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1

Scientific drilling and the evolution of the earth system: climate, biota, biogeochemistry and extreme systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A US National Science Foundation-funded workshop occurred 17-19 May 2013 at the University of Oklahoma to stimulate research using continental scientific drilling to explore earth's sedimentary, paleobiological and biogeochemical record. Participants submitted 3-page "pre-proposals" to highlight projects that envisioned using drill-core studies to address scientific issues in paleobiology, paleoclimatology, stratigraphy and biogeochemistry, and to identify locations where key questions can best be addressed. The workshop was also intended to encourage US scientists to take advantage of the exceptional capacity of unweathered, continuous core records to answer important questions in the history of earth's sedimentary, biogeochemical and paleobiologic systems. Introductory talks on drilling and coring methods, plus best practices in core handling and curation, opened the workshop to enable all to understand the opportunities and challenges presented by scientific drilling. Participants worked in thematic breakout sessions to consider questions to be addressed using drill cores related to glacial-interglacial and icehouse-greenhouse transitions, records of evolutionary events and extinctions, records of major biogeochemical events in the oceans, reorganization of earth's atmosphere, Lagerstätte and exceptional fossil biota, records of vegetation-landscape change, and special sampling requirements, contamination, and coring tool concerns for paleobiology, geochemistry, geochronology, and stratigraphy-sedimentology studies. Closing discussions at the workshop focused on the role drilling can play in studying overarching science questions about the evolution of the earth system. The key theme, holding the most impact in terms of societal relevance, is understanding how climate transitions have driven biotic change, and the role of pristine, stratigraphically continuous cores in advancing our understanding of this linkage. Scientific drilling, and particularly drilling applied to continental targets, provides unique opportunities to obtain continuous and unaltered material for increasingly sophisticated analyses, tapping the entire geologic record (extending through the Archean), and probing the full dynamic range of climate change and its impact on biotic history.

Soreghan, G. S.; Cohen, A. S.

2013-11-01

2

Biota of North America Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of the Biota of North America Program (BONAP) is to develop a unified digital system for assessing the North American biota. BONAP's database now includes assessment for all vascular plants and vertebrate animals (native, naturalized, and adventive) of North America north of Mexico, and it maintains the most current taxonomy, nomenclature, and biogeographic data for all members of the biota. The Synthesis of the North American Flora, published in 1999, is available for purchase as a CD-ROM (ordering information is provided); a 1mb demonstration version for Windows is available through the BONAP site. The Synthesis includes taxonomic, nomenclatural, and biogeographic data and images, enabling users to produce species checklists, distribution summaries, and species assessments for morphology, rarity, endemism, nativity, and other biological attributes. It consists of three parts: the "Lexicon," which provides the underlying nomenclature and taxonomy; the "Atlas," which displays distribution maps for each of the accepted taxa; and the "Biological Attributes," which provides summaries of morphological and other specialized data (rarity and endemism, nativity, weediness, habit, habitat, and others).

3

Soil biota and exotic plant invasion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Invasive plants are an economic problem and a threat to the conservation of natural systems. Escape from natural enemies might contribute to successful invasion, with most work emphasizing the role of insect herbivores; however, microbial pathogens are attracting increased attention. Soil biota in some invaded ecosystems may promote `exotic' invasion, and plant-soil feedback processes are also important. Thus, relatively rare

Ragan M. Callaway; Giles C. Thelen; Alex Rodriguez; William E. Holben

2004-01-01

4

Soil biota and exotic plant invasion.  

PubMed

Invasive plants are an economic problem and a threat to the conservation of natural systems. Escape from natural enemies might contribute to successful invasion, with most work emphasizing the role of insect herbivores; however, microbial pathogens are attracting increased attention. Soil biota in some invaded ecosystems may promote 'exotic' invasion, and plant-soil feedback processes are also important. Thus, relatively rare species native to North America consistently demonstrate negative feedbacks with soil microbes that promote biological diversity, whereas abundant exotic and native species demonstrate positive feedbacks that reduce biological diversity. Here we report that soil microbes from the home range of the invasive exotic plant Centaurea maculosa L. have stronger inhibitory effects on its growth than soil microbes from where the weed has invaded in North America. Centaurea and soil microbes participate in different plant-soil feedback processes at home compared with outside Centaurea's home range. In native European soils, Centaurea cultivates soil biota with increasingly negative effects on the weed's growth, possibly leading to its control. But in soils from North America, Centaurea cultivates soil biota with increasingly positive effects on itself, which may contribute to the success of this exotic species in North America. PMID:14973484

Callaway, Ragan M; Thelen, Giles C; Rodriguez, Alex; Holben, William E

2004-02-19

5

Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota  

SciTech Connect

At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

Marter, W.L.

2001-03-28

6

Factors affecting the organochlorine pollutant load in biota of a rice field ecosystem (Ebro Delta, NE Spain)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentrations of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, HCB and OCS were determined in sediments and associated biota, both invertebrates (Physella acuta, Hirudo medicinalis, chironomid larvae, Hydrous pistaceus, Helochares lividus) and vertebrates (Rana perezi), in a temporary aquatic system, a rice field in the Ebro Delta (NE Spain). The qualitative and quantitative distribution of organochlorine compounds in sediments and aquatic biota has

D. Pastor; C. Sanpera; J. González-Sol??s; X. Ruiz; J. Albaigés

2004-01-01

7

Extrapolation of Biota-sediment Accumulation Factors  

EPA Science Inventory

When assessing risks at sites with contaminated sediments, risk assessors need to estimate residues in fish and other aquatic biota based upon the levels of contaminants in the sediments. Unfortunately, risk assessors are often challenged by data limitations, i.e., i) contaminan...

8

Assessing Estuarine Biota in Southern California1  

E-print Network

of a restoration project. To identify impacts or opportunities for restoration, we also may want to know how. Western Ecological Research Center, USGS. c/o Marine Science Institute. University of California, SantaAssessing Estuarine Biota in Southern California1 Kevin D. Lafferty2 Abstract In southern

Standiford, Richard B.

9

The case for vestiges of early solar system biota in carbonaceous chondrites: petroleum geochemical snapshots and possible future petroleum prospects on Mars expedition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research documents the analysis and interpretation of selected Carbonaceous Chondrites (CC) including Murchison, Allende, NWA 3003, Dhofar 735, Orgueil, Tagish Lake and Vigarano using organic petrology, scanning electron microscopy, and petroleum geochemistry. The kerogen microstructures and bitumen within CCs closely resemble remnant 2.5 Ga terrestrial microbial-like structures and their biodegraded components and solid bitumen. In both instances, organoclasts are associated with framboidal iron sulfides or oxides and clay-like minerals. The organic-rich kerogens within three CCs (especially Murchison) might have served as petroleum source rocks for the early generation of hydrocarbons. The maturity varies between 0.7% (Orgueil) and 1.24% (Murchison), to 5.1 % Ro (Vigarano) with predicted maturation temperatures of 100° to 475°C. Geochemical analysis of selected CCs (Murchison, Orgueil, and Tagish Lake) reveal the organic richness and the presence of low molecular weight n-alkanes (C 10 to C 20), complex cyclo-and isoalkanes, nonhydrocarbons, elemental sulfur with abundant aromatic compounds, most of them similar to bacterial and algal derived petroleum products. Apart from the concept of panspermia, the data highlights that three CCs sustained a formation temperature (<200°C) capable of supporting bacterial growth in a cooler early Solar System environment. In effect, the information encoded within these extraterrestrial sediments represents a cosmic analogue to terrestrial geopolymers and bitumen that may include some crude oil biomarkers. Therefore, the authors propose a model of a "universal unconventional petroleum system", which implies a prospect of oil and gas within the Martian environment and elsewhere within the Solar System.

Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta K.; Mossman, David J.; Ehrman, James M.

2007-09-01

10

Bioconcentration of TNT and RDX in Coastal Marine Biota.  

PubMed

The bioconcentration factor (BCF) was measured for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in seven different marine species of varying trophic levels. Time series and concentration gradient treatments were used for water column and tissue concentrations of TNT, RDX, and their environmentally important derivatives 2-amino-4,6-dintrotoluene (2-ADNT) and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT). BCF values ranged from 0.0031 to 484.5 mL g(-1) for TNT and 0.023 to 54.83 mL g(-1) for RDX. The use of log K ow value as an indicator was evaluated by adding marine data from this study to previously published data. For the munitions in this study, log K ow value was a good indicator in the marine environment. The initial uptake and elimination rates of TNT and RDX for Fucus vesiculosus were 1.79 and 0.24 h(-1) for TNT and 0.50 and 0.0035 h(-1) for RDX respectively. Biotransformation was observed in all biota for both TNT and RDX. Biotransformation of TNT favored 4-ADNT over 2-ADNT at ratios of 2:1 for F. vesiculosus and 3:1 for Mytilus edulis. Although RDX derivatives were measureable, the ratios of RDX derivatives were variable with no detectable trend. Previous approaches for measuring BCF in freshwater systems compare favorably with these experiments with marine biota, yet significant gaps on the ultimate fate of munitions within the biota exist that may be overcome with the use stable isotope-labeled munitions substrates. PMID:25451633

Ballentine, Mark; Tobias, Craig; Vlahos, Penny; Smith, Richard; Cooper, Christopher

2014-12-01

11

Bioaccumulation factor of 137Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34.

Suseno, Heny

2014-03-01

12

Bioaccumulation factor of {sup 137}Cs in some marine biotas from West Bangka Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclides may be released from nuclear facilities to the marine environment. Concentrations of radionuclides within marine biotic systems can be influenced by a number of factors, including the type of biota, its source, the radionuclide, and specific characteristics of the sampled specimens and the marine environment (salinity, etc.). The bioconcentration factor for a marine organism is the ratio of the concentration of a radionuclide in that organism to the concentration found in its marine water environment - under conditions of equilibrium. Information on the bioaccumulation of Cs-137 in marine organisms is required to risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health. Bioaccumulation of Cs was investigated in marine biota from west Bangka such as Marine cat fish (Arius thalassinus), Baramundi (Lates calcarifer), Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), Striped eel catfish (Plotosus lineatus), eel tailed fish (Euristhmus microceps), Yellowtail fusilier (Caesio erythrogaster), Coastal crab (Scylla sp), White shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and marine bivalve mollusk (Anadara granosa). Muscle of these marine biota, sediments and water were assayed for Cs-137 by HPGe gamma spectrometer. The bioaccumulation factor for fishes were calculated by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in water. The bioaccumulation factor for mollusks were calculates by ratio of concentration Cs-137 in muscle biota to the its concentration in sediments. The bioaccumulation factor were range 4.99 to 136.34.

Suseno, Heny, E-mail: henis@batan.go.id [Radioactive Waste Technology Center - The Indonesia Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) (Indonesia)

2014-03-24

13

Redistribution of soil biota by rainfall erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil is central to the provision of multiple ecosystem services that sustain life through a myriad of chemical, physical and biological processes. One of the greatest threats to soil is erosion, a natural process accelerated by human activities. Elevated erosion rates are common in agro-ecosystems causing both direct physical impacts (e.g. soil loss), and indirect biogeochemical consequences, which ultimately leads to impaired ecosystem functioning. The consequences of erosion on soil biota have hitherto been ignored, yet biota have fundamental roles in the provision of soil ecosystem services. To our knowledge few studies have addressed the gap between erosion and impacts on soil biota. Here we use soil nematodes as a model organism for assessing erosion impacts on soil (micro) fauna in temperate agro-ecosystems. Soil nematodes are ubiquitous, abundant, are represented at all levels in soil food webs and can be categorised into a range of trophic or functional groups. To quantify transport of nematodes and gain a better understanding of erosive mechanisms responsible, we measured their export from small erosion plots (0.0625m2) under a fixed-intensity design rainstorm (6mm min-1 duration: 3 min) over six slope angles (4° - 24°) and three soil texture classes (sandy silt, silty sand, silt). Runoff and eroded sediment were collected for each plot (four replicate runs), and a suite of biological and physico-chemical parameters measured. Results confirmed that, similar to soil particles, nematodes were exported at rates influenced by slope angle and soil texture. These experiments, linked with field and catchment-scale equivalents, are designed to elucidate the links between soil erosion and provision of ecosystem services and to inform biodiversity-sensitive soil and water conservation practices.

Baxter, Craig; Rowan, John; McKenzie, Blair; Neilson, Roy

2013-04-01

14

A Silurian soft-bodied biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new Silurian (Llandoverian) biota from Wisconsin with a significant soft-bodied and lightly sclerotized component is dominated by arthropods and worms. The fauna includes the earliest well-preserved xiphosure, a possible marine uniramian, three new arthropods of uncertain affinity, and possibly the first Paleozoic leech. This may be only the second locality to yield a conodont animal. Lack of a normal shelly fauna suggests an unusual environment. The discovery adds significantly to the few such exceptionally preserved faunas known from Lower Paleozoic rocks.

Mikulic, D.G.; Briggs, D.E.G.; Kluessendorf, J.

1985-01-01

15

Metal contamination in sediments and biota of the Bay of Quinte, Lake Ontario, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bay of Quinte receives drainage from several large river systems, including the Moira River which carried sediment from mines into the Bay from the 1880s to the 1960s. We are investigating possible metal contamination of submerged weed beds and marsh biota which may contribute to the low diversity and biomass of macrophyte beds and Typha marshes in the Bay.

Adele Crowder; William T. Dushenko; Jean Greig; John S. Poland

1989-01-01

16

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota  

E-print Network

Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 8 What are soil biota? Soil biota, the biologically active, and earthworms), can live in an acre of soil and are more diverse than the community of plants and animals above and earthworms, shred dead leaves and residue, mix them with the soil, and make organic material more accessible

17

Compartmentalisation Strategies for Hydrocarbon-based Biota on Titan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of our study is to determine the nature of compartimentalisation strategies for any organisms inhabiting the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan (the largest moon of Saturn). Since receiving huge amounts of data via the Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system astrobiologists have speculated that exotic biota might currently inhabit this environment. The biota have been theorized to consume acetylene and hydrogen whilst excreting methane (1,2) leading to an anomalous hydrogen depletion near the surface; and there has been evidence to suggest this depletion exists (3). Nevertheless, many questions still remain concerning the possible physiological traits of biota in these environments, including whether cell-like structures can form in low temperature, low molecular weight hydrocarbons. The backbone of terrestrial cell membranes are vesicular structures composed primarily of a phospholipid bilayer with the hydrophilic head groups arranged around the periphery and are thought to be akin to the first protocells that terrestrial life utilised (4). It my be possible that reverse vesicles composed of a bilayer with the hydrophilic head groups arranged internally and a nonpolar core may be ideal model cell membranes for hydrocarbon-based organisms inhabiting Titan's hydrocarbon lakes (5). A variety of different surfactants have been used to create reverse vesicles in nonpolar liquids to date including; non-ionic ethers (7) and esters (6, 8); catanionic surfactant mixtures (9); zwitterionic gemini surfactants (10); coblock polymer surfactants (11); and zwitterionic phospholipid surfactants (12). In order to discover whether certain phospholipids can exhibit vesicular behaviour within hydrocarbon liquids, and to analyse their structure, we have carried out experimental studies using environmental conditions that are increasing comparable to those found on the surface of Titan. Experimental methods that have been used to determine the presence of vesicles include the use of microscopy, the presence of the Tyndall scattering effect, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) , small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). These studies are currently being anaylzed, however, some results have indcated the presence of reverse vesicles in certain systems. Compounds that are shown to form reverse vesicles in conditions comparable to those of Titan's lakes could be potential 'biomarkers' and searched for in future missions to Titan. References [1] Schulze-Makuch D et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 36, 324 (2006). [2] McKay C P et al. Icarus 178, 274 (2005). [3] Strobel D F. Icarus 208, 878 (2010). [4]. Fiordemondo D et al. Chem. Bio. Chem. 8, 1965 (2007). [5] Norman L H et al. A&G 52, 39 (2011). [6] Mollee H et al. J Pharm Sci 89, 930 (2000). ). [7] Kunieda H et al. Langmuir 15, 3118 (1999). [8] Shrestha L K et al. Langmuir 22, 1449 (2006). [9] Li H G et al. Chem. Lett 36, 702 (2007). [10] Peresypkin A et al. Mendeleev Commun. 17, 82 (2007). [11] Rangelov S et al. J. Phys. Chem B 108, 7542 (2004). [12] Tung S H et al. J. Am. Chem. 130, 8813 (2008).

Norman, L.; Fortes, A. D.; Skipper, N.; Crawford, I.

2013-05-01

18

Comparative analysis of doses to aquatic biota in water bodies impacted by radioactive contamination.  

PubMed

Comparative analysis of doses to the reference species of freshwater biota was performed for the following water bodies in Russia or former USSR: Chernobyl NPPs cooling pond, Lakes Uruskul and Berdenish located in the Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace, Techa River, Yenisei River. It was concluded that the doses to biota were considerably different in the acute and chronic periods of radioactive contamination. The most vulnerable part of all considered aquatic ecosystems was benthic trophic chain. A numerical scale on the "dose rate - effects" relationships for fish was formulated. Threshold dose rates above which radiation effects can be expected in fish were evaluated to be the following: 1 mGy d(-1) for appearance of the first morbidity effects in fish; 5 mGy d(-1) for the first negative effects on reproduction system; 10 mGy d(-1) for the first effects on life shortening of fish. The results of dose assessment to biota were compared with the scale "dose rate - effects" and the literature data on the radiobiological effects observed in the considered water bodies. It was shown that in the most contaminated water bodies the dose rates were high enough to cause the radiobiological effects in fish. PMID:21924530

Kryshev, A I; Sazykina, T G

2012-06-01

19

Residues of organochlorine insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and heavy metals in biota from Apalachicola River, Florida, 1978.  

PubMed

Seventy-seven composite samples composed of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides ), channel catfish ( Ictaluras punctatus), threadfin shad ( Dorosoma petenense ), Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea ), burrowing mayfly ( Hexagenia sp.), water snake ( Natrix spp.), and little green heron ( Butorides virescens ) were collected from upper and lower reaches of the Apalachicola River, Florida, in 1978 for residue analysis of organochlorine insecticides, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), and metals. Compared with data from the National Pesticide Monitoring Program and criteria recommended for the protection of aquatic life, residue concentrations were moderately high in the Apalachicola River. Biota from the upper river generally had higher organic and lower metal residues than those from the lower river. Highest residues in the biota were total DDT, total PCBs, and toxaphene. Although individual mean concentrations were below 2 micrograms/g and total organic contaminant residues never exceeded 5 micrograms/g, residue concentrations of DDT, PCBs, and toxaphene (particularly from the upper river) exceeded recommended permissible levels for the protection of aquatic life. Metal residues were generally below 1 microgram/g. Exceptions were arsenic residues in threadfin shad (1.07 micrograms/g) and Asiatic clams (1.75 micrograms/g), and selenium in eggs of channel catfish (1.39 micrograms/g). The residues observed in the biota, particularly from the upper station, indicated moderate contamination of the Apalachicola River system at the time samples were collected. PMID:6427177

Winger, P V; Sieckman, C; May, T W; Johnson, W W

1984-01-01

20

Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples.  

PubMed

A pilot study aimed on possible occurrence of elevated activity of non-exchangable organically bound tritium (NE-OBT) in biota was performed. The first results showed a significant surplus of NE-OBT activity in biota of the valley of Mohelno reservoir and Jihlava river. The liquid releases of HTO from the nuclear power plant Dukovany is the source of tritium in this area. This area can be a source of various types of natural samples for future studies of tritium pathways. PMID:24582481

Svetlik, I; Fejgl, M; Malátová, I; Tomaskova, L

2014-11-01

21

Direct Extrapolation of Biota-sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAFs)  

EPA Science Inventory

Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for fish and shellfish were extrapolated directly from one location and species to other species, to other locations within a site, to other sites, and their combinations. The median errors in the extrapolations across species at a loc...

22

Assessing Exposure of Marine Biota and Habitats to Petroleum Compounds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This publication, reprinted from Analytical Chemistry News & Features (March 1, 1998; pp. 186 A-192) describes methods that "accurately and rapidly measure aromatic components of oil spills in marine biota and habitats." In addition to full-text, the report includes color photographs, tables, chromatograms, and references.

