human exposure to environmental and occupational carcinogens. These methods involve the development of monoclonal and polyclonal antisera which specifically recognize the carcinogens themselves or their DNA or protein adducts. Antisera recognizing the DNA adducts of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diol epoxides have been used in competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to monitor adducts in tissue or blood samples. Elevated levels of DNA adducts have been seen in mononuclear cells of smokers and in total white blood cells of foundry and coke oven workers. Environmental exposure to PAH has been measured in individuals living in a highly polluted region of Poland. Antisera recognizing PAH-DNA adducts have also been used in immunohistochemical studies to monitor adducts in specific cells of biopsy samples. The DNA adducts of aflatoxin B1 have been monitored in liver tissue of hepatocellular carcinoma patients in Taiwan. Detectable adducts were seen in 50 - 70% of the patients suggesting that dietary exposure to this carcinogen may be a risk factor for cancer induction. Thus, immunoassays for monitoring exposure to carcinogens are an important tool in epidemiologic studies.

  2. LOW COST, LOW BURDEN, EXPOSURE MONITORING STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A birth cohort study designed to evaluate the association between exposures to environmental agents and health outcomes presents many challenges for exposure monitoring. Exposure of the child must be measured for multiple chemicals through multiply pathways over an extended peri...

  3. Monitoring urinary mercapturic acids as biomarkers of human dietary exposure to acrylamide in combination with acrylamide uptake assessment based on duplicate diets.

    PubMed

    Ruenz, Meike; Bakuradze, Tamara; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Richling, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The present human intervention study investigated the relation between the intake of acrylamide (AA) in diets with minimized, low, and high AA contents and the levels of urinary exposure biomarkers. As biomarkers, the mercapturic acids, N-acetyl-S-(carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) were monitored. The study was performed with 14 healthy male volunteers over a period of 9 days, under controlled conditions excluding any inadvertent AA exposure. Dietary exposure to AA was measured by determining AA contents in duplicates of all meals consumed by the volunteers. The study design included an initial washout period of 3 days on AA-minimized diet, resulting in dietary AA exposure not exceeding 41 ng/kg bw/d. Identical washout periods of 2 days each followed the AA exposure days (day 4, low exposure, and day 7, high exposure). At the respective AA intake days, volunteers ingested 0.6-0.8 (low exposure) or 1.3-1.8 (high exposure) μg AA/kg bw/d with their food. Both low and high AA intakes resulted in an AAMA output within 72 h corresponding to 58 % of the respective AA intake. At the end of the initial 3-day washout period, an AAMA baseline level of 93 ± 31 nmol/d was recorded, suggestive for an assumed net AA baseline exposure level of 0.2-0.3 μg AA/kg bw/d. PMID:25757395

  4. Monitoring Nanoaerosols and Environmental Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandin, Corinne; Le Bihan, Olivier; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier

    Environmental exposure refers to exposure of the population outside the occupational context (see Chap. 6.4) and excluding also medical exposure. The kind of exposure discussed in this chapter is due to the presence of nanoparticles in the various environmental compartments, such as the air (indoors or outdoors), water (water for drinking, bathing, etc.), soils, foodstuffs, and so on. These nanoparticles may come from the nanomaterials that contain them and upon which they bestow specific novel properties, or they may be formed unintentionally by human activities such as industry, traffic, domestic fuel combustion, etc., or natural phenomena such as forest fires, for example, or again by physicochemical reactions, e.g., the reaction between gases and particles in the air, spray formation, vapour condensation, and so on. This book is concerned with the former, namely manufactured nanoparticles, but the related questions and acquired knowledge must often be viewed from the perspective of what is already known about the latter, commonly referred to as ultrafine particles.

  5. 30 CFR 57.5071 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5071 Section 57.5071... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation... Exposure monitoring. (a) Mine operators must monitor as often as necessary to effectively determine,...

  6. 30 CFR 57.5071 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5071 Section 57.5071... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation... Exposure monitoring. (a) Mine operators must monitor as often as necessary to effectively determine,...

  7. 30 CFR 57.5071 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5071 Section 57.5071... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation... Exposure monitoring. (a) Mine operators must monitor as often as necessary to effectively determine,...

  8. 30 CFR 57.5071 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5071 Section 57.5071... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation... Exposure monitoring. (a) Mine operators must monitor as often as necessary to effectively determine,...

  9. AIR TOXICS HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to improve the scientific basis for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) assessments of human exposures to air toxics by developing improved human exposure models. The research integrates the major components of the exposure paradigm, i.e., sources, tr...

  10. Monitoring human exposure to ethylene oxide by the determination of hemoglobin adducts using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, P.B.; Bailey, E.; Gorf, S.M.; Toernqvist, M.O.; Osterman-Golkar, S.; Kautiainen, A.; Lewis-Enright, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Globin samples from ethylene oxide-exposed workers and non-exposed referrents were analyzed by two methods: (i) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of Nt-(2-hydroxyethyl)histidine as its methyl ester heptafluorobutyryl derivative, after hydrolysis of the protein and isolation of the alkylated amino acid by ion exchange chromatography. The internal standard, Nt-(2-hydroxy-d4-ethyl)histidine, was added to the protein before hydrolysis. (ii) Determination of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine after derivatization of the protein by a modified Edman procedure, extraction and g.c.-m.s. determination of alkylated N-terminal valine in the form of its pentafluorophenylthiohydantoin derivative. The internal standard used was in this case a globin with a known content of hydroxy-d4-ethylated amino acids. The two methods gave consistent results, especially at high levels of alkylated products. The average content of hydroxyethylhistidine was 0.6 nmol/g higher than the content of hydroxyethylvaline. Higher levels of background alkylation (of unknown origin) were recorded with the histidine method as compared with the valine method, suggesting that the latter assay should show greater sensitivity for low level ethylene oxide exposure monitoring.

  11. Measurement methods for human exposure analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, P J

    1995-01-01

    The general methods used to complete measurements of human exposures are identified and illustrations are provided for the cases of indirect and direct methods used for exposure analysis. The application of the techniques for external measurements of exposure, microenvironmental and personal monitors, are placed in the context of the need to test hypotheses concerning the biological effects of concern. The linkage of external measurements to measurements made in biological fluids is explored for a suite of contaminants. This information is placed in the context of the scientific framework used to conduct exposure assessment. Examples are taken from research on volatile organics and for a large scale problem: hazardous waste sites. PMID:7635110

  12. 30 CFR 56.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Agents Air Quality § 56.5002 Exposure monitoring. Dust, gas, mist, and fume surveys shall be conducted as... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 56.5002 Section 56.5002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  13. 30 CFR 56.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Agents Air Quality § 56.5002 Exposure monitoring. Dust, gas, mist, and fume surveys shall be conducted as... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 56.5002 Section 56.5002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  14. 30 CFR 56.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Agents Air Quality § 56.5002 Exposure monitoring. Dust, gas, mist, and fume surveys shall be conducted as... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 56.5002 Section 56.5002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  15. 30 CFR 57.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5002 Section 57.5002..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground § 57.5002 Exposure monitoring. Dust, gas, mist, and fume surveys shall be conducted as frequently as necessary to determine...

  16. 30 CFR 56.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Agents Air Quality § 56.5002 Exposure monitoring. Dust, gas, mist, and fume surveys shall be conducted as... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 56.5002 Section 56.5002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  17. 30 CFR 56.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Agents Air Quality § 56.5002 Exposure monitoring. Dust, gas, mist, and fume surveys shall be conducted as... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 56.5002 Section 56.5002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...

  18. HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT USING IMMUNOASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory-Las Vegas is developing analytical methods for human exposure assessment studies. Critical exposure studies generate a large number of samples which must be analyzed in a reliable, cost-effective and timely manner. TCP (3,5,6-trichlor...

  19. EPA'S HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of NERL's Exposure Research Program is to improve the scientific basis for conducting human exposure assessments that are part of the EPA's risk assessment, risk management and compliance process. Overall, we aim to address aggregate and cumulative exposures that pose...

  20. Exposure monitoring of graphene nanoplatelets manufacturing workplaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Jong Hun; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Boowook; Bello, Dhimiter; Kim, Jin Kwon; Lee, Gun Ho; Sohn, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kyungmin; Ahn, Kangho; Faustman, Elaine M; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    Graphenes have emerged as a highly promising, two-dimensional engineered nanomaterial that can possibly substitute carbon nanotubes. They are being explored in numerous R&D and industrial applications in laboratories across the globe, leading to possible human and environmental exposures to them. Yet, there are no published data on graphene exposures in occupational settings and no readily available methods for their detection and quantitation exist. This study investigates for the first time the potential exposure of workers and research personnel to graphenes in two research facilities and evaluates the status of the control measures. One facility manufactures graphene using graphite exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), while the other facility grows graphene on a copper plate using CVD, which is then transferred to a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet. Graphene exposures and process emissions were investigated for three tasks - CVD growth, exfoliation, and transfer - using a multi-metric approach, which utilizes several direct reading instruments, integrated sampling, and chemical and morphological analysis. Real-time instruments included a dust monitor, condensation particle counter (CPC), nanoparticle surface area monitor, scanning mobility particle sizer, and an aethalometer. Morphologically, graphenes and other nanostructures released from the work process were investigated using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Graphenes were quantified in airborne respirable samples as elemental carbon via thermo-optical analysis. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate at Workplaces A and B were very low, and elemental carbon concentrations were mostly below the detection limit, indicating very low exposure to graphene or any other particles. The real-time monitoring, especially the aethalometer, showed a good response to the released black carbon, providing a signature of the graphene released during the opening of the CVD reactor

  1. Magnetic field exposure and behavioral monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A W; Drost, D J; Prato, F S

    2001-09-01

    To maximize the availability and usefulness of a small magnetic field exposure laboratory, we designed a magnetic field exposure system that has been used to test human subjects, caged or confined animals, and cell cultures. The magnetic field exposure system consists of three orthogonal pairs of coils 2 m square x 1 m separation, 1.751 m x 0.875 m separation, and 1.5 m x 0.75 m separation. Each coil consisted of ten turns of insulated 8 gauge stranded copper conductor. Each of the pairs were driven by a constant-current amplifier via digital to analog (D/A) converter. A 9 pole zero-gain active Bessel low-pass filter (1 kHz corner frequency) before the amplifier input attenuated the expected high frequencies generated by the D/A conversion. The magnetic field was monitored with a 3D fluxgate magnetometer (0-3 kHz, +/- 1 mT) through an analog to digital converter. Behavioral monitoring utilized two monochrome video cameras (viewing the coil center vertically and horizontally), both of which could be video recorded and real-time digitally Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) encoded to CD-ROM. Human postural sway (standing balance) was monitored with a 3D forceplate mounted on the floor, connected to an analog to digital converter. Lighting was provided by 12 offset overhead dimmable fluorescent track lights and monitored using a digitally connected spectroradiometer. The dc resistance, inductance of each coil pair connected in series were 1.5 m coil (0.27 Omega, 1.2 mH), 1.75 m coil (0.32 Omega, 1.4 mH), and 2 m coil (0.38 Omega, 1.6 mH). The frequency response of the 1.5 m coil set was 500 Hz at +/- 463 microT, 1 kHz at +/- 232 microT, 150 micros rise time from -200 microT(pk) to + 200 microT(pk) (square wave) and is limited by the maximum voltage ( +/- 146 V) of the amplifier (Bessel filter bypassed). PMID:11536281

  2. In Silico Identification of a Candidate Synthetic Peptide (Tsgf118–43) to Monitor Human Exposure to Tsetse Flies in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Dama, Emilie; Cornelie, Sylvie; Camara, Mamadou; Somda, Martin Bienvenu; Poinsignon, Anne; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Elanga Ndille, Emmanuel; Jamonneau, Vincent; Solano, Philippe; Remoue, Franck; Bengaly, Zakaria; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Bucheton, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background The analysis of humoral responses directed against the saliva of blood-sucking arthropods was shown to provide epidemiological biomarkers of human exposure to vector-borne diseases. However, the use of whole saliva as antigen presents several limitations such as problems of mass production, reproducibility and specificity. The aim of this study was to design a specific biomarker of exposure to tsetse flies based on the in silico analysis of three Glossina salivary proteins (Ada, Ag5 and Tsgf1) previously shown to be specifically recognized by plasma from exposed individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Synthetic peptides were designed by combining several linear epitope prediction methods and Blast analysis. The most specific peptides were then tested by indirect ELISA on a bank of 160 plasma samples from tsetse infested areas and tsetse free areas. Anti-Tsgf118–43 specific IgG levels were low in all three control populations (from rural Africa, urban Africa and Europe) and were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in the two populations exposed to tsetse flies (Guinean HAT foci, and South West Burkina Faso). A positive correlation was also found between Anti-Tsgf118–43 IgG levels and the risk of being infected by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the sleeping sickness foci of Guinea. Conclusion/Significance The Tsgf118–43 peptide is a suitable and promising candidate to develop a standardize immunoassay allowing large scale monitoring of human exposure to tsetse flies in West Africa. This could provide a new surveillance indicator for tsetse control interventions by HAT control programs. PMID:24086785

  3. ISSUES IN MONITORING POPULATION EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript explores the risks associated with exposure to carcinogenic chemicals that have become a growing source of public concern. Steadily increasing numbers of agents are being identified as mutagens and carcinogens. Furthermore, we are increasingly aware of sources of ...

  4. Is plasma {beta}-glucuronidase a novel human biomarker for monitoring anticholinesterase pesticides exposure? A Malaysian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan H. |. E-mail: salmaan@mib.gov.my; Lubis, Syarif Husin; Sakian, Noor Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi; Ali, Noor Suhailah; El Sersi, Magdi; Toong, Lee Mun; Zainal, Awang Mat; Hashim, Suhaimi; Ghazali, Mohd Shariman; Saidin, Mohd Nazri; Rahman, Ab Razak Ab; Rafaai, Mohd Jamil Mohd; Omar, Sollahudin; Rapiai, Rafiah; Othman, Radziah; Chan, Lee Tiong; Johari, Amran; Soon, Wong Hing; Salleh, Abdul Rahim; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the effects of acute and chronic pesticide exposure on the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme activity among five patients of acute pesticide poisoning in Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital, Klang, 230 farmers in the MADA area, Kedah and 49 fishermen in Setiu, Terengganu. The duration of pesticide exposure among the patients was unknown, but the plasma samples from patients were collected on day one in the hospital. The duration of pesticide exposure among the farmers was between 1 and 45 years. The {beta}-glucuronidase activity was compared with plasma cholinesterase activity in the same individual. The plasma cholinesterase activity was measured using Cholinesterase (PTC) Reagent set kit (Teco Diagnostics, UK) based on colorimetric method, while the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity was measured fluorometrically based on {beta}-glucuronidase assay. The plasma cholinesterase activity was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) among the patients (1386.786 {+-} 791.291 U/L/min) but the inhibition in plasma cholinesterase activity among the farmers (7346.5 {+-} 1860.786 U/L/min) was not significant (p > 0.05). The plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity among the farmers was significantly elevated (p < 0.05) (0.737 {+-} 0.425 {mu}M/h) but not significant among the patients (p > 0.05). The plasma cholinesterase activity was positively correlated with the plasma {beta}-glucuronidase activity among the farmers (r = 0.205, p < 0.01) but not among the patients (r = 0.79, p > 0.05). Thus, plasma {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme activity can be measured as a biomarker for the chronic exposure of pesticide. However, further studies need to be performed to confirm whether plasma {beta}-glucuronidase can be a sensitive biomarker for anticholinesterase pesticide poisoning.

  5. Monitoring occupational exposure to carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Schoket, B

    1993-01-01

    32P-Postlabelling has been used for biomonitoring occupational exposure to complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in iron foundries, coke oven and aluminium plants and among roofers and surface-coating workers. Enhanced levels of aromatic DNA adducts have been detected in exposed populations in comparison to controls. Dose-related adduct formation has been found in iron foundry and coke-oven workers and roofers. The importance of longitudinal biomonitoring has been shown in two aluminium plants. Comparison between 32P-postlabelling and immunoassays revealed wide variations. DNA adduct levels obtained by the current methods should thus be regarded as relative values between individuals and control and exposure groups. PMID:8225504

  6. Human Exposure Estimates and Oral Equivalents of In Vitro Bioactivity for Prioritizing, Monitoring and Testing of Environmental Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput, lower-cost, in vitro toxicity testing is currently being evaluated for use in prioritization and eventually for predicting in vivo toxicity. Interpreting in vitro data in the context of in vivo human relevance remains a formidable challenge. A key component in us...

  7. Human exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Diffey, B L

    1990-03-01

    Although the sun remains the main source of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in humans, the advent of artificial UVR sources has increased the opportunity for both intentional and unintentional exposure. Intentional exposure is most often to tan the skin. People living in less sunny climates can now maintain a year-round tan by using sunbeds and solaria emitting principally UVA radiation. Another reason for intentional exposure to artificial UVR is treatment of skin diseases, notably psoriasis. Unintentional exposure is normally the result of occupation. Outdoor workers, such as farmers, receive three to four times the annual solar UV exposure of indoor workers. Workers in many industries, eg, photoprinting or hospital phototherapy departments, may be exposed to UVR from artificial sources. One group particularly at risk is electric arc welders, where inadvertent exposure is so common that the terms "arc eye" or "welders flash" are often used to describe photokeratitis. In addition to unavoidable exposure to natural UVR, the general public is exposed to low levels of UVR from sources such as fluorescent lamps used for indoor lighting and shops and restaurants where UVA lamps are often used in traps to attract flying insects. PMID:2203439

  8. Exposure estimates from personal lapel monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.

    1982-04-01

    For uniformly dispersed aerosols, no bias results from locating a monitor on the lapel or chest when estimating inhalation exposure. Where different results have been noted for different sampler positions, factors such as resuspended dust, spatial concentration variability, and electrostatic charges may be involved. Errors may result from electrostatic charge accumulated by plastic filter cassette holders.

  9. 30 CFR 57.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5002 Section 57.5002... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground § 57.5002...

  10. 30 CFR 57.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5002 Section 57.5002... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground § 57.5002...

  11. 30 CFR 57.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5002 Section 57.5002... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground § 57.5002...

  12. 30 CFR 57.5002 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exposure monitoring. 57.5002 Section 57.5002... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground § 57.5002...

  13. MINIMIZING OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES: PERSONNEL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This communication is presented with two objectives in mind. The first objective is to provide an introduction to personnel monitoring of occupational exposure to pesticides for those who are not familiar with this field of investigation. The second objective is to stimulate disc...

  14. Biomarkers of human exposure to pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, W A

    1997-01-01

    For centuries, several hundred pesticides have been used to control insects. These pesticides differ greatly in their mode of action, uptake by the body, metabolism, elimination from the body, and toxicity to humans. Potential exposure from the environment can be estimated by environmental monitoring. Actual exposure (uptake) is measured by the biological monitoring of human tissues and body fluids. Biomarkers are used to detect the effects of pesticides before adverse clinical health effects occur. Pesticides and their metabolites are measured in biological samples, serum, fat, urine, blood, or breast milk by the usual analytical techniques. Biochemical responses to environmental chemicals provide a measure of toxic effect. A widely used biochemical biomarker, cholinesterase depression, measures exposure to organophosphorus insecticides. Techniques that measure DNA damage (e.g., detection of DNA adducts) provide a powerful tool in measuring environmental effects. Adducts to hemoglobin have been detected with several pesticides. Determination of chromosomal aberration rates in cultured lymphocytes is an established method of monitoring populations occupationally or environmentally exposed to known or suspected mutagenic-carcinogenic agents. There are several studies on the cytogenetic effects of work with pesticide formulations. The majority of these studies report increases in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and/or sister chromatid exchanges among the exposed workers. Biomarkers will have a major impact on the study of environmental risk factors. The basic aim of scientists exploring these issues is to determine the nature and consequences of genetic change or variation, with the ultimate purpose of predicting or preventing disease. PMID:9255564

  15. Toxicologic methods: controlled human exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Utell, M J; Frampton, M W

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of risk from exposure to environmental air pollutants is complex, and involves the disciplines of epidemiology, animal toxicology, and human inhalation studies. Controlled, quantitative studies of exposed humans help determine health-related effects that result from breathing the atmosphere. The major unique feature of the clinical study is the ability to select, control, and quantify pollutant exposures of subjects of known clinical status, and determine their effects under ideal experimental conditions. The choice of outcomes to be assessed in human clinical studies can be guided by both scientific and practical considerations, but the diversity of human responses and responsiveness must be considered. Subjects considered to be among the most susceptible include those with asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, and cardiovascular disease. New experimental approaches include exposures to concentrated ambient air particles, diesel engine exhaust, combustion products from smoking machines, and experimental model particles. Future investigations of the health effects of air pollution will benefit from collaborative efforts among the disciplines of epidemiology, animal toxicology, and human clinical studies. PMID:10931779

  16. MEASUREMENT AND DECOMPOSITION OF TOTAL EXPOSURE USING THE TOTAL-ISOLATED-BY-MICROENVIRONMENT-EXPOSURE (TIME) MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a new, highly compact and lightweight monitor that directly measures personal exposure resolved into four microenvironments. he device is the "Total-Isolated-by-Microenvironment-Exposure (TIME)" monitor. he monitor can identify electronically a subject's micr...

  17. Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-06-23

    Version 01 The Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal (REMIT) system is designed to assist U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees in meeting the reporting requirements of the Revised 10 CFR Parts 20.1001 through 20.2401 as outlined in Regulatory Guide 8.7, Rev.1, Instructions for Recording and Reporting Occupational Exposure Data. REMIT is a PC‑based menu driven system that facilitates the manipulation of data base files to record and report radiation exposure information. REMIT is designedmore » to be user‑friendly and contains the full text of Regulatory Guide 8.7, Rev.1, on‑line as well as context‑sensitive help throughout the program. The user can enter data directly from NRC Forms 4 or 5. REMIT allows the user to view the individual's exposure in relation to regulatory or administrative limits and will alert the user to exposures in excess of these limits. The system also provides for the calculation and summation of dose from intakes and the determination of the dose to the maximally exposed extremity for the monitoring year. REMIT can produce NRC Forms 4 and 5 in paper and electronic format and can import/export data from ASCII and data base files. Additional information is available from the web page www.reirs.com.« less

  18. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    PubMed Central

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo AG

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends. PMID:24369128

  19. Latent image exposure monitor using scatterometry

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, L.M.; Hickman, K.C.; Gaspar, S.M.; Bishop, K.P.; Naqvi, S.S.; McNeil, J.R.; Blain, M.; Draper, B.L.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss the use of light scattered from a latent image to control photoresist exposure dose and focus conditions which results in improved control of the critical dimension (CD) of the developed photoresist. A laser at a non-exposing wavelength is used to illuminate a latent image grating. The light diffracted from the grating is directly related to the exposure dose and focus and thus to the resultant CD in the developed resist. Modeling has been done using rigorous coupled wave analysis to predict the diffraction from a latent image as a function of the substrate optical properties and the photoactive compound (PAC) concentration distribution inside the photoresist. It is possible to use the model to solve the inverse problem: given the diffraction, to predict the parameters of the latent image and hence the developed pattern. This latent image monitor can be implemented in a stepper to monitor exposure in situ, or prior to development to predict the developed CD of a wafer for early detection of bad devices. Experimentation has been conducted using various photoresists and substrates with excellent agreement between theoretical and experimental results. The technique has been used to characterize a test pattern with a focused spot as small as 36{mu}m in diameter. Using diffracted light from a simulated closed-loop control of exposure dose, CD control was improved by as much as 4 times for substrates with variations in underlying film thickness, compared to using fixed exposure time. The latent image monitor has also been applied to wafers with rough metal substrates and focus optimization.

  20. Latent image exposure monitor using scatterometry

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, L.M.; Hickman, K.C.; Gaspar, S.M.; Bishop, K.P.; Naqvi, S.S.; McNeil, J.R. . Center for High Technology Materials); Blain, M.; Draper, B.L. )

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the use of light scattered from a latent image to control photoresist exposure dose and focus conditions which results in improved control of the critical dimension (CD) of the developed photoresist. A laser at a non-exposing wavelength is used to illuminate a latent image grating. The light diffracted from the grating is directly related to the exposure dose and focus and thus to the resultant CD in the developed resist. Modeling has been done using rigorous coupled wave analysis to predict the diffraction from a latent image as a function of the substrate optical properties and the photoactive compound (PAC) concentration distribution inside the photoresist. It is possible to use the model to solve the inverse problem: given the diffraction, to predict the parameters of the latent image and hence the developed pattern. This latent image monitor can be implemented in a stepper to monitor exposure in situ, or prior to development to predict the developed CD of a wafer for early detection of bad devices. Experimentation has been conducted using various photoresists and substrates with excellent agreement between theoretical and experimental results. The technique has been used to characterize a test pattern with a focused spot as small as 36{mu}m in diameter. Using diffracted light from a simulated closed-loop control of exposure dose, CD control was improved by as much as 4 times for substrates with variations in underlying film thickness, compared to using fixed exposure time. The latent image monitor has also been applied to wafers with rough metal substrates and focus optimization.

  1. Human Exposures to PAHs: an Eastern United States Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure monitoring for select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Pilot Study in Baltimore, MD and in four surrounding counties (NHEXAS-Maryland). An objective of this effort was to esta...

  2. Monitoring occupational exposure to cancer chemotherapy drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, E. S.; Connor, T. H.

    1996-01-01

    Reports of the health effects of handling cytotoxic drugs and compliance with guidelines for handling these agents are briefly reviewed, and studies using analytical and biological methods of detecting exposure are evaluated. There is little conclusive evidence of detrimental health effects from occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs. Work practices have improved since the issuance of guidelines for handling these drugs, but compliance with the recommended practices is still inadequate. Of 64 reports published since 1979 on studies of workers' exposure to these drugs, 53 involved studies of changes in cellular or molecular endpoints (biological markers) and 12 described chemical analyses of drugs or their metabolites in urine (2 involved both, and 2 reported the same study). The primary biological markers used were urine mutagenicity, sister chromatid exchange, and chromosomal aberrations; other studies involved formation of micronuclei and measurements of urinary thioethers. The studies had small sample sizes, and the methods were qualitative, nonspecific, subject to many confounders, and possibly not sensitive enough to detect most occupational exposures. Since none of the currently available biological and analytical methods is sufficiently reliable or reproducible for routine monitoring of exposure in the workplace, further studies using these methods are not recommended; efforts should focus instead on wide-spread implementation of improved practices for handling cytotoxic drugs.

  3. Environmental monitoring of secondhand smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Apelberg, Benjamin J; Hepp, Lisa M; Avila-Tang, Erika; Gundel, Lara; Hammond, S Katharine; Hovell, Melbourne F; Hyland, Andrew; Klepeis, Neil E; Madsen, Camille C; Navas-Acien, Ana; Repace, James; Samet, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    The complex composition of secondhand smoke (SHS) provides a range of constituents that can be measured in environmental samples (air, dust and on surfaces) and therefore used to assess non-smokers' exposure to tobacco smoke. Monitoring SHS exposure (SHSe) in indoor environments provides useful information on the extent and consequences of SHSe, implementing and evaluating tobacco control programmes and behavioural interventions, and estimating overall burden of disease caused by SHSe. The most widely used markers have been vapour-phase nicotine and respirable particulate matter (PM). Numerous other environmental analytes of SHS have been measured in the air including carbon monoxide, 3-ethenylpyridine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco-specific nitrosamines, nitrogen oxides, aldehydes and volatile organic compounds, as well as nicotine in dust and on surfaces. The measurement of nicotine in the air has the advantage of reflecting the presence of tobacco smoke. While PM measurements are not as specific, they can be taken continuously, allowing for assessment of exposure and its variation over time. In general, when nicotine and PM are measured in the same setting using a common sampling period, an increase in nicotine concentration of 1 μg/m3 corresponds to an average increase of 10 μg/m3 of PM. This topic assessment presents a comprehensive summary of SHSe monitoring approaches using environmental markers and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these methods and approaches. PMID:22949497

  4. Radiation exposure monitoring in civil aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrewe, Ulrich J.

    1999-02-01

    Based on the 1990 Recommendation of the ICRP (ICRP Publication 60, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1991) a European Directive [Official J. Eur. Communities 19 (1996) L159, 1-114] commits the European Union (EU) member states to revise their national radiation protection laws by the year 2000 such that the exposure of aircrews to the increased cosmic radiation prevailing at aviation flight altitudes will be treated as occupational risks. A consequence will be that employers must assess the aircrew exposure. The ACREM (Air Crew Radiation Exposure Monitoring) research project intends to investigate practically methods for aircraft dose equivalent determination. The in-flight measurements were carried out on cargo aircraft. Field calibrations were performed using Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPC) as the reference instrument. Various monitors were used to investigate the spatial doserate distribution. The measured data were collated according to the different altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes. The results obtained from various in-flight measurements are reported and a concept for a future routine dose assessment for aircrew is proposed.

  5. HUMAN POPULATION EXPOSURES TO MIREX AND KEPONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to mirex and kepone are assessed in this study. Three major paths of exposure are examined: ingestion through the food chain, inhalation of atmospheric mirex and kepone, and exposure through drinking water. Exposure through the food chain appears to be the most pr...

  6. Biological monitoring and exposure to mercury.

    PubMed

    Mason, H J; Hindell, P; Williams, N R

    2001-02-01

    Occupational health professionals' interest in controlling mercury (Hg) exposure, and the use of biological monitoring in this context, has been ongoing for a number of years. Evidence from urinary Hg results in a number of UK firms who have undertaken some form of biological monitoring or occupational health surveillance suggest that exposure has decreased over the last 10-15 years. This decrease precedes the establishment in the UK of an advisory biological monitoring guidance value (HGV) for urinary Hg and the production of updated medical guidance from the Health & Safety Executive on Hg exposure (MS12 1996). This latter document recommends a urinary sampling interval for urinary Hg of between 1 and 3 months, which is consistent with the reported toxicokinetics of Hg excretion, but we highlight that urinary Hg represents integrated exposure over many previous months. Mercury is a recognized nephrotoxin and MS12 1996 mentions the use of regular dipstick protein estimations. We review our experience of investigating proteinuria and enzymuria in a large-scale cross-sectional occupational study. The incidence of Hg-induced renal disease is probably very rare at current exposure levels. Therefore acceptance of a high false-positive rate of proteinuria not related to Hg exposure needs to be considered in any urinary protein testing regime of Hg workers. The establishment of an HGV for urinary Hg has raised questions about the uncertainty associated with a urinary Hg result, including factors such as diurnal variation, whether urine correction by creatinine or specific gravity is preferable and the possibility of non-occupational sources of Hg contributing significantly towards breaching the HGV. Correction of urinary Hg results by creatinine or specific gravity and the use of a fixed sampling time, such as the beginning or end of the day, substantially reduce the uncertainty in a urinary Hg measurement. But even with good laboratory precision, an individual with a

  7. Monitoring of occupational exposure to cytostatic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sorsa, M; Anderson, D

    1996-08-17

    Many anticancer agents have been shown to be carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic in experimental animals and in in vitro test systems. Epidemiological data on the association of second neoplasms with a specific chemotherapy treatment is available on some 30 agents, and in the case of 10 compounds the overall evidence on human carcinogenicity has been evaluated to be conclusive (Group 1: IARC, 1987 and 1990). The primary source of human exposure to anticancer drugs is from their use in therapy of cancer. However, persons employed in the manufacture, preparation and administration of the drugs to patients and in nursing patients may also be exposed. Safe handling of anticancer drugs, since the introduction of various general handling guidelines, is now good practice in hospitals, pharmacies and drug manufacturing companies of most developed countries. Careless handling of cancer chemotherapeutic agents may lead to exposure of the personnel in amounts detectable with chemical or biological methods in the body fluids or cell samples of the subjects. The exposure is typically to mixed compounds over long-term and to low exposure levels with accidental peaks. Therefore, the use of biological exposure markers is appropriate for the monitoring of such exposure patterns. The biological markers/methods for exposure assessment are either non-specific (e.g., cytogenetic damage, point mutations or 32P-post-labelling adducts in peripheral blood lymphocytes, urinary mutagenicity) or specific for a given compound (immunological methods for DNA adducts, specific analytical methods). Studies have revealed minor amounts of cyclophosphamide in the urine of pharmacy technicians and nurses handling the drug even when taking special safety precautions (Sessink et al. (1994a) J. Occup. Med., 36, 79; Sessink et al. (1994b) Arch. Env. Health, 49, 165). Another study showed surface wipe samples with measurable cyclophosphamide even away from the handling site (McDevitt et al. (1993) J

  8. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES FOR HUMANS AND ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists and risk assessment experts are developing approaches to estimate exposure of human populations and ecosystems to environmental contaminants. cological scientists are exploring methodologies for estimating the exposure of ecosystems and their subdivisions to environmen...

  9. HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING: CONCEPTS, METHODS, AND TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding human exposure is critical when estimating the occurrence of deleterious effects that could follow contact with environmental contaminants. For many pollutants, the intensity, duration, frequency, route, and timing of exposure is highly variable, particularly whe...

  10. OUTDOOR VS. HUMAN EXPOSURE: NERL PM EXPOSURE PANEL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An association has been demonstrated between ambient particulate matter (PM 2.5 and PM 10) concentrations and human morbidity/mortality. However, little is known regarding the most important sources of PM exposure, interpersonal and intrapersonal variability in exposure, and the...

  11. NATIONAL HUMAN ACTIVITY PATTERN SURVEY (NHAPS): USE OF NATIONWIDE ACTIVITY DATA FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS) was initiated to fill a need for updated activity information on a nationwide scale. Several recent exposure field monitoring studies have shown that human activities play a critical role in explaining the variation in human expo...

  12. Human exposure to pollutants in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, J.J.; Jedrychowski, W.; Flak, E. )

    1992-07-01

    Serious environmental problems caused by decades of mismanagement of Poland's natural resources have been brought to light in recent years. All environmental media--air, water, food, and soil--have been burdened with toxic chemicals. Some environmental problems are so severe that the sources of pollution and the mitigation techniques needed are obvious, requiring no further research, but rather common sense, monies, and determination to implement the necessary controls and mitigation procedures. This paper will not address these obvious cases. Rather it will address that spectrum of environmental problems which requires a better understanding of public health risk in order to develop effective risk management strategies. Because these problems are numerous and monies limited, policy makers will need to set priorities both for research projects and control options. Using environmental concentration data presently available from Poland (especially for air), the paper will estimate human exposures, will point out research and monitoring needs, and hopefully, will lend credence to the concept that environmental policies and risk reduction strategies will be most effective if the Total Human Exposure Concept is used as the guiding scientific principle in risk assessment and management programs.

  13. TELOMERASE AND CHRONIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with increased risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer in humans. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not well understood. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of eukary...

  14. [Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to sevoflurane].

    PubMed

    Imbriani, M; Zadra, P; Negri, S; Alessio, A; Maestri, L; Ghittori, S

    2001-01-01

    conditions for the MSD were the following: ion mass monitored = 131 m/e; dwell time = 50 msec; selected ion monitoring window time = 0.1 amu; electromultiplier = 400 V. Urine samples were collected near the end of the shift and were analyzed for HFIP by head-space gas chromatography after glucuronide hydrolysis. 0.5 ml of urine and 1.5 ml of 10 M sulfuric acid were added to 21.8 ml headspace vials. The vials were immediately capped, vortexed, and loaded into the headspace autosampler. Samples were maintained at 100 degrees C for 30 min, after which glucuronide hydrolysis was 99% complete. Analyses were performed on a GC equipped with a MSD. The analytical conditions for urine analysis were as follows: cross-linked 5% phenylmethylsilicon column (internal diameter 0.2 mm, length 25 m); column temperature = 35 degrees C; carrier gas = helium. The analytical conditions for the MSD were: monitored ions = 51.05 and 99; dwell time = 100 ms; selected ion monitoring window time = 0.1 amu; electromultiplier voltage = 2000 Volt. With our analytical procedure, the detection limit of HFIP in urine was 20 micrograms/L. The variation coefficient (CV) for HFIP measurement in urine was 8.7% (on 10 determinations; mean value = 1000 micrograms/L). The median value of CI was 0.77 ppm (Geometric Standard Deviation = 4.08; range = 0.05-27.9 ppm). The correlation between CI and HFIP (Cu, microgram/L) was: Log Cu (microgram/L) = 0.813 x Log CI (ppm) + 2.517 (r = 0.79, n = 145, p < 0.0001). On the basis of the equation it was possible to establish tentatively the biological limit values corresponding to the respective occupational exposure limit values proposed for sevoflurane. According to our experimental results, HFIP values of 488 micrograms/L and 160 micrograms/L correspond to airborne sevoflurane concentrations of 2 and 0.5 ppm respectively. PMID:11515150

  15. Personalized Exposure Assessment: Promising Approaches for Human Environmental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Brenda K.; Balshaw, David; Barr, John R.; Brown, David; Ellisman, Mark; Lioy, Paul; Omenn, Gilbert; Potter, John D.; Smith, Martyn T.; Sohn, Lydia; Suk, William A.; Sumner, Susan; Swenberg, James; Walt, David R.; Watkins, Simon; Thompson, Claudia; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2005-01-01

    New technologies and methods for assessing human exposure to chemicals, dietary and lifestyle factors, infectious agents, and other stressors provide an opportunity to extend the range of human health investigations and advance our understanding of the relationship between environmental exposure and disease. An ad hoc Committee on Environmental Exposure Technology Development was convened to identify new technologies and methods for deriving personalized exposure measurements for application to environmental health studies. The committee identified a “toolbox” of methods for measuring external (environmental) and internal (biologic) exposure and assessing human behaviors that influence the likelihood of exposure to environmental agents. The methods use environmental sensors, geographic information systems, biologic sensors, toxicogenomics, and body burden (biologic) measurements. We discuss each of the methods in relation to current use in human health research; specific gaps in the development, validation, and application of the methods are highlighted. We also present a conceptual framework for moving these technologies into use and acceptance by the scientific community. The framework focuses on understanding complex human diseases using an integrated approach to exposure assessment to define particular exposure–disease relationships and the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in disease occurrence. Improved methods for exposure assessment will result in better means of monitoring and targeting intervention and prevention programs. PMID:16002370

  16. Oxidative metabolism of BDE-47, BDE-99, and HBCDs by cat liver microsomes: Implications of cats as sentinel species to monitor human exposure to environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Erratico, Claudio; Luo, Xiaojun; Mai, Bixian; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    BDE-99 is different by cat and human liver microsomes. This suggests that cats are not a suitable sentinel to represent internal exposure of PBDEs for humans, but is likely a promising sentinel for internal HBCDs exposure for humans. PMID:26923239

  17. Model of multiple exposure to contaminants in monitoring the environmental impact on population health.

    PubMed

    Kliment, V

    1996-12-01

    The model study is focused on possibilities of comprehensive evaluation of the multiple exposure of humans to selected inorganic contaminants (arsenic, cadmium, lead, zinc) monitored within the subsystems of the monitoring the environmental impact on population health (inhalation and ingestion exposure from air, drinking water and foodstuffs and biological monitoring). The mean daily intake of contaminants of average adults is assessed using the monitoring and literature data. The exposure balance showed that the total intake of individual contaminants studied did not exceed the limit values given by the exposure standards (acceptable daily intake). The highest value of exposure reaching 28% of the limit was reported for cadmium. The prevailing pathway of exposure is ingestion of foodstuffs: more than 95% in all contaminants under study. Information on the intake of contaminants is used as input in a linear multicompartmental model describing their kinetics and retention in the human organism. The results of the model computation are compared with the laboratory data obtained in the biological monitoring of adult urine. The model and monitoring sets of results were found to conform well for cadmium and zinc. For arsenic and lead the model values are roughly one order of magnitude lower than the monitored ones which should be considered as acceptable for the model studies of this type. The model study of contaminant monitoring data processing and evaluation suggests further applications of health risk assessment representing one of the basic outputs of monitoring the environmental impact on population health. PMID:8997533

  18. HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS - CHILDREN'S FOCUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, research under this task is designed to identify those pesticides, pathways, and activities that represent the highest potential exposures to children and to determine the factors that influence these exposures. The research...

  19. Carcinogen biomonitoring in human exposures and laboratory research: validation and application to human occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Talaska, Glenn; Maier, Andrew; Henn, Scott; Booth-Jones, Angela; Tsuneoka, Yutaka; Vermeulen, Roel; Schumann, Brenda L

    2002-08-01

    A multiple biomarker approach is required to integrate for metabolism, temporal response and exposure-response kinetics, biological relevance, and positive predictive value. Carcinogen DNA adduct analysis can be used in animal and in vitro studies to detect absorption permutations caused by mixture interactions, and to control metabolic variation when specific CYP450 genes (1A1 or 1A2) are knocked out. These enzymes are not critical to the metabolic activation of model Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAC) and aromatic amines, respectively, as suggested by in vitro analysis. Several human studies have been carried out where multiple biomarkers have been measured. In a study of benzidine workers, the similarities in elimination kinetics between urinary metabolites and mutagenicity is likely responsible for a better correlation between these markers than to BZ-DNA adducts in exfoliated cells. In a study of rubber workers, the relationship between specific departments, urinary 1 HP and DNA adducts in exfoliated cells coincided with the historical urinary bladder cancer risk in these departments; the same relationship did not hold for urinary mutagenicity. In a study of automotive mechanics, biomarkers were used to monitor the effectiveness of exposure interventions. These data reinforce the notion that carcinogen biomarkers are useful to monitor exposure, but that a complementary approaches involving effect and perhaps susceptibility biomarkers is necessary to obtain the necessary information. PMID:12191859

  20. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  1. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  2. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust mine air by a competent person to determine if concentrations of radon daughters are present....

  3. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037... Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5037 Radon daughter exposure monitoring. (a) In all mines at least one sample shall be taken in exhaust...

  4. mSpray: a mobile phone technology to improve malaria control efforts and monitor human exposure to malaria control pesticides in Limpopo, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Eskenazi, Brenda; Quirós-Alcalá, Lesliam; Lipsitt, Jonah M.; Wu, Lemuel D.; Kruger, Philip; Ntimbane, Tzundzukani; Nawn, John Burns; Bornman, M. S. Riana; Seto, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Recent estimates indicate that malaria has led to over half a million deaths worldwide, mostly to African children. Indoor residual spraying (IRS) of insecticides is one of the primary vector control interventions. However, current reporting systems do not obtain precise location of IRS events in relation to malaria cases, which poses challenges for effective and efficient malaria control. This information is also critical to avoid unnecessary human exposure to IRS insecticides. We developed and piloted a mobile-based application (mSpray) to collect comprehensive information on IRS spray events. We assessed the utility, acceptability and feasibility of using mSpray to gather improved homestead- and chemical-level IRS coverage data. We installed mSpray on 10 cell phones with data bundles, and pilot tested it with 13 users in Limpopo, South Africa. Users completed basic information (number of rooms/shelters sprayed; chemical used, etc.) on spray events. Upon submission, this information as well as geographic positioning system coordinates and time/date stamp were uploaded to a Google Drive Spreadsheet to be viewed in real time. We administered questionnaires, conducted focus groups, and interviewed key informants to evaluate the utility of the app. The low-cost, cell phone-based “mSpray” app was learned quickly by users, well accepted and preferred to the current paper-based method. We recorded 2,865 entries (99.1% had a GPS accuracy of 20 m or less) and identified areas of improvement including increased battery life. We also identified a number of logistic and user problems (e.g., cost of cell phones and cellular bundles, battery life, obtaining accurate GPS measures, user errors, etc.) that would need to be overcome before full deployment. Use of cell phone technology could increase the efficiency of IRS malaria control efforts by mapping spray events in relation to malaria cases, resulting in more judicious use of chemicals that are potentially harmful to

  5. mSpray: a mobile phone technology to improve malaria control efforts and monitor human exposure to malaria control pesticides in Limpopo, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Eskenazi, Brenda; Quirós-Alcalá, Lesliam; Lipsitt, Jonah M; Wu, Lemuel D; Kruger, Philip; Ntimbane, Tzundzukani; Nawn, John Burns; Bornman, M S Riana; Seto, Edmund

    2014-07-01

    Recent estimates indicate that malaria has led to over half a million deaths worldwide, mostly to African children. Indoor residual spraying (IRS) of insecticides is one of the primary vector control interventions. However, current reporting systems do not obtain precise location of IRS events in relation to malaria cases, which poses challenges for effective and efficient malaria control. This information is also critical to avoid unnecessary human exposure to IRS insecticides. We developed and piloted a mobile-based application (mSpray) to collect comprehensive information on IRS spray events. We assessed the utility, acceptability and feasibility of using mSpray to gather improved homestead- and chemical-level IRS coverage data. We installed mSpray on 10 cell phones with data bundles, and pilot tested it with 13 users in Limpopo, South Africa. Users completed basic information (number of rooms/shelters sprayed; chemical used, etc.) on spray events. Upon submission, this information as well as geographic positioning system coordinates and time/date stamp were uploaded to a Google Drive Spreadsheet to be viewed in real time. We administered questionnaires, conducted focus groups, and interviewed key informants to evaluate the utility of the app. The low-cost, cell phone-based "mSpray" app was learned quickly by users, well accepted and preferred to the current paper-based method. We recorded 2865 entries (99.1% had a GPS accuracy of 20 m or less) and identified areas of improvement including increased battery life. We also identified a number of logistic and user problems (e.g., cost of cell phones and cellular bundles, battery life, obtaining accurate GPS measures, user errors, etc.) that would need to be overcome before full deployment. Use of cell phone technology could increase the efficiency of IRS malaria control efforts by mapping spray events in relation to malaria cases, resulting in more judicious use of chemicals that are potentially harmful to humans

  6. Exposure to UV radiation and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimlin, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    This paper will overview the significant issues facing researchers in relating the impact of exposure to sunlight and human health. Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is the major causative factor in most sun-related skin and eye disorders, however, very little is known quantitatively about human UV exposures. Interestingly, human exposure to sunlight also has a nutritional impact, namely the development of pre-Vitamin D, which is an important nutrient in bone health. New research suggest that low vitamin D status may be a causative factor in the development of selective types of cancer and autoimminue diseases, as well as a contributing factor in bone health. The 'health duality' aspect of sunlight exposure is an interesting and controversial topic that is a research focus of Kimlin's research group.

  7. HUMAN EXPOSURE DATABASE SUPPORT AND MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers in the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) have performed a number of large human exposure measurement studies during the past decade. It is the goal of the NERL to make the data available to other researchers for analysis in order to further the scientific ...

  8. Controlled human exposures to diesel exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a complex mixture of gaseous and particulate compounds resulting from an incomplete combustion of diesel fuel. Controlled human exposures to DE and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have contributed to understanding health effects. Such exposure studies of h...

  9. Ultraviolet Radiation: Human Exposure and Health Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenkate, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation and associated health effects as well as risk estimates for acute and chronic conditions resulting from such exposure. Demonstrates substantial reductions in health risk that can be achieved through preventive actions. Also includes a risk assessment model for skin cancer. Contains 36…

  10. Human occupational and nonoccupational exposure to fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Esmen, N A; Erdal, S

    1990-01-01

    Human exposure to fibers in occupational and nonoccupational environments has been a health concern for nearly a century. In this review, selected results from the literature are presented to highlight the availability, limitations, and interpretive difficulties associated with the past and current human fiber exposure data sets. In the traditionally defined asbestos fibers, large amounts of the data available suffer from the diversity of sample collection and analysis methods. Two simple generalizations suggest that occupational exposures are several orders of magnitude higher than that of environmental exposures; and currently extant data and the current routine measurement practices present significant difficulties in the consistent interpretation of the data with respect to health effects. The data on the human exposures to man-made vitreous fibers are much more complete than the data on asbestos exposure, while exposure data on other man-made fibrous materials are lacking. The human exposure data to many minerals which, at times, exist in fibrous habit, are very scanty, and in view of the biological activity of some of these fibers, this lack may be of significant concern. PMID:2272324

  11. SEROLOGIC EVALUATION OF HUMAN MICROCYSTIN EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction Microcystins (MCYST) are among the most commonly detected toxins associated with cyanobacteria blooms worldwide. Biological evidence of human exposure is needed in order to evaluate potential MCYST-associated health effects. MCYST are detectable in free and bound fo...

  12. Community Engagement in Observational Human Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although observational human exposure studies do not deliberately expose participants to chemicals or environmental conditions, merely involving people as research participants and conducting research inside homes raises ethical issues. Community engagement offers a promising st...

