Science.gov

Sample records for monitoring workshop focus

  1. Cooperative monitoring workshop: Focus on the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.; Dobranich, P.

    1995-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation hosted a workshop on the application of cooperative monitoring to the Middle East. The workshop, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, from July 17 through 21, 1994, was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the US Department of State. The meeting, which focused on use of technical monitoring tools and sharing of collected information to facilitate regional agreements, included participants from five regional countries as well as from American universities, the US government, and US National Laboratories. Some attendees previously participated in meetings of the Arms Control and Regional Security working group of the Middle East Multilateral Peace Talks. The workshop combined presentations, demonstrations and hands-on experimentation with monitoring hardware and software. An exercise was conducted to evaluate and recommend cooperative monitoring options for a model agreement between two hypothetical countries. Historical precedents were reviewed and the role of environmental and natural resource conflicts explored. These activities were supplemented by roundtable discussions covering Middle East security issues, the relationship of ``national means`` to cooperative monitoring, and cooperative monitoring of ballistic missiles in the Middle East.

  2. Monitoring the Effectiveness of a Performance-focused Human Resource Development Workshop at Andersen Consulting Seven Days after the Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Joel R.

    The effectiveness of a 1-day performance-focused human resource (HR) development workshop that was conducted in 21 sessions in cities throughout North America in March-September 1996 was monitored by an electronic survey sent to all 506 participants 7 days after the workshop. Of those participants, 221 (43%) completed the survey, which sought…

  3. SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    2000-07-12

    The Fourth SlAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held on July 12, 2000 at the Westin Rio Mar Hotel in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. The Department of Energy provided partial support for this event. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities. The meeting opened with a discussion of some data collected by the American Mathematical Society on Ph.D.'s awarded in the U.S. to citizens and non-citizens, further classified as blacks, latinos, asians and native americans. The activity continued with nine technical talks by underrepresented minority graduate students, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum chaired by Dr. Richard Tapia (Rice University) in which issues related to the participation of minorities in national meetings and proposal writing where discussed. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants. The students attended as well the three SlAM plenary talks during the day and the community lecture in the evening. The activity had a lively participation of students and representatives from various academic institutions and sponsoring agencies. In particular, we had the participation of 24 undergraduate students from the Mathematics REU program of the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

  4. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1995-05-24

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  5. SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity 2001

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) held a workshop focused on underrepresented minorities--graduate and undergraduate students, postdocs, and recent Ph.D's--in the mathematical and computational sciences on July 11, 2001, as part of the SIAM Annual Meeting in San Diego, California. The workshop was intended to accomplish several goals: (1) to a provide workshop focused on careers for and retention of minority students in the mathematical and computational sciences; (2) to bring together a mixture of people from different levels of professional experience, ranging from undergraduate students to senior scientists in an informal setting in order to share career experiences and options; (3) to provide an opportunity for minority graduate students, postdocs, and recent Ph.D's to present their research at an international meeting; (4) to expose undergraduate students to the many professional opportunities resulting from graduate degrees in science and mathematics; and (5) to encourage undergraduate and graduate students to speak frankly with each other about personal issues and experiences associated with pursuing a scientific career.

  6. Reading and Writing Workshop: Focus on Biography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyers, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    Biographies can inspire students to reach their goals and explore various literary elements (turning points, cause and effect, and figurative language). This reading and writing workshop presents resources and strategies for introducing students to biography. A student reproducible has students examine why people are their role models or mentors.…

  7. Designing a Customer-Focused Workshop for Strategic Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Ahn-Sook

    1998-01-01

    A customer-focused workshop for manufacturing strategic planning used a market-oriented approach and an interactive collaborative process among stakeholders. Reflective learning was found to enhance strategic planning; organizational culture must support strategic thinking. (SK)

  8. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

  9. South Asia transboundary water quality monitoring workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect

    Betsill, Jeffrey David; Littlefield, Adriane C.; Luetters, Frederick O.; Rajen, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in several regions as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group made up of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States convened in Kathmandu, Nepal, from February 17-23,2002. The workshop was held to further develop the South Asia Transboundary Water Quality Monitoring (SATWQM) project. The project is sponsored in part by the CMC located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico through funding provided by the US. Department of State, Regional Environmental Affairs Office, American Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal, and the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This report summarizes the SATWQM project, the workshop objectives, process and results. The long-term interests of the participants are to develop systems for sharing regional environmental information as a means of building confidence and improving relations among South Asian countries. The more immediate interests of the group are focused on activities that foster regional sharing of water quality data in the Ganges and Indus River basins. Issues of concern to the SATWQM network participants include studying the impacts from untreated sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, salinity increases in fresh waters, the siltation and shifting of river channels, and the environmental degradation of critical habitats such as wetlands, protected forests, and endangered aquatic species conservation areas. The workshop focused on five objectives: (1) a deepened understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of additional regional and national government and non-government organizations in South Asia involved in river water quality monitoring; (3) identification of

  10. NORTH PACIFIC SALMON MONITORING WORKSHOP I - SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intent of the first North Pacific Salmon Monitoring Workshop was to initiate development of an economically feasible monitoring strategy that could serve as a warning system for detecting changes in the status of Pacific Rim salmon. This is a summary of the workshop held Fe...

  11. Focused Monitoring. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2005

    2005-01-01

    During this era of increased accountability and enhanced educational expectations for infants, toddlers and students with disabilities, the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) is using a new compliance and technical assistance model- focused monitoring. Focused monitoring is part of the Continuous Improvement…

  12. HST Cycle 21 Focus and Optical Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    This program is the Cycle 21 implementation of the HST Optical Monitoring Program. The 9 orbits comprising this proposal will utilize ACS {Wide Field channel} and WFC3 {UVIS channel} to observe stellar cluster members in parallel with multiple exposures over an orbit. Phase retrieval performed on the PSF in each image will be used to measure primarily focus, with the ability to explore apparent coma, astigmatism, and third order spherical changes in WFC3. The goals of this program are to:1.} monitor the overall OTA focal length for the purposes of maintaining focus within science tolerances.2.} gain experience with the relative effectiveness of phase retrieval on WFC3/UVIS PSFs.3.} determine focus offset between the imagers and identify any SI-specific focus behavior and dependencies.If need is determined, future visits will be modified to interleave WFC3/IR channel and STIS/CCD focii measurements.

  13. Infrasound workshop for CTBT monitoring: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, D.; Whitaker, R.

    1998-11-01

    It is expected that the establishment of new infrasound stations in the global IMS network by the Provisional Technical Secretariat of the CTBTO in Vienna will commence in the middle of 1998. Thus, decisions on the final operational design for IMS infrasound stations will have to be made within the next 12 months. Though many of the basic design problems have been resolved, it is clear that further work needs to be carried out during the coming year to ensure that IMS infrasound stations will operate with maximum capability in accord with the specifications determined during the May 1997 PrepCom Meeting. Some of the papers presented at the Workshop suggest that it may be difficult to design a four-element infrasound array station that will reliably detect and locate infrasound signals at all frequencies in the specified range from 0.02 to 4.0 Hz in all noise environments. Hence, if the basic design of an infrasound array is restricted to four array elements, the final optimized design may be suited only to the detection and location of signals in a more limited pass-band. Several participants have also noted that the reliable discrimination of infrasound signals could be quite difficult if the detection system leads to signal distortion. Thus, it has been emphasized that the detection system should not, if possible, compromise signal fidelity. This report contains the workshop agenda, a list of participants, and abstracts and viewgraphs from each presentation.

  14. Workshop on Evolution of Igneous Asteroids: Focus on Vesta and the HED Meteorites. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W. (Editor); Papike, James J. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Evolution of Igneous Asteroids: Focus on Vesta and the HED Meteorites, October 16-18, 1996, in Houston, Texas.

  15. Monitoring Exchange of CO2 - A KISS Workshop Report 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles; Wennberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The problem and context: Can top-down estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes resolve the anthropogenic emissions of China, India, the United States, and the European Union with an accuracy of +/-10% or better?The workshop "Monitoring Exchange of Carbon Dioxide" was convened at the Keck Institute for Space Studies in Pasadena, California in February 2010 to address this question. The Workshop brought together an international, interdisciplinary group of 24 experts in carbon cycle science, remote sensing, emissions inventory estimation, and inverse modeling. The participants reviewed the potential of space-based and sub-orbital observational and modeling approaches to monitor anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the presence of much larger natural fluxes from the exchange of CO2 between the land, atmosphere, and ocean. This particular challenge was motivated in part by the NRC Report "Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions" [Pacala et al., 2010]. This workshop report includes several recommendations for improvements to observing strategies and modeling frameworks for optimal and cost-effective monitoring of carbon exchange

  16. Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan

    2015-09-25

    Understanding and controlling beam halo is important for high-intensity hadron accelerators, for high-brightness electron linacs, and for low-emittance light sources. This can only be achieved by developing suitable diagnostics. The main challenge faced by such instrumentation is the high dynamic range needed to observe the halo in the presence of an intense core. In addition, measurements must often be made non-invasively. This talk summarizes the one-day workshop on Beam-Halo Monitoring that was held at SLAC on September 19 last year, immediately following IBIC 2014 in Monterey. Workshop presentations described invasive techniques using wires, screens, or crystal collimators, and non-invasive measurements with gas or scattered electrons. Talks on optical methods showed the close links between observing halo and astronomical problems like observing the solar corona or directly observing a planet orbiting another star.

  17. Abnormal Condition Monitoring of Workpieces Based on RFID for Wisdom Manufacturing Workshops.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunji; Yao, Xifan; Zhang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has been widely used in many fields. However, previous studies have mainly focused on product life cycle tracking, and there are few studies on real-time status monitoring of workpieces in manufacturing workshops. In this paper, a wisdom manufacturing model is introduced, a sensing-aware environment for a wisdom manufacturing workshop is constructed, and RFID event models are defined. A synthetic data cleaning method is applied to clean the raw RFID data. The Complex Event Processing (CEP) technology is adopted to monitor abnormal conditions of workpieces in real time. The RFID data cleaning method and data mining technology are examined by simulation and physical experiments. The results show that the synthetic data cleaning method preprocesses data well. The CEP based on the Rifidi(®) Edge Server technology completed abnormal condition monitoring of workpieces in real time. This paper reveals the importance of RFID spatial and temporal data analysis in real-time status monitoring of workpieces in wisdom manufacturing workshops. PMID:26633418

  18. Abnormal Condition Monitoring of Workpieces Based on RFID for Wisdom Manufacturing Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cunji; Yao, Xifan; Zhang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has been widely used in many fields. However, previous studies have mainly focused on product life cycle tracking, and there are few studies on real-time status monitoring of workpieces in manufacturing workshops. In this paper, a wisdom manufacturing model is introduced, a sensing-aware environment for a wisdom manufacturing workshop is constructed, and RFID event models are defined. A synthetic data cleaning method is applied to clean the raw RFID data. The Complex Event Processing (CEP) technology is adopted to monitor abnormal conditions of workpieces in real time. The RFID data cleaning method and data mining technology are examined by simulation and physical experiments. The results show that the synthetic data cleaning method preprocesses data well. The CEP based on the Rifidi® Edge Server technology completed abnormal condition monitoring of workpieces in real time. This paper reveals the importance of RFID spatial and temporal data analysis in real-time status monitoring of workpieces in wisdom manufacturing workshops. PMID:26633418

  19. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors-together with their interfaces in the transponder-are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27490546

  20. How Focus at Encoding Affects Children's Source Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Stacie L.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Bingman, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Retention of source information is enhanced by focus on speakers' feelings about statements even though recognition is reduced for both adults and children. However, does any focus on another person lead to enhanced source monitoring, or is a particular kind of focus required? Does other-focus enhance source monitoring, or does self-focus detract…

  1. International workshop on final focus and interaction regions of next generation linear colliders: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The first day of the workshop was devoted to four plenary ``issues`` talks, one for each working group: Beam-Beam Interaction, Detector, Hardware, and Optical Design. The last day was devoted to plenary talks summarizing the activities of the working groups. Each of the three remaining days there,was a short morning plenary devoted to a brief summary of the preceding day and an announcement of planned working group discussions for that day. The transparencies for the ``issues`` and ``summary`` talks are included in this volume, along with some remarks from the working group chairpersons. Very briefly, the beam-beam group continued to address the quantitative study of QED induced backgrounds, and attempted to better understand the nature and prevalence of QCD millijets. The detector group attempted to identify the impact on masking and detector design of the beam-beam backgrounds, the synchrotron radiation induced backgrounds from beam halos and muon backgrounds produced primarily in collimators. Nanosecond timing elements needed in conjunction with multi-bunch operation were discussed. The hardware group addressed the problem of magnet design and support, especially the final doublet magnets suspended within the detector environment, and instrumentation issues, such as high resolution beam position monitors. The optics group discussed new final focus system ideas, collimator design, and improvement of beamline tolerances. If you were not here to participate, we hope that this volume will help you in your orientation to these problems.

  2. International workshop on final focus and interaction regions of next generation linear colliders: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The first day of the workshop was devoted to four plenary issues'' talks, one for each working group: Beam-Beam Interaction, Detector, Hardware, and Optical Design. The last day was devoted to plenary talks summarizing the activities of the working groups. Each of the three remaining days there,was a short morning plenary devoted to a brief summary of the preceding day and an announcement of planned working group discussions for that day. The transparencies for the issues'' and summary'' talks are included in this volume, along with some remarks from the working group chairpersons. Very briefly, the beam-beam group continued to address the quantitative study of QED induced backgrounds, and attempted to better understand the nature and prevalence of QCD millijets. The detector group attempted to identify the impact on masking and detector design of the beam-beam backgrounds, the synchrotron radiation induced backgrounds from beam halos and muon backgrounds produced primarily in collimators. Nanosecond timing elements needed in conjunction with multi-bunch operation were discussed. The hardware group addressed the problem of magnet design and support, especially the final doublet magnets suspended within the detector environment, and instrumentation issues, such as high resolution beam position monitors. The optics group discussed new final focus system ideas, collimator design, and improvement of beamline tolerances. If you were not here to participate, we hope that this volume will help you in your orientation to these problems.

  3. Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1984-10-01

    A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

  4. February 2012 workshop jumpstarts the Mekong Fish Monitoring Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Matthew E.; Ainsley, Shaara M.

    2012-01-01

    , Cambodia, and Vietnam. Representatives from the governments, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and the Mekong River Commission discussed current and potential methods and mechanisms of the Mekong Fish Monitoring Network. The goals of the workshop were to determine if the Network and associated databases were of interest and value to the LMB nations, to determine if future fisheries monitoring data would be comparable among the nations, and to establish methods and an organizational structure for collaborating on future monitoring and research. The participants in this international workshop agreed that the Network would be useful but would require additional funding to secure their full participation. The USGS and FISHBIO are collaboratively seeking additional funding to expand research participation and projects in all four LMB nations. If the Network can facilitate cooperation among many fisheries researchers in the LMB, the basin would become a model of cooperative international fishery studies and would increase the understanding of a river basin rich in natural resources.

  5. IOC/WMO Workshop on Marine Pollution Monitoring (3rd, New Delhi, India, February 11-15, 1980). Summary Report. Workshop Report No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    Provided is a summary report of the third IOC/WMO (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission/World Meteorological Organization) workshop of marine pollution monitoring. Summaries are presented in nine sections, including: (1) workshop opening; (2) welcoming addresses; (3) reports on the Marine Pollution (Petroleum) Monitoring Pilot Project…

  6. Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1986-12-01

    A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

  7. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Baldwin; Magdy Tawfik; Leonard Bond

    2010-06-01

    In support of expanding the use of nuclear power, interest is growing in methods of determining the feasibility of longer term operation for the U.S. fleet of nuclear power plants, particularly operation beyond 60 years. To help establish the scientific and technical basis for such longer term operation, the DOE-NE has established a research and development (R&D) objective. This objective seeks to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which addresses the needs of this objective, is being developed in collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. In moving to identify priorities and plan activities, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Technologies was held June 10–12, 2010, in Seattle, Washington. The workshop was run to enable industry stakeholders and researchers to identify the nuclear industry needs in the areas of future OLM technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. It also sought to identify approaches for collaboration that would be able to bridge or fill the technology gaps. This report is the meeting proceedings, documenting the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for a plan which is under development that will enable the I&C research pathway to achieve its goals. Benefits to the nuclear industry accruing from On Line Monitoring Technology cannot be ignored. Information gathered thus far has contributed significantly to the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. DOE has

  8. Technical report. Graduate Student Focus on Diversity Workshop, 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia, May 12, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-12

    The Third SIAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held May 12 at the Sheraton Atlanta Hotel on the first day of the 1999 SIAM Annual Meeting. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities: eight technical talks by under-represented minority graduate students, a lively panel discussion concerning the benefits of undergraduate summer research programs, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum with candid discussions of graduate school experiences from a minority graduate student perspective. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants.

  9. Attention focusing and anomaly detection in systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.

  10. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2013-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  11. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostroem, Azalee

    2011-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  12. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Rachel

    2010-09-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  13. MAMA Spectroscopic Sensitivity and Focus Monitor Cycle 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Monitor sensitivity of each MAMA grating mode to detect any change due tocontamination or other causes. Also monitor the STIS focus in a spectroscopic and animaging mode.Obtain exposures in each of the 2 low-resolution MAMA spectroscopic modes every 4 months, in each of the 2 medium-resolution modes once a year, and in each of the 4 echelle modes every 3 months,using unique calibration standards for each mode, and ratio the results to the firstobservations to detect any trends. In addition, each L-mode sequence will be preceded by twospectroscopic ACQ/PEAKs with the CCD/G230LB and crossed linear patterns, with the purpose of measuringthe focus {PSF across the dispersion as a function of UV wavelength}; and each M-mode sequence will be preceded by aCCD/F28X50OII direct image also to monitor the focus.Whenever possible, obtain parallel airglow spectra with COS.

  14. HST Focus in Year 2000. A Review of the Cycle 9 Focus Monitor Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, M.; Krist, J.; Gilliland, R.

    2001-02-01

    After the last HST refocusing in June 2000, an enhanced OTA focus monitor (8829) began running as a cycle 9 observatory-level calibration to supplement the existing WFPC2 focus checks made as part of their standard photometric / decontamination monitor. The test was designed to improve our understanding of both the HST focus state and of the monitoring itself, allowing us to track and predict OTA focus changes, which during the past two years have been less smooth than anticipated. In addition to providing better temporal sampling, 8829 also utilized STIS imaging which helped quantify an apparent systematic between the two SIs. The program's WFPC2 observations were made in two filters and at two chip positions, also to test systematics. None were found. A review of the focus results show that since the June 2000 refocusing, there has been no meaningful trend in the focus state of HST. As an appendix, findings are presented which do not support the hypothetical scenario of an accumulation of observed coma as the result of a failed secondary mirror actuator.

  15. In-line-focus monitoring technique using lens aberration effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Sawano, Toshio; Yao, Teruyoshi; Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi; Asai, Satoru

    2005-05-01

    Process windows have become narrower as nano-processing technology has advanced. The semiconductor industry, faced with this situation, has had to impose extremely severe tool controls. Above all, with the advent of 90-nm device production, demand has arisen for strict levels of control that exceed the machine specifications of ArF exposure systems. Consequently, high-accuracy focus control and focus monitoring techniques for production wafers will be necessary in order for this to be achieved for practical use. Focus monitoring techniques that measure pattern placement errors and resist features using special reticle and mark have recently been proposed. Unfortunately, these techniques have several disadvantages. They are unable to identify the direction of a focus error, and there are limits on the illumination conditions. Furthermore, they require the use of a reticle that is more expensive than normal and they suffer from a low level of measurement accuracy. To solve these problems, the authors examined methods of focus control and focus error measurement for production wafers that utilize the lens aberration of the exposure tool system. The authors call this method FMLA (focus monitoring using lens aberration). In general, astigmatism causes a difference in the optimum focal point between the horizontal and vertical patterns in the same image plane. If a focus error occurs, regardless of the reason, a critical dimension (CD) difference arises between the sparse horizontal and vertical lines. In addition, this CD difference decreases or increases monotonously with the defocus value. That is to say, it is possible to estimate the focus errors to measure the vertical and horizontal line CD formed by exposure tool with astigmatism. In this paper, the authors examined the FMLA technique using astigmatism. First, focus monitoring accuracy was investigated. Using normal scholar type simulation, FMLA was able to detect a 32.3-nm focus error when 10-mλ astigmatism was

  16. Workshop on evolution of igneous asteroids: Focus on Vesta and the HED meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W. (Editor); Papike, J. J. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    mission to Vesta, we felt that time was ripe to convene a workshop bringing together astronomers, meteoriticists, and planetary geologists to focus on what could be learned about the geologic evolution of Vesta through integrating astronomical and HED meteorite studies. This, of course, assumes that the HED meteorites are from Vesta, and this issue was specifically addressed (but not resolved) in the workshop. Indeed, it seems likely that this issue can only be resolved by returning samples from Vesta for detailed study on Earth. The workshop was held at the LPI on October 16-18,1996, and was attended by some 70 scientists. Sessions included a set of talks on Earth- and space-based astronomical observations of Vesta plus the evidence pro and con for Vesta being the HED parent body, talks on the petrology and geochemistry of HED meteorites, talks on the formation and dynamics of ejecta from Vesta, talks on the thermal history of asteroids and HED meteorites, volcanic processes and differentiation history, and a short session devoted to possible missions to Vestal By all accounts, the workshop was considered a great success, although this is the opinion of a biased set of observers.