23

Taiwan's industrial heavy metal pollution threatens terrestrial biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bioconcentration levels of essential (Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Sn) elements have been investigated in different terrestrial biota such as fungi, plant, earthworm, snail, crab, insect, amphibian, lizard, snake, and bat including the associated soil, to investigate the ecosystem health status in Kenting National Park, Taiwan. High bioconcentrations of Cd, Hg,

M. J. Hsu; K. Selvaraj; G. Agoramoorthy

2006-01-01

24

Radiation exposure to marine biota around the Fukushima Daiichi NPP.  

PubMed

The dose rates for six marine organisms, pelagic fish, benthic fish, mollusks, crustaceans, macroalgae, and polychaete worms, representative in marine ecosystems, have been predicted by the equilibrium model with the measured seawater activity concentrations at three locations around the Fukushima Daiich nuclear power plant after the accident on March 11, 2011. Model prediction showed that total dose rates for the biota in the costal sea reached 4.8E4 ?Gy/d for pelagic fish, 3.6E6 ?Gy/d for crustaceans, 3.8E6 ?Gy/d for benthic fish, 5.2E6 ?Gy/d for macroalgae, 6.6E6 ?Gy/d for mollusks, and 8.0E6 ?Gy/d for polychaete worms. The predicted total dose rates remained above the UNSCEAR's (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation) benchmark level (1.0E4 ?Gy/d for an individual aquatic organism), for only the initial short period, which seems to be insufficiently long to bring about any detrimental effect on the marine biota at the population level. Furthermore, the total dose rates for benthic fish and crustaceans approximated using the measured activity concentration of the biota and bottom sediment was well below the benchmark level. From these results, it may be concluded that the impact of the ionizing radiation on the marine biota around the Fukushima NPP as a consequence of the accident would be insignificant. PMID:24374805

Keum, Dong-Kwon; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-Ho

2014-05-01

25

Beneficial effects of biota, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine on learning impairment induced by basal forebrain-lesion in mice.  

PubMed

The effects of biota (Biota orientalis ENDL.) on learning impairment produced by bilateral lesion of basal forebrain in mice were studied using step-through and step-down type passive avoidance tasks. Basal forebrain-lesion was generated by applying radiofrequency current. Behavioral experiment, started 15d after the survey, revealed prominent delay in the memory acquisition process in the lesioned mice. The operation also induced memory retention deficit in both learning tests. Chronic oral administration of ethanol extract of biota seeds at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg/d, from the day of surgery until the end of the behavioral test, dose-dependently improved memory acquisition impairment in the step-down test and memory retention disturbance in both behavioral tasks. The preparation also had a tendency to alleviate memory acquisition impairment in the step-through test. Although precise action mechanisms of biota extract remains speculative, such as what component works on which target, the present results clearly suggest that the preparation affects the learning and memory processes in the central nervous system and improves the impairment of memory acquisition and retention disturbances produced by basal forebrain-lesion. PMID:8593469

Nishiyama, N; Chu, P J; Saito, H

1995-11-01

26

Effects of soil biota from different ranges on Robinia invasion: acquiring mutualists and escaping pathogens  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The net effects of soil biota from invaded ranges are often less inhibitory to exotic invasive plants than soil biota from native ranges. However, the net effects of soil biota on exotics are highly variable, in part because net effects are the products of complex effects of suites of interacting s...

27

Analytical Methods for Measuring Mercury in Water, Sediment and Biota  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) exists in a large number of physical and chemical forms with a wide range of properties. Conversion between these different forms provides the basis for mercury's complex distribution pattern in local and global cycles and for its biological enrichment and effects. Since the 1960’s, the growing awareness of environmental mercury pollution has stimulated the development of more accurate, precise and efficient methods of determining mercury and its compounds in a wide variety of matrices. During recent years new analytical techniques have become available that have contributed significantly to the understanding of mercury chemistry in natural systems. In particular, these include ultra sensitive and specific analytical equipment and contamination-free methodologies. These improvements allow for the determination of total mercury as well as major species of mercury to be made in water, sediments and soils, and biota. Analytical methods are selected depending on the nature of the sample, the concentration levels of mercury, and what species or fraction is to be quantified. The terms “speciation” and “fractionation” in analytical chemistry were addressed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) which published guidelines (Templeton et al., 2000) or recommendations for the definition of speciation analysis. "Speciation analysis is the analytical activity of identifying and/or measuring the quantities of one or more individual chemical species in a sample. The chemical species are specific forms of an element defined as to isotopic composition, electronic or oxidation state, and/or complex or molecular structure. The speciation of an element is the distribution of an element amongst defined chemical species in a system. In case that it is not possible to determine the concentration of the different individual chemical species that sum up the total concentration of an element in a given matrix, meaning it is impossible to determine the speciation, it is a useful practice to do fractionation instead. Fractionation is the process of classification of an analyte or a group of analytes from a certain sample according to physical (e.g. size, solubility) or chemical (e.g. bonding, reactivity) properties."

Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Gill, Gary A.; Horvat, Milena

2012-06-07

28

THE EDIACARA BIOTA: Neoproterozoic Origin of Animals and Their Ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ediacara biota (575-542 Ma) marks the first appearance of large, architecturally complex organisms in Earth history. Present evidence suggests that the Ediacara biota included a mixture of stem- and crown-group radial animals, stem-group bilaterian animals, "failed experiments" in animal evolution, and perhaps representatives of other eukaryotic kingdoms. These soft-bodied organisms were preserved under (or rarely within) event beds of sand or volcanic ash, and four distinct preservational styles (Flinders-, Fermeuse-, Conception-, and Nama-style) profoundly affected the types of organisms and features that could be preserved. Even the earliest Ediacaran communities (575-565 Ma) show vertical and lateral niche subdivision of the sessile, benthic, filter-feeding organisms, which is strikingly like that of Phanerozoic and modern communities. Later biological and ecological innovations include mobility (>555 Ma), calcification (550 Ma), and predation (<549 Ma). The Ediacara biota abruptly disappeared 542 million years ago, probably as a consequence of mass extinction andor biological interactions with the rapidly evolving animals of the Cambrian explosio

Narbonne, Guy M.

2005-01-01

29

The utility of stream habitat and biota for identifying potential conflicting forest land uses: Montane riparian areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rinne, J.N., 1990. The utility of stream habitat and biota for identifying potential conflicting forest land uses: Montane riparian areas. For. Ecol. Manage., 33\\/34: 363-383. Investigations since 1960 on the effects of land-management practices on riparian-stream systems often have produced contradictory results. Inconsistencies have occurred, in part, because of efforts that have not been totally comprehensive and, in part, because

John N. Rinne

1990-01-01

30

Factors affecting the organochlorine pollutant load in biota of a rice field ecosystem (Ebro Delta, NE Spain).  

PubMed

The concentrations of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, HCB and OCS were determined in sediments and associated biota, both invertebrates (Physella acuta, Hirudo medicinalis, chironomid larvae, Hydrous pistaceus, Helochares lividus) and vertebrates (Rana perezi), in a temporary aquatic system, a rice field in the Ebro Delta (NE Spain). The qualitative and quantitative distribution of organochlorine compounds in sediments and aquatic biota has been explained by two mechanisms: equilibrium partitioning and/or biomagnification through the trophic web. Nevertheless, bioaccumulation processes are by far more complex, since several biotic and abiotic factors contribute to the observed pollutant loads in the organisms. In this respect, the biological characteristics of the organisms considered (e.g. species, age, lipid contents, feeding habits, etc.), as well as ecological factors (e.g. the habitat of the species and vertical distribution), have been shown to account for the organochlorine levels observed. PMID:15006509

Pastor, D; Sanpera, C; González-Solís, J; Ruiz, X; Albaigés, J

2004-04-01

31

Mercury Contamination of Biota from Acadia National Park, Maine: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed literature reporting both total and methylmercury from biota from Acadia National Park, Maine, USA. Our review\\u000a of existing data indicates that 1) mercury contamination is widespread throughout the Park’s various aquatic ecosystems; 2)\\u000a mercury pollution likely represents a moderate to high risk to biota inhabiting the Park; and 3) biota at all trophic levels\\u000a possess elevated concentrations of

Michael S. Bank; John R. Burgess; David C. Evers; Cynthia S. Loftin

2007-01-01

32

An Effective Solid State Sensor for In-situ Measurement of the Chemical and Thermal Environment Near Vent Biota - Preliminary Results from the Galapagos Expedition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal activity and associated biota 25 years ago in the Galapagos Rift Zone, numerous efforts have been devoted to study the chemistry of the venting fluids and its impact on vent animals. However, owing to limited progress in development of in-situ sensing technology under this extreme condition, our knowledge of this systems has largely been

K. Ding; W. E. Seyfried; Z. Zhang

2002-01-01

33

Status and health of biota at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal  

SciTech Connect

Field studies have been conducted on the populations and communities of the biota at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) since the late 1950`s. While earlier studies were primarily documentation of mortality events, a diverse program of studies conducted since 1982 has assessed a number of relevant endpoints. Studies of sedentary species (e.g. plants, earthworm, grasshoppers) focused on contaminated areas within RMA to identify potential contaminant effects. Studies on more mobile species (e.g. deer, great horned owls, kestrels) were conducted throughout RMA to evaluate effects on their RMA-wide populations. Both on- and off-post reference sites were used in some of the studies. Ecological endpoints were selected that were focused upon the population-level effects that could have a causal relationship to the RMA contaminants, such as population abundance and reproductive success, biomarkers, and community organization. Current EPA guidance on conducting ecological risk assessment encourages the use of observational field studies. Although many of these studies were conducted prior to the issuance of this guidance, they are consistent with its scope and intent. Investigators on the effects of contamination at RMA during the past decade indicate that while some effects may still be present in biota at RMA, the wildlife communities and populations are viable and appear healthy.

Macrander, A.M.; Mackey, C.V.; Reagen, D.P.; Tate, D.J.

1994-12-31

34

Carbon-14 Specific Activity Model Validation for Biota in Wetland Environments  

SciTech Connect

In many cases, contaminants, such as radionuclides, can show highly localized spatial distributions in natural systems. Therefore, a key question for environmental assessment and monitoring becomes, how can these localized distributions of contaminants in the environment lead to organism exposure, and ultimately, the potential for effects to receptor biota? To address this question, an important first step is to conduct field surveys at sites of interest to map out the spatial distribution and extent of contaminants in areas that are being occupied and utilized by resident receptor biota. Work can then be conducted to establish predictive relationships between contaminant concentrations in biota tissues and those in environmental media with which biota interact, to gain an understanding of how representative ambient contaminant concentrations are of biota exposure. The objectives of this study were: - To conduct a field survey in a wetland ecosystem to characterize the spatial distribution of carbon- 14 ({sup 14}C), a radionuclide with dynamics in natural systems that can be described using a specific activity model; and - To determine whether {sup 14}C concentrations in environmental media reflect those measured in tissues of resident flora and fauna. A detailed field campaign was carried out in summer 2001 to characterize the spatial distribution and areal coverage of {sup 14}C in Duke Swamp, a wetland ecosystem on Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site that receives {sup 14}C through releases from an up-gradient Waste Management Area (WMA), primarily through groundwater influx. Sampling of surface vegetation (dominantly comprised of Sphagnum moss) was conducted at a total of 69 locations, with complementary sampling of air, soil, fungi, aerial insects, ground-dwelling insects, amphibians, small mammals and snakes being carried out at a subset of five locations with varying {sup 14}C concentrations. Concentrations of {sup 14}C in resident Duke Swamp biota were compared to levels measured in environmental media (including moss, soil and air) to determine whether concentrations in such media reflect animal exposure, for application in routine environmental monitoring programs on the CRL site. In general, for most types of receptor animals, {sup 14}C specific activities were found to be similar to or less than those measured in air, soil and surface vegetation at all locations sampled, suggesting that in most cases, estimates of {sup 14}C levels in animals could either be realistically or conservatively predicted based on the values measured in environmental media. In the case of fungi, receptor-to-media {sup 14}C specific activity ratios fell between 0.04 and 0.23 relative to air, between 0.03 and 0.70 relative to soil, and between 0.078 and 0.31 relative to moss. Small mammal specific activities also generally fell well below those that would be predicted based on specific activities measured in environmental media, with ratios ranging from 0.11 to 0.36 relative to air, from 0.17 to 0.85 relative to soil and from 0.21 to 0.58 relative to moss. Similar ratios were also established for snakes; however, a notable exception occurred for amphibians, a type of animal that tends to spend relatively more time in aquatic environments than the other species tested. In the case of Duke Swamp amphibians, animal-to-air {sup 14}C specific activity ratios ranged from 0.40 to 2.3, animal-to-soil ratios ranged from 0.81 to 3.4 and animal-to-moss ratios ranged from 1.5 to 2.4. These higher {sup 14}C levels in amphibians relative to the environmental media may be due to increased {sup 14}C exposure of aquatic or amphibious animals that occupy systems receiving inputs via groundwater. In such systems, {sup 14}C is incorporated in aquatic plants and animals, and later transferred to higher predatory species, such as amphibians, that consume them. Therefore, with the exception of amphibians and other aquatic receptor species, it is reasonable to estimate concentrations of {sup 14}C in receptor biota in w

Yankovich, T.L.; Sharp, K.J.; Benz, M.L.; Carr, J.; Killey, R.W.D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1P0 (Canada)

2008-01-15

35

Cryptic vicariance in the historical assembly of a Baja California Peninsular Desert biota  

E-print Network

Cryptic vicariance in the historical assembly of a Baja California Peninsular Desert biota Brett R of a distinct Baja California Peninsular Desert biota. Comparative examination of phylogroup distributions evolutionary history of the Peninsular Desert has been obscured and ignored. The Peninsular Desert can

Jaeger, Jef R.

36

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota of  

E-print Network

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota Data Series 658 #12;#12;Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water.J., 2012, Mercury species and other selected constituent concentrations in water, sediment, and biota

37

Zinc in the sediments, water and biota of Lake Burley Griffin, Canberra  

E-print Network

HI 235 Zinc in the sediments, water and biota of Lake Burley Griffin, Canberra W.A. Maher, RResearchCentre. Universityo/Canberra. P.O. Box /. BelconnenACT 26/6. Australia ABSTRAcr Zinc concentrations and total amounts in the sediment, water and biota of Lake Burley Griffin were measured to identify where zinc originating from

Canberra, University of

38

Paleoecology of benthic metazoans in the Early Cambrian Maotianshan Shale biota and the Middle Cambrian Burgess  

E-print Network

Paleoecology of benthic metazoans in the Early Cambrian Maotianshan Shale biota and the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale biota: evidence for the Cambrian substrate revolution Stephen Q. Dornbosa,*, David J. Bibliotheks and Informationsystem del Carl von Ossietzky Universitat, Oldenburg, 97­105], and the impact

Dornbos, Stephen Q.

39

Do interactions between plant and soil biota change with elevation? A study on Fagus sylvatica  

PubMed Central

Theoretical models predict weakening of negative biotic interactions and strengthening of positive interactions with increasing abiotic stress. However, most empirical tests have been restricted to plant–plant interactions. No empirical study has examined theoretical predictions of interactions between plants and below-ground micro-organisms, although soil biota strongly regulates plant community composition and dynamics. We examined variability in soil biota effects on tree regeneration across an abiotic gradient. Our candidate tree species was European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), whose regeneration is extremely responsive to soil biota activity. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured tree survival in sterilized and non-sterilized soils collected across an elevation gradient in the French Alps. Negative effects of soil biota on tree survival decreased with elevation, similar to shifts observed in plant–plant interactions. Hence, soil biota effects must be included in theoretical models of plant biotic interactions to accurately represent and predict the effects of abiotic gradient on plant communities. PMID:21525055

Defossez, Emmanuel; Courbaud, Benoît; Marcais, Benoît; Thuiller, Wilfried; Granda, Elena; Kunstler, Georges

2011-01-01

40

Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms  

PubMed Central

Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m?3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

2014-01-01

41

Group report: Physiological and ecological effects of acidification on aquatic biota (Chapter 19). Book chapter  

SciTech Connect

Acidification affects all components of biological communities in lakes and streams: microbes, algae, macrophytes, invertebrates, fish amphibians, and other vertebrates that rely on aquatic ecosystems for habitat or food. Mechanisms of effect are both direct (toxic responses to changes in chemistry) and indirect (e.g., expressed through the food chain or caused by changes in habitat), and the responses may be immediate or delayed. In turn, many biological processes, especially microbial processes, can influence surface water acid-base chemistry. Thus, chemical and biological changes are intricately linked and complex, with extensive feedbacks. Research on the effects of acid deposition and acidification on aquatic biota has been ongoing in Europe and North America for over the last 15 years, and many comprehensive reviews have been published. These gaps often have occurred because funding has focused on chemical mechanisms and modeling response of systems rather than in making resource inventories or resolving uncertainties in biological responses to acidification.

Baker, J.P.; Boehmer, J.; Hartmann, A.; Havas, M.; Jenkins, A.

1994-01-01

42

Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

2014-03-01

43

Declines of biomes and biotas and the future of evolution  

PubMed Central

Although panel discussants disagreed whether the biodiversity crisis constitutes a mass extinction event, all agreed that current extinction rates are 50–500 times background and are increasing and that the consequences for the future evolution of life are serious. In response to the on-going rapid decline of biomes and homogenization of biotas, the panelists predicted changes in species geographic ranges, genetic risks of extinction, genetic assimilation, natural selection, mutation rates, the shortening of food chains, the increase in nutrient-enriched niches permitting the ascendancy of microbes, and the differential survival of ecological generalists. Rates of evolutionary processes will change in different groups, and speciation in the larger vertebrates is essentially over. Action taken over the next few decades will determine how impoverished the biosphere will be in 1,000 years when many species will suffer reduced evolvability and require interventionist genetic and ecological management. Whether the biota will continue to provide the dependable ecological services humans take for granted is less clear. The discussants offered recommendations, including two of paramount importance (concerning human populations and education), seven identifying specific scientific activities to better equip us for stewardship of the processes of evolution, and one suggesting that such stewardship is now our responsibility. The ultimate test of evolutionary biology as a science is not whether it solves the riddles of the past but rather whether it enables us to manage the future of the biosphere. Our inability to make clearer predictions about the future of evolution has serious consequences for both biodiversity and humanity. PMID:11344296

Woodruff, David S.

2001-01-01

44

Fukushima nuclear accident: preliminary assessment of the risks to non-human biota.  

PubMed

This study assesses the 'radio-ecological' impacts of Fukushima nuclear accident on non-human biota using the ERICA Tool, which adopts an internationally verified methodology. The paper estimates the impacts of the accident on terrestrial and marine biota based on the environmental data reported in literature for Japan, China, South Korea and the USA. Discernible impacts have been detected in the marine biota around Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This study confirms that the Fukushima accident had caused heavier damage to marine bionts compared with terrestrial flora and fauna, in Japan. PMID:24827576

Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur; Liman, Muhammad Sanusi

2015-02-01

45

Mudflat biota since the 1930s: change beyond return?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Where, since the 1980s, patchy and variable green algal mats are prevailing, distinct belts of an amphipod ( Corophium volutator) and seagrass ( Zostera spp.) had dominated in the 1930s. The zonation between tide marks has been mapped in a sheltered sedimentary bay in the Wadden Sea near the island of Sylt (coastal eastern North Sea). Maps on vegetation from 1924 and on selected macrobenthos from 1932 and 1934 are compared with biannual surveys conducted from 1988 to 2006. Rising high water levels and eutrophication are suggested to be major causes of the observed long-term changes. In front of a saltmarsh, a sandy beach developed and partly displaced former cyanobacterial mats. Advancing sandiness may have inhibited C. volutator and facilitated lugworms, Arenicola marina, in the upper tidal zone. A variable occurrence of green algal mats arising in the 1980s affected infauna and seagrass by smothering the biota underneath. This dissolved a coherent belt of Zostera noltii. In the lower tidal zone, natural disturbances had lasting effects on the occurrence of mussels with attached fucoid algae. The spectrum of species became enriched by alien species (13% of macrobenthic taxa). A reversal to habitat structure and biotic zonation of the 1920-1930s does not seem possible. Aliens, in combination with climate change, are expected to further divert the ecological pattern to new configurations.