  13. Human Poisoning Through Atypical Routes of Exposure.

    PubMed

    Behal, Niharika; Wong, Alan; Mantara, Ruzly; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-02-01

    There are over 2 million human exposure cases reported to United States poison centers annually. Much of the data involves exposure through ingestion, dermal contact, inhalation, ocular, or parenteral routes. There is limited data characterizing exposure via atypical routes. We conducted a retrospective review of the California Poison Control System Database for a 24-month period from January 2012 to December 2013 for poison exposure that occurred through the otic, vaginal, or rectal route. There were a total of 634 cases involving single-route and single-substance atypical poison exposure. There were 287 (45%) cases of otic exposure, 190 (30.0%) cases of vaginal exposure, and 157 (25%) cases of rectal exposure. Five hundred forty (85%) of the cases were unintentional. Gasoline exposure through the otic route occurred in 83 (13.1%) cases, followed by hydrogen peroxide (4.7%), acetaminophen (3.8%), and miconazole (2.7%). Adverse effects occurred in 336 (53%) cases. No deaths were reported. The most common treatment was observation only, occurring in 396 (62.4%) cases. The majority of the cases did not warrant hospital evaluation (73.5%). This is the first retrospective characterization study of atypical routes of poison exposure. These results may provide education to providers and the public regarding risks of exposure to substances through atypical routes. PMID:26250476

  14. Human exposure to dioxin from combustion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hattemer-Frey, H.A.; Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Because of their extreme toxicity, much concern and debate has arisen about the nature and extent of human exposure to dioxin. Since municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators are known to emit polychorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polycholorinated dibenzofurnas (PCDFs) many people who live near MSW incinerators fear that they will be exposed to high levels of dioxin and subsequently develop cancer. What is often overlooked in this debate, however, is the fact that the general population is continuously being exposed to trace amounts of dioxin as exemplified by the fact that virtually all human adipose tissue samples contain dioxin at levels of 3 parts per trillion (ppt) or greater. This paper provides a perspective on MSW incineration as a source of human exposure to dioxin by comparing this exposure source with exposure to background environmental contamination and evaluates some of the potential key sources of PCDD/PCDF input into the enviroment. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Overview of radiation environments and human exposures.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J W

    2000-11-01

    Human exposures to ionizing radiation have been vastly altered by developing technology in the last century. This has been most obvious in the development of radiation generating devices and the utilization of nuclear energy. But even air travel has had its impact on human exposure. Human exposure increases with advancing aircraft technology as a result of the higher operating altitudes reducing the protective cover provided by Earth's atmosphere from extraterrestrial radiations. This increase in operating altitudes is taken to a limit by human operations in space. Less obvious is the changing character of the radiations at higher altitudes. The associated health risks are less understood with increasing altitude due to the increasing complexity and new field components found in high-altitude and space operations. PMID:11045522

  16. Overview of Radiation Environments and Human Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposures to ionizing radiation have been vastly altered by developing technology in the last century. This has been most obvious in the development of radiation generating devices and the utilization of nuclear energy. But even air travel has had its impact on human exposure. Human exposure increases with advancing aircraft technology as a result of the higher operating altitudes reducing the protective cover provided by the Earth s atmosphere from extraterrestrial radiations. This increase in operating altitudes is taken to a limit by human operations in space. Less obvious is the changing character of the radiations at higher altitudes. The associated health risks are less understood with increasing altitude due to the increasing complexity and new field components found in high altitude and space operations.

  17. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, Karla D.; Kenny, Donald V.; Endres, George W. R.; Sisk, Daniel R.

    1997-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

  18. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and Human Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Friedberg, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Clem, J. M.; Copeland, K.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is of interest, apart from its main concern of aircraft exposures, because it is a principal source of human exposure to radiations with high linear energy transfer (LET). The ionizing radiations of the lower atmosphere near the Earth s surface tend to be dominated by the terrestrial radioisotopes especially along the coastal plain and interior low lands and have only minor contributions from neutrons (11 percent). The world average is substantially larger but the high altitude cities especially have substantial contributions from neutrons (25 to 45 percent). Understanding the world distribution of neutron exposures requires an improved understanding of the latitudinal, longitudinal, altitude and spectral distribution that depends on local terrain and time. These issues are being investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical program. This paper will give an overview of human exposures and describe the development of improved environmental models.

  19. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and Human Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Goldhagen, Paul; Friedberg, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Clem, J. M.; Copeland, K.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is of interest, apart from its main concern of aircraft exposures, because it is a principal source of human exposure to radiations with high linear energy transfer (LET). The ionizing radiations of the lower atmosphere near the Earth s surface tend to be dominated by the terrestrial radioisotopes. especially along the coastal plain and interior low lands, and have only minor contributions from neutrons (11 percent). The world average is substantially larger but the high altitude cities especially have substantial contributions from neutrons (25 to 45 percent). Understanding the world distribution of neutron exposures requires an improved understanding of the latitudinal, longitudinal, altitude and spectral distribution that depends on local terrain and time. These issues are being investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical program. This paper will give an overview of human exposures and describe the development of improved environmental models.

  20. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

    1997-07-08

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

  1. Bisphenol A: Human exposure and neurobehavior.

    PubMed

    Mustieles, Vicente; Pérez-Lobato, Rocío; Olea, Nicolás; Fernández, Mariana F

    2015-07-01

    The effect of bisphenol A (BPA) exposure on human brain and behavior is a relatively new issue, and particular concerns have been raised about its potential impact on children. The primary objective of this review was to analyze the current state of knowledge on the association of environmental BPA exposure during pregnancy and/or childhood with child cognitive and/or behavior outcomes. All scientific publications until March 2015 that include examination of this relationship have been reviewed using the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Although research on this issue has not been abundant, an association with altered neurobehavior was reported by eight out of the twelve available articles, including aggressive behavior, attention deficit, hyperactivity disorder, depression and anxiety impairments, mostly in children exposed in utero, indicating disruption of the brain during this critical window of development. Despite the reduced number of studies and their heterogeneity, the results suggest that prenatal BPA exposure may have a negative impact on neurobehavioral functioning in children and that the effects may be sex-dependent. It is therefore necessary to be vigilant towards the potential adverse effects of ubiquitous low-level BPA exposure, although more studies in humans are required to convincingly confirm or rule out the association between BPA exposure and health. Meanwhile, it is desirable to inform women planning or undergoing pregnancy about measures to reduce or avoid exposure to BPA. We discuss some key aspects of the relationship between exposure and neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:26121921

  2. RESIDENTIAL POST-APPLICATION EXPOSURE MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods of measurement of pesticide exposures can be separated into two categories: direct and indirect (Briston et al., 1984, Nigg et al. 1990). Direct methods measure a pesticide residue in environmental media or on the skin surface before it has entered the body in order to e...

  3. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  4. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  5. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  6. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  7. 10 CFR 850.24 - Exposure monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.24... areas that may have airborne beryllium, as shown by the baseline inventory and hazard assessment. The... periodic monitoring of workers who work in areas where airborne concentrations of beryllium are at or...

  8. Radiation exposure for human Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, L C; Wilson, J W; Kim, M H; Cucinotta, F A

    2000-11-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effects of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human space flight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar energetic particle events was of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep-space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays since the missions are of long duration, and accumulated exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to moderate thicknesses of aluminum shielding, according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to galactic cosmic ray-like ions, aluminum shield requirements for a Mars mission may be prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Alternative materials for vehicle construction are under investigation to provide lightweight habitat structures with enhanced shielding properties. In the present paper, updated estimates for astronaut exposures on a Mars mission are presented and shielding properties of alternative materials are compared with aluminum. PMID:11045525

  9. DEVELOPING MEANINGFUL COHORTS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes numerous statistical analyses focused on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD), used by many exposure modelers as the basis for data on what people do and where they spend their time. In doing so, modelers ...

  10. HUMAN EXPOSURE DATABASES DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past, data from human exposure research studies often resided with the study investigators and the only way the data were disseminated was by publication in EPA reports or peer-reviewed journal manuscripts. Data were often published only as summary statistics with limited...

  11. HUMAN EXPOSURE SYSTEM FOR CONTROLLED OZONE ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental exposure system for health effects research in environmental pollutants that permits the introduction and control of ozone (O3) to an acrylic plastic chamber in which a human subject actively resides is described. Ozone is introduced into the chamber air intake an...

  12. HUMAN EXPOSURE ANALYSIS, AN INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relatively new and expanding field of human exposure analysis has its genesis in the environmental movement and the interest of scientists and the public in understanding the interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic chemicals and people. The universe is full of chemi...

  13. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Peters, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual's exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-h monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  14. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Peters, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary, central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual’s exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-hour monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  15. A Translatable Predictor of Human Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Suchindran, Sunil; Nakamura, Mai; Chao, Nelson J.; Himburg, Heather; Minor, Kerry; Phillips, Gary; Ross, Joel; Abedi, Majid; Terbrueggen, Robert; Chute, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Terrorism using radiological dirty bombs or improvised nuclear devices is recognized as a major threat to both public health and national security. In the event of a radiological or nuclear disaster, rapid and accurate biodosimetry of thousands of potentially affected individuals will be essential for effective medical management to occur. Currently, health care providers lack an accurate, high-throughput biodosimetric assay which is suitable for the triage of large numbers of radiation injury victims. Here, we describe the development of a biodosimetric assay based on the analysis of irradiated mice, ex vivo-irradiated human peripheral blood (PB) and humans treated with total body irradiation (TBI). Interestingly, a gene expression profile developed via analysis of murine PB radiation response alone was inaccurate in predicting human radiation injury. In contrast, generation of a gene expression profile which incorporated data from ex vivo irradiated human PB and human TBI patients yielded an 18-gene radiation classifier which was highly accurate at predicting human radiation status and discriminating medically relevant radiation dose levels in human samples. Although the patient population was relatively small, the accuracy of this classifier in discriminating radiation dose levels in human TBI patients was not substantially confounded by gender, diagnosis or prior exposure to chemotherapy. We have further incorporated genes from this human radiation signature into a rapid and high-throughput chemical ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (CLPA) which was able to discriminate radiation dose levels in a pilot study of ex vivo irradiated human blood and samples from human TBI patients. Our results illustrate the potential for translation of a human genetic signature for the diagnosis of human radiation exposure and suggest the basis for further testing of CLPA as a candidate biodosimetric assay. PMID:25255453

  16. Human mutagens: evidence from paternal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Douglas, G.R.; Nestmann, E.R.; Blakey, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of inherited mutations as a cause of human disease has been established clearly through examples of well-defined genetic anomalies, such as Down syndrome and retinoblastoma. Furthermore, it is suspected that environmental contaminants induce mutations resulting in increased risk for such defects in subsequent generations of persons exposed. The present lack of direct evidence for induced inherited genetic disorders in human beings hampers the development of risk estimation techniques for extrapolation from animal models. The most extensive prospective epidemiologic studies of inherited genetic effects have involved survivors of atomic bomb detonations and patients treated with cancer chemotherapy. In neither case has a significant elevation in inherited genetic effects or cancer been detected in the offspring of exposed individuals. Epidemiologic studies of subjects receiving chronic exposure may be confounded by the effect of maternal exposure during pregnancy. Consideration of only paternal exposure can minimize the confounding influence of teratogenicity, enhancing the resolving power of studies for inherited effects. Using this approach, retrospective (case-control) studies of childhood cancer patients have provided limited but suggestive evidence for inheritance of induced effects. Endpoints, such as congenital malformations and spontaneous abortion following paternal exposure, can also be considered as indicators of heritable mutagenic effects. For example, there is limited evidence suggesting that paternal exposure to anaesthetic gases may cause miscarriage and congenital abnormalities as a result of induced male germ cell mutations. 104 references.

  17. EPA perspective - exposure and effects prediction and monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk-based decisions for environmental chemicals often rely on estimates of human exposure and biological response. Biomarkers have proven a useful empirical tool for evaluating exposure and hazard predictions. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Preventio...

  18. Indoor air and human exposure assessment--needs and approaches.

    PubMed

    Kotzias, Dimitris

    2005-07-01

    The Commission launched on June 9, 2004 the Environment and Health Action Plan to reduce diseases caused by a polluted environment. The plan would develop an EU system integrating information on the state of the environment, the ecosystem and human health. The action plan identifies 13 actions (including an action on indoor air quality), which refer to initiatives on how to better understand the environment-health link and establish how environmental exposure leads to epidemiological effects. The ultimate goal of the proposed "Environment and Health Strategy" is to develop an environment and health "cause-effect framework" that will provide the necessary information for the development of Community policy dealing with sources and the impact pathway of health stressors. The need for policy-science interface in the EU guided in the last few years the research on indoor air pollution. In particular, the lack of information regarding human exposure to air pollutants makes it necessary, in line with the Environment and Health Action Plan, to develop targeted strategies to evaluate the impact of indoor air pollution on human health. This includes apart from specific measurements in selected confined spaces (homes, schools, public buildings, etc.), large-scale monitoring campaigns at European level, specifically designed to assess indoor and outdoor air quality and personal exposure to pollutants in combination with micro-environmental activity patterns. Information from these studies will be considered as crucial for a first evaluation of the overall situation in indoor environments and the possible sources and source strengths of pollutants to which humans are exposed during working, commuting and rest time. As a first approach to systematically evaluate the relationship between indoor air pollution and human (chronic) exposure to pollutants, we started at the end of 2003 with the AIRMEX project (Indoor Air Monitoring and Exposure Assessment Study). In the frame of

  19. Reducing human exposure to Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-08-01

    In light of the increasing prevalence of Mycobacterium avium pulmonary disease and the challenges of treating patients with M. avium infection, consideration of measures to reduce exposure is warranted. Because M. avium inhabits water and soil, humans are surrounded by that opportunistic pathogen. Because infection has been linked to the presence of M. avium in household plumbing, increasing hot water temperature, reducing aerosol (mist) exposures in bathrooms and showers, and installing filters that prevent the passage of mycobacteria will likely reduce M. avium exposure. Granular activated carbon (charcoal) filters support the growth of M. avium and should be avoided. When gardening, avoid the inhalation of soil dusts by using a mask or wetting the soil because peat-rich potting soils have high numbers of mycobacteria. PMID:23952861

  20. Assessment of human exposure level to PM10 in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xingqin; Hou, Qing; Li, Nan; Zhai, Shixian

    2013-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have found that atmospheric particulate matter, especially PM10 (inhalable particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 μm) is one of the pollutants that are harmful to human health. In recent years, particulate matter pollution in China is becoming increasingly serious and PM10 has become the primary pollutant in Beijing and other cities. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out studies and a health damage assessment of PM10. In human health damage assessment, measuring human exposure level to PM10 is required and crucial to provide accurate exposure data for the exposure-response relationship, and also for the accurate quantitative assessment of human exposure. The spatial distribution of particle concentration in China is variable because of spatial differences in the local economic level and the geographical environment. Along with the accelerating urbanisation in China, city population density is high, and the population distribution is variable between and within cities, thus resulting in different population numbers exposed to different concentration ranges. Therefore, an accurate assessment of China's level of exposure to particulate matter is a priority and the basis for assessing the damage to public health caused by particle pollution. Using high accuracy population and PM10 monitoring data, this study analysed the human exposure to PM10 in different regions and typical cities of China. The results show that for most areas of China, the population-weighted PM10 exposure concentration is slightly higher than the annual mean concentration, meaning that more of the population is exposed to high concentrations, and most of the population is exposed to levels that meet the second national standard (between 40 and 100 μg m-3), occupying about 83.7% of population and 76.3% of area in China. The population exposure to PM10 is higher in two types of typical regions and cities: areas with dense human populations

  1. Assessment of carcinogenic risk from personal exposure to benzo(a)pyrene in the Total Human Environmental Exposure Study (THEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.P.; Post, G.B.; Lioy, P.J.; Waldman, J.M.; Greenberg, A. )

    1993-07-01

    The Total Human Environmental Exposure Study (THEES) was an investigation of multimedia exposure to the ubiquitous environmental carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). The three-phase study was conducted in Phillipsburg, New Jersey and involved the participation of 14-15 individuals (8-10 homes) during each 14-day monitoring period. Microenvironmental sampling of air, food, water and soil indicated that environmental exposure to BaP was primarily through air and food. Exposure and risk estimates were, therefore, based on the results of personal monitoring of breathing zone air and prepared food samples. Based on a comparison of the range and magnitude of inhalation and dietary BaP exposures, food ingestion was clearly the predominant exposure to pathway. The relative contributions of other potential sources of community exposure to BaP (e.g., soil and drinking water ingestion) were also assessed. The excess cancer risk estimates for food ingestion were consistently greater than those for personal air, reflecting both the predominantly higher BaP exposures through the diet and the higher carcinogenic potency value for oral exposure. Overall, the total lifetime risk from personal exposure to BaP for nonsmokers in the community was estimated at 10(-5). In identifying risk reduction options, it is important to account for the observation that personal activities, lifestyle, and diet strongly influenced individual exposures to BaP.

  2. Exposure Monitoring and Risk Assessment of Biphenyl in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Yeong; Shin, Sae-Mi; Ham, Miran; Lim, Cheol-Hong; Byeon, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to assess exposure to and the risk caused by biphenyl in the workplace. Biphenyl is widely used as a heat transfer medium and as an emulsifier and polish in industry. Vapor or high levels of dust inhalation and dermal exposure to biphenyl can cause eye inflammation, irritation of respiratory organs, and permanent lesions in the liver and nervous system. In this study, the workplace environment concentrations were assessed as central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure and were shown to be 0.03 and 0.12 mg/m3, respectively. In addition, the carcinogenic risk of biphenyl as determined by risk assessment was 0.14 × 10−4 (central tendency exposure) and 0.56 × 10−4 (reasonable maximum exposure), which is below the acceptable risk value of 1.0 × 10−4. Furthermore, the central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure hazard quotients were 0.01 and 0.06 for oral toxicity, 0.05 and 0.23 for inhalation toxicity, and 0.08 and 0.39 for reproduction toxicity, respectively, which are all lower than the acceptable hazard quotient of 1.0. Therefore, exposure to biphenyl was found to be safe in current workplace environments. Because occupational exposure limits are based on socioeconomic assessment, they are generally higher than true values seen in toxicity experiments. Based on the results of exposure monitoring of biphenyl, the current occupational exposure limits in Korea could be reviewed. PMID:25985312

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF LOW COST, LOW BURDEN EXPOSURE MONITORING STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is designed to develop and demonstrate relevant, low-cost, low-burden monitoring strategies that could be used in large longitudinal exposure/epidemiological studies, such as the National Children's Study. The focus of this study is on (1) recruiting and retaining p...

  4. Characterizing climate change impacts on human exposures to air pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to air pollutants such as ozone (O3) have the potential to be altered by changes in climate through multiple factors that drive population exposures, including: ambient pollutant concentrations, human activity patterns, population sizes and distributions, and hous...

  5. Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    SHEDS-Pesticides (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Pesticides) is a physically-based stochastic model developed to quantify exposure and dose of humans to multimedia, multipathway pollutants. Probabilistic inputs are combined in physical/mechanistic algorit...

  6. Personal exposure monitoring of PM2.5 in indoor and outdoor microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E; Semple, Sean; Twigg, Marsailidh M; Braban, Christine F; Leeson, Sarah R; Heal, Mathew R; Harrison, David; Lin, Chun; Wu, Hao

    2015-03-01

    Adverse health effects from exposure to air pollution are a global challenge and of widespread concern. Recent high ambient concentration episodes of air pollutants in European cities highlighted the dynamic nature of human exposure and the gaps in data and knowledge about exposure patterns. In order to support health impact assessment it is essential to develop a better understanding of individual exposure pathways in people's everyday lives by taking account of all environments in which people spend time. Here we describe the development, validation and results of an exposure method applied in a study conducted in Scotland. A low-cost particle counter based on light-scattering technology - the Dylos 1700 was used. Its performance was validated in comparison with equivalent instruments (TEOM-FDMS) at two national monitoring network sites (R(2)=0.9 at a rural background site, R(2)=0.7 at an urban background site). This validation also provided two functions to convert measured PNCs into calculated particle mass concentrations for direct comparison of concentrations with equivalent monitoring instruments and air quality limit values. This study also used contextual and time-based activity data to define six microenvironments (MEs) to assess everyday exposure of individuals to short-term PM2.5 concentrations. The Dylos was combined with a GPS receiver to track movement and exposure of individuals across the MEs. Seventeen volunteers collected 35 profiles. Profiles may have a different overall duration and structure with respect to times spent in different MEs and activities undertaken. Results indicate that due to the substantial variability across and between MEs, it is essential to measure near-complete exposure pathways to allow for a comprehensive assessment of the exposure risk a person encounters on a daily basis. Taking into account the information gained through personal exposure measurements, this work demonstrates the added value of data generated by the

  7. Gene-environment interaction and biological monitoring of occupational exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvonen, Ari . E-mail: Ari.Hirvonen@ttl.fi

    2005-09-01

    Biological monitoring methods and biological limit values applied in occupational and environmental medicine have been traditionally developed on the assumption that individuals do not differ significantly in their biotransformation capacities. It has become clear, however, that this is not the case, but wide inter-individual differences exist in the metabolism of chemicals. Integration of the data on individual metabolic capacity in biological monitoring studies is therefore anticipated to represent a significant refinement of the currently used methods. We have recently conducted several biological monitoring studies on occupationally exposed subjects, which have included the determination of the workers' genotypes for the metabolic genes of potential importance for a given chemical exposure. The exposure levels have been measured by urine metabolites, adducts in blood macromolecules, and cytogenetic alterations in lymphocytes. Our studies indicate that genetic polymorphisms in metabolic genes may indeed be important modifiers of individual biological monitoring results of, e.g., carbon disulphide and styrene. The information is anticipated to be useful in insuring that the workplace is safe for everyone, including the most sensitive individuals. This knowledge could also be useful to occupational physicians, industrial hygienists, and regulatory bodies in charge of defining acceptable exposure limits for environmental and/or occupational pollutants.

  8. Space Radiation and Human Exposures, A Primer.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory A

    2016-04-01

    The space radiation environment is a complex field comprised primarily of charged particles spanning energies over many orders of magnitude. The principal sources of these particles are galactic cosmic rays, the Sun and the trapped radiation belts around the earth. Superimposed on a steady influx of cosmic rays and a steady outward flux of low-energy solar wind are short-term ejections of higher energy particles from the Sun and an 11-year variation of solar luminosity that modulates cosmic ray intensity. Human health risks are estimated from models of the radiation environment for various mission scenarios, the shielding of associated vehicles and the human body itself. Transport models are used to propagate the ambient radiation fields through realistic shielding levels and materials to yield radiation field models inside spacecraft. Then, informed by radiobiological experiments and epidemiology studies, estimates are made for various outcome measures associated with impairments of biological processes, losses of function or mortality. Cancer-associated risks have been formulated in a probabilistic model while management of non-cancer risks are based on permissible exposure limits. This article focuses on the various components of the space radiation environment and the human exposures that it creates. PMID:27018778

  9. Human factors error and patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T; Beatty, P C W

    2002-08-01

    A wide range of studies have shown that human factors errors are the major cause of critical incidents that threaten patient safety in the medical environments where patient monitoring takes place, contributing to approximately 87% of all such incidents. Studies have also shown that good cognitively ergonomic design of monitoring equipment for use in these environments should reduce the human factors errors associated with the information they provide. The purpose of this review is to consider the current state of knowledge concerning human factors engineering in its application to patient monitoring. It considers the prevalence of human factors error, principles of good human factors design, the effect of specific design features and the problem of the measurement of the effectiveness of designs in reducing human factors error. The conclusion of the review is that whilst the focus of human factors studies has, in recent years, moved from instrument design to organizational issues, patient monitor designers still have an important contribution to make to improving the safety of the monitored patient. Further, whilst better psychological understanding of the causes of human factors errors will in future guide better human factors engineering, in this area there are still many practical avenues of research that need exploring from the current base of understanding. PMID:12214768

  10. Three-Day Continuous Exposure Monitoring of CNT Manufacturing Workplaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Kang Ho; Kim, Sun Man; Kim, Ellen; Lee, Gun Ho; Han, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Continuous monitoring for possible exposure to carbon nanotubes was conducted over a period of 2 to 3 days at workplaces that manufacture multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To estimate the potential emission of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and potential exposure of workers, personal sampling, area monitoring, and real-time monitoring using an scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dust monitor were conducted at workplaces where the workers manufactured CNTs. The personal and area sampling of the total suspended particulate (TSP) at the MWCNT manufacturing facilities ranged from 0.031 to 0.254 and from N.D (not detected) to 0.253 mg/m3, respectively. This 2- to 3-day monitoring study found that nanoparticles were released when opening the chemical vapor deposit (CVD) reactor door after the synthesis of MWCNTs, when transferring the MWCNTs to containers and during blending and grinding. However, distinguishing the background concentration from the work process particle emission was complicated due to sustained and even increased particle concentrations after the work processes were terminated. The MWCNTs sampled for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation exhibited a tangled shape with no individual dispersed CNT structures. PMID:26125022

  11. Three-Day Continuous Exposure Monitoring of CNT Manufacturing Workplaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Kang Ho; Kim, Sun Man; Kim, Ellen; Lee, Gun Ho; Han, Jeong Hee; Yu, Il Je

    2015-01-01

    Continuous monitoring for possible exposure to carbon nanotubes was conducted over a period of 2 to 3 days at workplaces that manufacture multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To estimate the potential emission of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and potential exposure of workers, personal sampling, area monitoring, and real-time monitoring using an scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dust monitor were conducted at workplaces where the workers manufactured CNTs. The personal and area sampling of the total suspended particulate (TSP) at the MWCNT manufacturing facilities ranged from 0.031 to 0.254 and from N.D (not detected) to 0.253 mg/m(3), respectively. This 2- to 3-day monitoring study found that nanoparticles were released when opening the chemical vapor deposit (CVD) reactor door after the synthesis of MWCNTs, when transferring the MWCNTs to containers and during blending and grinding. However, distinguishing the background concentration from the work process particle emission was complicated due to sustained and even increased particle concentrations after the work processes were terminated. The MWCNTs sampled for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation exhibited a tangled shape with no individual dispersed CNT structures. PMID:26125022

  12. Assessment of human exposure to gaseous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, L.B.; Falco, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A mathematical model to aid in assessment of human environmental exposure to volatile organic substances is presented. The model simulates the convective and diffusive transport of gas from the ambient environment into the human body by way of the respiratory and circulatory systems. Data required include easily obtained physical and chemical properties of substances as well as several estimated or measured physiological parameters. Transient and steady-state tissue concentrations resulting from an input atmospheric partial pressure are predicted. From these concentrations, an effective dose may be calculated, allowing for the determination of an exposure-response relationship based upon independently obtained dose-response data. The model's results compare favorably to experimental data on oxygen and halothane. Steady-state conditions are reached very rapidly. These results suggest that uptake of these substances is limited by both ventilation and perfusion. Rates are demonstrated to be essentially linear within the current neighborhoods. Conditions in which the primary processes of ventilation, diffusion, perfusion, and elimination limit uptake of gases are considered. Expressions describing the conditions necessary for a single process to limit gas uptake are derived. Accompanying equations for estimating tissue concentrations under these limiting conditions are presented.

  13. Systems biology of human benzene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Li, Guilan; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Hubbard, Alan E.; Ren, Xuefeng; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; North, Matthew; Skibola, Christine F.; Yin, Songnian; Vulpe, Christopher; Chanock, Stephen J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Toxicogenomic studies, including genome-wide analyses of susceptibility genes (genomics), gene expression (transcriptomics), protein expression (proteomics), and epigenetic modifications (epigenomics), of human populations exposed to benzene are crucial to understanding gene-environment interactions, providing the ability to develop biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility. Comprehensive analysis of these toxicogenomic and epigenomic profiles by bioinformatics in the context of phenotypic endpoints, comprises systems biology, which has the potential to comprehensively define the mechanisms by which benzene causes leukemia. We have applied this approach to a molecular epidemiology study of workers exposed to benzene. Hematotoxicity, a significant decrease in almost all blood cell counts, was identified as a phenotypic effect of benzene that occurred even below 1ppm benzene exposure. We found a significant decrease in the formation of progenitor colonies arising from bone marrow stem cells with increasing benzene exposure, showing that progenitor cells are more sensitive to the effects of benzene than mature blood cells, likely leading to the observed hematotoxicity. Analysis of transcriptomics by microarray in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of exposed workers, identified genes and pathways (apoptosis, immune response, and inflammatory response) altered at high (>10ppm) and low (<1ppm) benzene levels. Serum proteomics by SELDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins consistently down-regulated in exposed workers. Preliminary epigenomics data showed effects of benzene on the DNA methylation of specific genes. Genomic screens for candidate genes involved in susceptibility to benzene toxicity are being undertaken in yeast, with subsequent confirmation by RNAi in human cells, to expand upon the findings from candidate gene analyses. Data on these and future biomarkers will be used to populate a large toxicogenomics database, to which we will apply bioinformatic

  14. Monitoring radiation exposure to medical personnel during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, F.C.; Auster, M.; Beck, T.J.; Chang, R.; Marshall, F.F.

    1986-09-01

    To ascertain radiation exposure to medical personnel during percutaneous nephrolithotomy, lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were utilized for the radiographic monitoring of 7 consecutive patients. Average fluoroscopy time per procedure was 27.8 minutes of which 15.1 minutes were for nephrostomy tube insertion and 12.7 minutes were for calculi extraction. The 2 radiologists received 4.5 and 5.1 mrad per procedure, while the 2 urologists received 2.5 and 3.7 mrad. All other ancillary personnel received less than 2.1 mrad per procedure except the anesthesiologists whose mean exposure was 4.7 mrad. By taking appropriate precautions and using the proper equipment, percutaneous nephrolithotomy can be performed with a low level of radiation exposure for all involved physicians and personnel.

  15. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in human exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The potential dose received by an individual during defined exposure situations can be determined using personal dosimeters or estimated by combining information on exposure scenarios with the environmental concentration (C.) of chemicals. With the latter approach, not only the potential dose but also the internal dose (i.e., amount of chemical that has been absorbed and available for interaction with receptors) and biologically-effective dose (i.e., amount of chemical that actually reaches the cellular sites where interaction with macromolecules occur) can be estimated if C. is provided as an input to PBPK models. These models are mathematical representations of the interrelationships among the critical determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals in biota. Since the compartments in this model correspond to biologically relevant tissues or tissue groups, the amount of chemical reaching specific target organ(s) can be estimated. Further, the PBPK models permit the use of biological monitoring data such as urinary levels of metabolites, hemoglobin adduct levels, and alveolar air concentrations, to reconstruct the exposure levels and scenarios for specific subgroups of populations. These models are also useful in providing estimates of target tissue dose in humans simultaneously exposed to chemicals in various media (air, water, soil, food) by different routes (oral, dermal, inhalation). Several examples of exposure assessment for volatile organic chemicals using PBPK models for mammals will be presented, and the strategies for development of these models for other classes of chemicals highlighted.

  16. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  17. AN APPROACH TO METHODS DEVELOPMENT FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure assessment studies require methods that are rapid, cost-effective and have a high sample through-put. The development of analytical methods for exposure studies should be based on specific information for individual studies. Human exposure studies suggest that di...

  18. NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS): OPPORTUNITIES AND LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) in its fullest sense is a conceptual design, which upon implementation, will have long-term implications to exposure research and assessment. The ultimate goal is to document national distribution of human exposure to pote...

  19. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  20. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure... Information § 159.170 Human epidemiological and exposure studies. Information must be submitted which concerns... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  1. Biomarkers of human exposure to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1993-01-01

    Three biomarkers for benzene exposure were developed. The first biomarker, muconic acid in urine, results from the ring opening of a benzene metabolite. A gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) assay was developed to measure urinary muconic acid, and the analyte in urine samples from workers occupationally exposed to benzene was determined. Workers exposed to benzene concentrations as low as 4.4 ppm over an 8-h day showed higher urinary muconic acid concentrations than did any control individual (p < .005). The second biomarker, S-phenylcysteine (SPC) in hemoglobin (Hb), results from the addition of benzene oxide to a cysteine sulfhydryl group. A GC/MS assay was developed to measure SPC in the blood of F344/N rats and B67C3F mice exposed to benzene by inhalation. The cysteine moiety on rat Hb is at a more accessible site than on Hb of mice or humans, and rats showed considerably higher levels of SPC than did mice. As yet, we have been unable to detect SPC in the globin of humans occupationally exposed to benzene. The third biomarker is SPC in albumin. In humans occupationally exposed to average concentrations of 0, 4.4, 8.4, and 23.1 ppm benzene, 8 h/d, 5 d/wk, SPC increased in the exposed groups linearly, giving a statistically significant slope (p < .001) of 0.044 [+-] 0.008 pmol/mg albumin/ppm. The assay for SPC is arduous and often imprecise; assuming these difficulties can be overcome, muconic acid in urine and SPC in albumin may be useful for accurately determining benzene exposure. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Biological monitoring of nitroglycerin exposure by urine analysis.

    PubMed

    Akrill, Peter; Guiver, Robert; Cocker, John

    2002-08-01

    Historically biological monitoring to assess exposure has been difficult due to the rapid half-life of NG. However, the recent development of a method to assess NG and its metabolites (glycerol dinitrates, GDNs) in urine has made biological monitoring more feasible. The data reported here result from samples taken from three sites using NG. Two of the sites are munitions manufacturing sites and the other site is a pharmaceutical manufacturing site. The range of urinary GDN concentrations found in the samples at the two munitions sites were 0.9-18, and 0-4.7 micromol/mol creatinine, and at the pharmaceutical site were 0-0.9 micromol/mol creatinine). The presence of nitroglycols in the urine of workers despite the use of personal protective equipment and local exhaust ventilation shows the usefulness of biological monitoring to assess the efficacy of any controls in place and the potential of dermal absorption of NG. PMID:12191888

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF LOW COST, LOW BURDEN EXPOSURE MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR USE IN LONGITUDINAL COHORT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large longitudinal cohort study designed to evaluate the association between children's exposures to environmental agents and health outcomes presents many challenges for exposure monitoring. Exposure of the child must be measured for multiple chemicals through multiple path...

  4. INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    North Carolina Central University (NCCU) recently began an innovative human exposure research program in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, NC. In this project, researchers will examine ...

  5. ANALYSIS OF DISCRIMINATING FACTORS IN HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT AFFECT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately modeling exposure to particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants ultimately involves the utilization of human location-activity databases to assist in understanding the potential variability of microenvironmental exposures. This paper critically considers and stati...

  6. USE OF EXHALED BREATH CONDENSATE IN A HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a noninvasive, repeatable collection technique to sample biomarkers of lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and environmental exposure. It is unclear whether EBC is an effective tool in human environmental exposure studies with multi-day samplin...

  7. THE ROLE OF EXPOSURE ANALYSIS IN HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will cover the basic methodologies used for assessing human exposures to environmental pollutants, and some of the scientific challenges involved in conducting exposure and risk assessments in support of regulatory evaluations.

  8. NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) DATA ANALYSIS WORK GROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three field studies were under conducted the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey. These studies measured exposures in three study regions - Arizona, the six EPA Region V States (Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota), and Baltimore and four surrounding cou...

  9. MICROBES, MONITORING AND HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are about 20,000 wastewater treatment plants in the United States. These plants discharge about 50 trillion gallons of wastewater daily into the nation's surface waters. Most wastewater contains human feces, which are a potential source of microbial pathogens. Pathogens ...

  10. Preventable Exposures Associated With Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Baan, Robert; Straif, Kurt; Grosse, Yann; Lauby-Secretan, Béatrice; El Ghissassi, Fatiha; Bouvard, Véronique; Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Guha, Neela; Freeman, Crystal; Galichet, Laurent; Wild, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Information on the causes of cancer at specific sites is important to cancer control planners, cancer researchers, cancer patients, and the general public. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph series, which has classified human carcinogens for more than 40 years, recently completed a review to provide up-to-date information on the cancer sites associated with more than 100 carcinogenic agents. Based on IARC’s review, we listed the cancer sites associated with each agent and then rearranged this information to list the known and suspected causes of cancer at each site. We also summarized the rationale for classifications that were based on mechanistic data. This information, based on the forthcoming IARC Monographs Volume 100, offers insights into the current state-of-the-science of carcinogen identification. Use of mechanistic data to identify carcinogens is increasing, and epidemiological research is identifying additional carcinogens and cancer sites or confirming carcinogenic potential under conditions of lower exposure. Nevertheless, some common human cancers still have few (or no) identified causal agents. PMID:22158127

  11. Arsenic occurrence in Brazil and human exposure.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, Bernardino Ribeiro; Borba, Ricardo Perobelli; Angélica, Rômulo Simões

    2007-04-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic (As) in terms of public health is receiving increasing attention worldwide following cases of mass contamination in different parts of the world. However, there is a scarcity of data available on As geochemistry in Brazilian territory, despite the known occurrence of As in some of the more severely polluted areas of Brazil. The purpose of this paper is to discuss existing data on As distribution in Brazil based on recent investigations in three contaminated areas as well as results from the literature. To date, integrated studies on environmental and anthropogenic sources of As contamination have been carried out only in three areas in Brazil: (1) the Southeastern region, known as the Iron Quadrangle, where As was released into the drainage systems, soils and atmosphere as a result of gold mining; (2) the Ribeira Valley, where As occurs in Pb-Zn mine wastes and naturally in As-rich rocks and soils; (3) the Amazon region, including the Santana area, where As is associated with manganese ores mined over the last 50 years. Toxicological studies revealed that the populations were not exposed to elevated levels of As, with the As concentrations in surface water in these areas rarely exceeding 10 microg/L. Deep weathering of bedrocks along with formation of Fe/Al-enriched soils and sediments function as a chemical barrier that prevents the release of As into the water. In addition, the tropical climate results in high rates of precipitation in the northern and southeastern regions and, hence, the As contents of drinking water is diluted. Severe cases of human As exposure related to non-point pollution sources have not been reported in Brazil. However, increasing awareness of the adverse health effects of As will eventually lead to a more complete picture of the distribution of As in Brazil. PMID:17351814

  12. Activity Monitors Help Users Get Optimum Sun Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Goddard scientist Shahid Aslam was investigating alternative methods for measuring extreme ultraviolet radiation on the Solar Dynamics Observatory when he hit upon semiconductors that measured wavelengths pertinent to human health. As a result, he and a partner established College Park, Maryland-based Sensor Sensor LLC and developed UVA+B SunFriend, a wrist monitor that lets people know when they've received their optimal amounts of sunlight for the day.

  13. Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation for Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM) Version 2.0 is a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter developed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). EPA SHEDS-PM 2.0 uses a probabilistic approach t...

  14. Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation for Air Toxics

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) is a multimedia, multipathway population-based exposure and dose model for air toxics developed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). SHEDS-AirToxics uses a probabili...

  15. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: II. Exposure monitoring surveys and development of exposure groups.

    PubMed

    Coble, Joseph B; Stewart, Patricia A; Vermeulen, Roel; Yereb, Daniel; Stanevich, Rebecca; Blair, Aaron; Silverman, Debra T; Attfield, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Air monitoring surveys were conducted between 1998 and 2001 at seven non-metal mining facilities to assess exposure to respirable elemental carbon (REC), a component of diesel exhaust (DE), for an epidemiologic study of miners exposed to DE. Personal exposure measurements were taken on workers in a cross-section of jobs located underground and on the surface. Air samples taken to measure REC were also analyzed for respirable organic carbon (ROC). Concurrent measurements to assess exposure to nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), two gaseous components of DE, were also taken. The REC measurements were used to develop quantitative estimates of average exposure levels by facility, department, and job title for the epidemiologic analysis. Each underground job was assigned to one of three sets of exposure groups from specific to general: (i) standardized job titles, (ii) groups of standardized job titles combined based on the percentage of time in the major underground areas, and (iii) larger groups based on similar area carbon monoxide (CO) air concentrations. Surface jobs were categorized based on their use of diesel equipment and proximity to DE. A total of 779 full-shift personal measurements were taken underground. The average REC exposure levels for underground jobs with five or more measurements ranged from 31 to 58 μg m⁻³ at the facility with the lowest average exposure levels and from 313 to 488 μg m⁻³ at the facility with the highest average exposure levels. The average REC exposure levels for surface workers ranged from 2 to 6 μg m⁻³ across the seven facilities. There was much less contrast in the ROC compared with REC exposure levels measured between surface and underground workers within each facility, as well as across the facilities. The average ROC levels underground ranged from 64 to 195 μg m⁻³, while on the surface, the average ROC levels ranged from 38 to 71 μg m⁻³ by facility, an ∼2- to 3-fold difference. The average

  16. An introduction to the indirect exposure assessment approach: modeling human exposure using microenvironmental measurements and the recent National Human Activity Pattern Survey.

    PubMed Central

    Klepeis, N E

    1999-01-01

    Indirect exposure approaches offer a feasible and accurate method for estimating population exposures to indoor pollutants, including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). In an effort to make the indirect exposure assessment approach more accessible to people in the health and risk assessment fields, this paper provides examples using real data from (italic>a(/italic>) a week-long personal carbon monoxide monitoring survey conducted by the author; and (italic>b(/italic>) the 1992 to 1994 National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS) for the United States. The indirect approach uses measurements of exposures in specific microenvironments (e.g., homes, bars, offices), validated microenvironmental models (based on the mass balance equation), and human activity pattern data obtained from questionnaires to predict frequency distributions of exposure for entire populations. This approach requires fewer resources than the direct approach to exposure assessment, for which the distribution of monitors to a representative sample of a given population is necessary. In the indirect exposure assessment approach, average microenvironmental concentrations are multiplied by the total time spent in each microenvironment to give total integrated exposure. By assuming that the concentrations encountered in each of 10 location categories are the same for different members of the U.S. population (i.e., the NHAPS respondents), the hypothetical contribution that ETS makes to the average 24-hr respirable suspended particle exposure for Americans working their main job is calculated in this paper to be 18 microg/m3. This article is an illustrative review and does not contain an actual exposure assessment or model validation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10350522

  17. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: II. Exposure Monitoring Surveys and Development of Exposure Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coble, Joseph B.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Vermeulen, Roel; Yereb, Daniel; Stanevich, Rebecca; Blair, Aaron; Silverman, Debra T.; Attfield, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Air monitoring surveys were conducted between 1998 and 2001 at seven non-metal mining facilities to assess exposure to respirable elemental carbon (REC), a component of diesel exhaust (DE), for an epidemiologic study of miners exposed to DE. Personal exposure measurements were taken on workers in a cross-section of jobs located underground and on the surface. Air samples taken to measure REC were also analyzed for respirable organic carbon (ROC). Concurrent measurements to assess exposure to nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), two gaseous components of DE, were also taken. The REC measurements were used to develop quantitative estimates of average exposure levels by facility, department, and job title for the epidemiologic analysis. Each underground job was assigned to one of three sets of exposure groups from specific to general: (i) standardized job titles, (ii) groups of standardized job titles combined based on the percentage of time in the major underground areas, and (iii) larger groups based on similar area carbon monoxide (CO) air concentrations. Surface jobs were categorized based on their use of diesel equipment and proximity to DE. A total of 779 full-shift personal measurements were taken underground. The average REC exposure levels for underground jobs with five or more measurements ranged from 31 to 58 μg m−3 at the facility with the lowest average exposure levels and from 313 to 488 μg m−3 at the facility with the highest average exposure levels. The average REC exposure levels for surface workers ranged from 2 to 6 μg m−3 across the seven facilities. There was much less contrast in the ROC compared with REC exposure levels measured between surface and underground workers within each facility, as well as across the facilities. The average ROC levels underground ranged from 64 to 195 μg m−3, while on the surface, the average ROC levels ranged from 38 to 71 μg m−3 by facility, an ∼2- to 3-fold difference. The average NO and

  18. Biological monitoring of isocyanates and related amines. IV. 2,4- and 2,6-toluenediamine in hydrolysed plasma and urine after test-chamber exposure of humans to 2,4- and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate.

    PubMed

    Brorson, T; Skarping, G; Sangö, C

    1991-01-01

    Two men were exposed to toluene diisocyanate (TDI) atmospheres at three different air concentrations (ca. 25, 50 and 70 micrograms/m3). The TDI atmospheres were generated by a gas-phase permeation method, and the exposures were performed in an 8-m3 stainless-steel test chamber. The effective exposure period was 4 h. The isomeric composition of the air in the test chamber was 30% 2,4-TDI and 70% 2,6-TDI. The concentration of TDI in air of the test chamber was determined by an HPLC method using the 9-(N-methyl-amino-methyl)-anthracene reagent and by a continuous-monitoring filter-tape instrument. Following the hydrolysis of plasma and urine, the related amines, 2,4-toluenediamine (2,4-TDA) and 2,6-toluenediamine (2,6-TDA), were determined as pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) derivatives by capillary gas chromatography using selected ion monitoring (SIM) in the electron-impact mode. In plasma, 2,4- and 2,6-TDA showed a rapid-phase elimination half-time of ca. 2-5 h, and that for the slow phase was greater than 6 days. A connection was observed between concentrations of 2,4- and 2,6-TDI in air and the levels of 2,4- and 2,6-TDA in plasma. The cumulated amount of 2,4-TDA excreted in the urine over 24 h was ca. 15%-19% of the estimated inhaled dose of 2,4-TDI, and that of 2,6-TDA was ca. 17%-23% of the inhaled dose of 2,6-TDI. A connection was found between the cumulated (24-h) urinary excretion of 2,4- and 2,6-TDA and the air concentration of 2,4- and 2,6-TDI in the test chamber.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1660449

  19. PROBLEMS IN THE ESTIMATION OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO COMPONENTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Problems associated with estimation of human exposures to ambient air pollution are discussed. Ideally the authors would prefer to have some indication of actual dose. For most pollutants this is not presently feasible. Specific problems discussed are adequacy of outdoor monitors...

  20. Novel Approaches for Estimating Human Exposure to Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous health studies have used measurements from a few central-site ambient monitors to characterize air pollution exposures. Relying on solely on central-site ambient monitors does not account for the spatial-heterogeneity of ambient air pollution patterns, the temporal varia...

  1. Hair as a monitor of toxic chemicals exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.F.; Adams, S.; Baumgartner, W.A.

    1982-08-31

    The possibility of using hair analysis as a monitor of exposure to hydrazines and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was investigated. Two female Hartley guinea pigs injected with 0.6 milligrams (mg) of Aroclor-1254 had analyzable concentrations of the PCB in their hair. Analysis was made using glass capillary gas chromatography with an electron-capture detector. The levels ranged from 10 picograms/milligram (pg/mg) of Aroclor-1254 in washed hair to 100pg/mg in unwashed hair. Female Fischer-344 rats injected intraperitoneally with 60mg/kg unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (UDMH), 10mg/kg monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and/or 10mg/kg hydrazine did not have detectable amounts of these chemicals in their hair at 14, 30 or 42 days after injection. The hair samples did take up the hydrazines when suspended above solutions of the test compounds. The authors concluded that analyzing the PCB content of hair may be useful in providing a history of on-the-job PCB exposure.

  2. Design and clinical feasibility of personal wearable monitor for measurement of activity and environmental exposure.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Richard Ribón; Oreskovic, Nicolas M; Robinson, Alyssa I

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to specific environmental factors (e.g. air quality, lighting, and sound) is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases (e.g. asthma) and mental health disorders (e.g. anxiety). However, conventional fixed environmental monitoring stations are sparsely located and, despite environmental models, cannot adequately assess individual exposure levels. New forms of low-cost portable monitors have begun to emerge that enable the collection of higher spatial density "crowd sourced" data; however, the first generation of these low-cost environmental monitors have generally not been suitable for clinical environmental health studies due to practical challenges such as calibration, reproducibility, form factor, and battery life. In this paper, we present a wearable environmental monitor that overcomes these challenges and can be used in clinical studies The new device, called "Eco-Mini," can be used without a smart phone and is capable of locally sampling and recording a variety of environmental parameters (Ozone, Sulfur Dioxide, Volatile Organic Compounds, humidity, temperature, ambient light color balance, and sound level) as well as individual activity (3-axis accelerometer) and location (GPS). In this paper, we also report findings and discuss lessons learned from a feasibility study conducted for one week with pediatric patients as part of an ongoing asthma research study. PMID:25570098

  3. HEALTH RISKS OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this research was to determine the health effects, if any, associated with occupational exposure to biological agents present in municipal wastewater. An additional objective was to determine the sensitivity of the methodology for detecting potential heal...