  17. Focus of attention in systems for visual monitoring of experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, G. E.; Martin, W. N.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of designing a computerized experiment monitoring system for use in a space station or elsewhere is examined. It is shown that the essential challenge of such a system - attaining a reasonable expected running time - can be attacked using the concept of focus of attention and by exploiting parallelism. The use of the Contract Net Protocol for the latter purpose is discussed. The use of ideas from information science to help focus a programs's efforts on those computations likely to bring results is addressed, and the incorporation of those ideas into a design in order to aid the system in deciding upon the best course of action is considered.

  18. ACAL National Conference (Sydney, Australia, October 9-11, 1992). Conference Papers, Vol. 3, Workshops with a Local NSW Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy & Numeracy Exchange, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This third of three volumes of the 1992 Australian Council for Adult Literacy (ACAL) Conference Papers is a special edition of "Literacy and Numeracy Exchange." It includes nine papers from workshops with a more local New South Wales focus. "Literacy, Language, and Numeracy in the Workplace in the Context of Industry Restructuring" (Ursula…

  19. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Polagye, B. L.; Copping, A. E.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Suryan, R.; Kramer, S.; Smith, C.

    2014-01-14

    To better understand the state of instrumentation and capabilities for monitoring around marine energy converters, the U.S. Department of Energy directed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Washington to convene an invitation-only workshop of experts from around the world to address instrumentation needs.

  20. Coral Reef Monitoring Needs Assessment Workshop U.S. Virgin Islands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Virgin Island Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR) held a workshop September 11-13, 2007 in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) to begin the process of designing a monitoring program that meets multiple mana...

  1. Proceedings of a USGS Workshop on Facing Tomorrow's Challenges Along the U.S.-Mexico Border - Monitoring, Modeling, and Forecasting Change Within the Arizona-Sonora Transboundary Watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, Laura M.; Hirsch, Derrick D.; Ward, A. Wesley

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO THE WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS Competition for water resources, habitats, and urban areas in the Borderlands has become an international concern. In the United States, Department of Interior Bureaus, Native American Tribes, and other State and Federal partners rely on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide unbiased science and leadership in the Borderlands region. Consequently, the USGS hosted a workshop, ?Facing Tomorrow?s Challenges along the U.S.-Mexico Border,? on March 20?22, 2007, in Tucson, Ariz., focused specifically on monitoring, modeling, and forecasting change within the Arizona-Sonora Transboundary Watersheds

  2. Weak measurements applied to process monitoring using focused beam scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas G.; Alonso, Miguel A.; Vella, Anthony; Theisen, Michael J.; Head, Stephen T.

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to measure nanoscale features rapidly and accurately is of central importance for the monitoring of manufacturing processes in the production of computer integrated circuits. Parameters of interest include, for example, trench depth, duty cycle, wall angle and oxide layer thickness. The measurement method proposed here uses focused beam scatterometry, in which the illumination consists of a focused field with a suitably tailored spatially-varying polarization distribution. In an analysis that is analogous to classical off-null measurements as well as weak measurements in quantum mechanics, we predict that four or more parameters can be measured and distinguished with an accuracy consistent with the needs laid out in the semiconductor roadmap.

  3. An RF bunch length monitor for the SLC final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Yocky, G.; Whittum, D.

    1997-05-01

    In preparation for the 1997 SLC run, a novel RF bunch-length monitor has been installed in the SLC South Final Focus. The monitor consists of a ceramic gap in the beam pipe, a 160-ft long X-band waveguide (WR90), and a set of dividers, tapers and microwave detectors. Electromagnetic fields radiated through the ceramic gap excite modes in the nearby open-ended X-band waveguide, which transmits the beam-induced signal to a radiation-free shack outside of the beamline vault. There, a combination of power dividers, tapers, waveguides, and crystal detectors is used to measure the signal power in 4 separate frequency channels between 7 and 110 GHz. For typical rms bunch lengths of 0.5-2 mm in the SLC, the bunch frequency spectrum can extend up to 100 GHz. In this paper, the authors present the overall monitor layout, describe MAFIA calculations of the signal coupled into the waveguide based on a detailed model of the complex beam-pipe geometry, estimate the final power level at the RF conversion points, and report the measured transmission properties of the installed waveguide system.

  4. EPA/ORD WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY. OPENING & CLOSING REMARKS AND OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mercury Monitoring Workshop was developed because mercury contamination, both nationally and internationally, has long been recognized as a growing problem for both humans and ecosystems. Mercury is released to the environment from a variety of human (anthropogenic) sources i...

  5. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Sustainable ForestManagement: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye , Jayant; Makundi , Willy; Goldberg ,Beth; Andrasko , Ken; Sanchez , Arturo

    1997-07-01

    The International Workshop on Sustainable Forest Management: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases was held in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 29-31, 1996. The main objectives of the workshop were to: (1) assemble key practitioners of forestry greenhouse gas (GHG) or carbon offset projects, remote sensing of land cover change, guidelines development, and the forest products certification movement, to offer presentations and small group discussions on findings relevant to the crucial need for the development of guidelines for monitoring and verifying offset projects, and (2) disseminate the findings to interested carbon offset project developers and forestry and climate change policy makers, who need guidance and consistency of methods to reduce project transaction costs and increase probable reliability of carbon benefits, at appropriate venues. The workshop brought together about 45 participants from developed, developing, and transition countries. The participants included researchers, government officials, project developers, and staff from regional and international agencies. Each shared his or her perspectives based on experience in the development and use of methods for monitoring and verifying carbon flows from forest areas and projects. A shared sense among the participants was that methods for monitoring forestry projects are well established, and the techniques are known and used extensively, particularly in production forestry. Introducing climate change with its long-term perspective is often in conflict with the shorter-term perspective of most forestry projects and standard accounting principles. The resolution of these conflicts may require national and international agreements among the affected parties. The establishment of guidelines and protocols for better methods that are sensitive to regional issues will be an important first step to increase the credibility of forestry projects as viable mitigation options. The workshop deliberations led

  6. Linking physical monitoring to coho and Chinook salmon populations in the Redwood Creek Watershed, California—Summary of May 3–4, 2012 Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann; Torregrosa, Alicia; Woodward, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    On Thursday, May 3, 2012, a science workshop was held at the Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP) office in Arcata, California, with researchers and resource managers working in RNSP to share data and expert opinions concerning salmon populations and habitat in the Redwood Creek watershed. The focus of the workshop was to discuss how best to synthesize physical and biological data related to the freshwater and estuarine phases of salmon life cycles in order to increase the understanding of constraints on salmon populations. The workshop was hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Status and Trends (S&T) Program National Park Monitoring Project (http://www.fort.usgs.gov/brdscience/ParkMonitoring.htm), which supports USGS research on priority topics (themes) identified by the National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring Program (I&M) and S&T. The NPS has organized more than 270 parks with significant natural resources into 32 Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Networks (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/networks.cfm) that share funding and core professional staff to monitor the status and long-term trends of selected natural resources (http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor). All 32 networks have completed vital signs monitoring plans (available at http://science.nature.nps.gov/im/monitor/MonitoringPlans.cfm), containing background information on the important resources of each park, conceptual models behind the selection of vital signs for monitoring the condition of natural resources, and the selection of high priority vital signs for monitoring. Vital signs are particular physical, chemical, and biological elements and processes of park ecosystems that represent the overall health or condition of the park, known or hypothesized effects of stressors, or elements that have important human values (Fancy and others, 2009). Beginning in 2009, the I&M program funded projects to analyze and synthesize the biotic and abiotic data generated by vital signs

  7. Collaboration-Focused Workshop for Interdisciplinary, Inter-Institutional Teams of College Science Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Pamela K.; Stultz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Many science educators know of the pedagogical benefits of inquiry- and research-based labs, yet numerous barriers to implementation exist. In this article we describe a faculty development workshop that explored interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaborations as potential mechanisms for overcoming barriers to curricular innovation.

  8. Artists/Writers Workshop: Focusing in on the ART of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olshansky, Beth

    2006-01-01

    This photo essay includes children's reflections on the opportunities offered by Artists/Writers Workshop for meaning-making in two languages--the language of pictures and the language of words. As students move back and forth between pictures and words, they experience transmediation. They create new meanings, find new and stronger voices, and…

  9. Report on Focus on Elder Abuse Workshop (Regina, Saskachewan, May 31-June 1, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regina Univ. (Saskatchewan). Univ. Extension. Seniors Education Centre.

    This report describes a 2-day elder abuse workshop, hosted by the Seniors' Education Centre, University Extension, University of Regina in 1989 and attended by 96 participants from across Saskatchewan, Canada. Included is the text from the keynote address by Geri McGrath, a social worker from the Psychogeriatrics Day Hospital, Seven Oaks General…

  10. Lessons Learned from Implementing a Wet Laboratory Molecular Training Workshop for Beach Water Quality Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Verhougstraete, Marc Paul; Brothers, Sydney; Litaker, Wayne; Blackwood, A. Denene; Noble, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Rapid molecular testing methods are poised to replace many of the conventional, culture-based tests currently used in fields such as water quality and food science. Rapid qPCR methods have the benefit of being faster than conventional methods and provide a means to more accurately protect public health. However, many scientists and technicians in water and food quality microbiology laboratories have limited experience using these molecular tests. To ensure that practitioners can use and implement qPCR techniques successfully, we developed a week long workshop to provide hands-on training and exposure to rapid molecular methods for water quality management. This workshop trained academic professors, government employees, private industry representatives, and graduate students in rapid qPCR methods for monitoring recreational water quality. Attendees were immersed in these new methods with hands-on laboratory sessions, lectures, and one-on-one training. Upon completion, the attendees gained sufficient knowledge and practice to teach and share these new molecular techniques with colleagues at their respective laboratories. Key findings from this workshop demonstrated: 1) participants with no prior experience could be effectively trained to conduct highly repeatable qPCR analysis in one week; 2) participants with different desirable outcomes required exposure to a range of different platforms and sample processing approaches; and 3) the collaborative interaction amongst newly trained practitioners, workshop leaders, and members of the water quality community helped foster a cohesive cohort of individuals which can advocate powerful cohort for proper implementation of molecular methods. PMID:25822486

  11. Workshop on Evolution of Igneous Asteroids: Focus on Vesta and the HED Meteorites. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W. (Editor); Papike, J. J. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This volume contains papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop. Topics considered include: On the sample return from Vesta by low-thrust spacecraft; Astronomical evidence linking Vesta to the HED meteorites; Geologic mapping of Vesta with the Hubble Space Telescope; A space mission to Vesta; Asteroid spectroscopy; The thermal history of asteroid 4 Vesta, based on radionuclide and collision heating; Mineralogical records of early planetary processes on Vesta.

  12. Florida-focused climate change lesson demonstrations from the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of Florida-focused climate change activities will be featured as part of the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops. In a combined effort from Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and University of South Florida's Coalition for Science Literacy (CSL), and supported by NASA's NICE initiative, the ASK Florida professional development workshops are a series of workshops designed to enhance and support climate change information and related pedagogical skills for middle school science teachers from Title-I schools in Florida. These workshops took place during a two-year period from 2011 to 2013 and consisted of two cohorts in Hillsborough and Volusia counties in Florida. Featured activities include lab-style exercises demonstrating topics such as storm surge and coastal geometry, sea level rise from thermal expansion, and the greenhouse effect. These types of labs are modified so that they allow more independent, inquiry thinking as they require teachers to design their own experiment in order to test a hypothesis. Lecture based activities are used to cover a broad range of topics including hurricanes, climate modeling, and sink holes. The more innovative activities are group activities that utilize roll-playing, technology and resources, and group discussion. For example, 'Climate Gallery Walk' is an activity that features group discussions on each of the climate literacy principles established by the United States Global Change Research Program. By observing discussions between individuals and groups, this activity helps the facilitators gather information on their previous knowledge and identify possible misconceptions that will be addressed within the workshops. Furthermore, 'Fact or Misconception' presents the challenge of identifying whether a given statement is fact or misconception based on the material covered throughout the workshops. It serves as a way to

  13. Proceedings of the Federal Interagency Sediment Monitoring Instrument and Analysis Research Workshop, September 9-11, 2003, Flagstaff, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Water Information's Subcommittee on Sedimentation sponsored the Federal Interagency Sediment Monitoring Instrument and Analysis Research Workshop on September 9-11, 2003, at the U.S. Geological Survey Flagstaff Field Center, Arizona. The workshop brought together a diverse group representing most Federal agencies whose mission includes fluvial-sediment issues; academia; the private sector; and others with interests and expertise in fluvial-sediment monitoring ? suspended sediment, bedload, bed material, and bed topography ? and associated data-analysis techniques. The workshop emphasized technological and theoretical advances related to measurements of suspended sediment, bedload, bed material and bed topography, and data analyses. This workshop followed and expanded upon part of the 2002 Federal Interagency Workshop on Turbidity and Other Sediment Surrogates (http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/circ/2003/circ1250/), which initiated a process to provide national standards for measurement and use of turbidity and other sediment-surrogate data. This report provides a description of the salient attributes of the workshop and related information, major deliberations and findings, and principal recommendations. This information is available for evaluation by the Subcommittee on Sedimentation, which may opt to develop an action plan based on the recommendations that it endorses for consideration by the Advisory Committee on Water Information.

  14. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 ± 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise. PMID:26168177

  15. Plasma focus sources: Supplement to the neutron resonance radiography workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Nardi, V.; Brzosko, J.

    1989-01-01

    Since their discovery, plasma focus discharges have been recognized as very intense pulsed sources of deuterium-deuterium (D-D) or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion-reaction neutrons, with outstanding capabilities. Specifically, the total neutron emission/shot, YN, and the rate of neutron emission, Y/sub n/, of an optimized plasma focus (PF) are higher than the corresponding quantities observed in any other type of pinched discharge at the same level of powering energy W/sub 0/. Recent developments have led to the concept and experimental demonstration of an Advanced Plasma Focus System (APF) that consists of a Mather-geometry plasma focus in which field distortion elements (FDEs) are inserted in the inter-electrode gap for increasing the neutron yield/shot, Y/sub n/. The FDE-induced redistribution of the plasma current increases Y/sub n/ by a factor approx. =5-10 above the value obtained without FDEs under otherwise identical conditions of operation of the plasma focus. For example, an APF that is fed by a fast capacitor bank with an energy, W/sub 0/ = 6kJ, and voltage, V/sub 0/ = 16.5 kV provides Y/sub n/ /congruent/ 4 /times/ 10/sup 9/ D-D neutrons/shot (pure D/sub 2/ filling) and Y/sub n/ = 4 /times/ 10/sup 11/ D-T neutrons/shot (filling is 50% deuterium and 50% tritium). The FDE-induced increase of Y/sub n/ for fixed values of (W/sub 0/, V/sub 0/), the observed scaling law Y/sub n/ /proportional to/ W/sub 0//sup 2/ for optimized plasma focus systems, and our experience with neutron scattering in bulk objects lead us to the conclusion that we can use an APF as a source of high-intensity neutron pulses (10/sup 14/ n/pulse) in the field off neutron radiography (surface and bulk) with a nanosecond or millisecond time resolution.

  16. Point Focusing Thermal and Electric Applications Project. Volume 2: Workshop proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, K. E. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Point focus distributed receiver solar thermal technology for the production of electric power and of industrial process heat is discussed. Thermal power systems are described. Emphasis is on the development of cost effective systems which will accelerate the commercialization and industrialization of plants, using parabolic dish collectors. The characteristics of PFDR systems and the cost targets for major subsystems hardware are identified. Markets for this technology and their size are identified, and expected levelized bus bar energy costs as a function of yearly production level are presented. The present status of the technology development effort is discussed.

  17. [Focus Notified Bodies. New requirements for designation and monitoring].

    PubMed

    Poos, U; Edelhäuser, R

    2014-12-01

    For medical devices with a higher risk, Notified Bodies assess whether the manufacturers and their products fulfill the requirements laid down in the European directives on medical devices. Notified Bodies are designated through a designation procedure by the designating authority, in Germany by ZLG. The requirements for the designation arise from the respective annexes of the directives on medical devices. Since these are only minimal criteria, different documents have been compiled on a European and national level to concretize these minimal criteria regarding the organization, quality management system, resources, and certification procedure. The rules of the ZLG are thereby the essential documents for designation in Germany. Moreover, according to Implementing Regulation (EU) no. 912/2013, the European commission and the other European designating authorities also have to be involved in the designation process. The aim of continuous monitoring of the Notified Bodies with assessments on the bodies' premises as well as with observed audits is to ensure the permanent fulfillment of the requirements. If nonconformities are found in a body's quality management system or in its implementation of the conformity assessment procedures, the body is obliged to provide ZLG with a corrective actions plan. In the case that the nonconformities are not resolved in time or critical nonconformities are found, ZLG may take actions, e.g., restrict the scope of designation, suspend, or - as last resort - withdraw the designation. PMID:25373553

  18. NASA Explorer Institutes: Exploring the Possibilities for Collaboration with the Informal Education Community. Report of the NASA Explorer Institutes--Focus Groups and Pilot Workshops, September 2004-March 2005; Planning and Evaluation Meeting, March 14-17, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Debbie; Freeman, Jason; Walker, Gretchen; Davis, Hilarie

    2005-01-01

    This report contains summary information and conclusions from the pilot workshops, focus groups, and the NEI (NASA Explorer Institutes) Planning and Evaluation Conference which united representatives of the workshops, focus groups, and NASA education. The culmination of these NEI pilot initiatives resulted in the identification of strategies that…

  19. The perceived impacts of monitoring activities on intergovernmental relationships: some lessons from the Ecological Monitoring Network and Water in Focus.

    PubMed

    de Kool, Dennis

    2015-11-01

    An increasing stream of monitoring activities is entering the public sector. This article analyzes the perceived impacts of monitoring activities on intergovernmental relationships. Our theoretical framework is based on three approaches to monitoring and intergovernmental relationships, namely, a rational, a political, and a cultural perspective. Our empirical insights are based on two Dutch case studies, namely, the Ecological Monitoring Network and the Water in Focus reports. The conclusion is that monitoring activities have an impact on intergovernmental relationships in terms of standardizing working processes and methods, formalizing information relationships, ritualizing activities, and developing shared concepts ("common grammar"). An important challenge is to deal with the politicization of intergovernmental relationships, because monitoring reports can also stimulate political discussions about funding, the design of the instrument, administrative burdens, and supervisory relationships. PMID:26471275

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING ISSUES - RESULTS OF WORKSHOPS HELD IN JULY 1992 AS PART OF EPA'S EIGHTH ANNUAL WASTE TESTING AND QUALITY ASSURANCE SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the ideas and information developed in a series of workshops held in July, 1992 to address four environmental monitoring issues. he issues addressed were: Adoption of performance based methods Predicting the environmental impact of oily materials Characteri...

  1. Phase Retrieval to Monitor HST Focus: II. Results Post-Servicing Mission 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami-Matias Niemi, Sami-Matias; Lallo, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) focus has been monitored throughout the Observatory's life primarily using high-resolution imaging cameras. The preferred method to determine the focus position is a Phase Retrieval technique. It solves for certain Zernike polynomials such as focus, coma and astigmatism, by fitting a model Point Spread Function interactively adjusting the aberration parameters to observed data. In this report, we discuss results of the monthly focus monitoring program since the latest mirror move in July 2009. Since the primary purpose for this monitoring is to support accurate focus maintenance, we present a picture of the current focus state of the HST. We discuss focus measurements done with both the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and draw conclusions about their confocality. We also predict when the Observatory is going to be in the best focus. The spread in these predictions is large and arises from uncertainties, such as orbital thermal variations (breathing) and long-term trends, which are difficult to model. Our best estimate, based on the long-term historical focus trend, implies that ACS (and all science instruments confocal to it) is close to the best focus at the time of writing. There is tentative evidence that the best focus of WFC3 UVIS is ˜ 0.5 ± 0.2 μm below that of ACS.

  2. Skin sensitization in chemical risk assessment: Report of aWHO/IPCS international workshop focusing on dose–responseassessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    An international workshop was held in 2006 to evaluate experimental techniques for hazard identification and hazard characterization of sensitizing agents in terms of their ability to produce data, including dose–response information, to inform risk assessment. Human testing to i...

  3. Measuring bed load discharge in rivers: bedload-surrogate monitoring workshop Minneapolis, Minnesota, 11-14 April 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2007-01-01

    The International Bedload-Surrogate Monitoring Workshop (http://www.nced.umn.edu/BRIC_2007.html), organized by the Bedload Research International Cooperative (BRIC; www.bedloadresearch.org), was held to assess and abet progress in continuous, semiautomated, or fully automated (surrogate) technologies for monitoring bed load discharge in gravel-, sand-, and mixed gravel-sand-bedded rivers. Direct bed load measurements, particularly at medium and high flows, during which most bed load occurs, tend to be time-consuming, expensive, and potentially hazardous. Surrogate technologies developed largely over the past decade and used at a number of research sites around the world show considerable promise toward providing relatively dense, robust, and quantifiably reliable bed load data sets. However, information on the efficacy of selected technologies for use in monitoring programs is needed, as is identification of the ways and means for bringing the most promising and practical of the technologies to fruition.