Reise, Karsten; Herre, Elisabeth; Sturm, Manfred

2008-03-01

46

Climate interaction mechanism between solar activity and terrestrial biota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solar activity has been proposed as one of the main factors of Earth's climate variability, however biological processes have been also proposed. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is the main biogenic sulfur compound in the atmosphere. DMS is mainly produced by the marine biosphere and plays an important role in the atmospheric sulfur cycle. Currently it is accepted that terrestrial biota not only adapts to environmental conditions but influences them through regulations of the chemical composition of the atmosphere. In the present study we used different methods of analysis to investigate the relationship between the DMS, Low Clouds, Ultraviolet Radiation A (UVA) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the Southern Hemisphere. We found that the series analyzed have different periodicities which can be associated with climatic and solar phenomena such as El Niño, the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and the changes in solar activity. Also, we found an anticorrelation between DMS and UVA, the relation between DMS and clouds is mainly non-linear and there is a correlation between DMS and SST. Then, our results suggest a positive feedback interaction among DMS, solar radiation and cloud at time-scales shorter than the solar cycle.

Osorio-Rosales, J.; Mendoza, B.

2012-07-01

47

SURVEY, ECOLOGY, AND SYSTEMATICS OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY BIOTA: AUFWUCHS MICROFAUNA PHASE III  

E-print Network

#12;#12;SURVEY, ECOLOGY, AND SYSTEMATICS OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY BIOTA: AUFWUCHS MICROFAUNA) of the fresh water estuarine Potomac River from Hains Point to Piscataway Creek. Initially all eight aquaria

District of Columbia, University of the

48

FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

General guidance for designing field studies to measure bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) is not available. To develop such guidance, a series of modeling simulations were performed to evaluate the underlying factors and principles th...

49

FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

A series of modeling simulations were performed to develop an understanding of the underlying factors and principles involved in developing field sampling designs for measuring bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs. These simulations reveal...

50

ENANTIOMERIC COMPOSITION OF CHIRAL POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL ATROPISOMERS IN AQUATIC AND RIPARIAN BIOTA  

EPA Science Inventory

The enantiomeric composition of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) atropisomers was measured in river and riparian biota (fish, bivalves, crayfish, water snakes, barn swallows) from selected sites throughout the United States by using chiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Nonr...

51

Effects of soil biota from different ranges on Robinia invasion: acquiring mutualists and escaping pathogens.  

PubMed

The net effects of soil biota on exotic invaders can be variable, in part, because net effects are produced by many interacting mutualists and antagonists. Here we compared mutualistic and antagonistic biota in soils collected in the native, expanded, and invasive range of the black locust tree, Robinia pseudoacacia. Robinia formed nodules in all soils with a broad phylogenetic range of N-fixing bacteria, and leaf N did not differ among the different sources of soil. This suggests that the global expansion of Robinia was not limited by the lack of appropriate mutualistic N-fixers. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) from the native range stimulated stronger positive feedbacks than AMF from the expanded or invasive ranges, a biogeographic difference not described previously for invasive plants. Pythium taxa collected from soil in the native range were not more pathogenic than those from other ranges; however, feedbacks produced by the total soil biota were more negative from soils from the native range than from the other ranges, overriding the effects of AMF. This suggests that escape from other pathogens in the soil or the net negative effects of the whole soil community may contribute to superior performance in invaded regions. Our results suggest that important regional evolutionary relationships may occur among plants and soil biota, and that net effects of soil biota may affect invasion, but in ways that are not easily explained by studying isolated components of the soil biota. PMID:21661564

Callaway, Ragan M; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Reinhart, Kurt O; Silvan, Cinta Gómez; Klironomos, John

2011-05-01

52

Coal ash basin effects (particulates, metals, acidic pH) upon aquatic biota: an eight-year evaluation. [Gambusia affinis; Plathemis lydia; Libellula spp  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coal ash effluent effects including particulates, acidic pH excursions, elemental concentrations and bioconcentration in selected organisms have been studied as changes in water quality and densities of benthic macroinvertebrate and mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) populations in a swanmp drainage system over an eight-year period. Initial density of the aquatic biota was altered severely by heavy ash siltation, followed by acidic pH

D. S. Cerry; R. K. Guthrie; E. M. Davis; R. S. Harvey

1984-01-01

53

Improvements and application of a modified gas chromatography atomic fluorescence spectroscopy method for routine determination of methylmercury in biota samples.  

PubMed

Improvements to the application of a combined solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to pyrolysis and atomic fluorescence spectrometry method (SPME-GC-AFS) for methylmercury (MeHg) determination in biota samples are presented. Our new method includes improvements in the methodology of determination and the quantification technique. A shaker instead of a stirrer was used, in order to reduce the possibility of sample contamination and to simplify cleaning procedures. Then, optimal rotation frequency and shaking time were settled at 800 rpm and 10 min, respectively. Moreover, the GC-AFS system was equipped with a valve and an argon heater to eliminate the effect of the decrease in analytical signal caused by the moisture released from SPME fiber. For its determination, MeHg was first extracted from biota samples with a 25% KOH solution (3h) and then it was quantified by two methods, a conventional double standard addition method (AC) and a modified matrix-matched calibration (MQ) which is two times faster than the AC method. Both procedures were successfully tested with certified reference materials, and applied for the first time to the determination of MeHg in muscle samples of goosander (Mergus merganser) and liver samples of white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) with values ranging from 1.19 to 3.84 mg/kg dry weight (dw), and from 0.69 to 6.23 mg kg(-1) dw, respectively. PMID:24054647

Gorecki, Jerzy; Díez, Sergi; Macherzynski, Mariusz; Kalisinska, El?bieta; Golas, Janusz

2013-10-15

54

Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.  

PubMed

Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified Reference Material. The major contributions to the expanded uncertainty, i.e. 86.1%, arose from the uncertainty associated with recovery, followed by the contribution from fluorescence signal. Additional validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison with the values reported for MeHg in the IAEA-452 inter-laboratory comparison exercise. PMID:24720970

Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

2014-05-01

55

Mass extinction of the marine biota at the Ordovician-Silurian transition due to environmental changes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The terminal Ordovician was marked by one of five great mass extinction events of the Phanerozoic (445.6-443.0 Ma ago), when up to 86% of the marine species became extinct. The rapid onset of the continental glaciation on Gondwana determined by its position in the South Pole area; the cooling; the hydrodynamic changes through the entire water column in the World Ocean; and the corresponding sea level fall, which was responsible for the reduction of shelf areas and shallow-water basins, i.e., the main ecological niche of the Ordovician marine biota, were main prerequisites of the stress conditions. Similar to other mass extinction events, these processes were accompanied by volcanism, impact events, a corresponding reduction of the photosynthesis and bioproductivity, the destruction of food chains, and anoxia. The appearance and development of terrestrial plants and microphytoplankton, which consumed atmospheric carbon dioxide, thus, diminishing the greenhouse effect and promoting the transition of the climatic system to the glacial mode, played a unique role in that period.

Barash, M. S.

2014-11-01

56

Geological sampling data and benthic biota classification: Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sea-floor sample collection is an important component of a statewide cooperative mapping effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM). Sediment grab samples, bottom photographs, and video transects were collected within Vineyard Sound and Buzzards Bay in 2010 aboard the research vesselConnecticut. This report contains sample data and related information, including analyses of surficial-sediment grab samples, locations and images of sea-floor photography, survey lines along which sea-floor video was collected, and a classification of benthic biota observed in sea-floor photographs and based on the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS). These sample data and analyses information are used to verify interpretations of geophysical data and are an essential part of geologic maps of the sea floor. These data also provide a valuable inventory of benthic habitat and resources. Geographic information system (GIS) data, maps, and interpretations, produced through the USGS and CZM mapping cooperative, are intended to aid efforts to manage coastal and marine resources and to provide baseline information for research focused on coastal evolution and environmental change.

Ackerman, Seth D.; Pappal, Adrienne L.; Huntley, Emily C.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Schwab, William C.

2015-01-01

57

A geochemical investigation of hydrologically derived threats to rare biota: the Drummond Nature Reserve, Western Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Drummond Nature Reserve (DNR), a high-value conservation area 100 km northeast of Perth, Western Australia, contains two rare freshwater claypans and a diverse range of rare and threatened vascular plants. Groundwater/surface-water interactions were investigated via isotopic (?18O and ?D) and major ion analysis. The groundwater chemical and isotope analyses combined with nutrient data allowed for the assessment of potential hydrologically derived threats to the claypans and their associated conservation values. Groundwater composition is typically Na-Cl to Na-Mg-Cl; whereas the claypan's ephemeral fresh surface water is Na-Cl-HCO3. Distinct ?18O and ?D isotopic signatures for the claypan surface waters and adjoining groundwaters indicate that there currently is minimal connection between these two hydrological systems. Hence the current threat to the freshwater claypans and associated biota from rising saline and acidic groundwater is minimal. Elevated nutrient (N) levels identified in groundwaters along the reserve's western boundary may be linked to fertiliser regimes employed in adjoining agricultural lands. The ecosystem associated with the southwest claypan is particularly vulnerable to N and P inputs via surface-water flows, which could cause algal blooms, vegetation degradation and weed infestation.

Forbes, Matthew; Vogwill, Ryan

2012-02-01

58

Overview of the Late Cretaceous Biota of the western São Paulo State, Brazil, Bauru Group  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Turonian-Maastrichtian beds of the Bauru Group, western São Paulo State (Brazil), have yielded a diverse biota. The nine species of mesoecrocodilians are all mesosuchians. There is a single frog, a Neubatrachia. The vertebrates include, four types of fishes, a neobatrachian frog, an anilioid snake, two lizard, six species of podocnemid turtles, nine species of mesosuchian mesoecrocodilians three theropods, two birds, five titanosaurid sauropods, and one mammalian. The invertebrates include one cyclo, one cyclophoroid and eight pulmonates. Plants are represented by only two carophyte species. The biota from western São Paulo State is one the most diverse of the Late Cretaceous in Brazil. The biota from this area confirms that Bauru Group was connected to Patagonia and other Gondwanan areas during the Late Cretaceous.

Candeiro, Carlos Roberto A.; Rich, Thomas

2010-03-01

59

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aquatic biota from the lower reach of the Yangtze River, East China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixteen species of aquatic biota from the lower reach of the Yangtze River including fishes, crabs and shrimps were collected and analyzed for 13 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) congeners. All the PBDEs congeners except BDE-17 were detectable in the samples indicating that the aquatic biota from the lower reach of the Yangtze River are widely exposed to these pollutants. The

Zishen Gao; Jie Xu; Qiming Xian; Jianfang Feng; Xiaohui Chen; Hongxia Yu

2009-01-01

60

Effects of land use on water quality and aquatic biota of three North Carolina Piedmont streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three streams in the Piedmont ecoregion of North Carolina were studied to evaluate the effect of land use (forested, agricultural, urban) on water quality and aquatic biota. In comparison with the forested stream, there were few changes in water quality at the agricultural and urban streams. Suspended-sediment yield was greatest for the urban catchment and least at the forested catchment.

David R. Lenat; J. Kent Crawford

1994-01-01

61

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 21382149 Heterogeneity of soil nutrients and subsurface biota  

E-print Network

Author's personal copy Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 2138­2149 Heterogeneity of soil Laboratory, 999-W, Aiken, SC 29808, USA f Department of Plant & Soil Science, University of Vermont, Hills to have a highly heterogeneous distribution of nutrients and soil biota, with greater concentrations

Neher, Deborah A.

62

Chlorobenzenes, chlorinated pesticides, coplanar chlorobiphenyls and other organochlorine compounds in Greenland biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarises the levels and composition of chlorobenzenes, chlorinated pesticides, coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the chlorinated compounds octachlorostyrene (OCS), hexachlorocyclobutadiene (HCBD) and pentachloro-anisole (PCA) in biota from the terrestrial, freshwater and marine environment of Greenland. The data were obtained during the second phase of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP). Of the chlorobenzenes, hexachlorobenzene was the main

Katrin Vorkamp; Frank Riget; Marianne Glasius; Maria Pécseli; Michel Lebeuf; Derek Muir

2004-01-01

63

Atmospheric transport of persistent pollutants governs uptake by holarctic terrestrial biota  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric deposition of PCBs, DDT, and lindane, governed uptake in terrestrial biota in the Scandinavian peninsula. Mammalian herbivores and predators as well as predatory insects contained higher levels of pollutants at locations where the fallout load was high than at stations where atmospheric deposition was lower, and the two variables were significantly correlated.

Larsson, P.; Okla, L.; Woin, Per (Limnology, Lund (Sweden))

1990-10-01

64

The impact of agricultural practices on soil biota: a regional study1 Jean-Franois Pongea,  

E-print Network

;soil quality index; earthworms; macrofauna; microarthropods;20 Corresponding author. Tel.: +33 (0) 678930133, France hal-00869859,version1-4Oct2013 Author manuscript, published in "Soil Biology and Biochemistry 67 covering a regular grid of 109 sites spread over the whole area of French Brittany. Soil biota6 (earthworms

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

LEVELS OF SYNTHETIC MUSK COMPOUNDS IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER FOR ESTIMATING BIOTA EXPOSURE IN RECEIVING WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

To test the ruggedness of a newly developed analytical method for synthetic musks, a 1-year monthly monitoring of synthetic musks in water and biota was conducted for Lake Mead (near Las Vegas, Nevada) as well as for combined sewage-dedicated effluent streams feeding Lake ...

66

Technical report series: Concentrations of PCBs, DDTr, and selected metals in biota from Guntersville Reservoir  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose was to determine if there was potential for human health risks from consumption of reservoir fish or if selected toxic substances might be impacting reservoir biota. Fillets from catfish (channel and blue) and largemouth bass were analyzed for the first purpose and whole gizzard shad, catfish livers, and turtle livers and fat were analyzed for the second. Results

D. L. Dycus; D. R. Lowery

1986-01-01

67

Local Adaptation of Aboveground Herbivores towards Plant Phenotypes Induced by Soil Biota  

PubMed Central

Background Soil biota may trigger strong physiological responses in plants and consequently induce distinct phenotypes. Plant phenotype, in turn, has a strong impact on herbivore performance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that aboveground herbivores are able to adapt to plant phenotypes induced by soil biota. Methodology and Principal Findings We bred spider mites for 15 generations on snap beans with three different belowground biotic interactions: (i) no biota (to serve as control), (ii) arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and (ii) root-feeding nematodes. Subsequently, we conducted a reciprocal selection experiment using these spider mites, which had been kept on the differently treated plants. Belowground treatments induced changes in plant biomass, nutrient composition and water content. No direct chemical defence through cyanogenesis was detected in any of the plant groups. Growth rates of spider mites were higher on the ecotypes on which they were bred for 15 generations, although the statistical significance disappeared for mites from the nematode treatment when corrected for all multiple comparisons. Conclusion/Significance These results demonstrate that belowground biota may indeed impose selection on the aboveground insect herbivores mediated by the host plant. The observed adaptation was driven by variable quantitative changes of the different separately studied life history traits (i.e. fecundity, longevity, sex-ratio, time to maturity). PMID:20567507

Bonte, Dries; De Roissart, Annelies; Vandegehuchte, Martijn L.; Ballhorn, Daniel J.; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; de la Peña, Eduardo

2010-01-01

68

Cyanobacterial macrophytes in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone,  

E-print Network

, lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA ALEXANDRU M. F. TOMESCU, GAR W. ROTHWELL AND ROSMARIE in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA, in the lower Massanutten Sandstone (Virginia, USA). Filaments are predominantly multiseriate and consist

Tomescu, Alexandru MF

69

SOME BIOACCUMULATION FACTORS AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTORS FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN LAKE TROUT  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and chrysene/triphenylene were calculated using the tissue data of Zabik et al. for Salvelinus namaycush siscovet with 20.5% lipid content, th...

70

An atypical intra-platform environment and biota from the Silurian of Gotland, MIKAEL CALNER1  

E-print Network

shale from the middle Silurian of Gotland (Sweden) is herein described with regard to its bioticAn atypical intra-platform environment and biota from the Silurian of Gotland, Sweden MIKAEL CALNER of Gotland, Sweden. GFF, Vol. 130 (Pt. 2, June), pp. 79­86. Stockholm. ISSN 1103-5897. Abstract: A condensed

Calner, Mikael

71

Plantsoil biota interactions and spatial distribution of black cherry in its native and invasive ranges  

E-print Network

LETTER Plant­soil biota interactions and spatial distribution of black cherry in its native investigated. Here we present evidence showing that the invasion of black cherry (Prunus serotina) into north that develops near black cherry inhibits the establishment of neighbouring conspecifics and reduces seedling

Packer, Alissa A.

72

A method to assess longitudinal riverine connectivity in tropical streams dominated by migratory biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

1. One way in which dams affect ecosystem function is by altering the distribution and abundance of aquatic species. 2. Previous studies indicate that migratory shrimps have significant effects on ecosystem processes in Puerto Rican streams, but are vulnerable to impediments to upstream or downstream passage, such as dams and associated water intakes where stream water is withdrawn for human water supplies. Ecological effects of dams and water withdrawals from streams depend on spatial context and temporal variability of flow in relation to the amount of water withdrawn. 3. This paper presents a conceptual model for estimating the probability that an individual shrimp is able to migrate from a stream's headwaters to the estuary as a larva, and then return to the headwaters as a juvenile, given a set of dams and water withdrawals in the stream network. The model is applied to flow and withdrawal data for a set of dams and water withdrawals in the Caribbean National Forest (CNF) in Puerto Rico. 4. The index of longitudinal riverine connectivity (ILRC), is used to classify 17 water intakes in streams draining the CNF as having low, moderate, or high connectivity in terms of shrimp migration in both directions. An in-depth comparison of two streams showed that the stream characterized by higher water withdrawal had low connectivity, even during wet periods. Severity of effects is illustrated by a drought year, where the most downstream intake caused 100% larval shrimp mortality 78% of the year. 5. The ranking system provided by the index can be used as a tool for conservation ecologists and water resource managers to evaluate the relative vulnerability of migratory biota in streams, across different scales (reach-network), to seasonally low flows and extended drought. This information can be used to help evaluate the environmental tradeoffs of future water withdrawals. ?? 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Crook, K.E.; Pringle, C.M.; Freeman, M.C.

2009-01-01

73

Climate change and Southern Ocean ecosystems I: how changes in physical habitats directly affect marine biota.  

PubMed

Antarctic and Southern Ocean (ASO) marine ecosystems have been changing for at least the last 30 years, including in response to increasing ocean temperatures and changes in the extent and seasonality of sea ice; the magnitude and direction of these changes differ between regions around Antarctica that could see populations of the same species changing differently in different regions. This article reviews current and expected changes in ASO physical habitats in response to climate change. It then reviews how these changes may impact the autecology of marine biota of this polar region: microbes, zooplankton, salps, Antarctic krill, fish, cephalopods, marine mammals, seabirds, and benthos. The general prognosis for ASO marine habitats is for an overall warming and freshening, strengthening of westerly winds, with a potential pole-ward movement of those winds and the frontal systems, and an increase in ocean eddy activity. Many habitat parameters will have regionally specific changes, particularly relating to sea ice characteristics and seasonal dynamics. Lower trophic levels are expected to move south as the ocean conditions in which they are currently found move pole-ward. For Antarctic krill and finfish, the latitudinal breadth of their range will depend on their tolerance of warming oceans and changes to productivity. Ocean acidification is a concern not only for calcifying organisms but also for crustaceans such as Antarctic krill; it is also likely to be the most important change in benthic habitats over the coming century. For marine mammals and birds, the expected changes primarily relate to their flexibility in moving to alternative locations for food and the energetic cost of longer or more complex foraging trips for those that are bound to breeding colonies. Few species are sufficiently well studied to make comprehensive species-specific vulnerability assessments possible. Priorities for future work are discussed. PMID:24802817

Constable, Andrew J; Melbourne-Thomas, Jessica; Corney, Stuart P; Arrigo, Kevin R; Barbraud, Christophe; Barnes, David K A; Bindoff, Nathaniel L; Boyd, Philip W; Brandt, Angelika; Costa, Daniel P; Davidson, Andrew T; Ducklow, Hugh W; Emmerson, Louise; Fukuchi, Mitsuo; Gutt, Julian; Hindell, Mark A; Hofmann, Eileen E; Hosie, Graham W; Iida, Takahiro; Jacob, Sarah; Johnston, Nadine M; Kawaguchi, So; Kokubun, Nobuo; Koubbi, Philippe; Lea, Mary-Anne; Makhado, Azwianewi; Massom, Rob A; Meiners, Klaus; Meredith, Michael P; Murphy, Eugene J; Nicol, Stephen; Reid, Keith; Richerson, Kate; Riddle, Martin J; Rintoul, Stephen R; Smith, Walker O; Southwell, Colin; Stark, Jonathon S; Sumner, Michael; Swadling, Kerrie M; Takahashi, Kunio T; Trathan, Phil N; Welsford, Dirk C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Westwood, Karen J; Wienecke, Barbara C; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Wright, Simon W; Xavier, Jose C; Ziegler, Philippe

2014-10-01

74

Levels and spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in Greenland biota: an updated review.  