  4. INDOOR, OUTDOOR, AND PERSONAL EXPOSURE MONITORING OF PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION: THE BALTIMORE ELDERLY EPIDEMIOLOGY-EXPOSURE PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 17-day pilot study investigating potential PM exposures of an elderly population was conducted near Baltimore, Maryland. Collection of residential indoor, residential outdoor, and ambient monitoring data associated with the subjects living at a common retirement facility was...

  5. TOLUENE EXPERIMENTAL EXPOSURES IN HUMANS: PHARMACOKINETICS AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene Experimental Exposures in Humans:
    Pharmacokinetics and Behavioral Effects
    (Ongoing Research)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    Human subjects will be exposed to 250 and 500 ppm toluene for one hour in the Human St...

  6. Human dermal exposure to galaxolide from personal care products.

    PubMed

    Correia, P; Cruz, A; Santos, L; Alves, A

    2013-06-01

    Musks are synthetic fragrances applied on personal care and household products as fixatives, by retarding the release of other fragrances with higher volatility. Galaxolide is the most used polycyclic musk since the 90th decade, and it has been detected in several environmental and biological matrices, particularly in human tissues and fluids. For exposure assessment purposes, large-monitoring data need to be obtained and rapid but reliable analytical techniques are requested. The main objective of this study is to develop and validate a new and fast analytical methodology to quantify galaxolide in personal care products and to apply this method to real matrices like skin care products (creams and lotions), shower products (soap bar), hair care products (shampoo and hair conditioner) and oral care products (toothpaste), to evaluate the human dermal exposure risk. A dispersive solid-phase extraction is proposed, using QuEChERS methodology, followed by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Some extraction parameters were studied, like the ratio of sample/solvent amounts, the homogenization time, the salt addition effect and the used sorbents. The validation parameters of the developed method were the following: a linearity range of 0.005-1.002 mg kg⁻¹ sample, a limit of detection of 0.001 mg kg⁻¹ sample, repeatability between 0.7% and 11.3% (variation coefficient of six standard injections), an intermediate precision of 2.5% (variation coefficient of six independent analysis of the same sample), mean recoveries ranging from 65% (soap bar) to 95% (body cream) and 3% of global uncertainty in most of the working range. The time of analysis, including the extraction steps, is 60 min, allowing a throughput of 4 samples h⁻¹ . Galaxolide was detected in all of the seven analysed products in concentrations ranging from 0.04 ± 0.01 mg kg⁻¹ sample (toothpaste) to 280.78 ± 8.19 mg kg⁻¹ sample (perfumed body cream), which may correspond to a significant estimated

  7. Environmental chemical exposures and human epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lifang; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Dong; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Every year more than 13 million deaths worldwide are due to environmental pollutants, and approximately 24% of diseases are caused by environmental exposures that might be averted through preventive measures. Rapidly growing evidence has linked environmental pollutants with epigenetic variations, including changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Environ mental chemicals and epigenetic changes All of these mechanisms are likely to play important roles in disease aetiology, and their modifications due to environmental pollutants might provide further understanding of disease aetiology, as well as biomarkers reflecting exposures to environmental pollutants and/or predicting the risk of future disease. We summarize the findings on epigenetic alterations related to environmental chemical exposures, and propose mechanisms of action by means of which the exposures may cause such epigenetic changes. We discuss opportunities, challenges and future directions for future epidemiology research in environmental epigenomics. Future investigations are needed to solve methodological and practical challenges, including uncertainties about stability over time of epigenomic changes induced by the environment, tissue specificity of epigenetic alterations, validation of laboratory methods, and adaptation of bioinformatic and biostatistical methods to high-throughput epigenomics. In addition, there are numerous reports of epigenetic modifications arising following exposure to environmental toxicants, but most have not been directly linked to disease endpoints. To complete our discussion, we also briefly summarize the diseases that have been linked to environmental chemicals-related epigenetic changes. PMID:22253299

  8. Biomarkers of organophosphorus (OP) exposures in humans

    PubMed Central

    Marsillach, Judit; Richter, Rebecca J.; Kim, Jerry H.; Stevens, Richard C.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Tomazela, Daniela; Suzuki, Stephanie M.; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana; Furlong, Clement E.

    2011-01-01

    There are ongoing events where aircraft engine lubricant containing tricresyl phosphates (TCPs) contaminates aircraft cabins. Some individuals have experienced tremors or other neurological symptoms that may last for many months following exposures. Mass spectrometric (MS) protocols are being developed to determine the percentage of “biomarker proteins” that are modified by such exposures, specifically on active site serines. Both plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and red cell acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) are readily inhibited by 2-(o-cresyl)-4H-1:3:2:benzodioxaphosphoran-2-one (CBDP) or phenyl saligenin cyclic phosphate (PSP) and have the potential to provide information about the level of exposure of an individual. We have developed immunomagnetic bead-based single-step purification protocols for both BChE and APH and have characterized the active site serine adducts of BChE by MS. PMID:21767566

  9. Human exposure limits to hypergolic fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, H. D.; James, J. T.; Limero, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past four decades, many studies have been conducted on the toxicities of the rocket propellants hydrazine (HZ) and monomethylhydrazine (MH). Numerous technical challenges have made it difficult to unambiguously interpret the results of these studies, and there is considerable divergence between results obtained by different investigators on the inhalation concentrations (MAC's) for each toxic effect inducible by exposure to hypergolic fuels in spacecraft atmospheres, NASA undertook a critical review of published and unpublished investigations on the toxicities of these compounds. The current state of the art practices for similar studies. While many questions remain unanswered, MAC's were determined using the best available data for a variety of toxic endpoints for potential continuous exposure durations ranging from 1 hour to 180 days. Spacecraft MAC's (SMAC's) were set for each compound based on the most sensitive toxic endpoint at each exposure duration.

  10. IMMUNOCHEMISTRY AT THE U.S. EPA, NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH BRANCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HERB has developed several immunoassay methods for environmental and human exposure studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been developed for dietary and indoor exposure surveys. An immunoassay for th...

  11. ASSESSING RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a workshop sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development and Office of Pesticide Programs, the Aggregate Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) Model was used to assess potential aggregate residential pesticide e...

  12. SECOND NATIONAL REPORT ON HUMAN EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals is an ongoing assessment of the exposure of the U.S. population to environmental chemicals using biomonitoring. The first Report on 27 chemicals was issued in March 2001. This Second Report, released in January 20...

  13. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure studies. 159.170 Section 159.170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  14. 40 CFR 159.170 - Human epidemiological and exposure studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Human epidemiological and exposure studies. 159.170 Section 159.170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... that a correlation may exist between exposure to a pesticide and observed adverse effects in...

  15. INTEGRATED HUMAN EXPOSURE SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NERL human exposure research program is designed to provide a sound, scientifically-based approach to understanding how people are actually exposed to pollutants and the factors and pathways influencing exposure and dose. This research project serves to integrate and incorpo...

  16. NATIONAL REPORT ON HUMAN EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals is a new publication that will provide an ongoing assessment of the U.S. population's exposure to environmental chemicals using biomonitoring. For this Report, an environmental chemical means a chemical compound or ...

  17. Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Wood Preservatives

    EPA Science Inventory

    SHEDS-Wood (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Wood Preservatives) is a physically-based stochastic model that was developed to quantify exposure and dose of children to wood preservatives on treated playsets and residential decks. Probabilistic inputs are co...

  18. Reconstructing Human Exposures Using Biomarkers and other "Clues"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomonitoring is the process by which biomarkers are measured in human tissues and specimens to evaluate exposures. Given the growing number of population-based biomonitoring surveys, there is now an escalated interest in using biomarker data to reconstruct exposures for supporti...

  19. Data Sources for Prioritizing Human Exposure to Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans may be exposed to thousands of chemicals through contact in the workplace, home, and via air, water, food, and soil. A major challenge is estimating chemical exposures, which requires understanding potential exposure pathways directly related to how chemicals are used. Wit...

  20. Controlled human exposures to ambient pollutant particles in susceptible populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have established an association between exposures to air pollution particles and human mortality and morbidity at concentrations of particles currently found in major metropolitan areas. The adverse effects of pollution particles are most prominent in suscep...

  1. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Toxic Cyanobacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide. Warming and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. We examine the evidence for adverse human health effects associated with exposure to toxic blooms in drinking water, recreational water a...

  2. LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three NHEXAS Studies were conducted from 1995-1997 to evaluate total human exposure to multiple chemicals on community and regional scales. EPA established cooperative agreements with three Consortia to conduct three interrelated NHEXAS field studies. The University of Arizona...

  3. Identification and characterization of biomarkers of organophosphorus exposures in humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jerry H; Stevens, Richard C; MacCoss, Michael J; Goodlett, David R; Scherl, Alex; Richter, Rebecca J; Suzuki, Stephanie M; Furlong, Clement E

    2010-01-01

    Over 1 billion pounds of organophosphorus (OP) chemicals are manufactured worldwide each year, including 70 million pounds of pesticides sprayed in the US. Current methods to monitor environmental and occupational exposures to OPs such as chlorpyrifos (CPS) have limitations, including low specificity and sensitivity, and short time windows for detection. Biomarkers for the OP tricresyl phosphate (TCP), which can contaminate bleed air from jet engines and cause an occupational exposure of commercial airline pilots, crewmembers and passengers, have not been identified. The aim of our work has been to identify, purify, and characterize new biomarkers of OP exposure. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibition has been a standard for monitoring OP exposure. By identifying and characterizing molecular biomarkers with longer half-lives, we should be able to clinically detect TCP and OP insecticide exposure after longer durations of time than are currently possible. Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) is a red blood cell (RBC) cytosolic serine proteinase that removes N-acetylated amino acids from peptides and cleaves oxidized proteins. Due to its properties, it is an excellent candidate for a biomarker of exposure. We have been able to purify APH and detect inhibition by both CPS and metabolites of TCP. The 120-day lifetime of the RBC offers a much longer window for detecting exposure. The OP-modified serine conjugate in the active site tryptic peptide has been characterized by mass spectrometry. This research uses functional proteomics and enzyme activities to identify and characterize useful biomarkers of neurotoxic environmental and occupational OP exposures. PMID:20221871

  4. Identification and Characterization of Biomarkers of Organophosphorus Exposures in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jerry H.; Stevens, Richard C.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Goodlett, David R.; Scherl, Alex; Richter, Rebecca J.; Suzuki, Stephanie M.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2010-01-01

    Over 1 billion pounds of organophosphorus (OP) chemicals are manufactured worldwide each year, including 70 million pounds of pesticides sprayed in the US. Current methods to monitor environmental and occupational exposures to OPs such as chlorpyrifos (CPS) have limitations, including low specificity and sensitivity, and short time windows for detection. Biomarkers for the OP tricresyl phosphate (TCP), which can contaminate bleed air from jet engines and cause an occupational exposure of commercial airline pilots, crewmembers and passengers, have not been identified. The aim of our work has been to identify, purify, and characterize new biomarkers of OP exposure. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibition has been a standard for monitoring OP exposure. By identifying and characterizing molecular biomarkers with longer half-lives, we should be able to clinically detect TCP and OP insecticide exposure after longer durations of time than are currently possible. Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) is a red blood cell (RBC) cytosolic serine proteinase that removes N-acetylated amino acids from peptides and cleaves oxidized proteins. Due to its properties, it is an excellent candidate for a biomarker of exposure. We have been able to purify APH and detect inhibition by both CPS and metabolites of TCP. The 120-day lifetime of the RBC offers a much longer window for detecting exposure. The OP-modified serine conjugate in the active site tryptic peptide has been characterized by mass spectrometry. This research uses functional proteomics and enzyme activities to identify and characterize useful biomarkers of neurotoxic environmental and occupational OP exposures. PMID:20221871

  5. Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect in Human Lymphoblastoid TK6 Cells Following [13C2]-Acetaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Swenberg, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The dose-response relationship for biomarkers of exposure (N2-ethylidene-dG adducts) and effect (cell survival and micronucleus formation) was determined across 4.5 orders of magnitude (50nM–2mM) using [13C2]-acetaldehyde exposures to human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells for 12h. There was a clear increase in exogenous N 2-ethylidene-dG formation at exposure concentrations ≥ 1µM, whereas the endogenous adducts remained nearly constant across all exposure concentrations, with an average of 3.0 adducts/107 dG. Exogenous adducts were lower than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≤ 10µM and were greater than endogenous adducts at concentrations ≥ 250µM. When the endogenous and exogenous adducts were summed together, statistically significant increases in total adduct formation over the endogenous background occurred at 50µM. Cell survival and micronucleus formation were monitored across the exposure range and statistically significant decreases in cell survival and increases in micronucleus formation occurred at ≥ 1000µM. This research supports the hypothesis that endogenously produced reactive species, including acetaldehyde, are always present and constitute the majority of the observed biological effects following very low exposures to exogenous acetaldehyde. These data can replace default assumptions of linear extrapolation to very low doses of exogenous acetaldehyde for risk prediction. PMID:23425604

  6. MULTIMEDIA HUMAN EXPOSURE AND RISK ASSESSMENT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures and health risk comparisons from different sites may be used for allocating limited resources available for remedial action. It is important that comparisons between different sites use similar levels of site-specific data and/or screening level data. Risk assessment c...

  7. EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that...

  8. Human rights monitoring in virtual community.

    PubMed

    El Morr, Christo

    2012-01-01

    Holistic disability rights monitoring is essential in order to translate rights on paper into rights in reality for people with disabilities. At the same time, evidence-based knowledge produced through holistic monitoring has to be made accessible to a broad range of groups - researchers, representatives of disability community, people with disabilities, the media, policy makers, general public - and also has to contribute to building capacity within disability community around human rights issues. This article focuses on the design process of a complex Virtual Knowledge Network (VKN) as an operational tool to support mobilization and dissemination of evidence-based knowledge produced by the Disability Rights Promotion International Canada (DRPI-Canada) project. This tool is embedded in the more general framework of the project grounded in a human rights approach to disability and that acknowledges the importance of creating knowledgeable communities in order to make the disability rights monitoring efforts sustainable, advancing thus the decision making process in Canada in order to enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. PMID:22874302

  9. Personal Air Pollution Exposure Monitoring using Low Cost Sensors in Chennai City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Yasa, Pavan; Shiva, Nagendra S. N.

    2016-04-01

    Air quality in many cities is deteriorating due to rapid urbanization and motorization. In the past, most of the health impacts studies in the urban areas have considered stationary air quality monitoring station data for health impact assessment. Since, there exist a spatial and temporal variation of air quality because of rapid change in land use pattern and complex interaction between emission sources and meteorological conditions, the human exposure assessment using stationary data may not provide realistic information. In such cases low cost sensors monitoring is viable in providing both spatial and temporal variations of air pollutant concentrations. In the present study an attempt has been made to use low cost sensor for monitoring the personal exposure to the two criteria pollutants CO and PM2.5 at 3 different locations of Chennai city. Maximum and minimum concentrations of CO and PM2.5 were found to be 5.4ppm, 0.8ppm and 534.8μg/m3, 1.9μg/m3 respectively. Results showed high concentrations near the intersection and low concentrations in the straight road.

  10. LEAD EXPOSURES IN THE HUMAN ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans consume lead by inhaling air, drinking beverages, eating food and ingesting dust. The natural source of this lead is primarily soil. Anthropogenic sources are lead in gasoline, fossil fuels and industrial products and processes. Lead is ubiquitous in the human environment,...

  11. MANAGEMENT AND DISSEMINATION OF HUMAN EXPOSURE DATABASES AND OTHER DATABASES NEEDED FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers in the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) have performed a number of large human exposure measurement studies during the past decade. It is the goal of the NERL to make the data available to other researchers for analysis in order to further the scientific ...

  12. Biomonitoring of the mycotoxin Zearalenone: current state-of-the art and application to human exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Mally, Angela; Solfrizzo, Michele; Degen, Gisela H

    2016-06-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN), a mycotoxin with high estrogenic activity in vitro and in vivo, is a widespread food contaminant that is commonly detected in maize, wheat, barley, sorghum, rye and other grains. Human exposure estimates based on analytical data on ZEN occurrence in various food categories and food consumption data suggest that human exposure to ZEN and modified forms of ZEN may be close to or even exceed the tolerable daily intake (TDI) derived by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for some consumer groups. Considering the inherent uncertainties in estimating dietary intake of ZEN that may lead to an under- or overestimation of ZEN exposure and consequently human risk and current lack of data on vulnerable consumer groups, there is a clear need for more comprehensive and reliable exposure data to refine ZEN risk assessment. Human biomonitoring (HBM) is increasingly being recognized as an efficient and cost-effective way of assessing human exposure to food contaminants, including mycotoxins. Based on animal and (limited) human data on the toxicokinetics of ZEN, it appears that excretion of ZEN and its major metabolites may present suitable biomarkers of ZEN exposure. In view of the limitations of available dietary exposure data on ZEN and its modified forms, the purpose of this review is to provide an overview of recent studies utilizing HBM to monitor and assess human exposure to ZEN. Considerations are given to animal and human toxicokinetic data relevant to HBM, analytical methods, and available HBM data on urinary biomarkers of ZEN exposure in different cohorts. PMID:27034246

  13. 75 FR 69617 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... addressing Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors. The proposed rule was published on October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64412) and is available on MSHA's Web...' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety...

  14. An overview of human exposure modeling activities at the USEPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Furtaw, E J

    2001-06-01

    The computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessment paradigm. In exposure assessment, we analyze the source-to-dose sequence of processes, in which pollutants are released from sources into the environment, where they may move through multiple environmental media, and to human receptors via multiple pathways. Exposure occurs at the environment-human interface, where pollutants are contacted in the course of human activities. Exposure may result in a dose, by which chemicals enter the body through multiple portals of entry, primarily inhalation, ingestion, and dermal absorption. Within the body, absorbed pollutants are distributed to, metabolized within, and eliminated from various organs and tissues, where they may cause toxicologic responses or adverse health effects. The NERL's modeling efforts are directed at improving our understanding of this sequence of processes, by characterizing the various factors influencing exposures and dose, and their associated variabilities and uncertainties. Modeling at the NERL is one of three essential programmatic elements, along with measurements and methods development. These are pursued interactively to advance our understanding of exposure-related processes. Exposure models are developed and run using the best currently available measurement data to simulate and predict population exposure and dose distributions, and to identify the most important factors and their variabilities and uncertainties. This knowledge is then used to guide the development of improved methods and measurements needed to obtain better data to improve the assessment and reduce critical uncertainties. These models and measurement results are tools that can be used in risk assessments and in risk management decisions in order

  15. Wood smoke in a controlled exposure experiment with human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Riddervold, I S; Bønløkke, J H; Mølhave, L; Massling, A; Jensen, B; Grønborg, T K; Bossi, R; Forchhammer, L; Kjærgaard, S K; Sigsgaard, T

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to wood smoke in the general population is increasing and concurrently, also our awareness. This article describes a wood-smoke generating system for studying human exposure to wood smoke and symptoms related to this exposure. Twenty nonsmoking atopic human participants with normal lung function and normal bronchial reactivity were randomly exposed for 3 h at three different exposure conditions; clean filtered air (control exposure) and wood smoke with a characteristic particulate matter (PM) concentration of 200 µg/m³ (low) and 400 µg/m³ (high) under controlled environmental conditions. The range for PM₂.₅ load observed for single experiments was 165-303 µg/m³ for the low exposure and 205-662 µg/m³ for the high exposure, whereas particle loads during clean air exposure most often were below the detection limit (< 20 µg/m³). Health effects were evaluated in relation to rated changes in symptoms and environmental perception using a computerized questionnaire and a potentiometer. Subjective symptoms were generally weak, but when combining the effect of each of the symptoms into categorical symptom indices, significant effects were found for "environmental perception" (p = 0.0007), "irritative body perceptions" (p = 0.0127), "psychological/neurological effects" (p = 0.0075) and "weak inflammatory responses" (p = 0.0003). Furthermore, significant effects (p = 0.0192) on self-reported general mucosa irritation were found. In conclusion, exposure to wood smoke affected symptom rating and caused irritated mucosas in humans. The knowledge gained in this study on subjective-rated symptoms may be important for understanding human response to wood-smoke exposure. PMID:21506878

  16. Exposure, epidemiology and human cancer incidence of naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Griego, Fumie Y; Bogen, Kenneth T; Price, Paul S; Weed, Douglas L

    2008-07-01

    This report provides a summary of deliberations conducted under the charge for members of Module B participating in the Naphthalene State-of-the-Science Symposium (NS(3)), Monterey, CA, October 9-12, 2006. The panel's charge was to derive consensus estimates of human exposure to naphthalene under various conditions, cancer incidence plausibly associated with these exposures, and identify quintessential research that could significantly reduce or eliminate material uncertainties to inform human cancer risk assessment. Relying in large part on a commissioned paper [Price, P.S., Jayjock, M.A., 2008. Available data on naphthalene exposures: strengths and limitations, in this issue], exposure levels were estimated for background (0.0001-0.003 microg/m(3)), ambient air (0.001-1.0 microg/m(3)), vehicles (0.003-3.0 microg/m(3)), residences (0.1-10 microg/m(3)), mothball use (on-label: 1-100 microg/m(3); off-label: 10-100 microg/m(3)), and occupational (low: 3-100 microg/m(3); high: 30-1,000 microg/m(3)). There have been few published reports of human cancer associated with naphthalene exposure. Several research projects are suggested that could reduce uncertainty in our understanding of human exposure. Using best scientific judgment, it is reasonably certain that the largest non-occupational exposures to naphthalene are indoor/residential exposures, particularly in households that use naphthalene-based products such as mothballs. However, even the highest of these exposures is likely to fall one or more orders of magnitude below moderate or high-level occupational exposure levels experienced by the few known cohorts exposed occupationally to naphthalene alone or as part of chemical mixtures such as jet fuel. PMID:18423820

  17. The total human environmental exposure study (THEES) to benzo (A) pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.; Waldman, J.M. ); Greenberg, A. ); Harkov, R.; Pietarinan, C. )

    1987-01-01

    The traditional approach to examining the concentration patterns of pollutants or the uptake by humans usually has been to focus on a single medium, e.g. air or water. In recent years progress has been made in extending study designs to multimedia; however, these have usually been limited in scope and the data available from each medium are not always compatible for estimating exposure. The exposure assessment guidelines developed by EPA have illustrated some of the important types of source, measurement and pathway information necessary to conduct a multimedia analysis for a pollutant or class of pollutants. However, at present there is a lack of systematic approaches to the quantitative study of multimedia human exposures. The need to systematically examine exposure led to the Total Human Environmental Exposure Study (THEES). It is a four year project that includes microenvironmental, personal monitoring protocols, and the development of human exposure models. In this paper the experimental design is described, and the indoor-outdoor air results of the first phase, a Winter, 1987 microenvironmental study, are presented.

  18. The evaluation of stack metal emissions from hazardous waste incinerators: Assessing human exposure through noninhalation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Sedman, R.M.; Polisini, J.M.; Esparza, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Potential public health effects associated with exposure to metal emissions from hazardous waste incinerators through noninhalation pathways were evaluated. Instead of relying on modeling the movement of toxicants through various environmental media, an approach based on estimating changes from baseline levels of exposure was employed. Changes in soil and water As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Cr, and Be concentrations that result from incinerator emissions were first determined. Estimates of changes in human exposure due to direct contact with shallow soil or the ingestion of surface water were then ascertained. Projected changes in dietary intakes of metals due to incinerator emissions were estimated based on changes from baseline dietary intakes that are monitored in U.S. Food and Drug Administration total diet studies. Changes from baseline intake were deemed to be proportional to the projected changes in soil or surface water metal concentrations. Human exposure to metals emitted from nine hazardous waste incinerators were then evaluated. Metal emissions from certain facilities resulted in tangible human exposure through noninhalation pathways. However, the analysis indicated that the deposition of metals from ambient air would result in substantially greater human exposure through noninhalation pathways than the emissions from most of the facilities. 51 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  19. The evaluation of stack metal emissions from hazardous waste incinerators: assessing human exposure through noninhalation pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Sedman, R M; Polisini, J M; Esparza, J R

    1994-01-01

    Potential public health effects associated with exposure to metal emissions from hazardous waste incinerators through noninhalation pathways were evaluated. Instead of relying on modeling the movement of toxicants through various environmental media, an approach based on estimating changes from baseline levels of exposure was employed. Changes in soil and water As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Cr, and Be concentrations that result from incinerator emissions were first determined. Estimates of changes in human exposure due to direct contact with shallow soil or the ingestion of surface water were then ascertained. Projected changes in dietary intakes of metals due to incinerator emissions were estimated based on changes from baseline dietary intakes that are monitored in U.S. Food and Drug Administration total diet studies. Changes from baseline intake were deemed to be proportional to the projected changes in soil or surface water metal concentrations. Human exposure to metals emitted from nine hazardous waste incinerators were then evaluated. Metal emissions from certain facilities resulted in tangible human exposure through noninhalation pathways. However, the analysis indicated that the deposition of metals from ambient air would result in substantially greater human exposure through noninhalation pathways than the emissions from most of the facilities. PMID:7925180

  20. HUMAN HEALTH IMPACTS OF EXPOSURE TO POPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was adopted in 2001 to protect human health and the environment from chemicals that are highly toxic, persistent, bioaccumulative and undergo long range transport. These POPs include 9 pesticides, polychlorinated d...

  1. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  2. ANALYSIS AND PRODUCTS FROM NHEXAS -- NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) was developed as a federal interagency research effort to examine the full range of environmental pollutants and chemicals (volatile organic chemicals, metals, and pesticides) that humans are exposed to in daily life. The pu...

  3. TOTAL HUMAN EXPOSURE MODEL (THEM) FOR RESPIRABLE SUSPENDED PARTICLES (RSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Total Human Exposure Model (THEM) has been developed that calculates 24-hour profiles using real human activity patterns and indoor air models derived from actual measurements of pollutants. HEM was designed for implementation on personal computers. urrently, the model uses the...

  4. BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN HUMANS UPON EXPOSURE TO OZONE AND EXERCISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 44 human subjects were exposed to 784 micrograms/cu.m.(0.4 ppm) ozone and 30 human subjects were exposed to air as controls. A four hour exposure was given on each of five consecutive days. Half of each group received a higher level of treadmill exercise than the other...

  5. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S CONSOLIDATED HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from 12 U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the Internet. The data system is called the Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD), and it is ...

  6. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S COMPREHENSIVE HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from nine U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the world-wide web. The data system is called CHAD-Consolidated Human Activity Database-and it is ...

  7. MULTIPLE SOLVENT EXPOSURE IN HUMANS: CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple Solvent Exposures in Humans:
    Cross-Species Extrapolations
    (Future Research Plan)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    A few solvents can be safely studied in acute experiments in human subjects. Data exist in rats f...

  8. The Influence of Human and Environmental Exposure Factors on Personal NO2 Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency’s (US EPA) Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) deployed a total of over 2000 nitrogen dioxide, NO2, passive monitors during 3 years of field data collections. These 24-h based personal, residential outdoor and comm...

  9. The design of a miniature personal exposure monitor for continuous real-time data acquisition in electromagnetic field exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N.H.; Conroy, T.J.; Wilson, B.W.

    1994-06-01

    The design of a small, light-weight personal exposure monitor suitable for use in EMF exposure assessment studies is nearing completion at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The monitor is designed to be non-obtrusive, battery operated, and able to continuously record extremely low-frequency (ELF) (1Ohz--500hz) magnetic-field data. It also captures high-frequency (500hz--1OMhz) transients that exceed a preset threshold, retaining the largest transients in memory. The monitor can record one or more days of data on a single easily replaceable, credit-card-size memory (PCMCIA). A battery charge will last a minimum of one day. Batteries are rechargeable and easily replaced. A data-compression algorithm is under development that will be tailored to the efficient compression of low-frequency EMF signals and will permit data to be logged for at least one day before swapping memory cards. The memory cards are readable by a base- station computer that can perform analysis of the data. The monitor is designed to accommodate four inputs supporting full-field sensors as well as a proposed ocular exposure measurement system. Our design effort has shown that a practical personal exposure monitor for EMF can be built based on current technology, continuous logging of real-time ELF waveforms is both feasible and practical, and such a device is appropriate for proposed EMF exposure studies.

  10. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (p<0.0001). Boron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups. PMID:19962437

  11. Long duration human exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntoon, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Looking toward the era of long duration manned spaceflight, questions remain regarding human adaptation to the weightless environment. In particular, bone calcium loss, cardiovascular deconditioning, and effects of radiation require further study. NASA has undertaken a series of experiments to increase the knowledge base of human adaptation to spaceflight. To date, results in the area of cardiovascular deconditioning countermeasures are the furthest advanced. The results from the upcoming SLS-1 mission will enhance knowledge in all areas. With continued research, there is every confidence that astronauts will be able to be kept healthy for long periods of time.

  12. Long duration human exposure to microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntoon, C. L.

    Looking toward the era of long duration manned spaceflight, questions remain regarding human adaptation to the weightless environment. In particular, bone calcium loss, cardiovascular deconditioning, and effects of radiation require further study. NASA has undertaken a series of experiments to increase the knowledge base of human adaptation to spaceflight. To date, results in the area of cardiovascular deconditioning countermeasures are the furthest advanced. The results from the upcoming SLS-1 mission will enhance knowledge in all areas. With continued research, there is every confidence that astronauts will be able to be kept healthy for long periods of time.

  13. Lead exposures in the human environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Humans consume lead by inhaling air, drinking beverages, eating food and ingesting dust. The natural source of this lead is primarily soil. Anthropogenic sources are lead in gasoline, fossil fuels and industrial products and processes. Lead is ubiquitous in the human environment, and pinpointing the primary sources of lead in any particular environmental component is difficult. Nevertheless, our purpose is to describe the total exposure of humans to environmental lead and to determine the sources of lead contributing to this exposure. The total exposure is the total amount of lead consumed by ingestion and inhalation. Excluding lead exposure from choice or circumstance, a baseline level of potential human exposure can be defined for a normal individual eating a typical diet and living in a non-urban community remote from industrial sources of lead in a house without lead-based paints. Beyond this level, additive exposure factors can be determined for other environments (e.g. urban, occupational and smelter communities) and for certain habits and activities (e.g. pica, smoking, drinking and hobbies), with variation for age, sex or socioeconomic status.

  14. Human inhalation exposure to ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Jörn; Csanády, György A; Faller, Thomas H; Filser, Johannes G

    2003-08-01

    Two male volunteers (A and B) inhaled 1.43 and 1.34 mmol, respectively, of vaporous (13)C-labeled ethylene glycol ((13)C(2)-EG) over 4 h. In plasma, (13)C(2)-EG and its metabolite (13)C(2)-glycolic acid ((13)C(2)-GA) were determined together with the natural burden from background GA using a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass selective detector. Maximum plasma concentrations of (13)C(2)-EG were 11.0 and 15.8 micromol/l, and of (13)C(2)-GA were 0.9 and 1.8 micromol/l, for volunteers A and B, respectively. Corresponding plasma half-lives were 2.1 and 2.6 h for (13)C(2)-EG, and 2.9 and 2.6 h for (13)C(2)-GA. Background GA concentrations were 25.8 and 28.3 micro mol/l plasma. Unlabeled background EG, GA and oxalic acid (OA) were detected in urine in which the corresponding (13)C-labeled compounds were also quantified. Within 28 h after the start of the exposures, 6.4% and 9.3% (13)C(2)-EG, 0.70% and 0.92% (13)C(2)-GA, as well as 0.08% and 0.28% (13)C(2)-OA of the inhaled amounts of (13)C(2)-EG, were excreted in urine by volunteers A and B, respectively. The amounts of (13)C(2)-GA represented 3.7% and 14.2% of background urinary GA excreted over 24 h (274 and 88 micromol). The amounts of (13)C(2)-OA were 0.5% and 2.1% of background urinary OA excreted over 24 h (215 and 177 micromol). From the findings obtained in plasma and urine and from a toxicokinetic analysis of these data, it is highly unlikely that workplace EG exposure according to the German exposure limit (MAK-value 10 ppm EG, 8 h) could lead to adverse effects from the metabolically formed GA and OA. PMID:12856104

  15. HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS OF AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's air toxics program is moving toward a risk-based focus. The framework for such a focus was laid out in the National Air Toxics Program: Integrated Urban Strategy which included the requirement for EPA to conduct a National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) of human expos...

  16. HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING FOR CUMULATIVE RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) has identified cumulative risk assessment as a priority research area. This is because humans and other organisms are exposed to a multitude of chemicals, physical agents, and other stressors through multiple pathways, routes, an...

  17. Human exposure to bisphenol A by biomonitoring: Methods, results and assessment of environmental exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Dekant, Wolfgang Voelkel, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Human exposure to bisphenol A is controversially discussed. This review critically assesses methods for biomonitoring of bisphenol A exposures and reported concentrations of bisphenol A in blood and urine of non-occupationally ('environmentally') exposed humans. From the many methods published to assess bisphenol A concentrations in biological media, mass spectrometry-based methods are considered most appropriate due to high sensitivity, selectivity and precision. In human blood, based on the known toxicokinetics of bisphenol A in humans, the expected very low concentrations of bisphenol A due to rapid biotransformation and the very rapid excretion result in severe limitations in the use of reported blood levels of bisphenol A for exposure assessment. Due to the rapid and complete excretion of orally administered bisphenol A, urine samples are considered as the appropriate body fluid for bisphenol A exposure assessment. In urine samples from several cohorts, bisphenol A (as glucuronide) was present in average concentrations in the range of 1-3 {mu}g/L suggesting that daily human exposure to bisphenol A is below 6 {mu}g per person (< 0.1 {mu}g/kg bw/day) for the majority of the population.

  18. Benzene exposure: An overview of monitoring methods and their findings

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Clifford P.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person’s total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites

  19. Benzene exposure: an overview of monitoring methods and their findings.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Clifford P

    2010-03-19

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person's total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites, differences

  20. Anogenital distance as a marker of androgen exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Thankamony, A; Pasterski, V; Ong, K K; Acerini, C L; Hughes, I A

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal foetal testis development has been proposed to underlie common disorders of the male reproductive system such as cryptorchidism, hypospadias, reduced semen quality and testicular germ cell tumour, which are regarded as components of a 'testicular dysgenesis syndrome'. The increasing trends and geographical variation in their incidence have been suggested to result from in utero exposure to environmental chemicals acting as endocrine disruptors. In rodents, the anogenital distance (AGD), measured from the anus to the base of genital tubercle, is a sensitive biomarker of androgen exposure during a critical embryonic window of testis development. In humans, several epidemiological studies have shown alterations in AGD associated with prenatal exposure to several chemicals with potential endocrine disrupting activity. However, the link between AGD and androgen exposure in humans is not well-defined. This review focuses on the current evidence for such a relationship. As in rodents, a clear gender difference is detected during foetal development of the AGD in humans which is maintained thereafter. Reduced AGD in association with clinically relevant outcomes of potential environmental exposures, such as cryptorchidism or hypospadias, is in keeping with AGD as a marker of foetal testicular function. Furthermore, AGD may reflect variations in prenatal androgen exposure in healthy children as shorter AGD at birth is associated with reduced masculine play behaviour in preschool boys. Several studies provide evidence linking shorter AGD with lower fertility, semen quality and testosterone levels in selected groups of adults attending andrology clinics. Overall, the observational data in humans are consistent with experimental studies in animals and support the use of AGD as a biomarker of foetal androgen exposure. Future studies evaluating AGD in relation to reproductive hormones in both infants and adults, and to gene polymorphisms, will help to further delineate

  1. [Clinical monitoring in areas of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, I M

    2013-01-01

    Clinical syndromes induced by high intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic field chronic exposure are described. Persons injured by occupational exposure have been observed central nervous system changes in diencephalic syndrome form, cardio-vascular system changes revealed in atherosclerosis, isch(a)emic heart disease and coronary insufficiency rapid progressive expansion. General public living in territory of radar station exposure zone different functional disorders have been identified: vegetative dystonia (asthenovegetative syndrome), thrombocytopenia, decrease of blood coagulation index, and thyroid gland function changes. Observed diseases clinical variability may be determined by electromagnetic exposure characteristics. PMID:23785812

  2. Human exposure assessment: a graduate level course

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The course has been offered three times. The content and the approach to each lecture has evolved after each time it was given. This is not unexpected since the field has been undergoing major transformations, and new approaches to measurement and modeling are being applied to current problems. The most recent student evaluation, 1990, indicates a difficulty rating of just right' (70%) to difficult' (30%). Most felt the course stimulated their interest in the topic (72%) and the examinations were learning experiences as well as a grading exercise. The major need for the discipline is an adequate text book. The GRAPE program has excellent potential as an educational tool, but it needs to make more interactions and allow introduction of activities and data. The major strengths of the course are the problems provided to the students for homework. These give the student quantitative perspective on the concepts, range in values, variables, and uncertainties necessary to complete an assessment. In addition, the development of the mathematical and conceptional continuum for placing exposure assessment in the context of toxicology, environmental science, epidemiology, and clinical intervention provides a basic framework for the discipline.

  3. Dose-Response Relationships in Human Experimental Exposure to Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Carelli, Giovanni; Marinaccio, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies carried out in the field of experimental toxicology have shown evidence of biphasic dose-response relationships for different experimental models, endpoints and chemicals tested. As these studies excluded humans as the experimental model, we have examined the literature of the last three decades in order to verify data concerning human experimental exposure with the aim of highlighting possible biphasic dose-response relationships. The substances used for experimental exposures included hydrocarbons, esters, alcohols, ketones, ethers, glycoethers, halogenated hydrocarbons, and carbon sulphide; the absorption route was inhalation. We did not detect any biphasic dose-response relationship and, in the studies reviewed, our examination revealed major methodological limitations that prevented us making a more detailed examination of experimental data. We concluded that the experimental data available did not allow us to support evidence of biphasic dose-response relationships in human experimental exposure to the above-mentioned chemical substances. PMID:18648639

  4. Assessment of human exposure to atrazine through the determination of free atrazine in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Catenacci, G. ); Maroni, M. ); Cottica, D. ); Pozzoli, L.

    1990-01-01

    Studies on metabolism and excretion of atrazine in man are not available in the literature. The present study has investigated human exposure to atrazine during its industrial production by means of assessment of ambient exposure and determination of free atrazine in urine. Four workers exposed to atrazine during its manufacture and packaging in a production plant, volunteered for the study. Atrazine was determined in airborne dust of the working environment obtained by personal sampling, on skin pads according to the WHO standard method, and on the skin of the hands of the workers by means of a washing procedure. Urine was collected before, during, and after exposure. A 24 hr collection before the first workshift, all the urine voided during the monitoring period, subdivided in 8 hr fractions; and one or more 12 hr samples after the end of the exposure period were collected.

  5. OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. EPA NERL'S HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessment para...

  6. Perspectives for integrating human and environmental exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, P; Péry, A R R; Roth, N

    2016-10-15

    Integrated Risk Assessment (IRA) has been defined by the EU FP7 HEROIC Coordination action as "the mutual exploitation of Environmental Risk Assessment for Human Health Risk Assessment and vice versa in order to coherently and more efficiently characterize an overall risk to humans and the environment for better informing the risk analysis process" (Wilks et al., 2015). Since exposure assessment and hazard characterization are the pillars of risk assessment, integrating Environmental Exposure assessment (EEA) and Human Exposure assessment (HEA) is a major component of an IRA framework. EEA and HEA typically pursue different targets, protection goals and timeframe. However, human and wildlife species also share the same environment and they similarly inhale air and ingest water and food through often similar overlapping pathways of exposure. Fate models used in EEA and HEA to predict the chemicals distribution among physical and biological media are essentially based on common properties of chemicals, and internal concentration estimations are largely based on inter-species (i.e. biota-to-human) extrapolations. Also, both EEA and HEA are challenged by increasing scientific complexity and resources constraints. Altogether, these points create the need for a better exploitation of all currently existing data, experimental approaches and modeling tools and it is assumed that a more integrated approach of both EEA and HEA may be part of the solution. Based on the outcome of an Expert Workshop on Extrapolations in Integrated Exposure Assessment organized by the HEROIC project in January 2014, this paper identifies perspectives and recommendations to better harmonize and extrapolate exposure assessment data, models and methods between Human Health and Environmental Risk Assessments to support the further development and promotion of the concept of IRA. Ultimately, these recommendations may feed into guidance showing when and how to apply IRA in the regulatory decision

  7. Human UVA exposures estimated from ambient UVA measurements.

    PubMed

    Kimlin, Michael G; Parisi, Alfio V; Downs, Nathan D

    2003-04-01

    The methods presented in this paper allow for the estimation of human UVA exposure using measured UVA irradiance values. Using measured broadband UVA irradiances over the period of a year, it was estimated that for humans in an upright posture and not moving the head with respect to the body, the nose received 26.5% of the available ambient UVA radiation, whilst the shoulders and vertex of the head received 81% and 100% respectively of the available ambient UVA radiation. Measurement of the exposure ratios for a series of solar zenith angles between 90 degrees and 0 degrees will allow extension of this technique to other latitudes. PMID:12760531

  8. A dermatotoxicokinetic model of human exposures to jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kim, David; Andersen, Melvin E; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2006-09-01

    Workers, both in the military and the commercial airline industry, are exposed to jet fuel by inhalation and dermal contact. We present a dermatotoxicokinetic (DTK) model that quantifies the absorption, distribution, and elimination of aromatic and aliphatic components of jet fuel following dermal exposures in humans. Kinetic data were obtained from 10 healthy volunteers following a single dose of JP-8 to the forearm over a surface area of 20 cm2. Blood samples were taken before exposure (t = 0 h), after exposure (t = 0.5 h), and every 0.5 h for up to 3.5 h postexposure. The DTK model that best fit the data included five compartments: (1) surface, (2) stratum corneum (SC), (3) viable epidermis, (4) blood, and (5) storage. The DTK model was used to predict blood concentrations of the components of JP-8 based on dermal-exposure measurements made in occupational-exposure settings in order to better understand the toxicokinetic behavior of these compounds. Monte Carlo simulations of dermal exposure and cumulative internal dose demonstrated no overlap among the low-, medium-, and high-exposure groups. The DTK model provides a quantitative understanding of the relationship between the mass of JP-8 components in the SC and the concentrations of each component in the systemic circulation. The model may be used for the development of a toxicokinetic modeling strategy for multiroute exposure to jet fuel. PMID:16801332

  9. Worker-specific exposure monitor and method for surveillance of workers

    DOEpatents

    Lovejoy, Michael L.; Peeters, John P.; Johnson, A. Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A person-specific monitor that provides sensor information regarding hazards to which the person is exposed and means to geolocate the person at the time of the exposure. The monitor also includes means to communicate with a remote base station. Information from the monitor can be downloaded at the base station for long term storage and analysis. The base station can also include means to recharge the monitor.

  10. Cancer mortality in relation to monitoring for radionuclide exposure in three UK nuclear industry workforces.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, L. M.; Higgins, C. D.; Douglas, A. J.; Maconochie, N. E.; Omar, R. Z.; Fraser, P.; Beral, V.; Smith, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    Cancer mortality in 40,761 employees of three UK nuclear industry facilities who had been monitored for external radiation exposure was examined according to whether they had also been monitored for possible internal exposure to tritium, plutonium or other radionuclides (uranium, polonium, actinium or other unspecified). Death rates from cancer were compared both with national rates and with rates in radiation workers not monitored for exposure to any radionuclides. Among workers monitored for tritium exposure, overall cancer mortality was significantly below national rates [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 83, 165 deaths; 2P = 0.02] and none of the cancer-specific death rates was significantly above either the national average or rates in non-monitored workers. Although the overall death rate from cancer in workers monitored for plutonium exposure was also significantly low relative to national rates (SMR = 89, 581 deaths; 2P = 0.005), mortality from pleural cancer was significantly raised (SMR = 357, nine deaths; 2P = 0.002); none of the rates differed significantly from those of non-monitored workers. Workers monitored for radionuclides other than tritium or plutonium also had a death rate from all cancers combined that was below the national average (SMR = 86, 418 deaths; 2P = 0.002) but prostatic cancer mortality was raised both in relation to death rates in the general population (SMR = 153, 37 deaths; 2P = 0.02) and to death rates in radiation workers who had not been monitored for exposure to any radionuclide [rate ratio (RR) = 1.65; 2P = 0.03]. Mortality from cancer of the lung was also significantly increased in workers monitored for other radionuclides compared with those of radiation workers not monitored for exposure to radionuclides (RR = 1.31, 164 deaths; 2P = 0.01). For cancers of the lung, prostate and all cancers combined, death rates in monitored workers were examined according to the timing and duration of monitoring for radionuclide

  11. Development and evaluation of a technique for in vivo monitoring of 60Co in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, J. Q.; Lucena, E. A.; Dantas, A. L. A.; Dantas, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    60Co is a fission product of 235U and represents a risk of internal exposure of workers in nuclear power plants, especially those involved in the maintenance of potentially contaminated parts and equipment. The control of 60Co intake by inhalation can be performed through in vivo monitoring. This work describes the evaluation of a technique through the minimum detectable activity and the corresponding minimum detectable effective doses, based on biokinetic and dosimetric models of 60Co in the human body. The results allow to state that the technique is suitable either for monitoring of occupational exposures or evaluation of accidental intake.

  12. Analysis of human exposure to benzo(a)pyrene via inhalation and food ingestion in the Total Human Environmental Exposure Study (THEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.M.; Lioy, P.J.; Greenberg, A.; Butler, J.P. )

    1991-04-01

    The Total Human Environmental Exposure Study (THEES) focuses on benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as an example of a combustion-generated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compound. Primary pathways for environmental exposures to BaP are inhalation and ingestion. This program of field studies was conducted in Phillipsburg, New Jersey, a small, industrial city in the Delaware River valley. The study protocols included direct monitoring of BaP exposures via inhalation and ingestion pathways during three separate periods, each lasting 14 days. BaP concentrations in air were sampled at outdoor and in-home locations, with personal air sampling added during the latter two phases. Cooked food samples from each household were acquired, using a constant portion second plate' of each meal prepared at home. Ambient levels were 4-10 times higher during the cold months compared with the late summer study period. Space heating and regional aerosol were major contributors to community levels of BaP in the air during the wintertime. Penetration of outdoor air, cooking activities, combustion appliances, and cigarette smoke were important sources of indoor air exposures. Cooking activities, besides releasing BaP-enriched particles indoors, produced food imbued with BaP and added substantially to exposure via the ingestion route. Among the study subjects, the range and magnitude of dietary exposures (2 to 500 ng/d) were much greater than for inhalation (10 to 50 ng/d). Nevertheless, there were ample individual cases where inhalation of BaP was the predominant exposure route. Indoor air BaP levels were closely correlated with ambient levels in most of the homes. For some individuals, measured personal air BaP exposures were adequately predicted by time-weighting of microenvironmental (i.e., outdoor and in-home) concentrations.

  13. AN OVERVIEW OF HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessm...

  14. Monitoring of troponin release from cardiomyocytes during exposure to toxic substances using surface plasmon resonance biosensing.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik; Kågedal, Bertil; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is a useful biomarker for studying drug-induced toxicity effects on cardiac cells. We describe how a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was applied to monitor the release of TnT from active HL-1 cardiomyocytes in vitro when exposed to cardiotoxic substances. Two monoclonal human TnT antibodies were compared in the SPR immunosensor to analyse the TnT release. The detection limit of TnT was determined to be 30 ng/ml in a direct assay set-up and to be 10 ng/ml in a sandwich assay format. Exposure of the cardiomyocytes to doxorubicin, troglitazone, quinidine and cobalt chloride for periods of 6 and 24 h gave significant SPR responses, whereas substances with low toxicity showed insignificant effects (ascorbic acid, methotrexate). The SPR results were verified with a validated immunochemiluminescence method which showed a correlation of r (2) = 0.790. PMID:20694813

  15. EXPOSURE MONITORING COMPONENT FOR DETROIT CHILDREN'S HEALTH STUDY ( DCHS )

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional, regulatory-based air monitoring is expensive and, thus, conducted at one or few locations in a city. This provides limited info on intra-urban variability and spatial distribution of air pollution. Research-oriented urban network monitoring has progressed with inc...