  4. Multi-parametric monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2012-11-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and relative phase-shift during high energy HIFU where tissue boiling occurs. Forty three (n=18) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens. Two dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10-, 20-and 30-s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11W. For the 10-, 20-, and 30-s treatment cases, a steady decrease in the displacement (-8.67±4.80, -14.44±7.77, 24.03±12.11μm), compressive strain -0.16±0.06, -0.71±0.30, -0.68±0.36 %, and phase shift +1.80±6.80, -15.80±9.44, -18.62±13.14 ° were obtained, respectively, indicating overall increase of relative stiffness and decrease of the viscosity-to-stiffness ratio during heating. After treatment, 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions showed an increased lesion-to-background contrast of 1.34±0.19, 1.98±0.30, 2.26±0.80 and lesion size of 40.95±8.06, 47.6±4.87, and 52.23±2.19 mm2, respectively, which was validated again with pathology 25.17±6.99, 42.17±1.77, 47.17±3.10 mm2. Additionally, studies also investigated the performance of mutli-parametric monitoring under the influence of boiling and attenuation change due to tissue boiling, where discrepancies were found such as deteriorated displacement SNR and reversed lesion-to-background displacement contrast with indication on possible increase in attenuation and tissue gelatification or pulverization. Despite the challenge of the boiling mechanism, the relative phase shift served as consist biomechanical tissue

  5. A PVDF Receiver for Ultrasound Monitoring of Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) shows great promise for use in the area of transcranial therapy. Currently dependent on MRI for monitoring, transcranial FUS would benefit from a real-time technique to monitor acoustic emissions during therapy. A polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) receiver with an active area of 17.8 mm2 and a film thickness of 110 μm was constructed. A compact preamplifier was designed to fit within the receiver to improve the receiver SNR and allow the long transmission line needed to remove the receiver electronics outside of the MRI room. The receiver was compared with a 0.5 mm commercial needle hydrophone, and focused and unfocused piezoceramics. The receiver was found to have a higher sensitivity than the needle hydrophone, a more wideband response than the piezoceramic and sufficient threshold for detection of microbubble emissions. Sonication of microbubbles directly and through a fragment of human skull demonstrated the ability of the receiver to detect harmonic bubble emissions, and showed potential for use in a larger scale array. Monitoring of disruption of the blood brain barrier in rats showed functionality in vivo, and the ability to detect subharmonic, harmonic and wideband emissions during therapy. The receiver shows potential for monitoring acoustic emissions during treatments and providing additional parameters to assist treatment planning. Future work will focus on developing a multi-element array for transcranial treatment monitoring. PMID:20515709

  6. Frontiers in glycomics: bioinformatics and biomarkers in disease. An NIH white paper prepared from discussions by the focus groups at a workshop on the NIH campus, Bethesda MD (September 11-13, 2006).

    PubMed

    Packer, Nicolle H; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Paulson, James C; Raman, Rahul; Rudd, Pauline; Sasisekharan, Ram; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; York, William S

    2008-01-01

    Key issues relating to glycomics research were discussed after the workshop entitled "Frontiers in Glycomics: Bioinformatics and Biomarkers in Disease" by two focus groups nominated by the organizers. The groups focused on two themes: (i) glycomics as the new frontier for the discovery of biomarkers of disease and (ii) requirements for the development of informatics for glycomics and glycobiology. The mandate of the focus groups was to build consensus on these issues and develop a summary of findings and recommendations for presentation to the NIH and the greater scientific community. A list of scientific priorities was developed, presented, and discussed at the workshops. Additional suggestions were solicited from workshop participants and collected using the workshop mailing list. The results are summarized in this White Paper, authored by the co-chairs of the focus groups. PMID:18095367

  7. A Distance Measure for Attention Focusing and Anomaly Detection in Systems Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. Previous results on extending traditional anomaly detection techniques are summarized. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing.

  8. Dynamics of gel isoelectric focusing with ampholytic dyes monitored by camera in real-time.

    PubMed

    Stastná, Miroslava; Slais, Karel

    2003-08-01

    The dynamics of gel isoelectric focusing were studied by using amphoteric low-molecular-mass colored substances (isoelectric point markers). The polyacrylamide gel in slab format was in direct contact with the electrodes. In addition to isoelectric focusing with a pH gradient composed of synthetic carrier ampholytes, pH gradients created by simple buffers of acetic acid, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid, histidine and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine were applied. The progress of the electrofocusing process was monitored by a charge-coupled device camera and video recording. The gradient profile and dynamics were approximated from the positions of isoelectric point markers, which were focused both on boundaries between individual zones of simple buffers and within the zones themselves. The obtained animated records enabled the observation of the entire real focusing run within fractions of a minute, which is useful both for the understanding and optimization of the focusing. PMID:12967184

  9. Focused attention, open monitoring and loving kindness meditation: effects on attention, conflict monitoring, and creativity – A review

    PubMed Central

    Lippelt, Dominique P.; Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    Meditation is becoming increasingly popular as a topic for scientific research and theories on meditation are becoming ever more specific. We distinguish between what is called focused Attention meditation, open Monitoring meditation, and loving kindness (or compassion) meditation. Research suggests that these meditations have differential, dissociable effects on a wide range of cognitive (control) processes, such as attentional selection, conflict monitoring, divergent, and convergent thinking. Although research on exactly how the various meditations operate on these processes is still missing, different kinds of meditations are associated with different neural structures and different patterns of electroencephalographic activity. In this review we discuss recent findings on meditation and suggest how the different meditations may affect cognitive processes, and we give suggestions for directions of future research. PMID:25295025

  10. A Simulation Model for Local Harmonic Motion Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkilae, Janne; Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    A computational model for local harmonic motion (LHM) imaging-based monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is presented. LMH technique is based on a focused ultrasound radiation force excitation, which induces local mechanical vibrations at the focal region. These pulse-echo imaged vibrations are then used to estimate the mechanical properties of the sonication region. LHM has been proven to be feasible for FUS monitoring because changes in the material properties during the coagulation affect the measured displacements. The presented model includes separate models to simulate acoustic fields, sonication induced temperature elevation and mechanical vibrations, and pulse-echo imaging of the induced motions. These simulation models are based on Rayleigh integral, finite element, and spatial impulse response methods. Simulated temperature rise and vibration amplitudes have been compared with in vivo rabbit experiments with noninvasive MRI thermometry.

  11. A Simulation Model for Local Harmonic Motion Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, Janne; Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    A computational model for local harmonic motion (LHM) imaging-based monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is presented. LMH technique is based on a focused ultrasound radiation force excitation, which induces local mechanical vibrations at the focal region. These pulse-echo imaged vibrations are then used to estimate the mechanical properties of the sonication region. LHM has been proven to be feasible for FUS monitoring because changes in the material properties during the coagulation affect the measured displacements. The presented model includes separate models to simulate acoustic fields, sonication induced temperature elevation and mechanical vibrations, and pulse-echo imaging of the induced motions. These simulation models are based on Rayleigh integral, finite element, and spatial impulse response methods. Simulated temperature rise and vibration amplitudes have been compared with in vivo rabbit experiments with noninvasive MRI thermometry.

  12. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  13. Mass sensor for in situ monitoring of focused ion and electron beam induced processes

    SciTech Connect

    Friedli, Vinzenz; Santschi, Christian; Michler, Johann; Hoffmann, Patrik; Utke, Ivo

    2007-01-29

    A cantilever-based mass sensor for in situ monitoring of deposition and milling using focused ion and electron beams is presented. Carefully designed experiments allowed for mass measurements with a noise level of {+-}10 fg by tracking the resonance frequency of a temperature stabilized piezoresistive cantilever using phase locking. The authors report on measurements of precursor surface coverage, residence time, mass deposition rates, yields, and deposit density using the (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}PtCpCH{sub 3} precursor.

  14. Record of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition (D and D) workshop: A new focus for technology development, opportunities for industry/government collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R.C.; Bossart, S.J.; Hart, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    This workshop was held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia, on July 11--12, 1995. The workshop sought to establish a foundation for continued dialogue between industry and the DOE to ensure that industry`s experiences, lessons learned, and recommendations are incorporated into D and D program policy, strategy, and plans. The mission of the D and D Focus Area is to develop improved technologies, processes and products, to characterize, deactivate, survey, maintain, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of DOE surplus structures, buildings, and contents. The target is a five-to-one return on investment through cost avoidance. The cornerstone of the D and D focus area activities is large-scale demonstration projects that actually decontaminate, decommission, and dispose of a building. The aim is to demonstrate innovative D and D technologies as part of an ongoing DOE D and D project. OTD would pay the incremental cost of demonstrating the innovative technologies. The goal is to have the first demonstration project completed within the next 2 years. The intent is to select projects, or a project, with visible impact so all of the stakeholders know that a building was removed, and demonstrate at a scale that is convincing to the customers in the EM program so they feel comfortable using it in subsequent D and D projects. The plan is to use a D and D integrating contractor who can then use the expertise in this project to use in jobs at other DOE sites.

  15. What's the Technology For? Teacher Attention and Pedagogical Goals in a Modeling-Focused Professional Development Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Michelle Hoda; Andrews, Chelsea; Shaban, Yara; Laina, Vasiliki; Gravel, Brian E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores the role that technology can play in engaging pre-service teachers with the iterative, "messy" nature of model-based inquiry. Over the course of 5 weeks, 11 pre-service teachers worked in groups to construct models of diffusion using a computational animation and simulation toolkit, and designed lesson plans for the toolkit. Content analyses of group discussions and lesson plans document attention to content, representation, revision, and evaluation as interwoven aspects of modeling over the course of the workshop. When animating, only content and representation were heavily represented in group discussions. When simulating, all four aspects were represented to different extents across groups. Those differences corresponded with different planned uses for the technology during lessons: to teach modeling, to engage learners with one another's ideas, or to reveal student ideas. We identify specific ways in which technology served an important role in eliciting teachers' knowledge and goals related to scientific modeling in the classroom.

  16. Cost effective CD control for DUV implant layers using the Archer MPX focus-exposure monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Sean; Eichelberger, Brad; Nelson, Chris; Dinu, Berta; Kennemer, Harold; Monahan, Kevin

    2005-05-01

    CD control is one of the main parameters for IC product performances and a major contributor to yield performance. Traditional SEM metrology can be a challenge on particular layers due to normal process variation and has not proven to provide sufficient focus monitoring ability. This in turn causes false positives resulting in unnecessary rework, but more importantly missed focus excursions resulting in yield loss. Alexander Starikov, Intel Corporation, alludes to the fact that focus and exposure "knobs" account for greater than 80% of CD correctible variance1. Spansion F25 is evaluating an alternative technology using an optical method for the indirect monitoring of the CD on the implant layer. The optical method utilizes a dual tone line-end-shortening (LES) target which is measured on a standard optical overlay tool. The dual tone technology enables the ability to separate the contributions of the focus and exposure resulting in a more accurate characterization of the two parameters on standard production wafers. Ultimately by keeping focus and exposure within acceptable limits it can be assumed that the CD will be within acceptable limits as well without the unnecessary rework caused by process variation. By using designed experiments this paper will provide characterization of the LES technique on the implant layer showing its ability to separate focus-exposure errors vs. the traditional SEM metrology. Actual high volume production data will be used to compare the robustness and sensitivity of the two technologies in a real life production environment. An overall outline of the production implementation will be documented as well.

  17. Local harmonic motion monitoring of focused ultrasound surgery--a simulation model.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Janne; Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a computational model for localized harmonic motion (LHM) imaging-based monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is presented. The LHM technique is based on a focused, time-varying ultrasound radiation force excitation, which induces local oscillatory motions at the focal region. These vibrations are tracked, using pulse-echo imaging, and then, used to estimate the mechanical properties of the sonication region. LHM is feasible for FUS monitoring because changes in the material properties during the coagulation process affect the measured displacements. The presented model includes separate models to simulate acoustic sonication fields, sonication-induced temperature elevation and mechanical motion, and pulse-echo imaging of the induced motions. These 3-D simulation models are based on Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, finite element, and spatial impulse response methods. Simulated-tissue temperature elevation and mechanical motion were compared with previously published in vivo measurements. Finally, the simulation model was used to simulate coagulation and LHM monitoring, as would occur with multiple, neighbouring sonication locations covering a large tumor. PMID:19822463

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF MICROBIAL ECOGENOMIC INDICATORS FOR MONITORING WATER QUALITY: REPORT OF A WORKSHOP ASSESSING THE STATE OF THE SCIENCE, RESEARCH.....

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article brings forth recommendations from a workshop sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science to Achieve Results (STAR) and Environmental Monitoring and Assessment (EMAP) Programs and by the Council of State Governments, held during May 2002 in Kansas ...

  19. WORKSHOP ON THE CHARACTERIZATION, MODELING, REMEDIATION AND MONITORING OF MINING-IMPACTED PIT LAKES, SANDS RGENCY CASINO HOTEL, DOWNTOWN RENO, NV. APRIL 4-6, 2000 (PROGRAM FLYER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum for the exchange of scientific infomation on current approaches for assessing the characterization, monitoring, treatment and/or remediation of impacts on aquatic ecosystems including pit lakes from mining-related contamination i...

  20. 76 FR 38360 - Workshop-Monitoring Changes in Extreme Storm Statistics: State of Knowledge; Notice of Open...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... website at https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/severe-storms-workshop/ . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... available, they may be found at https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/severe-storms-workshop/ . Topics To...

  1. Biomechanical assessment and monitoring of thermal ablation using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Yi

    Cancer remains, one of the major public health problems in the United States as well as many other countries worldwide. According to According to the World Health Organization, cancer is currently the leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths annually, and 25% of the annual death was due to Cancer during the year of 2011. In the long history of the cancer treatment field, many treatment options have been established up to date. Traditional procedures include surgical procedures as well as systemic therapies such as biologic therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Nevertheless, side-effects are often associated with such procedures due to the systemic delivery across the entire body. Recently technologies have been focused on localized therapy under minimally or noninvasive procedure with imaging-guidance, such as cryoablation, laser ablation, radio-frequency (RF) ablation, and High Intensity F-ocused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a non-invasive procedure aims to coagulate tissue thermally at a localized focal zone created with noninvasively emitting a set of focused ultrasound beams while the surrounding healthy tissues remain relatively untreated. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a dynamic, radiation-force-based imaging technique, which utilizes a single HIFU transducer by emitting an Amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to both thermally ablate the tumor while inducing a stable oscillatory tissue displacement at its focal zone. The oscillatory response is then estimated by a cross-correlation based motion tracking technique on the signal collected by a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. HMIFU addresses the most critical aspect and one of the major unmet needs of HIFU treatment, which is the ability to perform real-time monitoring and mapping of tissue property change during the HIFU treatment. In this dissertation, both the assessment and monitoring aspects of HMIFU have been investigated

  2. Passive monitoring using a combination of focused and phased array radiometry: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Farantatos, Panagiotis; Karanasiou, Irene S; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this simulation study is to use the focusing properties of a conductive ellipsoidal reflector in conjunction with directive phased microwave antenna configurations in order to achieve brain passive monitoring with microwave radiometry. One of the main modules of the proposed setup which ensures the necessary beamforming and focusing on the body and brain areas of interest is a symmetrical axis ellipsoidal conductive wall cavity. The proposed system operates in an entirely non-invasive contactless manner providing temperature and/or conductivity variations monitoring and is designed to also provide hyperthermia treatment. In the present paper, the effect of the use of patch antennas as receiving antennas on the system's focusing properties and specifically the use of phased array setups to achieve scanning of the areas under measurement is investigated. Extensive simulations to compute the electric field distributions inside the whole ellipsoidal reflector and inside two types of human head models were carried out using single and two element microstrip patch antennas. The results show that clear focusing (creation of "hot spots") inside the head models is achieved at 1.53GHz. In the case of the two element antennas, the "hot spot" performs a linear scan around the brain area of interest while the phase difference of the two microstrip patch antennas significantly affects the way the scanning inside the head model is achieved. In the near future, phased array antennas with multiband and more elements will be used in order to enhance the system scanning properties toward the acquisition of tomography images without the need of subject movement. PMID:22254358

  3. Monitoring of HIFU thermal damage using integrated photoacoustic imaging and high intensity focused ultrasound technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we applied an integrated photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system to noninvasively monitor the thermal damage due to HIFU ablation in vivo. A single-element, spherically focused ultrasonic transducer, with a central frequency of 5MHz, was used to generate a HIFU area in soft tissue. Photoacoustic signals were detected by the same ultrasonic transducer before and after HIFU treatments using different wavelengths. The feasibility of combined contrast imaging and treatment of solid tumor in vivo by the integrated PAI and HIFU system was also studied. Gold nanorods were used to enhance PAI during the imaging of a CT26 tumor, which was subcutaneously inoculated on the hip of a BALB/c mouse. Subsequently, the CT26 tumor was ablated by HIFU with the guidance of photoacoustic images. Our results suggested that the tumor was clearly visible on photoacoustic images after the injection of gold nanorods and was ablated by HIFU. In conclusion, PAI may potentially be used for monitoring HIFU thermal lesions with possible diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors.

  4. Applied antineutrino physics workshop.

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river.

  5. U.S. EPA WORKSHOP ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS, 07/31/2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a one-day seminar to present an overview of site characterization approaches to support evaluation of the potential for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as a remedy for inorganic contaminants in ground water. These se...

  6. WORKSHOP ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a one-day seminar to present an overview of site characterization approaches to support evaluation of the potential for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as a remedy for inorganic contaminants in ground water. These sem...

  7. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal–noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  8. Real-time Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS) Monitoring Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    SciTech Connect

    Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2009-04-14

    Monitoring changes in tissue mechanical properties to optimally control thermal exposure is important in thermal therapies. The amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging (HMI) for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) technique is a radiation force technique, which has the capability of tracking tissue stiffness during application of an oscillatory force. The feasibility of HMIFU for assessing mechanical tissue properties has been previously demonstrated. In this paper, a confocal transducer, combining a 4.5 MHz FUS transducer and a 3.3 MHz phased array imaging transducer, was used. The FUS transducer was driven by AM wave at 15 Hz with an acoustic intensity (I{sub spta}) was equal to 1050 W/cm{sup 2}. A lowpass digital filter was used to remove the spectrum of the higher power beam prior to displacement estimation. The resulting axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D cross-correlation with a correlation window of 2 mm and a 92.5% overlap. A thermocouple was also used to measure the temperature near the ablated region. 2D HMI-images from six-bovine-liver specimens indicated the onset of coagulation necrosis through changes in amplitude displacement after coagulation due to its simultaneous probing and heating capability. The HMI technique can thus be used to monitor temperature-related stiffness changes of tissues during thermal therapies in real-time, i.e., without interrupting or modifying the treatment protocol.

  9. Optical coherence tomography monitoring of cardiac ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Matthew; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Hesheng; Deng, Cheri X.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2005-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a promising method for ablation therapy in the heart. Little is understood about early lesion development with HIFU because the lesions cannot be imaged reliably with sufficient resolution, and no other real time monitoring techniques are available to date. We investigated Optical coherence tomography (OCT) for monitoring early lesion formation. We created a series of lesions in fresh canine cardiac tissue using 5W (frequency=4.23Mhz, F#=1.2) of acoustic power with 10sec., 7sec., and 5sec. exposures. The lesions were then imaged using an OCT imaging system with an axial resolution of 12μm and a lateral resolution of 15μm. The maximum width of the lesions were measured using custom software. In separate experiments, lesion formation was investigated under varying acoustic power levels ranging from 5W to 20W at 0.1sec. and 0.2 sec. exposures. The average maximum widths of the lesions were 1.06mm for 10sec. lesions, .65mm for 7sec. lesions, and .59mm for 5sec. lesions. We observed both subsurface lesions and superficial blister-like formations, which may be a precursor of cavitation inception or tissue vaporization. The subsurface lesion forms over time as expected from thermal energy deposition. The surface blister forms prior to the subsurface lesion at high power, and after subsurface lesion formation at lower powers. OCT provides a method for monitoring HIFU lesion formation at high resolution, and can potentially be used to optimize HIFU dose for clinical applications.

  10. The Right to Literacy: The Rhetoric, the Romance, the Reality. ACAL National Conference (Sydney, Australia, October 9-11, 1992). Conference Papers, Vol. 2, Workshops with a National Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Adult Literacy, Victoria.

    This second of three volumes of the 1992 Australian Council for Adult Literacy (ACAL) Conference Papers includes 12 papers from workshops, with a national focus. The "Welcome Speech" (Marie Perrson) is followed by "Literacy: An Ecological View" (David Sless) that shares a view of literacy as an interdependent component in a much larger…

  11. Air Pollution Sensors: Highlights from an EPA Workshop on the Evolution and Revolution in Low-Cost Participatory Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes the findings from the EPA's Apps and Sensors for Air Pollution Workshop that was held March 26-27 of 2012. The workshop brought together researchers, developers, and community-based groups who have been working with sensors and apps in a variety of settin...

  12. Solar education project workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.

    1980-10-31

    A summary of proceedings of the Solar Education Project Workshop is presented. The workshop had as its focus the dissemination of curriculum materials developed by the Solar Energy Project of the New York State Department of Education under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. It includes, in addition to presentations by speakers and workshop leaders, specific comments from participants regarding materials available and energy-related activities underway in their respective states and suggested strategies from them for ongoing dissemination efforts.