PubMed

Knowledge of contaminant levels in Greenland biota has increased substantially in recent years, particularly for persistent organic pollutants. This paper reviews and updates knowledge of spatial and temporal trends of Cd, Hg and organochlorines (PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, HCB and chlordane-related compounds) in Greenland terrestrial, freshwater and marine biota. The most comprehensive studies of spatial trends of Cd and Hg in the terrestrial ecosystem concern lichens, with relatively complete coverage, and caribou (Rangifer tarandus), with coverage mainly in different regions of central West Greenland and Southwest Greenland. The Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) is the only freshwater organism for which studies of spatial trends of Hg levels have been completed. Information on spatial trends of Cd and Hg in the marine environment is available from studies of fish, seabirds, ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Geographical patterns of Cd and Hg in Greenland biota were not always consistent among different species or different studies. In landlocked Arctic char the concentrations of Hg decreased from south to north. In marine animals levels of Hg tended to be higher in East Greenland than in West Greenland and Cd levels were highest in biota from Disko Island in central West Greenland. The observed regional differences are difficult to explain but in most cases the causes appear to be natural rather than anthropogenic. Only a few time series covering the last 20 years exist for Cd and Hg. The one time series indicating a temporal change is for ringed seals in Northwest Greenland, which shows an increasing trend of Hg and a decreasing trend of Cd since 1984. Whether the changes reflect anthropogenic inputs, seal behaviour or other environmental factors is unknown. The most significant new insights have concerned organochlorines. In general, levels of these compounds were very low in terrestrial biota compared to marine species. Concentrations in landlocked Arctic char were highest in Southeast Greenland and lowest in Northwest and Northeast Greenland. Marine species from East Greenland had consistently higher levels of SigmaPCB, SigmaDDT and SigmaHCH than marine species from West Greenland. Very few data exist to evaluate temporal changes of organochlorine levels in Greenland biota, and this is the most significant knowledge gap at present. The most pronounced change observed was a decrease of 78% in SigmaPCB levels in polar bears from East Greenland from 1990 to 2000. Levels of SigmaHCH in shorthorn sculpins (Myoxocephalus scorpius) and seals from both central West Greenland and central East Greenland appear to have decreased since 1994. Increasing trends of SigmaDDT from 1994 until now were found in both sexes of seals as well as in male sculpins from central West Greenland. PMID:15325140

Riget, F; Dietz, R; Vorkamp, K; Johansen, P; Muir, D

2004-09-20

75

Technical report series: Concentrations of PCBs, DDTr, and selected metals in biota from Guntersville Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The purpose was to determine if there was potential for human health risks from consumption of reservoir fish or if selected toxic substances might be impacting reservoir biota. Fillets from catfish (channel and blue) and largemouth bass were analyzed for the first purpose and whole gizzard shad, catfish livers, and turtle livers and fat were analyzed for the second. Results indicate largemouth bass should be safe for consumption based on low levels of tested contaminants. However, three of sixteen catfish samples contained PCB levels above the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tolerance of 2.0 ..mu..g/g, and seven others contained levels sufficiently close to that value to warrant concern. DDT and its metabolites and selected metals were low in catfish except for chromium, nickel, and mercury in selected cases. Analyses on all sample types (those referenced above plus catfish livers and turtle fat and livers) indicated levels of metals were generally low and probably not individually impacting reservoir biota.

Dycus, D.L.; Lowery, D.R.

1986-10-01

76

Application of the ERICA Assessment Tool to freshwater biota in Finland.  

PubMed

In recent years there has been growing international interest in the assessment of doses and risks from ionising contaminants to biota. In this study the ERICA Tool, developed within the EC 6th Framework Programme, was applied to estimate incremental dose rates to biota in freshwater ecosystems in Finland mainly resulting from exposure to the Chernobyl-derived radionuclides (137)Cs, (134)Cs and (90)Sr. Data sets consisting of measured activity concentrations in fish, aquatic plants, lake water and sediment for three selected lakes located in a region with high (137)Cs deposition were applied in the assessment. The dose rates to most species studied were clearly below the screening level of 10 microGy h(-1), indicating no significant impact of the Chernobyl fallout on these species. However, the possibility of higher dose rates to certain species living on or in the bottom sediment cannot be excluded based on this assessment. PMID:19828217

Vetikko, Virve; Saxén, Ritva

2010-01-01

77

Methods for calculating dose conversion coefficients for terrestrial and aquatic biota.  

PubMed

Plants and animals may be exposed to ionizing radiation from radionuclides in the environment. This paper describes the underlying data and assumptions to assess doses to biota due to internal and external exposure for a wide range of masses and shapes living in various habitats. A dosimetric module is implemented which is a user-friendly and flexible possibility to assess dose conversion coefficients for aquatic and terrestrial biota. The dose conversion coefficients have been derived for internal and various external exposure scenarios. The dosimetric model is linked to radionuclide decay and emission database, compatible with the ICRP Publication 38, thus providing a capability to compute dose conversion coefficients for any nuclide from the database and its daughter nuclides. The dosimetric module has been integrated into the ERICA Tool, but it can also be used as a stand-alone version. PMID:18329144

Ulanovsky, A; Pröhl, G; Gómez-Ros, J M

2008-09-01

78

A Kinetic-Allometric Approach to Predicting Tissue Radionuclide Concentrations for Biota  

SciTech Connect

Allometry, or the biology of scaling, is the study of size and its consequences. It has become a useful tool for comparative phsiology. There are several allometric equations that relate body size to many parameters, including ingestion rate, lifespan, inhalation rate, home range and more. While these equations were originally derived from empirical observations, there is a growing body of evidence that these relationships have their origins in the dynamics of energy transport mechanisms. As part of an ongoing effort to assist the Department of Energy in developing generic methods for evaluating radiation dose to biota, we have examined the utility of applyig allometric techniques to predicting radionuclide tissue concentration across a large range of terrestrial and riparian species of animals. This particular study examined twenty-three elements. Initial investigations suggest that the allometric approach can provide a useful tool to derive limiting values of uptake and elimination factors for biota.

Higley, Kathryn A. (OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY); Domotor, S L. (DOE); Antonio, Ernest J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2003-06-06

79

New evidence suggests pyroclastic flows are responsible for the remarkable preservation of the Jehol biota.  

PubMed

The lower Cretaceous Yixian and Jiufotang formations contain numerous exceptionally well-preserved invertebrate, vertebrate and plant fossils that comprise the Jehol Biota. Freshwater and terrestrial fossils of the biota usually occur together within some horizons and have been interpreted as deposits of mass mortality events. The nature of the events and the mechanisms behind the exceptional preservation of the fossils, however, are poorly understood. Here, after examining and analysing sediments and residual fossils from several key horizons, we postulate that the causal events were mainly phreatomagmatic eruptions. Pyroclastic density currents were probably responsible for the major causalities and for transporting the bulk of the terrestrial vertebrates from different habitats, such as lizards, birds, non-avian dinosaurs and mammals, into lacustrine environments for burial. Terrestrial vertebrate carcasses transported by and sealed within the pyroclastic flows were clearly preserved as exceptional fossils through this process. PMID:24495913

Jiang, Baoyu; Harlow, George E; Wohletz, Kenneth; Zhou, Zhonghe; Meng, Jin

2014-01-01

80

A method for calculation of dose per unit concentration values for aquatic biota.  

PubMed

A dose per unit concentration database has been generated for application to ecosystem assessments within the FASSET framework. Organisms are represented by ellipsoids of appropriate dimensions, and the proportion of radiation absorbed within the organisms is calculated using a numerical method implemented in a series of spreadsheet-based programs. Energy-dependent absorbed fraction functions have been derived for calculating the total dose per unit concentration of radionuclides present in biota or in the media they inhabit. All radionuclides and reference organism dimensions defined within FASSET for marine and freshwater ecosystems are included. The methodology has been validated against more complex dosimetric models and compared with human dosimetry based on ICRP 72. Ecosystem assessments for aquatic biota within the FASSET framework can now be performed simply, once radionuclide concentrations in target organisms are known, either directly or indirectly by deduction from radionuclide concentrations in the surrounding medium. PMID:15700696

Vives i Batlle, J; Jones, S R; Gómez-Ros, J M

2004-12-01

81

Climate Warming and Disease Risks for Terrestrial and Marine Biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infectious diseases can cause rapid population declines or species extinctions. Many pathogens of terrestrial and marine taxa are sensitive to temperature, rainfall, and humidity, creating synergisms that could affect biodiversity. Climate warming can increase pathogen development and survival rates, disease transmission, and host susceptibility. Although most host-parasite systems are predicted to experience more frequent or severe disease impacts with warming,

C. Drew Harvell; Charles E. Mitchell; Jessica R. Ward; Sonia Altizer; Andrew P. Dobson; Richard S. Ostfeld; Michael D. Samuel

2002-01-01

82

Organochlorine pesticide residues in marine sediment and biota from the northern Florida reef tract  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a two-phased study, sediment and biota were collected from Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park and Key Largo National Marine Sanctuary and analysed for organochlorine pesticide residues. Phase 1 consisted of an inter-laboratory comparison using replicates of unspiked field samples. The five participating contract-laboratories differed in methodology, detection limits and their ability to detect pesticides. The highest concentration

P. W. Glynn; D. G. Rumbold; S. C. Snedaker

1995-01-01

83

Trace elements in soil and biota in confined disposal facilities for dredged material  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We studied the relation of trace element concentrations in soil to those in house mice (Mus musculus), common reed (Phragmites australis) and ladybugs (Coccinella septempunctata) at five disposal facilities for dredged material. The sites had a wide range of soil trace element concentrations, acid soils and a depauperate fauna. They were very poor wildlife habitat because they were dominated by the common reed. Bioassay earthworms exposed to surface soils from three of the five sites died, whereas those exposed to four of five soils collected a meter deep survived, presumably because the deeper, unoxidized soil, was not as acid. Concentrations of Ni and Cr in the biota from each of the sites did not seem to be related to the concentrations of the same elements in soil. Although Pb, Zn and Cu concentrations in biota were correlated with those in soil, the range of concentrations in the biota was quite small compared to that in soil. The concentrations of Pb detected in mice were about as high as the concentrations previously reported in control mice from other studies. Mice from the most contaminated site (530 ppm Pb in soil) contained only slightly more Pb (8 ppm dry wt) than did mice (2-6 ppm dry wt) from sites containing much less Pb (22-92 ppm in soil). Despite the acid soil conditions, very little Cd was incorporated into food chains. Rather, Cd was leaching from the surface soil. We concluded that even the relatively high concentrations of trace elements in the acid dredged material studied did not cause high, concentrations of trace elements in the biota.

Beyer, W.N.; Miller, G.; Simmers, J.W.

1990-01-01

84

Historical records of radioactive contamination in biota at the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes and reports a literature search of 85 environmental monitoring records of wildlife and vegetation (biota) at the 200 East Area and the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site since 1965. These records were published annually and provided the majority of the data in this report. Additional sources of data have included records of specific facilities, such as site characterization documents and preoperational environmental surveys. These documents have been released for public use. Records before 1965 were still being researched and therefore not included in this document. The intent of compiling these data into a single source was to identify past and current concentrations of radionuclides in biota at specific facilities and waste sites within each operable unit that may be used to help guide cleanup activities in the 200 Areas to be completed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). The 200 East Area and 200 West Area were the locations of the Hanford Site separation and process facilities and waste management units. For the purposes of this document, a sample was of interest if a Geiger-Mueller counter equipped with a pancake probe-indicated beta/gamma emitting radioactivity above 200 counts per minute (cpm), or if laboratory radioanalyses indicated a radionuclide concentration equaled or exceeded 10 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). About 4,500 individual cases of monitoring for radionuclide uptake or transport in biota in the 200 Areas environs were included in the documents reviewed. About 1,900 (i.e., 42%) of these biota had radionuclide concentrations in excess of 10 pCi/g. These radionuclide transport or uptake cases were distributed among 45 species of wildlife (primarily small mammals and feces) and 30 species of vegetation. The wildlife species most commonly associated with radioactive contamination were the house mouse and the deer mouse and of vegetation species, the Russian thistle.

Johnson, A.R.; Markes, B.M.; Schmidt, J.W.; Shah, A.N.; Weiss, S.G.; Wilson, K.J.

1994-06-01

85

Biota of a Pennsylvanian muddy coast: habitat within the Mazonian delta complex, northeast Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Mazon Creek biota (Westphalian D) is composed of plants and animals from terrestrial fresh water and marginal marine habitats. Fossil animals, including jellyfish, worms, crustaceans, holothurians, insects, chordates, and problematica occur in sideritic concretions on spoilpiles of more than 100 abandoned coal mines in a five county region (Mazon Creek area) of northeast Illinois. These fossils record rapid burial and early diagenesis in a muddy, delta-influenced coastal setting submerged during marine transgression.

Baird, G.C.

1985-03-01

86

THE NEOGENE MARINE BIOTA OF TROPICAL AMERICA (“NMITA”) DATABASE: ACCOUNTING FOR BIODIVERSITY IN PALEONTOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT—The reliability of any survey of biodiversity through geologic time depends on the rigor and consistency by which taxa are recognized and samples are identified. The main goal of the Neogene Marine Biota of Tropical America (‘NMITA’) project is to create an online biotic database (http:\\/\\/nmita.geology.uiowa.edu) containing images and synoptic taxonomic information that are essential to collecting and disseminating high-quality

ANN F. BUDD; CHARLES T. FOSTER Jr.; JOHN P. DAWSON; KENNETH G. JOHNSON

2001-01-01

87

Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

1993-08-01

88

On the Origin of Pantepui montane biotas: A Perspective Based on the Phylogeny of Aulacorhynchus toucanets  

E-print Network

´rica, Quito, Pichincha, Ecuador, 2 Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, United States of America Abstract To understand the origin of Pantepui montane biotas, we studied the biogeography of toucanets in the genus Aulacorhynchus..., Bermudez MA, Mora A, et al. (2010) Amazonia through time: Andean uplift, climate change, landscape evolution, and biodiversity. Science 330: 927–931. 25. Croizat L, Nelson G, Rosen DE (1974) Centers of Origin and Related Concepts. Systematic Zoology 23: 265...

Bonaccorso, Elisa; Guayasamin, Juan Manuel

2013-06-26

89

Trace organic contamination in biota collected from the Pearl River Estuary, China: a preliminary risk assessment.  

PubMed

The marine ecosystem of the Pearl River Delta, located on the southern coast of China, has been heavily exploited following the rapid economic growth that has occurred since the 1980s. This investigation aimed to elucidate trace organic contamination in marine biota inhabiting the Pearl River Delta area. Biota samples, including green-lipped mussels (Perna viridis), oysters (Crassostrea rivularis) and shrimp (Penaeus orientalis) were sampled from 16 stations fringing the Estuary. Elevated concentrations (on a dry weight basis) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (27.8-1041.0 ng/g), petroleum hydrocarbons (1.7-2345.4 microg/g), polychlorinated biphenyls (2.1-108.8 ng/g), DDTs (1.9-79.0 ng/g), and hexachlorocyclohexanes (n.d.-38.4 ng/g) were recorded. A human health risk assessment was conducted to estimate the risk to local residents associated with the consumption of biota collected from the Pearl River Estuary. The results indicated that PCBs were at levels that may cause deleterious health effects in populations that consume large amounts of seafood. However, it would be instructive to establish health criteria for trace organic contaminants that are specific to the local populations, in order to derive a more accurate and relevant health risk assessment. PMID:16908034

Wei, S; Lau, R K F; Fung, C N; Zheng, G J; Lam, J C W; Connell, D W; Fang, Z; Richardson, B J; Lam, P K S

2006-12-01

90

The Empire Knight: Patterns of mercury contamination in sediment and biota at a marine site  

SciTech Connect

The Empire Knight, a merchant ship carrying approximately 7.3 metric tons of elemental mercury in its cargo, sank in a storm off the Maine coast in 1 944. Unique attributes of the site include the deep water marine conditions (80 m) and mercury originally in elemental form. Recent evaluations of the site were undertaken to determine environmental risk of the remaining mercury and possible remedial actions. Data collected in 1993 for this risk evaluation included sediment core samples, and a variety of biota samples. Biota were analyzed for total and methylmercury, and the following patterns examined: percent methylmercury, variability between species groups, and spatial patterns related to sediment contamination. Sediment contamination was largely confined to the immediate area near the wreck, with levels decreasing to background within 60 m. Invertebrates within this area had elevated levels of mercury in tissue. Most contamination was in an inorganic form, with percentages of methyl to total mercury below 20%, except for crab and lobster. Most of the residual mercury appears to be largely unavailable to biota, with local invertebrates comprising the main biological receptors. Evidence of bioaccumulation of mercury in higher trophic level organisms was not found, thus mercury did not appear to be a source of contamination beyond the immediate area the wreck.

Hoff, R.Z. [NOAA Hazmat, Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-12-31

91

On the Origin of Pantepui montane biotas: A Perspective Based on the Phylogeny of Aulacorhynchus toucanets  

PubMed Central

To understand the origin of Pantepui montane biotas, we studied the biogeography of toucanets in the genus Aulacorhynchus. These birds are ideal for analyzing historical relationships among Neotropical montane regions, given their geographic distribution from Mexico south to Bolivia, including northern Venezuela (Cordillera de la Costa), and the Pantepui. Analyses were based on molecular phylogenies using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Topology tests were applied to compare alternative hypotheses that may explain the current distribution of Aulacorhynchus toucanets, in the context of previous hypotheses of the origin of Pantepui montane biotas. Biogeographic reconstructions in RASP and Lagrange were used to estimate the ancestral area of the genus, and an analysis in BEAST was used to estimate a time framework for its diversification. A sister relationship between the Pantepui and Andes+Cordillera de la Costa was significantly more likely than topologies indicating other hypothesis for the origin of Pantepui populations. The Andes was inferred as the ancestral area for Aulacorhynchus, and the group has diversified since the late Miocene. The biogeographic patterns found herein, in which the Andes are the source for biotas of other regions, are consistent with those found for flowerpiercers and tanagers, and do not support the hypothesis of the geologically old Pantepui as a source of Neotropical montain diversity. Based on the high potential for cryptic speciation and isolation of Pantepui populations, we consider that phylogenetic studies of additional taxa are important from a conservation perspective. PMID:23840663

Bonaccorso, Elisa; Guayasamin, Juan M.

2013-01-01

92

On the Origin of Pantepui montane biotas: A Perspective Based on the Phylogeny of Aulacorhynchus toucanets.  

PubMed

To understand the origin of Pantepui montane biotas, we studied the biogeography of toucanets in the genus Aulacorhynchus. These birds are ideal for analyzing historical relationships among Neotropical montane regions, given their geographic distribution from Mexico south to Bolivia, including northern Venezuela (Cordillera de la Costa), and the Pantepui. Analyses were based on molecular phylogenies using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Topology tests were applied to compare alternative hypotheses that may explain the current distribution of Aulacorhynchus toucanets, in the context of previous hypotheses of the origin of Pantepui montane biotas. Biogeographic reconstructions in RASP and Lagrange were used to estimate the ancestral area of the genus, and an analysis in BEAST was used to estimate a time framework for its diversification. A sister relationship between the Pantepui and Andes+Cordillera de la Costa was significantly more likely than topologies indicating other hypothesis for the origin of Pantepui populations. The Andes was inferred as the ancestral area for Aulacorhynchus, and the group has diversified since the late Miocene. The biogeographic patterns found herein, in which the Andes are the source for biotas of other regions, are consistent with those found for flowerpiercers and tanagers, and do not support the hypothesis of the geologically old Pantepui as a source of Neotropical montain diversity. Based on the high potential for cryptic speciation and isolation of Pantepui populations, we consider that phylogenetic studies of additional taxa are important from a conservation perspective. PMID:23840663

Bonaccorso, Elisa; Guayasamin, Juan M

2013-01-01

93

Occurrence of 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2) in the environment and effect on exposed biota: a review.  