  16. FIELD SURVEYS OF CARBON MONOXIDE IN COMMERCIAL SETTINGS USING PERSONAL EXPOSURE MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study employed miniaturized personal exposure monitors (PEMs) to measure carbon monoxide (CO) in 588 different commercial settings (e.g., retail stores, office buildings, hotels, restaurants) in five California cities. Altogether, 5000 CO observations were made by recording ...

  17. Biological monitoring of environment exposure to safrole and the Taiwanese betel quid chewing.

    PubMed

    Chang, M J W; Ko, C Y; Lin, R F; Hsieh, L L

    2002-11-01

    A rapid and sensitive biological monitoring (BM) method for assessing exposure to the environmental carcinogen safrole has been developed. The method is an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of urinary dihydroxychavicol (DHAB) and eugenol, the urinary metabolites of safrole. Good linearity, precision, and accuracy were demonstrated. A recovery of 98.8 +/- 5.4% (SD, n = 3) was found for DHAB and 84.1 +/- 3.4% (n = 3) for eugenol. The quantitation limits of the method were 8 ng for DHAB and 10 ng for eugenol. The validity of the method was demonstrated by a linear dose-response relationship observed in rats given oral doses of safrole at 30, 75, and 150 mg/kg body weight. The method was also used to monitor the environmental exposure to the Taiwanese betel quid (TBQ) chewing, because TBQ used in Taiwan not only contains areca (betel) nut, slaked lime, and catechu but also Piper betle inflorescence or its leaves. Both of the latter have a high content of safrole. The feasibility of the method to monitor TBQ chewing was demonstrated by an analysis of 153 spot human urine samples. The results showed that the p value of the nonparametric group comparison was < 0.001 for DHAB and 0.832 for eugenol. The TBQ chewers also exhibited a significantly higher rate of urinary DHAB (but not eugenol) than the nonchewers with an odd ratio of 3.47 (95% CI, 1.61-7.51). However, when only the eugenol-positive subjects were taken into analysis, the ratio rose to 24.38 (95% CI, 3.00-197.90). PMID:12399914

  18. Combined Toxic Exposures and Human Health: Biomarkers of Exposure and Effect

    PubMed Central

    Silins, Ilona; Högberg, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for risk assessment of chemical mixtures, combined and cumulative exposures are under development, but the scientific database needs considerable expansion. In particular, there is a lack of knowledge on how to monitor effects of complex exposures, and there are few reviews on biomonitoring complex exposures. In this review we summarize articles in which biomonitoring techniques have been developed and used. Most examples describe techniques for biomonitoring effects which may detect early changes induced by many chemical stressors and which have the potential to accelerate data gathering. Some emphasis is put on endocrine disrupters acting via epigenetic mechanisms and on carcinogens. Solid evidence shows that these groups of chemicals can interact and even produce synergistic effects. They may act during sensitive time windows and biomonitoring their effects in epidemiological studies is a challenging task. PMID:21556171

  19. Exposure and Health Effects of Fungi on Humans.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Sachin N; Portnoy, Jay M; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous microorganisms that are present in outdoor and indoor environments. Previous research has found relationships between environmental fungal exposures and human health effects. We reviewed recent articles focused on fungal exposure and dampness as risk factors for respiratory disease development, symptoms, and hypersensitivity. In particular, we reviewed the evidence suggesting that early exposure to dampness or fungi is associated with the development of asthma and increased asthma morbidity. Although outdoor exposure to high concentrations of spores can cause health effects such as asthma attacks in association with thunderstorms, most people appear to be relatively unaffected unless they are sensitized to specific genera. Indoor exposure and dampness, however, appears to be associated with an increased risk of developing asthma in young children and asthma morbidity in individuals who have asthma. These are important issues because they provide a rationale for interventions that might be considered for homes and buildings in which there is increased fungal exposure. In addition to rhinitis and asthma, fungus exposure is associated with a number of other illnesses including allergic bronchopulmonary mycoses, allergic fungal sinusitis, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Additional research is necessary to establish causality and evaluate interventions for fungal- and dampness-related health effects. PMID:26947460

  20. THE EFFECT OF CONTROLLED OZONE EXPOSURE ON HUMAN LUMPHOCYTE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of ozone (03) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 micrograms/cu.m. 03 (0.6 ppm) for 2 hr in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood smaples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and 03 expos...

  1. DETERMINING THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF IMPROVED HUMAN EXPOSURE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA develops and revises environmental regulations and policies to protect the environment and human health. One of the key components of the regulatory process is establishing the proposed action level, which requires high quality exposure data. In many cases, expos...

  2. DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE. TL Leavens1, MW Case1, RA Pegram1, BC Blount2, DM DeMarini1, MC Madden1, and JL Valentine3. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3RTI, RTP, NC, USA.
    The disinfection byproduct ...

  3. INTRAUTERINE EXPOSURE OF HUMANS TO PCBS (POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS): NEWBORN EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of low-level chronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from consumption of Lake Michigan fish was assessed in pregnant women and their newborn offspring. Low levels of PCBs remain in the human body for some time, and caused, in this sample, decreases in birt...

  4. Total Human Exposure Risk Database and Advance Simulaiton Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    THERdbASE is no longer supported by EPA and is no longer available as download.

    THERdbASE is a collection of databases and models that are useful to assist in conducting assessments of human exposure to chemical pollutants, especial...

  5. ORD BEST PRACTICES FOR OBSERVATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a presentation for the 2007 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting in Charlotte, NC on March 27, 2007. It will be included in a special Issues Session titled "Scientific and Ethical Considerations in Human Exposure Studies." The presentation desc...

  6. Traditional goat husbandry may substantially contribute to human toxoplasmosis exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raising goats in settings that are highly contaminated with oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii may contribute significantly to human exposure to this zoonotic parasite. Increasing consumption of young goats in Romania, where goats are typically reared in backyards that are also home to cats (the definitiv...

  7. NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS): ANALYSIS OF EXPOSURE PATHWAYS AND ROUTES FOR ARSENIC AND LEAD IN EPA REGION 5

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I field study conducted in EPA Region 5 (Great Lakes Area) provides extensive exposure data on a representative sample of approximately 250 residents of the region. Associated environmental media and biomarker (blood...

  8. Biomonitoring of genotoxic effects for human exposure to nanomaterials: The challenge ahead.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Laetitia; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2016-01-01

    Exposures to nanomaterials (NMs), with their specific physico-chemical characteristics, are likely to increase over the next years, as their production for industrial, consumer and medical applications is steadily rising. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the implementation of human biomonitoring studies of genotoxic effects after NM exposures in order to monitor and assure safety for workers and the general population. In this review, most commonly used biomarkers of early genetic effects were analyzed for their adequacy after NM exposures. A more in depth analysis of the ex vivo/in vitro lymphocyte MN assay was performed, although, in literature no studies are available using this assay for NM exposures. Therefore, the known factors determining the NMs tissue/cellular targets and the multiplicity of modes of action of NMs were summarized. The main pending questions are whether (1) lymphocytes are a NM target or an adequate surrogate tissue, (2) whether the buccal MN assay might be more suitable for NM exposures via inhalation or ingestion, as buccal cells might be exposed more directly. While the current state-of-the-art does not allow for drawing firm conclusions, major research gaps are identified and some cautious recommendations can be formulated. Therefore in vitro and in vivo studies should be conducted comparing methodologies side-by-side in the same subjects and for different types of NMs. The ex vivo/in vitro MN assay in its automated version, allowing objective analysis of large cohorts and detection of direct and indirect genotoxic effects, remains a valuable candidate for human biomonitoring to NM exposure. Considering the potential cancer risk from exposure to NMs and previous dramatic experiences with too late surveillance of occupational exposures to similar substances (e.g. to asbestos), there is an urgent need to define and implement adequate scientifically sound biomonitoring methods and programme for exposure to NMs. PMID:27234560

  9. 76 FR 25277 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... FR 64412), MSHA published a proposed rule, Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust... the proposed rule. The proposal was published on October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64412). DATES: All comments...' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety...

  10. RESULTS FROM EXPOSURE MONITORING PERFORMED DURING THE 1997 BALTIMORE PM PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An eighteen day winter-time ambient and personal exposure monitoring study of particulate matter (PM) was conducted as part of an.integrated epidemiological-exposure pilot study of an aged population. Goals of the study were to determine the feasibility of performing active per...

  11. Selection of adduct-forming chemicals for human-monitoring studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The U.S. EPA, through its Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) and its Health Effects Research Laboratory-Research Triangle Park (HERL-RTP) has been exploring the feasibility of using biological markers to monitor exposure to environmental chemicals. The participants began by compiling a list of chemicals of known or suspected health hazards and for which the potential for human exposure exists. The chemicals on the master list were then systematically evaluated for: (1) the potential for adduct-formation in vivo, (2) the availability of supportive adduct research data, (3) the identifiability of exposed population(s), and (4) the level of genetic activity. After considering all the relevant data, the participants selected and prioritized for further study a small group of chemicals considered to have the greatest potential for use in pilot, adduct-based, biological monitoring studies in human populations.

  12. Cardiovascular impacts and micro-environmental exposure factors associated with continuous personal PM2.5 monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Davyda; Croghan, Carry; Shin, Hwashin; Burnett, Richard; Bard, Robert; Brook, Robert D; Williams, Ron

    2014-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) has provided extensive data on human exposures to a wide variety of air pollutants and their impact on human health. Previous analyses in the DEARS revealed select cardiovascular (CV) health outcomes such as increase in heart rate (HR) associated with hourly based continuous personal fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures in this adult, non-smoking cohort. Examination of time activity diary (TAD), follow-up questionnaire (FQ) and the continuous PM2.5 personal monitoring data provided the means to more fully examine the impact of discreet human activity patterns on personal PM2.5 exposures and changes in CV outcomes. A total of 329 343 min-based PM2.5 personal measurements involving 50 participants indicated that ∼75% of these total events resulted in exposures <35 μg/m(3). Cooking and car-related events accounted for nearly 10% of the hourly activities that were identified with observed peaks in personal PM2.5 exposures. In-residence cooking often resulted in some of the highest incidents of 1 min exposures (33.5-17.6 μg/m(3)), with average peaks for such events in excess of 209 μg/m(3). PM2.5 exposure data from hourly based personal exposure activities (for example,, cooking, cleaning and household products) were compared with daily CV data from the DEARS subject population. A total of 1300 hourly based lag risk estimates associated with changes in brachial artery diameter and flow-mediated dilatation (BAD and FMD, respectively), among others, were defined for this cohort. Findings indicate that environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures resulted in significant HR changes between 3 and 7 h following the event, and exposure to smells resulted in increases in BAD on the order of 0.2-0.7 mm/μg/m(3). Results demonstrate that personal exposures may be associated with several biological responses, sometimes varying in degree and direction in

  13. ASSESSING CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO PESTICIDES: AN IMPORTANT APPLICATION OF THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION MODEL (SHEDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately quantifying human exposures and doses of various populations to environmental pollutants is critical for the Agency to assess and manage human health risks. For example, the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 (FQPA) requires EPA to consider aggregate human exposure ...

  14. Monitoring recombinant human erythropoietin abuse among athletes.

    PubMed

    Citartan, Marimuthu; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chen, Yeng; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2015-01-15

    The illegal administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) among athletes is largely preferred over blood doping to enhance stamina. The advent of recombinant DNA technology allowed the expression of EPO-encoding genes in several eukaryotic hosts to produce rHuEPO, and today these performance-enhancing drugs are readily available. As a mimetic of endogenous EPO (eEPO), rHuEPO augments the oxygen carrying capacity of blood. Thus, monitoring the illicit use of rHuEPO among athletes is crucial in ensuring an even playing field and maintaining the welfare of athletes. A number of rHuEPO detection methods currently exist, including measurement of hematologic parameters, gene-based detection methods, glycomics, use of peptide markers, electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing (IEF)-double immunoblotting, aptamer/antibody-based methods, and lateral flow tests. This review gleans these different strategies and highlights the leading molecular recognition elements that have potential roles in rHuEPO doping detection. PMID:25058943

  15. Human Bisphenol A Exposure and the “Diabesity Phenotype”

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Alessandro; Battezzati, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a known endocrine disruptor, is a food contaminant suspected of being a contributing factor to the present-day increase in obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. This issue is of increasing interest in the field of diabetes research and has become a matter of concern for regulatory agencies and food industries. Recently, the number of studies involving BPA has increased exponentially, but there are still many gaps in the knowledge of the relationship between actual BPA exposure and cardiometabolic risk and of the modalities of food intake exposure, all of which prevents sound judgments concerning the risks to human health. This review focuses on the association between human exposure to BPA and obesity, thyroid function, diabetes, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and BPA content in food. Many cross-sectional studies support, sometimes contradictorily, an adverse effect of BPA exposure on obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Few prospective studies support an adverse effect of BPA exposure on such pathologies. Moreover, no intervention studies have been conducted to evaluate the causality of such associations. This is mainly due to lack of an appropriate database of BPA content in foods, thus hindering any estimation of the usual dietary BPA intake. PMID:26858585

  16. 76 FR 12648 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ...-693-9441 (facsimile). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Public Hearings On October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64412...' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety and... Continuous Personal Dust Monitors. The proposed rule would improve health protections for coal miners...

  17. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  18. MODELING CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) EXPOSURES WITHIN MICROENVIRONMENTS GIVEN PERSONAL EXPOSURE MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data collected at ambient fixed sites may not adequately reflect personal CO exposures, as they most often miss exposures resulting from CO emissions from sources in the immediate physical surroundings of individuals, such as within automobiles. he SHAPE model was proposed to acc...

  19. Assessing sources of human methylmercury exposure using stable mercury isotopes.

    PubMed

    Li, Miling; Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D; Grandjean, Philippe; Mikkelsen, Bjarni; Weihe, Pál; Sunderland, Elsie M; Shine, James P

    2014-01-01

    Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new method for discerning MeHg exposure sources. We characterized Hg isotope fractionation between humans and their diets using hair samples from Faroese whalers exposed to MeHg predominantly from pilot whales. We observed an increase of 1.75‰ in δ(202)Hg values between pilot whale muscle tissue and Faroese whalers' hair but no mass-independent fractionation. We found a similar offset in δ(202)Hg between consumed seafood and hair samples from Gulf of Mexico recreational anglers who are exposed to lower levels of MeHg from a variety of seafood sources. An isotope mixing model was used to estimate individual MeHg exposure sources and confirmed that both Δ(199)Hg and δ(202)Hg values in human hair can help identify dietary MeHg sources. Variability in isotopic signatures among coastal fish consumers in the Gulf of Mexico likely reflects both differences in environmental sources of MeHg to coastal fish and uncertainty in dietary recall data. Additional data are needed to fully refine this approach for individuals with complex seafood consumption patterns. PMID:24967674

  20. DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Nimi; Hagemeyer, Derek

    2012-05-05

    This slide show presents the 2011 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure.Clarification is given on Reporting Data regarding: reporting Total Organ Dose (TOD); reporting Total Skin Dose (TSD), and Total Extremity Dose (TExD) ; and Special individuals reporting.

  1. Human health risk assessment from arsenic exposures in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Tijo; Dubey, Brajesh; McBean, Edward A

    2015-09-15

    High arsenic exposures, prevalent through dietary and non-dietary sources in Bangladesh, present a major health risk to the public. A quantitative human health risk assessment is described as a result of arsenic exposure through food and water intake, tea intake, accidental soil ingestion, and chewing of betel quid, while people meet their desirable dietary intake requirements throughout their lifetime. In evaluating the contribution of each intake pathway to average daily arsenic intake, the results show that food and water intake combined, makes up approximately 98% of the daily arsenic intake with the balance contributed to by intake pathways such as tea consumption, soil ingestion, and quid consumption. Under an exposure scenario where arsenic concentration in water is at the WHO guideline (0.01 mg/L), food intake is the major arsenic intake pathway ranging from 67% to 80% of the average daily arsenic intake. However, the contribution from food drops to a range of 29% to 45% for an exposure scenario where arsenic in water is at the Bangladesh standard (0.05 mg/L). The lifetime excess risk of cancer occurrence from chronic arsenic exposure, considering a population of 160 million people, based on an exposure scenario with 85 million people at the WHO guideline value and 75 million people at the Bangladesh standard, and assuming that 35 million people are associated with a heavy activity level, is estimated as 1.15 million cases. PMID:26006052

  2. Naphthalene distributions and human exposure in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rong; Wu, Jun; Turco, Richard P.; Winer, Arthur M.; Atkinson, Roger; Arey, Janet; Paulson, Suzanne E.; Lurmann, Fred W.; Miguel, Antonio H.; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu

    The regional distribution of, and human exposure to, naphthalene are investigated for Southern California. A comprehensive approach is taken in which advanced models are linked for the first time to quantify population exposure to the emissions of naphthalene throughout Southern California. Naphthalene is the simplest and most abundant of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in polluted urban environments, and has been detected in both outdoor and indoor air samples. Exposure to high concentrations of naphthalene may have adverse health effects, possibly causing cancer in humans. Among the significant emission sources are volatilization from naphthalene-containing products, petroleum refining, and combustion of fossil fuels and wood. Gasoline and diesel engine exhaust, with related vaporization from fuels, are found to contribute roughly half of the daily total naphthalene burden in Southern California. As part of this study, the emission inventory for naphthalene has been verified against new field measurements of the naphthalene-to-benzene ratio in a busy traffic tunnel in Los Angeles, supporting the modeling work carried out here. The Surface Meteorology and Ozone Generation (SMOG) airshed model is used to compute the spatial and temporal distributions of naphthalene and its photooxidation products in Southern California. The present simulations reveal a high degree of spatial variability in the concentrations of naphthalene-related species, with large diurnal and seasonal variations as well. Peak naphthalene concentrations are estimated to occur in the early morning hours in the winter season. The naphthalene concentration estimates obtained from the SMOG model are employed in the Regional Human Exposure (REHEX) model to calculate population exposure statistics. Results show average hourly naphthalene exposures in Southern California under summer and winter conditions of 270 and 430 ng m -3, respectively. Exposure to significantly higher concentrations

  3. Biological monitoring of child lead exposure in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Cikrt, M; Smerhovsky, Z; Blaha, K; Nerudova, J; Sediva, V; Fornuskova, H; Knotkova, J; Roth, Z; Kodl, M; Fitzgerald, E

    1997-04-01

    The area around the Pribram lead smelter has been recognized to be heavily contaminated by lead (Pb). In the early 1970s, several episodes of livestock lead intoxication were reported in this area; thereafter, several epidemiological and ecological studies focused on exposure of children. In contrast to earlier studies, the recent investigation (1992-1994) revealed significantly lower exposure to lead. From 1986-1990, recorded average blood lead levels were about 37.2 micrograms lead (Pb)/100 ml in an elementary school population living in a neighborhood close to the smelter (within 3 km of the plant). The present study, however, has found mean blood lead levels of 11.35 micrograms/100 ml (95% CI = 9.32; 13.82) among a comparable group of children. In addition to blood lead, tooth lead was used to assess exposure among children. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between the geometric mean tooth lead level of 6.44 micrograms Pb/g (n = 13; 95% CI = 3.95; 10.50) in the most contaminated zone and 1.43 micrograms Pb/g (n = 35; 95% CI = 1.11; 1.84) in zones farther away from the point source. Both biomarkers, blood and tooth lead levels, reflect a similar pattern of lead exposure in children. This study has attempted a quantitative assessment of risk factors associated with elevated lead exposure in the Czech Republic. Content of lead in soil, residential distance from the smelter, consumption of locally grown vegetables or fruits, drinking water from local wells, the mother's educational level, cigarette consumption among family members, and the number of children in the family were factors positively related (p < 0.05) to blood lead levels. The resulting blood lead level was found to be inversely proportional to the child's age. PMID:9189705

  4. Biological monitoring of child lead exposure in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed Central

    Cikrt, M; Smerhovsky, Z; Blaha, K; Nerudova, J; Sediva, V; Fornuskova, H; Knotkova, J; Roth, Z; Kodl, M; Fitzgerald, E

    1997-01-01

    The area around the Pribram lead smelter has been recognized to be heavily contaminated by lead (Pb). In the early 1970s, several episodes of livestock lead intoxication were reported in this area; thereafter, several epidemiological and ecological studies focused on exposure of children. In contrast to earlier studies, the recent investigation (1992-1994) revealed significantly lower exposure to lead. From 1986-1990, recorded average blood lead levels were about 37.2 micrograms lead (Pb)/100 ml in an elementary school population living in a neighborhood close to the smelter (within 3 km of the plant). The present study, however, has found mean blood lead levels of 11.35 micrograms/100 ml (95% CI = 9.32; 13.82) among a comparable group of children. In addition to blood lead, tooth lead was used to assess exposure among children. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between the geometric mean tooth lead level of 6.44 micrograms Pb/g (n = 13; 95% CI = 3.95; 10.50) in the most contaminated zone and 1.43 micrograms Pb/g (n = 35; 95% CI = 1.11; 1.84) in zones farther away from the point source. Both biomarkers, blood and tooth lead levels, reflect a similar pattern of lead exposure in children. This study has attempted a quantitative assessment of risk factors associated with elevated lead exposure in the Czech Republic. Content of lead in soil, residential distance from the smelter, consumption of locally grown vegetables or fruits, drinking water from local wells, the mother's educational level, cigarette consumption among family members, and the number of children in the family were factors positively related (p < 0.05) to blood lead levels. The resulting blood lead level was found to be inversely proportional to the child's age. Images Figure 1. PMID:9189705

  5. Municipal waste incinerators: air and biological monitoring of workers for exposure to particles, metals, and organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, A; Collot-Fertey, D; Anzivino, L; Marques, M; Hours, M; Stoklov, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate occupational exposure to toxic pollutants at municipal waste incinerators (MWIs). Methods: Twenty nine male subjects working near the furnaces in two MWIs, and 17 subjects not occupationally exposed to combustion generated pollutants were studied. Individual air samples were taken throughout the shift; urine samples were collected before and after. Stationary air samples were taken near potential sources of emission. Results: Occupational exposure did not result in the infringement of any occupational threshold limit value. Atmospheric exposure levels to particles and metals were 10–100 times higher in MWIs than at the control site. The main sources were cleaning operations for particles, and residue transfer and disposal operations for metals. MWI workers were not exposed to higher levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons than workers who are routinely in contact with vehicle exhaust. The air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes were low and did not appear to pose any significant threat to human health. Only the measurement of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels would seem to be a reliable marker for the combustion of plastics. Urine metal levels were significantly higher at plant 1 than at plant 2 because of high levels of pollutants emanating from one old furnace. Conclusion: While biological monitoring is an easy way of acquiring data on long term personal exposure, air monitoring remains the only method that makes it possible to identify the primary sources of pollutant emission which need to be controlled if occupational exposure and environmental pollution are to be reduced. PMID:12883016

  6. A hybrid modeling with data assimilation to evaluate human exposure level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Y. S.; Cheong, H. K.; Choi, D.; Kim, A. L.; Yun, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure models are designed to better represent human contact with PM (Particulate Matter) and other air pollutants such as CO, SO2, O3, and NO2. The exposure concentrations of the air pollutants to human are determined by global and regional long range transport of global and regional scales from Europe and China as well as local emissions from urban and road vehicle sources. To assess the exposure level in detail, the multiple scale influence from background to local sources should be considered. A hybrid air quality modeling methodology combing a grid-based chemical transport model with a local plume dispersion model was used to provide spatially and temporally resolved air quality concentration for human exposure levels in Korea. In the hybrid modeling approach, concentrations from a grid-based chemical transport model and a local plume dispersion model are added to provide contributions from photochemical interactions, long-range (regional) transport and local-scale dispersion. The CAMx (Comprehensive Air quality Model with Extensions was used for the background concentrations from anthropogenic and natural emissions in East Asia including Korea while the road dispersion by vehicle emission was calculated by CALPUFF model. The total exposure level of the pollutants was finally assessed by summing the background and road contributions. In the hybrid modeling, the data assimilation method based on the optimal interpolation was applied to overcome the discrepancies between the model predicted concentrations and observations. The air quality data from the air quality monitoring stations in Korea. The spatial resolution of the hybrid model was 50m for the Seoul Metropolitan Ares. This example clearly demonstrates that the exposure level could be estimated to the fine scale for the exposure assessment by using the hybrid modeling approach with data assimilation.

  7. Human Physiological Responses to Acute and Chronic Cold Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Jodie M.; Taylor, Nigel A. S.; Tipton, Michael J.; Greenleaf, John E.

    2001-01-01

    When inadequately protected humans are exposed to acute cold, excessive body heat is lost to the environment and unless heat production is increased and heat loss attenuated, body temperature will decrease. The primary physiological responses to counter the reduction in body temperature include marked cutaneous vasoconstriction and increased metabolism. These responses, and the hazards associated with such exposure, are mediated by a number of factors which contribute to heat production and loss. These include the severity and duration of the cold stimulus; exercise intensity; the magnitude of the metabolic response; and individual characteristics such as body composition, age, and gender. Chronic exposure to a cold environment, both natural and artificial, results in physiological alterations leading to adaptation. Three quite different, but not necessarily exclusive, patterns of human cold adaptation have been reported: metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative. Cold adaptation has also been associated with an habituation response, in which there is a desensitization, or damping, of the normal response to a cold stress. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the human physiological and pathological responses to cold exposure. Particular attention is directed to the factors contributing to heat production and heat loss during acute cold stress, and the ability of humans to adapt to cold environments.

  8. Design and characterization of a two-stage human subject exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kuprov, Roman Y; Buck, David; Pope, C Arden; Eatough, Delbert J; Hansen, Jaron C

    2011-08-01

    A human subject exposure chamber, designed to hold six to eight subjects, coupled to an approximately 30-m3 Teflon reaction bag was designed and built to provide exposures that mimic the production and photochemical oxidation of atmospheric pollutants resulting from the combustion of coal or wood from a stove. The combustion products are introduced into the Teflon bag under atmospheric conditions. Photochemical oxidation of this mixture is accomplished by exposure to tropospheric sun-like radiation from an array of ultraviolet and black lamps. The aerosol in the Teflon reaction bag is then transferred into the exposure room to maintain a constant, lower exposure level. Continuous and semicontinuous monitoring of the gas and particulate matter (PM) pollution in the exposure room and the reaction bag is accomplished using a suite of instruments. This suite of instruments allows for the measurement of the concentrations of total and nonvolatile PM, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ozone. The concentration of the particles was monitored by an R&P tapered element oscillating microbalance monitor. The chemical composition of the PM and its morphological characterization is accomplished by collecting samples in filter packs and conducting ion chromatography, elemental X-ray fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The concentration and composition of emissions from combustion of wood and coal is described. The results of this study suggest that although the bulk compositions of particulate emissions from the combustion of coal or wood in a stove have many similarities, the wood smoke aerosol is photochemically reactive, whereas the coal smoke aerosol is not. PMID:21874958

  9. Human exposure pathways of heavy metals in a lead-zinc mining area, Jiangsu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chang-Sheng; Ma, Zong-Wei; Yang, Jin; Liu, Yang; Bi, Jun; Huang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is becoming a serious issue in developing countries such as China, and the public is increasingly aware of its adverse health impacts in recent years. We assessed the potential health risks in a lead-zinc mining area and attempted to identify the key exposure pathways. We evaluated the spatial distributions of personal exposure using indigenous exposure factors and field monitoring results of water, soil, food, and indoor and outdoor air samples. The risks posed by 10 metals and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion and dermal contact pathways to these risks were estimated. Human hair samples were also analyzed to indicate the exposure level in the human body. Our results show that heavy metal pollution may pose high potential health risks to local residents, especially in the village closest to the mine (V1), mainly due to Pb, Cd and Hg. Correspondingly, the residents in V1 had higher Pb (8.14 mg/kg) levels in hair than those in the other two villages. Most of the estimated risks came from soil, the intake of self-produced vegetables and indoor air inhalation. This study highlights the importance of site-specific multipathway health risk assessments in studying heavy-metal exposures in China. PMID:23152752

  10. Human Exposure Pathways of Heavy Metals in a Lead-Zinc Mining Area, Jiangsu Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chang-Sheng; Ma, Zong-Wei; Yang, Jin; Liu, Yang; Bi, Jun; Huang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is becoming a serious issue in developing countries such as China, and the public is increasingly aware of its adverse health impacts in recent years. We assessed the potential health risks in a lead-zinc mining area and attempted to identify the key exposure pathways. We evaluated the spatial distributions of personal exposure using indigenous exposure factors and field monitoring results of water, soil, food, and indoor and outdoor air samples. The risks posed by 10 metals and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion and dermal contact pathways to these risks were estimated. Human hair samples were also analyzed to indicate the exposure level in the human body. Our results show that heavy metal pollution may pose high potential health risks to local residents, especially in the village closest to the mine (V1), mainly due to Pb, Cd and Hg. Correspondingly, the residents in V1 had higher Pb (8.14 mg/kg) levels in hair than those in the other two villages. Most of the estimated risks came from soil, the intake of self-produced vegetables and indoor air inhalation. This study highlights the importance of site-specific multipathway health risk assessments in studying heavy-metal exposures in China. PMID:23152752

  11. Does acute exposure to mobile phones affect human attention?

    PubMed

    Russo, Riccardo; Fox, Elaine; Cinel, Caterina; Boldini, Angela; Defeyter, Margaret A; Mirshekar-Syahkal, Dariush; Mehta, Amit

    2006-04-01

    Recent studies have indicated that acute exposure to low level radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phones affects human cognition. However, the relatively small samples used, in addition to methodological problems, make the outcomes of these studies difficult to interpret. In our study we tested a large sample of volunteers (168) using a series of cognitive tasks apparently sensitive to RF exposure (a simple reaction task, a vigilance task, and a subtraction task). Participants performed those tasks twice, in two different sessions. In one session they were exposed to RFs, with half of subjects exposed to GSM signals and the other half exposed to CW signals, while in the other session they were exposed to sham signals. No significant effects of RF exposure on performance for either GSM or CW were found, independent of whether the phone was positioned on the left or on the right side. PMID:16304701

  12. Air pollution exposure monitoring and estimation. Part V. Traffic exposure in adults.

    PubMed

    Bartonova, A; Clench-Aas, J; Gram, F; Grønskei, K E; Guerreiro, C; Larssen, S; Tønnesen, D A; Walker, S E

    1999-08-01

    In Oslo, traffic has been one of the dominating sources of air pollution in the last decade. In one part of the city where most traffic collects, two tunnels were built. A series of before and after studies was carried out in connection with the tunnels in use. Dispersion models were used as a basis for estimating exposure to nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter in two fractions. Exposure estimates were based on the results of the dispersion model providing estimates of outdoor pollutant concentrations on an hourly basis. The estimates represent concentrations in receptor points and in a square kilometre grid. The estimates were used to assess development of air pollution load in the area, compliance with air quality guidelines, and to provide a basis for quantifying exposure-effect relationships in epidemiological studies. After both tunnels were taken in use, the pollution levels in the study area were lower than when the traffic was on the surface (a drop from 50 to 40 micrograms m-3). Compliance with air quality guidelines and other prescribed values has improved, even if high exposures still exist. The most important residential areas are now much less exposed, while areas around tunnel openings can be in periods exposed to high pollutant concentrations. The daily pattern of exposure shows smaller differences between peak and minimum concentrations than prior to the traffic changes. Exposures at home (in the investigation area) were reduced most, while exposures in other locations than at home showed only a small decrease. Highest hourly exposures are encountered in traffic. PMID:11529132

  13. Monitoring of human populations for early markers of cadmium toxicity: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Bruce A.

    2009-08-01

    Exposure of human populations to cadmium (Cd) from air, food and water may produce effects in organs such as the kidneys, liver, lungs, cardiovascular, immune and reproductive systems. Since Cd has been identified as a human carcinogen, biomarkers for early detection of susceptibility to cancer are of an importance to public health. The ability to document Cd exposure and uptake of this element through biological monitoring is a first step towards understanding its health effects. Interpretation and application of biological monitoring data for predicting human health outcomes require correlation with biological measures of organ system responses to the documented exposure. Essential to this understanding is the detection and linkage of early biological responses toxic effects in target cell populations. Fortunately, advances in cell biology have resulted in the development of pre-clinical biological markers (biomarkers) that demonstrate measurable and characteristic molecular changes in organ systems following chemical exposures that occur prior to the onset of overt clinical disease or development of cancer. Technical advances have rendered a number of these biomarkers practical for monitoring Cd-exposed human populations. Biomarkers will be increasingly important in relation to monitoring effects from the exposure to new Cd-based high technology materials. For example, cadmium-selenium (CdSe), nano-materials made from combinations of these elements have greatly altered cellular uptake characteristics due to particle size. These differences may greatly alter effects at the target cell level and hence risks for organ toxicities from such exposures. The value of validated biomarkers for early detection of systemic Cd-induced effects in humans cannot be underestimated due to the rapid expansion of nano-material technologies. This review will attempt to briefly summarize the applications, to date, of biomarker endpoints for assessing target organ system effects in

  14. Eravacycline Pharmacokinetics and Challenges in Defining Humanized Exposure In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Abrar K; Monogue, Marguerite L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-08-01

    We assessed the pharmacokinetic profile of eravacycline, a novel antibiotic of the tetracycline class, and determined the dose in an immunocompetent murine thigh infection model that would provide free-drug exposure similar to that observed in humans after the administration of 1 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h). Eravacycline demonstrated a nonlinear protein-binding profile. The 2.5-mg/kg i.v. q12h dose in mice resulted in an area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug of 1.64 mg · h/liter, which closely resembles the human exposure level. PMID:27353264

  15. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  16. Chronic drug exposures during development in nonhuman primates: models of brain dysfunction in humans.

    PubMed

    Paule, Merle G

    2005-01-01

    This review of our work presents three specific examples of how nonhuman primates (rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta) have been used to study the effects of chronic drug exposures on brain function during different stages of development. In all cases, exposure levels similar to those experienced by humans were employed and the focus was on long-term--not acute--effects. In the case of the marijuana studies, exposures occurred during the adolescent period; for the cocaine studies, exposures occurred in binge-like fashion entirely before birth (in utero); and for the remacemide studies, exposures occurred daily in juveniles, prior to adolescence. An automated battery of behavioral tasks, the National Center for Toxicological Research Operant Test Battery (NCTR OTB), designed to assess aspects of motivation, visual discrimination, time perception, short-term memory, and learning, was used to monitor treatment effects. Chronic marijuana smoke exposure resulted in an 'amotivational' syndrome--even in weekend-only smokers--that resolved within three months of exposure cessation. In utero cocaine exposure was shown to cause behavioral rigidity or lack of plasticity as evidenced by the difficulty of subjects to adjust to rules changes for some OTB tasks. These effects were seen in adult subjects suggesting that the effects of gestational cocaine exposure are long-term or permanent. In addition, animals exposed to cocaine in utero were less sensitive to the behaviorally-disrupting effects of cocaine as adults. Remacemide caused profound and long-lasting, perhaps permanent, changes in learning task performance and because performance of this same task by children is significantly correlated with traditional measures of intelligence (IQ), these data suggest that such treatment may provide a valuable model of chemically-induced mental retardation. PMID:15970490

  17. Gene expression as a biomarker for human radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Omaruddin, Romaica A; Roland, Thomas A; Wallace, H James; Chaudhry, M Ahmad

    2013-03-01

    Accidental exposure to ionizing radiation can be unforeseen, rapid, and devastating. The detonation of a radiological device leading to such an exposure can be detrimental to the exposed population. The radiation-induced damage may manifest as acute effects that can be detected clinically or may be more subtle effects that can lead to long-term radiation-induced abnormalities. Accurate identification of the individuals exposed to radiation is challenging. The availability of a rapid and effective screening test that could be used as a biomarker of radiation exposure detection is mandatory. We tested the suitability of alterations in gene expression to serve as a biomarker of human radiation exposure. To develop a useful gene expression biomonitor, however, gene expression changes occurring in response to irradiation in vivo must be measured directly. Patients undergoing radiation therapy provide a suitable test population for this purpose. We examined the expression of CC3, MADH7, and SEC PRO in blood samples of these patients before and after radiotherapy to measure the in vivo response. The gene expression after ionizing radiation treatment varied among different patients, suggesting the complexity of the response. The expression of the SEC PRO gene was repressed in most of the patients. The MADH7 gene was found to be upregulated in most of the subjects and could serve as a molecular marker of radiation exposure. PMID:23446844

  18. Update to the U.S. EPA's Guidelines for Human Exposure Assessment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. EPA is to protect human health and the environment by understanding, characterizing, and reducing risks associated with exposure to environmental contaminants. Exposure science characterizes, estimates, and predicts exposures and provides information for d...

  19. User's manual for the Human Exposure Model (HEM). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This document describes the Human Exposure Model, furnishes contact personnel to establish access to the UNIVAC System, and provides step-by-step instructions for operating both the SHED and SHEAR portions of the model. The manual also lists caveats that should be considered when using the HEM and criteria to distinguish situations that are appropriately modeled by each portion of HEM. The intended audience ranges from someone with limited knowledge of modeling to someone well acquainted with the UNIVAC.

  20. Arsenic Exposure and the Induction of Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Becker-Santos, Daiana D.; Gil, Lionel; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid, that is, considered to be a human carcinogen. Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed through drinking water, with consequences ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies, such as skin and lung cancer. Despite well-known arsenic-related health effects, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood; however, the arsenic biotransformation process, which includes methylation changes, is thought to play a key role. This paper explores the relationship of arsenic exposure with cancer development and summarizes current knowledge of the potential mechanisms that may contribute to the neoplastic processes observed in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:22174709

  1. Monitoring methylmercury during pregnancy: maternal hair predicts fetal brain exposure.

    PubMed

    Cernichiari, E; Brewer, R; Myers, G J; Marsh, D O; Lapham, L W; Cox, C; Shamlaye, C F; Berlin, M; Davidson, P W; Clarkson, T W

    1995-01-01

    Autopsy brains were obtained from infants dying from a variety of causes within a few days of birth in a population exposed to methylmercury in fish. Infant and maternal blood and hair samples were also obtained. The concentration of total mercury in 6 major brain regions were highly correlated with maternal hair levels. This correlation was confirmed by a sequence of comparisons of maternal hair to maternal blood to infant blood and finally to infant brain. The results lend support to the use of maternal hair in assessing fetal exposure to methylmercury in fish-eating populations. PMID:8714874

  2. Satellite nighttime lights reveal increasing human exposure to floods worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceola, Serena; Laio, Francesco; Montanari, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    River floods are the first cause of human fatalities and economic losses among natural disasters. Floods claim thousands of lives every year, but effective and high-resolution methods to provide a spatially and temporally detailed analysis of the human exposure to floods at the global scale are still lacking. To this aim, we use satellite nightlight data to prove that nocturnal lights close to rivers are consistently related to flood damages. First, we analyse the temporal evolution of nightlights along the river network all over the world from 1992 to 2012 and obtain a global map of nightlight trends, which we associate with increasing human exposure to floods, at 1 km2 resolution. Then, we correlate global data of economic losses caused by flooding events with nighttime lights and find that increasing nightlights are associated to flood damage intensification. Our results show an enhancement of exposure to floods worldwide, particularly in Africa and Asia. Therefore our analysis argues for the development of valuable flood preparedness and mitigation strategies, also associated to the projected effects of climate change on flood-related losses.

  3. Biological monitoring IX: Concomitant exposure to medications and industrial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, J.

    1994-05-01

    A significant proportion of workers may be receiving prescription or nonprescription medications. In two surveys, one in the United States and the other in the Netherlands, 15 to 30 percent of workers reported current use of pharmaceuticals. In a viscose rayon factory in Belgium, 31 percent of 129 workers exposed to carbon disulfide and 19.8 percent of 81 control workers from other factories reported use of some medication. Some of the drugs may affect the relationship between the external exposure (dose) of a chemical and the concentration of that chemical or its metabolite(s) in a sampled biological medium (internal dose), and/or the relationship between external exposure and concentration at a receptor site. They may also modulate the response of the receptor, as suggested by the increased reports of neurological symptoms in carbon disulfide-exposed workers taking certain medications. There are two obvious differences between drugs and industrial chemicals: (1) The effects of drugs cover a wider spectrum and include effects not known to be the result of any industrial chemicals. Examples include selective destructive inhibition of hepatic enzymes (monoamine oxidase inhibitors, indomethacin) and alteration of hepatic blood flow (adrenergic agents, cimetidine). (2) Drugs are administered to produce specific therapeutic effects. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Bisphenol Analogues Other Than BPA: Environmental Occurrence, Human Exposure, and Toxicity-A Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tan, Hongli; Zheng, Zhengui; Feng, Yong-Lai; Wu, Yan; Widelka, Margaret

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the environmental occurrence, human exposure, and toxicity of bisphenol A (BPA). Following stringent regulations on the production and usage of BPA, several bisphenol analogues have been produced as a replacement for BPA in various applications. The present review outlines the current state of knowledge on the occurrence of bisphenol analogues (other than BPA) in the environment, consumer products and foodstuffs, human exposure and biomonitoring, and toxicity. Whereas BPA was still the major bisphenol analogue found in most environmental monitoring studies, BPF and BPS were also frequently detected. Elevated concentrations of BPAF, BPF, and BPS (i.e., similar to or greater than that of BPA) have been reported in the abiotic environment and human urine from some regions. Many analogues exhibit endocrine disrupting effects, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, dioxin-like effects, and neurotoxicity in laboratory studies. BPAF, BPB, BPF, and BPS have been shown to exhibit estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic activities similar to or even greater than that of BPA. Knowledge gaps and research needs have been identified, which include the elucidation of environmental occurrences, persistence, and fate of bisphenol analogues (other than BPA), sources and pathways for human exposure, effects on reproductive systems and the mammary gland, mechanisms of toxicity from coexposure to multiple analogues, metabolic pathways and products, and the impact of metabolic modification on toxicity. PMID:27143250

  5. Local-Scale Air Quality Modeling in Support of Human Health and Exposure Research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, V.

    2010-12-01

    Spatially- and temporally-sparse information on air quality is a key concern for air-pollution-related environmental health studies. Monitor networks are sparse in both space and time, are costly to maintain, and are often designed purposely to avoid detecting highly localized sources. Recent studies have shown that more narrowly defining the geographic domain of the study populations and improvements in the measured/estimated ambient concentrations can lead to stronger associations between air pollution and hospital admissions and mortality records. Traditionally, ambient air quality measurements have been used as a primary input to support human health and exposure research. However, there is increasing evidence that the current ambient monitoring network is not capturing sharp gradients in exposure due to the presence of high concentration levels near, for example, major roadways. Many air pollutants exhibit large concentration gradients near large emitters such as major roadways, factories, ports, etc. To overcome these limitations, researchers are now beginning to use air quality models to support air pollution exposure and health studies. There are many advantages to using air quality models over traditional approaches based on existing ambient measurements alone. First, models can provide spatially- and temporally-resolved concentrations as direct input to exposure and health studies and thus better defining the concentration levels for the population in the geographic domain. Air quality models have a long history of use in air pollution regulations, and supported by regulatory agencies and a large user community. Also, models can provide bidirectional linkages between sources of emissions and ambient concentrations, thus allowing exploration of various mitigation strategies to reduce risk to exposure. In order to provide best estimates of air concentrations to support human health and exposure studies, model estimates should consider local-scale features

  6. Approaches to characterizing human health risks of exposure to fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Vu, V T; Lai, D Y

    1997-01-01

    Naturally occurring and man-made (synthetic) fibers of respirable sizes are substances that have been identified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) as priority substances for risk reduction and pollution prevention under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The health concern for respirable fibers is based on the link of occupational asbestos exposure and environmental erionite fiber exposure to the development of chronic respiratory diseases, including interstitial lung fibrosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma in humans. There is also considerable laboratory evidence indicating that a variety of fibers of varying physical and chemical characteristics can elicit fibrogenic and carcinogenic effects in animals under certain exposure conditions. This paper discusses key scientific issues and major default assumptions and uncertainties pertaining to the risk assessment of inhaled fibers. This is followed by a description of the types of assessment performed by the U.S. EPA to support risk management actions of new fibers and existing fibers under TSCA. The scope and depth of these risk assessments, however, vary greatly depending on whether the substance under review is an existing or a new fiber, the purpose of the assessment, the availability of data, time, and resources, and the intended nature of regulatory action. In general, these risk assessments are of considerable uncertainty because health hazard and human exposure information is often incomplete for most fibers. Furthermore, how fibers cause diseases and what specific determinants are critical to fiber-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity are still not completely understood. Further research to improve our knowledge base in fiber toxicology and additional toxicity and exposure data gathering are needed to more accurately characterize the health risks of inhaled fibers. PMID:9400747

  7. AN OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) PHASE I STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Phase I studies were sponsored by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) to address critical information needs for assessing human exposures to multiple chemicals from multiple pathways and media. These studies were...

  8. Human exposure to arsenic from drinking water in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Lan, Vi Mai; Anh, Duong Hong; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Viet, Pham Hung; Berg, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Vietnam is an agricultural country with a population of about 88 million, with some 18 million inhabitants living in the Red River Delta in Northern Vietnam. The present study reports the chemical analyses of 68 water and 213 biological (human hair and urine) samples conducted to investigate arsenic contamination in tube well water and human arsenic exposure in four districts (Tu Liem, Dan Phuong, Ly Nhan, and Hoai Duc) in the Red River Delta. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in these areas were in the range of <1 to 632 μg/L, with severe contamination found in the communities Ly Nhan, Hoai Duc, and Dan Phuong. Arsenic concentrations were markedly lowered in water treated with sand filters, except for groundwater from Hoai Duc. Human hair samples had arsenic levels in the range of 0.07-7.51 μg/g, and among residents exposed to arsenic levels ≥50 μg/L, 64% of them had hair arsenic concentrations higher than 1 μg/g, which is a level that can cause skin lesions. Urinary arsenic concentrations were 4-435 μg/g creatinine. Concentrations of arsenic in hair and urine increased significantly with increasing arsenic content in drinking water, indicating that drinking water is a significant source of arsenic exposure for these residents. The percentage of inorganic arsenic (IA) in urine decreased with age, whereas the opposite trend was observed for monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine. Significant co-interactions of age and arsenic exposure status were also detected for concentrations of arsenic in hair and the sum of IA, MMA, and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine and %MMA. In summary, this study demonstrates that a considerable proportion of the Vietnamese population is exposed to arsenic levels of chronic toxicity, even if sand filters reduce exposure in many households. Health problems caused by arsenic ingestion through drinking water are increasingly reported in Vietnam. PMID:24262873

  9. Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    1996-05-01

    Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M; Kyoizumi, S; Kusunoki, Y; Hirai, Y; Tanabe, K; Cologne, J B

    1996-05-01

    Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. PMID:8781371

  11. Wearable sensors for human health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H. Harry; Reisner, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Wearable sensors for continuous monitoring of vital signs for extended periods of weeks or months are expected to revolutionize healthcare services in the home and workplace as well as in hospitals and nursing homes. This invited paper describes recent research progress in wearable health monitoring technology and its clinical applications, with emphasis on blood pressure and circulatory monitoring. First, a finger ring-type wearable blood pressure sensor based on photo plethysmogram is presented. Technical issues, including motion artifact reduction, power saving, and wearability enhancement, will be addressed. Second, sensor fusion and sensor networking for integrating multiple sensors with diverse modalities will be discussed for comprehensive monitoring and diagnosis of health status. Unlike traditional snap-shot measurements, continuous monitoring with wearable sensors opens up the possibility to treat the physiological system as a dynamical process. This allows us to apply powerful system dynamics and control methodologies, such as adaptive filtering, single- and multi-channel system identification, active noise cancellation, and adaptive control, to the monitoring and treatment of highly complex physiological systems. A few clinical trials illustrate the potentials of the wearable sensor technology for future heath care services.

  12. CHARACTERIZING THE SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC CHEMICALS IN AIRBORNE FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal and ambient exposures to airborne fine particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and genotoxic activity has been studied in populations in the US, Japan, China, and the Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors used to collect fine particles were extracted f...