  13. Focused beam reflectance measurement as a tool for in situ monitoring of the lactose crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Pandalaneni, K; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-07-01

    Lactose accounts for about 75 and 85% of the solids in whey and deproteinized whey, respectively. Production of lactose is usually carried out by a process called crystallization. Several factors including rate of cooling, presence of impurities, and mixing speed influence the crystal size characteristics. To optimize the lactose crystallization process parameters to maximize the lactose yield, it is important to monitor the crystallization process. However, efficient in situ tools to implement at concentrations relevant to the dairy industry are lacking. The objective of the present work was to use a focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) system for in situ monitoring of lactose crystallization at supersaturated concentrations (wt/wt) 50, 55, and 60% at 20 and 30°C. The FBRM data were compared with Brix readings collected using a refractometer during isothermal crystallization. Chord length distributions obtained from FBRM in the ranges of <50 µm (fine crystals) and 50 to 300 µm (coarse crystals) were recorded and evaluated in relation to the extent of crystallization and rate constants deduced from the refractometer measurements. Extent of crystallization and rate constants increased with increasing supersaturation concentration and temperature. The measured fine crystal counts from FBRM increased at higher supersaturated concentration and temperature during isothermal crystallization. On the other hand, coarse counts were observed to increase with decreasing supersaturated concentration and temperature. Square weighted chord length distribution obtained from FBRM showed that as concentration increased, a decrease in chord lengths occurred at 20°C and similar observations were made from microscopic images. The robustness of FBRM in understanding isothermal lactose crystallization at various concentrations and temperatures was successfully assessed in the study. PMID:27132102

  14. System-focused environmental flow regime prescription, monitoring and adaptive management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, David; Lexartza Artza, Irantzu

    2016-04-01

    that more peripheral influencing factors should be given serious consideration when developing environmental flow regimes. These factors could include the development of ice, non-fluvial geomorphic processes such as landslides, connectivity with groundwater and provision for local cottage industries. Even with a thorough appreciation of the holistic system, the value of detailed environmental monitoring and adaptive management plans cannot be underestimated as a means of further managing risk and uncertainty in complex systems. It is suggested that by taking a more holistic and system-focused approach to environmental flow definition, that environmental flow regimes can be tailored to the specificity and complexity of any given location. By improving the way that environmental flow regimes and associated physical mitigation are prescribed, monitored and managed it should be possible to develop more sustainable forms of energy production whilst minimising environmental harm as far as possible.

  15. Auto-focus control and weld process monitoring of laser welding using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Jung; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Min Seok; Chung, Chin-Man

    1998-08-01

    The thermal radiation from a weld pool is focused on an aperture and the transmitted thermal radiation is monitored at two wavelengths with high-speed single-element detectors. Due to the chromatic aberration introduced in the focusing optics, the transmittance curve of thermal radiation varies by the wavelength. Likewise, the detector field of view varies by the wavelength. Owing to this difference in the transmittance and in the field of view, the local variation in a weld pool can be monitored by processing the two spectroscopic signals from two detectors. In this paper, the algorithms to monitor the weld pool size and the focus shift are presented and the performances of weld pool size monitoring and auto-focus control are shown for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding. The size variation monitoring has been applied to the weld depth and weld defects monitoring. The effects of laser power change and weld defects on the weld pool size variation are also shown.

  16. Long-term bridge health monitoring focusing on the Mahalanobis Distance of modal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul-Woo; Morita, Tomoaki; Wang, Ziran; Sugiura, Kunitomo

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining civil infrastructure, including bridges, has been a keen technical issue in developed countries and will surely be one in developing countries in the near future. An effective maintenance strategy strongly depends on timely decisions on the health condition of the structure. Bridge health monitoring (BHM) using vibration data is widely recognized to be one of the effective technologies that aid decision-making on bridge maintenance. This research focuses on long-term BHM expecting that changes in physical properties of the bridge subject to aged-deterioration progress slowly. In the practical application of the long-term BHM, one of the difficulties is that the observed vibration data includes environmental influences such as temperature change. In order to achieve high accuracy in evaluating modal parameters of the bridge, other influencing variables have to be taken into consideration. In this study, temperature is considered as the main environmental factor by means of a regression analysis. The Mahalanobis distance (MD), a multivariate statistical distance, is adopted to emphasize potential changes in the identified modal parameters. The validity of the proposed approach is investigated utilizing vibration data measured at a real bridge in service.

  17. IN VIVO MONITORING OF FOCUSED ULTRASOUND SURGERY USING LOCAL HARMONIC MOTION

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    The present study established the feasibility of a technique for monitoring FUS lesion formation in vivo using localized harmonic motion (LHM) measurements. Oscillatory motion (frequencies between 50 and 300 Hz) was generated within tissues by induction of a periodic radiation force with a focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer. The harmonic motion was estimated using cross-correlation of RF ultrasonic signals acquired at different instances during the motion by using a confocal diagnostic ultrasound transducer. The technique was evaluated in vivo in rabbit muscle (14 locations) in an MR imager for simultaneous ultrasound harmonic motion tracking and MR thermometry. The measured maximum amplitude of the induced harmonic motion before and after the lesion formation was significantly different for all the tested motion frequencies and decreased between 17 and 81% depending on the frequency and location. During the FUS exposure a drop in the maximum amplitude value was observed and a threshold value could be associated to the formation of a thermal lesion. A series of controlled sonications was performed by stopping the exposure when the threshold value in LHM amplitude was reached and the presence of a thermal lesion was confirmed by MR imaging. LHM measurements were also used to perform a spatial scan of the tissues across the exposure region and the thermal lesions could be detected as a reduction in the maximum motion amplitude value at the sonication region. PMID:18805626

  18. Optimization of real-time acoustical and mechanical monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using harmonic motion imaging for high focused ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in silica, in vitro and in vivo. Its principle is based on emission of an Amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam utilizing a therapeutic transducer to induce an oscillatory radiation force while tracking the focal tissue mechanical response during the HIFU treatment using a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. In order to translate towards the clinical implementation of HMIFU, a complete assessment study is required in order to investigate the optimal radiation force threshold for reliable monitoring the local tissue mechanical property changes, i.e., the estimation HMIFU displacement under thermal, acoustical, and mechanical effects within focal medium (i.e., boiling, cavitation, and nonlinearity) using biological specimen. In this study, HMIFU technique is applied on HIFU treatment monitoring on freshly excised ex vivo canine liver specimens. In order to perform the multi-characteristic assessment, the diagnostic transducer was operated as either a pulse-echo imager or Passive Cavitation Detector (PCD) to assess the acoustic and mechanical response, while a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. As the acoustic power of HIFU treatment was ranged from 2.3 to 11.4 W, robust HMI displacement was observed across the entire range. Moreover, an optimized range for high quality displacement monitoring was found to be between 3.6 to 5.2W, where displacement showed an increase followed by significant decrease, indicating a stiffening of focal medium due to thermal lesion formation, while the correlation coefficient was maintained above 0.95. PMID:24111176

  19. How Can Remote Sensing Be Used for Water Quality Monitoring?

    EPA Science Inventory

    “How can remote sensing address information needs and gaps in water quality and quantity management?” was a workshop convened during the biennial National Water Quality Monitoring Conference 2014, held in Cincinnati, OH. The focus of this workshop was to provide an o...

  20. OMLTA Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Donna E.

    Workshops sponsored by the Ohio Modern Language Teachers' Association (OMLTA) are described and information about organizing OMLTA workshops is provided. Specifically, guidelines are given on: policies, the local workshop director's responsibilities, selecting consultants, site selection, luncheon arrangements, and publicity. The workshops by…

  1. Real-time Monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Ablation of In Vitro Canine Livers Using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Grondin, Julien; Payen, Thomas; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a technique that can perform and monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. An oscillatory motion is generated at the focus of a 93-element and 4.5 MHz center frequency HIFU transducer by applying a 25 Hz amplitude-modulated signal using a function generator. A 64-element and 2.5 MHz imaging transducer with 68kPa peak pressure is confocally placed at the center of the HIFU transducer to acquire the radio-frequency (RF) channel data. In this protocol, real-time monitoring of thermal ablation using HIFU with an acoustic power of 7 W on canine livers in vitro is described. HIFU treatment is applied on the tissue during 2 min and the ablated region is imaged in real-time using diverging or plane wave imaging up to 1,000 frames/second. The matrix of RF channel data is multiplied by a sparse matrix for image reconstruction. The reconstructed field of view is of 90° for diverging wave and 20 mm for plane wave imaging and the data are sampled at 80 MHz. The reconstruction is performed on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) in order to image in real-time at a 4.5 display frame rate. 1-D normalized cross-correlation of the reconstructed RF data is used to estimate axial displacements in the focal region. The magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement at the focal depth decreases during the thermal ablation which denotes stiffening of the tissue due to the formation of a lesion. The displacement signal-to-noise ratio (SNRd) at the focal area for plane wave was 1.4 times higher than for diverging wave showing that plane wave imaging appears to produce better displacement maps quality for HMIFU than diverging wave imaging. PMID:26556647

  2. DOE Lab-to-Lab MPC&A workshop for cooperative tasks with Russian institutes: Focus on critical assemblies and item facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Fishbone, L.G.; Kato, W.Y.; Lazareth, O.W.; Suda, S.C.; Garcia, D.; Haga, R.

    1995-12-01

    Seventeen Russian scientists and engineers representing five different institutes participated in a Workshop on material control and accounting as part of the US-Russian Lab-to-Lab Cooperative Program in Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A). In addition to presentations and discussions, the Workshop included an exercise at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and demonstrations at the Zero Power Physics Reactor (critical-assembly facility) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). The Workshop particularly emphasized procedures for physical inventory-taking at critical assemblies and item facilities, with associated supporting techniques and methods. By learning these topics and applying the methods and experience at their own institutes, the Russian scientists and engineers will be able to determine and verify nuclear material inventories based on sound procedures, including measurements. This will constitute a significant enhancement to MPC&A at the Russian institutes.

  3. A Distance Measure for Attention Focusing and Anaomaly Detection in Systems Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by.

  4. MEETING REPORT OF THE EC/US WORKSHOP ON GENETIC RISK ASSESSMENT: "HUMAN GENETIC RISKS FROM EXPOSURE TO CHEMICALS, FOCUSING ON THE FEASIBILITY OF A PARALLELOGRAM APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This workshop was the concept of Professor Frits Sobels who passed away on the 6th of July, 1993. he underlying idea of the Sobel's parallelogram approach is that an estimate (based on DNA adduct dosimetry) of the genetic damage in human germ cells can be obtained by measuring a ...

  5. The urban perspectives of acid rain. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.E.

    1993-06-04

    This report documents discussions held during a workshop an Urban Perspective of Acid Rain. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of the Director, National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). NAPAP anticipates giving increased emphasis to the benefits in urban areas of emissions reductions. The goal of this informal, exploratory workshop was to serve as a first step towards identifying pollutant monitoring, and research and assessment needs to help answer, from an urban perspective, the two key questions posed to NAPAP by Congress: (1) what are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of the acid rain control program, and (2) what reductions in deposition, rates are needed in order to prevent adverse effects? The workshop addressed research activities needed to respond to these questions. The discussions focused. sequentially, on data needs, data and model availability, and data and modeling gaps. The discussions concentrated on four areas of effects: human health, materials, urban forests, and visibility.

  6. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): an ex vivo feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-03-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n = 43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 28). Two-dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10 s, 20 s and 30 s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11 W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and passive cavitation detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (Δϕ) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite the expectedly chaotic changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property changes throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with

  7. Workshop Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviews a leadership development aerospace educators workshop held at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, July 22, 1977, and an introductory/advanced aerospace workshop held at Central Washington State College. (SL)

  8. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop on Tuesday, May 14, 2002, to discuss space mechanisms technology. The theme for this workshop was 'Working in the Cold,' a focus on space mechanisms that must operate at low temperatures. We define 'cold' as below -60C (210 K), such as would be found near the equator of Mars. However, we are also concerned with much colder temperatures such as in permanently dark craters of the Moon (about 40 K).

  9. Fast monitoring of species-specific peptide biomarkers using high-intensity-focused-ultrasound-assisted tryptic digestion and selected MS/MS ion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Mónica; Cañas, Benito; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Piñeiro, Carmen; Vázquez, Jesús; Gallardo, José M

    2011-07-15

    A new strategy for the fast monitoring of peptide biomarkers is described. It is based on the use of accelerated in-solution trypsin digestions under an ultrasonic field provided by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and the monitoring of several peptides by selected MS/MS ion monitoring in a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The performance of the method was established for the unequivocal identification of all commercial fish species belonging to the Merlucciidae family. Using a particular combination of only 11 peptides, resulting from the HIFU-assisted tryptic digestion of the thermostable proteins parvalbumins, the workflow allowed the unequivocal identification of these closely related fish species in any seafood product, including processed and precooked products, in less than 2 h. The present strategy constitutes the fastest method for peptide biomarker monitoring. Its application for food quality control provides to the authorities an effective and rapid method of food authentication and traceability to guarantee the quality and safety to the consumers. PMID:21627098

  10. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter: Translating a Terrestrial Focused Technique into a Clinical Monitoring Tool for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Sara; Foy, Millennia; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen; Wear, Mary L.; Bedi, Deepak; Ernst, Randy; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used to quickly measure optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) when increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is suspected. NASA Space and Clinical Operations Division has been using ground and on-orbit ultrasound since 2009 as a proxy for ICP in non-acute monitoring for space medicine purposes. In the terrestrial emergency room population, an ONSD greater than 0.59 cm is considered highly predictive of elevated intracranial pressure. However, this cut-off limit is not applicable to the spaceflight setting since over 50% of US Operating Segment (USOS) astronauts have an ONSD greater than 0.60 cm even before launch. Crew Surgeon clinical decision-making is complicated by the fact that many astronauts have history of previous spaceflights. Our data characterize the distribution of baseline ONSD in the astronaut corps, its longitudinal trends in long-duration spaceflight, and the predictive power of this measure related to increased ICP outcomes.

  11. Conceptual design and development of GEM based detecting system for tomographic tungsten focused transport monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Malinowski, K.; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, E.; Poźniak, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabołotny, W.; Wojeński, A.; Kolasiński, P.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2015-10-01

    Implementing tungsten as a plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactors will require effective monitoring of not just its level in the plasma but also its distribution. That can be successfully achieved using detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. This work presents the conceptual design of the detecting unit for poloidal tomography to be tested at the WEST project tokamak. The current stage of the development is discussed covering aspects which include detector's spatial dimensions, gas mixtures, window materials and arrangements inside and outside the tokamak ports, details of detector's structure itself and details of the detecting module electronics. It is expected that the detecting unit under development, when implemented, will add to the safe operation of tokamak bringing the creation of sustainable nuclear fusion reactors a step closer. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  12. Summary of an NIH workshop to identify research needs to improve the monitoring of iodine status in the United States and to inform the DRI.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Christine A; Zimmermann, Michael B; Skeaff, Sheila; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Dwyer, Johanna T; Trumbo, Paula R; Zehaluk, Christina; Andrews, Karen W; Carriquiry, Alicia; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Egan, S Kathleen; Long, Stephen E; Bailey, Regan Lucas; Sullivan, Kevin M; Holden, Joanne M; Betz, Joseph M; Phinney, Karen W; Brooks, Stephen P J; Johnson, Clifford L; Haggans, Carol J

    2012-06-01

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the NIH sponsored a workshop on May 12-13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH institutes and centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine research initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would inform the dietary reference intakes for iodine, which were last revised in 2001. Iodine is required throughout the life cycle, but pregnant women and infants are the populations most at risk of deficiency, because iodine is required for normal brain development and growth. The CDC monitors iodine status of the population on a regular basis, but the status of the most vulnerable populations remains uncertain. The NIH funds very little investigator-initiated research relevant to iodine and human nutrition, but the ODS has worked for several years with a number of other U.S. government agencies to develop many of the resources needed to conduct iodine research of high quality (e.g., validated analytical methods and reference materials for multiple types of samples). Iodine experts, scientists from several U.S. government agencies, and NIH representatives met for 2 d to identify iodine research needs appropriate to the NIH mission. PMID:22551802

  13. Summary of an NIH Workshop to Identify Research Needs to Improve the Monitoring of Iodine Status in the United States and to Inform the DRI123

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine A.; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Skeaff, Sheila; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Dwyer, Johanna T.; Trumbo, Paula R.; Zehaluk, Christina; Andrews, Karen W.; Carriquiry, Alicia; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Egan, S. Kathleen; Long, Stephen E.; Bailey, Regan Lucas; Sullivan, Kevin M.; Holden, Joanne M.; Betz, Joseph M.; Phinney, Karen W.; Brooks, Stephen P. J.; Johnson, Clifford L.; Haggans, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the NIH sponsored a workshop on May 12–13, 2011, to bring together representatives from various NIH institutes and centers as a first step in developing an NIH iodine research initiative. The workshop also provided an opportunity to identify research needs that would inform the dietary reference intakes for iodine, which were last revised in 2001. Iodine is required throughout the life cycle, but pregnant women and infants are the populations most at risk of deficiency, because iodine is required for normal brain development and growth. The CDC monitors iodine status of the population on a regular basis, but the status of the most vulnerable populations remains uncertain. The NIH funds very little investigator-initiated research relevant to iodine and human nutrition, but the ODS has worked for several years with a number of other U.S. government agencies to develop many of the resources needed to conduct iodine research of high quality (e.g., validated analytical methods and reference materials for multiple types of samples). Iodine experts, scientists from several U.S. government agencies, and NIH representatives met for 2 d to identify iodine research needs appropriate to the NIH mission. PMID:22551802

  14. Toward Deep Brain Monitoring with Superficial EEG Sensors Plus Neuromodulatory Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Felix; Mehić, Edin; Caler, Connor J; Ojemann, Jeff G; Mourad, Pierre D

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive recordings of electrophysiological activity have limited anatomic specificity and depth. We hypothesized that spatially tagging a small volume of brain with a unique electroencephalography (EEG) signal induced by pulsed focused ultrasound could overcome those limitations. As a first step toward testing this hypothesis, we applied transcranial ultrasound (2 MHz, 200-ms pulses applied at 1050 Hz for 1 s at a spatial peak temporal average intensity of 1.4 W/cm(2)) to the brains of anesthetized rats while simultaneously recording EEG signals. We observed a significant 1050-Hz electrophysiological signal only when ultrasound was applied to a living brain. Moreover, amplitude demodulation of the EEG signal at 1050 Hz yielded measurement of gamma band (>30 Hz) brain activity consistent with direct measurements of that activity. These results represent preliminary support for use of pulsed focused ultrasound as a spatial tagging mechanism for non-invasive EEG-based mapping of deep brain activity with high spatial resolution. PMID:27181686

  15. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  16. In vivo feasibility of real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) technique is applied to monitor changes in mechanical properties of tissues during thermal therapy in a transgenic breast cancer mouse model in vivo. An HMIFU system, composed of a 4.5-MHz focused ultrasound (FUS) and a 3.3-MHz phased-array imaging transducer, was mechanically moved to image and ablate the entire tumor. The FUS transducer was driven by an amplitude-modulated (AM) signal at 15 Hz. The acoustic intensity ( I(spta)) was equal to 1050 W/cm(2) at the focus. A digital low-pass filter was used to filter out the spectrum of the FUS beam and its harmonics prior to displacement estimation. The resulting axial displacement was estimated using 1-D cross-correlation on the acquired RF signals. Results from two mice with eight lesions formed in each mouse (16 lesions total) showed that the average peak-to-peak displacement amplitude before and after lesion formation was respectively equal to 17.34 +/- 1.34 microm and 10.98 +/- 1.82 microm ( p < 0.001). Cell death was also confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin histology. HMI displacement can be used to monitor the relative tissue stiffness changes in real time during heating so that the treatment procedure can be performed in a time-efficient manner. The HMIFU system may, therefore, constitute a cost-efficient and reliable alternative for real-time monitoring of thermal ablation. PMID:19643703

  17. Workshop on the Development of an Experimental Global Drought Information System (GDIS): Overview of Workshop Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Among the key recommendations of a recent WCRP Workshop on Drought Predictability and Prediction in a Changing Climate is the development of an experimental global drought information system (GDIS). The timeliness of such an effort is evidenced by the wide aITay of relevant ongoing national and international (as well as regional and continental scale) efforts to provide drought information, including the US and North American drought monitors, and various integrating activities such as GEO and the Global Drought Portal. The workshop will review current capabilities and needs, and focus on the steps necessary to develop a GDIS that will build upon the extensive worldwide investments that have already been made in developing drought monitoring (including new space-based observations), drought risk management, and climate prediction capahilities.

  18. Focus on physicochemical parameters and nutrient dynamics in a little peri-urban river, using different frequency monitoring (northern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovsky, Anastasia; Dumoulin, David; Criquet, Justine; Superville, Pierre-Jean; Prygiel, Jean; Alary, Claire; Billon, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The Marque River is a small river located in Northern France in a peri-urban watershed, going through both agricultural and urban areas. A multi scale monitoring frequency has been undertaken in order to understand the aquatic ecosystem dynamic. Indeed, two types of monitoring (low and high frequencies) were applied to assess the quality of this river impacted by multi-origin inputs. The low frequency monitoring consisted in monthly or bi-monthly historical data from 2007 to 2012, and monthly grab samplings carried out from February 2014 to February 2015 focused on physicochemical parameters and nutrients. Additionally, a high frequency monitoring was implemented twice a year at two different seasons (summer 2014 and from spring to summer 2015) in the river. Physicochemical parameters (oxygen, temperature, conductivity, pH, solid particle matter, dissolved organic carbon) and nutrients (NO3-, NH4+ and PO43-) were recorded every 10 minutes. Furthermore, both the river flow and the pluviometry were recorded at the scale of the day. This presentation is going to demonstrate that (i) considering nutrients, a multi-origin pressure (agricultural and urban) impacts the stream and leads to its ecological degradation by comparison with the concentrations limits suggested by the Water Framework Directive; (ii) photosynthesis/respiration cycles are affected by intense inputs of organic matter and nutrients especially during heavy rain events that can also cause anoxic events; (iii) the effects of the urban inputs are more pronounced during the dry periods as exhibited for example by the increase of the river flow during the day; (iv) the phosphate concentrations seem to be related to the dissolved oxygen contents and (v) strong nutrients concentrations stimulate eutrophication. Overall, our findings clearly highlight the importance of high frequency monitoring in order to better understand the dynamic behavior of water courses.