PubMed

17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic hormone, which is a derivative of the natural hormone, estradiol (E2). EE2 is an orally bio-active estrogen, and is one of the most commonly used medications for humans as well as livestock and aquaculture activity. EE2 has become a widespread problem in the environment due to its high resistance to the process of degradation and its tendency to (i) absorb organic matter, (ii) accumulate in sediment and (iii) concentrate in biota. Numerous studies have reported the ability of EE2 to alter sex determination, delay sexual maturity, and decrease the secondary sexual characteristics of exposed organisms even at a low concentration (ng/L) by mimicking its natural analogue, 17?-estradiol (E2). Thus, the aim of this review is to provide an overview of the science regarding EE2, the concentration levels in the environment (water, sediment and biota) and summarize the effects of this compound on exposed biota at various concentrations, stage life, sex, and species. The challenges in respect of EE2 include the extension of the limited database on the EE2 pollution profile in the environment, its fate and transport mechanism, as well as the exposure level of EE2 for better prediction and definition revision of EE2 toxicity end points, notably for the purpose of environmental risk assessment. PMID:24825791

Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Shamsuddin, Aida Soraya; Praveena, Sarva Mangala

2014-08-01

94

Reconstructing Long Island Sound Environmental Changes and Thier Influence on the Biota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long Island Sound (LIS) is a large urban estuary. Its environmental problems include algal blooms, leading to hypoxia and die-off of submerged aquatic vegetation and, in the last few years, significant die-off of lobsters, particularly in western LIS. We use a combination of geochemical, isotope and micropaleontological data (benthic foraminifera) on cores from Long Island Sound to investigate the environmental changes since western European settlement and industrialization, and their effects on biota. Age models are based on 210Pb, 137Cs, and pollen profiles. In LIS, seawater from the Atlantic Ocean is mixed with freshwater from the Connecticut River, Housatonic River and Thames River, resulting in salinities from 22 to 32 per mille. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are marginally marine, and dominated by Elphidium excavatum. In the deeper parts of LIS Buccella frigida is common, and since the 1960s Ammonia beccarii has strongly increased in abundance in western LIS and shallow waters close to river mouths. The carbonate tests of Elphidium excavatum reflect a combination of salinity and temperature in their ? 18O, Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca values. The ? 13C of carbonates reflects the isotopic values of dissolved carbonate in LIS waters, which depend on the mixing proportions of river and sea water, the ? 13C of carbonate in river water, and the degree of oxidation of organic carbon in the Sound. The latter process is responsible for the seasonal hypoxia in LIS. We hypothesize that the ? 13C in foraminiferal calcite can be used as a tracer for the degree of hypoxia that was prevalent when shells were being formed, and foraminiferal assemblages in the same samples will reveal whether faunal changes occurred coeval with changes in degree of hypoxia. We established a mixing model for modern LIS through analyses of river and LIS water samples for salinity, ? 18O, dissolved carbonate, ? 13C in dissolved carbonate and Ca, Mg and Sr. Bottom water oxygen contents and temperatures were measured at the time of collection of living foraminifera. We calibrated the elemental and oxygen isotopic composition of carbonates for salinity and temperature using field measurements. We determined the difference between measured and predicted ? 13C, which is a measure of the amount of oxidized organic matter in the system. Our field results in the western part of LIS show that when oxygen levels are at or below 4mg/l, significantly lighter carbon isotopic compositions are observed than those predicted. Results from the mixing model calibrations will be applied to carbonates from 4 short cores to establish changes in temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen in LIS over the last 400 years, and correlate these with faunal assemblage changes observed in the same samples.

Thomas, E.; Lugolobi, F.; Abramson, I.; Varekamp, J. C.

2001-12-01

95

Climate warming and disease risks for terrestrial and marine biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Infectious diseases can cause rapid population declines or species extinctions. Many pathogens of terrestrial and marine taxa are sensitive to temperature, rainfall, and humidity, creating synergisms that could affect biodiversity. Climate warming can increase pathogen development and survival rates, disease transmission, and host susceptibility. Although most host-parasite systems are predicted to experience more frequent or severe disease impacts with warming, a subset of pathogens might decline with warming, releasing hosts from disease. Recently, changes in El Niño–Southern Oscillation events have had a detectable influence on marine and terrestrial pathogens, including coral diseases, oyster pathogens, crop pathogens, Rift Valley fever, and human cholera. To improve our ability to predict epidemics in wild populations, it will be necessary to separate the independent and interactive effects of multiple climate drivers on disease impact.

Harvell, C.D.; Mitchell, C.E.; Ward, J.R.; Altizer, S.; Dobson, A.P.; Ostfeld, R.S.; Samuel, M.D.

2002-01-01

96

Asphalt mounds and associated biota on the Angolan margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Release of hydrocarbons from sediments is important in increasing habitat heterogeneity on deep ocean margins. Heterogeneity arises from variation in abiotic and biotic conditions, including changes in substratum, geochemistry, fluid flow, biological communities and ecological interactions. The seepage of heavy hydrocarbons to the seafloor is less well studied than most other cold seep systems and may lead to the formation of asphalt mounds. These have been described from several regions, particularly the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we describe the structure, potential formation and biology of a large asphalt mound province in Block 31SE Angola. A total of 2254 distinct mound features was identified by side-scan sonar, covering a total area of 3.7 km2 of seafloor. The asphalt mounds took a number of forms from small (<0.5 m diameter; 13% observations) mounds to large extensive (<50 m diameter) structures. Some of the observed mounds were associated with authigenic carbonate and active seepage (living chemosynthetic fauna present in addition to the asphalt). The asphalt mounds are seabed accumulations of heavy hydrocarbons formed from subsurface migration and fractionation of reservoir hydrocarbons primarily through a network of faults. In Angola these processes are controlled by subsurface movement of salt structures. The asphalt mounds were typically densely covered with epifauna (74.5% of mounds imaged had visible epifauna) although individual mounds varied considerably in epifaunal coverage. Of the 49 non-chemosynthetic megafaunal taxa observed, 19 taxa were only found on hard substrata (including asphalt mounds), 2 fish species inhabited the asphalt mounds preferentially and 27 taxa were apparently normal soft-sediment fauna. Antipatharians (3.6±2.3% s.e.) and poriferans (2.6±1.9% s.e.) accounted for the highest mean percentage of the observed cover, with actinarians (0.9±0.4% s.e.) and alcyonaceans (0.4±0.2% s.e.) covering smaller proportions of the area. Asphalt mounds represent a common and important habitat on several margin systems globally and should be recognised in future environmental assessment and management of these areas.

Jones, Daniel O. B.; Walls, Anne; Clare, Michael; Fiske, Mike S.; Weiland, Richard J.; O'Brien, Robert; Touzel, Daniel F.

2014-12-01

97

Threatened biotas: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mass-extinction episode underway is largely centred on tropical forests, insofar as they contain at least half of all Earth's species and they are being depleted faster than any other biome. But species distributions and depletion patterns are anything but uniform throughout the biome. This paper identifies 10 areas that, a) are characterised by exceptional concentrations of species with high

Norman Myers

1988-01-01

98

Soil Biota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In teams of two, students collect samples from one or two different environments -- agricultural fields, sports turf areas, lawns, forest floor, wetland/pond margin, greenhouse, etc. They construct a Berlese funnel apparatus, process their two samples, identify and photograph (under a microscope) the organisms they isolate. The class aggregates their data from all the different environments, calculates a Simpson's diversity index for each environment, and uses this value to compare the diversity of the different environments.

Katherine McCarville

99

Amino acid racemization on Mars: implications for the preservation of biomolecules from an extinct martian biota  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using kinetic data, we have estimated the racemization half-lives and times for total racemization of amino acids under conditions relevant to the surface of Mars. Amino acids from an extinct martian biota maintained in a dry, cold (<250 K) environment would not have racemized significantly over the lifetime of the planet. Racemization would have taken place in environments where liquid water was present even for time periods of only a few million years following biotic extinction. The best preservation of both amino acid homochirality and nucleic acid genetic information associated with extinct martian life would be in the polar regions.

Bada, J. L.; McDonald, G. D.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

1995-01-01

100

The climate change for Jehol Biota and its revolution in early Cretaceous in Western Liaoning, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jehol Biota is known by us as the biological assemblage of eosestheria, Ephemeropsis trisetalis and Lycoptera at the beginning. And then we found more fossils at near time such as Sinosauropteryx, Confuciusornis, Cathayornis, Callobatrachus sanyanensis, Archaefructaceae and other fossils in Western Liaoning, China. With the finding of those fossils, we become to think about what is the environment of this area in that time, what led to the development of such livings? In early Cretaceous, there are a lot of basins in North of Liaoning which were with plain layer in side, a lot of Lakes and volcano campaign frequently. We built up a section located in Sihetun of Liaoning with the layer is volcano-lake face. Date of the bottom is Aptian period. From TEX86 dates, we can know that the Paleatemperature is from? (the samples from the bottom is on testing and will be known soon, ), 17°C (Lake surface temperature, in the middle layer), and then 22°C(Lake surface temperature, on the top of the layer). The climate was changed from the seasonal arid or semi-arid into a warm and humid climate. With his kind of changing of the environment, the lives of Jehol Biota can survive, evolve and multiple in those basins. The movement of the volcano took the nutrients from the earth which made a flourishing many plants and plankton. This is the power of the evolution of plants. The early angiosperm came out in this time in this area which is called as Archaefructaceae. In the same time, the direction-sense, mass death of the birds and the macrofaunas showed that the exploration of the volcanoes made a lot of animals die and then be covered very quickly. In such an area where death and living was fast, there must be a quickly evolution. And it led to the formation and preservation of a large number of fossils. we found the same fossils out of the basin but later on date which showed the climate transferred to hot and dry later, and the livings in the basin were strong enough so that they could moved out of the basin at the last time. Section Map of Jehol Biota in North of Lliaoning, China LST by TEX86 in Jehol Biota layer Lake surface temperature using calibration of Powers et al., 2010, Organic Geochemistry

Wang, M.; Weijers, J.; Wang, C.; 973 Project; Igcp555

2010-12-01

101

Feedbacks between geomorphology and biota controlling Earth surface processes and landforms: A review of foundation concepts and current understandings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This review article presents recent advances in the field of biogeomorphology related to the reciprocal coupling between Earth surface processes and landforms, and ecological and evolutionary processes. The aim is to present to the Earth Science community ecological and evolutionary concepts and associated recent conceptual developments for linking geomorphology and biota. The novelty of the proposed perspective is that (1) in the presence of geomorphologic-engineer species, which modify sediment and landform dynamics, natural selection operating at the scale of organisms may have consequences for the physical components of ecosystems, and particularly Earth surface processes and landforms; and (2) in return, these modifications of geomorphologic processes and landforms often feed back to the ecological characteristics of the ecosystem (structure and function) and thus to biological characteristics of engineer species and/or other species (adaptation and speciation). The main foundation concepts from ecology and evolutionary biology which have led only recently to an improved conception of landform dynamics in geomorphology are reviewed and discussed. The biogeomorphologic macroevolutionary insights proposed explicitly integrate geomorphologic niche-dimensions and processes within an ecosystem framework and reflect current theories of eco-evolutionary and ecological processes. Collectively, these lead to the definition of an integrated model describing the overall functioning of biogeomorphologic systems over ecological and evolutionary timescales.

Corenblit, Dov; Baas, Andreas C. W.; Bornette, Gudrun; Darrozes, José; Delmotte, Sébastien; Francis, Robert A.; Gurnell, Angela M.; Julien, Frédéric; Naiman, Robert J.; Steiger, Johannes

2011-06-01

102

Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 5, Surface-based subject areas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Biota subject area of the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is to manage the data collected from samples of plants and animals. This includes both samples taken from the plant or animal or samples related to the plant or animal. Related samples include animal feces and animal habitat. Data stored in the Biota subject area include data about the biota samples taken, analysis results counts from population studies, and species distribution maps.

Not Available

1994-01-14

103

Coal ash basin effects (particulates, metals, acidic pH) upon aquatic biota: an eight-year evaluation. [Gambusia affinis; Plathemis lydia; Libellula spp  

SciTech Connect

Coal ash effluent effects including particulates, acidic pH excursions, elemental concentrations and bioconcentration in selected organisms have been studied as changes in water quality and densities of benthic macroinvertebrate and mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) populations in a swanmp drainage system over an eight-year period. Initial density of the aquatic biota was altered severely by heavy ash siltation, followed by acidic pH excursions, and perhaps overall by elemental concentrations and bioaccumulation. Heavy ash siltation, followed by acidic pH excursions after the addition of fly ash to the original settling basin system, had the most profound effect on biota. Dipterans (chironomids) and some odonates (Plathemis lydia and Libellula spp.) were resistant to heavy ash siltation, while mosquitofish, which showed no discernible responses to ash siltation, were absent at acidic pH along with the few previously surviving invertebrate populations. Elemental concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, selenium, and zinc did not appear to limit aquatic flora and fauna on a short-term, acute basis. Long-chronic elemental exposures may have been instrumental in retarding the recovery of all forms of aquatic life in the receiving system. Elemental concentrations (except for arsenic and selenium) in the receiving system were generally one to two orders of magnitude higher than the Water Quality Criteria set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (1980) for protection of aquatic life for the minimum and 24-hour mean values. By 1978, when the new settling basin systems were operating effectively, invertebrate populations were largely recovered, and mosquito-fish populations recovered within one year afterward.

Cerry, D.S.; Guthrie, R.K.; Davis, E.M.; Harvey, R.S.

1984-08-01

104

Improved cleanup technique for gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of alkylphenols from biota extract.  

PubMed

A simple and economical cleanup technique was developed to determine alkylphenols by GC-MS from biological extracts containing relatively high lipids. The lipids were successfully removed from bivalve extracts through a two-step cleanup. The new method is a combination of Florisil adsorption chromatography and silyl derivatization technique. Low and high (non-polar and highly polar) molecular weight lipids were removed from the biota extract with deactivated Florisil column in the first step. And in the second step, middle molecular weight (middle polar) lipids were removed in an activated Florisil column after the alkylphenols were converted to corresponding silyl derivatives with bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). On the basis of the above results, a simple cleanup kit was developed for convenience. The technique was optimized with reference to the activity of packing materials and polarity of eluting solvents. Only 3g of Florisil, 25 mL of hexane and 10 mL of dichloromethane were required for one sample. The recoveries of alkylphenols from spiked samples varied from 88 to 103% with a low relative standard deviation (mean value: 5.3%) and the recovery was similar or even higher than other methods currently in use. The technique was successfully applied to mussel samples from Masan Bay, South Korea. Simultaneous measurement of these compounds in water, sediment and biota; the resulting bio-concentration factor and their relationships confirm previously published works, validating the method applied. PMID:17920609

Wang, Juan; Dong, Meihua; Shim, Won Joon; Kannan, Narayanan; Li, Donghao

2007-11-01

105

Persistence of spilled oil on shores and its effects on biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Over two million tonnes of oil are estimated to enter the world's oceans every year. A small percentage, but still a large volume, of this oil strands onshore, where its persistence is governed primarily by the action of physical forces. In some cases, biota influence the persistence of stranded oil or the rate of its weathering. Oil's deleterious effects on biota are frequently related to the persistence and degree of weathering of the oil, with long-lasting effects in low-energy environments such as salt marshes and coastal mangroves, or in higher-energy environments where oil is sequestered. However, an oil spill can have disproportionately large biological effects when it affects key species or processes (e.g., structurally important species, predators, prey, recruitment, or succession). In these cases, the continuing presence of oil is not always a prerequisite for continuing biological effects. There are relatively few long-term studies of the effects of oil spills; data from these suggest that oil can persist for decades in some environments or situations, and that biological effects can be equally persistent. Broad-based, integrated studies have been the most revealing in terms of the importance of direct and indirect effects, spillover effects between different parts of the environment, and continuing linkages between residual oil and biologic effects. Clean-up and treatment techniques applied to spilled or stranded oil can also have significant, long-lasting effects and need to be carefully evaluated prior to use.

Irvine, G.V.

2000-01-01

106

Modeling transport and dilution of produced water and the resulting uptake and biomagnification in marine biota  

SciTech Connect

The paper explains the numerical modelling efforts undertaken in order to study possible marine biological impacts caused by releases of produced water from the Haltenbanken area outside the western coast of Norway. Acute effects on marine life from releases of produced water appear to be relatively small and confined to areas rather lose to the release site. Biomagnification may however be experienced for relatively low concentrations at larger distances from the release point. Such effects can he modeled by performing a step-wise approach which includes: The use of 3-D hydrodynamic models to determine the ocean current fields; The use of 3-D multi-source numerical models to determine the concentration fields from the produced water releases, given the current field; and The use of biologic models to simulate the behavior of and larvae (passive marine biota) and fish (active marine biota) and their interaction with the concentration field. The paper explains the experiences gained by using this approach for the calculation of possible influences on marine life below the EC{sub 50} or LC{sub 50} concentration levels. The models are used for simulating concentration fields from 5 simultaneous sources at the Haltenbank area and simulation of magnification in some marine species from 2 simultaneous sources in the same area. Naphthalenes and phenols, which are both present in the produced water, were used as the chemical substances in the simulations.

Rye, H.; Reed, M.; Slagstad, D. [and others

1996-12-31

107

The 2.1 Ga old Francevillian biota: biogenicity, taphonomy and biodiversity.  

PubMed

The Paleoproterozoic Era witnessed crucial steps in the evolution of Earth's surface environments following the first appreciable rise of free atmospheric oxygen concentrations ?2.3 to 2.1 Ga ago, and concomitant shallow ocean oxygenation. While most sedimentary successions deposited during this time interval have experienced thermal overprinting from burial diagenesis and metamorphism, the ca. 2.1 Ga black shales of the Francevillian B Formation (FB2) cropping out in southeastern Gabon have not. The Francevillian Formation contains centimeter-sized structures interpreted as organized and spatially discrete populations of colonial organisms living in an oxygenated marine ecosystem. Here, new material from the FB2 black shales is presented and analyzed to further explore its biogenicity and taphonomy. Our extended record comprises variably sized, shaped, and structured pyritized macrofossils of lobate, elongated, and rod-shaped morphologies as well as abundant non-pyritized disk-shaped macrofossils and organic-walled acritarchs. Combined microtomography, geochemistry, and sedimentary analysis suggest a biota fossilized during early diagenesis. The emergence of this biota follows a rise in atmospheric oxygen, which is consistent with the idea that surface oxygenation allowed the evolution and ecological expansion of complex megascopic life. PMID:24963687

El Albani, Abderrazak; Bengtson, Stefan; Canfield, Donald E; Riboulleau, Armelle; Rollion Bard, Claire; Macchiarelli, Roberto; Ngombi Pemba, Lauriss; Hammarlund, Emma; Meunier, Alain; Moubiya Mouele, Idalina; Benzerara, Karim; Bernard, Sylvain; Boulvais, Philippe; Chaussidon, Marc; Cesari, Christian; Fontaine, Claude; Chi-Fru, Ernest; Garcia Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Mazurier, Arnaud; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne Catherine; Rouxel, Olivier; Trentesaux, Alain; Vecoli, Marco; Versteegh, Gerard J M; White, Lee; Whitehouse, Martin; Bekker, Andrey

2014-01-01

108

The 2.1 Ga Old Francevillian Biota: Biogenicity, Taphonomy and Biodiversity  

PubMed Central

The Paleoproterozoic Era witnessed crucial steps in the evolution of Earth's surface environments following the first appreciable rise of free atmospheric oxygen concentrations ?2.3 to 2.1 Ga ago, and concomitant shallow ocean oxygenation. While most sedimentary successions deposited during this time interval have experienced thermal overprinting from burial diagenesis and metamorphism, the ca. 2.1 Ga black shales of the Francevillian B Formation (FB2) cropping out in southeastern Gabon have not. The Francevillian Formation contains centimeter-sized structures interpreted as organized and spatially discrete populations of colonial organisms living in an oxygenated marine ecosystem. Here, new material from the FB2 black shales is presented and analyzed to further explore its biogenicity and taphonomy. Our extended record comprises variably sized, shaped, and structured pyritized macrofossils of lobate, elongated, and rod-shaped morphologies as well as abundant non-pyritized disk-shaped macrofossils and organic-walled acritarchs. Combined microtomography, geochemistry, and sedimentary analysis suggest a biota fossilized during early diagenesis. The emergence of this biota follows a rise in atmospheric oxygen, which is consistent with the idea that surface oxygenation allowed the evolution and ecological expansion of complex megascopic life. PMID:24963687

El Albani, Abderrazak; Bengtson, Stefan; Canfield, Donald E.; Riboulleau, Armelle; Rollion Bard, Claire; Macchiarelli, Roberto; Ngombi Pemba, Lauriss; Hammarlund, Emma; Meunier, Alain; Moubiya Mouele, Idalina; Benzerara, Karim; Bernard, Sylvain; Boulvais, Philippe; Chaussidon, Marc; Cesari, Christian; Fontaine, Claude; Chi-Fru, Ernest; Garcia Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Mazurier, Arnaud; Pierson-Wickmann, Anne Catherine; Rouxel, Olivier; Trentesaux, Alain; Vecoli, Marco; Versteegh, Gerard J. M.; White, Lee; Whitehouse, Martin; Bekker, Andrey

2014-01-01

109

Whole-body to tissue concentration ratios for use in biota dose assessments for animals.  