  13. Monitoring of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in Czechoslovak human sera by immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Fukal, L. ); Reisnerova, H. )

    1990-03-01

    Since a level of food contamination with aflatoxins and ochratoxin A has been found low in Czechoslovakia, human exposure to these mycotoxins may not be negligible. However, analysis of food samples provides only indirect evidence of mycotoxin ingestion and no evidence about mycotoxin absorption. Direct evidence can only be obtained by analysis of human body fluids. Therefore, the authors decided to carry out a monitoring of aflatoxin and ochratoxin A level in human sera. In general, TLC and HPLC are most commonly used to analyze mycotoxins and its metabolites. The recent development of immunochemical techniques opens the possibility of determining individual exposure in a relatively large human population. These assays have the advantage of high specificity and sensitivity. Sample through-put is high, and the methods are technically simple and can be performed at low cost.

  14. Monitoring the influence of antibiotic exposure using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Zemanek, Pavel; Bernatova, Silvie; Jezek, Jan; Sery, Mojmir; Jakl, Petr; Siler, Martin; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-03-01

    Here we report on combination of the data obtained from MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) with infor- mation of microoragnisms fingerprint provided by Raman spectroscopy. In our feasibility study we could follow mechanisms of the bacteriostatic versus bactericidal action on biofilm-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis simply by monitoring Raman bands corresponding to DNA translating the changes introduced by selected antibiotics. The Raman spectra of Staphylococcus epidermidis treated with a bacteriostatic agent show little effect on DNA which is in contrast with the action of a bactericidal agent where decreased in dedicated Raman spectra signal strength suggests DNA fragmentation. Moreover, we demonstrate that Raman tweezers are indeed able to distinguish strains of biofilm-forming (biofilm-positive) and biofilm-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strains using principal component analysis (PCA).

  15. Human exposure to methylmercury from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Greenfield, Ben K; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan

    2016-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in aquatic food raises global concerns about human exposure to MeHg. Crayfish is the world's third largest farmed crustacean species and a favorite aquatic food in many countries. However, human health hazard due to MeHg exposure via crayfish consumption is unclear, partly because appropriate survey data are lacking. We report on mercury concentrations and speciation in edible tail muscle of crayfish collected from restaurants in 23 Chinese cities. On average, MeHg constituted 99.1 % of mercury in tail muscle, and MeHg concentrations were comparable with those reported for fish in China. Variation in MeHg concentrations was not attributable to broad geographic region (i.e., provinces) or tail length. For different populations, potential health risk (characterized by hazard quotient or HQ) of MeHg exposure through crayfish consumption depended largely on crayfish consumption rates. In particular, a health hazard (HQ > 1) was found for high-rate consumers (i.e., 95 %ile or higher) in some cities in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR), during the peak consumption season. Our results suggest that more attention should be paid to dietary MeHg intake via crayfish consumption in China, particularly for communities with high consumption in MLYR. PMID:25850898

  16. Modeling of human movement monitoring using Bluetooth Low Energy technology.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, G; Zhang, Q; Karunanithi, M

    2015-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a wireless communication technology which can be used to monitor human movements. In this monitoring system, a BLE signal scanner scans signal strength of BLE tags carried by people, to thus infer human movement patterns within its monitoring zone. However to the extent of our knowledge one main aspect of this monitoring system which has not yet been thoroughly investigated in literature is how to build a sound theoretical model, based on tunable BLE communication parameters such as scanning time interval and advertising time interval, to enable the study and design of effective and efficient movement monitoring systems. In this paper, we proposed and developed a statistical model based on Monte-Carlo simulation, which can be utilized to assess impacts of BLE technology parameters in terms of latency and efficiency, on a movement monitoring system, and can thus benefit a more efficient system design. PMID:26737430

  17. Human performance analysis of industrial radiography radiation exposure events

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, W.J.; Hill, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    A set of radiation overexposure event reports were reviewed as part of a program to examine human performance in industrial radiography for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Incident records for a seven year period were retrieved from an event database. Ninety-five exposure events were initially categorized and sorted for further analysis. Descriptive models were applied to a subset of severe overexposure events. Modeling included: (1) operational sequence tables to outline the key human actions and interactions with equipment, (2) human reliability event trees, (3) an application of an information processing failures model, and (4) an extrapolated use of the error influences and effects diagram. Results of the modeling analyses provided insights into the industrial radiography task and suggested areas for further action and study to decrease overexposures.

  18. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN ACTIVITY DATA FOR USE IN MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity data are a critical part of exposure models being developed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). An analysis of human activity data within NERL's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) was performed in two areas relevant to exposure ...

  19. Untargeted profiling of pesticide metabolites by LC-HRMS: an exposomics tool for human exposure evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Emilien L; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Chevrier, Cécile; Cordier, Sylvaine; Debrauwer, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Human exposure to xenobiotics is usually estimated by indirect methods. Biological monitoring has emerged during the last decade to improve assessment of exposure. However, biomonitoring is still an analytical challenge, because the amounts of sample available are often very small yet analysis must be as thorough and sensitive as possible. The purpose of this work was to develop an untargeted "exposomics" approach by using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS), which was applied to the characterization of pesticide metabolites in urine from pregnant women from a French epidemiological cohort. An upgradable list of pesticides commonly used on different crops, with their metabolites (more than 400 substances) was produced. Raw MS data were then processed to extract signals from these substances. Metabolites were identified by tandem mass spectrometry; putative identifications were validated by comparison with standards and metabolites generated by experiments on animals. Finally, signals of identified compounds were statistically analyzed by use of multivariate methods. This enabled discrimination of exposure groups, defined by indirect methods, on the basis of four metabolites from two fungicides (azoxystrobin, fenpropimorph) used in cereal production. This original approach applied to pesticide exposure can be extended to a variety of contaminant families for upstream evaluation of exposure from food and the environment. PMID:23892877

  20. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  1. The Chemical Nature of Mercury in Human Brain Following Poisoning or Environmental Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury is among the most potentially toxic species to which human populations are exposed, both at high levels through poisonings and at lower levels through consumption of fish and other seafood. However, the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity in humans remain poorly understood. We used synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to study mercury chemical forms in human brain tissue. Individuals poisoned with high levels of methylmercury species showed elevated cortical selenium with significant proportions of nanoparticulate mercuric selenide plus some inorganic mercury and methylmercury bound to organic sulfur. Individuals with a lifetime of high fish consumption showed much lower levels of mercuric selenide and methylmercury cysteineate. Mercury exposure did not perturb organic selenium levels. These results elucidate a key detoxification pathway in the central nervous system and provide new insights into the appropriate methods for biological monitoring. PMID:22826746

  2. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  3. Banking of human tissue for biomonitoring and exposure assessment: utility for environmental epidemiology and surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, L R; Anton-Culver, H; Kharrazi, M; Blake, E

    1995-01-01

    Human tissue banking could provide a tool to address a number of public health concerns. We can potentially use it to monitor trends in human exposures, serve as an early warning system for new environmental exposures, assess low-level exposures around hazardous waste and other point sources of pollutants, evaluate the effectiveness of regulatory programs, and study etiologies of diseases (e.g., childhood cancer and birth defects) that are likely to be related to the environment. This article discusses opportunities to establish human tissue banks in connection with pre-existing public health surveillance programs for cancer and adverse reproductive outcomes. This is a cost-effective way to conduct surveillance and enhances the ability to carry out epidemiologic studies. The article also discusses ethical issues that are particularly important for public health practice. One is the issue of risk communication and the need to explain risks in a way that provides people with the information they need to determine appropriate action on the individual and community levels. Second is the issue of environmental justice. We recommend early involvement of communities that are likely to be involved in tissue-banking projects and full explanation of individual and group social risks from their participation. PMID:7635109

  4. Mercury Exposure in Ireland: Results of the DEMOCOPHES Human Biomonitoring Study

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Elizabeth; Evans, David S.; Davidson, Fred; Burke, Padraig; Burns, Damien; Flanagan, Andrew; Griffin, Chris; Kellegher, Anne; Mannion, Rory; Mulcahy, Maurice; Ryan, Michael; Biot, Pierre; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Castaño, Argelia; Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M.; Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit K.; Navarro, Carmen; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Fiddicke, Ulrike; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Sepai, Ovnair; Exley, Karen; Bloemen, Louis; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Joas, Reinhard; Joas, Anke; Aerts, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Background: Monitoring of human exposure to mercury is important due to its adverse health effects. This study aimed to determine the extent of mercury exposure among mothers and their children in Ireland, and to identify factors associated with elevated levels. It formed part of the Demonstration of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES) pilot biomonitoring study. Methods: Hair mercury concentrations were determined from a convenience sample of 120 mother/child pairs. Mothers also completed a questionnaire. Rigorous quality assurance within DEMOCOPHES guaranteed the accuracy and international comparability of results. Results: Mercury was detected in 79.2% of the samples from mothers, and 62.5% of children’s samples. Arithmetic mean levels in mothers (0.262 µg/g hair) and children (0.149 µg /g hair) did not exceed the US EPA guidance value. Levels were significantly higher for those with higher education, and those who consumed more fish. Conclusions: The study demonstrates the benefit of human biomonitoring for assessing and comparing internal exposure levels, both on a population and an individual basis. It enables the potential harmful impact of mercury to be minimised in those highly exposed, and can therefore significantly contribute to population health. PMID:25233018

  5. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  6. Comparison of exposure estimation methods for air pollutants: ambient monitoring data and regional air quality simulation.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Mercedes A; Fuentes, Montserrat; Zhang, Yang; Burr, Michael J; Bell, Michelle L

    2012-07-01

    Air quality modeling could potentially improve exposure estimates for use in epidemiological studies. We investigated this application of air quality modeling by estimating location-specific (point) and spatially-aggregated (county level) exposure concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) and ozone (O(3)) for the eastern U.S. in 2002 using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and a traditional approach using ambient monitors. The monitoring approach produced estimates for 370 and 454 counties for PM(2.5) and O(3), respectively. Modeled estimates included 1861 counties, covering 50% more population. The population uncovered by monitors differed from those near monitors (e.g., urbanicity, race, education, age, unemployment, income, modeled pollutant levels). CMAQ overestimated O(3) (annual normalized mean bias=4.30%), while modeled PM(2.5) had an annual normalized mean bias of -2.09%, although bias varied seasonally, from 32% in November to -27% in July. Epidemiology may benefit from air quality modeling, with improved spatial and temporal resolution and the ability to study populations far from monitors that may differ from those near monitors. However, model performance varied by measure of performance, season, and location. Thus, the appropriateness of using such modeled exposures in health studies depends on the pollutant and metric of concern, acceptable level of uncertainty, population of interest, study design, and other factors. PMID:22579357

  7. Comparison of exposure estimation methods for air pollutants: Ambient monitoring data and regional air quality simulation

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Mercedes A.; Fuentes, Montserrat; Zhang, Yang; Burr, Michael J.; Bell, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    Air quality modeling could potentially improve exposure estimates for use in epidemiological studies. We investigated this application of air quality modeling by estimating location-specific (point) and spatially-aggregated (county level) exposure concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) for the eastern U.S. in 2002 using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and a traditional approach using ambient monitors. The monitoring approach produced estimates for 370 and 454 counties for PM2.5 and O3, respectively. Modeled estimates included 1861 counties, covering 50% more population. The population uncovered by monitors differed from those near monitors (e.g., urbanicity, race, education, age, unemployment, income, modeled pollutant levels). CMAQ overestimated O3 (annual normalized mean bias = 4.30%), while modeled PM2.5 had an annual normalized mean bias of −2.09%, although bias varied seasonally, from 32% in November to −27% in July. Epidemiology may benefit from air quality modeling, with improved spatial and temporal resolution and the ability to study populations far from monitors that may differ from those near monitors. However, model performance varied by measure of performance, season, and location. Thus, the appropriateness of using such modeled exposures in health studies depends on the pollutant and metric of concern, acceptable level of uncertainty, population of interest, study design, and other factors. PMID:22579357

  8. Exposure to formaldehyde and its potential human health hazards.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jahan, Shamin Ara; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2011-10-01

    A widely used chemical, formaldehyde is normally present in both indoor and outdoor air. The rapid growth of formaldehyde-related industries in the past two decades reflects the result of its increased use in building materials and other commercial sectors. Consequently, formaldehyde is encountered almost every day from large segments of society due to its various sources. Many governments and agencies around the world have thus issued a series of standards to regulate its exposure in homes, office buildings, workshops, public places, and food. In light of the deleterious properties of formaldehyde, this article provides an overview of its market, regulation standards, and human health effects. PMID:22107164

  9. ATSDR evaluation of potential for human exposure to zinc.

    PubMed

    Roney, Nickolette; Osier, Mark; Paikoff, Sari J; Smith, Cassandra V; Williams, Malcolm; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-01-01

    As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals found at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) sites that have the greatest public health impact. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of portions of the toxicological profile for zinc. The primary purpose of this article is to provide interested individuals with environmental information on zinc that includes production data, environmental fate, potential for human exposure, analytical methods and a listing of regulations and advisories. PMID:18386523

  10. ATSDR evaluation of potential for human exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, S; Wohlers, D; Paikoff, S; Keith, L S; Faroon, O

    2008-01-01

    As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals found at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) sites that have the greatest public health impact. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of portions of the toxicological profile for benzene. The primary purpose of this article is to provide interested individuals with environmental information on benzene that includes production data, environmental fate, potential for human exposure, analytical methods, and a listing of regulations and advisories. PMID:19022881

  11. ATSDR evaluation of potential for human exposure to tungsten.

    PubMed

    Keith, L Samuel; Wohlers, David W; Moffett, Daphne B; Rosemond, Zemoria A

    2007-01-01

    As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals found at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, National Priorities List sites that have the greatest public health impact. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of portions of the Toxicological Profile for Tungsten. The primary purpose of this article is to provide interested individuals with environmental information on tungsten that includes production data, environmental fate, potential for human exposure, analytical methods and a listing of regulations and advisories. PMID:18386524

  12. Human Biological Monitoring of Diisononyl Phthalate and Diisodecyl Phthalate: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saravanabhavan, Gurusankar; Murray, Janine

    2012-01-01

    High molecular-weight phthalates, such as diisononyl phthalate (DINP), and diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), are widely used as plasticizers in the manufacturing of polymers and consumer products. Human biological monitoring studies have employed the metabolites of DINP and DIDP as biomarkers to assess human exposure. In this review, we summarize and analyze publicly available scientific data on chemistry, metabolism, and excretion kinetics, of DINP and DIDP, to identify specific and sensitive metabolites. Human biological monitoring data on DINP and DIDP are scrutinised to assess the suitability of these metabolites as biomarkers of exposure. Results from studies carried out in animals and humans indicate that phthalates are metabolised rapidly and do not bioaccmulate. During Phase-I metabolism, ester hydrolysis of DINP and DIDP leads to the formation of hydrolytic monoesters. These primary metabolites undergo further oxidation reactions to produce secondary metabolites. Hence, the levels of secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP in urine are found to be always higher than the primary metabolites. Results from human biological monitoring studies have shown that the secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP in urine were detected in almost all tested samples, while the primary metabolites were detected in only about 10% of the samples. This indicates that the secondary metabolites are very sensitive biomarkers of DINP/DIDP exposure while primary metabolites are not. The NHANES data indicate that the median concentrations of MCIOP and MCINP (secondary metabolites of DINP and DIDP, resp.) at a population level are about 5.1 μg/L and 2.7 μg/L, respectively. Moreover, the available biological monitoring data suggest that infants/children are exposed to higher levels of phthalates than adults. PMID:22505951

  13. Reproductive health in humans and wildlife: are adverse trends associated with environmental chemical exposure?

    PubMed

    Harrison, P T; Holmes, P; Humfrey, C D

    1997-10-20

    In recent years, evidence from disparate observations has indicated adverse changes in the reproductive health and fecundity of animals and humans. In humans, there is strong evidence for such trends in the incidences of testicular and female breast cancer, and concern has also been expressed regarding semen quality, cryptorchidism, hypospadias and polycystic ovaries. Laboratory studies have indicated that some chemicals in the environment, both natural and synthetic, have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system and that these could, at least theoretically, be partly responsible for the observed changes. Chemicals thus identified include the naturally occurring steroid hormones, phyto- and myco-estrogens, and anthropogenic chemicals such as synthetic hormones, organotins, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, phthalates and bisphenol-A. While there is no direct evidence from human studies to confirm a causal link between exposure and effect, concern exists and is strengthened by reports of adverse reproductive and developmental effects in wildlife, possibly mediated via endocrine disruptive pathways. The development of imposex in neogastropod molluscs exposed to tributyltin has been attributed to such a mechanism and in wild populations of fish, alligators and birds, instances of masculinisation or feminisation in polluted areas have been noted. Among mammals, disturbed fertility of Florida panthers and some marine species has also been reported. A concentrated research and monitoring programme is required to clarify the nature and extent of effects on reproductive health in humans and wildlife, and to assess human and wildlife exposure to relevant naturally occurring or anthropogenic endocrine disrupting substances. This will enable a more robust evaluation of the contribution that environmental chemical exposure may have on adverse trends in the reproductive health of humans and wildlife. PMID:9372623

  14. Memory monitoring by animals and humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. D.; Shields, W. E.; Allendoerfer, K. R.; Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The authors asked whether animals and humans would use similarly an uncertain response to escape indeterminate memories. Monkeys and humans performed serial probe recognition tasks that produced differential memory difficulty across serial positions (e.g., primacy and recency effects). Participants were given an escape option that let them avoid any trials they wished and receive a hint to the trial's answer. Across species, across tasks, and even across conspecifics with sharper or duller memories, monkeys and humans used the escape option selectively when more indeterminate memory traces were probed. Their pattern of escaping always mirrored the pattern of their primary memory performance across serial positions. Signal-detection analyses confirm the similarity of the animals' and humans' performances. Optimality analyses assess their efficiency. Several aspects of monkeys' performance suggest the cognitive sophistication of their decisions to escape.

  15. Monitoring the stability of human vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, William R; Mogg, Robin; Bennett, Philip S; Zhong, Jinglin; Morrisey, Cynthia; Schofield, Timothy L

    2003-08-01

    Postmarketing stability studies of vaccines that tend to be close to their clinical specification at the end of the expiration dating period may require enhanced annual monitoring. In addition, an early assessment of product stability prior to completion of each individual study is desired. However, predictive measures of individual lots may produce early indication of failure. In many cases, these prove to be false alarms. For such products, continued product quality after marketing should, therefore, depend less on evaluating individual observations or individual lot projections, and more on assuring that the underlying stability profile of the product as a whole has not changed. We propose a monitoring procedure and an index of the average quality of vaccine lots currently on the market. We explore the statistical properties of the index for several experimental designs for sampling of marketed lots, and we describe an optimality property of the index. PMID:12921389

  16. 76 FR 2617 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... rule. The proposal was published on October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64412), and is available on MSHA's Web site... INFORMATION: Extension of Comment Period On October 19, 2010 (75 FR 64412), MSHA published a proposed rule...' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety...

  17. 76 FR 30878 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ...In response to requests from interested parties, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is extending the comment period on the proposed rule addressing Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors. This extension gives commenters additional time to review and comment on the proposed...

  18. Exposure to Violence, Parental Monitoring, and Television Viewing as Contributors to Children's Psychological Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Mark I.; Flannery, Daniel J.; Guo, Shenyang; Miller, David; Leibbrandt, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relative contributions of exposure to violence, parental monitoring, and television viewing habits to children's self-reported symptoms of psychological trauma. Children in grades 3-8 in 11 public schools completed an anonymous self-report questionnaire administered during usual school hours. The final sample was comprised…

  19. The head dome: a simplified method for human exposures to inhaled air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Bowes, S M; Frank, R; Swift, D L

    1990-05-01

    Acute controlled exposures of human subjects to air pollutants are customarily carried out with whole-body chambers, masks, or mouthpieces. The use of these methods may be limited by cost or technical considerations. To permit a study involving a highly unstable pollutant, artificial acid fog, administered to subjects during natural breathing, a head-only exposure chamber, called a head dome, was developed. It consists of a transparent cylinder with a neck seal which fits over the subject's head and rests lightly on his shoulders. The head dome does not constrain the upper airways or impede exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Ventilation can be monitored accurately and unobtrusively with a pneumotachograph at the exhaust port of the dome. A thermocouple may be used to monitor the onset and persistence of oronasal breathing. For short-term exposures to unstable or reactive pollutants lasting up to several hours, the head dome is an effective alternative to a whole-body chamber and probably superior to a face mask or mouthpiece. PMID:2346113

  20. The head dome: A simplified method for human exposures to inhaled air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Bowes, S.M. III; Frank, R.; Swift, D.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Acute controlled exposures of human subjects to air pollutants are customarily carried out with whole-body chambers, masks, or mouthpieces. The use of these methods may be limited by cost or technical considerations. To permit a study involving a highly unstable pollutant, artificial acid fog, administered to subjects during natural breathing, a head-only exposure chamber, called a head dome, was developed. It consists of a transparent cylinder with a neck seal which fits over the subject's head and rests lightly on his shoulders. The head dome does not constrain the upper airways or impede exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Ventilation can be monitored accurately and unobtrusively with a pneumotachograph at the exhaust port of the dome. A thermocouple may be used to monitor the onset and persistence of oronasal breathing. For short-term exposures to unstable or reactive pollutants lasting up to several hours, the head dome is an effective alternative to a whole-body chamber and probably superior to a face mask or mouthpiece.

  1. Human exposure to large solar particle events in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Curtis, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Whenever energetic solar protons produced by solar particle events traverse bulk matter, they undergo various nuclear and atomic collision processes which significantly alter the physical characteristics and biologically important properties of their transported radiation fields. These physical interactions and their effect on the resulting radiation field within matter are described within the context of a recently developed deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation transport computer code (BRYNTRN). Using this computer code, estimates of human exposure in interplanetary space, behind nominal (2 g/sq cm) and storm shelter (20 g/sq cm) thicknesses of aluminum shielding, are made for the large solar proton event of August 1972. Included in these calculations are estimates of cumulative exposures to the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow as a function of time during the event. Risk assessment in terms of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is discussed for these organs. Also presented are estimates of organ exposures for hypothetical, worst-case flare scenarios. The rate of dose equivalent accumulation places this situation in an interesting region of dose rate between the very low values of usual concern in terrestrial radiation environments and the high-dose-rate values prevalent in radiation therapy.

  2. New approach for assessing human perfluoroalkyl exposure via hair.

    PubMed

    Alves, Andreia; Jacobs, Griet; Vanermen, Guido; Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years hair has been increasingly used as alternative matrix in human biomonitoring (HBM) of environmental pollutants. Sampling advantages and time integration of exposure assessment seems the most attractive features of hair matrix. In the current study, a novel miniaturized method was developed and validated for measuring 15 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluoro n-butanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA), perfluoro n-hexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluoro n-heptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluor n-octanoic acid (PFOA), perfluoro n-nonanoic acid (PFNA), perfluoro tetradecanoic acid (PFTeDA), perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluoro pentane sulfonic acid (PFPeS), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluoroheptane sulfonic acid (PFHpS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorononane sulfonic acid (PFNS), perfluorodecane sulfonic acid (PFDS) and perfluorododecane sulfonic acid (PFDoS) in human hair by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). After extraction using ethyl acetate, dispersive ENVI-Carb was used for clean-up. Good intra- and inter-day precision for low (LQ 5 ng/g hair) and high spike (HQ 15n g/g) levels were achieved (in general RSD <10%). The accuracy was assessed using recoveries (%), which ranged between 68-118% (LQ) and 70-121% (HQ). The instrumental limit of detection (LODi) and limit of quantification (LOQi) were between 1-4 pg/g hair and 3-13 pg/g hair, respectively. The method limit of quantification (LOQm) ranged between 6 and 301 pg/g hair. The PFAS levels were measured in 30 human hair samples indicating that the levels are low (14-1534 pg/g hair). Some PFAS were not present in any hair sample (e.g. PFHpA, PFTeDA, PFNA, PFPeS, PFHpS, PFOS and PFNS), while other PFAS were frequently detected (PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA, PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS, PFDS and PFDoS) in human hair. Although levels in general were low, there is evidence of higher human exposure to some analytes, such as PFBA

  3. Hg speciation and stable isotope signatures in human hair as a tracer for dietary and occupational exposure to mercury.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Laure; Sonke, Jeroen E; Maurice, Laurence; Monrroy, Selma Luna; Chincheros, Jaime; Amouroux, David; Behra, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of humans and wildlife to various inorganic and organometallic forms of mercury (Hg) may induce adverse health effects. While human populations in developed countries are mainly exposed to marine fish monomethylmercury (MMHg), this is not necessarily the case for developing countries and diverse indigenous people. Identification of Hg exposure sources from biomonitor media such as urine or hair would be useful in combating exposure. Here we report on the Hg stable isotope signatures and Hg speciation in human hair across different gold miner, indigenous and urban populations in Bolivia and France. We found evidence for both mass-dependent isotope fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent isotope fractionation (MIF) in all hair samples. Three limiting cases of dominant exposure to inorganic Hg (IHg), freshwater fish MMHg, and marine fish MMHg sources are used to define approximate Hg isotope source signatures. Knowing the source signatures, we then estimated Hg exposure sources for the Bolivian gold miner populations. Modeled IHg levels in hair correspond well to measured IHg concentrations (R = 0.9), demonstrating that IHg exposure sources to gold miners can be monitored in hair samples following either its chemical speciation or isotopic composition. Different MMHg and inorganic exposure levels among gold miners appear to correspond to living and working conditions, including proximity to small towns, and artisanal vs large scale mining activity. PMID:22003970

  4. Variability in biological monitoring of solvent exposure. I. Development of a population physiological model.

    PubMed Central

    Droz, P O; Wu, M M; Cumberland, W G; Berode, M

    1989-01-01

    Biological indicators of exposure to solvents are often characterised by a high variability that may be due either to fluctuations in exposure or individual differences in the workers. To describe and understand this variability better a physiological model for differing workers under variable industrial environments has been developed. Standard statistical distributions are used to simulate variability in exposure concentration, physical workload, body build, liver function, and renal clearance. For groups of workers exposed daily, the model calculates air monitoring indicators and biological monitoring results (expired air, blood, and urine). The results obtained are discussed and compared with measured data, both physiological (body build, cardiac output, alveolar ventilation) and toxicokinetic for six solvents: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, toluene, styrene, and their main metabolites. Possible applications of this population physiological model are presented. PMID:2765418

  5. Open-source radiation exposure extraction engine (RE3) for dose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenthal, Samuel; Folio, Les; Derderian, Vana; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Our goal was to investigate the feasibility of an open-source, PACS-integrated, DICOM header-based tool that automatically provides granular data for monitoring of CT radiation exposure. To do so, we constructed a radiation exposure extraction engine (RE3) that is seamlessly connected to the PACS using the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) toolkit (DCMTK) and runs on the fly within the workflow. We evaluated RE3's ability to determine the number of acquisitions and calculate the exposure metric dose length product (DLP) by comparing its output to the vendor dose pages. RE3 output closely correlated to the dose pages for both contiguously acquired exams (R2 =0.9987) and non-contiguously acquired exams (R2 =0.9994). RE3 is an open-source, automated radiation monitoring program to provide study-, series-, and slice-level radiation data.

  6. Assessment of human exposure to environmental sources of nickel in Europe: Inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Buekers, Jurgen; De Brouwere, Katleen; Lefebvre, Wouter; Willems, Hanny; Vandenbroele, Marleen; Van Sprang, Patrick; Eliat-Eliat, Maxime; Hicks, Keegan; Schlekat, Christian E; Oller, Adriana R

    2015-07-15

    The paper describes the inhalation nickel (Ni) exposure of humans via the environment for the regional scale in the EU, together with a tiered approach for assessing additional local exposure from industrial emissions. The approach was designed, in the context of REACH, for the purpose of assessing and controlling emissions and air quality in the neighbourhood of Ni producers and downstream users. Two Derived No Effect Level (DNEL) values for chronic inhalation exposure to total Ni in PM10 (20 and 60ngNi/m(3)) were considered. The value of 20ngNi/m(3) is the current EU air quality guidance value. The value of 60ngNi/m(3) is derived here based on recently published Ni data (Oller et al., 2014). Both values are protective for respiratory toxicity and carcinogenicity but differ in the application of toxicokinetic adjustments and cancer threshold considerations. Estimates of air Ni concentrations at the European regional scale were derived from the database of the European Environment Agency. The 50th and 90th percentile regional exposures were below both DNEL values. To assess REACH compliance at the local scale, measured ambient air data are preferred but are often unavailable. A tiered approach for the use of modelled ambient air concentrations was developed, starting with the application of the default EUSES model and progressing to more sophisticated models. As an example, the tiered approach was applied to 33 EU Ni sulphate producers' and downstream users' sites. Applying the EUSES model demonstrates compliance with a DNEL of 60ngNi/m(3) for the majority of sites, while the value of the refined modelling is demonstrated when a DNEL of 20ngNi/m(3) is considered. The proposed approach, applicable to metals in general, can be used in the context of REACH, for refining the risk characterisation and guiding the selection of risk management measures. PMID:25863314

  7. Medications as a source of human exposure to phthalates.

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Russ; Duty, Susan; Godfrey-Bailey, Linda; Calafat, Antonia M

    2004-01-01

    Phthalates are a group of multifunctional chemicals used in consumer and personal care products, plastics, and medical devices. Laboratory studies show that some phthalates are reproductive and developmental toxicants. Recently, human studies have shown measurable levels of several phthalates in most of the U.S. general population. Despite their widespread use and the consistent toxicologic data on phthalates, information is limited on sources and pathways of human exposure to phthalates. One potential source of exposure is medications. The need for site-specific dosage medications has led to the use of enteric coatings that allow the release of the active ingredients into the small intestine or in the colon. The enteric coatings generally consist of various polymers that contain plasticizers, including triethyl citrate, dibutyl sebacate, and phthalates such as diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP). In this article we report on medications as a potential source of exposure to DBP in a man who took Asacol [active ingredient mesalamine (mesalazine)] for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. In a spot urine sample from this man collected 3 months after he started taking Asacol, the concentration of monobutyl phthalate, a DBP metabolite, was 16,868 ng/mL (6,180 micro g/g creatinine). This concentration was more than two orders of magnitude higher than the 95th percentile for males reported in the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The patient's urinary concentrations of monoethyl phthalate (443.7 ng/mL, 162.6 micro g/g creatinine), mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (3.0 ng/mL, 1.1 micro g/g creatinine), and monobenzyl phthalate (9.3 ng/mL, 3.4 micro g/g creatinine) were unremarkable compared with the NHANES 1999-2000 values. Before this report, the highest estimated human exposure to DBP was more than two orders of magnitude lower than the no observable adverse effect level from animal studies. Further research is necessary to

  8. Real-time measurement of dust in the workplace using video exposure monitoring: Farming to pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, P. T.; Forth, A. R.; Clark, R. D. R.; Dowker, K. P.; Thorpe, A.

    2009-02-01

    Real-time, photometric, portable dust monitors have been employed for video exposure monitoring (VEM) to measure and highlight dust levels generated by work activities, illustrate dust control techniques, and demonstrate good practice. Two workplaces, presenting different challenges for measurement, were used to illustrate the capabilities of VEM: (a) poultry farming activities and (b) powder transfer operations in a pharmaceutical company. For the poultry farm work, the real-time monitors were calibrated with respect to the respirable and inhalable dust concentrations using cyclone and IOM reference samplers respectively. Different rankings of exposure for typical activities were found on the small farm studied here compared to previous exposure measurements at larger poultry farms: these were mainly attributed to the different scales of operation. Large variations in the ratios of respirable, inhalable and real-time monitor TWA concentrations of poultry farm dust for various activities were found. This has implications for the calibration of light-scattering dust monitors with respect to inhalable dust concentration. In the pharmaceutical application, the effectiveness of a curtain barrier for dust control when dispensing powder in a downflow booth was rapidly demonstrated.

  9. Assessing isocyanate exposures in polyurethane industry sectors using biological and air monitoring methods.

    PubMed

    Creely, K S; Hughson, G W; Cocker, J; Jones, K

    2006-08-01

    Isocyanates, as a chemical group, are considered to be the biggest cause of occupational asthma in the UK. Monitoring of airborne exposures to total isocyanate is costly, requiring considerable expertise, both in terms of sample collection and chemical analysis and cannot be used to assess the effectiveness of protection from wearing respiratory protective equipment (RPE). Biological monitoring by analysis of metabolites in urine can be a relatively simple and inexpensive way to assess exposure to isocyanates. It may also be a useful way to evaluate the effectiveness of control measures in place. In this study biological and inhalation monitoring were undertaken to assess exposure in a variety of workplaces in the non-motor vehicle repair sector. Companies selected to participate in the survey included only those judged to be using good working practices when using isocyanate formulations. This included companies that used isocyanates to produce moulded polyurethane products, insulation material and those involved in industrial painting. Air samples were collected by personal monitoring and were analysed for total isocyanate content. Urine samples were collected soon after exposure and analysed for the metabolites of different isocyanate species, allowing calculation of the total metabolite concentration. Details of the control measures used and observed contamination of exposed skin were also recorded. A total of 21 companies agreed to participate in the study, with exposure measurements being collected from 22 sites. The airborne isocyanate concentrations were generally very low (range 0.0005-0.066 mg m(-3)). A total of 50 of the 70 samples were <0.001 mg m(-3), the limit of quantification (LOQ), therefore samples below the LOQ were assigned a value of 1/2 LOQ (0.0005 mg m(-3)). Of the 70 samples, 67 were below the current workplace exposure limit of 0.02 mg m(-3). The highest inhalation exposures occurred during spray painting activities in a truck manufacturing

  10. Human lead metabolism: Chronic exposure, bone lead and physiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, David Eric Berkeley

    Exposure to lead is associated with a variety of detrimental health effects. After ingestion or inhalation, lead may be taken up from the bloodstream and retained by bone tissue. X-ray fluorescence was used to make in vivo measurements of bone lead concentration at the tibia and calcaneus for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers. Blood lead levels following a labour disruption were used in conjunction with bone lead readings to examine the endogenous release of lead from bone. Relations between bone lead and a cumulative blood lead index differed depending on time of hiring. This suggests that the transfer of lead from blood to bone has changed over time, possibly as a result of varying exposure conditions. A common polymorphism in the δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme may influence the distribution of lead in humans. Blood lead levels were higher for smelter workers expressing the more rare ALAD2 allele. Bone lead concentrations, however, were not significantly different. This implies that a smaller proportion of lead in blood is distributed to tissue for individuals expressing the ALAD2 allele. The O'Flaherty physiological model of lead metabolism was modified slightly and tested with input from the personal exposure histories of smelter workers. The model results were consistent with observation in tern of endogenous exposure to lead and accumulation of lead in cortical bone. Modelling the calcaneus as a trabecular bone site did not reproduce observed trends. variations in lead metabolism between different trabecular sites may therefore be significant. The model does not incorporate a genetic component, and its output did not reflect observed differences in this respect. This result provides further support for the influence of the ALAD polymorphism on lead metabolism. Experimental trials with a digital spectrometer revealed superior energy resolution and count throughput relative to the conventional X-ray fluorescence system. The associated

  11. [Occupational lead exposure assessment: a proposal for a strategy to monitor prevention of clinical and subclinical effects].

    PubMed

    Araujo, U C; Pivetta, F R; Moreira, J C

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, lead-acid battery factories are one of the heaviest consumers of lead. Due to lead's toxicological properties and prevalent working conditions in such factories, workers are subject to high exposure and health risk. This study discusses results obtained by lead exposure assessment of workers from a Rio de Janeiro battery factory, in light of Brazilian legislation and recent scientific data. Evaluation methods used were environmental (personal air sampling) and biological (determination of lead in blood, Pb-B) monitoring, showing a high personal exposure both in air (>0.1 mg/m3) and blood (55% of Pb-B >25 microg/dl). These results confirmed the inefficiency of current control measures, with a possible 46% of workers presenting a Pb-B range of 25-60 microg/dl in risk areas. Recent data suggest that Pb-B levels above 25 microg/dl are related to subclinical alterations in human body that should be investigated during clinical examination. Finally, we propose a strategy based on environmental and biological monitoring to prevent both clinical and subclinical effects. PMID:10203453

  12. Human exposure to soil contaminants in subarctic Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ellen Stephanie; Liberda, Eric Nicholas; Tsuji, Leonard James S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemical contaminants in the Canadian subarctic present a health risk with exposures primarily occurring via the food consumption. Objective Characterization of soil contaminants is needed in northern Canada due to increased gardening and agricultural food security initiatives and the presence of known point sources of pollution. Design A field study was conducted in the western James Bay Region of Ontario, Canada, to examine the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (ΣDDT), other organochlorines, and metals/metalloids in potentially contaminated agriculture sites. Methods Exposure pathways were assessed by comparing the estimated daily intake to acceptable daily intake values. Ninety soil samples were collected at random (grid sampling) from 3 plots (A, B, and C) in Fort Albany (on the mainland), subarctic Ontario, Canada. The contaminated-soil samples were analysed by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Results The range of ΣDDT in 90 soil samples was below the limit of detection to 4.19 mg/kg. From the 3 soil plots analysed, Plot A had the highest ΣDDT mean concentration of 1.12 mg/kg, followed by Plot B and Plot C which had 0.09 and 0.01 mg/kg, respectively. Concentrations of other organic contaminants and metals in the soil samples were below the limit of detection or found in low concentrations in all plots and did not present a human health risk. Conclusion Exposure analyses showed that the human risk was below regulatory thresholds. However, the ΣDDT concentration in Plot A exceeded soil guidelines set out by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment of 0.7 mg/kg, and thus the land should not be used for agricultural or recreational purposes. Both Plots B and C were below threshold limits, and this land can be used for agricultural purposes. PMID:26025557

  13. International project on individual monitoring and radiation exposure levels in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Padovani, R; Le Heron, J; Cruz-Suarez, R; Duran, A; Lefaure, C; Miller, D L; Sim, H K; Vano, E; Rehani, M; Czarwinski, R

    2011-03-01

    Within the Information System on Occupational Exposure in Medicine, Industry and Research (ISEMIR), a new International Atomic Energy Agency initiative, a Working Group on interventional cardiology, aims to assess staff radiation protection (RP) levels and to propose an international database of occupational exposures. A survey of regulatory bodies (RBs) has provided information at the country level on RP practice in interventional cardiology (IC). Concerning requirements for wearing personal dosemeters, only 57 % of the RB specifies the number and position of dosemeters for staff monitoring. Less than 40 % of the RBs could provide occupational doses. Reported annual median effective dose values (often <0.5 mSv) were lower than expected considering validated data from facility-specific studies, indicating that compliance with continuous individual monitoring is often not achieved in IC. A true assessment of annual personnel doses in IC will never be realised unless a knowledge of monitoring compliance is incorporated into the analysis. PMID:21051431

  14. Mass spectrometry data from proteomic analysis of human skin keratins after exposure to UV radiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Matsushima, Keita; Miyamoto, Kohei; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    A mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic methodology was employed to monitor oxidative modifications in keratins, the main constituents of human skin (“Non-invasive proteomic analysis of human skin keratins: screening of methionine oxidation in keratins by mass spectrometry” [1], “UV irradiation-induced methionine oxidation in human skin keratins: mass spectrometry-based non-invasive proteomic analysis” [2]). Human skin proteins were obtained non-invasively by tape stripping and solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) buffer, followed by purification and digestion using the filter-aided sample preparation method. The tryptic peptides were then analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC)/electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS, tandem MS (MS/MS), and LC/ESI-selected reaction monitoring (SRM)/MS. The MS/MS data were generated to confirm amino acid sequences and oxidation sites of tryptic peptides D290VDGAYMTK298 (P1) and N258MQDMVEDYR267 (P2), which contain the most susceptible oxidation sites (Met259, Met262, and Met296 in K1 keratin) upon UVA irradiation [2]. Subsequently, quantitative determination of the relative oxidation levels of P1 and P1 [2] was achieved by LC/ESI-SRM/MS analyses of P1 and P2 together with their oxidized forms after exposure to UVA radiation or treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PMID:26958637

  15. Mass spectrometry data from proteomic analysis of human skin keratins after exposure to UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Matsushima, Keita; Miyamoto, Kohei; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2016-06-01

    A mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic methodology was employed to monitor oxidative modifications in keratins, the main constituents of human skin ("Non-invasive proteomic analysis of human skin keratins: screening of methionine oxidation in keratins by mass spectrometry" [1], "UV irradiation-induced methionine oxidation in human skin keratins: mass spectrometry-based non-invasive proteomic analysis" [2]). Human skin proteins were obtained non-invasively by tape stripping and solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) buffer, followed by purification and digestion using the filter-aided sample preparation method. The tryptic peptides were then analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC)/electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS, tandem MS (MS/MS), and LC/ESI-selected reaction monitoring (SRM)/MS. The MS/MS data were generated to confirm amino acid sequences and oxidation sites of tryptic peptides D(290)VDGAYMTK(298) (P1) and N(258)MQDMVEDYR(267) (P2), which contain the most susceptible oxidation sites (Met(259), Met(262), and Met(296) in K1 keratin) upon UVA irradiation [2]. Subsequently, quantitative determination of the relative oxidation levels of P1 and P1 [2] was achieved by LC/ESI-SRM/MS analyses of P1 and P2 together with their oxidized forms after exposure to UVA radiation or treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PMID:26958637

  16. EXPOSURE MODELING OF ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting an intensive characterization and human exposure monitoring program of acid species and related air pollutants in an urban environment. he EPA's Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) in coopera...

  17. A Cell Kinetic Model of Granulocytopoiesis Under Radiation Exposure: Extension from Murines to Canines and Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Space radiation poses significant challenges to space travel, and it is essential to understand the possible adverse effects from space radiation exposure to the radiosensitive organ systems that are important for immediate survival of human, e.g., the hematopoietic system. In this presentation a biomathematical model of granulocytopoiesis is described and used to analyze the blood granulocyte changes seen in the blood of mammalians under continuous and acute radiation exposure. This is one of a set of hematopoietic models that have been successfully utilized to simulate and interpret the experimental data of acute and chronic radiation on rodents. We discuss the underlying implicit regulation mechanism and the biological relevance of the kinetic parameters estimation method. Extension of the model to predictions in dogs and humans systems indicates that the modeling results are consistent with the cumulative experimental and empirical data from various sources. This implies the potential to integrate the models into one united system for monitoring the hematopoietic response of various species under irradiation. Based on the evidence of threshold responses of dogs to extended periods of low daily dose exposures, we discuss the potential health risks of the space traveler under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation and the possibly encountered Solar Particle Events.

  18. 40 CFR 158.250 - Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. 158.250 Section 158.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. No data for applicator exposure and...

  19. HEDS - EPA DATABASE SYSTEM FOR PUBLIC ACCESS TO HUMAN EXPOSURE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) is an Internet-based system developed to provide public access to human-exposure-related data from studies conducted by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). HEDS was designed to work with the EPA Office of Research and Devel...

  20. THE HUMAN EXPOSURE DATABASE SYSTEM (HEDS)-PUTTING THE NHEXAS DATA ON-LINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed an Internet accessible Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) to provide the results of NERL human exposure studies to both the EPA and the external scientific communities. The first data sets that will be ava...

  1. 40 CFR 158.250 - Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. 158.250 Section 158.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. No data for applicator exposure and...

  2. 40 CFR 158.250 - Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. 158.250 Section 158.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. No data for applicator exposure and...

  3. 40 CFR 158.250 - Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. 158.250 Section 158.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. No data for applicator exposure and...

  4. 40 CFR 158.250 - Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. 158.250 Section 158.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Experimental use permit data requirements for human exposure. No data for applicator exposure and...

  5. Human Brucella canis Infection and Subsequent Laboratory Exposures Associated with a Puppy, New York City, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Dentinger, Catherine M.; Jacob, Kathleen; Lee, Lillian V.; Mendez, Herman A.; Chotikanatis, Kobkul; McDonough, Patrick L.; Chico, David M.; De, Barun K.; Traxler, Rita M.; Campagnolo, Enzo R.; Schmitt, David; Guerra, Marta A.; Slavinski, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Brucella canis infection incidence is unknown. Most identified cases are associated with pet dogs. Contact with pathogenic Brucella spp. can lead to laboratory-acquired infections. We identified a pediatric B. canis case, the source, and other exposed persons. A three-year-old New York City child with fever and dyspnea was hospitalized for 48 hours for bronchiolitis. After her admission blood culture grew B. canis, she was prescribed antimicrobials and recovered. B. canis was isolated from blood of the child's pet dog. Isolates from the child and the dog were genetically similar. The dog originated from an Iowa breeding facility which was quarantined after identification of the puppy's infection. Thirty-one laboratory workers were exposed and subsequently monitored for symptoms; 15 completed post-exposure prophylaxis. This first report strongly suggesting B. canis transmission from a canine to a child in the United States highlights the need for coordinated control policies to minimize human illness. PMID:25363807

  6. Human Brucella canis Infection and Subsequent Laboratory Exposures Associated with a Puppy, New York City, 2012.

    PubMed

    Dentinger, C M; Jacob, K; Lee, L V; Mendez, H A; Chotikanatis, K; McDonough, P L; Chico, D M; De, B K; Tiller, R V; Traxler, R M; Campagnolo, E R; Schmitt, D; Guerra, M A; Slavinski, S A

    2015-08-01

    Human Brucella canis infection incidence is unknown. Most identified cases are associated with pet dogs. Laboratory-acquired infections can occur following contact with Brucella spp. We identified a paediatric B. canis case, the source and other exposed persons. A 3-year-old New York City child with fever and dyspnoea was hospitalized for 48 h for bronchiolitis. After her admission, blood culture grew B. canis, she was prescribed anti-microbials and recovered. B. canis was also isolated from blood of the child's pet dog; these isolates were genetically similar. The dog originated from an Iowa breeding facility which was quarantined after identification of the dog's infection. Additionally, 31 laboratory workers were exposed and subsequently monitored for symptoms; 15 completed post-exposure prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first report strongly suggesting B. canis zoonotic transmission to a child in the United States, and highlights the need for coordinated control policies to minimize human illness. PMID:25363807

  7. Monitoring of Occupational Exposure of Mild Steel Welders to Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Morteza; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Salehpour, Sousan

    2011-01-01

    Background Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding are widely used for mild steel segments in basic metal industries. Pulmonary problems such as asthma, pulmonary inflammation, hyper-responsiveness of airways and higher susceptibility to infections are reported as the result of occupational exposure of welders to ozone and nitrogen oxides. Potent oxidizing agents like ozone and nitrogen oxides are also reported to be a precursor for respiratory problems and cause lipid peroxidation of membranes. Materials and Methods A total of 43 nonsmoking MIG and TIG welders and 41 nonsmoking workers without appreciable exposure to any chemicals as the control population were chosen to participate in this study. Occupational exposure to ozone was monitored according to the validated methods. Malondialdehyde (MDA) of blood serum as a biomarker for lipid peroxidation was analyzed using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results A total of 88.4% and 74.4% of welders had exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide higher than the permissible limit of occupational exposure, respectively. Generally, exposure of MIG welders to ozone was significantly higher than TIG welders (P = 0.006). However, exposure to nitrogen dioxide gas was comparable in both groups. Serum MDA of welders was significantly higher than that of the control group (P = 0.001). A significant correlation was detected between ozone exposure and level of serum malondialdehyde. Such correlation was not observed for nitrogen dioxide exposure. Conclusion Considering the high exposure of welders to ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and higher level of serum malondialdehyde in them compared to controls, risk management is recommended for this group of workers. PMID:25191389

  8. Monitoring and modeling human interactions with ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milesi, Cristina

    With rapidly increasing consumption rates and global population, there is a growing interest in understanding how to balance human activities with the other components of the Earth system. Humans alter ecosystem functioning with land cover changes, greenhouse gas emissions and overexploitation of natural resources. On the other side, climate and its inherent interannual variability drive global Net Primary Productivity (NPP), the base of energy for all trophic levels, shaping humans' distribution on the land surface and their sensitivity to natural and accelerated patterns of variation in ecosystem processes. In this thesis, I analyzed anthropogenic influences on ecosystems and ecosystems impacts on humans through a multi-scale approach. Anthropogenic influences were analyzed with a special focus on urban ecosystems, the living environment of nearly half of the global population and almost 90% of the population in the industrialized countries. A poorly quantified aspect of urban ecosystems is the biogeochemistry of urban vegetation, intensively managed through fertilization and irrigation. In chapter 1, adapting the ecosystem model Biome-BGC, I simulated the growth of turf grasses across the United States, and estimated their potential impact on the continental water and carbon budget. Using a remote sensing-based approach, I also developed a methodology to estimate the impact of land cover changes due to urbanization on the regional photosynthetic capacity (chapter 2), finding that low-density urbanization can retain high levels of net primary productivity, although at the expense of inefficient sprawl. One of the feedbacks of urbanization is the urban heat island effect, which I analyzed in conjunction with a remote sensing based estimate of fractional impervious surface area, showing how this is related to increases in land surface temperatures, independently from geographic location and population density (chapter 3). Finally, in chapter 4, I described the

  9. Air pollution effects field research facility: 3. UV-B exposure and monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    McEvers, J.A.; Hileman, M.S.; Edwards, N.T.