  19. The Experimental Lakes Area: Over 45 Years of Whole Ecosystem Monitoring and Manipulation Experiments and a Focus on the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The IISD Experimental Lakes Area is a unique facility which has existed since 1968 and consists of 58 lakes and their watersheds set aside for research purposes. The IISD-ELA also boasts an on-site water chemistry lab, accommodations and facilities for up to 60 personnel. Since its inception in 1968 over 50 whole ecosystem experiments have been conducted at the ELA including eutrophication, acidification of lakes, environmental mercury fates, hydro-electric reservoir impacts and much more. The recent partnership between IISD and ELA has allowed ELA to refocus on freshwater research and policy development in a time where the preservation of the earth's most precious resource is of the utmost concern. In addition to water quality monitoring, the ELA is also focused on autotrophic ecology, zooplankton community structures, fish population and behaviour and food-web interactions. Monitoring all of these disciplines and their inter-relationships gives the research facility a unique perspective and along with the long term dataset stretching back to 1968 the ELA can look at historical records to monitor long term changes in the environment.

  20. Report on an international workshop on Cryptoexplosions and Catastrophes in the Geological Record, with a Special Focus on the Vredefort Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimold, W. U.

    1988-01-01

    Eighty-five geoscientists gathered in the heart of the Vredefort Cryptoexplosion structure to discuss and evaluate the current knowledge about mass extinctions, impact and volcanic cratering and to obtain first-hand information on the Vredefort structure and its origin. Presentations were made within 8 topical sessions: (1) the regional setting of the Vredefort structure; (2) the Vredefort structure itself; (3) deformations and microdeformations; (4) large cryptoexplosion structures; (5) the Ries Crater; (6) tektites; (7) the K-T boundary, and (8) tectonophysics of cratering. The program was rounded up by working group and plenum discussions culminating in a Workshop report emphasizing problem areas, gaps in the data base and recommendations for future research.

  1. March 2011 Physical Indicators Workshop Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Brent

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Assessment (NCA) convened a workshop on Physical Climate Indicators from 29-30 March 2011, as part of a series on Monitoring Climate Change and its Impacts . The overarching goal of this workshop was to identify a few broad categories of potential physical climate indicators using a set of priorities developed by the NCA, and to provide a clear justification for how they would inform the Nation about climate change. Additional goals included providing input on the overall NCA framework for selecting the indicators and suggesting methodologies to construct indicators. Although one of the workshop goals was to address the status of current observational networks to support indicators, this was not a main focus of any single discussion. However, participants agreed with the NCA indicator vision that high quality data were needed to develop indicators, and generally focused on identifying indicator categories that current observation systems could support. The nearly 60 participants, primarily from Federal agencies, received a white paper in advance of the workshop that detailed the NCA vision for a coordinated suite of climate-related physical, ecological, and societal indicators. The intent of these national indicators of change is to develop a way to evaluate and communicate over time both the rate of change in impacts and the capacity to respond to climate drivers. These indicators will be tracked as a part of ongoing, long-term assessment activities, with adjustments as necessary to adapt to changing conditions and understanding. An initial framework was provided to workshop participants to ensure that everyone understood the audience, scope, and purpose of the indicators. A common lexicon was defined since indicator terminology varies widely. In addition, several potential approaches to grouping or categorizing the indicators were presented. Participants spent most of their time in small breakout groups with facilitators, working to address a

  2. A NASA-NOAA Update on Global Fire Monitoring Capabilities for Studying Fire-Climate Interactions: Focus on Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, G.; Csiszar, I.

    2012-04-01

    The global, long-term effects of fires are not well understood and we are learning more every year about its global impacts and potential feedbacks to climate change. The frequency, intensity, severity, and emissions of fires may be changing as a result of climate warming as has been manifested by the observations in northern Eurasia. The climate-fire interaction may produce important societal and environmental impacts in the long run. NASA and NOAA have been developing long-term fire datasets and improving systems to monitor active fires, study fire severity, fire growth, emissions into the atmosphere, and fire effects on carbon stocks. Almost every year there are regions in the world that experience particularly severe fires. For example, less than two years ago the European part of Russia was the focus of attention due to the anomalous heat and dry wave with record high temperatures that caused wildfires rage for weeks and that led to thousands of deaths. The fires also have spread to agricultural land and damaged crops, causing sharp increases of global wheat commodity prices. Remote sensing observations are widely used to monitor fire occurrence, fire spread; smoke dispersion, and atmospheric pollutant levels. In the context of climate warming and acute interest to large-scale emissions from various land-cover disturbances studying spatial-temporal dynamics of forest fire activity is critical. NASA supports several activities related to fires and the Earth system. These include GOFC-GOLD Fire Project Office at University of Maryland and the Rapid Response System for global fire monitoring. NASA has funded many research projects on biomass burning, which cover various geographic regions of the world and analyze impacts of fires on atmospheric carbon in support of REDD initiative, as well as on atmospheric pollution with smoke. Monitoring active fires, studying their severity and burned areas, and estimating fire-induced atmospheric emissions has been the

  3. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  4. Physical security workshop summary: entry control

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Entry control hardware has been used extensively in the past to assist security forces in separating the authorized from the unauthorized at the plant perimeter. As more attention is being focused on the insider threat, these entry control elements are being used to extend the security inspectors' presence into the plant by compartmentalizing access and monitoring vital components. This paper summarizes the experiences expressed by the participants at the March 16 to 19, 1982 INMM Physical Protection Workshop in utilizing access control and contraband detection hardware for plant wide entry control applications.

  5. Workshop on Agricultural Air Quality: State of the science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneja, Viney P.; Blunden, Jessica; Roelle, Paul A.; Schlesinger, William H.; Knighton, Raymond; Niyogi, Dev; Gilliam, Wendell; Jennings, Greg; Duke, Clifford S.

    The first Workshop on Agricultural Air Quality: State of the Science was held at the Bolger Center in Potomac, Maryland from 4 to 8 June 2006. This international conference assembled approximately 350 people representing 25 nations from 5 continents, with disciplines ranging from atmospheric chemistry to soil science. The workshop was designed as an open forum in which participants could openly exchange the most current knowledge and learn about numerous international perspectives regarding agricultural air quality. Participants represented many stakeholder groups concerned with the growing need to assess agricultural impacts on the atmosphere and to develop beneficial policies to improve air quality. The workshop focused on identifying methods to improve emissions inventories and best management practices for agriculture. Workshop participants also made recommendations for technological and methodological improvements in current emissions measurement and modeling practices. The workshop commenced with a session on agricultural emissions and was followed by international perspectives from the United States, Europe, Australia, India, and South America. This paper summarizes the findings and issues of the workshop and articulates future research needs. These needs were identified in three general areas: (1) improvement of emissions measurement; (2) development of appropriate emission factors; and (3) implementation of best management practices (BMPs) to minimize negative environmental impacts. Improvements in the appropriate measurements will inform decisions regarding US farming practices. A need was demonstrated for a national/international network to monitor atmospheric emissions from agriculture and their subsequent depositions to surrounding areas. Information collected through such a program may be used to assess model performance and could be critical for evaluating any future regulatory policies or BMPs. The workshop concluded that efforts to maximize

  6. Groundwater workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Interstate Conference on Water Policy has released an Executive Report of the 1989 Ground Water Information Management Workshops. The report summarizes workgroup findings and recommendations for action as identified at the four workshops conducted in the winter and spring of 1989 in Little Rock, Ark.; Sacramento, Calif.; Harrisburg, Pa.; and Omaha, Nebr. The workshops, cosponsored by ICWP and the U.S. Geological Survey, attracted over 200 participants from local, state, and federal government, academia, and the private sector.The two primary objectives of the workshop series were to provide participants with information about groundwater data management initiatives at all levels of government, and to elicit information and ideas from participants about improving data management and exchange. The report states that although the individual workshops reflected regional concerns and experiences, collectively they provide a solid foundation for developing a national perspective on groundwater information management needs.

  7. Child Nutrition. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Jacqueline; Eastman, Wayne; Aird, Laura Dutil; McCrea, Nadine L.

    2002-01-01

    Four workshops focus on nutrition for infants and children in child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Nutrition and Child Development: Global Perspectives" (Jacqueline Hayden); (2) "Working with Families around Nutritional Issues" (Wayne Eastman); (3) "Breastfeeding Promotion in Child Care" (Laura Dutil Aird); and (4) "Food as Shared…

  8. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  9. Fluorescent microscope system to monitor real-time interactions between focused ultrasound, echogenic drug delivery vehicles, and live cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Stuart; Benchimol, Michael; Esener, Sadik

    2013-01-01

    Rapid development in the field of ultrasound triggered drug delivery has made it essential to study the real-time interaction between the membranes of live cells and the membranes of echogenic delivery vehicles under exposure to focused ultrasound. The objective of this work was to design an analysis system that combined fluorescent imagining, high speed videography, and definable pulse sequences of focused ultrasound to allow for real time observations of both cell and vehicle membranes. Documenting the behavior of the membranes themselves has not previously been possible due to limitations with existing optical systems used to understand the basic physics of microbubble/ultrasound interaction and the basic interaction between microbubbles and cells. The performance of this new system to monitor membrane behavior was demonstrated by documenting the modes of vehicle fragmentation at different ultrasound intensity levels. At 1.5MPa the membranes were shown to completely fragment while at intensities below 1MPa the membranes pop open and slowly unfold. The interaction between these vehicles and cell membranes was also documented by the removal of fluorescent particles from the surfaces of live cells out to 20μm from the microbubble location. The fluid flow created by microstreaming around ensonated microbubbles was documented at video recording speeds from 60 to 18,000 frames per second. This information about membrane behavior allows the chemical and physical properties of the drug delivery vehicle to be designed along with the ultrasound pulse sequence to cause the most efficient drug delivery. PMID:22749476

  10. NRC Consultation and Monitoring at the Savannah River Site: Focusing Reviews of Two Different Disposal Actions - 12181

    SciTech Connect

    Ridge, A. Christianne; Barr, Cynthia S.; Pinkston, Karen E.; Parks, Leah S.; Grossman, Christopher J.; Alexander, George W.

    2012-07-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for certain non-high level waste determinations. The NDAA also requires NRC to monitor DOE's disposal actions related to those determinations. In Fiscal Year 2011, the NRC staff reviewed DOE performance assessments for tank closure at the F-Tank Farm (FTF) Facility and salt waste disposal at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of consultation and monitoring, respectively. Differences in inventories, waste forms, and key barriers led to different areas of focus in the NRC reviews of these two activities at the SRS. Because of the key role of chemically reducing grouts in both applications, the evaluation of chemical barriers was significant to both reviews. However, radionuclide solubility in precipitated metal oxides is expected to play a significant role in FTF performance whereas release of several key radionuclides from the SDF is controlled by sorption or precipitation within the cementitious wasteform itself. Similarly, both reviews included an evaluation of physical barriers to flow, but differences in the physical configurations of the waste led to differences in the reviews. For example, NRC's review of the FTF focused on the modeled degradation of carbon steel tank liners while the staff's review of the SDF performance included a detailed evaluation of the physical degradation of the saltstone wasteform and infiltration-limiting closure cap. Because of the long time periods considered (i.e., tens of thousands of years), the NRC reviews of both facilities included detailed evaluation of the engineered chemical and physical barriers. The NRC staff reviews of residual waste disposal in the FTF and salt waste disposal in the SDF focused on physical barriers to flow and chemical barriers to radionuclide release from

  11. The Shuttle Environment Workshop, executive summary and workshop procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmann, J.; Tanner, S. G. (Editor); Wilkerson, T. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    One of the main experimental monitors used to determine the environment in the payload bay was the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor. This package of instruments has made environmental measurements during STS flights with a high degree of success. This has shown that the shuttle environment is relatively free of contaminants, except for special instances of increased abundance of methane, water vapor and particulates. Results of these measurements are rapidly becoming more available. In establishing the Shuttle Environment Workshop, the findings were shared with scientific experimenters, users and other individuals who need to know what the Shuttle is like and what experimenters may expect in the payload bay. The Workshop was centered around results obtained from the environmental measurements made on the Shuttle. The program agenda for the workshop is given. The procedures and flow of communications for the workshop are indicated.

  12. Future developments in modelling and monitoring of volcanic ash clouds: outcomes from the first IAVCEI-WMO workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadonna, Costanza; Folch, Arnau; Loughlin, Susan; Puempel, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the serious consequences of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption (Iceland) on civil aviation, 52 volcanologists, meteorologists, atmospheric dispersion modellers and space and ground-based monitoring specialists from 12 different countries (including representatives from 6 Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres and related institutions) gathered to discuss the needs of the ash dispersal modelling community, investigate new data-acquisition strategies (i.e. quantitative measurements and observations) and discuss how to improve communication between the research community and institutions with an operational mandate. Based on a dedicated benchmark exercise and on 3 days of in-depth discussion, recommendations have been made for future model improvements, new strategies of ash cloud forecasting, multidisciplinary data acquisition and more efficient communication between different communities. Issues addressed in the workshop include ash dispersal modelling, uncertainty, ensemble forecasting, combining dispersal models and observations, sensitivity analysis, model variability, data acquisition, pre-eruption forecasting, first simulation and data assimilation, research priorities and new communication strategies to improve information flow and operational routines. As a main conclusion, model developers, meteorologists, volcanologists and stakeholders need to work closely together to develop new and improved strategies for ash dispersal forecasting and, in particular, to: (1) improve the definition of the source term, (2) design models and forecasting strategies that can better characterize uncertainties, (3) explore and identify the best ensemble strategies that can be adapted to ash dispersal forecasting, (4) identify optimized strategies for the combination of models and observations and (5) implement new critical operational strategies.

  13. Workshop Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-04-01

    19 Workshops were held during IAU S285. 15 submitted reports of the discussions that took place, while for the remaining 4 we have reproduced the summaries that were available on our wiki prior to the Symposium.

  14. The QED Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  15. Displacement analysis of diagnostic ultrasound backscatter: a methodology for characterizing, modeling, and monitoring high intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Gavriel; Kaczkowski, Peter J; Brayman, Andrew A; Crum, Lawrence A

    2010-07-01

    Accurate monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is critical for widespread clinical use. Pulse-echo diagnostic ultrasound (DU) is known to exhibit temperature sensitivity through relative changes in time-of-flight between two sets of radio frequency (RF) backscatter measurements, one acquired before and one after therapy. These relative displacements, combined with knowledge of the exposure protocol, material properties, heat transfer, and measurement noise statistics, provide a natural framework for estimating the administered heating, and thereby therapy. The proposed method, termed displacement analysis, identifies the relative displacements using linearly independent displacement patterns, or modes, each induced by a particular time-varying heating applied during the exposure interval. These heating modes are themselves linearly independent. This relationship implies that a linear combination of displacement modes aligning the DU measurements is the response to an identical linear combination of heating modes, providing the heating estimate. Furthermore, the accuracy of coefficient estimates in this approximation is determined a priori, characterizing heating, thermal dose, and temperature estimates for any given protocol. Predicted performance is validated using simulations and experiments in alginate gel phantoms. Evidence for a spatially distributed interaction between temperature and time-of-flight changes is presented. PMID:20649206

  16. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Professional Development Workshop Series: Example of an Excellent Mechanism of Scientific Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.; Hsu, B. C.; Bleacher, L.; Millham, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Institute for Educators pilot workshop was held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD in July of 2010. At this workshop, educators of grades 6-12 learned about lunar science, exploration, and how our understanding of the Moon has changed since the Apollo missions. The workshop exposed teachers to science results from recent lunar missions, particularly LRO, through presentations and discussions with lunar scientists. It allowed them to explore real LRO data, participate in hands-on lunar science activities, and learn how to incorporate these data and activities into their classrooms. Other workshop activities focused on mitigating student, and teacher, misconceptions about the Moon. As a result of the workshop, educators reported feeling a renewed excitement about the Moon, and more confidence in teaching lunar science to their students. Quarterly follow-up professional development sessions will monitor the progress of the workshop participants throughout the year, and provide additional support to the teachers, as needed. Evaluations from the 2010 pilot program are being used to improve LRO workshops as they expand contextually and geographically in the coming years. Ten workshops will be held across the United States in 2011 and 2012. Areas that have been underserved, with respect to NASA workshops, will be specifically targeted. Educator professional development workshops such as this one are an excellent mechanism for scientists to disseminate the latest discoveries from their missions and research to educators across the country and to get real data in the hands of students, further strengthening the students’ interest and understanding of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) content and careers. Making a model: educators construct topographic maps of Play-Doh volcanoes.

  17. Workshop introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  18. MRI Monitoring of Tumor-Selective Anticancer Drug Delivery with Stable Thermosensitive Liposomes Triggered by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ryoung; You, Dong Gil; Park, Sang-Jun; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Um, Wooram; Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Young-Sun

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring of drug release from a heat-activated liposome carrier provides an opportunity for real-time control of drug delivery and allows prediction of the therapeutic effect. We have developed short-chain elastin-like polypeptide-incorporating thermosensitive liposomes (STLs). Here, we report the development of STL encapsulating gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA), a MRI contrast agent, and doxorubicin (Dox) (Gd-Dox-STL). The Dox release profile from Gd-Dox-STL was comparable to Gd-Dox-LTSL; however, the serum stability of Gd-Dox-STL was much higher than Gd-Dox-LTSL. MRI studies showed that the difference in T1 relaxation time between 37 and 42 °C for Gd-Dox-STL was larger than the difference for Gd-Dox-LTSL. Although relaxivity for both liposomes at 42 °C was similar, the relaxivity of Gd-Dox-STL at 37 °C was 2.5-fold lower than that of Gd-Dox-LTSL. This was likely due to Gd-BOPTA leakage from the LTSL because of low stability at 37 °C. Pharmacokinetic studies showed plasma half-lives of 4.85 and 1.95 h for Gd-Dox-STL and Gd-Dox-LTSL, respectively, consistent with in vitro stability data. In vivo MRI experiments demonstrated corelease of Dox and Gd-BOPTA from STL under mild hyperthermia induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which suggests STL is a promising tumor selective formulation when coupled with MR-guided HIFU. PMID:26998616

  19. Real-time monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal therapy using the manifold learning method.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Sobhebidari, Pooya; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-12-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) induces thermal lesions by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. The main ultrasound imaging techniques currently used to monitor HIFU treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation and elastography-based methods. The present study was carried out on ex vivo animal tissue samples, in which backscattered radiofrequency (RF) signals were acquired in real time at time instances before, during and after HIFU treatment. The manifold learning algorithm, a non-linear dimensionality reduction method, was applied to RF signals whichconstruct B-mode images to detect the HIFU-induced changes among the image frames obtained during HIFU treatment. In this approach, the embedded non-linear information in the region of interest of sequential images is represented in a 2-D manifold with the Isomap algorithm, and each image is depicted as a point on the reconstructed manifold. Four distinct regions are chosen in the manifold corresponding to the four phases of HIFU treatment (before HIFU treatment, during HIFU treatment, immediately after HIFU treatment and 10-min after HIFU treatment). It was found that disorganization of the points is achieved by increasing the acoustic power, and if the thermal lesion has been formed, the regions of points related to pre- and post-HIFU significantly differ. Moreover, the manifold embedding was repeated on 2-D moving windows in RF data envelopes related to pre- and post-HIFU exposure data frames. It was concluded that if mean values of the points related to pre- and post-exposure frames in the reconstructed manifold are estimated, and if the Euclidean distance between these two mean values is calculated and the sliding window is moved and this procedure is repeated for the whole image, a new image based on the Euclidean distance can be formed in which the HIFU thermal lesion is detectable. PMID:25438863

  20. Magnetoencephalographic alpha band connectivity reveals differential default mode network interactions during focused attention and open monitoring meditation

    PubMed Central

    Marzetti, Laura; Di Lanzo, Claudia; Zappasodi, Filippo; Chella, Federico; Raffone, Antonino; Pizzella, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    According to several conceptualizations of meditation, the interplay between brain systems associated to self-related processing, attention and executive control is crucial for meditative states and related traits. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate such interplay in a highly selected group of “virtuoso” meditators (Theravada Buddhist monks), with long-term training in the two main meditation styles: focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) meditation. Specifically, we investigated the differences between FA meditation, OM meditation and resting state in the coupling between the posterior cingulate cortex, core node of the Default Mode Network (DMN) implicated in mind wandering and self-related processing, and the whole brain, with a recently developed phase coherence approach. Our findings showed a state dependent coupling of posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to nodes of the DMN and of the executive control brain network in the alpha frequency band (8–12 Hz), related to different attentional and cognitive control processes in FA and OM meditation, consistently with the putative role of alpha band synchronization in the functional mechanisms for attention and consciousness. The coupling of PCC with left medial prefrontal cortex (lmPFC) and superior frontal gyrus characterized the contrast between the two meditation styles in a way that correlated with meditation expertise. These correlations may be related to a higher mindful observing ability and a reduced identification with ongoing mental activity in more expert meditators. Notably, different styles of meditation and different meditation expertise appeared to modulate the dynamic balance between fronto-parietal (FP) and DMN networks. Our results support the idea that the interplay between the DMN and the FP network in the alpha band is crucial for the transition from resting state to different meditative states. PMID:25360102

  1. Focus Curriculum Manual; A Focus Dissemination Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resource Associates, Inc., Hastings, Minn.