PubMed

Environmental monitoring programs often measure contaminant concentrations in animal tissues consumed by humans (e.g., muscle). By comparison, demonstration of the protection of biota from the potential effects of radionuclides involves a comparison of whole-body doses to radiological dose benchmarks. Consequently, methods for deriving whole-body concentration ratios based on tissue-specific data are required to make best use of the available information. This paper provides a series of look-up tables with whole-body:tissue-specific concentration ratios for non-human biota. Focus was placed on relatively broad animal categories (including molluscs, crustaceans, freshwater fishes, marine fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) and commonly measured tissues (specifically, bone, muscle, liver and kidney). Depending upon organism, whole-body to tissue concentration ratios were derived for between 12 and 47 elements. The whole-body to tissue concentration ratios can be used to estimate whole-body concentrations from tissue-specific measurements. However, we recommend that any given whole-body to tissue concentration ratio should not be used if the value falls between 0.75 and 1.5. Instead, a value of one should be assumed. PMID:20931337

Yankovich, Tamara L; Beresford, Nicholas A; Wood, Michael D; Aono, Tasuo; Andersson, Pål; Barnett, Catherine L; Bennett, Pamela; Brown, Justin E; Fesenko, Sergey; Fesenko, J; Hosseini, Ali; Howard, Brenda J; Johansen, Mathew P; Phaneuf, Marcel M; Tagami, Keiko; Takata, Hyoe; Twining, John R; Uchida, Shigeo

2010-11-01

110

An Integrated Case Study for Evaluating the Impacts of an Oil Refinery Effluent on Aquatic Biota in the Delaware River: Advanced Chemical Fingerprinting of PAHs  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than one thousand samples were collected and analyzed to evaluate the potential impact of Motiva's oil refinery effluent on the receiving water, sediment, and biota of the Delaware River. The data collected from these samples were used with advanced chemical fingerprinting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Motiva's oil refinery effluent to differentiate Motiva-related PAHs in sediment and biota

Allen D. Uhler; Stephen Emsbo-Mattingly; Bo Liu; Lenwood W. Hall Jr; Dennis T. Burton

2005-01-01

111

Environmental assessment of water, sediment, and biota collected from the Bear Creek watershed, Colusa County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cache Creek watershed lies within California's North Coast Range, an area with abundant geologic sources of mercury (Hg) and a long history of Hg contamination (Rytuba, 2000). Bear Creek, Cache Creek, and the North Fork of Cache Creek are the major streams of the Cache Creek watershed, encompassing 2978 km2. The Cache Creek watershed contains soils naturally enriched in Hg as well as natural springs (both hot and cold) with varying levels of aqueous Hg (Domagalski and others, 2004, Suchanek and others, 2004, Holloway and others 2009). All three tributaries are known to be significant sources of anthropogenically derived Hg from historic mines, both Hg and gold (Au), and associated ore storage/processing sites and facilities (Slotton and others, 1995, 2004; CVRWQCB, 2003; Schwarzbach and others, 2001; Gassel and others, 2005; Suchanek and others., 2004, 2008a, 2009). Historically, two of the primary sources of mercury contamination in the upper part of Bear Creek have been the Rathburn and Petray Hg Mines. The Rathburn Hg mine was discovered and initially mined in the early 1890s. The Rathburn and the more recently developed Petray open pit mines are localized along fault zones in serpentinite that has been altered and cut by quartz and chalcedony veins. Cold saline-carbonate springs are located perepheral to the Hg deposits and effluent from the springs locally has high concentrations of Hg (Slowey and Rytuba, 2008). Several ephemeral tributaries to Bear Creek drain the mine area which is located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in sediment, water, and biota to establish baseline information prior to remediation of the Rathburn and Petray mines. Samples sites were established in Bear Creek upstream and downstream from the mine area. This report is made in response to the USBLM request, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to the possible removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from Bear Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of water, sediment, and biota in Bear Creek, above input from the mine area and downstream from the Rathburn-Petray mine area to the confluence with Cache Creek. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in Bear Creek and its uptake by biota and provide baseline information for comparison to conditions after mine remediation is completed.

Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Goldstein, Daniel; May, Jason

2015-01-01

112

Environmental Setting and the Effects of Natural and Human-Related Factors on Water Quality and Aquatic Biota, Oahu, Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The island of Oahu is the third largest island of the State of Hawaii, and is formed by the eroded remnants of the Waianae and Koolau shield volcanoes. The landscape of Oahu ranges from a broad coastal plain to steep interior mountains. Rainfall is greatest in the mountainous interior parts of the island, and lowest near the southwestern coastal areas. The structure and form of the two volcanoes in conjunction with processes that have modified the original surfaces of the volcanoes control the hydrologic setting. The rift zones of the volcanoes contain dikes that tend to impede the flow of ground water, leading to high ground-water levels in the dike-impounded ground-water system. In the windward (northeastern) part of the island, dike-impounded ground-water levels may reach the land surface in stream valleys, resulting in ground-water discharge to streams. Where dikes are not present, the volcanic rocks are highly permeable, and a lens of freshwater overlies a brackish-water transition zone separating the freshwater from saltwater. Ground water discharges to coastal springs and streams where the water table in the freshwater-lens system intersects the land surface. The Waianae and Koolau Ranges have been deeply dissected by numerous streams. Streams originate in the mountainous interior areas and terminate at the coast. Some streams flow perennially throughout their entire course, others flow perennially over parts of their course, and the remaining streams flow during only parts of the year throughout their entire course. Hawaiian streams have relatively few native species compared to continental streams. Widespread diverse orders of insects are absent from the native biota, and there are only five native fish, two native shrimp, and a few native snails. The native fish and crustaceans of Hawaii's freshwater systems are all amphidromous (adult lives are spent in streams, and larval periods as marine or estuarine zooplankton). During the 20th century, land-use patterns on Oahu reflected increases in population and decreases in large-scale agricultural operations over time. The last two remaining sugarcane plantations on Oahu closed in the mid-1990's, and much of the land that once was used for sugarcane now is urbanized or used for diversified agriculture. Although two large pineapple plantations continue to operate in central Oahu, some of the land previously used for pineapple cultivation has been urbanized. Natural and human-related factors control surface- and ground-water quality and the distribution and abundance of aquatic biota on Oahu. Natural factors that may affect water quality include geology, soils, vegetation, rainfall, ocean-water quality, and air quality. Human-related factors associated with urban and agricultural land uses also may affect water quality. Ground-water withdrawals may cause saltwater intrusion. Pesticides and fertilizers that were used in agricultural or urban areas have been detected in surface and ground water on Oahu. In addition, other organic compounds associated with urban uses of chemicals have been detected in surface and ground water on Oahu. The effects of urbanization and agricultural practices on instream and riparian areas in conjunction with a proliferation of nonnative fish and crustaceans have resulted in a paucity of native freshwater macrofauna on Oahu. A variety of pesticides, nutrients, and metals are associated with urban and agricultural land uses, and these constituents can affect the fish and invertebrates that live in the streams.

Oki, Delwyn S.; Brasher, Anne M.D.

2003-01-01

113

Paleoclimatic modeling and phylogeography of least killifish, Heterandria formosa: insights into Pleistocene expansion-contraction dynamics and evolutionary history of North American Coastal Plain freshwater biota  

PubMed Central

Background Climatic and sea-level fluctuations throughout the last Pleistocene glacial cycle (~130-0 ka) profoundly influenced present-day distributions and genetic diversity of Northern Hemisphere biotas by forcing range contractions in many species during the glacial advance and allowing expansion following glacial retreat ('expansion-contraction’ model). Evidence for such range dynamics and refugia in the unglaciated Gulf-Atlantic Coastal Plain stems largely from terrestrial species, and aquatic species Pleistocene responses remain relatively uninvestigated. Heterandria formosa, a wide-ranging regional endemic, presents an ideal system to test the expansion-contraction model within this biota. By integrating ecological niche modeling and phylogeography, we infer the Pleistocene history of this livebearing fish (Poeciliidae) and test for several predicted distributional and genetic effects of the last glaciation. Results Paleoclimatic models predicted range contraction to a single southwest Florida peninsula refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by northward expansion. We inferred spatial-population subdivision into four groups that reflect genetic barriers outside this refuge. Several other features of the genetic data were consistent with predictions derived from an expansion-contraction model: limited intraspecific divergence (e.g. mean mtDNA p-distance?=?0.66%); a pattern of mtDNA diversity (mean Hd?=?0.934; mean ??=?0.007) consistent with rapid, recent population expansion; a lack of mtDNA isolation-by-distance; and clinal variation in allozyme diversity with higher diversity at lower latitudes near the predicted refugium. Statistical tests of mismatch distributions and coalescent simulations of the gene tree lent greater support to a scenario of post-glacial expansion and diversification from a single refugium than to any other model examined (e.g. multiple-refugia scenarios). Conclusions Congruent results from diverse data indicate H. formosa fits the classic Pleistocene expansion-contraction model, even as the genetic data suggest additional ecological influences on population structure. While evidence for Plio-Pleistocene Gulf Coast vicariance is well described for many freshwater species presently codistributed with H. formosa, this species demography and diversification departs notably from this pattern. Species-specific expansion-contraction dynamics may therefore have figured more prominently in shaping Coastal Plain evolutionary history than previously thought. Our findings bolster growing appreciation for the complexity of phylogeographical structuring within North America’s southern refugia, including responses of Coastal Plain freshwater biota to Pleistocene climatic fluctuations. PMID:24107245

2013-01-01

114

Cellulolytic microbes in the Yanbaru, a subtropical rainforest with an endemic biota on Okinawa Island, Japan.  

PubMed

Cellulolytic microbes in the soil of the Yanbaru, a subtropical forest with an endemic biota, on Okinawa Island, were isolated and characterized in a search for novel microbial strains with biotechnological potential. Soil samples of the Yanbaru were suspended in sterilized water, inoculated on mineral salt agar overlaid with a filter paper as carbon source, and cultivated aerobically at 30 °C. After 2 weeks of cultivation, emerging colonies were isolated and subjected to phylogenetic and enzyme analyses. The phylogenetic analyses revealed bacterial and fungal isolates belonging to nine and three genera respectively. All isolates possessed cellulase activity, and several strains showed strong activity comparable to Trichoderma cellulase. Many isolates also exhibited xylanase activity. PMID:22738957

Fujii, Katsuhiko; Oosugi, Ayaka; Sekiuchi, Shiori

2012-01-01

115

Some bioaccumulation factors and biota-sediment accumulation factors for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Lake Trout  

SciTech Connect

Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and chrysene/triphenylene were calculated using the tissue data of Zabik et al. for Salvelinus namaycush siscowet with a 20.5% lipid content, the water data of Baker and Eisenreich, and the sediment data of Baker and Eisenreich for the Lake Superior ecosystem. Log BAFs, both lipid normalized and based on the freely dissolved concentration of the chemical in the water, of 1.95, 3.22, 4.72, 4.73, and 3.61 were calculated for phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and chrysene/triphenylene, respectively. The BSAFs for phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and chrysene/tripenylene were 0.00011, 0.00016, 0.0071, 0.0054, and 0.00033, respectively.

Burkhard, L.P.; Lukasewycz, M.T.

2000-05-01

116

As reciprocal influences between humans and the cli-mate, biota, and ecological functions of the world  

E-print Network

As reciprocal influences between humans and the cli- mate, biota, and ecological functions processes in human-dominated ecosystems (McDonnell and Pickett 1993; Collins et al. 2000; Grimm et al. 2000; Alberti et al. 2003). In some ecosystems, structure and function are now determined primarily by human

Cook, William M.

117

USE OF THE BIOTIC LIGAND MODEL TO PREDICT METAL TOXICITY TO AQUATIC BIOTA IN AREAS OF DIFFERING GEOLOGY1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work evaluates the use of the biotic ligand model (BLM), an aquatic toxicity model, to predict toxic effects of metals on aquatic biota in areas underlain by different rock types. The chemical composition of water, soil, and sediment is largely derived from the composition of the underlying rock. Geologic source materials control key attributes of water chemistry that affect

Kathleen S. Smith

118

Interactions with soil biota shift from negative to positive when a tree species is moved outside its native range.  

PubMed

Studies evaluating plant-soil biota interactions in both native and introduced plant ranges are rare, and thus far have lacked robust experimental designs to account for several potential confounding factors. Here, we investigated the effects of soil biota on growth of Pinus contorta, which has been introduced from Canada to Sweden. Using Swedish and Canadian soils, we conducted two glasshouse experiments. The first experiment utilized unsterilized soil from each country, with a full-factorial cross of soil origin, tree provenance, and fertilizer addition. The second experiment utilized gamma-irradiated sterile soil from each country, with a full-factorial cross of soil origin, soil biota inoculation treatments, tree provenance, and fertilizer addition. The first experiment showed higher seedling growth on Swedish soil relative to Canadian soil. The second experiment showed this effect was due to differences in soil biotic communities between the two countries, and occurred independently of all other experimental factors. Our results provide strong evidence that plant interactions with soil biota can shift from negative to positive following introduction to a new region, and are relevant for understanding the success of some exotic forest plantations, and invasive and range-expanding native species. PMID:24444123

Gundale, Michael J; Kardol, Paul; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Nilsson, Urban; Lucas, Richard W; Wardle, David A

2014-04-01

119

MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN SEDIMENT, WATER AND BIOTA COLLECTED FROM NEAR-COASTAL AREAS IMPACTED BY COMMON ESTUARINE STRESSORS  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury concentrations in non-commercial organisms indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico are not well characterized particularly when compared to potential sources. In response to this need, mercury levels were determined in sediment, water and various biota in reference and non-refer...

120

Ediacaran acritarch biota from the Giles 1 drillhole, Officer Basin, Australia, and its potential for biostratigraphic correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The remarkable diversification of single-celled photosynthesising biota of algal and other as yet unknown affinities (acritarchs), followed by the diversification of metazoans, occurred during the Ediacaran Period, which is marked by extreme climatic and environmental changes. Here we describe a taxonomically diverse acritarch association from the Ediacaran part of the Giles 1 drillcore in the Officer Basin, South Australia, which

Sebastian Willman; Ma?gorzata Moczyd?owska

2008-01-01

121

Study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation.  

PubMed

Uncertainty in estimations of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation may arise from a number of sources including values of the model parameters, empirical data, measurement errors and biases in the sampling. The significance of the overall uncertainty of an exposure assessment will depend on how the estimated dose compares with reference doses used for risk characterisation. In this paper, we present the results of a study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota using some of the models and parameters recommended in the FASSET methodology. The study was carried out for semi-natural terrestrial, agricultural and marine ecosystems, and for four radionuclides (137Cs, 239Pu, 129I and 237Np). The parameters of the radionuclide transfer models showed the highest sensitivity and contributed the most to the uncertainty in the predictions of doses to biota. The most important ones were related to the bioavailability and mobility of radionuclides in the environment, for example soil-to-plant transfer factors, the bioaccumulation factors for marine biota and the gut uptake fraction for terrestrial mammals. In contrast, the dose conversion coefficients showed low sensitivity and contributed little to the overall uncertainty. Radiobiological effectiveness contributed to the overall uncertainty of the dose estimations for alpha emitters although to a lesser degree than a number of transfer model parameters. PMID:15700701

Avila, R; Beresford, N A; Agüero, A; Broed, R; Brown, J; Iospje, M; Robles, B; Suañez, A

2004-12-01

122

Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in biota from the Pearl River Estuary, South China.  

PubMed

Two hundred and fifty-four biota samples (four species of invertebrates and ten species of fish) were collected from the Pearl River Estuary between 2005 and 2007 and one hundred and twenty four individual or composite samples were analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The concentrations of PBDEs in organisms varied from 6.2 to 208ng/g lipid weight. This PBDE level was significantly lower than those collected in 2004, showing a decreasing trend of PBDEs in biota in the study area. Trophic magnification factors (TMFs) for nine BDE congeners were calculated with values ranging from 0.78 to 3.0. TMFs of BDE47, 66, 100, 99, 154, and 153 were statistically greater than one, indicating a biomagnifcation potential for these congeners. Significant positive correlations were also found between concentrations of the total PBDEs, BDE28, 47, 66, 100, 99, 154, and153 and lipid content in biota, indicating the that bioconcentration also played an important role in the accumulation of PBDEs. No correlation between trophic level and lipid content was found, suggesting that biomagnification was not the result of lipid content effect but indeed occurred. The concentration ratios of BDE99 to BDE100 were much lower in biota than that in water implying that potential congener-specific biotransformation of PBDEs occurred and influenced the biomagnification of BDE congeners. PMID:19616300

Yu, Mei; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Chen, She-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

2009-10-01

123

Study of the uncertainty in estimation of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uncertainty in estimations of the exposure of non-human biota to ionising radiation may arise from a number of sources including values of the model parameters, empirical data, measurement errors and biases in the sampling. The significance of the overall uncertainty of an exposure assessment will depend on how the estimated dose compares with reference doses used for risk characterisation. In

R. Avila; N. A. Beresford; A. Agüero; R. Broed; J. Brown; M. Iospje; B. Robles; A. Suañez

2004-01-01

124

Biota – Sediment partitioning of aluminium smelter related PAHs and pulp mill related diterpenes by intertidal clams at Kitimat, British Columbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability and its relationship to specific PAH sources with different PAH binding characteristics is an important one, because bioavailability drives PAH accumulation in biota and ultimately the biochemical responses to the PAH contaminants. The industrial harbour at Kitimat (British Columbia, Canada) provides an ideal location to study the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of sediment

Mark B. Yunker; Cara L. Lachmuth; Walter J. Cretney; Brian R. Fowler; Neil Dangerfield; Linda White; Peter S. Ross

2011-01-01

125

Native congeners provide biotic resistance to invasive Potentilla through soil biota.  

PubMed

Soil biota can facilitate exotic plant invasions and these effects can be influenced by specific phylogenetic relationships among plant taxa. We measured the effects of sterilizing soils from different native plant monocultures on the growth of Potentilla recta, an exotic invasive forb in North America, and conducted plant-soil feedback experiments with P. recta, two native congeners, a close confamilial, and Festuca idahoensis, a native grass species. We also reanalyzed data comparing the ability of P. recta to invade experimentally constructed congeneric monocultures vs. monocultures of a broad suite of non-congeners. We found that monocultures as a group, other than those of the native P. arguta, were highly invasible by P. recta. In contrast, this was not the case for monocultures of P. arguta. In our first experiment, the biomass of P. recta was 50% greater when grown in soil from F. idahoensis monocultures compared to when it was grown in soils from P. arguta or P. recta monocultures. Sterilizing soil from F. idahoensis rhizospheres had no effect on the biomass of P. recta, but sterilizing soil from P. arguta and P. recta rhizospheres increased the biomass of P. recta by 108% and 90%, respectively. In a second experiment, soil trained by F. idahoensis resulted in a positive feedback for P. recta. In contrast, soils trained independently by each of the two native Potentilla species, or the closely related Dasiphora (formerly Potentilla) resulted in decreases in the total biomass of the invasive P. recta indicating strong negative feedbacks. Soil trained by P. recta also resulted in intraspecific negative feedbacks. Our results demonstrate substantial negative feedbacks for an invader in its nonnative range under certain conditions, and that native congeners can mount strong biotic resistance to an invader through the accumulation of deleterious soil biota. PMID:23923481

Callaway, Ragan M; Montesinos, Daniel; Williams, Kimberlyn; Maron, John L

2013-06-01

126

Concentration ratios of stable elements for selected biota in Japanese estuarine areas.  