    1993-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Outdoor UltraViolet-B (UV-B) Exposure and Monitoring Facility was developed in 1980 to provide well-controlled and -monitored exposure of specific terrestrial plant. species to elevated levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The introduction of various anthropogenic agents into the earth`s stratosphere has resulted in a decrease in the volume of ozone (O{sub 3}) present here. The decrease in O{sub 3} has resulted in an increase in the level of UV radiation reaching thee earth`s surface. Of particular interest is the level of UV-B, because it has the most detrimental effect on living tissue. A thorough understanding of the effects of elevated levels of UV-B on living tissue is critical to the formulation of economic policy regarding production of such agents and alternative strategies. The UV region of interest is referred to as UV-B and corresponds to radiation with a wavelength of 290 to 320 nm. Design, operation, and performance of the automated generation, exposure, and monitoring system are described. The system has proved to be reliable and easy to maintain and operate, and it provides significant flexibility in exposure programs. The system software is described, and detailed listings are provided. The ability to expose plants to controlled set point percentages of UV-B above the ambient level was developed.

  10. Comparison of recruitment, retention, and compliance results for three children's exposure monitoring studies.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Ken

    2005-07-01

    The School Health Initiative: Environment, Learning, Disease (SHIELD) study, the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES), and the National Cooperative Inner-City Asthma Study (NCICAS) are three of the most intensive and invasive exposure-monitoring projects ever undertaken in children. An intrinsic facet of each study was the need to recruit children and their families, retain them for the duration of the project, and ensure that they completed monitoring protocols successfully. All of the studies used fiscal incentives to encourage participation, retention, and compliance. Recruitment rates varied from 40% in MNCPES, to 57% in SHIELD, to 64% in NCICAS, while retention rates varied from 85% in SHIELD, to 94% in MNCPES, to 95% in NCICAS. Rates of compliance with exposure sampling procedures were typically >80% for each study. For example, > or =85% of the enrolled children provided all requested urine samples (1 for NCICAS, 2 for SHIELD, 3 for MNCPES), and 82% of the children in SHIELD provided two out of two blood samples (optional in MNCPES and NCICAS). However, compliance rates were substantially lower (34% SHIELD, 40% NCICAS, not applicable to MNCPES) for the more complex and time-consuming protocol used to collect peak flow data. Overall, results demonstrate that it is practical and affordable to conduct demanding exposure-monitoring studies in children, including children from poor minority communities. PMID:15523509

  11. Monitoring agricultural rodenticide use and secondary exposure of raptors in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J; Sharp, E; Taylor, M J; Melton, L; Hartley, G

    2013-08-01

    Despite the documented risk of secondary poisoning to non-target species by anticoagulant rodenticides there is no statutory post-approval monitoring of their use in the UK. This paper presents results from two Scottish monitoring schemes for the period 2000-2010; recording rodenticide use on arable farms and the presence of residues in raptor carcasses. More than three quarters of arable farms used anticoagulant rodenticides; predominately the second generation compounds difenacoum and bromadiolone. There was widespread exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides in liver tissues of the raptor species tested and the residues encountered generally reflected agricultural use patterns. As found in other studies, Red Kites (Milvus milvus) appeared to be particularly vulnerable to rodenticide exposure, 70 % of those sampled (n = 114) contained residues and 10 % died as a result of rodenticide ingestion. More unexpectedly, sparrowhawks (Accipiter nisus), which prey almost exclusively on birds, had similar exposure rates to species which prey on rodents. Although, with the exception of kites, confirmed mortality from rodenticides was low, the widespread exposure recorded is concerning. Particularly when coupled with a lack of data about the sub-lethal effects of these compounds. This raises questions regarding whether statutory monitoring of use is needed; both to address whether there are deficiencies in compliance with approval conditions or whether the recommended risk management procedures are themselves adequate to protect non-target wildlife. PMID:23595554

  12. Energy monitoring system based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Husain, Mohd Nor; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abdul; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Malek, Fareq

    2015-05-01

    Human behaviors always related to day routine activities in a smart house directly give the significant factor to manage energy usage in human life. An Addition that, the factor will contribute to the best efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on the monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior at working place. Besides that, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy saving based on human behaviors. This scenario will help to see the human activity in the workplace in order to get the energy saving and support world green environment.

  13. Human health perspective on environmental exposure to hydrazines: a review.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, G; Hansen, H

    1998-08-01

    Hydrazines are colorless liquid compounds that have been found at various Department of Defense hazardous waste sites. They are designated as environmental contaminants causing adverse effects to public health and have been identified at many National Priorities List (NPL) hazardous waste sites and federal facilities sites in the United States. Three chemically similar hydrazines-hydrazine, 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine--occur in the environment and cause adverse health effects to persons living near hazardous waste sites. Humans are exposed to hydrazines by drinking contaminated, water, by inhaling contaminated air, or by swallowing or touching contaminated dust. Human occupational data and studies in laboratory animals suggest that people exposed to hydrazines may develop adverse systemic health effects or cancer. Hydrazines have caused cancer in animals following acute- or intermediate- duration exposure by the oral and inhalation routes. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the World Health Organization have classified hydrazines as possible cancer-causing environmental contaminants. PMID:9717244

  14. Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal (REMIT) system. User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Cale, R.; Clark, T.; Dixson, R.; Hagemeyer, D.

    1993-06-01

    The Radiation Exposure Monitoring and Information Transmittal (REMIT) system is designed to assist US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)licensees in meeting the reporting requirements of the revised 10 CFR 20 and in agreement with the guidance contained in R.G. 8.7, Rev. 1, ``Instructions for Recording and Reporting Occupational Exposure Data.`` REMIT is a personal computer (PC) based menu driven system that facilitates the manipulation of data base files to record and report radiation exposure information. REMIT is designed to be user-friendly and contains the full text of R. G. 8.7, Rev. 1, on-line as well as context-sensitive help throughout the program. The user can enter data directly from NRC Forms 4 or 5, REMIT allows the user to view the individual`s exposure in relation to regulatory or administrative limits and alerts the user to exposures in excess of these limits. The system also provides for the calculation and summation of dose from intakes and the determination of the dose to the maximally exposed extremity for the monitoring year. REMIT can produce NRC Forms 4 and 5 in paper and electronic format and can import/export data from ASCII and data base files.

  15. Air pollution dispersion models for human exposure predictions in London.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Sean D; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L; Kelly, Frank J; Ross Anderson, H; Carslaw, David C

    2013-01-01

    The London household survey has shown that people travel and are exposed to air pollutants differently. This argues for human exposure to be based upon space-time-activity data and spatio-temporal air quality predictions. For the latter, we have demonstrated the role that dispersion models can play by using two complimentary models, KCLurban, which gives source apportionment information, and Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ)-urban, which predicts hourly air quality. The KCLurban model is in close agreement with observations of NO(X), NO(2) and particulate matter (PM)(10/2.5), having a small normalised mean bias (-6% to 4%) and a large Index of Agreement (0.71-0.88). The temporal trends of NO(X) from the CMAQ-urban model are also in reasonable agreement with observations. Spatially, NO(2) predictions show that within 10's of metres of major roads, concentrations can range from approximately 10-20 p.p.b. up to 70 p.p.b. and that for PM(10/2.5) central London roadside concentrations are approximately double the suburban background concentrations. Exposure to different PM sources is important and we predict that brake wear-related PM(10) concentrations are approximately eight times greater near major roads than at suburban background locations. Temporally, we have shown that average NO(X) concentrations close to roads can range by a factor of approximately six between the early morning minimum and morning rush hour maximum periods. These results present strong arguments for the hybrid exposure model under development at King's and, in future, for in-building models and a model for the London Underground. PMID:23443237

  16. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR APPLICATION OF CFD TO ESTIMATING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), Fluent, Inc. and the US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) propose to improve the ability of environmental scientists to use computer modeling for environmental exposure to air pollutants in human exp...

  17. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell’s ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. PMID:23811327

  18. Influence of environmental exposure on human epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Carmen J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental toxicants can alter epigenetic regulatory features such as DNA methylation and microRNA expression. As the sensitivity of epigenomic regulatory features may be greatest during the in utero period, when critical windows are narrow, and when epigenomic profiles are being set, this review will highlight research focused on that period. I will focus on work in human populations, where the impact of environmental toxicants in utero, including cigarette smoke and toxic trace metals such as arsenic, mercury and manganese, on genome-wide, gene-specific DNA methylation has been assessed. In particular, arsenic is highlighted, as this metalloid has been the focus of a number of studies and its detoxification mechanisms are well understood. Importantly, the tissues and cells being examined must be considered in context in order to interpret the findings of these studies. For example, by studying the placenta, it is possible to identify potential epigenetic adaptations of key genes and pathways that may alter the developmental course in line with the developmental origins of health and disease paradigm. Alternatively, studies of newborn cord blood can be used to examine how environmental exposure in utero can impact the composition of cells within the peripheral blood, leading to immunological effects of exposure. The results suggest that in humans, like other vertebrates, there is a susceptibility for epigenomic alteration by the environment during intrauterine development, and this may represent a mechanism of plasticity of the organism in response to its environment as well as a mechanism through which long-term health consequences can be shaped. PMID:25568453

  19. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are associated with severe lead poisoning. Leaded gasoline and lead in food, but not lead-based paint, are strongly associated with population blood lead levels in both young children and adults. Soil lead and house dust, but not lead-based paint, are associated with population blood lead levels in children. Most soil lead and house dust are associated with leaded gasoline. Lead-based paint dust is associated with cases of renovation of either exterior or interior environments in which the paint was pulverized. Based upon the limited data to date, abatement of soil lead is more effective than abatement of lead-based paint in reducing blood lead levels of young children. About equal numbers of children under 7 years of age are exposed to soil lead and lead-based paint. Seasonality studies point to soil lead as the main source of population blood lead levels. Soil lead is a greater risk factor than lead-based paint to children engaged in hand-to-mouth and pica behavior. In summary, soil lead is important for addressing the population of children at risk of lead poisoning. When soil lead is acknowledged by regulators and the public health community as an important pathway of human lead exposure, then more effective opportunities for improving primary lead prevention can become a reality. Images Figure 1 PMID:9539015

  20. Computer subroutines for estimation of human exposure to radiation in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computer subroutines to calculate human exposure to trapped radiations in low Earth orbit (LEO) on the basis of a simple approximation of the human geometry by spherical shell shields of varying thickness are presented and detailed. The subroutines calculate the dose to critical body organs and the fraction of exposure limit reached as a function of altitude of orbit, degree of inclination, shield thickness, and days in mission. Exposure rates are compared with current exposure limits.

  1. Development and application of quantitative methods for monitoring dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Flack, Sheila; Goktepe, Ipek; Ball, Louise M; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2008-03-01

    Quantitative methods to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to the fungicide propiconazole were developed in the laboratory and applied in the occupational exposure setting for monitoring five farm workers' exposure during pesticide preparation and application to peach crops. Dermal exposure was measured with tape-strips applied to the skin, and the amount of propiconazole was normalized to keratin content in the tape-strip. Inhalation exposure was measured with an OVS tube placed in the worker's breathing-zone during pesticide handling. Samples were analyzed by GC-MS in EI+ mode (limit of detection 6 pg microl(-1)). Dermal exposure ranged from non-detectable to 32.1 +/- 22.6 ng per microg keratin while breathing-zone concentrations varied from 0.2 to 2.2 microg m(-3). A positive correlation was observed between breathing-zone concentrations and ambient air temperature (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.01). Breathing-zone concentrations did not correlate with dermal exposure levels (r2 = 0.11, p = 0.52). Propiconazole levels were below limit of detection when rubber gloves, coveralls, and full-face mask were used. The total-body propiconazole dose, determined for each worker by summing the estimated dermal dose and inhalation dose, ranged from 0.01 to 12 microg per kg body weight per day. Our results show that tape-stripping of the skin and the OVS can be effectively utilized to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole, respectively, and that the dermal route of exposure contributed substantially more to the total dose than the inhalation route. PMID:18392276

  2. Promoting early exposure monitoring for respirable crystalline silica: Taking the laboratory to the mine site.

    PubMed

    Cauda, Emanuele; Miller, Arthur; Drake, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) in the mining industry is a recognized occupational hazard. The assessment and monitoring of the exposure to RCS is limited by two main factors: (1) variability of the silica percent in the mining dust and (2) lengthy off-site laboratory analysis of collected samples. The monitoring of respirable dust via traditional or real-time techniques is not adequate. A solution for on-site quantification of RCS in dust samples is being investigated by the Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, a division of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The use of portable Fourier transform infrared analyzers in conjunction with a direct-on-filter analysis approach is proposed. The progress made so far, the necessary steps in progress, and the application of the monitoring solution to a small data set is presented. When developed, the solution will allow operators to estimate RCS immediately after sampling, resulting in timelier monitoring of RCS for self-assessment of compliance at the end of the shift, more effective engineering monitoring, and better evaluation of control technologies. PMID:26558490

  3. Statistical Anomaly Detection for Monitoring of Human Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, K.; Fuse, T.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of human dynamics has drawn attention to various areas. Due to the wide spread of positioning technologies that use GPS or public Wi-Fi, location information can be obtained with high spatial-temporal resolution as well as at low cost. By collecting set of individual location information in real time, monitoring of human dynamics is recently considered possible and is expected to lead to dynamic traffic control in the future. Although this monitoring focuses on detecting anomalous states of human dynamics, anomaly detection methods are developed ad hoc and not fully systematized. This research aims to define an anomaly detection problem of the human dynamics monitoring with gridded population data and develop an anomaly detection method based on the definition. According to the result of a review we have comprehensively conducted, we discussed the characteristics of the anomaly detection of human dynamics monitoring and categorized our problem to a semi-supervised anomaly detection problem that detects contextual anomalies behind time-series data. We developed an anomaly detection method based on a sticky HDP-HMM, which is able to estimate the number of hidden states according to input data. Results of the experiment with synthetic data showed that our proposed method has good fundamental performance with respect to the detection rate. Through the experiment with real gridded population data, an anomaly was detected when and where an actual social event had occurred.

  4. Influence of the exposure time in the area monitors at radiodiagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyton, F.; Ferreira, M. J.; Macedo, E. M.; Navarro, V. C. C.; Garcia, I. F. M.; Pereira, L. L. S.; Navarro, M. V. T.

    2016-07-01

    Area monitoring ensures radiation exposure at an acceptable level, which must be lower than the legal limit. Experimental measurements were taken in an ionizing radiation calibration laboratory. The specified reference radiation to radiation protection N80 was used. Five area monitors were used. The ranges of dose rate inaccuracy measured in rate mode for times ≤ 2 and ≥ 3s were from 10 to 48% and from 1 to 15%, respectively. The inaccuracy ranges measured in integrated mode for times ≤ 2 and ≥ 3s were from 4 to 8% and from 0 to 22%, respectively.

  5. The use of mammals as sentinels for human exposure to toxic contaminants in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, D J; Kaneene, J B; Poppenga, R H

    1993-01-01

    The use of sentinel species shows the potential to bridge the gap between animal-based and human-based environmental health research. With regard to the assessment of environmental contamination, the use of the terms "indicator," "monitor," and "sentinel" has often been confusing and ambiguous. A set of definitions is proposed as a standard to rectify this situation. The advantages of the use of sentinel species are provided, as well as criteria for sentinel selection, based on species characteristics. The recent use of mammals as sentinels for human exposure to toxic environmental contaminants is reviewed. A tabulated review of mammals proposed as indicators or monitors is included, as these may act as a database for the selection of sentinel species for future research efforts. The complexity and subtlety of factors interacting between an organism and its environment make it imperative that one provide a focused definition of what one wants the sentinel to assess and for what particular aspect of human health. Some examples of how sentinels might be selected for particular research questions are provided. While the potential for sentinel use in the field of environmental health is enormous, future investigators need to choose sentinels carefully, based on well-defined research questions, and confine conclusions drawn to the particular problem the sentinel was chosen to assess. PMID:8319652

  6. Energy monitoring based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, N. H.; Husain, M. N.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Othman, M. A.; Malek, F.

    2014-04-01

    Human behavior is the most important factor in order to manage energy usage. Nowadays, smart house technology offers a better quality of life by introducing automated appliance control and assistive services. However, human behaviors will contribute to the efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior atb the workplace. Then, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy in efficient ways based on human behaviours. This scenario will lead to the positive impact in order to achieve the energy saving in the building and support the green environment.

  7. Demonstration of real-time monitoring of a photolithographic exposure process using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, C.D.

    1998-02-01

    Silicon wafers are coated with photoresist and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light in a laboratory to simulate typical conditions expected in an actual semiconductor manufacturing process tool. Air is drawn through the exposure chamber and analyzed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI/MS). Species that evaporate or outgas from the wafer are thus detected. The purpose of such analyses is to determine the potential of CI/MS as a real-time process monitoring tool. Results demonstrate that CI/MS can remotely detect the products evolved before, during, and after wafer UV exposure; and that the quantity and type of products vary with the photoresist coated on the wafer. Such monitoring could provide semiconductor manufacturers benefits in quality control and process analysis. Tool and photoresist manufacturers could also realize benefits from this measurement technique with respect to new tool, method, or photoresist development. The benefits realized can lead to improved device yields and reduced product and development costs.

  8. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  9. High-resolution EUV imaging tools for resist exposure and aerial image monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Brisco, O.; Brunton, A.; Cashmore, J.; Elbourn, P.; Elliner, G.; Gower, M.; Greuters, J.; Grunewald, P.; Gutierrez, R.; Hill, T.; Hirsch, J.; Kling, L.; McEntee, N.; Mundair, S.; Richards, P.; Truffert, V.; Wallhead, I.; Whitfield, M.; Hudyma, R.

    2005-05-01

    Key features are presented of two high-resolution EUV imaging tools: the MS-13 Microstepper wafer exposure and the RIM-13 reticle imaging microscope. The MS-13 has been developed for EUV resist testing and technology evaluation at the 32nm node and beyond, while the RIM-13 is designed for actinic aerial image monitoring of blank and patterned EUV reticles. Details of the design architecture, module layout, major subsystems and performance are presented for both tools.

  10. Usability of a Daily Noise Exposure Monitoring Device for Industrial Workers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Steven C.; Rabinowitz, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Usability is an important but often overlooked aspect of personal protective equipment technology. As part of a worksite intervention trial of a new technology for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss that allows workers to monitor their noise exposure inside of hearing protection on a daily basis, we studied the usability of the daily noise exposure monitoring device. Methods: We conducted surveys and focus groups for workers enrolled in an intervention trial of daily use of a noise dosimeter with a microphone fitted inside of an individual’s hearing protector (QuietDose). Volunteers completed a baseline and annual survey that included questions about perceived usability of the QuietDose device. Responses to usability questions on the annual survey were abstracted and compared to whether the individual was still using the device. Finally, 16 in-depth focus groups were conducted with subjects to qualitatively explore common themes regarding the usability of the technology. Results: Reported problems downloading data or starting and stopping the monitoring device and/or ear discomfort were associated with whether individuals chose to continue monitoring and downloading their noise exposure data. Perceived benefits of the technology included the perception that it could help preserve hearing. Conclusions: A novel technology that allows workers to record noise exposures inside of hearing protectors on a daily basis has been developed. Current users of the device report positive perception about how the device is helping them prevent noise-induced hearing loss. However, in its current version, users reported a number of usability barriers that are associated with stopping use of the device. These barriers to use should be addressed as the technology progresses. PMID:22459319

  11. Computational strategy for quantifying human pesticide exposure based upon a saliva measurement

    PubMed Central

    Timchalk, Charles; Smith, Jordan N.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative exposure data is important for evaluating toxicity risk and biomonitoring is a critical tool for evaluating human exposure. Direct personal monitoring provides the most accurate estimation of a subject’s true dose, and non-invasive methods are advocated for quantifying exposure to xenobiotics. In this regard, there is a need to identify chemicals that are cleared in saliva at concentrations that can be quantified to support the implementation of this approach. This manuscript reviews the computational modeling approaches that are coupled to in vivo and in vitro experiments to predict salivary uptake and clearance of xenobiotics and provides additional insight on species-dependent differences in partitioning that are of key importance for extrapolation. The primary mechanism by which xenobiotics leave the blood and enter saliva involves paracellular transport, passive transcellular diffusion, or transcellular active transport with the majority of xenobiotics transferred by passive diffusion. The transcellular or paracellular diffusion of unbound chemicals in plasma to saliva has been computationally modeled using compartmental and physiologically based approaches. Of key importance for determining the plasma:saliva partitioning was the utilization of the Schmitt algorithm that calculates partitioning based upon the tissue composition, pH, chemical pKa, and plasma protein-binding. Sensitivity analysis identified that both protein-binding and pKa (for weak acids and bases) have significant impact on determining partitioning and species dependent differences based upon physiological variance. Future strategies are focused on an in vitro salivary acinar cell based system to experimentally determine and computationally predict salivary gland uptake and clearance for xenobiotics. It is envisioned that a combination of salivary biomonitoring and computational modeling will enable the non-invasive measurement of chemical exposures in human populations. PMID

  12. Guide to the evaluation of human exposure to noise from large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.; Grosveld, F.

    1982-01-01

    Guidance for evaluating human exposure to wind turbine noise is provided and includes consideration of the source characteristics, the propagation to the receiver location, and the exposure of the receiver to the noise. The criteria for evaluation of human exposure are based on comparisons of the noise at the receiver location with the human perception thresholds for wind turbine noise and noise-induced building vibrations in the presence of background noise.

  13. Human milk as a source of methylmercury exposure in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, P. ); Jorgensen, P.J. ); Weihe, P. )

    1994-01-01

    As methylmercury is excreted in human milk and infants are particularly susceptible to toxicity due to this compound, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible transfer of methylmercury to infants via breast-feeding. In a community with a high intake of seafood, 583 children from a birth cohort were followed. The duration of nursing was recorded, and hair samples were obtained for mercury analysis at approximately 12 months of age. The hair mercury concentrations increased with the length of the nursing period, and those nursed throughout the first year showed the highest geometric mean (9.0 nmol/g or 1.8 [mu]g/g). Human milk therefore seems to be an important source of methylmercury exposure in infants. As increasing time interval from weaning to hair sample collection was not associated with any detectable decrease in mercury concentrations. A slow or absent elimination of methylmercury during the first year after birth could explain this finding. In certain fishing communities, infants nursed for long periods may be at increased risk of developing methylmercury toxicity. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Anthropogenic and biogenic sources of Ethylene and the potential for human exposure: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Morgott, David A

    2015-11-01

    This review examines available published information on ethylene emission sources, emission magnitudes, and inhalation exposures in order to assess those factors and circumstances that can affect human contact with this omnipresent gas. The results reveal that airborne ethylene concentrations at the ppb levels are commonplace and can arise in the vicinity of traffic corridors, forest fires, indoor kitchens, horticultural areas, oil fields, house fires, and petrochemical sites. The primary biogenic sources of ethylene derive from microbial activity in most soil and marine environments as well as its biological formation in wide variety of plant species. Sizable amounts of ethylene can also result from the burning of fossil fuels, forest and savanna fires, and crop residue combustion. Motor vehicle exhaust is the largest contributor to urban ethylene levels under most circumstances, but industrial flare releases and fugitive emissions may also be of relevance. Occupational exposures generally range up to about 50-100 ppm and have been documented for those working in the horticultural, petrochemical, and fire and rescue industries. Continuous personal monitoring at the community level has documented exposures of 3-4 ppb. These levels are more closely associated with the ethylene concentrations found indoors rather than outdoors indicating the importance of exposure sources found within the home. Indoor air sources of ethylene are associated with environmental tobacco smoke, wood or propane fuel use, fruit and vegetable storage, and cooking. Ethylene is not found in any consumer or commercial products and does not off-gas from building products to any appreciable extent. The review indicates that outdoor sources located some distance from the home do not make an appreciable contribution to personal exposures given the strength and variety of sources found in the immediate living environment. PMID:26296759

  15. Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Qafmolla, Luan; Hoxhaj, Enver

    2010-01-21

    In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korca etj. The Department of Human and Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

  16. Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafmolla, Luan; Hoxhaj, Enver

    2010-01-01

    In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korça etj. The Department of Human & Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

  17. The applied indicators of water quality may underestimate the risk of chemical exposure to human population in reservoirs utilized for human supply-Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Debora Regina; Yamamoto, Flávia Yoshie; Filipak Neto, Francisco; Randi, Marco Antônio Ferreira; Garcia, Juan Esquivel; Costa, Daniele Dietrich Moura; Liebel, Samuel; Campos, Sandro Xavier; Voigt, Carmen Lúcia; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The knowledge concerning associations between chronic chemical exposure and many disorders with complex etiology involving gene-environment interactions is increasing, and new methods must be developed to improve water quality monitoring. The complexity of chemical mixtures in polluted aquatic environments makes the evaluation of toxic potential in those sites difficult, but the use of biomarkers and bioindicators has been recognized as a reliable tool to assess risk of exposure to biota and also the human population. In order to evaluate the use of fish and biomarkers to assess toxic potential and bioavailability of chemicals in human-related hydric resources, an in situ experiment was accomplished in two water reservoirs designated for human supply, which were previously evaluated by the local environmental regulatory agency through a set of physical, chemical, and classical biological parameters. Molecular, biochemical, and morphological biomarkers were performed in caged Oreochromis niloticus kept for 6 months in the studied reservoirs to assess potentially useful biomarkers to evaluate the quality of water for human supply. Chemical analysis of toxic metals in liver and muscle and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bile was considered to assess the bioavailability of pollutants and highlight human activity impact. The reservoir previously classified by a governmental agency as less impacted presented more risk of exposure to biota. These results were supported by chemical analysis, vitellogenin expression, histopathological findings (gonads, liver, and gills), as well as indicators of neurotoxic effects and oxidative stress in liver. The inclusion of some biomarkers as parameters in regulatory monitoring programs in reservoirs designated for human supply is strongly suggested to evaluate the risks of exposure to the human population. Thus, a revision of the traditional biological and physicochemical analysis utilized to establish the conditions of

  18. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  19. Human exposure to piroplasms in Central and Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Simona; Calderini, Pietro; Cassini, Rudi; Galuppi, Roberta; Tampieri, Maria Paola; Pietrobelli, Mario; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    TA serosurvey has been conducted in Northern and Central Italy to investigate the presence in humans of antibodies against zoonotic Babesia and Theileria species. The study focused on a total of 432 volunteers, of which 290 were persistently exposed to tick bites because of their jobs (forester employees, livestock keepers, veterinary practitioners, farmers and hunters) and 142 resident in the same area less frequently exposed. An indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) for humans was used to detect antibodies to Babesia microti, IFAT tests for veterinary use were modified to detect reactivity to Babesia bovis, Babesia canis and Theileria equi. A laboratory-derived ELISA was employed to detect antibodies to Babesia divergens. Both reactive and 10 negative sera were analysed against plasmodial antigens to evaluate possible aspecificity. A high reactivity to piroplasm antigens was found, showing significant difference between the sera of the two groups of volunteers (24% vs 7.%; p<0.001). No cross-reactivity was observed, while each professional group showed reactivity that would fit with the professional risk exposure. In particular, a high reactivity to B. microti and B. divergens antigens was observed in foresters and hunters (32% and 12%, respectively). This is the first report on the human seroreactivity to piroplasms in Italy; it also provides additional epidemiological information on these tick-borne zoonoses in Europe. Our findings suggest the possible occurrence of piroplasm infections in Italy and alert physicians to consider these otherwise neglected parasitic diseases when dealing with any febrile illness, especially in subjects exposed to tick bites. PMID:24715592

  20. Barrier responses of human bronchial epithelial cells to grass pollen exposure.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; Swindle, Emily J; Dennison, Patrick; Jayasekera, Nivenka P; Dudley, Sarah; Monk, Phillip; Behrendt, Heidrun; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Holgate, Stephen T; Howarth, Peter H; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Davies, Donna E

    2013-07-01

    The airway epithelium forms a physical, chemical and immunological barrier against inhaled environmental substances. In asthma, these barrier properties are thought to be abnormal. In this study, we analysed the effect of grass pollen on the physical and immunological barrier properties of differentiated human primary bronchial epithelial cells. Following exposure to Timothy grass (Phleum pratense) pollen extract, the integrity of the physical barrier was not impaired as monitored by measuring the transepithelial resistance and immunofluorescence staining of tight junction proteins. In contrast, pollen exposure affected the immunological barrier properties by modulating vectorial mediator release. CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)8/interleukin (IL)-8 showed the greatest increase in response to pollen exposure with preferential release to the apical compartment. Inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways selectively blocked apical CXCL8/IL-8 release via a post-transcriptional mechanism. Apical release of CC chemokine ligand (CCL)20/macrophage inflammatory protein-3α, CCL22/monocyte-derived chemokine and tumour necrosis factor-α was significantly increased only in severe asthma cultures, while CCL11/eotaxin-1 and CXCL10/interferon-γ-induced protein-10 were reduced in nonasthmatic cultures. The bronchial epithelial barrier modulates polarised release of mediators in response to pollen without direct effects on its physical barrier properties. The differential response of cells from normal and asthmatic donors suggests the potential for the bronchial epithelium to promote immune dysfunction in asthma. PMID:23143548

  1. Radiation exposure to human trachea from Xenon-133 procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Metz, C.D.; Atkins, H.L. ||

    1995-08-01

    The general dosimetry of {sup 133}Xe for human studies is well documented, but the resultant radiation exposure to tracheal tissue is poorly known. This organ is of central relevance because the tracer is primarily eliminated through exhalation. We report actual {sup 133}Xe concentrations in respiratory air during measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), when the tracer is administered both by inhalation and intravenous injection. Data were collected from 102 patients, with equal gender representation and an age range of 18-82 yr. Most of the patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage or Alzheimer`s disease or were normal control subjects. Average administered doses were 18 {plus_minus} 4 mCi by inhalation and 15 {plus_minus} 3 intravenously. We found average respiratory concentrations of about 1.80 mCi/liter during a 1-min inhalation and 0.74 mCi/liter following intravenous injection of standard doses. These activities drop rapidly: average respiratory concentrations during the second minute are 0.70 mCi/liter for inhalation and 0.19 mCi/liter for intravenous injection and reach negligible levels thereafter. We calculate that the tracheal absorbed dose from {sup 133}Xe procedures is approximately 28 mrad following inhalation and about 11 mrad following intravenous injection. These values reflect the full 11-min exposure, but most of the activity is only present initially. These values will agree with previous estimates and indicate an excellent safety margin. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A Review of Human Health and Ecological Risks due to CO2 Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepple, R. P.; Benson, S. M.

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the human health and ecological consequences of exposure to elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the context of geologic carbon sequestration. The purpose of this effort is to provide a baseline of information to guide future efforts in risk assessment for CO2 sequestration. Scenarios for hazardous CO2 exposure include surface facility leaks, leaks from abandoned or aging wells, and leakage from geologic CO2 storage structures. Amounts of carbon in various reservoirs, systems, and applications were summarized, and the levels of CO2 encountered in nature and everyday life were compared along with physiologically relevant concentrations. Literature pertaining to CO2 occupational exposure limits, regulations, monitoring, and ecological consequences was reviewed. The OSHA, NIOSH, and ACGIH occupational exposure standards are 0.5% CO2 averaged over a 40 hour week, 3% average for a short-term (15 minute) exposure, and 4% as the maximum instantaneous limit considered immediately dangerous to life and health. All three conditions must be satisfied at all times. Any detrimental effects of low-level CO2 exposure are reversible, including the long-term metabolic compensation required by chronic exposure to 3% CO2. Breathing rate doubles at 3% CO2 and is four times the normal rate at 5% CO2. According to occupational exposure and controlled atmosphere research into CO2 toxicology, CO2 is hazardous via direct toxicity at levels above 5%, concentrations not encountered in nature outside of volcanic settings and water-logged soils. Small leaks do not present any danger to people unless the CO2 does not disperse quickly enough through atmospheric mixing but accumulates instead in depressions and confined spaces. These dangers are the result of CO2 being more dense than air. Carbon dioxide is regulated for diverse purposes but never as a toxic substance. Catastrophic incidents involving large amounts and/or rapid release of CO2 such as Lake

  3. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  4. A cell kinetic model of granulopoiesis under radiation exposure: extension from rodents to canines and humans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2011-02-01

    As significant ionising radiation exposure will occur during prolonged space travel in future, it is essential to understand their adverse effects on the radiosensitive organ systems that are important for immediate survival of humans, e.g. the haematopoietic system. In this paper, a biomathematical model of granulopoiesis is used to analyse the granulocyte changes seen in the blood of mammalians under acute and continuous radiation exposure. This is one of a set of haematopoietic models that have been successfully utilised to simulate and interpret the experimental data of acute and chronic radiation on rodents. Extension to canine and human systems indicates that the results of the model are consistent with the cumulative experimental and empirical data from various sources, implying the potential to integrate them into one united model system to monitor the haematopoietic response of various species under irradiation. The suppression of granulocytes' level of a space traveller under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation as well as the granulopoietic response when encountering a historically large solar particle event is also discussed. PMID:21196459

  5. Widespread Decreased Expression of Immune Function Genes in Human Peripheral Blood Following Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a large-scale reduced expression of genes in pathways related to cell-type specific immunity functions that emerges from microarray analysis 48 h after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 8 Gy) of human peripheral blood from five donors. This response is similar to that seen in patients at 24 h after the start of total-body irradiation and strengthens the rationale for the ex vivo model as an adjunct to human in vivo studies. The most marked response was in genes associated with natural killer (NK) cell immune functions, reflecting a relative loss of NK cells from the population. T- and B-cell mediated immunity genes were also significantly represented in the radiation response. Combined with our previous studies, a single gene expression signature was able to predict radiation dose range with 97% accuracy at times from 6–48 h after exposure. Gene expression signatures that may report on the loss or functional deactivation of blood cell subpopulations after radiation exposure may be particularly useful both for triage biodosimetry and for monitoring the effect of radiation mitigating treatments. PMID:24168352

  6. Monitoring exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an Australian population using pooled urine samples.

    PubMed

    Thai, Phong K; Heffernan, Amy L; Toms, Leisa-Maree L; Li, Zheng; Calafat, Antonia M; Hobson, Peter; Broomhall, Sara; Mueller, Jochen F

    2016-03-01

    Integrated exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be assessed through monitoring of urinary mono-hydroxylated PAHs (OH-PAHs). The aim of this study was to provide the first assessment of exposure to PAHs in a large sample of the population in Queensland, Australia including exposure to infant (0-4years). De-identified urine specimens, obtained from a pathology laboratory, were stratified by age and sex, and pooled (n=24 pools of 100) and OH-PAHs were measured by gas chromatography-isotope dilution-tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations ranged from 30ng/L (4-hydroxyphenanthrene) to 9221ng/L (1-naphthol). GM of 1-hydroxypyrene, the most commonly used PAH exposure biomarker, was 142ng/L. The concentrations of OH-PAHs found in this study are consistent with those in developed countries and lower than those in developing countries. We observed no association between sex and OH-PAH concentrations. However, we observed lower urinary concentrations of all OH-PAHs in samples from infants (0-4years), children (5-14years) and the elderly (>60year old) compared with samples from other age groups (15-29, 30-44 and 45-59years) which may be attributed to age-dependent behaviour-specific exposure sources. PMID:26700419

  7. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde: genotoxic risk evaluation by comet assay and micronucleus test using human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange; Pina, Carolina; Coelho, Patrícia; Costa, Carla; Silva, Susana; Porto, Beatriz; Laffon, Blanca; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a world high-production compound with numerous applications ranging from production of resins to medicines. Due to its sensitizing properties, irritating effects and potential cancer hazard FA is of great environmental health concern. Numerous studies in humans and experimental animals demonstrated that inhaled FA produced toxicity, genotoxicity, and cancer at distal sites. IARC, based on sufficient data, reclassified FA as a human carcinogen. The highest level of human exposure to this aldehyde occurs in occupational settings, namely, in pathology and anatomy laboratories, where FA is commonly used as a fixative and tissue preservative. Several studies consistently showed that the levels of airborne FA in anatomy laboratories exceeded recommended exposure criteria. In order to assess the genotoxic effects of chronic occupational exposure to FA, a group of pathology/anatomy workers was assessed using a micronucleus (MN) test and comet assay. The level of exposure to FA was also determined and the time-weighted average (TWA) of exposure was calculated for each subject. The TWA mean value for FA exposed workers was 0.43 ± 0.06 ppm, exceeding national and international recommended limit levels of 0.3 ppm. Both MN frequency and comet assay parameters were significantly higher in exposed subjects. Data obtained confirm a correlation between genetic damage and occupational exposure to FA. These data, along with recent implications of human carcinogenicity, point out the need for close monitoring of occupational exposure to FA. Implementation of security and hygiene measures as well as good practices campaigns may be crucial to decrease risk. PMID:21707428

  8. Computational Strategy for Quantifying Human Pesticide Exposure based upon a Saliva Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles; Weber, Thomas J.; Smith, Jordan N.

    2015-05-27

    The National Research Council of the National Academies report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and Strategy, highlighted the importance of quantitative exposure data for evaluating human toxicity risk and noted that biomonitoring is a critical tool for quantitatively evaluating exposure from both environmental and occupational settings. Direct measurement of chemical exposures using personal monitoring provides the most accurate estimation of a subject’s true exposure, and non-invasive methods have also been advocated for quantifying the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drugs and xenobiotics. In this regard, there is a need to identify chemicals that are readily cleared in saliva at concentrations that can be quantified to support the implementation of this approach.. The current manuscript describes the use of computational modeling approaches that are closely coupled to in vivo and in vitro experiments to predict salivary uptake and clearance of xenobiotics. The primary mechanism by which xenobiotics leave the blood and enter saliva is thought to involve paracellular transport, passive transcellular diffusion, or trancellular active transport with the majority of drugs and xenobiotics cleared from plasma into saliva by passive diffusion. The transcellular or paracellular diffusion of unbound chemicals in plasma to saliva has been computational modeled using a combination of compartmental and physiologically based approaches. Of key importance for determining the plasma:saliva partitioning was the utilization of a modified Schmitt algorithm that calculates partitioning based upon the tissue composition, pH, chemical pKa and plasma protein-binding. Sensitivity analysis of key model parameters specifically identified that both protein-binding and pKa (for weak acids and bases) had the most significant impact on the determination of partitioning and that there were clear species dependent differences based upon physiological variance between

  9. PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PM: THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS AND HUMAN ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) models being developed by the US EPA/NERL use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposures to pollutants. The SHEDS model for particulate matter (SHEDS-PM) estimates the population distribution of PM exposure...

  10. A liquid crystal-based passive badge for personal monitoring of exposure to hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sheila E; Grinwald, Bart A; Bremer, Laura L; Kupcho, Kurt A; Acharya, Bharat R; Owens, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    A new liquid crystal (LC)-based passive dosimeter badge for personal monitoring of exposure to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is reported. When a thin film of LC supported on a surface functionalized with lead perchlorate Pb(ClO4)2 (the LC sensor) is exposed to H2S, the orientation of LC molecules in the film changes from perpendicular to parallel. This reorientation induces a change in the appearance of the LC film when viewed between crossed polarizers. A H2S dosimeter was fabricated by pairing a LC sensor with a glass substrate forming a headspace between the two surfaces, to control diffusion of H2S across the LC film. When the dosimeter is exposed to H2S, a bright front appears as a function of exposure time. An algorithm has been developed to correlate this response length and exposure dose. The dosimeters are functionally stable when subjected to extreme temperature and humidity fluctuations, and are immune to a number of potentially interfering chemicals, except mercaptans. These dosimeters detect H2S at 0.2 ppm TWA (8 hr) with ±20% overall accuracy. The dosimeters were used to monitor the personal exposure of personnel working in an oil refinery. The TWA concentrations measured by the LC-based dosimeters correlate strongly with the NIOSH 1063 method that uses a sorbent tube and a pump followed by laboratory analysis. Thus, the LC-based dosimeters can provide a sensitive tool for on-site assessment of personal exposure to H2S in different environments. PMID:24766440

  11. Monitoring of onboard aircraft exposure to cosmic radiation: May December 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurný, F.; Ploc, O.; Jadrníčková, I.; Turek, K.; Dachev, T.; Gelev, M.

    Onboard aircraft exposure to cosmic radiation has been monitored during the period May December 2005. Mobile Dosimetry Unit (MDU) Si-spectrodosimeter has been used as an active measuring equipment, it has been installed onboard of an A310 300 aircraft. Some passive detectors were placed on the body of MDU. Three types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) were used as well as track etch detectors (TEDs). TEDs were treated both as a neutron dosimeter and as a spectrometer of linear energy transfer. Available navigation data permitted us also to calculate onboard exposure during more than 400 individual flights. MDU established and calculated data for each individual flight are compared and analyzed, from the data conclusions as to aircrew exposure are outlined. Particular attention is devoted to the influence of:geomagnetic characteristics and flight altitude on the calculated and MDU-Liulin measured dosimetry characteristic of onboard radiation field;some solar events (Forbush decreases) registered by MDU-Liulin on the level of aircraft crew exposure during monitoring period. Integral data on the exposure due to non-neutron and neutron-like component obtained on the base of MDU and calculated data are compared with the data obtained by TLDs and TEDs, respectively. Total effective dose during the period mentioned (494 flights and 2940 h between taking offs and landings) was found to be about 11 12 mSv for. Results obtained by means of different approaches are analyzed and discussed, it was found that in general good agreement of all data sets could be stated.

  12. Human health perspectives on environmental exposure to benzidine: a review.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, G

    1996-01-01

    Benzidine, an odorless, white to slightly reddish-white crystalline organic compound, is an environmental contaminant that has been identified at about 30 National Priorities List (NPL) hazardous waste sites in the United States. In the environment, it is usually found attached to suspended particles either in its "free" state or as chloride or sulfate salts. In the past, U.S. industries used large quantities of benzidine to produce dyes for paper, clothes, and leather. Since the ban on its production and use in the United States in the 1970s, this compound is imported for specialty uses. People living near hazardous waste sites might be exposed to benzidine by drinking contaminated water, by inhaling contaminated air, or by swallowing or touching contaminated dust. People can also be exposed by using benzidine dyes on paper, clothes, and other materials. Human occupational data and studies of laboratory animals suggest that people exposed to benzidine may develop adverse systemic health effects or cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), and the World Health Organization (WHO) have classified benzidine as a carcinogen. Urinary bladder cancer is the most common form of cancer caused by exposure to benzidine. The stomach, kidneys, brain, mouth, esophagus, liver, and gallbladder might also be targets. The information presented in the article may help public health officials, physicians, and toxicologists evaluate and develop the health information materials on the nature of benzidine in the environment and its potential impact on public health. PMID:8581430

  13. Integration of Air Quality Modeling and Monitoring Data for Enhanced Health Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to assess the environmental impact of air pollution on human health it is necessary to establish the concentrations to which the population is exposed. The obvious way to determine this is to measure these quantities. However, given the limited number of monitoring stati...

  14. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF HUMAN BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID AFTER SUBSGEMENTAL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew W.; Will Thompson, J.; Que, Loretta G.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Arthur Moseley, M.; Marshall, Harvey E.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of airway fluid, as sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), provides a minimally invasive route to interrogate lung biology in health and disease. Here, we used immunodepletion, coupled with gel- and label-free LC-MS/MS, for quantitation of the BAL fluid (BALF) proteome in samples recovered from human subjects following bronchoscopic instillation of saline, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite antigen into three distinct lung subsegments. Among more than 200 unique proteins quantified across nine samples, neutrophil granule-derived and acute phase proteins were most highly enriched in the LPS-exposed lobes. Of these, peptidoglycan response protein 1 was validated and confirmed as a novel marker of neutrophilic inflammation. Compared to a prior transcriptomic analysis of airway cells in this same cohort, the BALF proteome revealed a novel set of response factors. Independent of exposure, the enrichment of tracheal-expressed proteins in right lower lung lobes suggests a potential for constitutive intralobar variability in the BALF proteome; sampling of multiple lung subsegments also appears to aid in the identification of protein signatures that differentiate individuals at baseline. Collectively, this proof-of-concept study validates a robust workflow for BALF proteomics and demonstrates the complementary nature of proteomic and genomic techniques for investigating airway (patho)physiology. PMID:23550723

  15. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to positive Gz accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1973-01-01

    Tolerance to positive g accelerations was measured in ten normal male subjects using both standard and advanced techniques. In addition to routine electrocardiogram, heart rate, respiratory rate, and infrared television, monitoring techniques during acceleration exposure included measurement of peripheral vision loss, noninvasive temporal, brachial, and/or radial arterial blood flow, and automatic measurement of indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Although brachial and radial arterial flow measurements reflected significant cardiovascular changes during and after acceleration, they were inconsistent indices of the onset of grayout or blackout. Temporal arterial blood flow, however, showed a high correlation with subjective peripheral light loss.

  16. Estimating Mercury Exposure of Piscivorous Birds and Sport Fish Using Prey Fish Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Hartman, C Alex; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Herzog, Mark P; Davis, Jay; Ichikawa, Gary; Bonnema, Autumn

    2015-11-17

    Methylmercury is a global pollutant of aquatic ecosystems, and monitoring programs need tools to predict mercury exposure of wildlife. We developed equations to estimate methylmercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using mercury concentrations in prey fish. We collected original data on western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark's grebes (Aechmophorus clarkii) and summarized the published literature to generate predictive equations specific to grebes and a general equation for piscivorous birds. We measured mercury concentrations in 354 grebes (blood averaged 1.06 ± 0.08 μg/g ww), 101 grebe eggs, 230 sport fish (predominantly largemouth bass and rainbow trout), and 505 prey fish (14 species) at 25 lakes throughout California. Mercury concentrations in grebe blood, grebe eggs, and sport fish were strongly related to mercury concentrations in prey fish among lakes. Each 1.0 μg/g dw (∼0.24 μg/g ww) increase in prey fish resulted in an increase in mercury concentrations of 103% in grebe blood, 92% in grebe eggs, and 116% in sport fish. We also found strong correlations between mercury concentrations in grebes and sport fish among lakes. Our results indicate that prey fish monitoring can be used to estimate mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish when wildlife cannot be directly sampled. PMID:26449260

  17. Estimating mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using prey fish monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Hartman, C. Alex; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.; Davis, Jay; Ichikawa, Gary; Bonnema, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a global pollutant of aquatic ecosystems, and monitoring programs need tools to predict mercury exposure of wildlife. We developed equations to estimate methylmercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using mercury concentrations in prey fish. We collected original data on western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark’s grebes (Aechmophorus clarkii) and summarized the published literature to generate predictive equations specific to grebes and a general equation for piscivorous birds. We measured mercury concentrations in 354 grebes (blood averaged 1.06 ± 0.08 μg/g ww), 101 grebe eggs, 230 sport fish (predominantly largemouth bass and rainbow trout), and 505 prey fish (14 species) at 25 lakes throughout California. Mercury concentrations in grebe blood, grebe eggs, and sport fish were strongly related to mercury concentrations in prey fish among lakes. Each 1.0 μg/g dw (∼0.24 μg/g ww) increase in prey fish resulted in an increase in mercury concentrations of 103% in grebe blood, 92% in grebe eggs, and 116% in sport fish. We also found strong correlations between mercury concentrations in grebes and sport fish among lakes. Our results indicate that prey fish monitoring can be used to estimate mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish when wildlife cannot be directly sampled.