    This training manual is for use in preparing staff members to use the Focus Model, which is a "school within a school" for disaffected high school students. The material is designed to be used as a resource aid following participation in an in-service workshop. Information is presented to help implement a contracting system to establish and…

  2. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  3. Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Vitko, J. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    The Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) Workshop concentrated on reviewing and refining the science experiments planned for the UAV Demonstration Flights (UDF) scheduled at the Oklahoma Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) in April 1994. These experiments were focused around the following sets of parameters: Clear sky, daylight; Clear-sky, night-to-day transition; Clear sky - improve/validate the accuracy of radiative fluxes derived from satellite-based measurements; Daylight, clouds of opportunity; and, Daylight, broken clouds.

  4. Winter Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Outdoor Educators of Quebec, Montreal.

    Materials on 11 topics presented at a winter workshop for Quebec outdoor educators have been compiled into this booklet. Action story, instant replay, shoe factory, sound and action, and find an object to fit the description are described and recommended as group dynamic activities. Directions for five games (Superlative Selection; Data…

  5. Workshop Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackoway, Marlin K.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes workshop discussions on adolescent prejudice; making the most of the media in improving school attendance; services available to children--treatment centers; truancy in Ontario; and discipline. Presented at the 64th annual conference of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, St. Louis, Missouri, 1978. (Author/LPG)

  6. Women's Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karelius, Karen

    The Women's Workshop Notebook is the tool used in the nine-week course designed for the mature woman returning to school at Antelope Valley College. The notebook exercises along with the group interaction and instruction stress the importance of personal assessment of strengths, weaknesses, dreams, deliberations and life history in…

  7. Teacher workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

  8. Wordland Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlish, Harvey Neil

    Can and should the preschool child learn to read? To answer this and related questions, a study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a television program and parental home assistance in teaching reading skills to three-year-old children. For five days a week over a 39-week period, an experimental group watched "Wordland Workshop," a…

  9. Rangeland and pasture monitoring: An approach to interpretation of high-resolution imagery focused on observer calibration for repeatability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collection of standardized assessment and monitoring data is critically important for supporting policy and management at local to continental scales. Remote sensing techniques, including image interpretation, have shown promise for collecting plant community composition and ground cover data effic...

  10. Early Career Workshop Focuses on Leadership Qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meth, Charna; Schuffert, Jeff

    2009-08-01

    Marine Geoscience Leadership Symposium; Washington, D. C., 23-27 March 2009; Earth and marine geoscientists are crossing the boundaries between traditional scientific disciplines, pushing the frontiers of scientific research, and addressing the needs of society. As it becomes increasingly important for scientists to form interdisciplinary collaborations and communicate their science to the public and policy makers, early career scientists are seeking insight into the nontraditional skills needed today to achieve a successful career. With funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), the Consortium for Ocean Leadership organized the first Marine Geoscience Leadership Symposium to provide leadership training to early career scientists. Through meetings with more than 40 leaders from the academic, policy, and education communities, the symposium exposed the 25 participants to leadership qualities intended to help them navigate the laboratory and beyond. The discussions and activities covered the tangible and intangible aspects of building a career, such as proposal writing, research funding, building interdisciplinary collaborations, and communicating to nonacademic audiences.

  11. Fiscal Officer Training Workshop Trainee Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This manual provides instructional information for conducting a 2-day workshop aimed at training fiscal officers concerning their role in administering Title IV student financial aid. The workshop focuses on essential procedures, requirements, and responsibilities for proper fiscal officer administration of Title IV programs; and offers guidance…

  12. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Abdominal Tumor Detection and High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Monitoring: A Feasibility Study in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y.; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiation force-based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess relative tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radiofrequency signals using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated with a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  13. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  14. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 2a (Sterilization)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Brunch, Carl W. (Editor); Setlow, Richard B. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Studies Board of the National Research Council provided a series of recommendations to NASA on planetary protection requirements for future Mars sample return missions. One of the Board's key findings suggested, although current evidence of the martian surface suggests that life as we know it would not tolerate the planet's harsh environment, there remain 'plausible scenarios for extant microbial life on Mars.' Based on this conclusion, all samples returned from Mars should be considered potentially hazardous until it has been demonstrated that they are not. In response to the National Research Council's findings and recommendations, NASA has undertaken a series of workshops to address issues regarding NASA's proposed sample return missions. Work was previously undertaken at the Mars Sample Handling and Protocol Workshop 1 (March 2000) to formulate recommendations on effective methods for life detection and/or biohazard testing on returned samples. The NASA Planetary Protection Officer convened the Mars Sample Sterilization Workshop, the third in the Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series, on November 28-30, 2000 at the Holiday Inn Rosslyn Westpark, Arlington, Virginia. Because of the short timeframe between this Workshop and the second Workshop in the Series, which was convened in October 2000 in Bethesda, Maryland, they were developed in parallel, so the Sterilization Workshop and its report have therefore been designated as '2a'). The focus of Workshop 2a was to make recommendations for effective sterilization procedures for all phases of Mars sample return missions, and to answer the question of whether we can sterilize samples in such a way that the geological characteristics of the samples are not significantly altered.

  15. Focus on Efficient Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Office of Resource Management.

    Compiled as a workshop handbook, this guide presents information to help food service program administrators comply with federal regulations and evaluate and upgrade their operations. Part I discusses requirements of the National School Lunch Program, focusing on the "offer versus serve" method of service enacted in 1976 to reduce waste. After an…

  16. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermann, Laura B.; Clark, Blythe G.; Colbert, Rachel S.; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Gupta, Vipin P.; Hibbs, Michael R.; Perkins, David Nikolaus; West, Roger Derek

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  17. Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) Vegetation Volume Index: An assessment tool for marsh habitat focused on the three-dimensional structure at CRMS vegetation monitoring stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, William B.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; Hundy, Laura C.; McGinnis, Tommy E.

    2015-01-01

    The VV and VVI will be used to establish trends, to make comparisons, and to evaluate restoration projects. Assessments that rely on the VVI will be included in appropriate Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) project reports and analyses. Implementation of the VVI will give coastal managers a new tool to design, implement, and monitor coastal restoration projects. A yearly trajectory of site, project, basin, and coastwide VVI will be posted on the CRMS Web site as data are collected. The primary purpose of the tool is to assess CWPPRA restoration project effectiveness, but it will also be useful in identifying areas in need of restoration and in coastwide vegetation assessments.

  18. Incorporating Bioenergy in Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop Two: Agricultural Landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M. Cristina; Ssegane, H.

    2015-08-01

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted two workshops on Incorporating Bioenergy in Sustainable Landscape Designs with Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories in 2014. The second workshop focused on agricultural landscapes and took place in Argonne, IL from June 24—26, 2014. The workshop brought together experts to discuss how landscape design can contribute to the deployment and assessment of sustainable bioenergy. This report summarizes the discussions that occurred at this particular workshop.

  19. Monitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for selecting a monitor to suit specific applications, explains the process by which graphics images are produced on a CRT monitor, and describes four types of flat-panel displays being used in the newest lap-sized portable computers. A comparison chart provides prices and specifications for over 80 monitors. (MBR)

  20. Multi-temporal InSAR monitoring of landslides in a tropical urban environment: focus on Bukavu (DR Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Adriano; Monsieurs, Elise; Dewitte, Olivier; d'Oreyes, Nicolas; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The western branch of the East African Rift System, in Central Africa, is characterized by the presence of several geohazards: earthquakes, volcanoes, and landslides. Every year, landslides cause fatalities, structural and functional damage to infrastructure and private properties with serious disruptions of the organization of societies and severe impact on the populations. These impacts are particularly important in the city of Bukavu (DR Congo) located within the Rift, on the southern shore of Lake Kivu. Large slow-moving landslides continuously affect highly populated slopes in the city. However little is known about their actual kinematics and the processes at play. Here we use multi-temporal InSAR technique to monitor these ground deformations. Using 50 Cosmo-SkyMed SAR images, acquired between March - October 2015 with a revisiting time of 8 days (ascending and descending orbits), we produce displacement-rate maps and ground deformation time series using the PS technique. Movements with a velocity >5cm/yr are detected, which is consistent with field observations. DGPS measurements, taken at 21 benchmarks in the area during the same period, allow validating the results. Similar ground deformation rates are found for the period 2002-2008 using Envisat ASAR images. Furthermore, comparison with rainfall monitoring data acquire on site should help us to understand the influence of water and the tropical seasonality in the slide mechanisms.

  1. June 2007 gasification technologies workshop papers

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    Topics covered in this workshop are fundamentals of gasification, carbon capture and sequestration, reviews of financial and regulatory incentives, co-production, and focus on gasification in the Western US.

  2. Space Weather Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop will focus on what space weather is about and its impact on society. An overall picture will be "painted" describing the Sun's influence through the solar wind on the near-Earth space environment, including the aurora, killer electrons at geosynchronous orbit, million ampere electric currents through the ionosphere and along magnetic field lines, and the generation of giga-Watts of natural radio waves. Reference material in the form of Internet sites will be provided so that teachers can discuss space weather in the classroom and enable students to learn more about this topic.

  3. CENDI Indexing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The CENDI Indexing Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided indexing, indexing quality, an indexing pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information indexing activities, high-tech coding structures, category indexing schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.

  4. Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science and Management Workshop Proceedings, May 12-14, 2009, Laramie, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hosted the second Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) Science and Management Workshop at the University of Wyoming Conference Center and Hilton Garden Inn on May 12, 13, and 14, 2009, in Laramie, Wyo. The workshop focused on six topics seen as relevant to ongoing WLCI science and management activities: mapping and modeling resources for decisionmaking; data information and management; fish and wildlife research; changing landscapes; monitoring; and reclamation and offsite mitigation. Panelists gave presentations on ongoing research in these six areas during plenary sessions followed by audience discussions. Three breakout groups focused on discussing wildlife, reclamation, and monitoring. Throughout the plenary sessions, audience discussions, and breakout groups, several needs were repeatedly emphasized by panelists and workshop participants: developing a conservation plan and identifying priority areas and species for conservation actions; gaining a deeper understanding of sagebrush ecology; identifying thresholds for wildlife that can be used to create an 'early warning system' for managers; continuing to collect basic data across the landscape; facilitating even greater communication and partnership across agencies and between scientists and land managers; and engaging proactively in understanding new changes on the landscape such as wind energy development and climate change. Detailed proceedings from the workshop are captured and summarized in this report.

  5. Curriculum Experts Workshop on the Training of Curriculum Specialists (Bangkok, Thailand, October 19-25, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand).

    This document describes the objectives and focus of a workshop convened by UNESCO in 1982 to design and develop frameworks for training national curriculum specialists, and presents three "workshop products," i.e., reports on policy resulting from the workshop. Part one outlines purpose of the workshop and lists the participants from eight…

  6. Focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative parathormone monitoring: The value of PTH assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration washout

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Fatih; Arpaci, Dilek; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz; Emre, Ali Ugur; Elri, Tarik; Ilikhan, Sevil Uygun; Bahadir, Burak; Bayraktaoglu, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate identification of hyperfunctioning parathyroid (HP) gland is the only issue for definitive surgical treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Various imaging and operative techniques have been proposed to confirm the localization of the diseased gland. Nevertheless, none of these methods proved to be the gold standard. The presented study aimed to assess the value of parathyroid hormone assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA)-PTH washout fluid to verify the correct localisation for focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative PTH monitoring. Material and Methods The retrospective analysis of 57 patients with pHPT who underwent FNA-PTH was conducted from a prospective database. Biochemical assessment together with radiological (ultrasonography) and nuclear (MIBI scan) imaging was reviewed. Associations between FNA-PTH washout values and localization technics were evaluated and compared in terms of operative findings. Results Focused parathyroidectomy without intraoperative PTH monitoring was performed to 45 patients with high FNA-PTH values. The median largest diameter of the target parathyroid lesion identified by ultrasonography was 13 mm (range, 6 to 36). The median serum PTH level was 190 pg/mL (range, 78 to 1709; reference range, 15 to 65) whereas the median washout PTH was 2500 pg/mL (range, 480 to 3389). According to operative findings high FNA-PTH levels correctly identified parathyroid adenoma in 40 cases (89% of sensitivity and 100% of specificity and positive predictive value) whereas MIBI scan localized the lesion in 36 of these cases (80% of sensitivity). Conclusions The higher level of PTH in preoperative ultrasound guided FNA washout is a considerable data to predict the correct localization of HP, particularly in circumstances of greater values than the serum PTH level. However, although its specificity is high, in cases of coexisting nodular thyroid disease, associated additional HP

  7. Vocational Staff Workshops Project (and) Celebrate Great Counseling [Workshop] Addendum. Project Number: 88-0484.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    Workshops and related staff development activities designed for vocational education instructors, administrators, career counselors, and support services staff are described in this two-part report. Part I focuses on the Vocational Staff Workshops (VSW) project, indicating that its key objectives were to identify regional in-service training…

  8. Session: Monitoring wind turbine project sites for avian impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01

    This third session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the session was on existing wind projects that are monitored for their impacts on birds and bats. The presentation given was titled ''Bird and Bat Fatality Monitoring Methods'' by Wally Erickson, West, Inc. Sections included protocol development and review, methodology, adjusting for scavenging rates, and adjusting for observer detection bias.

  9. Sparse matrix beamforming and image reconstruction for real-time 2D HIFU monitoring using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) with in vitro validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Provost, Jean; Grondin, Julien; Wang, Shutao; Marquet, Fabrice; Bunting, Ethan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method. HMIFU utilizes an Amplitude-Modulated (fAM = 25 Hz) HIFU beam to induce a localized focal oscillatory motion, which is simultaneously estimated and imaged by confocally-aligned imaging transducer. HMIFU feasibilities have been previously shown in silico, in vitro, and in vivo in 1-D or 2-D monitoring of HIFU treatment. The objective of this study is to develop and show the feasibility of a novel fast beamforming algorithm for image reconstruction using GPU-based sparse-matrix operation with real-time feedback. In this study, the algorithm was implemented onto a fully integrated, clinically relevant HMIFU system composed of a 93-element HIFU transducer (fcenter = 4.5MHz) and coaxially-aligned 64-element phased array (fcenter = 2.5MHz) for displacement excitation and motion estimation, respectively. A single transmit beam with divergent beam transmit was used while fast beamforming was implemented using a GPU-based delay-and-sum method and a sparse-matrix operation. Axial HMI displacements were then estimated from the RF signals using a 1-D normalized cross-correlation method and streamed to a graphic user interface. The present work developed and implemented a sparse matrix beamforming onto a fully-integrated, clinically relevant system, which can stream displacement images up to 15 Hz using a GPU-based processing, an increase of 100 fold in rate of streaming displacement images compared to conventional CPU-based conventional beamforming and reconstruction processing. The achieved feedback rate is also currently the fastest and only approach that does not require interrupting the HIFU treatment amongst the acoustic radiation force based HIFU imaging techniques. Results in phantom experiments showed reproducible displacement imaging, and monitoring of twenty two in vitro HIFU treatments using the new 2D system showed a

  10. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  11. Workshop on geophysical grain flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, Daniel M.

    “Geophysical Grain Flows: Fluid-Grain Interactions in Coastal Sand Transport” was the focus of a workshop held from March 10 to 14 on Amelia Island, Fla. The workshop was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the University of Florida. Approximately thirty-five participants from ten different countries attended, representing universities, government laboratories, and private companies. During the workshop, one of the largest and strongest storms in the recorded history of North America impacted the eastern half of the United States. The local response of the beach at Amelia Island to this storm was striking and somewhat surprising. There was substantial accretion and widening of the beach. While the morphological changes in the beach profile were of medium to large scale, it is intriguing to realize that the changes resulted from the integrated motion of an uncountable number of sand grains, each moving more or less independently, yet cumulatively producing a wider beach.

  12. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, Bill

    1999-03-15

    On March 15, 1999, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory hosted a workshop focused on energy efficiency in Cleanroom facilities. The workshop was held as part of a multiyear effort sponsored by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency, and the California Energy Commission. It is part of a project that concentrates on improving energy efficiency in Laboratory type facilities including cleanrooms. The project targets the broad market of laboratory and cleanroom facilities, and thus cross-cuts many different industries and institutions. This workshop was intended to raise awareness by sharing case study success stories, providing a forum for industry networking on energy issues, contributing LBNL expertise in research to date, determining barriers to implementation and possible solutions, and soliciting input for further research.

  13. Transition from Consultation to Monitoring-NRC's Increasingly Focused Review of Factors Important to F-Area Tank Farm Facility Performance - 13153

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Cynthia; Grossman, Christopher; Alexander, George; Parks, Leah; Fuhrmann, Mark; Shaffner, James; McKenney, Christepher; Pabalan, Roberto; Pickett, David; Dinwiddie, Cynthia

    2013-07-01

    In consultation with the NRC, DOE issued a waste determination for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) facility in March 2012. The FTF consists of 22 underground tanks, each 2.8 to 4.9 million liters in capacity, used to store liquid high-level waste generated as a result of spent fuel reprocessing. The waste determination concluded stabilized waste residuals and associated tanks and auxiliary components at the time of closure are not high-level and can be disposed of as LLW. Prior to issuance of the final waste determination, during the consultation phase, NRC staff reviewed and provided comments on DOE's revision 0 and revision 1 FTF PAs that supported the waste determination and produced a technical evaluation report documenting the results of its multi-year review in October 2011. Following issuance of the waste determination, NRC began to monitor DOE disposal actions to assess compliance with the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C. To facilitate its monitoring responsibilities, NRC developed a plan to monitor DOE disposal actions. NRC staff was challenged in developing a focused monitoring plan to ensure limited resources are spent in the most cost-effective manner practical. To address this challenge, NRC prioritized monitoring areas and factors in terms of risk significance and timing. This prioritization was informed by NRC staff's review of DOE's PA documentation, independent probabilistic modeling conducted by NRC staff, and NRC-sponsored research conducted by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses in San Antonio, TX. (authors)

  14. Pathway-focused bioassays and transcriptome analysis contribute to a better activity monitoring of complex herbal remedies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcriptome analysis in combination with pathway-focused bioassays is suggested to be a helpful approach for gaining deeper insights into the complex mechanisms of action of herbal multicomponent preparations in living cells. The polyherbalism based concept of Tibetan and Ayurvedic medicine considers therapeutic efficacy through multi-target effects. A polyherbal Indo-Tibetan preparation, Padma 28, approved by the Swiss drug authorities (Swissmedic Nr. 58436), was applied to a more detailed dissection of mechanism of action in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Cell-free and cell-based assays were employed to evaluate the antioxidant capacity. Genome-wide expression profiling was done by applying Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Affymetrix arrays. Pathway- and network-oriented analysis elucidated the affected biological processes. The results were validated using reporter gene assays and quantitative real-time PCR. Results To reveal the direct radical scavenging effects of the ethanolic extract of the Indo-Tibetan polyherbal remedy Padma 28, an in vitro oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC) was employed, which resulted in a peroxyl-radical scavenging activity of 2006 ± 235 μmol TE/g. Furthermore, the antioxidant capacity of Padma 28 was analysed in living HepG2 cells, by measuring its scavenging potential against radical induced ROS. This formulation showed a considerable antioxidant capacity by significantly reducing ROS levels in a dose-dependent manner. Integrated transcriptome analysis revealed a major influence on phase I and phase II detoxification and the oxidative stress response. Selected target genes, such as heme oxygenase 1, were validated in qPCR experiments. Network analysis showed 18 interrelated networks involved in important biological functions such as drug and bio-molecule metabolism, molecular transport and cellular communication. Some molecules are part of signaling cascades that are active during development and morphogenesis or

  15. Highlights from the Air Sensors 2014 Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hosted its fourth next-generation air monitoring workshop to discuss the current state of the science in air sensor technologies and their applications for environmental monitoring, Air Sensors 2014: A New Frontier. Th...

  16. Geoscientific Applications of Particle Detection and Imaging Techniques withSpecial Focus on the Monitoring Clay Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, Laurence N.; Grathoff, Georg H.

    The combined use of focused X-ray, electron, and ion beams offers a diverse range of analytical capabilities for characterizing nanoscale mineral reactions that occur in hydrous environments. Improved image and microanalytical techniques (e.g., electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), in combination with controlled sample environments, are currently leading to new advances in the understanding of fluid-mineral reactions in the Earth Sciences. One group of minerals playing a key role in the containment of radioactive waste and the underground storage of CO2 is the clay minerals: these small, expandable, and highly adsorbent hydrous phyllosilicates form important low-permeable geological barriers by which waste can be safely deposited. In this article we summarize some of the state-of-the-art particle and imaging techniques employed to predict the behavior of both engineered and natural clay mineral seals in proposed storage sites. Particular attention is given to two types of low-permeability geomaterials: engineered bentonite backfill and natural shale in the subsurface. These materials have contrasting swelling properties and degrees of chemical stability that require detailed analytical study for developing suitable disposal or storage solutions.

  17. College Astronomy Teaching Excellence Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.; Bennett, M.; Greene, W. M.; Pompea, S.; Prather, E. E.

    2003-12-01

    As part of the education and public outreach efforts of the NASA JPL Navigator, SIRTF Mission and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, astronomy educators affiliated with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona are conducting a series of two- and three-day teaching excellence workshops for college faculty. These workshops are being held in conjunction with professional society meetings, such as the American Astronomical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, and through the infrastructure of the National Science Foundation's Summer Chautauqua Workshop program. This three-day, interactive teaching excellence workshop focuses on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses and construct effective course syllabi reflecting the ASTRO 101 goals publicized by the AAS. To improve instruction, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. Texts provided at the workshop are: (i) Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching, Slater and Adams, Prentice Hall, 2002; (ii) Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy, Pompea, Brooks Cole, 2000; and (iii) Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, Adams, Prather, & Slater, Prentice Hall, 2002.