PubMed

For the estimation of radiation doses to organisms, concentration ratios (C ( R )s) of radionuclides are required. In the present study, C(R)s of various elements were obtained as analogues of radionuclides for algae, molluscs, and crustaceans, in eight estuarine areas around Japan. The elements measured were Na, Mg, K, Ca, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Pb, and U. The geometric mean (GM) values of C(R)s (GM-C(R)s) for alkali and alkaline earth elements, Mo, and U for all biota, as well as V for crustaceans, were less than 100 L/kg, while GM-C(R)s for the other elements were higher. When the obtained GM-C(R)s were compared with the C(R)s recommended in IAEA Technical Report Series 422 for marine organisms, no big differences between them were found; however, several elements (i.e. Cd and U for algae, Mn for molluscs, and Pb for crustaceans) were lower than the recommended C(R)s. In the present study, conversion factors (the ratio of C(R) for the whole body to that for muscle) for molluscs and crustaceans were also calculated, since data on edible parts of these organisms are generally available in the literature. For crustaceans, GM conversion factors of all the elements were more than one. For molluscs, GM conversion factors of rare earth elements and U were slightly higher than those for crustaceans, while GM conversion factors of the other elements were almost the same and less than 10. These results indicate that some elements tend to be concentrated in the internal organs of biota collected in the estuarine areas. For environmental radiological assessment, conversion factors from tissue to whole-body C(R) values are useful parameters. PMID:20711600

Takata, H; Aono, T; Tagami, K; Uchida, S

2010-11-01

127

General Relationships between Abiotic Soil Properties and Soil Biota across Spatial Scales and Different Land-Use Types  

PubMed Central

Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future studies that consider larger spatial scales and different land-use types. PMID:22937029

Birkhofer, Klaus; Schöning, Ingo; Alt, Fabian; Herold, Nadine; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Marhan, Sven; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wubet, Tesfaye; Yurkov, Andrey; Begerow, Dominik; Berner, Doreen; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Diekötter, Tim; Ehnes, Roswitha B.; Erdmann, Georgia; Fischer, Christiane; Foesel, Bärbel; Groh, Janine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Kandeler, Ellen; Lang, Christa; Lohaus, Gertrud; Meyer, Annabel; Nacke, Heiko; Näther, Astrid; Overmann, Jörg; Polle, Andrea; Pollierer, Melanie M.; Scheu, Stefan; Schloter, Michael; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Schulze, Waltraud; Weinert, Jan; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wolters, Volkmar; Schrumpf, Marion

2012-01-01

128

Screening of perfluorinated compounds in water, sediment and biota of the Llobregat River basin (NE Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PFCs present significant thermal and chemical stability being persistent in the environment, where they can bio-accumulate and adversely affect humans and wildlife (Llorca et al., 2012). Human exposure to PFCs is of concern since PFCs tend to be associated with fatty acid binding proteins in the liver or albumin proteins in blood, and have been detected in human serum, urine, saliva, seminal plasma and breast milk (Sundstrom et al., 2011). This study is aimed at the screening of 21 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in environmental samples by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The main objective is to identify target compounds at low levels in water, sediments and biota of the Llobregat River (2010), second longest river in Catalonia and one of Barcelona's major drinking water resources. PFCs were extracted from water samples by Solid Phase Extraction (SPE); from sediment by ultrasonication with acidified methanol followed by an off-line SPE procedure (Picó et al., 2012), and from biota (fish) with alkaline digestion, clean-up by TurboFlow™ on line technology coupled to LC-MS/MS (Llorca et al., 2012). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the method were calculated by analysis of spiked river water, sediment, and biota with minimum concentrations of each individual compound at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and 10, respectively. The LODs and LOQs of the method in river water ranged between 0.004 and 0.8 ng L-1 and between 0.01 and 2 ng L-1, respectively. In sediment LODs were 0.013-2.667 ng g-1 dry weight (dw) and LOQs were 0.04-8 ng g-1 dw, meanwhile in biota these were 0.006-0.7 pg ?L-1 and 0.02-2.26 pg ?L-1, respectively. Recoveries ranged between 65% and 102% for all target compounds. The method was applied to study the spatial distribution of these compounds in the Llobregat River basin. For this, a total of 40 samples were analysed (14 water, 14 sediments, 12 fishes). Of the 21 target compounds, 13 were identified in water samples (PFBA, PFDA, PFHpA, PFHxA, PFHxDA, PFNA, PFOA, PFPeA, PFTrDA, PFUdA, L-PFBS, L-PFHxS and L-PFOS), and their concentrations ranged between 0. 1 ng L-1 (PFNA) and 2709 ng L-1 (L-PFOS). Similarly, PFBA, PFDA, PFDoA, PFHpA, PFNA, PFOA, PFPeA, PFTrDA, PFUdA, L-PFBS, L-PFHxS, L-PFOS and PFOSA were identified in sediments samples, with concentrations ranging from 0.147 ng g-1 dw (L-PFOS) to 13 ng g-1 dw (PFBA). In biota similar PFC were detected, with values between 0.03 and 1738.06 ng g-1. According to this study, PFCs were detected in different compartments of the ecosystem where they are bio-accumulating and, potentially, would produce adverse effects on humans. Acknowledgements This work has been supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through the projects Consolider-Ingenio 2010 CSD2009-00065 and CGL2011-29703-C02-02. We also thank the persons of IDAEA for taking the samples. References Llorca, M., Farre, M., Pico, Y., Muller, J., Knepper, T. P., Barcelo, D., 2012. Analysis of perfluoroalkyl substances in waters from Germany and Spain. Sci. Total Environ. 431, 139-150. Llorca, M., Pérez, F., Farre, M., Agramunt, S., Kogevinas, M., Barceló, D., 2012. Analysis of perfluoroalkyl substances in cord blood by turbulent flow chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Sci. Total Environ. 433, 151-160. Pico, Y., Blasco, C., Farre, M., Barcelo, D., 2012. Occurrence of perfluorinated compounds in water and sediment of L'Albufera Natural Park (Valencia, Spain). Environ.Sci.Pollut.Res. 19, 946-957. Sundstrom, M., Ehresman, D. J., Bignert, A., Butenhoff, J. L., Olsen, G. W., Chang, S. C., Bergman, A., 2011. A temporal trend study (1972-2008) of perfluorooctanesulfonate, perfluorohexanesulfonate, and perfluorooctanoate in pooled human milk samples from Stockholm, Sweden. Environ. Inter. 37, 178-183.

Campo, Julian; Perez, Francisca; Pico, Yolanda; Farre, Marinella; Barcelo, Damia; Andreu, Vicente

2014-05-01

129

Magnitudes and spatial and temporal patterns of self-organized processes between geomorphology and biota that drive salt marsh evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many complex systems show non-equilibrium fluctuations, often determining the spontaneous evolution towards a critical state. In this context salt marshes are known to be characterized by complex patterns in both geomorphological and ecological features, which often appear to be strongly correlated. One of the main drivers on low-order channel network geometry is the hydrodynamic forcing entering the system in the form of an intermittent stress: the occurrence of infrequent rainfall events determines saturation-excess overland flow, which results in higher stream energy to be dissipated through an increase in cross section and meandering of the tidal channels in the marsh. This external driver determines a second, important effect on the intertidal zone: together with the emergence of a higher number of minor draining channels, salt marshes are provided with pulses of sediment input, causing a vertical build-up that allows pioneer species to colonize new areas of mudflat and channels. This eventually leads to salt marsh development through the higher frequency of occurrence and horizontal spread of marsh pioneer patterns, coupled with the displacement of the limit between the salt marsh and mudflat. As opposed to infrequent events, a much more frequent source of variation and uncertainty affecting the system is the difference between the observed and astronomical tide, which is referred to as surge. Since it would be difficult to simultaneously monitor these parameters through field surveys, and even harder to analyze them over medium to large time scales, we propose a remote sensing approach to monitor the temporal dynamics of both biotic and abiotic factors in salt marshes. We characterized the complex interactions between morphology and biota in two salt marshes in the densely populated Scheldt estuary through the implementation of different algorithms on multispectral endmember fraction maps from optical space-borne remote sensing. Multitemporal fractional abundance maps spanning from 1986 to 2011 were used to identify the interaction between vegetation pattern dynamics and channel drainage density, and integrated with field sampling and in situ spectroradiometry. The objectives were to: a) analyze and validate the processing procedure used to define the patterns of macrophyte vegetation cover; b) obtain field data on microphytobenthos biomass in two intertidal mudflat areas differing in the degree of sediment cohesiveness; c) integrate spectroradiometric measurements with simultaneous sampling; d) build a spectral library of salt marsh vegetation composition and zonation of Northern Europe estuarine areas. The latter can then be compared with vegetation field sampling data already available on the Plymouth estuary, Po Delta and Venice lagoon, in order to support the classification of the different surface cover types for the development of new methods of monitoring salt marsh-mudflat systems.

Cornacchia, L.; Taramelli, A.; Valentini, E.; Monbaliu, J. A.; Sabbe, K.

2012-12-01

130

RESPONSES OF AIRBORNE BIOTA TO MICROWAVE TRANSMISSION FROM SATELLITE POWER SYSTEM (SPS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The goal of this program is to determine whether microwave irradiation adversely alters a wide-range of complex avian behavior modes that are essential to their survival. Effects of microwaves (2.45 GHz) have been studied extensively in mammalian species, e.g., rats, mice, rabbit...

131

Persistent organic pollutants and mercury in marine biota of the Canadian Arctic: an overview of spatial and temporal trends.  

PubMed

This review summarizes and synthesizes the significant amount of data which was generated on mercury (Hg) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Canadian Arctic marine biota since the first Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report (CACAR) was published in 1997. This recent body of work has led to a better understanding of the current levels and spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in biota, including the marine food species that northern peoples traditionally consume. Compared to other circumpolar countries, concentrations of many organochlorines (OCs) in Canadian Arctic marine biota are generally lower than in the European Arctic and eastern Greenland but are higher than in Alaska, whereas Hg concentrations are substantially higher in Canada than elsewhere. Spatial coverage of OCs in ringed seals, beluga and seabirds remains a strength of the Arctic contaminant data set for Canada. Concentrations of OCs in marine mammals and seabirds remain fairly consistent across the Canadian Arctic although subtle differences from west to east and south to north are found in the proportions of various chemicals. The most significant development since 1997 is improvement in the temporal trend data sets, thanks to the use of archived tissue samples from the 1970s and 1980s, long-term studies using archeological material, as well as the continuation of sampling. These data cover a range of species and chemicals and also include retrospective studies on new chemicals such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers. There is solid evidence in a few species (beluga, polar bear, blue mussels) that Hg at some locations has significantly increased from pre-industrial times to the present; however, the temporal trends of Hg over the past 20-30 years are inconsistent. Some animal populations exhibited significant increases in Hg whereas others did not. Therefore, it is currently not possible to determine if anthropogenic Hg is generally increasing in Canadian Arctic biota. It is also not yet possible to evaluate whether the recent Hg increases observed in some biota may be due solely to increased anthropogenic inputs or are in part the product of environmental change, e.g., climate warming. Concentrations of most "legacy" OCs (PCBs, DDT, etc.) significantly declined in Canadian Arctic biota from the 1970s to the late 1990s, and today are generally less than half the levels of the 1970s, particularly in seabirds and ringed seals. Chlorobenzenes and endosulfan were among the few OCs to show increases during this period while summation operatorHCH remained relatively constant in most species. A suite of new-use chemicals previously unreported in Arctic biota (e.g., polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), perfluoro-octane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs)) has recently been found, but there is insufficient information to assess species differences, spatial patterns or food web dynamics for these compounds. Concentrations of these new chemicals are generally lower than legacy OCs, but there is concern because some are rapidly increasing in concentration (e.g., PBDEs), while others such as PFOS have unique toxicological properties, and some were not expected to be found in the Arctic because of their supposedly low potential for long-range transport. Continuing temporal monitoring of POPs and Hg in a variety of marine biota must be a priority. PMID:16109439

Braune, B M; Outridge, P M; Fisk, A T; Muir, D C G; Helm, P A; Hobbs, K; Hoekstra, P F; Kuzyk, Z A; Kwan, M; Letcher, R J; Lockhart, W L; Norstrom, R J; Stern, G A; Stirling, I

2005-12-01

132

Derivation of transfer parameters for use within the ERICA Tool and the default concentration ratios for terrestrial biota.  

PubMed

An ability to predict radionuclide activity concentrations in biota is a requirement of any method assessing the exposure of biota to ionising radiation. Within the ERICA Tool fresh weight whole-body activity concentrations in organisms are estimated using concentration ratios (the ratio of the activity concentration in the organism to the activity concentration in an environmental media). This paper describes the methodology used to derive the default terrestrial ecosystem concentration ratio database available within the ERICA Tool and provides details of the provenance of each value for terrestrial reference organisms. As the ERICA Tool considers 13 terrestrial reference organisms and the radioisotopes of 31 elements, a total of 403 concentration ratios were required for terrestrial reference organisms. Of these, 129 could be derived from literature review. The approaches taken for selecting the remaining values are described. These included, for example, assuming values for similar reference organisms and/or biogeochemically similar elements, and various simple modelling approaches. PMID:18406022

Beresford, N A; Barnett, C L; Howard, B J; Scott, W A; Brown, J E; Copplestone, D

2008-09-01

133

Comparison and unification of carbon stable isotope ratios in specific aquatic biota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotope analysis has become a convenient tool for aquatic food web research in recent years. However, one controversial point on using stable isotope analysis for food web is whether to extract lipids or not before stable isotope analysis due to strong discrimination against 13C and more negative 13C in lipid-rich tissues independent of diet that can be induced by the key step of endogenous lipid synthesis. Lipid extraction may result in the loss of non-lipid compounds that alters ?15N, which urged the development of arithmetic correction techniques for ?13C, although the techniques as well as their underlying assumptions were seldom systematically verified. A novel lipid normalizing model for different aquatic biota was therefore established and applied to the East China Sea (ECS). According to the experimentally measured ?13C values of dorsal muscle of 11 common fish species, organs and whole-body of Japanese Anchovy (Engraulis japonicas), the proposed model is verified to be appropriate to the food web research on the East China Sea.

Wang, N.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, J.

2009-05-01

134

Interspecific variation in heavy metal body concentrations in biota of Sunderban mangrove wetland, northeast India.  

PubMed

The coastal environment of West Bengal, recognized as the most diversified and productive ecosystem among all the maritime states of India, faces organic pollution from domestic sewage and urban and industrial effluents leading serious impacts on biota. The present paper aims at providing information on concentration level of heavy metals among the tissues of benthic polychaetes, bivalve molluscs and finfishes collected from Sundarban mangrove wetland, northeast coast of India. An overall common trend in bioaccumulation was revealed with the following decreasing order: Zn>Mn>Cu>Cr>Se>Hg with few exceptions. Both species dependent variability and temporal variations were pronounced. A high degree of organ specificity was evident in the bivalves where gill and mantle exhibited higher metal accumulation due to ion exchange property of the mucous layer covering these organs. Variability between closely related species is a reflection of different uptake rates, physiology and impact of environmental factors. The results of this analysis suggest that mollusks can play a significant role in trace metal trophic transfer studies, especially as their representatives are intertidally and subtidally ubiquitous. PMID:16213017

Saha, M; Sarkar, S K; Bhattacharya, B

2006-02-01

135

Determining the response of African biota to climate change: using the past to model the future  

PubMed Central

Prediction of biotic responses to future climate change in tropical Africa tends to be based on two modelling approaches: bioclimatic species envelope models and dynamic vegetation models. Another complementary but underused approach is to examine biotic responses to similar climatic changes in the past as evidenced in fossil and historical records. This paper reviews these records and highlights the information that they provide in terms of understanding the local- and regional-scale responses of African vegetation to future climate change. A key point that emerges is that a move to warmer and wetter conditions in the past resulted in a large increase in biomass and a range distribution of woody plants up to 400–500 km north of its present location, the so-called greening of the Sahara. By contrast, a transition to warmer and drier conditions resulted in a reduction in woody vegetation in many regions and an increase in grass/savanna-dominated landscapes. The rapid rate of climate warming coming into the current interglacial resulted in a dramatic increase in community turnover, but there is little evidence for widespread extinctions. However, huge variation in biotic response in both space and time is apparent with, in some cases, totally different responses to the same climatic driver. This highlights the importance of local features such as soils, topography and also internal biotic factors in determining responses and resilience of the African biota to climate change, information that is difficult to obtain from modelling but is abundant in palaeoecological records. PMID:23878343

Willis, K. J.; Bennett, K. D.; Burrough, S. L.; Macias-Fauria, M.; Tovar, C.

2013-01-01

136

Screening level dose assessment of aquatic biota downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in southern France  

SciTech Connect

Aquatic biota in the Rhone River downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in France are exposed to natural sources of radiation and to radioactivity released from the Marcoule complex. A simple conservative screening level model was used to estimate the range of concentrations in aquatic media of both artificial and natural radionuclides and the consequent absorbed dose rates for aquatic organisms. Five categories of aquatic organisms were studied, namely, submerged aquatic plants (phanerogam), non-bottom-feeding fish, bottom-feeding fish, mollusca, and fish-eating birds. The analysis was based on the radionuclide concentrations reported in four consecutive annual radioecological monitoring reports published by French agencies with nuclear regulatory responsibilities. The results of this assessment were used to determine, qualitatively, the magnitude of any potential health impacts on each of the five categories of aquatic organisms studied. The range of dose rate estimates ranged over three orders of magnitude, with maximum dose rates estimated to be in the order of 1 to 10 {micro}Gy h{sup {minus}1}. These maximum dose rates are a factor 40 or more below the international guideline intended to ensure the protection of aquatic populations, and a factor ten or more below the level which may trigger the need for a more detailed evaluation of potential ecological consequences to the exposed populations.

St-Pierre, S.; Chambers, D.B.; Lowe, L.M.; Bontoux, J.G.

1999-09-01

137

Screening for planar chlorobiphenyl congeners in marine biota by HPLC/PDA  

SciTech Connect

A rapid method has been developed to screen for the dioxin-like planar chlorobiphenyl (CB) congeners, as well as certain other CBs and DDTs, in tissue samples from marine biota. Following extraction, the analytes were separated from interfering compounds on a gravity-flow column packed with acidic, basic and neutral silica gel. Subsequently, the planar CB congeners were resolved from the DDTs and other CBs by HPLC on Cosmosil PYE analytical columns cooled to 9 C and were measured by an ultraviolet (UV) photodiode array (PDA) detector. Individual analytes were identified by comparing their UV spectra and retention to those of reference standards and analyte purity was established by comparing spectra within a peak to the apex spectrum. The HPLC/PDA method was tested with tissue samples from fish, shellfish and marine mammals. Concentrations of the planar CB congeners, as well as certain other CBs and DDTs, in samples determined by screening compared favorably with those in the same samples analyzed by a comprehensive method. The screening method required about 20% of the time needed for the comprehensive analyses. The authors demonstrated the utility of the HPLC/PDA method by determining CBs and DDTs in edible tissue from a variety of seafood species; preliminary results from this survey will be presented.

Krahn, M.M.; Ylitalo, G.M.; Buzitis, J.; Sloan, C.A.; Boyd, D.T.; Chan, S.L.; Varanasi, U. [NOAA/NMFS, Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-12-31

138

A new middle eocene whale (Mammalia: Cetacea: Archaeoceti) and associated biota from Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A shallow-marine fossil biota was recovered from the Blue Bluff unit (formerly part of the McBean Formation) in the Upper Coastal Plain of eastern Georgia. Biochronologically significant mollusks (e.g., Turritella nasuta, Cubitostrea sellaeformis, Pteropsella lapidosa) and calcareous nannoplankton (e.g., Chiasmolithus solitus, Reticulofenestra umbilica, Cribocentrum reticulatum) indicate a latest Lutetian-earliest Bartonian age, or about 40 to 41 Ma. Georgiacetus vogtlensis new genus and species is described from a well-preserved, partial skeleton. Georgiacetus is the oldest known whale with a true pterygoid sinus fossa in its basicranium and a pelvis that did not articulate directly with the sacral vertebrae, two features whose acquisitions were important steps toward adaptation to a fully marine existence. The posterior four cheek teeth of G. vogtlensis form a series of carnassial-like shearing blades. These teeth also bear small, blunt accessory cusps, which are regarded as being homologous with the larger, sharper accessory cusps of basilosaurid cheek teeth.

Hulbert, R.C., Jr.; Petkewich, R.M.; Bishop, G.A.; Bukry, D.; Aleshire, D.P.

1998-01-01

139

Novel brominated flame retardants and dechlorane plus in Greenland air and biota.  