  18. Environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds among workers in Mexico City as assessed by personal monitors and blood concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Romieu, I; Ramirez, M; Meneses, F; Ashley, D; Lemire, S; Colome, S; Fung, K; Hernandez-Avila, M

    1999-01-01

    Benzene, an important component in gasoline, is a widely distributed environmental contaminant that has been linked to known health effects in animals and humans, including leukemia. In Mexico City, environmental benzene levels, which may be elevated because of the heavy traffic and the poor emission control devices of older vehicles, may pose a health risk to the population. To assess the potential risk, portable passive monitors and blood concentrations were used to survey three different occupational groups in Mexico City. Passive monitors measured the personal exposure of 45 workers to benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, o-xylene and m-/p-xylene during a work shift. Blood concentrations of the above volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methyl tert-butyl ether, and styrene were measured at the beginning and the end of a work shift. Passive monitors showed significantly higher (p > 0.0001) benzene exposure levels among service station attendants (median = 330 microg/m3; range 130-770) as compared to street vendors (median = 62 microg/m3; range 49-180) and office workers (median = 44 microg/m3, range 32-67). Baseline blood benzene levels (BBLs) for these groups were higher than those reported for similar populations from Western countries (median = 0.63 microg/L, n = 24 for service station attendants; median = 0.30 microg/L, n = 6 for street vendors; and median = 0.17 microgr;g/L, n = 7 for office workers). Nonsmoking office workers who were nonoccupationally exposed to VOCs had BBLs that were more than five times higher than those observed in a nonsmoking U.S. population. BBLs of participants did not increase during the work shift, suggesting that because the participants were chronically exposed to benzene, complex pharmacokinetic mechanisms were involved. Our results highlight the need for more complete studies to assess the potential benefits of setting environmental standards for benzene and other VOCs in Mexico. Images Figure 1 PMID:10378996

  19. Overview of EPA CSS Intramural Research on Life Cycle and Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved human exposure modeling in life cycle assessmentsModeling and assessment for chemicals/products with less extensive dataMore rapid and higher throughput assessmentsLife Cycle-Human Exposure Modeling (LC-HEM) tool usable by Offices/Regions and by external stakeholders

  20. COLLECTION AND USE OF EXPOSURE DATA FROM HUMAN MILK BIOMONITORING IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human milk is a unique biological matrix which can be used to estimate exposures in both the mother and the breastfed infant. In addition, the presence of environmental chemicals in human milk may act as a sentinel for exposures to a broader population. Several factors play a r...

  1. MODELING HUMAN EXPOSURES AND DOSE USING A 2-DIMENSIONAL MONTE-CARLO MODEL (SHEDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1998, US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been developing the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model for various classes of pollutants. SHEDS is a physically-based probabilistic model intended for improving estimates of human ex...

  2. OVERVIEW OF EPA HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS PROJECTS AS APPLIED TO JP-8 JET FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the many responsibilities of the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is the development and demonstration of methodology for assessing human exposure to environmental pollutants. As such, personnel from the Human E...

  3. A NEW METHOD OF LONGITUDINAL DIARY ASSEMBLY FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure time-series modeling requires longitudinal time-activity diaries to evaluate the sequence of concentrations encountered, and hence, pollutant exposure for the simulated individuals. However, most of the available data on human activities are from cross-sectional su...

  4. Biomarkers of benzene exposure and their interpretation for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human biomarkers of exposure such as parent or metabolite concentrations in blood or urine are often reported without any context to the sources of exposure or the implications for human risk. The Biomonitoring Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute/Huma...

  5. The use of biomonitoring data in exposure and human health risk assessment: benzene case study

    PubMed Central

    Angerer, Juergen; Boogaard, Peter J.; Hughes, Michael F.; O’Lone, Raegan B.; Robison, Steven H.; Robert Schnatter, A.

    2013-01-01

    A framework of “Common Criteria” (i.e. a series of questions) has been developed to inform the use and evaluation of biomonitoring data in the context of human exposure and risk assessment. The data-rich chemical benzene was selected for use in a case study to assess whether refinement of the Common Criteria framework was necessary, and to gain additional perspective on approaches for integrating biomonitoring data into a risk-based context. The available data for benzene satisfied most of the Common Criteria and allowed for a risk-based evaluation of the benzene biomonitoring data. In general, biomarker (blood benzene, urinary benzene and urinary S-phenylmercapturic acid) central tendency (i.e. mean, median and geometric mean) concentrations for non-smokers are at or below the predicted blood or urine concentrations that would correspond to exposure at the US Environmental Protection Agency reference concentration (30 µg/m3), but greater than blood or urine concentrations relating to the air concentration at the 1 × 10−5 excess cancer risk (2.9 µg/m3). Smokers clearly have higher levels of benzene exposure, and biomarker levels of benzene for non-smokers are generally consistent with ambient air monitoring results. While some biomarkers of benzene are specific indicators of exposure, the interpretation of benzene biomonitoring levels in a health-risk context are complicated by issues associated with short half-lives and gaps in knowledge regarding the relationship between the biomarkers and subsequent toxic effects. PMID:23346981

  6. Oral Fat Exposure Pattern and Lipid Loading Effects on the Serum Triacylglycerol Concentration of Humans.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Richard D

    2009-12-01

    Orosensory exposure to dietary fat elicits an early, transient spike (first phase; minutes 0-60) and augmented, more sustained postprandial (second phase; minutes 120-360) elevation of serum triacylglycerol (TAG) in humans. To assess the physiological significance of these effects, TAG concentrations were monitored following manipulation of the oral exposure pattern and accompanying lipid load. Fifteen healthy adults participated in a randomized, 6-arm, crossover design study. Conditions consisted of ingestion of 30-g loads of safflower oil, provided as capsules to bypass oral stimulation, followed by 15 min of oral stimulation (mastication and expectoration) with full-fat or nonfat cream cheese (conditions 1 and 2); the same oral load ingested intermittently with oral stimulation by both food forms (conditions 3 and 4); and 10-g lipid loads ingested with intermittent oral stimulation by both food forms (conditions 5 and 6). Blood was collected via an indwelling catheter and TAG was measured at minutes -15, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 120, 240, and 360 relative to the onset of sensory stimulation. Testing was conducted weekly. Sequential (lipid loading followed by oral stimulation) and intermittent (intermixed lipid loading and oral stimulation) conditions led to comparable TAG responses. Significant first- and second-phase TAG concentration increases were observed with the 30-g loads, but not the 10-g loads. TAG responses to the full-fat and nonfat stimuli were similar. These data support the veracity of the earlier literature based on sequential oral exposure regimens and indicate that TAG responses reflect an interaction between oral fat signaling and gut lipid content. The augmentation of TAG associated specifically with dietary fat exposure, as compared to a nonfat food matched on other sensory properties, may only occur with higher fat loads. PMID:20352072

  7. Occupational Exposure to Ultrafine Particles among Airport Employees - Combining Personal Monitoring and Global Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Karina Lauenborg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Schipperijn, Jasper; Loft, Steffen; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) has been linked to cardiovascular and lung diseases. Combustion of jet fuel and diesel powered handling equipment emit UFP resulting in potentially high exposure levels among employees working at airports. High levels of UFP have been reported at several airports, especially on the apron, but knowledge on individual exposure profiles among different occupational groups working at an airport is lacking. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare personal exposure to UFP among five different occupational groups working at Copenhagen Airport (CPH). Method 30 employees from five different occupational groups (baggage handlers, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside and landside security) at CPH were instructed to wear a personal monitor of particle number concentration in real time and a GPS device. The measurements were carried out on 8 days distributed over two weeks in October 2012. The overall differences between the groups were assessed using linear mixed model. Results Data showed significant differences in exposure levels among the groups when adjusted for variation within individuals and for effect of time and date (p<0.01). Baggage handlers were exposed to 7 times higher average concentrations (geometric mean, GM: 37×103 UFP/cm3, 95% CI: 25–55×103 UFP/cm3) than employees mainly working indoors (GM: 5×103 UFP/cm3, 95% CI: 2–11×103 UFP/cm3). Furthermore, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside security were exposed to intermediate concentrations (GM: 12 to 20×103 UFP/cm3). Conclusion The study demonstrates a strong gradient of exposure to UFP in ambient air across occupational groups of airport employees. PMID:25203510

  8. Biological monitoring of organophosphorus pesticide exposure among children of agricultural workers in central Washington State.

    PubMed Central

    Loewenherz, C; Fenske, R A; Simcox, N J; Bellamy, G; Kalman, D

    1997-01-01

    Children up to 6 years of age who lived with pesticide applicators were monitored for increased risk of pesticide exposure: 48 pesticide applicator and 14 reference families were recruited from an agricultural region of Washington State in June 1995. A total of 160 spot urine samples were collected from 88 children, including repeated measures 3-7 days apart. Samples were assayed by gas chromatography flame photometric detector for dimethylphosphate metabolites. Dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP) was the dominant metabolite. DMTP levels were significantly higher in applicator children than in reference children (p = 0.015), with median concentrations of 0.021 and 0.005 microg/ml, respectively; maximum concentrations were 0.44 and 0.10 microg/ml, respectively. Percentages of detectable samples were 47% for applicator children and 27% for reference children. A marginally significant trend of increasing concentration was observed with decreasing age among applicator children (p = 0.060), and younger children within these families had significantly higher concentrations when compared to their older siblings (p = 0.040). Applicator children living less than 200 feet from an orchard were associated with higher frequency of detectable DMTP levels than nonproximal applicator children (p =0.036). These results indicate that applicator children experienced higher organophosphorus pesticide exposures than did reference children in the same community and that proximity to spraying is an important contributor to such exposures. Trends related to age suggest that child activity is an important variable for exposure. It is unlikely that any of the observed exposures posed a hazard of acute intoxication. This study points to the need for a more detailed understanding of pesticide exposure pathways for children of agricultural workers. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9405329

  9. Application of mixed models to assess exposures monitored by construction workers during hot processes.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, S M; Weaver, M; Taylor, D; Kupper, L; Susi, P

    1999-10-01

    Particulate exposures were assessed among construction workers engaged in hot processes in four jobs (boilermakers, ironworkers, pipefitters and welder-fitters) at nine sites in the U.S. After being trained by occupational hygienists, the workers obtained shift-long personal samples at each site for total particulates (TP). Selected samples were also assayed for manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and chromium (Cr). Workers provided information about process- and task-related covariates that were present on the days of monitoring. Data were investigated with mixed-model regression analyses that designated the jobs and covariates as fixed effects and the worker and error terms as random effects. Results indicated that the within-worker variance components, but not the between-worker variance components, could be pooled among jobs. Mean air levels for a given agent varied by roughly six to 100 fold among the jobs, with boilermakers and ironworkers experiencing much higher levels of TP and Mn than pipefitters and welder-fitters. Limited data also suggested that welder-fitters were exposed to greater levels of Ni and Cr than pipefitters. Sufficient sample sizes were available to evaluate the effects of covariates upon exposures to TP and Mn. As expected, processes involving more than 50% hot work led to substantially higher levels of TP and Mn than those involving shorter durations of hot work. Local-exhaust or mechanical ventilation reduced exposure to TP (but not Mn) by as much as 44%, and shielded or manual arc welding increased exposure to Mn (but not TP) by about 80%. Parameters estimated with these mixed models were used to calculate probabilities that workers were exposed at levels above U.S. occupational exposure limits (OELs). Regarding TP and Mn, these calculations suggested that 26-95% of exposures to boilermakers and pipefitters and 2-13% of exposures to pipefitters and welder-fitters exceeded the current Threshold Limit Values. Among welder-fitters, limited data

  10. Pharmaceuticals in Tap Water: Human Health Risk Assessment and Proposed Monitoring Framework in China

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ho Wing; Jin, Ling; Wei, Si; Tsui, Mirabelle Mei Po; Zhou, Bingsheng; Jiao, Liping; Cheung, Pak Chuen; Chun, Yiu Kan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pharmaceuticals are known to contaminate tap water worldwide, but the relevant human health risks have not been assessed in China. Objectives: We monitored 32 pharmaceuticals in Chinese tap water and evaluated the life-long human health risks of exposure in order to provide information for future prioritization and risk management. Methods: We analyzed samples (n = 113) from 13 cities and compared detected concentrations with existing or newly-derived safety levels for assessing risk quotients (RQs) at different life stages, excluding the prenatal stage. Results: We detected 17 pharmaceuticals in 89% of samples, with most detectable concentrations (92%) at < 50 ng/L. Caffeine (median–maximum, nanograms per liter: 24.4–564), metronidazole (1.8–19.3), salicylic acid (16.6–41.2), clofibric acid (1.2–3.3), carbamazepine (1.3–6.7), and dimetridazole (6.9–14.7) were found in ≥ 20% of samples. Cities within the Yangtze River region and Guangzhou were regarded as contamination hot spots because of elevated levels and frequent positive detections. Of the 17 pharmaceuticals detected, 13 showed very low risk levels, but 4 (i.e., dimetridazole, thiamphenicol, sulfamethazine, and clarithromycin) were found to have at least one life-stage RQ ≥ 0.01, especially for the infant and child life stages, and should be considered of high priority for management. We propose an indicator-based monitoring framework for providing information for source identification, water treatment effectiveness, and water safety management in China. Conclusion: Chinese tap water is an additional route of human exposure to pharmaceuticals, particularly for dimetridazole, although the risk to human health is low based on current toxicity data. Pharmaceutical detection and application of the proposed monitoring framework can be used for water source protection and risk management in China and elsewhere. PMID:23665928

  11. Effects of maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposure on CEM T-lymphoblastoid human cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, K.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields similar to those produced by maglev vehicles (combined ac and dc components) was studied for the ability to alter cell growth and chemically induced cellular differentiation processes in cultured human CEM Tlymphoblastoid leukemia cells. A series of continuous and intermittent magnetic field (MF) exposures for varying lengths of time were tested at intensities up to 7-fold greater than that produced by the German TR07 maglev vehicle. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or mycophenolic acid were used to induce cell differentiation. Changes in cell number, morphology, and fluorescence expression of antigenic markers of differentiation were monitored. The results indicated that maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposures up to 2 gauss had little effect on culture growth or chemically induced cellular differentiation when exposed to maglev-spectrum magnetic fields compared to chemically treated but MF-unexposed controls.

  12. Cardiovascular impacts and micro-environmental exposure factors associated with continuous personal PM2.5 monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency’s (US EPA) Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) has provided extensive data on human exposures to a wide variety of air pollutants and their impact on human health. Previous analyses in the DEARS revealed select cardiovascul...

  13. Monitoring of human chemical signatures using membrane inlet mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giannoukos, Stamatios; Brkić, Boris; Taylor, Stephen; France, Neil

    2014-01-21

    This work is an attempt to assist border security crackdown on illegal human immigration, by providing essential results on human chemical signatures. Data was obtained using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a membrane probe for volunteers of both genders and under different conditions in a container simulator. During experiments, participants were asked to follow various protocols while volatile organic compounds emitted from their breath, sweat, skin, and other biological excretes were continuously being monitored. Experimental setups using different membrane materials (both hydrophilic and hydrophobic) including heating of the sampling probe and sampling flow rates were examined. From our measurements, significant information was obtained for NH3, CO2, water, and volatile organic compounds levels, illustrating a human chemical profile and indicating human presence in a confined space. PMID:24377277

  14. Monitoring of onboard Aircraft Exposure to Cosmic Radiation: May - December 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurny, F.; Ploc, O.; Jadrinková, I.; Turek, K.; Dachev, T.; Gelev, M.

    Onboard aircraft exposure to cosmic radiation has been monitored in the period May -- December 2005 MDU Si-spectrometer-dosimeter has been used as an active measuring equipment it has been installed onboard of an A310-300 aircraft Together with it also some passive detectors were placed on the body of MDU Three types of thermoluminescent detectors TLD were used as well as track etch detectors TEDs TEDs were treated both as a neutron dosimeter and as a spectrometer of linear energy transfer Available navigation data permitted us also to calculate onboard exposure during more than 400 individual flights MDU established and calculated data for each individual flight are compared and analyzed conclusions following from that for aircraft crew exposure are outlined Integral data on the exposure due to non-neutron and neutron-like component obtained on the base of MDU and calculated data are compared with the data obtained by TLD s and TED s respectively Results obtained are analyzed and discussed

  15. Human Rights Engagement and Exposure: New Scales to Challenge Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Jane; Abell, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Advancing human rights is a core competency of U.S. social work education; yet, human rights attitudes and behaviors have never been measured in the social work literature. Thus, this article describes the development and initial validation of two scales, Human Rights Engagement in Social Work (HRESW) and Human Rights Exposure in…

  16. Monitoring Ionizing Radiation Exposure for Cardiotoxic Effects of Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Gillian; Yu, Zoe; Harrold, Emily; Cooke, Jennie; Keegan, Niamh; Fukuda, Shota; Addetia, Karima; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Spencer, Kirk T; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Kennedy, John; Ward, R Parker; Patel, Amit R; Lang, Roberto M; DeCara, Jeanne M

    2016-05-15

    Serial assessments of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) are customary in patients with breast cancer receiving trastuzumab. Radionuclide angiography (RNA) is often used; however, a typical monitoring schedule could include 5 scans in a year. We evaluated the proportion of imaging-related ionizing radiation attributable to RNA in 115 patients with breast cancer, from 3 medical centers in the United States, Ireland, and Japan, who completed 12 months of trastuzumab treatment. Estimated radiation dose (ERD) was used to calculate exposure associated with imaging procedures spanning the 18 months before and after trastuzumab therapy. In addition, 20 cardiologists and oncologists from participating centers were surveyed for their opinions regarding the contribution of RNA to overall radiation exposure during trastuzumab treatment. When RNA was used to monitor LVEF, the mean ERD from imaging was substantial (34 ± 24.3 mSv), with the majority attributable solely to RNA (24.7 ± 14.8 mSv, 72.6%). Actual ERD associated with RNA in this population differed significantly from the perception in surveyed cardiologists and oncologists; 70% of respondents believed that RNA typically accounted for 0% to 20% of overall radiation exposure from imaging; RNA actually accounted for more than 70% of ERD. In conclusion, RNA was used to monitor LVEF in most patients in this cohort during and after trastuzumab therapy. This significantly increased ERD and accounted for a greater proportion of radiation than that perceived by surveyed physicians. ERD should be taken into account when choosing a method of LVEF surveillance. Alternative techniques that do not use radiation should be strongly considered. PMID:27040573

  17. Monitoring and reducing exposure of infants to pollutants in house dust.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John W; Wallace, Lance A; Camann, David E; Dickey, Philip; Gilbert, Steven G; Lewis, Robert G; Takaro, Tim K

    2009-01-01

    most mitigation control. Normal vacuum cleaning allows deep dust to build up in carpets where it can be brought to the surface and become airborne as a result of activity on the carpet. Vacuums with dirt finders allow families to use the three-spot test to monitor deep dust, which can reinforce good cleaning habits. Motivated families that receive home visits from trained outreach workers can monitor and reduce dust exposures by 90% or more in 1 wk. The cost of such visits is low considering the reduction of risks achieved. Improved home cleaning is one of the first results observed among families who receive home visits from MHEs and CHWs. We believe that proven intervention methods can reduce the exposure of infants to pollutants in house dust, while recognizing that much remains to be learned about improving the effectiveness of such methods. PMID:19484587

  18. Advance techniques for monitoring human tolerance to +Gz accelerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R.; Sandler, H.; Rositano, S.; Skrettingland, K.; Mancini, R.

    1972-01-01

    Standard techniques for monitoring the acceleration-stressed human subject have been augmented by measuring (1) temporal, brachial and/or radial arterial blood flow, and (2) indirect systolic and diastolic blood pressure at 60-sec intervals. Results show that the response of blood pressure to positive accelerations is complex and dependent on an interplay of hydrostatic forces, diminishing venous return, redistribution of blood, and other poorly defined compensatory reflexes.

  19. Cost effective CD control for DUV implant layers using the Archer MPX focus-exposure monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Sean; Eichelberger, Brad; Nelson, Chris; Dinu, Berta; Kennemer, Harold; Monahan, Kevin

    2005-05-01

    CD control is one of the main parameters for IC product performances and a major contributor to yield performance. Traditional SEM metrology can be a challenge on particular layers due to normal process variation and has not proven to provide sufficient focus monitoring ability. This in turn causes false positives resulting in unnecessary rework, but more importantly missed focus excursions resulting in yield loss. Alexander Starikov, Intel Corporation, alludes to the fact that focus and exposure "knobs" account for greater than 80% of CD correctible variance1. Spansion F25 is evaluating an alternative technology using an optical method for the indirect monitoring of the CD on the implant layer. The optical method utilizes a dual tone line-end-shortening (LES) target which is measured on a standard optical overlay tool. The dual tone technology enables the ability to separate the contributions of the focus and exposure resulting in a more accurate characterization of the two parameters on standard production wafers. Ultimately by keeping focus and exposure within acceptable limits it can be assumed that the CD will be within acceptable limits as well without the unnecessary rework caused by process variation. By using designed experiments this paper will provide characterization of the LES technique on the implant layer showing its ability to separate focus-exposure errors vs. the traditional SEM metrology. Actual high volume production data will be used to compare the robustness and sensitivity of the two technologies in a real life production environment. An overall outline of the production implementation will be documented as well.

  20. REAL-TIME AND INTEGRATED MEASUREMENT OF POTENTIAL HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLE-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) FROM AIRCRAFT EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time monitors and low-volume air samplers were used to measure the potential human exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations during various flight-related and ground-support activities of C-130H aircraft at an Air National Guard base. Three...

  1. Modeling of In-vehicle PM2.5 Exposure Using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Frey, H. Christopher; Cao, Ye; Deshpande, Bela

    2010-01-01

    Factors that influence in-vehicle PM2.5 exposure are indentified and assessed. The methodology used in the current version of Stochastic Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM) for in-vehicle PM2.5 concentration is reviewed, and alternative modeling approaches are identified and evaluated. SHEDS-PM uses a linear regression model to estimate in-vehicle PM2.5 concentration based on ambient PM2.5 concentration, such as from a fixed site monitor (FSM) or a grid cell average concentration estimate from an air quality model. The ratio of in-vehicle to FSM concentration varies substantially with respect to location, vehicle type and other factors. SHEDS-PM was used to estimate PM2.5 exposure for 1% of people living in Wake County, NC in order to assess the importance of in-vehicle exposures. In-vehicle PM2.5 exposure can be as much as half of the total exposure for some individuals, depending on employment status and the time spent in-vehicle during commuting. An alternative modeling approach is explored based on the use of a dispersion model to estimate near-road PM2.5 concentration based on FSM data and a mass balance model for estimating in-vehicle concentration. Recommendations for updating the input data to the existing model, and implementation of the alternative modeling approach are made. PMID:21209848

  2. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Michael B; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the "smartphone", a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and more recently magnetometer and barometer) which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs). As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that "count" steps (i.e., pedometers); gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to "close the loop" by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions. PMID:26263998

  3. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement

    PubMed Central

    del Rosario, Michael B.; Redmond, Stephen J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the “smartphone”, a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and more recently magnetometer and barometer) which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs). As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that “count” steps (i.e., pedometers); gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to “close the loop” by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions. PMID:26263998

  4. Surveillance methods for identifying, characterizing, and monitoring tobacco products: potential reduced exposure products as an example

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Richard J.; Cummings, K. Michael; Rees, Vaughan W.; Connolly, Gregory N.; Norton, Kaila J.; Sweanor, David; Parascandola, Mark; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Shields, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco products are widely sold and marketed, yet integrated data systems for identifying, tracking, and characterizing products are lacking. Tobacco manufacturers recently have developed potential reduction exposure products (PREPs) with implied or explicit health claims. Currently, a systematic approach for identifying, defining, and evaluating PREPs sold at the local, state or national levels in the US has not been developed. Identifying, characterizing, and monitoring new tobacco products could be greatly enhanced with a responsive surveillance system. This paper critically reviews available surveillance data sources for identifying and tracking tobacco products, including PREPs, evaluating strengths and weaknesses of potential data sources in light of their reliability and validity. Absent regulations mandating disclosure of product-specific information, it is likely that public health officials will need to rely on a variety of imperfect data sources to help identify, characterize, and monitor tobacco products, including PREPs. PMID:19959680

  5. An Immunoassay to Evaluate Human/Environmental Exposure to the Antimicrobial Triclocarban

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Kasagami, Takeo; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Schebb, Nils Helge; Ogunyoku, Temitope; Gee, Shirley J.; Young, Thomas M.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive, competitive indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) was developed. The haptens were synthesized by derivatizing the para position of a phenyl moiety of TCC. The rabbit antisera were screened and the combination of antiserum #1648 and a heterologous competitive hapten containing a piperidine was further characterized. The IC50 and the detection range for TCC in buffer were 0.70 and 0.13–3.60 ng/mL, respectively. The assay was selective for TCC, providing only low cross-reactivity to TCC-related compounds and its major metabolites except for the closely related antimicrobial 3-trifluoromethyl-4,4′-dichlorocarbanilide. A liquid-liquid extraction for sample preparation of human body fluids resulted in an assay that measured low part per billion levels of TCC in small volumes of the samples. The limits of quantification of TCC were 5 ng/mL in blood/serum, and 10 ng/mL in urine, respectively. TCC in human urine was largely the N- or N′-glucuronide. TCC concentrations of biosolids measured by the ELISA were similar to those determined by LC-MS/MS. This immunoassay can be used as a rapid, inexpensive and convenient tool to aid researchers monitoring human/environmental exposure to TCC to better understand the health effects. PMID:22077920

  6. Generation of oxidative stress in human cutaneous models following in vitro ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Cotovio, J; Onno, L; Justine, P; Lamure, S; Catroux, P

    2001-01-01

    Ozone, one of the main components of photochemical smog, represents an important source of environmental oxidative stress. The skin, being the outermost barrier of the body, is directly exposed to environmental oxidant toxicants. Skin sebum and cellular plasma membrane lipids contain polyunsaturated fatty acids which are primary targets for ozone and free radical attack induced lipid peroxides. These ozonation processes in skin can also generate aldehydes, hydroxyhydroperoxides and specific Criegee's ozonides. In order to evaluate in vitro human skin susceptibility to ozone, we have exposed cultured immortalized human keratinocytes (DK7-NR) and the reconstructed human epidermis Episkin to 10 ppm of ozone in a specific incubator. We measured the formation of protein carbonyls by an ELISA method and monitored the oxidative stress using the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin-diacetate (DCFH-DA). Results showed a time-dependent increase of fluorescence levels (linked to oxidative stress) in both models exposed to ozone. Using this protocol, we investigated the protective potential of different products including vitamin C, a thiol derivative and a plant extract. All products dramatically reduced oxidative responses during ozone exposure. Decreases observed in fluorescence levels were between 60 and 90% as compared to non-protected controls. These results demonstrate: (a) cutaneous in vitro models are remarkably susceptible to oxidative stress generated by an environmental air pollutant as ozone, and (b) raw antioxidants, thiols and vitamin C were efficient products to prevent ozone induced cellular oxidative damage. PMID:11566563

  7. MODELING INHALATION AND MULTIMEDIA MULTIPATHWAY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimation of exposures of children and adults to air toxics or multimedia pollutants require careful consideration of sources and concentrations of pollutants that may be present in different media, as well as various routes and pathways of exposures associated with age-specif...

  8. 78 FR 33633 - Human Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ..., including labeling and other requirements for occupational exposure classification, clarification of... approval. 3. Pinna (Outer Ear) Classification as an Extremity 11. In the NPRM, the Commission requested... classification, and it amends Sec. 1.1310 of its rules to subject the pinnae to the same RF exposure...

  9. Is house dust the missing exposure pathway for PBDEs? An analysis of the urban fate and human exposure to PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Jones-Otazo, Heather A; Clarke, John P; Diamond, Miriam L; Archbold, Josephine A; Ferguson, Glenn; Harner, Tom; Richardson, G Mark; Ryan, John Jake; Wilford, Bryony

    2005-07-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) body burdens in North America are 20 times that of Europeans and some "high accumulation" individuals have burdens up to 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than median values, the reasons for which are not known. We estimated emissions and fate of sigma PBDEs (minus BDE-209) in a 470 km2 area of Toronto, Canada, using the Multi-media Urban Model (MUM-Fate). Using a combination of measured and modeled concentrations for indoor and outdoor air, soil, and dust plus measured concentrations in food, we estimated exposure to sigma PBDEs via soil, dust, and dietary ingestion and indoor and outdoor inhalation pathways. Fate calculations indicate that 57-85% of PBDE emissions to the outdoor environment originate from within Toronto and that the dominant removal process is advection by air to downwind locations. Inadvertent ingestion of house dust is the largest contributor to exposure of toddlers through to adults and is thus the main exposure pathway for all life stages other than the infant, including the nursing mother, who transfers PBDEs to her infant via human milk. The next major exposure pathway is dietary ingestion of animal and dairy products. Infant consumption of human milk is the largest contributor to lifetime exposure. Inadvertent ingestion of dust is the main exposure pathway for a scenario of occupational exposure in a computer recycling facility and a fish eater. Ingestion of dust can lead to almost 100-fold higher exposure than "average" for a toddler with a high dust intake rate living in a home in which PBDE concentrations are elevated. PMID:16082939

  10. Monitoring and Modeling Astronaut Occupational Radiation Exposures in Space: Recent Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weyland, Mark; Golightly, Michael

    1999-01-01

    In 1982 astronauts were declared to be radiation workers by OSHA, and as such were subject to the rules and regulations applied to that group. NASA was already aware that space radiation was a hazard to crewmembers and had been studying and monitoring astronaut doses since 1962 at the Johnson Space Center. It was quickly realized NASA would not be able to accomplish all of its goals if the astronauts were subject to the ground based radiation worker limits, and thus received a waiver from OSHA to establish independent limits. As part of the stipulation attached to setting new limits, OSHA included a requirement to perform preflight dose projections for each crew and inform them of the associated risks. Additional requirements included measuring doses from various sources during the flight, making every effort to prevent a crewmember from exceeding the new limits, and keeping all exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (a.k.a. ALARA - a common health physics principle). The assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and its initial manned operations will coincide with the 4-5 year period of high space weather activity at the next maximum in the solar cycle. For the first time in NASA's manned program, US astronauts will be in orbit continuously throughout a solar maximum period. During this period, crews are at risk of significantly increased radiation exposures due to solar particle events and trapped electron belt enhancements following geomagnetic storms. The problem of protecting crews is compounded by the difficulty of providing continuous real-time monitoring over a period of a decade in an era of tightly constrained budgets. In order to prepare for ISS radiological support needs, the NASA Space Radiation Analysis Group and the NOAA Space Environment Center have undertaken a multiyear effort to improve and automate ground-based space weather monitoring systems and real-time radiation analysis tools. These improvements include a coupled, automated

  11. Quantification of metabolites for assessing human exposure to soapberry toxins hypoglycin A and methylenecyclopropylglycine.

    PubMed

    Isenberg, Samantha L; Carter, Melissa D; Graham, Leigh Ann; Mathews, Thomas P; Johnson, Darryl; Thomas, Jerry D; Pirkle, James L; Johnson, Rudolph C

    2015-09-21

    Ingestion of soapberry fruit toxins hypoglycin A and methylenecyclopropylglycine has been linked to public health challenges worldwide. In 1976, over 100 years after Jamaican vomiting sickness (JVS) was first reported, the cause of JVS was linked to the ingestion of the toxin hypoglycin A produced by ackee fruit. A structural analogue of hypoglycin A, methylenecyclopropylglycine (MCPG), was implicated as the cause of an acute encephalitis syndrome (AES). Much of the evidence linking hypoglycin A and MCPG to these diseases has been largely circumstantial due to the lack of an analytical method for specific metabolites. This study presents an analytical approach to identify and quantify specific urine metabolites for exposure to hypoglycin A and MCPG. The metabolites are excreted in urine as glycine adducts methylenecyclopropylacetyl-glycine (MCPA-Gly) and methylenecyclopropylformyl-glycine (MCPF-Gly). These metabolites were processed by isotope dilution, separated by reverse-phase liquid chromatography, and monitored by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The analytical response ratio was linearly proportional to the concentration of MCPF-Gly and MCPA-Gly in urine from 0.10 to 20 μg/mL with a correlation coefficient of r > 0.99. The assay demonstrated accuracy ≥80% and precision ≤20% RSD across the calibration range. This method has been applied to assess exposure to hypoglycin A and MCPG as part of a larger public health initiative and was used to provide the first reported identification of MCPF-Gly and MCPA-Gly in human urine. PMID:26328472

  12. Exposure of humans to a volatile organic mixture. 3. Inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Koren, H.S.; Graham, D.E.; Devlin, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    A set of symptoms has been described during the past two decades that has been called the sick building syndrome. These symptoms include eye, nose, and throat irritation; headache; mental fatigue; and respiratory distress. It is likely that the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in synthetic materials used in homes and office buildings contribute to these symptoms. However, there have been very few studies in which humans have been exposed to known amounts of VOCs under carefully controlled conditions. In the study, 14 subjects were exposed to a mixture of VOCs (25 mg/sq meter total hydrocarbon) that is representative of what is found in new homes and office buildings. Because irritations of the nose and throat are symptoms often associated with the upper respiratory tract and may result from an inflammatory response in the upper airways, the authors used nasal lavage to monitor neutrophil (PMN) influx into the nasal passages following exposure to VOCs. There were statistically significant increases in PMNs, both immediately after a 4-h exposure to VOCs and 18 h later.

  13. Guidance for exposure design of human studies addressing health risk evaluations of mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Niels; Schuderer, Jürgen; Christ, Andreas; Futter, Peter; Ebert, Sven

    2004-10-01

    Conflicting results have recently emerged from human provocation studies that addressed the possible health hazards of radio frequency (RF) field exposure from mobile phones. Different findings may have resulted from exposures that are poorly defined and difficult to compare. The aim of this study was to develop guidelines to facilitate the development of exposure systems for human volunteer studies which lead to reproducible results and which provide maximum relevance with respect to the assessment of the safety of mobile technology. The most important exposure parameters are discussed such as the signal, field distribution, and field strength, as well as the minimum requirements for the setup and dosimetry. PMID:15376239

  14. Conduits from community violence exposure to peer aggression and victimization: contributions of parental monitoring, impulsivity, and deviancy.

    PubMed

    Low, Sabina; Espelage, Dorothy

    2014-04-01

    Community violence exposure results in heightened risk for engaging in and being a victim of interpersonal violence. Despite this robust literature, few studies have specifically examined how the relation between community violence exposure, peer aggression, and victimization is modified by individual, peer, and familial influences (considered jointly). In the current study, we used risk and resiliency theory to examine links between community violence exposure and peer aggression and victimization. Impulsivity and parental monitoring were examined as potential moderators of the link between community violence exposure and outcomes, both directly and indirectly via deviant behavior. Survey data on bullying involvement, fighting, deviancy, parental monitoring, and impulsivity were collected on 3 occasions over an 18-month period among a large cohort of adolescents (N = 1,232) in 5th-7th grades. Structural equation modeling suggests that for both male and female adolescents, impulsivity exacerbates the effects of community violence exposure by increasing involvement in deviant behavior. Parental monitoring buffered the effects of community violence exposure on perpetration and victimization (for males and female adolescents) via reduced involvement in deviant behavior. Findings suggest that impulsivity and parental monitoring are implicated in modifying the effects of community violence exposure on both victimization and perpetration through deviancy, although deviancy is not as potent of a predictor for victimization. Thus, prevention efforts would seem to be optimally targeted at multiple ecological levels, including parental involvement and peer networks. PMID:24635595

  15. Human dermal absorption of chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants; implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elwafa Abdallah, Mohamed; Pawar, Gopal; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-01-15

    Tris-2-chloroethyl phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and tris-1,3-dichloropropyl phosphate (TDCIPP) are organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) widely applied in a plethora of consumer products despite their carcinogenic potential. Human dermal absorption of these PFRs is investigated for the first time using human ex vivo skin and EPISKIN™ models. Results of human ex vivo skin experiments revealed 28%, 25% and 13% absorption of the applied dose (500 ng/cm(2), finite dose) of TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP, respectively after 24h exposure. The EPISKIN™ model showed enhanced permeability values (i.e. weaker barrier), that were respectively 16%, 11% and 9% for TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP compared to human ex vivo skin. However, this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Estimated permeability constants (Kp, cm/h) showed a significant negative correlation with log Kow for the studied contaminants. The effect of hand-washing on dermal absorption of PFRs was investigated. Washing reduced overall dermal absorption, albeit to varying degrees depending on the physicochemical properties of the target PFRs. Moreover, slight variations of the absorbed dose were observed upon changing the dosing solution from acetone to 20% Tween 80 in water, indicating the potential influence of the dose vehicle on the dermal absorption of PFRs. Finally, estimated dermal uptake of the studied PFRs via contact with indoor dust was higher in UK toddlers (median ΣPFRs=36 ng/kg bw day) than adults (median ΣPFRs=4 ng/kg bw day). More research is required to fully elucidate the toxicological implications of such exposure. PMID:26712466

  16. Exposure to sulfosulfuron in agricultural drainage ditches: field monitoring and scenario-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Brown, Colin D; Dubus, Igor G; Fogg, Paul; Spirlet, Marie; Gustin, Christophe

    2004-08-01

    Field monitoring and scenario-based modelling were used to assess exposure of small ditches in the UK to the herbicide sulfosulfuron following transport via field drains. A site in central England on a high pH, clay soil was treated with sulfosulfuron, and concentrations were monitored in the single drain outfall and in the receiving ditch 1 km downstream. Drainflow in the nine months following application totalled 283 mm. Pesticide lost in the first 12.5 mm of flow was 99% of the total loading to drains (0.5% of applied). Significant dilution was observed in the receiving ditch and quantifiable residues were only detected in one sample (0.06 microg litre(-1)). The MACRO model was evaluated against the field data with minimal calibration. The parameterisation over-estimated the importance of macropore flow at the site. As a consequence, the maximum concentration in drainflow (2.3 microg litre(-1)) and the total loading to drains (0.76 g) were over-estimated by factors of 2.4 and 5, respectively. MACRO was then used to simulate long-term fate of the herbicide for each of 20 environmental scenarios. Resulting estimates for concentrations of sulfosulfuron in a receiving ditch were weighted according to the prevalence of each scenario to produce a probability distribution of daily exposure. PMID:15307668

  17. Occupational and environmental human lead exposure in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Paoliello, M.M.B. . E-mail: monibas@sercomtel.com.br; De Capitani, E.M.

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review of data on assessment of exposure and adverse effects due to environmental and occupational lead exposure in Brazil. Epidemiological investigations on children lead exposure around industrial and mining areas have shown that lead contamination is an actual source of concern. Lead in gasoline has been phasing out since the 1980s, and it is now completely discontinued. The last lead mining and lead refining plant was closed in 1995, leaving residual environmental lead contamination which has recently been investigated using a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, there are hundreds of small battery recycling plants and secondary smelting facilities all over the country, which produce focal urban areas of lead contamination. Current regulatory limits for workplace lead exposure have shown to be inadequate as safety limits according to a few studies carried out lately.

  18. XENOBIOTIC METHODS DEVELOPMENT FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomarkers from blood, breath, urine, and other physiological matrices can provide useful information regarding exposures to environmental pollutants. Once developed and applied appropriately, specific and sensitive methods can often provide definitive data identifying the vario...

  19. FIELD COLLECTION METHODS USED IN THE EPA NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENT PROGRAM TO EVALUATE CHILDREN'S AGGREGATE EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES: A TUTORIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tutorial on the field sampling equipment used to collect multimedia samples.

    We conduct observational human exposure measurement studies in order to understand what chemicals people come into contact with, at what levels, what the sources of those chemicals are, and wher...

  20. OCT monitoring of cosmetic creams in human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Hee; Yoon, Chang Han; Conroy, Leigh; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a tool currently used for noninvasive diagnosis of human disease as well as for monitoring treatment during or after therapy. In this study, OCT was used to examine penetration and accumulation of cosmetic creams on human hand skin. The samples varied in collagen content with one formulation containing soluble collagen as its primary active ingredient. Collagen is a major connective tissue protein that is essential in maintaining health vitality and strength of many organs. The penetration and localization of collagen in cosmetic creams is thought to be the main determinant of the efficacy of new collagen synthesis. Detection and quantification of collagen in cosmetic creams applied to skin may thus help predict the eventual efficacy of the product in skin collagen regeneration. We hypothesize that the topically applied collagen may be detectable by OCT through its modulation of skin scattering properties. To test this hypothesis, we used a FDML swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. A particular location on the skin of two male adult volunteers was used to investigate 4 different cosmetic creams. The duration of OCT monitoring of cosmetic penetration into skin ranged from 5 minutes to 2 hours following topical application. The results showed that OCT can discriminate between a cream with collagen and other collagen-free formulations. Thus it seems feasible that OCT intensity can monitor the in vivo effects of topical application of collagen contained in cosmetic formulations.

  1. Biological monitoring of pesticide exposures among applicators and their children in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Teresa; Younglove, Lisa; Lu, Chensheng; Funez, Aura; Weppner, Sarah; Barr, Dana B; Fenske, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Exposures were assessed for seven small-scale farmers using chlorpyrifos on corn and ten banana plantation employees applying diazinon, and for one child of each worker. Metabolites (TCPYand IMPY) were measured in urine before and after applications. TCPY concentrations peaked at 27 and 8.5 hours post-application for applicators and children, respectively (geometric means, 26 and 3.0 microg/L). Proximity to spraying and spray mixture preparation in homes were important exposure factors. IMPY concentrations differed substantially across workers at two plantations (geometric means, 1.3 and 168 mirog/L); however, their children had little or no diazinon exposure. These workers and children were also exposed to chlorpyrifos, most likely through contact with chlorpyrifos-impregnated bags used in banana production. Several recommendations are offered: (1) monitor children's activities during applications; (2) do not store or prepare pesticides in homes; (3) institute sound occupational hygiene practices at banana plantations; (4) dispose of plastic insecticide bags properly at the worksite. PMID:17168218

  2. Monitoring of daily integrated exposure of outdoor workers to respirable particulates in an urban region

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, M.M.; Patil, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    A realization is gradually emerging that estimation of daily integrated exposure of population to air pollutants is more relevant rather than the ambient air quality, since it gives a better indicator of health risk. Outdoor workers in urban region are generally of low income category and suffer from both indoor and outdoor air pollution of high levels. These respondent population sub-group have been selected for this study. The outdoor workers are divided into two categories - stationary and mobile. Stationary outdoor workers are further divided into two groups viz. traffic police and casual outdoor workers like watchman, roadside shopkeeper, etc. The mobile outdoor workers include drivers and workers who have to travel for a majority period of their occupation time. Most of the respondents are from lower income group. The sampling frequency is once a week. The study region is situated in the N-W part of Greater Bombay Municipal Corporation. It can be classified as industrial cum residential area. Ambient air quality monitoring stations are established at three sites viz. Marol, Sakinaka and Jogeshwari in this region and respondents for the exposure measurement are selected from the cluster of residential houses (slums) near these stations. In the present study, outdoor workers residing and working in the study region are selected. This has eliminated the commuting microenvironment. The daily integrated exposure of the outdoor workers consists of two major microenvironments viz. occupation and indoor residential. In addition, activity diary of the respondents is maintained to check whether there are any other major microenvironments.

  3. Bioindicators of contaminant exposure and effect in aquatic and terrestrial monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melancon, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Bioindicators of contaminant exposure presently used in environmental monitoring arc discussed. Some have been extensively field-validated and arc already in routine application. Included are (1) inhibition of brain or blood cholinesterase by anticholinesterase pesticides, (2) induction of hepatic microsomal cytochromes P450 by chemicals such as PAHs and PCBs, (3) reproductive problems such as terata and eggshell thinning, and (4) aberrations of hemoglobin synthesis, including the effects of lead and of certain chlorinated hydrocarbons. Many studies on DNA damage and of histopathological effects, particularly in the form of tumors, have already been completed. There are presently numerous other opportunities for field validation. Bile metabolites of contaminants in fish reveal exposure to contaminants that might otherwise be difficult to detect or quantify. Bile analysis is beginning to be extended to species other than fishes. Assessment of oxidative damage and immune competence appear to be valuable biomarkers. needing only additional field validation for wider use. The use of metallothioneins as biomarkers depends on the development of convenient, inexpensive methodology that provides information not available from measurements of metal ions. The use of stress proteins as biomarkers depends on development of convenient, inexpensive methodology and field validation. Gene arrays and proteomics hold promise as bioindicators for contaminant exposure or effect, particularly because of the large amount of data that could be generated, but they still need extensive development and testing.

  4. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Response Inhibition in the Conflict-monitoring Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of high-altitude exposure on response inhibition, event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were measured in Go/NoGo task. The participants included an ‘immigrant’ high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but born at low altitude) and a low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although the behavioural data showed no significant differences between the two groups, a delayed latency of NoGo-N2 was found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group. Moreover, larger N2 and smaller P3 amplitudes were found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group, for both the Go and NoGo conditions. These findings suggest that high-altitude exposure affects response inhibition with regard to processing speed during the conflict monitoring stage. In addition, high altitude generally increases the neural activity in the matching step of information processing and attentional resources. These results may provide some insights into the neurocognitive basis of the effects on high-altitude exposure on response inhibition. PMID:26324166

  5. Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production—Part II: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    BIRCH, M. EILEEN

    2015-01-01

    Production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNFs/CNTs) and their composite products is increasing globally. High-volume production may increase the exposure risks for workers who handle these materials. Though health effects data for CNFs/CNTs are limited, some studies raise serious health concerns. Given the uncertainty about their potential hazards, there is an immediate need for toxicity data and field studies to assess exposure to CNFs/CNTs. An extensive study was conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes CNFs. Filter, sorbent, cascade impactor, bulk, and microscopy samples, combined with direct-reading instruments, provided complementary information on air contaminants. Samples were analyzed for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with EC as a measure of CNFs. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy also was applied. Fine/ultrafine iron-rich soot, PAHs, and carbon monoxide were production byproducts. Direct-reading instrument results were reported previously [Evans DE et al. (Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling. Ann Occup Hyg 2010; 54:514–31)]. Results for time-integrated samples are reported as companion papers in this issue. OC and EC, metals, and microscopy results are reported in Part I [Birch ME et al. (Exposure and emissions monitoring during carbon nanofiber production—Part I: elemental carbon and iron–soot aerosols. Ann Occup Hyg 2011; 55: 1016–36.)] whereas results for PAHs are reported here. Naphthalene and acenaphthylene were the dominant PAHs with average concentrations ranging from 115 to 336 μg m−3 and 35 to 84 μg m−3, respectively. Concentrations of other PAHs ranged from ~1 to 10 μg m−3. PMID:21976308

  6. Assessment of two nonnative poeciliid fishes for monitoring selenium exposure in the endangered desert pupfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the suitability of two nonnative poeciliid fishes—western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna)—for monitoring selenium exposure in desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius). Our investigation was prompted by a need to avoid lethal take of an endangered species (pupfish) when sampling fish for chemical analysis. Total selenium (SeTot) concentrations in both poeciliids were highly correlated with SeTot concentrations in pupfish. However, mean SeTot concentrations varied among fish species, with higher concentrations measured in mosquitofish than in mollies and pupfish from one of three sampled agricultural drains. Moreover, regression equations describing the relationship of selenomethionine to SeTot differed between mosquitofish and pupfish, but not between mollies and pupfish. Because selenium accumulates in animals primarily through dietary exposure, we examined fish trophic relationships by measuring stable isotopes (δ 13C and δ 15N) and gut contents. According to δ 13C measurements, the trophic pathway leading to mosquitofish was more carbon-depleted than trophic pathways leading to mollies and pupfish, suggesting that energy flow to mosquitofish originated from allochthonous sources (terrestrial vegetation, emergent macrophytes, or both), whereas energy flow to mollies and pupfish originated from autochthonous sources (filamentous algae, submerged macrophytes, or both). The δ 15N measurements indicated that mosquitofish and mollies occupied similar trophic levels, whereas pupfish occupied a slightly higher trophic level. Analysis of gut contents showed that mosquitofish consumed mostly winged insects (an indication of terrestrial taxa), whereas mollies and pupfish consumed mostly organic detritus. Judging from our results, only mollies (not mosquitofish) are suitable for monitoring selenium exposure in pupfish.