  18. Workshop on Atmospheric Transport on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. R. (Editor); Haberle, R. M. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    On June 28-30, 1993, the Workshop on Atmospheric Transport on Mars was held in Corvallis, Oregon. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the MSATT (Mars Surface and Atmosphere Through Time) Program of NASA, and was jointly sponsored by the Lunar and Planetary Institute, Oregon State University, and the Oregon Space Grant Consortium. More than 50 scientists attended the workshop, which was the first such meeting to focus upon circulation processes in the Mars atmosphere. The timing of the workshop placed it almost on the eve of the arrival of Mars Observer at Mars, so that the presented papers gave a picture of the 'state of the art' in Mars atmospheric science just prior to the expected arrival of new data. The workshop highlighted a host of recent advances in atmospheric modeling and analysis - advances that will be relevant to any future observations.

  19. Determination of epileptic focus side in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using long-term noninvasive fNIRS/EEG monitoring for presurgical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizki, Edmi Edison; Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Yokota, Hidenori; Oguro, Keiji; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Noninvasive localization of an epileptogenic zone is a fundamental step for presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients. Here, we applied long-term simultaneous functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)/electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring for focus diagnosis in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Six MTLE patients underwent long-term (8–16 h per day for 4 days) fNIRS/EEG monitoring for the occurrence of spontaneous seizures. Four spontaneous seizures were successfully recorded out of the six patients. To determine oxy-Hb amplitude, the period-average values of oxy-Hb across 20 s from the EEG- or clinically defined epileptic onset were calculated for both hemispheres from the simultaneously recorded fNIRS data. The average oxy-Hb values for the temporal lobe at the earlier EEG- or clinically defined epileptic onsets were greater for the epileptic side than for the contralateral side after EEG activity suppression, spike train, and clinical seizure in all four cases. The true laterality was determined based on the relief of seizures by selective amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Thus, oxy-Hb amplitude could be a reliable measure for determining the epileptic focus side. Long-term simultaneous fNIRS/EEG measurement serves as an effective tool for recording spontaneous seizures. Cerebral hemodynamic measurement by fNIRS would serve as a valuable supplementary noninvasive measurement method for presurgical evaluation of MTLE. PMID:26158007

  20. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  1. A modeling-based assessment of acousto-optic sensing for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew Tyler

    Real-time acousto-optic (AO) sensing---a dual-wave modality that combines ultrasound with diffuse light to probe the optical properties of turbid media---has been demonstrated to non-invasively detect changes in ex vivo tissue optical properties during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. The AO signal indicates the onset of lesion formation and predicts resulting lesion volumes. Although proof-of-concept experiments have been successful, many of the underlying parameters and mechanisms affecting thermally induced optical property changes and the AO detectability of HIFU lesion formation are not well understood. In thesis, a numerical simulation was developed to model the AO sensing process and capture the relevant acoustic, thermal, and optical transport processes. The simulation required data that described how optical properties changed with heating. Experiments were carried out where excised chicken breast was exposed to thermal bath heating and changes in the optical absorption and scattering spectra (500 nm--1100 nm) were measured using a scanning spectrophotometer and an integrating sphere assembly. Results showed that the standard thermal dose model currently used for guiding HIFU treatments needs to be adjusted to describe thermally induced optical property changes. To model the entire AO process, coupled models were used for ultrasound propagation, tissue heating, and diffusive light transport. The angular spectrum method was used to model the acoustic field from the HIFU source. Spatial-temporal temperature elevations induced by the absorption of ultrasound were modeled using a finite-difference time-domain solution to the Pennes bioheat equation. The thermal dose model was then used to determine optical properties based on the temperature history. The diffuse optical field in the tissue was then calculated using a GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm, which accounted for light-sound interactions and AO signal detection. The simulation was

  2. Planetary protection and humans missions to Mars: summary results from two workshops sponsored by NASA and NASA/ESA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Race, M. S.; Kminek, G.; Rummel, J. D.; Nasa; Nasa/Esa Workshop Participants

    Planetary Protection PP requirements will strongly influence mission and spacecraft designs for future human missions to Mars particularly those related to the operation of advanced life support systems ALS extravehicular activities EVA laboratory and in situ sampling operations and systems for environmental monitoring and control EMC In order to initiate communication understanding and working relations between the ALS EVA EMC and PP communities in both NASA and ESA two separate workshops were held to focus on mission-specific PP issues during future human missions to Mars The NASA Life Support and Habitation and Planetary Protection Workshop was held in Houston TX Center for Advanced Space Studies April 2005 and The Mars PP and Human Systems Research and Technology Joint NASA ESA Workshop was held at ESA ESTEC Noordwijk Netherlands May 2005 This poster presentation summarizes the findings of both workshops and their associated recommendations which are summarized as follows The NASA workshop developed a tentative conceptual approach consistent with current PP requirements to provide preliminary guidance in the assessment of EVA ALS EMC and other aspects of human missions The workshop report identified the need for development of a comprehensive classification and zoning system for Mars to minimize contamination and guide operations particularly in relation to COSPAR Special Region and protection of science and environmental conditions Critical research and technology

  3. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Race Margaret S. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Rummel, John D. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for missions to Mars that will involve the return of samples to Earth, it will be necessary to prepare for the receiving, handling, testing, distributing, and archiving of martian materials here on Earth. Previous groups and committees have studied selected aspects of sample return activities, but specific detailed protocols for the handling and testing of returned samples must still be developed. To further refine the requirements for sample hazard testing and to develop the criteria for subsequent release of sample materials from quarantine, the NASA Planetary Protection Officer convened a series of workshops in 2000-2001. The overall objective of the Workshop Series was to produce a Draft Protocol by which returned martian sample materials can be assessed for biological hazards and examined for evidence of life (extant or extinct) while safeguarding the purity of the samples from possible terrestrial contamination. This report also provides a record of the proceedings of Workshop 4, the final Workshop of the Series, which was held in Arlington, Virginia, June 5-7, 2001. During Workshop 4, the sub-groups were provided with a draft of the protocol compiled in May 2001 from the work done at prior Workshops in the Series. Then eight sub-groups were formed to discuss the following assigned topics: Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Physical/Chemical Testing Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Life Detection Testing Review and Assess the Draft Protocol for Biohazard Testing Environmental and Health/Monitoring and Safety Issues Requirements of the Draft Protocol for Facilities and Equipment Contingency Planning for Different Outcomes of the Draft Protocol Personnel Management Considerations in Implementation of the Draft Protocol Draft Protocol Implementation Process and Update Concepts This report provides the first complete presentation of the Draft Protocol for Mars Sample Handling to meet planetary protection needs. This Draft Protocol

  4. Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2004-11-23

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  5. Highlights of the Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1997-01-01

    Economic stresses are forcing many industries to reduce cost and time-to-market, and to insert emerging technologies into their products. Engineers are asked to design faster, ever more complex systems. Hence, there is a need for novel design paradigms and effective design tools to reduce the design and development times. Several computational tools and facilities have been developed to support the design process. Some of these are described in subsequent presentations. The focus of the workshop is on the computational tools and facilities which have high potential for use in future design environment for aerospace systems. The outline for the introductory remarks is given. First, the characteristics and design drivers for future aerospace systems are outlined; second, simulation-based design environment, and some of its key modules are described; third, the vision for the next-generation design environment being planned by NASA, the UVA ACT Center and JPL is presented. The anticipated major benefits of the planned environment are listed; fourth, some of the government-supported programs related to simulation-based design are listed; and fifth, the objectives and format of the workshop are presented.

  6. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  7. Sensor technology workshop: Structure and goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    The Astrotech 21 charter for the second of three workshops is described. The purpose was to identify technology needs in the areas of electromagnetic radiation sensors, and to recommend a plan to develop the required capabilities that are not currently available. The panels chosen for this workshop focused specifically on those technologies needed for the Astrotech 21 Program including: gamma ray and x ray sensors, ultraviolet and visible sensors, direct infrared sensors, and heterodyne submillimeter wave sensors.

  8. Enhanced flow injection leaching of rocks by focused microwave heating with in-line monitoring of released elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Milithza; Kyser, Kurt; Beauchemin, Diane

    2007-02-19

    A focused microwave digestion system was used to heat a mini-column of sample of crushed rock (hematite) during its successive leaching by repeated 250-microL injections of water, HNO(3) 1%, 10% and 30% (v/v). The mini-column was connected to the nebulizer of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry instrument, which allowed a continuous monitoring of the progressive release of elements by a given leaching reagent. Quantitation of the accessible fraction of Mg, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Sb and Pb was done by calibration using 250-microL injections of standard solutions prepared in the leaching reagent matrices. Total digestion of the sample residue was also done to verify mass balance. With the exception of Mg, V and Co, where the same total amount was released with or without microwave heating, an increased release resulted from focused microwave heating, by up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, mass balance was verified for more elements using microwave heating, presumably because of a lower relative proportion of spectroscopic interference as a result of an increased release of analytes. Using microwave energy in general resulted in the dissolution of additional phases, as evidenced by significantly different (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios as well as the increased release of elements with milder reagents. In fact, in the case of Pb, leaching with 30% HNO(3) was no longer necessary as all the Pb was released in the first three leaching reagents. Microwave heating could therefore be used advantageously in on-line leaching for exploration geochemistry and environmental monitoring. PMID:17386636

  9. 77 FR 14814 - Tobacco Product Analysis; Scientific Workshop; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Product Analysis; Scientific Workshop; Request for.... The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Tobacco Products is announcing a scientific... analyses are reliable and accurate. This scientific workshop will focus on understanding how...

  10. Real-Time Monitoring and Quantitative Evaluation of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Using B-Mode Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Chen, Chu-Yi; Chen, Gong; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Ma, Yong; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    A software-based method is proposed to eliminate the flooding interference strips in B-mode images, and to evaluate the cavitation bubbles generated during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposures. In vitro tissue phantoms are exposed to 1.12 MHz HIFU pulses with a fixed 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency. HIFU-induced cavitation bubbles are detected as hyperechoic regions in B-mode images. The temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles, generated by HIFU pulses with varying driving amplitude and pulse length, is analyzed by measuring the time-varying area of the hyperechoic region. The results show that: first, it is feasible to monitor HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity in real-time using B-mode imaging; second, more cavitation bubbles can be generated with higher acoustic energy delivered; third, the hyperechoic region is observed to shrink gradually after ceasing the HIFU pulses, which indicates the dissolution of cavitation bubbles. This work will be helpful for developing an effective tool to realize real-time monitoring and quantitative evaluation of HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity using a current commercialized B-mode machine.

  11. Keeping Hawai’i’s forest birds one step ahead of avian diseases in a warming world: a focus on Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge. A case study from the National Conservation and Training Center Structured Decision Making Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben; Burgett, Jeff; McDonald-Fadden, Eve; Bean, Ellen; Atkinson, Carter T.; Ball, Donna; Cole, Colleen; Crampton, Lisa H.; Kraus, Jim; LaPointe, Dennis A.; Mehrhoff, Loyal; Samuel, Michael D.; Brewer, Donna; Converse, Sarah J.; Morey, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This report is a product of a one-week workshop on using Structured Decision Making to identify and prioritize conservation actions to address the threat of climate change on Hawaii‟s native forest bird community. Specifically, t his report addresses the issue of global warming ‟s likely role in increasing disease prevalence in upper elevation forests of Hawaii, negatively impacting native bird populations susceptible to the disease but currently disease - free because of the cooler temperatures at high elevations. 

  12. Music Workshop Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dorothy; And Others

    Designed for administrators promoting music workshops for teachers, the packet presents a general workshop framework used by California Public Schools. Eight recommendations for planning a 30-hour workshop, and 12 hints for working with classroom teachers are listed. Each of the 15 sessions represents a two-hour block of time representing the…

  13. DIAPER INDUSTRY WORKSHOP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is the product of a one-day workshop on the diaper industry that was sponsored by the U.S. EPA. our topics covered during the workshop were public health and safety, recycling, composting, and product life cycle analysis. he primary objective of the workshop was to id...

  14. ICP-MS Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  15. Building Strong Geoscience Departments Through the Visiting Workshop Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, C. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Bralower, T. J.; Clemens-Knott, D.; Doser, D. I.; Feiss, P. G.; Rhodes, D. D.; Richardson, R. M.; Savina, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project focuses on helping geoscience departments adapt and prosper in a changing and challenging environment. From 2005-2009, the project offered workshop programs on topics such as student recruitment, program assessment, preparing students for the workforce, and strengthening geoscience programs. Participants shared their departments' challenges and successes. Building on best practices and most promising strategies from these workshops and on workshop leaders' experiences, from 2009-2011 the project ran a visiting workshop program, bringing workshops to 18 individual departments. Two major strengths of the visiting workshop format are that it engages the entire department in the program, fostering a sense of shared ownership and vision, and that it focuses on each department's unique situation. Departments applied to have a visiting workshop, and the process was highly competitive. Selected departments chose from a list of topics developed through the prior workshops: curriculum and program design, program elements beyond the curriculum, recruiting students, preparing students for the workforce, and program assessment. Two of our workshop leaders worked with each department to customize and deliver the 1-2 day programs on campus. Each workshop incorporated exercises to facilitate active departmental discussions, presentations incorporating concrete examples drawn from the leaders' experience and from the collective experiences of the geoscience community, and action planning to scaffold implementation. All workshops also incorporated information on building departmental consensus and assessing departmental efforts. The Building Strong Geoscience Departments website complements the workshops with extensive examples from the geoscience community. Of the 201 participants in the visiting workshop program, 140 completed an end of workshop evaluation survey with an overall satisfaction rating of 8.8 out of a possible 10

  16. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  17. Proceedings of the NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Phillippe F. (Editor); Kwong, Victor H. S. (Editor); Salama, Farid (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers presented at the 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics held in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from February 14 to 16, 2006. This workshop brings together producers and users of laboratory astrophysics data so that they can understand each other's needs and limitations in the context of the needs for NASA's missions. The last NASA-sponsored workshop was held in 2002 at Ames Research Center. Recent related meetings include the Topical Session at the AAS meeting and the European workshop at Pillnitz, Germany, both of which were held in June 2005. The former showcased the importance of laboratory astrophysics to the community at large, while the European workshop highlighted a multi-laboratory approach to providing the needed data. The 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics, sponsored by the NASA Astrophysics Division, focused on the current status of the field and its relevance to NASA. This workshop attracted 105 participants and 82 papers of which 19 were invited. A White Paper identifying the key issues in laboratory astrophysics during the break-out sessions was prepared by the Scientific Organizing Committee, and has been forwarded to the Universe Working Group (UWG) at NASA Headquarters. This White Paper, which represented the collective inputs and opinions from experts and stakeholders in the field of astrophysics, should serve as the working document for the future development of NASA's R&A program in laboratory astrophysics.

  18. USGS-NPS Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) workshop report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moses, Christopher S.; Nayagandhi, Amar; Brock, John; Beavers, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program recently allocated funds to initiate a benthic mapping program in ocean and Great Lakes parks in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. Seventy-four (ocean and Great Lakes) parks, spanning more than 5,000 miles of coastline, many affected by increasing coastal storms and other natural and anthropogenic processes, make the development of a Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) timely. The resulting maps and associated reports will be provided to NPS managers in a consistent servicewide format to help park managers protect and manage the 3 million acres of submerged National Park System natural and cultural resources. Of the 74 ocean and Great Lakes park units, the 40 parks with submerged acreage will be the focus in the early years of the SBMP. The NPS and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop (June 3-5, 2008) in Lakewood, CO. The assembly of experts from the NPS and other Federal and non-Federal agencies clarified the needs and goals of the NPS SBMP and was one of the key first steps in designing the benthic mapping program. The central needs for individual parks, park networks, and regions identified by workshop participants were maps including bathymetry, bottom type, geology, and biology. This workshop, although not an exhaustive survey of data-acquisition technologies, highlighted the more promising technologies being used, existing sources of data, and the need for partnerships to leverage resources. Workshop products include recommended classification schemes and management approaches for consistent application and products similar to other long-term NPS benthic mapping efforts. As part of the SBMP, recommendations from this workshop, including application of an improved version of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), will be tested in several pilot parks. In 2008, in conjunction with the findings of this workshop

  19. Broadening Diversity in the Geosciences through Teacher-Student Workshops that Emphasizes Community-Based Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napieralski, J.; Murray, K.; Luera, G.; Brown, K. Thomas; Reynolds Keefer, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Geosciences Institute for Research and Education at the University of Michigan-Dearborn (UM-D) has been an example of a successful and effective model in increasing the participation of underrepresented groups in the geosciences. The program emphasizes involving middle school and at-risk high school students from Detroit area public schools along with their teachers in urban geology research projects through a series of spring and summer workshops. The workshops introduce students to the geosciences by emphasizing how geology can be used as a tool to solve community-based environmental problems in a metropolitan setting. Students work alongside their teachers and UM-D faculty on projects that include the assessment of brownfield sites, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, and evaluation of land use impact on groundwater and surface water quality. Spring workshops focused on students from three middle schools in Detroit, while the summer workshops focused more on middle school and high school teacher training, but also included a small group of middle school and high school students. Instruments used to evaluate the effectiveness of the summer workshops included the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBI), Geoscience Concept Inventory (GCI), and pre- and post-workshop questionnaires and focus groups demonstrate that we have not only increased student awareness of the geosciences but are motivating students to pursue career opportunities in science. Since the Institute began in 2005, we have reached over 100 middle and high school students and 75 teachers, and the Earth Science major at UM-D has tripled in size and we have quadrupled the number of minority students taking introductory geology courses during this time.

  20. Combined use of thermal methods and seepage meters to efficiently locate, quantify, and monitor focused groundwater discharge to a sand-bed stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Briggs, Martin A.; Delin, Geoffrey; Hare, Danielle K.

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying flow of groundwater through streambeds often is difficult due to the complexity of aquifer-scale heterogeneity combined with local-scale hyporheic exchange. We used fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS), seepage meters, and vertical temperature profiling to locate, quantify, and monitor areas of focused groundwater discharge in a geomorphically simple sand-bed stream. This combined approach allowed us to rapidly focus efforts at locations where prodigious amounts of groundwater discharged to the Quashnet River on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, northeastern USA. FO-DTS detected numerous anomalously cold reaches one to several m long that persisted over two summers. Seepage meters positioned upstream, within, and downstream of 7 anomalously cold reaches indicated that rapid groundwater discharge occurred precisely where the bed was cold; median upward seepage was nearly 5 times faster than seepage measured in streambed areas not identified as cold. Vertical temperature profilers deployed next to 8 seepage meters provided diurnal-signal-based seepage estimates that compared remarkably well with seepage-meter values. Regression slope and R2 values both were near 1 for seepage ranging from 0.05 to 3.0 m d-1. Temperature-based seepage model accuracy was improved with thermal diffusivity determined locally from diurnal signals. Similar calculations provided values for streambed sediment scour and deposition at subdaily resolution. Seepage was strongly heterogeneous even along a sand-bed river that flows over a relatively uniform sand and fine-gravel aquifer. FO-DTS was an efficient method for detecting areas of rapid groundwater discharge, even in a strongly gaining river, that can then be quantified over time with inexpensive streambed thermal methods.

  1. Homolog-focused profiling of ginsenosides based on the integration of step-wise formate anion-to-deprotonated ion transition screening and scheduled multiple reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuelin; Zhang, Na; Shi, Shepo; Li, Jun; Zhao, Yunfang; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2015-08-01

    Homolog-focused profiling is a favored option to bridge targeted metabolomics toward non-targeted metabolomics. In current study, an attempt was made for the large-scale ginsenoside-specific analysis in ginseng (G) and American ginseng (AG). When formic acid (0.1%, v/v) was introduced as the mobile phase additive, formate anion-to-deprotonated ion transitions ([M+HCOO](-)>[M-H](-)) with an optimal collision energy (-32eV) could result in satisfactory responses for ginsenosides. Therefore, a step-wise multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based method employing [M+HCOO](-)>[M-H](-) ion pairs was constructed to screen ginsenosides among 501-1250u (for Q1) with a step-size of 2u, and MRM also served as a survey experiment to trigger enhanced product ion scans for MS(2) spectrum acquisition on a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer; then, the identification of those observed ginsenosides was achieved on the basis of the well-defined mass cracking patterns for ginsenosides; afterwards, scheduled MRM was introduced for large-scale relatively quantitative analysis of all detected ginsenosides. Finally, comparative metabolomics were performed to differentiate G, AG, and their processed products. Method validation was carried out using thirteen authentic compounds. A total of 221 ginsenosides, among which 185 ones were annotated, were observed and relatively quantitated. All crude materials were obviously classified into groups I-III. Above all, the MRM-based homolog-focused profiling of ginsenosides could be used as a reliable tool to gain an in-depth view for ginsenoside-enriched herbal products. PMID:26105782

  2. Turbulence Modeling Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R. (Editor); Rumsey, C. L. (Editor); Salas, M. D. (Editor); Thomas, J. L. (Editor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advances in turbulence modeling are needed in order to calculate high Reynolds number flows near the onset of separation and beyond. To this end, the participants in this workshop made the following recommendations. (1) A national/international database and standards for turbulence modeling assessment should be established. Existing experimental data sets should be reviewed and categorized. Advantage should be taken of other efforts already under-way, such as that of the European Research Community on Flow, Turbulence, and Combustion (ERCOFTAC) consortium. Carefully selected "unit" experiments will be needed, as well as advances in instrumentation, to fill the gaps in existing datasets. A high priority should be given to document existing turbulence model capabilities in a standard form, including numerical implementation issues such as grid quality and resolution. (2) NASA should support long-term research on Algebraic Stress Models and Reynolds Stress Models. The emphasis should be placed on improving the length-scale equation, since it is the least understood and is a key component of two-equation and higher models. Second priority should be given to the development of improved near-wall models. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) would provide valuable guidance in developing and validating new Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. Although not the focus of this workshop, DNS, LES, and hybrid methods currently represent viable approaches for analysis on a limited basis. Therefore, although computer limitations require the use of RANS methods for realistic configurations at high Reynolds number in the foreseeable future, a balanced effort in turbulence modeling development, validation, and implementation should include these approaches as well.