  7. Assessment of two nonnative poeciliid fishes for monitoring selenium exposure in the endangered desert pupfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the suitability of two nonnative poeciliid fishes—western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna)—for monitoring selenium exposure in desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius). Our investigation was prompted by a need to avoid lethal take of an endangered species (pupfish) when sampling fish for chemical analysis. Total selenium (SeTot) concentrations in both poeciliids were highly correlated with SeTot concentrations in pupfish. However, mean SeTot concentrations varied among fish species, with higher concentrations measured in mosquitofish than in mollies and pupfish from one of three sampled agricultural drains. Moreover, regression equations describing the relationship of selenomethionine to SeTot differed between mosquitofish and pupfish, but not between mollies and pupfish. Because selenium accumulates in animals primarily through dietary exposure, we examined fish trophic relationships by measuring stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) and gut contents. According to δ13C measurements, the trophic pathway leading to mosquitofish was more carbon-depleted than trophic pathways leading to mollies and pupfish, suggesting that energy flow to mosquitofish originated from allochthonous sources (terrestrial vegetation, emergent macrophytes, or both), whereas energy flow to mollies and pupfish originated from autochthonous sources (filamentous algae, submerged macrophytes, or both). The δ15N measurements indicated that mosquitofish and mollies occupied similar trophic levels, whereas pupfish occupied a slightly higher trophic level. Analysis of gut contents showed that mosquitofish consumed mostly winged insects (an indication of terrestrial taxa), whereas mollies and pupfish consumed mostly organic detritus. Judging from our results, only mollies (not mosquitofish) are suitable for monitoring selenium exposure in pupfish.

  8. Pesticide Flow Analysis to Assess Human Exposure in Greenhouse Flower Production in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R.

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area. PMID:23528812

  9. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  10. Pesticide flow analysis to assess human exposure in greenhouse flower production in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R

    2013-04-01

    Human exposure assessment tools represent a means for understanding human exposure to pesticides in agricultural activities and managing possible health risks. This paper presents a pesticide flow analysis modeling approach developed to assess human exposure to pesticide use in greenhouse flower crops in Colombia, focusing on dermal and inhalation exposure. This approach is based on the material flow analysis methodology. The transfer coefficients were obtained using the whole body dosimetry method for dermal exposure and the button personal inhalable aerosol sampler for inhalation exposure, using the tracer uranine as a pesticide surrogate. The case study was a greenhouse rose farm in the Bogota Plateau in Colombia. The approach was applied to estimate the exposure to pesticides such as mancozeb, carbendazim, propamocarb hydrochloride, fosetyl, carboxin, thiram, dimethomorph and mandipropamide. We found dermal absorption estimations close to the AOEL reference values for the pesticides carbendazim, mancozeb, thiram and mandipropamide during the study period. In addition, high values of dermal exposure were found on the forearms, hands, chest and legs of study participants, indicating weaknesses in the overlapping areas of the personal protective equipment parts. These results show how the material flow analysis methodology can be applied in the field of human exposure for early recognition of the dispersion of pesticides and support the development of measures to improve operational safety during pesticide management. Furthermore, the model makes it possible to identify the status quo of the health risk faced by workers in the study area. PMID:23528812

  11. Refined Assessment of Human PM2.5 Exposure in Chinese city by Incorporating Time-activity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Wang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Since urban residents tend to spend a majority of time indoors throughout a day, it has been widely discussed in recent years, whether fixed-site monitoring PM2.5 ambient concentration is feasible as a surrogate of human PM2.5 exposure. Comprehensive understanding of residents' daily time-activity patterns (TAP) and possible indoor behavior are urgently needed to perform a more accurate estimate of human PM2.5exposure, especially in China, where is experiencing rapid urbanization.Field surveys of TAP were carried out in a Chinese city of Suzhou from 2014 to 2015 to evaluate PM2.5 exposure in various micro-environments (ME, e.g., residence, outdoors and in-transit). We gathered and analyzed urban residents' seasonal time-activity data using 24h retrospective time-location diaries, as well as diversified exposure-related indoor information (e.g. ventilation, environment tobacco smoke and cooking). PM2.5exposure is calculated through the incorporation of ambient concentration data, modified indoor/outdoor empirical functions and TAP. The spatial distributions of TAP-based exposure and static-population based exposure are also compared.Residents in Suzhou urban area spend over 65% of time at home and 90% indoors. There are significant temporal (season, day type) and socioeconomic differences (gender, age, education, living alone, having children at home, employment status, etc.) of time-activity distributions, which makes the sum of PM2.5 ME exposure differs notably from static-population based ambient exposure. People prefer to spend more time at home both in winter (P<0.05) and on weekends (P<0.001), less time outdoors in winter but more on weekends (P<0.001). Gender, education and living alone are negative associated with time spent home, while age, children at home and employment status are positively related. On the other hand, due to lack of monitoring stations in unban Suzhou, the inverse distance squared weighting method is not ideally performed and may be less

  12. Effects of bilateral and unilateral laser ocular exposure in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, David A.; Lund, David J.; Molchany, Jerome W.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    INTRODUCTION: The amount of visual disruption experienced by individuals exposed to a visible laser source at levels, which are below that, which will damage the cornea or retina will depend on laser exposure parameters and task demands. Previous work has evaluated the effects of wavelength, duration, ambient light level, and target variables. One factor that has not received attention is monocular vs. binocular exposure. Whether the exposure is monocular or binocular may alter pupil dynamics, eyelid closure, and ultimately affect visual performance. METHODS: In this study 10 males and females were exposed to 0.1 and 3.0 sec laser flashes while tracking a dynamic target at 0.28 deg/sec through a scope that was capable of selecting binocular or monocular viewing. Bright (430 nits) and dawn/dusk (4.3 nits) ambient light conditions were simulated using ND filters. A collimated 514.5 nm argon laser beam produced corneal radiant exposures of 0.16 and 1.0 mJ/cm2 for the 0.1 and 3.0 sec conditions respectively. For each flash trial total time off target and maximum absolute error scores were calculated. Eye response (changes in pupil diameter) was assessed by evaluation of videotape from an IR eye camera. Tracking error scores (total time off target) were calculated for each flash trial. RESULTS: Analysis of variance results for the total time off target scores found all three main factors (light level, exposure duration, and monocular/binocular to be significant. Earlier studies have previously shown dawn/dusk flash exposures be more disruptive than bright light trials. Also three sec exposures were more disruptive than one sec exposures. Finally, monocular exposures produced significantly higher error scores than did binocular exposures. For the pupil diameters the post-flash diameters were significantly smaller that the pre-flash diameters and monocular diameters larger that binocular pupil sizes. SUMMARY: The Total Time Off Target error scores for the monocular

  13. Integration of biological monitoring, environmental monitoring and computational modelling into the interpretation of pesticide exposure data: introduction to a proposed approach.

    PubMed

    Colosio, Claudio; Rubino, Federico M; Alegakis, Athanasios; Ariano, Eugenio; Brambilla, Gabri; Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Metruccio, Francesca; Minoia, Claudio; Moretto, Angelo; Somaruga, Chiara; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Turci, Roberta; Vellere, Francesca

    2012-08-13

    Open field, variability of climatic and working conditions, and the use of complex mixtures of pesticides makes biological and environmental monitoring in agriculture, and therefore risk assessment and management, very complicated. A need of pointing out alternative risk assessment approaches, not necessarily based on measures, but simple, user-friendly and reliable, feasible also in the less advanced situations and in particular in small size enterprises, arises. This aim can be reached through a combination of environmental monitoring, biological monitoring and computational modelling. We have used this combination of methods for the creation of "exposure and risk profiles" to be applied in specific exposure scenarios, and we have tested this approach on a sample of Italian rice and maize herbicide applicators. We have given specific "toxicity scores" to the different products used and we have identified, for each of the major working phases, that is mixing and loading, spraying, maintenance and cleaning of equipment, the main variables affecting exposure and inserted them into a simple algorithm, able to produce "exposure indices". Based on the combination of toxicity indices and exposure indices it is possible to obtain semiquantitative estimates of the risk levels experienced by the workers in the exposure scenarios considered. Results of operator exposure data collected under real-life conditions can be used to validate and refine the algorithms; moreover, the AOEL derived from pre-marketing studies can be combined to estimate tentative biological exposure limits for pesticides, useful to perform individual risk assessment based on technical surveys and on simple biological monitoring. A proof of principle example of this approach is the subject of this article. PMID:21903154

  14. Biomarkers of exposure to combustion by-products in a human population in Shanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Naufal, Ziad; Zhiwen, Li; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Guo-Dong; McDonald, Thomas; He, Ling Yu; Mitchell, Laura; Ren, Aiguo; Zhu, Huiping; Finnell, Richard; Donnelly, Kirby C

    2010-06-01

    Emissions of complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other compounds into the environment represent a potential threat to the health of humans. Information regarding the dose and duration of exposure is essential to determine the degree of risk and to identify sensitive receptors within a population. Although measurements of chemical concentrations in air may be used to estimate exposures, internal biomarkers provide more accurate information regarding the dose of exposure and retention of toxic chemicals. This study was conducted in a population in rural China exposed to PAHs from a variety of sources. The study population was located in an area known to have an elevated incidence of birth defects. Parents of children born with a neural tube defect (NTD) were recruited as case participants and parents of children born with no visible birth defect were recruited as controls. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that parents of children born with a NTD would exhibit a biomarker of exposure at higher levels than the parents of a child with no visible birth defect. A total of 35 mothers and 32 fathers were recruited as case participants, and 18 mothers and 19 fathers were recruited as control participants. Venous blood was collected from the study participants by hospital staff as soon as possible following the birth of the child. PAHs were isolated from the whole blood by solvent extraction and DNA was isolated from a separate aliquot of blood for (32)P-postlabeling to measure bulky adducts. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in phase II enzymes were also monitored in an attempt to identify sensitive receptors. Both total and carcinogenic PAH (cPAH) concentrations were elevated in the parents of case children. Both values were elevated significantly in mothers, whereas only cPAH concentrations were elevated significantly in fathers. Levels of DNA adducts were highly variable and displayed a reverse pattern to that of PAH levels in

  15. The next generation of low-cost personal air quality sensors for quantitative exposure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedrahita, R.; Xiang, Y.; Masson, N.; Ortega, J.; Collier, A.; Jiang, Y.; Li, K.; Dick, R.; Lv, Q.; Hannigan, M.; Shang, L.

    2014-03-01

    Advances in embedded systems and low-cost gas sensors are enabling a new wave of low cost air quality monitoring tools. Our team has been engaged in the development of low-cost wearable air quality monitors (M-Pods) using the Arduino platform. The M-Pods use commercially available metal oxide semiconductor (MOx) sensors to measure CO, O3, NO2, and total VOCs, and NDIR sensors to measure CO2. MOx sensors are low in cost and show high sensitivity near ambient levels; however they display non-linear output signals and have cross sensitivity effects. Thus, a quantification system was developed to convert the MOx sensor signals into concentrations. Two deployments were conducted at a regulatory monitoring station in Denver, Colorado. M-Pod concentrations were determined using laboratory calibration techniques and co-location calibrations, in which we place the M-Pods near regulatory monitors to then derive calibration function coefficients using the regulatory monitors as the standard. The form of the calibration function was derived based on laboratory experiments. We discuss various techniques used to estimate measurement uncertainties. A separate user study was also conducted to assess personal exposure and M-Pod reliability. In this study, 10 M-Pods were calibrated via co-location multiple times over 4 weeks and sensor drift was analyzed with the result being a calibration function that included drift. We found that co-location calibrations perform better than laboratory calibrations. Lab calibrations suffer from bias and difficulty in covering the necessary parameter space. During co-location calibrations, median standard errors ranged between 4.0-6.1 ppb for O3, 6.4-8.4 ppb for NO2, 0.28-0.44 ppm for CO, and 16.8 ppm for CO2. Median signal to noise (S/N) ratios for the M-Pod sensors were higher for M-Pods than the regulatory instruments: for NO2, 3.6 compared to 23.4; for O3, 1.4 compared to 1.6; for CO, 1.1 compared to 10.0; and for CO2, 42.2 compared to 300

  16. The food chain as a source of human exposure to organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Hattemer-Frey, H.A.; Travis, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    Although human exposure to environmentally released pollutants can occur via several pathways including, inhalation, ingestion of contaminated food items, infant consumption of mother's milk, and dermal absorption, of particular concern are potential exposures from ingesting contaminated food items, since the food chain has been shown to be a primary source of human exposure to a large class of organics, including DDT, TCDD, pentachlorophenol, benzo(a)pyrene, and most pesticides. For risk assessment purposes, an important objective in evaluating the environmental behavior and fate of various pollutants is predicting the major pathways and extent of human exposure. Many chemicals cycle in the environment with cross-media transfers occurring between air, water, soil, and biota. As a result of this cycling behavior and a chemical's presence in various environmental media, human exposure often results from multiple sources. We found that 50--80% of all chemicals released into the environment result in human exposure through multiple media. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a perspective on the food chain as a source of human exposure to organic chemicals chronically released into the environment. 121 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Wearable real-time direct reading naphthalene and VOC personal exposure monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hug, W. F.; Bhartia, R.; Reid, R. D.; Reid, M. R.; Oswal, P.; Lane, A. L.; Sijapati, K.; Sullivan, K.; Hulla, J. E.; Snawder, J.; Proctor, S. P.

    2012-06-01

    Naphthalene has been identified by the National Research Council as a serious health hazard for personnel working with jet fuels and oil-based sealants containing naphthalene. We are developing a family of miniature, self-contained, direct reading personal exposure monitors (PEMs) to detect, differentiate, quantify, and log naphthalene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breathing zone of the wearer or in the hands of an industrial hygienist with limits of detection in the low parts per billion (ppb) range. The VOC Dosimeter (VOCDos) described here is a PEM that provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose, with alarms addressing long term and immediate exposure limits. We will describe the sensor, which employs optical methods with a unique excitation source and rapidly refreshable vapor concentrator. This paper addresses the rapidly increasing awareness of the health risks of inhaling jet fuel vapors by Department of Defense (DOD) personnel engaged in or around jet fueling operations. Naphthalene is a one to three percent component of the 5 billion gallons of jet fuels used annually by DOD. Naphthalene is also a component of many other petroleum products such as asphalt and other oil-based sealants. The DOD is the single largest user of petroleum fuels in the United States (20% of all petroleum fuel used). The VOCDos wearable sensor provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose. We will describe the sensor, which employs endogenous fluorescence from VOCs accumulated on a unique, rapidly refreshable, patent-pending concentrator, excited by a unique deep ultraviolet excitation source.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL IMMUNOCHEMISTRY AT THE U.S. EPA, NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S HUMAN EXPOSURE BRANCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunoehemical methods are responding to the changing needs of regulatory and monitoring programs and are meeting new analytical challenges as they arise. Recent advances in environmental immunoehemistry have expanded the role of immunoassays from field screening methods to hig...

  19. Human exposure and risk from indoor use of chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J E; Peterson, R K; Shurdut, B A

    1998-01-01

    The toxicity, exposure, and risk from chlorpyrifos are briefly discussed in juxtaposition with two recent articles in Environmental Health Perspectives concerning potential exposures to children. In studies conducted according to EPA guidelines, chlorpyrifos has been shown not to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, or teratogenic, nor does it adversely affect reproduction. Chlorpyrifos toxicity does not occur in the absence of significant cholinesterase inhibition. If exposures are less than those that cause significant cholinesterase depression, then no signs or symptoms related to chlorpyrifos exposure occur. The weight of empirical evidence indicates that the risk of adults or children experiencing an adverse health effect from exposure to chlorpyrifos through both nondietary and dietary sources is negligible. Both the research supporting the registration of these products and their long history of widespread use suggest that unless these products are seriously misused, their margins of safety are wide enough to protect everyone with the potential to be exposed. A weight-of-evidence review of the entire scientific knowledge base relating to chlorpyrifos products supports these conclusions. PMID:9618344

  20. Microbial contamination monitoring and control during human space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Houdt, Rob; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Leys, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquity and resilience of microorganisms makes them unavoidable in most environments including space habitats. The impaired immune system of astronauts in flight raises the level of concern about disease risk during human space missions and additionally these biological contaminants may affect life support systems and hardware. In this review, the microbial contamination observed in manned space stations and in particular the International Space Station ISS will be discussed, demonstrating that it is a microbiologically safe working and living habitat. Microbial contamination levels were in general below the implemented quality standards, although, occasional contamination hazard reports indicate that the current prevention and monitoring strategies are the strict minimum.

  1. Continuous monitoring of blood volume changes in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    Use of on-line high-precision mass densitometry for the continuous monitoring of blood volume changes in humans was demonstrated by recording short-term blood volume alterations produced by changes in body position. The mass density of antecubital venous blood was measured continuously for 80 min per session with 0.1 g/l precision at a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min. Additional discrete plasma density and hematocrit measurements gave linear relations between all possible combinations of blood density, plasma density, and hematocrit. Transient filtration phenomena were revealed that are not amenable to discontinuous measurements.

  2. Mapping human health risks from exposure to trace metal contamination of drinking water sources in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Alamdar, Ambreen; Katsoyiannis, Ioannis; Shen, Heqing; Ali, Nadeem; Ali, Syeda Maria; Bokhari, Habib; Schäfer, Ralf B; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah

    2015-12-15

    The consumption of contaminated drinking water is one of the major causes of mortality and many severe diseases in developing countries. The principal drinking water sources in Pakistan, i.e. ground and surface water, are subject to geogenic and anthropogenic trace metal contamination. However, water quality monitoring activities have been limited to a few administrative areas and a nationwide human health risk assessment from trace metal exposure is lacking. Using geographically weighted regression (GWR) and eight relevant spatial predictors, we calculated nationwide human health risk maps by predicting the concentration of 10 trace metals in the drinking water sources of Pakistan and comparing them to guideline values. GWR incorporated local variations of trace metal concentrations into prediction models and hence mitigated effects of large distances between sampled districts due to data scarcity. Predicted concentrations mostly exhibited high accuracy and low uncertainty, and were in good agreement with observed concentrations. Concentrations for Central Pakistan were predicted with higher accuracy than for the North and South. A maximum 150-200 fold exceedance of guideline values was observed for predicted cadmium concentrations in ground water and arsenic concentrations in surface water. In more than 53% (4 and 100% for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% confidence interval (CI)) of the total area of Pakistan, the drinking water was predicted to be at risk of contamination from arsenic, chromium, iron, nickel and lead. The area with elevated risks is inhabited by more than 74 million (8 and 172 million for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% CI) people. Although these predictions require further validation by field monitoring, the results can inform disease mitigation and water resources management regarding potential hot spots. PMID:26312405

  3. Effects of parental monitoring and exposure to community violence on antisocial behavior and anxiety/depression among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bacchini, Dario; Concetta Miranda, Maria; Affuso, Gaetana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the influence of gender, exposure to community violence, and parental monitoring upon antisocial behavior and anxiety/depression in adolescence. Involved in the study were 489 adolescents (290 males and 189 females) from 4 secondary schools in the city of Naples, Italy. The age of participants ranged from 16 to 19 (mean age = 17.53, standard deviation = 1.24). All were in the 3rd (11th grade) or 5th year (13th grade) of high school. Self-reported measures were used to assess antisocial behavior, symptoms of anxiety/depression, parental monitoring and exposure to community violence as a victim or as a witness. First of all we tested, through a hierarchical multiple regression, the independent contribution of gender, exposure to community violence and parental monitoring upon antisocial behavior and symptoms of anxiety/depression; then we tested the moderating role of gender and parental monitoring on the negative effects of exposure to violence. The results show that male gender, high level of exposure to community violence (both as a victim and a witness), and low level of parental monitoring predict a higher involvement in antisocial behavior. Female gender, being a victim and low level of parental monitoring predict symptoms of anxiety/depression. Furthermore, parental monitoring and gender play a moderating role, minimizing or amplifying the negative effects of exposure to community violence. The results of the research suggest that a similar pattern of risk and protective factors can give rise to multiple paths of adaptive or maladaptive development. PMID:20234055

  4. Frequency of Extreme Heat Event as a Surrogate Exposure Metric for Examining the Human Health Effects of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Romeo Upperman, Crystal; Parker, Jennifer; Jiang, Chengsheng; He, Xin; Murtugudde, Raghuram; Sapkota, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigation of the impact of climate change on human health, particularly chronic diseases, is hindered by the lack of exposure metrics that can be used as a marker of climate change that are compatible with health data. Here, we present a surrogate exposure metric created using a 30-year baseline (1960–1989) that allows users to quantify long-term changes in exposure to frequency of extreme heat events with near unabridged spatial coverage in a scale that is compatible with national/state health outcome data. We evaluate the exposure metric by decade, seasonality, area of the country, and its ability to capture long-term changes in weather (climate), including natural climate modes. Our findings show that this generic exposure metric is potentially useful to monitor trends in the frequency of extreme heat events across varying regions because it captures long-term changes; is sensitive to the natural climate modes (ENSO events); responds well to spatial variability, and; is amenable to spatial/temporal aggregation, making it useful for epidemiological studies. PMID:26641244

  5. Integrating smart-phone based momentary location tracking with fixed site air quality monitoring for personal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G; Jerrett, Michael; Meng, Ying-Ying; Pickett, Melissa; Ritz, Beate

    2015-02-15

    Epidemiological studies investigating relationships between environmental exposures from air pollution and health typically use residential addresses as a single point for exposure, while environmental exposures in transit, at work, school or other locations are largely ignored. Personal exposure monitors measure individuals' exposures over time; however, current personal monitors are intrusive and cannot be operated at a large scale over an extended period of time (e.g., for a continuous three months) and can be very costly. In addition, spatial locations typically cannot be identified when only personal monitors are used. In this paper, we piloted a study that applied momentary location tracking services supplied by smart phones to identify an individual's location in space-time for three consecutive months (April 28 to July 28, 2013) using available Wi-Fi networks. Individual exposures in space-time to the traffic-related pollutants Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) were estimated by superimposing an annual mean NOX concentration surface modeled using the Land Use Regression (LUR) modeling technique. Individual's exposures were assigned to stationary (including home, work and other stationary locations) and in-transit (including commute and other travel) locations. For the individual, whose home/work addresses were known and the commute route was fixed, it was found that 95.3% of the time, the individual could be accurately identified in space-time. The ambient concentration estimated at the home location was 21.01 ppb. When indoor/outdoor infiltration, indoor sources of air pollution and time spent outdoors were taken into consideration, the individual's cumulative exposures were 28.59 ppb and 96.49 ppb, assuming a respective indoor/outdoor ratio of 1.33 and 5.00. Integrating momentary location tracking services with fixed-site field monitoring, plus indoor-outdoor air exchange calibration, makes exposure assessment of a very large population over an extended time period

  6. THE USE OF BIOMONITORING DATA IN EXPOSURE AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomonitoring utilizes analytical methods which permit the accurate measurement of low levels of environmental chemicals in human tissues. However, depending on the intended use, biomonitoring, like all exposure tools, may not be a stand-alone exposure assessment tool for some o...

  7. A Quantitative ADME-base Tool for Exploring Human Exposure to Consumer Product Ingredients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to a wide range of chemicals through our daily habits and routines is ubiquitous and largely unavoidable within modern society. The potential for human exposure, however, has not been quantified for the vast majority of chemicals with wide commercial use. Creative advanc...

  8. OVERVIEW OF EPA'S HUMAN EXPOSURE AND SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING PROGRAM: HEADSUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's human exposure and source-to-dose modeling program is designed to provide a scientifically sound approach to understanding how people are actually exposed to pollutants and the magnitude of predicted exposures and dose. The objective of this research project is to develo...

  9. STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) PILOT STUDY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) in the early 1990's. It was a population-based pilot study of the exposure of over 500 people in three areas of the U.S....

  10. OZONE-INDUCED RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS AND LUNG FUNCTION DECREMENTS IN HUMANS: EXPOSURE-RESPONSE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short duration exposure to ozone (<8 hr) is known to result in lung function decrements and respiratory symptoms in humans. The magnitudes of these responses are functions of ozone concentration (C), activity level measured by minute ventilation (Ve), duration of exposure (T), a...

  11. STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT SURVEY (NHEXAS) PILOT STUDY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) in the early 1990's. It was a population-based pilot study of the exposure of over 500 people in three areas of the U....

  12. The EPA's Human Exposure Research Program for Assessing Cumulative Risk in Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Communities are faced with challenges in identifying and prioritizing environmental issues, taking actions to reduce their exposures, and determining their effectiveness for reducing human health risks. Additional challenges include determining what scientific tools are available...

  13. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  14. EXPOSURES AND INTERNAL DOSES OF TRIHALOMETHANES IN HUMANS: MULTI-ROUTE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM DRINKING WATER (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) has released a final report that presents and applies a method to estimate distributions of internal concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in humans resulting from a residential drinking water exposure. The report presen...

  15. MODELING ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS: ACCOUNTING FOR FATIGUE AND EPOC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled Individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized val...

  16. CURRENT ISSUES IN HTE DETECTION OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO THE CYANOBACTERIA TOXINS, MICROCYSTINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Toxic cyanobacteria are contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins are some of the most commonly detected toxins. Biological evidence of human exposure has been difficult to obtain due to technical, temporal, and biological limitations. However, evide...

  17. A SIMPLE COLORIMETRIC METHOD TO DETECT BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MICROCYSTINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic cyanobacteria are contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins are some of the most commonly detected toxins. Biological evidence of human exposure may be difficult to obtain due to limitations associated with cost, laboratory capacity, analytic support, and exp...

  18. 3D Case Studies of Monitoring Dynamic Structural Tests using Long Exposure Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, D. M. J.; Chandler, J. H.; Palmeri, A.

    2014-06-01

    Structural health monitoring uses non-destructive testing programmes to detect long-term degradation phenomena in civil engineering structures. Structural testing may also be carried out to assess a structure's integrity following a potentially damaging event. Such investigations are increasingly carried out with vibration techniques, in which the structural response to artificial or natural excitations is recorded and analysed from a number of monitoring locations. Photogrammetry is of particular interest here since a very high number of monitoring locations can be measured using just a few images. To achieve the necessary imaging frequency to capture the vibration, it has been necessary to reduce the image resolution at the cost of spatial measurement accuracy. Even specialist sensors are limited by a compromise between sensor resolution and imaging frequency. To alleviate this compromise, a different approach has been developed and is described in this paper. Instead of using high-speed imaging to capture the instantaneous position at each epoch, long-exposure images are instead used, in which the localised image of the object becomes blurred. The approach has been extended to create 3D displacement vectors for each target point via multiple camera locations, which allows the simultaneous detection of transverse and torsional mode shapes. The proposed approach is frequency invariant allowing monitoring of higher modal frequencies irrespective of a sampling frequency. Since there is no requirement for imaging frequency, a higher image resolution is possible for the most accurate spatial measurement. The results of a small scale laboratory test using off-the-shelf consumer cameras are demonstrated. A larger experiment also demonstrates the scalability of the approach.

  19. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB

  20. Risk assessment of human exposure to cypermethrin during treatment of mandarin fields.

    PubMed

    Choi, H; Moon, J K; Liu, K H; Park, H W; Ihm, Y B; Park, B S; Kim, J H

    2006-04-01

    The potential dermal and respiratory exposure assessment and risk assessment for applicator were performed with cypermethrin EC. The pesticide was applied on a mandarin field using a power sprayer. Gloves were used for the hand exposure assessment, mask for face, and dermal patches for the other parts of the body. Personal air monitor equipped with a XAD-2 resin was used for the respiratory exposure assessment. During the application of cypermethrin in the field, the rate of potential dermal exposure ranged from 28.1 to 58.8 mg/h. The major exposure parts were upper-arms (22.1-24.6%) and legs (thigh and shin, 28.3-29.2%) for females and thigh (21.0-46.9%) and hand (14.9-19.3%) for males. Females were exposed more than males. No exposure was detected from the respiratory monitoring. For risk assessment, the potential dermal exposure (PDE), the absorbable quantity of exposure (AQE), and the margin of safety (MOS) were calculated. Among those four risk assessments, MOS was < 1 in only trial I, which indicated any possibility of risk. However, in the others, the possibility of risk was little. Moreover, the safe work time ranged from 3.61 h to 9.69 h. PMID:16502205

  1. CONTROLLED EXPOSURES OF HUMAN VOLUNTEERS TO DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST: BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE AND HEALTH OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion of diesel fuel contributes to ambient air pollutant fine particulate matter (PM) and gases. Fine PM exposure has been associated with increased mortality due to adverse cardiac events, and morbidity, such as increased hospitalization for asthma symptoms and lung infect...

  2. Progress in High Throughput Exposure Assessment for Prioritizing Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals (SRA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    For thousands of chemicals in commerce, there is little or no information about exposure or health and ecological effects. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has ongoing research programs to develop and evaluate models that use the often minimal chemical information a...

  3. Identifying biological monitoring tools to evaluate the chronic effects of chemical exposures in terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.

    1994-12-31

    When contamination of any habitat, such as a wetland impacted by heavy metals or a high desert disposal area impacted by chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides, is considered within an ecological risk assessment context, long-term land use goals should be included as part of the decision-making process, especially when remediation options are being considered for the site. If imminent threats to human health and the environment are highly unlikely, and environmental management and projected land use allow, remediation options and monitoring programs for a site should be developed that assure long-term habitat use, while continuing surveillance for evaluating potential chronic ecological effects. For example, at Milltown Reservoir wetlands on the Clark Fork River in western Montana the baseline ecological risk assessment suggested that no current adverse biological or ecological effects warranted extensive remediation at the site. But, given the land use goals currently anticipated for the wetland habitat and the hydroelectric facility located on the Clark Fork River, a program,should be developed that, in part, continues assessing plant communities and sublethal biological effects as cost-effective monitoring tools for evaluating long-term effects associated with metal-contaminated soils. Similarly, high desert sites that have been impacted by past disposal activities like that at Alkali Lake, Oregon, should be monitored using cost-effective methods that continue to monitor terrestrial plants as a field screening tool for evaluating soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides.

  4. Modeling human exposure to hazardous-waste sites: A question of completeness

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; McKone, T.E.

    1991-06-01

    In risk analysis, we use human-exposure assessments to translate contaminant sources into quantitative estimates of the amount of contaminant that comes in contact with human-environment boundaries, that is, the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, and the skin surface of individuals within a specified population. An assessment of intake requires that we determine how much crosses these boundaries. Exposure assessments often rely implicitly on the assumption that exposure can be linked by simple parameters to ambient concentrations in air, water, and soil. However, more realistic exposure models require that we abandon such simple assumptions. To link contaminant concentrations in water, air, or soil with potential human intakes, we construct pathway-exposure factors (PEFs). For each PEF we combine information on environmental partitioning as well as human anatomy, physiology, and behavior patterns into an algebraic term that converts concentrations of contaminants into a daily intake per unit body weight in mg/kg-d for a specific route of exposure such as inhalation, ingestion, or dermal uptake. Using examples involving human exposure to either a radionuclide (tritium, {sup 3}H) or a toxic organic chemical (tetrachloroethylene, PCE) in soil, water, and air, we illustrate the use of PEFs and consider the implications for risk assessment. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Porphyrin Metabolisms in Human Skin Commensal Propionibacterium acnes Bacteria: Potential Application to Monitor Human Radiation Risk

    PubMed Central

    Shu, M.; Kuo, S.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Liu, Y.-T.; Gallo, R.L.; Huang, C.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, is a commensal organism in human skin. Like human cells, the bacteria produce porphyrins, which exhibit fluorescence properties and make bacteria visible with a Wood’s lamp. In this review, we compare the porphyrin biosynthesis in humans and P. acnes. Also, since P. acnes living on the surface of skin receive the same radiation exposure as humans, we envision that the changes in porphyrin profiles (the absorption spectra and/or metabolism) of P. acnes by radiation may mirror the response of human cells to radiation. The porphyrin profiles of P. acnes may be a more accurate reflection of radiation risk to the patient than other biodosimeters/biomarkers such as gene up-/down-regulation, which may be non-specific due to patient related factors such as autoimmune diseases. Lastly, we discuss the challenges and possible solutions for using the P. acnes response to predict the radiation risk. PMID:23231351

  6. Potential exposure to human prescription pharmaceutical residues from wastewater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals in the environment (PiE) pose a complicated problem, involving multiple dissimilar compounds, multiple routes of potential exposure, and a range of potentially affected organisms that span the tree of life. Key uncertainties include not knowing which of the thous...

  7. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS AND HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that u...

  8. GLI3 Links Environmental Arsenic Exposure and Human Fetal Growth.

    PubMed

    Winterbottom, Emily F; Fei, Dennis L; Koestler, Devin C; Giambelli, Camilla; Wika, Eric; Capobianco, Anthony J; Lee, Ethan; Marsit, Carmen J; Karagas, Margaret R; Robbins, David J

    2015-06-01

    Although considerable evidence suggests that in utero arsenic exposure affects children's health, these data are mainly from areas of the world where groundwater arsenic levels far exceed the World Health Organization limit of 10 μg/L. We, and others, have found that more common levels of in utero arsenic exposure may also impact children's health. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression of key developmental genes in fetal placenta in a birth cohort of women using unregulated water supplies in a US region with elevated groundwater arsenic. We identified several genes whose expression associated with maternal arsenic exposure in a fetal sex-specific manner. In particular, expression of the HEDGEHOG pathway component, GLI3, in female placentae was both negatively associated with arsenic exposure and positively associated with infant birth weight. This suggests that modulation of GLI3 in the fetal placenta, and perhaps in other fetal tissues, contributes to arsenic's detrimental effects on fetal growth. We showed previously that arsenic-exposed NIH3T3 cells have reduced GLI3 repressor protein. Together, these studies identify GLI3 as a key signaling node that is affected by arsenic, mediating a subset of its effects on developmental signaling and fetal health. PMID:26288817

  9. Monitoring mercury exposure in reproductive aged women inhabiting the Tapajós river basin, Amazon.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Corvelo, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Érika Abdon Fiquene; de Parijós, Amanda Magno; de Oliveira, Claudia Simone Baltazar; do Socorro Pompeu de Loiola, Rosane; de Araújo, Amélia A; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Lima Silveira, Luiz Carlos; da Conceição Nascimento Pinheiro, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Among Amazonian communities, exposure to methylmercury is associated mainly with fish consumption that may affect fetal development in pregnant women. Therefore a temporal assessment was performed to assess the exposure of reproductive aged women to mercury who reside in the riparian communities of São Luís do Tapajós and Barreiras located in the Tapajós basin of the Brazilian Amazon from 1999 to 2012. The total mercury concentration in the 519 hair samples was assessed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Data analysis showed that the average total mercury concentration decreased from 1.066 to 0.743 μg/g in those years. In 1999 the proportion of volunteers with mercury levels ≥ 10 μg/g was approximately 68 %. In general, exposure to mercury decreased among women of reproductive age, but the potential risks to reproduction and human health is still an issue as 22 % of the woman continued showing high mercury levels (≥ 10 μg/g) in 2012. PMID:24789525

  10. Contribution of various microenvironments to the daily personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Personal monitoring coupled with GPS tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Kjeldsen, Birthe Uldahl; Olsen, Yulia; Schipperijn, Jasper; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Toftum, Jørn; Loft, Steffen; Clausen, Geo

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) may have adverse health effects. Central monitoring stations do not represent the personal exposure to UFP accurately. Few studies have previously focused on personal exposure to UFP. Sixty non-smoking residents living in Copenhagen, Denmark were asked to carry a backpack equipped with a portable monitor, continuously recording particle number concentrations (PN), in order to measure the real-time individual exposure over a period of ∼48 h. A GPS logger was carried along with the particle monitor and allowed us to estimate the contribution of UFP exposure occurring in various microenvironments (residence, during active and passive transport, other indoor and outdoor environments) to the total daily exposure. On average, the fractional contribution of each microenvironment to the daily integrated personal exposure roughly corresponded to the fractions of the day the subjects spent in each microenvironment. The home environment accounted for 50% of the daily personal exposure. Indoor environments other than home or vehicles contributed with ∼40%. The highest median UFP concentration was obtained during passive transport (vehicles). However, being in transit or outdoors contributed 5% or less to the daily exposure. Additionally, the subjects recorded in a diary the periods when they were at home. With this approach, 66% of the total daily exposure was attributable to the home environment. The subjects spent 28% more time at home according to the diary, compared to the GPS. These results may indicate limitations of using diaries, but also possible inaccuracy and miss-classification in the GPS data.

  11. Acute effects of acrolein in human volunteers during controlled exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Aishwarya M.; Johanson, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Johnny C.; Palmberg, Lena; Sjögren, Bengt; Ernstgård, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Acrolein is a reactive aldehyde mainly formed by combustion. The critical effect is considered to be irritation of the eyes and airways; however, the scarce data available make it difficult to assess effect levels. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine thresholds for acute irritation for acrolein. Methods: Nine healthy volunteers of each sex were exposed at six occasions for 2 h at rest to: clean air, 15 ppm ethyl acetate (EA), and 0.05 ppm and 0.1 ppm acrolein with and without EA (15 ppm) to mask the potential influence of odor. Symptoms related to irritation and central nervous system effects were rated on 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales. Results: The ratings of eye irritation were slightly but significantly increased during exposure to acrolein in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001, Friedman test) with a median rating of 8 mm (corresponding to “hardly at all”) at the 0.1 ppm condition and with no influence from EA. No significant exposure-related effects were found for pulmonary function, or nasal swelling, nor for markers of inflammation and coagulation in blood (IL-6, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and Clara cell protein) or induced sputum (cell count, differential cell count, IL-6 and IL-8). Blink frequency recorded by electromyography was increased during exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein alone but not during any of the other five exposure conditions. Conclusion: Based on subjective ratings, the present study showed minor eye irritation by exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein. PMID:26635308

  12. BIOSENSORS RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE MONITORING TECHNIQUES THAT SUPPORT EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RELATED TO THE SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the approaches for reducing uncertainties in the assessment of human exposure is to better characterize the hazardous wastes that contaminate our environment. A significant limitation to this approach, however, is that sampling and laboratory analysis of contaminated envi...

  13. Uveka: a UV exposure monitoring system using autonomous instruments network for Reunion Island citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébastien, Nicolas; Cros, Sylvain; Lallemand, Caroline; Kurzrock, Frederik; Schmutz, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Reunion Island is a French oversea territory located in the Indian Ocean. This tropical Island has about 840,000 inhabitants and is visited every year by more than 400,000 tourists. On average, 340 sunny days occurs on this island in a whole year. Beyond these advantageous conditions, exposure of the population to ultraviolet radiation constitutes a public health issue. The number of hospitalisations for skin cancer increased by 50% between 2005 and 2010. Health insurance reimbursements due to ophthalmic anomalies caused by the sun is about two million Euros. Among the prevention measures recommended by public health policies, access to information on UV radiation is one of the basic needs. Reuniwatt, supported by the Regional Council of La Reunion, is currently developing the project Uveka. Uveka is a solution permitting to provide in real-time and in short-term forecast (several hours), the UV radiation maps of the Reunion Island. Accessible via web interface and smartphone application, Uveka informs the citizens about the UV exposure rate and its risk according to its individual characteristics (skin phototype, past exposure to sun etc.). The present work describes this initiative through the presentation of the UV radiation monitoring system and the data processing chain toward the end-users. The UV radiation monitoring system of Uveka is a network of low cost UV sensors. Each instrument is equipped with a solar panel and a battery. Moreover, the sensor is able to communicate using the 3G telecommunication network. Then, the instrument can be installed without AC power or access to a wired communication network. This feature eliminates a site selection constraint. Indeed, with more than 200 microclimates and a strong cloud cover spatial variability, building a representative measurement site network in this island with a limited number of instruments is a real challenge. In addition to these UV radiation measurements, the mapping of the surface solar radiation

  14. Cadmium osteotoxicity in experimental animals: Mechanisms and relationship to human exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.

    2009-08-01

    Extensive epidemiological studies have recently demonstrated increased cadmium exposure correlating significantly with decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture incidence in humans at lower exposure levels than ever before evaluated. Studies in experimental animals have addressed whether very low concentrations of dietary cadmium can negatively impact the skeleton. This overview evaluates results in experimental animals regarding mechanisms of action on bone and the application of these results to humans. Results demonstrate that long-term dietary exposures in rats, at levels corresponding to environmental exposures in humans, result in increased skeletal fragility and decreased mineral density. Cadmium-induced demineralization begins soon after exposure, within 24 h of an oral dose to mice. In bone culture systems, cadmium at low concentrations acts directly on bone cells to cause both decreases in bone formation and increases in bone resorption, independent of its effects on kidney, intestine, or circulating hormone concentrations. Results from gene expression microarray and gene knock-out mouse models provide insight into mechanisms by which cadmium may affect bone. Application of the results to humans is considered with respect to cigarette smoke exposure pathways and direct vs. indirect effects of cadmium. Clearly, understanding the mechanism(s) by which cadmium causes bone loss in experimental animals will provide insight into its diverse effects in humans. Preventing bone loss is critical to maintaining an active, independent lifestyle, particularly among elderly persons. Identifying environmental factors such as cadmium that contribute to increased fractures in humans is an important undertaking and a first step to prevention.

  15. A Flexible and Wearable Human Stress Monitoring Patch

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sunghyun; Sim, Jai Kyoung; Cho, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A human stress monitoring patch integrates three sensors of skin temperature, skin conductance, and pulsewave in the size of stamp (25 mm × 15 mm × 72 μm) in order to enhance wearing comfort with small skin contact area and high flexibility. The skin contact area is minimized through the invention of an integrated multi-layer structure and the associated microfabrication process; thus being reduced to 1/125 of that of the conventional single-layer multiple sensors. The patch flexibility is increased mainly by the development of flexible pulsewave sensor, made of a flexible piezoelectric membrane supported by a perforated polyimide membrane. In the human physiological range, the fabricated stress patch measures skin temperature with the sensitivity of 0.31 Ω/°C, skin conductance with the sensitivity of 0.28 μV/0.02 μS, and pulse wave with the response time of 70 msec. The skin-attachable stress patch, capable to detect multimodal bio-signals, shows potential for application to wearable emotion monitoring. PMID:27004608

  16. A Flexible and Wearable Human Stress Monitoring Patch.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sunghyun; Sim, Jai Kyoung; Cho, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A human stress monitoring patch integrates three sensors of skin temperature, skin conductance, and pulsewave in the size of stamp (25 mm × 15 mm × 72 μm) in order to enhance wearing comfort with small skin contact area and high flexibility. The skin contact area is minimized through the invention of an integrated multi-layer structure and the associated microfabrication process; thus being reduced to 1/125 of that of the conventional single-layer multiple sensors. The patch flexibility is increased mainly by the development of flexible pulsewave sensor, made of a flexible piezoelectric membrane supported by a perforated polyimide membrane. In the human physiological range, the fabricated stress patch measures skin temperature with the sensitivity of 0.31 Ω/°C, skin conductance with the sensitivity of 0.28 μV/0.02 μS, and pulse wave with the response time of 70 msec. The skin-attachable stress patch, capable to detect multimodal bio-signals, shows potential for application to wearable emotion monitoring. PMID:27004608

  17. A Flexible and Wearable Human Stress Monitoring Patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sunghyun; Sim, Jai Kyoung; Cho, Young-Ho

    2016-03-01

    A human stress monitoring patch integrates three sensors of skin temperature, skin conductance, and pulsewave in the size of stamp (25 mm × 15 mm × 72 μm) in order to enhance wearing comfort with small skin contact area and high flexibility. The skin contact area is minimized through the invention of an integrated multi-layer structure and the associated microfabrication process; thus being reduced to 1/125 of that of the conventional single-layer multiple sensors. The patch flexibility is increased mainly by the development of flexible pulsewave sensor, made of a flexible piezoelectric membrane supported by a perforated polyimide membrane. In the human physiological range, the fabricated stress patch measures skin temperature with the sensitivity of 0.31 Ω/°C, skin conductance with the sensitivity of 0.28 μV/0.02 μS, and pulse wave with the response time of 70 msec. The skin-attachable stress patch, capable to detect multimodal bio-signals, shows potential for application to wearable emotion monitoring.

  18. Ten years of monitoring the occupational radiation exposure in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Basić, B; Beganović, A; Samek, D; Skopljak-Beganović, A; Gazdić-Santić, M

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of occupationally exposed persons in Bosnia and Herzegovina started in 1960s and it was interrupted in 1992. Dosimetry service resumed in 1999 when the International Atomic Energy Agency provided Harshaw 4500 TLD-reader and the first set of TLDs for the Radiation Protection Centre (RPC) of the Institute of Public Health of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In January 2009, the RPC covered 1279 professionals with personal dosimetry, which is more than 70 % of all radiation workers in the country. Most of the TLD users work in medical institutions. In period 1999-2003 RPC provided 984 workers with dosemeters. In the next 5 y period (2004-2008), the number of persons covered by dosimetry increased by an average of 51 %. The mean and collective effective dose in the period 1999-2003 were 1.55 mSv and 1.54 personSv, respectively. In the period 2004-2008, the mean doses changed by 1 % on average, but the collective effective dose increased by 53 % for all practices. Mean and collective effective dose were 1.57 mSv and 2.34 personSv, respectively. The highest personal doses are associated with industrial radiography, than exposures in nuclear medicine. Radiology plays a significant role in collective dose only, whereas other exposures are low. Results correspond to results found in the literature. New practices in industry and medicine emphasise the need for more personal dosemeters, as well as specialised dosemeters for extremities monitoring, etc. PMID:20150230

  19. Bayesian estimation of cyclosporin exposure for routine therapeutic drug monitoring in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Bourgoin, Hélène; Paintaud, Gilles; Büchler, Matthias; Lebranchu, Yvon; Autret-Leca, Elisabeth; Mentré, France; Guellec, Chantal Le

    2005-01-01

    Aims AUC-based monitoring of cyclosporin A (CsA) is useful to optimize dose adaptation in difficult cases. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to describe dose-exposure relationships for CsA in renal transplant patients and applied it to the Bayesian estimation of AUCs using three blood concentrations. Methods A total of 84 renal graft recipients treated with CsA microemulsion were included in this study. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using NONMEM. A two-compartment model with zero-order absorption and a lag time best described the data. Bayesian estimation was based on CsA blood concentrations measured before dosing and 1 h and 2 h post dose. Predictive performance was evaluated using a cross-validation approach. Estimated AUCs were compared with AUCs calculated by the trapezoidal method. The Bayesian approach was also applied to an independent group of eight patients exhibiting unusual pharmacokinetic profiles. Results Mean population pharmacokinetic parameters were apparent clearance 30 l h−1, apparent volume of distribution 79.8 l, duration of absorption 52 min, absorption lag time 7 min. No significant relationships were found between any of the pharmacokinetic parameters and individual characteristics. A good correlation was obtained between Bayesian-estimated and experimental AUCs, with a mean prediction error of 2.8% (95% CI [−0.6, 6.2]) and an accuracy of 13.1% (95% CI [7.5, 17.2]). A good correlation was also obtained in the eight patients with unusual pharmacokinetic profiles (r2 = 0.96, P < 0.01). Conclusions Our Bayesian approach enabled a good estimation of CsA exposure in a population of patients with variable pharmacokinetic profiles, showing its usefulness for routine AUC-based therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:15606436

  20. Reductions in human benzene exposure in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruin, Scott A.; Denis, Michael J. St; Winer, Arthur M.; Colome, Steven D.; Lurmann, Frederick W.

    Benzene typically contributes a significant fraction of the human cancer risk associated with exposure to urban air pollutants. In recent years, concentrations of benzene in ambient air have declined in many urban areas due to the use of reformulated gasolines, lower vehicle emissions, and other control measures. In the California South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) ambient benzene concentrations have been reduced by more than 70% since 1989. To estimate the resulting effect on human exposures, the Regional Human Exposure (REHEX) model was used to calculate benzene exposures in the SoCAB for the years 1989 and 1997. Benzene concentration distributions in 14 microenvironments (e.g. outdoor, home, vehicle, work) were combined with California time-activity patterns and census data to calculate exposure distributions for 11 demographic groups in the SoCAB. For 1997, the calculated average benzene exposure for nonsmoking adults in the SoCAB was 2 ppb, compared to 6 ppb for 1989. For nonsmokers, about half of the 1997 exposure was due to ambient air concentrations (including their contributions to other microenvironments), but only 4% for smokers. Passive tobacco smoke contributed about one-fourth of all exposure for adult nonsmokers. In-transit microenvironments and attached garages contributed approximately 15 and 10%, respectively. From 1989 to 1997, decreases in passive smoke exposure accounted for about one-sixth of the decrease in exposure for nonsmoking adults, with the remainder due to decreases in ambient concentrations. The reductions in exposure during this time period indicate the effectiveness of reformulated fuels, more stringent emission standards, and smoking restrictions in significantly reducing exposure to benzene.