  3. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  4. 75 FR 25281 - Food Protection Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... about food safety, food defense, the regulations authorized by the Public Health Security and... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Protection Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ] ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  5. 76 FR 69764 - Stab-Resistant Body Armor Standard Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are jointly hosting a workshop focused on the NIJ Stab-resistant Body Armor Standard, and the discussion is directed toward manufacturers, certification bodies, and test laboratories. This workshop is being held specifically to discuss with interested parties recent progress made toward the......

  6. The Parent Project. A Workshop Approach to Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vopat, James

    The Parent Project is a workshop approach to increasing parent involvement in their children's education. It began in the late 1980s in three inner-city elementary schools in Milwaukee (Wisconsin) as an outgrowth of the Milwaukee Writing Project. The workshop approach that developed focused on what children were learning in the classroom and how…

  7. [12th International workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabalais, J.W.; Nordlander, P.

    1999-10-15

    The twelfth international workshop on inelastic ion surface collisions was held at the Bahia Mar Resort and Conference Center on South Padre Island, Texas (USA) from January 24-29, 1999. The workshop brought together most of the leading researchers from around the world to focus on both the theoretical and experimental aspects of particle - surface interactions and related topics.

  8. Applying Psychology: Live Skill Workshops for Undergraduate Credit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, David F.; Ziegler, Daniel J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a program of undergraduate, weekend life skills workshops designed to demonstrate practical applications of psychological theories. Each workshop focuses on the relationship of psychological theory to skill development using lecture and group process exercises. The benefits of this program for students, faculty, psychology department,…

  9. Interviews with Students Enrolled in Academic CPR Workshops, Summer 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maple, Chelley

    This study focuses on students enrolled in academic CPR workshops in the summer of 2002. The goal of the study is to examine changes in the population of students with academic problems. The CPR workshops are a requirement for students that are subject to dismissal. The study was conducted in the summer of 2003 on the telephone with a random…

  10. Learning Is Homegrown--Workshop Series. An Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Carole L.; And Others

    This evaluation report of the "Learning Is Homegrown" workshop series, given by Dorothy Rich in a large school district, focuses on the workshops and the learning materials and their impact on parent-child relationships as perceived by parents. The evaluation report first points out that the dropout rate and low reading scores of the school…

  11. South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

    2000-04-01

    To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

  12. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  13. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Lumley, David; Sherlock, Don; Daley, Tom; Lawton, Don; Masters, Ron; Verliac, Michel; White, Don

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  14. "Boden macht Schule" - a soil awareness workshop for Austrian pupils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foldal, Cecile B.; Aust, Günter; Baumgarten, Andreas; Berthold, Helene; Birli, Barbara; Englisch, Michael; Ferstl, Elsa; Leregger, Florian; Schwarz, Sigrid; Tulipan, Monika

    2014-05-01

    In order to raise awareness and understanding for the importance of soil, we developed a workshop for schoolchildren between the age of nine and thirteen. The workshop focuses on soil formation, soil functions and soil organisms. Guided by young soil scientist the children can actively explore different soil properties. Key elements are studies and identification of soil animals, small physical experiments and several games followed up with creative tasks. Our aim is to make the workshop an attractive tool for environmental education in public schools and by this to increase the interest in soil and soil protection. This poster gives a short overview of the contents of the workshop "Boden macht Schule"

  15. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop.

  16. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

  17. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  18. CARE 3 User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A user's workshop for CARE 3, a reliability assessment tool designed and developed especially for the evaluation of high reliability fault tolerant digital systems, was held at NASA Langley Research Center on October 6 to 7, 1987. The main purpose of the workshop was to assess the evolutionary status of CARE 3. The activities of the workshop are documented and papers are included by user's of CARE 3 and NASA. Features and limitations of CARE 3 and comparisons to other tools are presented. The conclusions to a workshop questionaire are also discussed.

  19. Findings and Recommendations from the NIST Workshop on Alternative Fuels and Materials: Biocorrosion

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Elisabeth; Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Applied Chemicals and Materials Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) hosted a workshop to identify and prioritize research needs in the area of biocorrosion. Materials used to store and distribute alternative fuels have experienced an increase in corrosion due to the unique conditions caused by the presence of microbes and the chemistry of biofuels and biofuel precursors. Participants in this workshop, including experts from the microbiological, fuel, and materials communities, delved into the unique materials and chemical challenges that occur with production, transport, and storage of alternative fuels. Discussions focused on specific problems including: a) the changing composition of “drop-in” fuels and the impact of that composition on materials; b) the influence of microbial populations on corrosion and fuel quality; and c) state-of-the-art measurement technologies for monitoring material degradation and biofilm formation. PMID:26958436

  20. 76 FR 35023 - National Institute of Justice Protective Helmet Standards Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ...The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are jointly hosting a workshop focused on NIJ protective helmet standards. It is anticipated that the discussion at the workshop will be directed primarily toward manufacturers, certification bodies, and test laboratories. NIJ and NIST are hosting this workshop specifically to discuss with......

  1. 76 FR 35024 - National Institute of Justice Stab-Resistant Body Armor Standard Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ...The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are jointly hosting workshop focused on the NIJ Stab-Resistant Body Armor Standard. It is anticipated that the discussion at the workshop will be directed primarily toward manufacturers, certification bodies, and test laboratories. NIJ and NIST are hosting this workshop specifically to discuss......

  2. Helping International Students Succeed Academically through Research Process and Plagiarism Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Van Ullen, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Workshops on the research process and plagiarism were designed to meet the needs of international students at the University at Albany. The research process workshop covered formulating research questions, as well as locating and evaluating sources. The plagiarism workshop focused on acknowledging sources, quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing…

  3. 78 FR 76842 - Food and Drug Administration/American Academy of Ophthalmology Workshop on Developing Novel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... Ophthalmology Workshop on Developing Novel Endpoints for Premium Intraocular Lenses; Public Workshop AGENCY... Developing Novel Endpoints for Premium Intraocular Lenses.'' The main topic of this workshop is the current challenges in the assessment of innovative intraocular lens (IOL) designs with a focus on...

  4. 70 FR 53362 - Public Workshop: Competition Policy and the Real Estate Industry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-09-08

    ... Public Workshop: Competition Policy and the Real Estate Industry AGENCIES: Federal Trade Commission (FTC...: The FTC and DOJ are planning to host a public workshop, ``Competition Policy and the Real Estate Industry.'' The workshop will focus on issues related to the competitiveness of the residential real...

  5. Recommendations from the Workshop: Environment, Ecology and Sustainable Development ICAE 7th World Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viezzer, Moema L.

    2006-01-01

    One of the workshops presented at the 7th International Council for Adult Education (ICAE) Assembly was focused on environment, ecology, and sustainable development. The workshop had participants from Asia, Africa, Europe, South America, North America and the South Pacific. This article presents a list of recommendations from the workshop.

  6. 1993 DOE technical standards managers workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This workshop is focused on the benefits of the DOE technical standards program, which is focused toward the preferred use of non-Government standards for DOE activities and the development of DOE technical standards when non-Government standards are not available or are inappropriate. One goal of the program is to replace redundant site-specific standards with more universally accepted documents that have been scrutinized by experts. This replacement is discussed at the workshop along with the problems encountered and solutions found. The workshop provided an opportunity for geographically dispersed people to meet and advance their standards knowledge and efforts to support the program. Safety issues have been the driving force behind the program to date. Several companies offer products and services that support the development, processing, and retrieval of standards. This document mostly comprise vugraphs.

  7. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrig, L.

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986 to 1990. The reliability photovoltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warrantees available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the U.S., PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  8. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  9. Testing an mHealth Momentary Assessment Routine Outcome Monitoring Application: A Focus on Restoration of Daily Life Positive Mood States

    PubMed Central

    van Os, Jim; Delespaul, Philippe; Barge, Daniela; Bakker, Roberto P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) is used as a means to enrich the process of treatment with feedback on patient outcomes, facilitating patient involvement and shared decision making. While traditional ROM measures focus on retrospective accounts of symptoms, novel mHealth technology makes it possible to collect real life, in-the-moment ambulatory data that allow for an ecologically valid assessment of personalized and contextualized emotional and behavioural adjustment in the flow daily life (mROM). Method In a sample of 34 patients with major depressive disorder, treated with antidepressants, the combined effect of treatment and natural course was examined over a period of 18 weeks with Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA). EMA consisted of repeated, within-subject, mini-measurements of experience (eg positive affect, negative affect, medication side effects) and context (eg stressors, situations, activities) at 10 unselected semi-random moments per day, for a period of six days, repeated three times over the 18-week period (baseline, week 6 and week 18). Results EMA measures of emotional and behavioural adjustment were sensitive to the effects of treatment and natural course over the 18-week period, particularly EMA measures focussing on positive mood states and the ability to use natural rewards (impact of positive events on positive mood states), with standardized effect sizes of 0.4–0.5. EMA measures of activities, social interaction, stress-sensitivity and negative mood states were also sensitive to change over time. Conclusion This study supports the use of mROM as a means to involve the patient in the process of needs assessment and treatment. EMA data are meaningful to the patient, as they reflect daily life circumstances. Assessment of treatment response with mROM data allows for an interpretation of the effect of treatment at the level of daily life emotional and social adjustment – as an index of health, obviating the need for an

  10. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs. PMID:25038809

  11. Two-Year Monitoring of Water Samples from Dam of Iskar and the Black Sea, Bulgaria, by Molecular Analysis: Focus on Mycobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Panaiotov, Stefan; Simeonovski, Ivan; Levterova, Victoria; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Brankova, Nadia; Tankova, Kristin; Campbell, Katrina; Jacob, Pauline; Helmi, Karim; Boots, Bas; D’Ugo, Emilio; Marcheggiani, Stefania; Mancini, Laura; Breitenbach, Ulrich; Mielke, Erik; Kantardjiev, Todor

    2015-01-01

    The coast of the Bulgarian Black Sea is a popular summer holiday destination. The Dam of Iskar is the largest artificial dam in Bulgaria, with a capacity of 675 million m3. It is the main source of tap water for the capital Sofia and for irrigating the surrounding valley. There is a close relationship between the quality of aquatic ecosystems and human health as many infections are waterborne. Rapid molecular methods for the analysis of highly pathogenic bacteria have been developed for monitoring quality. Mycobacterial species can be isolated from waste, surface, recreational, ground and tap waters and human pathogenicity of nontuberculose mycobacteria (NTM) is well recognized. The objective of our study was to perform molecular analysis for key-pathogens, with a focus on mycobacteria, in water samples collected from the Black Sea and the Dam of Iskar. In a two year period, 38 water samples were collected—24 from the Dam of Iskar and 14 from the Black Sea coastal zone. Fifty liter water samples were concentrated by ultrafiltration. Molecular analysis for 15 pathogens, including all species of genus Mycobacterium was performed. Our results showed presence of Vibrio spp. in the Black Sea. Rotavirus A was also identified in four samples from the Dam of Iskar. Toxigenic Escherichia coli was present in both locations, based on markers for stx1 and stx2 genes. No detectable amounts of Cryptosporidium were detected in either location using immunomagnetic separation and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analyses did not detect key cyanobacterial toxins. On the basis of the results obtained we can conclude that for the period 2012–2014 no Mycobacterium species were present in the water samples. During the study period no cases of waterborne infections were reported. PMID:26133133

  12. Two-Year Monitoring of Water Samples from Dam of Iskar and the Black Sea, Bulgaria, by Molecular Analysis: Focus on Mycobacterium spp.

    PubMed

    Panaiotov, Stefan; Simeonovski, Ivan; Levterova, Victoria; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Brankova, Nadia; Tankova, Kristin; Campbell, Katrina; Jacob, Pauline; Helmi, Karim; Boots, Bas; D'Ugo, Emilio; Marcheggiani, Stefania; Mancini, Laura; Breitenbach, Ulrich; Mielke, Erik; Kantardjiev, Todor

    2015-07-01

    The coast of the Bulgarian Black Sea is a popular summer holiday destination. The Dam of Iskar is the largest artificial dam in Bulgaria, with a capacity of 675 million m3. It is the main source of tap water for the capital Sofia and for irrigating the surrounding valley. There is a close relationship between the quality of aquatic ecosystems and human health as many infections are waterborne. Rapid molecular methods for the analysis of highly pathogenic bacteria have been developed for monitoring quality. Mycobacterial species can be isolated from waste, surface, recreational, ground and tap waters and human pathogenicity of nontuberculose mycobacteria (NTM) is well recognized. The objective of our study was to perform molecular analysis for key-pathogens, with a focus on mycobacteria, in water samples collected from the Black Sea and the Dam of Iskar. In a two year period, 38 water samples were collected-24 from the Dam of Iskar and 14 from the Black Sea coastal zone. Fifty liter water samples were concentrated by ultrafiltration. Molecular analysis for 15 pathogens, including all species of genus Mycobacterium was performed. Our results showed presence of Vibrio spp. in the Black Sea. Rotavirus A was also identified in four samples from the Dam of Iskar. Toxigenic Escherichia coli was present in both locations, based on markers for stx1 and stx2 genes. No detectable amounts of Cryptosporidium were detected in either location using immunomagnetic separation and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analyses did not detect key cyanobacterial toxins. On the basis of the results obtained we can conclude that for the period 2012-2014 no Mycobacterium species were present in the water samples. During the study period no cases of waterborne infections were reported. PMID:26133133

  13. Two-photon microscopy for real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to the brain in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Alison; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-02-01

    There is substantial evidence that focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubble contrast agent can cause disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to aid in drug delivery to the brain. We have previously demonstrated that FUS efficiently delivers antibodies against amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) through the BBB, leading to a reduction in amyloid pathology at 4 days in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In the current study, we used two-photon microscopy to characterize the effect of FUS in real time on amyloid pathology in the mouse brain. Mice were anesthetized and a cranial window was made in the skull. A custom-built ultrasound transducer was fixed to a coverslip and attached to the skull, covering the cranial window. Methoxy-X04 [2-5mg/kg] delivered intravenously 1 hr prior to the experiment clearly labelled the Aβ surrounding the vessels and the amyloid plaques in the cortex. Dextran conjugated Texas Red (70kDa) administered intravenously, confirmed BBB disruption. BBB disruption occurred in transgenic and non-transgenic animals at similar ultrasound pressures tested. However, the time required for BBB closure following FUS was longer in the Tg mice. We have conjugated Aβ antibodies to the fluorescent molecule FITC for real time monitoring of the antibody distribution in the brain. Our current experiments are aimed at optimizing the parameters to achieve maximal fluorescent intensity of the BAM10 antibody at the plaque surface. Two-photon microscopy has proven to be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of FUS mediated drug delivery, including antibodies, to the Alzheimer brain.

  14. Genetic Engineering Workshop Report, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J; Slezak, T

    2010-11-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies (TMT) program. The high-level goal of TMT is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve this goal, there is a need to assess the genetic engineering (GE) approaches, potential application as well as detection and mitigation strategies. LLNL was tasked to coordinate a workshop to determine the scope of investments that DTRA should make to stay current with the rapid advances in genetic engineering technologies, so that accidental or malicious uses of GE technologies could be adequately detected and characterized. Attachment A is an earlier report produced by LLNL for TMT that provides some relevant background on Genetic Engineering detection. A workshop was held on September 23-24, 2010 in Springfield, Virginia. It was attended by a total of 55 people (see Attachment B). Twenty four (44%) of the attendees were academic researchers involved in GE or bioinformatics technology, 6 (11%) were from DTRA or the TMT program management, 7 (13%) were current TMT performers (including Jonathan Allen and Tom Slezak of LLNL who hosted the workshop), 11 (20%) were from other Federal agencies, and 7 (13%) were from industries that are involved in genetic engineering. Several attendees could be placed in multiple categories. There were 26 attendees (47%) who were from out of the DC area and received travel assistance through Invitational Travel Orders (ITOs). We note that this workshop could not have been as successful without the ability to invite experts from outside of the Beltway region. This workshop was an unclassified discussion of the science behind current genetic engineering capabilities. US citizenship was not required for attendance. While this may have limited some discussions concerning risk, we felt that it was more important for this first workshop to focus on the scientific state of the

  15. Sensors Workshop summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A review of the efforts of three workshops is presented. The presentation describes those technological developments that would contribute most to sensor subsystem optimization and improvement of NASA's data acquisition capabilities, and summarizes the recommendations of the sensor technology panels from the most recent workshops.

  16. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  17. Hands-on Precision Agriculture Data Management Workshops for Producers and Industry Professionals: Development and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luck, Joe D.; Fulton, John P.; Rees, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Three Precision Agriculture Data Management workshops regarding yield monitor data were conducted in 2014, reaching 62 participants. Post-workshop surveys (n = 58) indicated 73% of respondents experienced a moderate to significant increase in knowledge related to yield monitor data usage. Another 72% reported that they planned to utilize best…

  18. Frontiers in neurodegeneration--new insights and prospects--20th HUPO BPP Workshop: 15 September 2013, Yokohama, Japan.

    PubMed

    Schrötter, Andreas; El Magraoui, Fouzi; Gröttrup, Bernd; Heinsen, Helmut; Marcus, Katrin; Meyer, Helmut E; Park, Young Mok; Grinberg, Lea T

    2014-06-01

    The HUPO Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) held its 20th workshop in Yokohama, Japan, September 15, 2013. The focus of the autumn workshop was on new insights and prospects of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24903697

  19. Epilepsy Workshop for Public School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rassel, Gary; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most misunderstood and stigmatized disorders in society. A four-hour workshop was conducted over two days with the first two hours discussing types of epilepsy, causes, treatment, and medication. The second part of the study focused on social and psychological implications of epilepsy. (JN)

  20. Regional Workshops on CETA/Educational Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert; And Others

    This document presents a summary of the proceedings of five regional workshops in Virginia which focused on planning for future involvement and linkages, as well as giving an orientation to the capabilities and operational philosophies of both Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs and educational organizations. Following…

  1. 6th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of the 6th workshop is on lysine, arginine, and related amino acids. Functions, metabolic pathways, clinical uses, and upper tolerance intakes are emphasized in the articles that follow. Lysine is arguably the most deficient amino acid in the food supply of countries where poverty exists, ...

  2. Workshop Proceedings: Pitting in Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    A two-day workshop focused on the probable causes of steam generator pitting at two nuclear plants and on whether pitting is a low-temperature or a high-temperature phenomenon. Participants also heard descriptions of various pit-resistant metals that are suitable for tube sleeving.

  3. AN ORGANIZATIONAL GUIDE TO POLLUTION PREVENTION WORKSHOPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This three-day workshop focuses on the new EPA publication, An Organizational Guide to Pollution Prevention (EPA/625/R-01/003). This new Guide presents three well-publicized approaches to environmental planning for organizations desiring to start, revitalize, or promote pollutio...

  4. X-chromosome workshop.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  5. 75 FR 74736 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ....'' Mail to: Dr. Ruth MacDonald, Food Science and Human Nutrition, 2312 Food Sciences Building, Ames, IA... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and... workshop. Topics to be discussed at the workshop include: (1) Mandatory label elements, (2)...

  6. Focusing the surgical microscope.

    PubMed

    Socea, Sergiu D; Barak, Yoreh; Blumenthal, Eytan Z

    2015-01-01

    A well-focused operating microscope addresses several needs that are all secondary to the surgeon's need to see clearly at all times. These needs include: the assistant; the sharpness of the video and monitor; as well as field of view, asthenopia, and focusing issues related to zoom, accommodation, and presbyopia. We provide a practical approach to achieve optimal focus that we call the sloping paper calibration method. PMID:25891029

  7. Proceedings of the NASA Microbiology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, M. C.; Jan, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term spaceflight is characterized by extraordinary challenges to maintain the life-supporting instrumentation free from microbial contamination and the crew healthy. The methodology currently employed for microbial monitoring in space stations or short spaceflights within the orbit of Earth have been instrumental in safeguarding the success of the missions, but suffers certain shortcomings that are critical for long spaceflights. This workshop addressed current practices and methodologies for microbial monitoring in space systems, and identified and discussed promising alternative methodologies and cutting-edge technologies for pursuit in the microbial monitoring that hold promise for supporting future NASA long-duration space missions.

  8. Computer Aided Drafting Workshop. Workshop Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetsch, David L.

    This mini-course and article are presentations from a workshop on computer-aided drafting. The purpose of the mini-course is to assist drafting instructors in updating their occupational knowledge to include computer-aided drafting (CAD). Topics covered in the course include general computer information, the computer in drafting, CAD terminology,…

  9. Workshop by Design: Planning a Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Dorothy; Parsons, A. Chapman

    In an Ohio Library Association guide for planning workshops, detailed instructions are given for forming a committee, holding meetings, selecting and paying the speaker, and developing the program. Budgets and fees are discussed along with information on federal funding. Practical guidance is also provided about equipment, table arrangements,…

  10. Space and Earth Science Data Compression Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The workshop explored opportunities for data compression to enhance the collection and analysis of space and Earth science data. The focus was on scientists' data requirements, as well as constraints imposed by the data collection, transmission, distribution, and archival systems. The workshop consisted of several invited papers; two described information systems for space and Earth science data, four depicted analysis scenarios for extracting information of scientific interest from data collected by Earth orbiting and deep space platforms, and a final one was a general tutorial on image data compression.