PubMed

Following the ban of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, other halogenated flame retardants (FRs) might be used increasingly. This study has analyzed hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-ethane (BTBPE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) and dechlorane plus (DP) in Greenland air over the course of a year. Moreover, BTBPE, DPTE, DP, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl)tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were analyzed in samples of polar bear, ringed seal, black guillemot and glaucous gull from Greenland. HBCD in air appeared low, while mean concentrations of syn- and anti-DP were 2.3 and 5.2 pg/m(3), respectively. BTBPE and DPTE were undetectable in air. Detection frequencies in biota were <50% for BTBPE, TBPH and DBDPE, but near 100% for the remaining compounds. Ringed seals from East Greenland had highest mean concentrations of TBB, DPTE, syn- and anti-DP (1.02, 0.078, 0.096 and 0.42 ng/g wet weight, respectively). Our study documents the long-range transport and, to some extent, bioaccumulation of these novel FRs. PMID:25463724

Vorkamp, Katrin; Bossi, Rossana; Rigét, Frank F; Skov, Henrik; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune

2014-11-01

140

Technical report series: North Alabama water quality assessment: Volume 7, Contaminants in biota  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results and recommendations from a two-part study conducted to determine concentrations of various contaminants in biota from Wilson and upper Pickwick Reservoirs in north Alabama. One part of the study was a ''screening'' effort where fish, clams, and turtles were analyzed as composites for contaminants on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of priority pollutants. The other part was specific to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) because there was a known source of PCBs. Analysis of biological samples for priority pollutants identified few contaminants present in detectable quantities. Of those detected, some were sufficiently low to be of no concern. Presence of cadmium in turtle livers and clam flesh indicates a need for further evaluation because this metal is highly toxic to aquatic life. Phthalate esters in turtles from one location were quite high, but were low in fish and clam samples. Results of PCB analyses indicated largemouth bass and crappie contamination levels were well below the FDSA limit of 2.0 ..mu..g/g. Data for buffalo were not as conclusive. Highest PCB concentrations occurred in catifsh from Wilson Reservoir. Twenty-two of 45 individuals from Wilson Reservoir exceeded the FDA limit and the overall average was 2.6 ..mu..g/g.

Dycus, D.L.

1986-04-01

141

Metal contamination in water, sediment and biota from a semi-enclosed coastal area.  

PubMed

This study identifies and quantifies the spatial variations of metal contamination in water, sediment and biota: the common cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and the Mermaid's glove sponge (Haliclona oculata), within a heavily anthropogenically impacted semi-enclosed estuarine-coastal area with a low ability to disperse and flush contaminants (Poole Harbour, UK). The results showed that metal contamination was detected in all environmental compartments. Water was polluted with As, and Hg sediment metals were mostly within "the possible effect range" in which adverse effects occasionally occurs. Cockles had considerable concentrations of Ni, Ag and Hg in areas close to pollution sources, and sponges accumulate Cu and Zn with very high magnitude. A systematic monitoring approach that includes biological monitoring techniques, which covers all embayments, is needed, and an integrated management of the semi-enclosed coastal zones should be based on the overall hydrological characteristics of these sensitive areas and their ability to self-restore which is different than open coastal zones. PMID:23014922

Aly, Walid; Williams, Ian D; Hudson, Malcolm D

2013-05-01

142

Contrasting Food Web Factor and Body Size Relationships with Hg and Se Concentrations in Marine Biota  

PubMed Central

Marine fish and shellfish are primary sources of human exposure to mercury, a potentially toxic metal, and selenium, an essential element that may protect against mercury bioaccumulation and toxicity. Yet we lack a thorough understanding of Hg and Se patterns in common marine taxa, particularly those that are commercially important, and how food web and body size factors differ in their influence on Hg and Se patterns. We compared Hg and Se content among marine fish and invertebrate taxa collected from Long Island, NY, and examined associations between Hg, Se, body length, trophic level (measured by ?15N) and degree of pelagic feeding (measured by ?13C). Finfish, particularly shark, had high Hg content whereas bivalves generally had high Se content. Both taxonomic differences and variability were larger for Hg than Se, and Hg content explained most of the variation in Hg:Se molar ratios among taxa. Finally, Hg was more strongly associated with length and trophic level across taxa than Se, consistent with a greater degree of Hg bioaccumulation in the body over time, and biomagnification through the food web, respectively. Overall, our findings indicate distinct taxonomic and ecological Hg and Se patterns in commercially important marine biota, and these patterns have nutritional and toxicological implications for seafood-consuming wildlife and humans. PMID:24019976

Karimi, Roxanne; Frisk, Michael; Fisher, Nicholas S.

2013-01-01

143

The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota : an extended inter-comparison.  

SciTech Connect

An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of {+-}20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota.

Batlle, J. V. I.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Beresford, N. A.; Copplestone, D.; Horyna, J.; Hosseini, A.; Johansen, M.; Kamboj, S.; Keum, D.-K.; Kurosawa, N.; Newsome, L.; Olyslaegers, G.; Vandenhove, H.; Ryufuku, S.; Lynch, S. V.; Wood, M. D.; Yu, C. (Environmental Science Division); (Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd.); (Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire); (Centre for Ecology & Hydrology); (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority); (State Office for Nuclear Safety); (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute); (Visible Information Centre Inc.); (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre); (University of Liverpool)

2011-05-01

144

The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota: an extended intercomparison.  

PubMed

An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of ±20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota. PMID:21113609

Vives i Batlle, J; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Horyna, J; Hosseini, A; Johansen, M; Kamboj, S; Keum, D-K; Kurosawa, N; Newsome, L; Olyslaegers, G; Vandenhove, H; Ryufuku, S; Vives Lynch, S; Wood, M D; Yu, C

2011-05-01

145

How do cold water biota arrive in a tropical bay near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous ecological studies on foraminifera and ostracoda from the tropical Sepetiba Bay, located in the southern part of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, have noted the presence in this area of some cool water taxons typical of the Argentine continental platform. These studies have proposed that parcels of these temperate waters with their associated biological indicators are advected northward along the platform, penetrating into some tropical entrances of the southeast coast of Brazil. In the present study, ecological data (foraminifera, ostracoda and microbivalves), are used together with information obtained by satellite tracked drifting buoys and digital thermal imagery obtained from NOAA satellites to indicate the path taken by these high latitude species along the southern Brazilian coast to arrive in the Sepetiba Bay, near the city of Rio de Janeiro. Our general conclusion is that biotic elements native to the colder, less saline marine waters seen to the south of Brazil have been and are being advected northward along the inner part of the continental platform to about 22°S. Water parcels containing this biota may, in a sporadic fashion, enter into the tropical Sepetiba Bay. The passage of meteorological fronts through the region is considered to be an important if not the principal mechanism for the sporadic entry of the cool water into the Southern Coastal Entrance of the State of Rio de Janeiro.

Stevenson, Merritt R.; Dias-Brito, Dimas; Stech, Jose L.; Kampel, Milton

1998-11-01

146

Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama–Sechura)  

PubMed Central

The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama–Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth’s driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama–Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4–14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ?8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ?2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

Guerrero, Pablo C.; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Wiens, John J.

2013-01-01

147

Radionuclide transfer to marine biota species: review of Russian language studies.  

PubMed

An extensive programme of experiments on transfer of radionuclides to aquatic species was conducted in the former USSR starting from the early 1950s. Only a few of these studies were made available in the English language literature or taken into account in international reviews of radionuclide behaviour in marine ecosystems. Therefore, an overview of original information on radionuclide transfer to marine biota species available from Russian language literature sources is presented here. The concentration ratio (CR) values for many radionuclides and for marine species such as: (239)Pu, (106)Ru and (95)Zr (crustacean), (54)Mn, (90)Sr, (95)Nb, (106)Ru, (137)Cs (239)Pu, (241)Am and natural U (molluscs), and (54)Mn, (90)Sr, (137)Cs and (144)Ce (fish) are in good agreement with those previously published, whilst for some of them, in particular, for (32)P and (110)Ag (crustaceans), (35)S (molluscs), (32)P, (35)S, (95)Nb, and (106)Ru (macroalgae) and (60)Co and (239,240)Pu (fish) the data presented here suggest that changes in the default CR reference values presented in recent marine reviews may be required. The data presented here are intended to supplement substantially the CR values being collated within the handbook on Wildlife Transfer Coefficients, coordinated under the IAEA EMRAS II programme. PMID:20798950

Fesenko, S; Fesenko, E; Titov, I; Karpenko, E; Sanzharova, N; Fonseca, A Gondin; Brown, J

2010-11-01

148

Evidence of debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in biota from a wastewater receiving stream.  

PubMed

Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is a high production volume flame retardant. To date, regulation and control of its environmental release have been minimal. Once in the environment, BDE-209 may encounter conditions favoring debromination, potentially forming congeners with greater toxicity, bioaccumulation potential, and persistence. However, (photolytic and in vivo) debromination has only been demonstrated under laboratory scenarios. To examine whether debromination was likely in the field, PBDE congener profiles were tracked from a wastewater treatment plant (sludge) to receiving stream sediments and associated aquatic biota. BDE-209 and 23 additional PBDEs were detected. Sludge congener profiles resembled the commercial penta- and deca- formulations, suggesting minimal -209 debromination during wastewater treatment. Similar profiles were observed in surficial sediments at the outfall and downstream. However, sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus), creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus), and crayfish (Cambarus puncticambarus sp. c) collected near the outfall contained tri- through deca-PBDEs, including congeners not detected in the commercial deca-mixture, sludges or sediments (BDE-179, -184, -188, -201, and -202). A previous in vivo laboratory study identified these as -209 debromination products. This supports the hypothesis that metabolic debromination of -209 does occur in the aquatic environment under realistic conditions. Hence assessments that assume no BDE-209 debromination may underestimate associated bioaccumulation and toxicity attributable to the less brominated congeners produced. PMID:17969678

La Guardia, Mark J; Hale, Robert C; Harvey, Ellen

2007-10-01

149

Levels of Brominated Flame Retardants in Sediments and Their Bioaccumulation Potential in Biota from Jakarta Bay and Its Surroundings, Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study determined concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in mussels, fish and surface sediments from Jakarta Bay and its surroundings, Indonesia to understand their levels and distribution in sediment and their bioaccumulation in biota. Concentrations of PBDEs and HBCDs in sediments varied widely depending on sampling locations, ranging from 0.15-130 ng\\/g dry wt. and <0.020-5.9

Agus SUDARYANTO; Iwan Eka SETIAWAN; Muhammad ILYAS; Endro SOEYANTO; Adi Slamet RIADI; Tomohiko ISOBE; Shin TAKAHASHI; Shinsuke TANABE

150

Occurrence of brominated flame retardants other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers in environmental and biota samples from southern China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentrations of three currently used non-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) brominated flame retardants (BFRs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), and tetrabromobisphenol A bis (2,3-dibromopropyl ether) (TBBPA-DBPE), were examined in environmental and biota samples collected from the Pearl River Delta (PRD) and an electronic waste (e-waste) area in southern China. We also examined deca-BDE (decabromodiphenyl ether) and nine tri- through hepta-BDE

Tian Shi; She-Jun Chen; Xiao-Jun Luo; Xiu-Lan Zhang; Cai-Ming Tang; Yong Luo; Yun-Juan Ma; Jiang-Ping Wu; Xian-Zhi Peng; Bi-Xian Mai

2009-01-01

151

Biomonitoring study of heavy metals in biota and sediments in the South Eastern coast of Mediterranean sea, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Co, Zn, Mn and Fe were determined in biota and sediment samples collected from the Eastern Harbour\\u000a and El-Mex Bay in the Mediterranean Sea, Egypt. The levels of Cu, Co, Zn, Mn and Fe in the macroalgae, Ulva lactuca, Enteromorpha compressa (green algae) and Jania rubens (red algae), recorded high concentrations except for Cd. Moreover, Fe

Maha A. M. Abdallah; Aly M. A. Abdallah

2008-01-01

152

The 40Ar/39Ar dating of the early Jehol Biota from Fengning, Hebei Province, northern China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The bird fossil-bearing deposits at the Jiecaigou section, correlative to the Dabeigou Formation, in Fengning, Hebei Province, northern China, is well known for yielding a fossil assemblage representing the earliest evolutionary stage of the Jehol Biota. The precise age of the fossil-bearing deposits, however, is unknown. The 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum obtained on bulk K-feldspars from the tuff layer about 2 m below the bird fossil-bearing layer gave a plateau age of 129.0 ± 1.3 Ma (2?, full external error) and an isochron age of 132.3 ± 4.5 Ma (2?, full external error). Seventeen total-fusion 40Ar/39Ar ages on K-feldspars from the interbedded tuff about 6 m below the fossil-bearing layer resulted in a weighted mean of 130.7 ± 1.4 Ma (2?, full external error). These dates suggest an age of ˜131 Ma for the early Jehol Biota and combined with previous dating indicate that this biota lasted at least from 131 Ma to 120 Ma (Late Hauterivian to Aptian). These dates also represent the earliest absolute age for known enantiornithine birds in the world.

He, H. Y.; Wang, X. L.; Jin, F.; Zhou, Z. H.; Wang, F.; Yang, L. K.; Ding, X.; Boven, A.; Zhu, R. X.

2006-04-01

153

Recruitment of marine biota onto hard and soft artificially created subtidal habitats in Sabah Al-Ahmad Sea City, Kuwait.  

PubMed

Remediation of coastal habitats from impacts such as dredging and excavation in Gulf coastal waters is hampered by a lack of information on natural recolonisation rates and recruitment patterns of subtidal biota. For soft substrate habitats recovery information is only available for severely polluted sites where recovery takes many years (Jones et al., 2008). Construction of the Sabah Al-Ahmad Sea City provides a unique opportunity to follow benthic recruitment and community development on a range of artificially created benthic habitats over time. The three phases completed were each flooded by the sea separately and annual ecological surveys allow comparison of colonisation patterns and community development rates over time. Species diversity similar to that seen in comparable natural open sea habitats is reached within 2-5 years for mixed sand/rock biota, but longer (2-6 years) for sand biota. Biotic abundance exceeds open sea levels within 1-2 years due to settlement of opportunistic species. Coral recruitment occurred within 3 years. Present data provides a reference point for recovery rates into none polluted benthic habitats for the Gulf. PMID:23199731

Jones, David A; Nithyanandan, Manickam

2013-07-30

154

Evidence for the transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from soil into biota.  

PubMed

The concentrations of six indicator and co-planar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were determined in soil and associated biota samples collected from a polluted and wasted farmland in southern China. The sum of six indicator PCBs (Nos 28, 52, 101, 138, 153 and 180) concentrations in biota samples were proportional to the total amount of PCBs that transferred from soil to the corresponding biota samples, and the sum six indicator PCB congeners in samples were about 20% of the total PCBs, respectively. The ratios of the sum six indicator PCBs and the total PCBs in samples collected in the same area were approximately equal. The sums of six indicator PCBs were proportional to the total PCBs that transferred from soil to plant, while the co-planar PCBs were not. Analysis of individual PCB and PCDD/F congener signatures in soil revealed the original pollutant source after transportation and biodegradation for 14 years using principal component analysis (PCA). The pattern of PCBs in soils and plants could reflect the original pollution source after transportation and biodegradation for 14 years, while the pattern of PCBs in the terrestrial animals could not reflect the primary source. The consumption foods in this region such as foraging chicken eggs, foraging duck eggs, and loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) were highly contaminated, the total toxicity equivalent (TEQ) was up to 784 pg WHO-TEQ/g on basis lipid in foraging chicken eggs. PMID:16574199

Zhao, Xingru; Zheng, Minghui; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Qinghua; Liu, Wenbin

2006-09-15

155

Radiation dose assessment for the biota of terrestrial ecosystems in the shoreline zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant cooling pond.  

PubMed

Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. This paper addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from 90Sr and 137Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to draw down naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature. PMID:21878760

Oskolkov, Boris Ya; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Gaschak, Sergey P; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Hinton, Thomas G; Coughlin, Daniel; Jannik, G Timothy; Farfán, Eduardo B

2011-10-01

156

RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect

Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01

157

Cyanobacterial toxins: a qualitative meta-analysis of concentrations, dosage and effects in freshwater, estuarine and marine biota.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the rapidly expanding literature on the ecological effects of cyanobacterial toxins. The study employs a qualitative meta-analysis from the literature examining results from a large number of independent studies and extracts general patterns from the literature or signals contradictions. The meta-analysis is set up by putting together two large tables--embodying a large and representative part of the literature (see Appendix A). The first table (Table A.1) reviews the presence (concentrations) of different cyanobacterial toxins in the tissues of various groups of aquatic biota after exposure via different routes, experimentally in the lab or via natural routes in the environment. The second table (Table A.2) reviews the dose dependent effect of toxins on biota. The great majority of studies deal with the presence and effects of microcystin, especially of the MC-LR congener. Although this may partly be justified--MC-LR is an abundant and highly toxic protein--our review also emphasizes what is known about (i) other MC congeners (a number of studies showed a preferred accumulation of the less toxic variant MC-RR in animal tissues), (ii) nodularin (data on a range of biota from studies on the Baltic Sea), (iii) neurotoxins like anatoxin-a(s), which are conspicuously often present at times when mass mortalities of birds occur, (iv) a few studies on the presence and effects of cylindrospermposin, as well as (v) the first examples of ecological effects of newly identified bioactive compounds, like microviridin-J. Data were reorganized to assess to what extent bioconcentration (uptake and concentration of toxins from the water) or biomagnification (uptake and concentration via the food) of cyanobacterial toxins occurs in ecosystems. There is little support for the occurrence of biomagnification, and this reduces the risk for biota at higher trophic levels. Rather than biomagnification biodilution seems to occur in the foodweb with toxins being subject to degradation and excretion at every level. Nevertheless toxins were present at all tropic levels, indicating that some vectorial transport must take place, and in sufficient quantities for effects to possibly occur. Feeding seemed to be the most important route for exposure of aquatic biota to cyanobacterial toxins. A fair number of studies focus on dissolved toxins, but in those studies purified toxin typically is used, and biota do not appear very sensitive to this form of exposure. More effects are found when crude cyanobacterial cell lysates are used, indicating that there may be synergistic effects between different bioactive compounds. Aquatic biota are by no means defenseless against toxic cyanobacteria. Several studies indicate that those species that are most frequently exposed to toxins in their natural environment are also the most tolerant. Protection includes behavioral mechanisms, detoxication of MC and NODLN by conjugation with glutathione, and fairly rapid depuration and excretion. A common theme in much of the ecological studies is that of modulating factors. Effects are seldom straightforward, but are dependent on factors like the (feeding) condition of the animals, environmental conditions and the history of exposure (acclimation and adaptation to toxic cyanobacteria). This makes it harder to generalize on what is known about ecological effects of cyanobacterial toxins. The paper concludes by summarizing the risks for birds, fish, macroinvertebrates and zooplankton. Although acute (lethal) effects are mentioned in the literature, mass mortalities of--especially--fish are more likely to be the result of multiple stress factors that co-occur during cyanobacterial blooms. Bivalves appear remarkably resistant, whilst the harmful effects of cyanobacteria on zooplankton vary widely and the specific contribution of toxins is hard to evaluate. PMID:18461789

Ibelings, Bas W; Havens, Karl E

2008-01-01

158

Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

2013-04-01

159

Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the ocean and biota off Japan  

PubMed Central

The T?hoku earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011, resulted in unprecedented radioactivity releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants to the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Results are presented here from an international study of radionuclide contaminants in surface and subsurface waters, as well as in zooplankton and fish, off Japan in June 2011. A major finding is detection of Fukushima-derived 134Cs and 137Cs throughout waters 30–600 km offshore, with the highest activities associated with near-shore eddies and the Kuroshio Current acting as a southern boundary for transport. Fukushima-derived Cs isotopes were also detected in zooplankton and mesopelagic fish, and unique to this study we also find 110mAg in zooplankton. Vertical profiles are used to calculate a total inventory of ?2 PBq 137Cs in an ocean area of 150,000 km2. Our results can only be understood in the context of our drifter data and an oceanographic model that shows rapid advection of contaminants further out in the Pacific. Importantly, our data are consistent with higher estimates of the magnitude of Fukushima fallout and direct releases [Stohl et al. (2011) Atmos Chem Phys Discuss 11:28319–28394; Bailly du Bois et al. (2011) J Environ Radioact, 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2011.11.015]. We address risks to public health and marine biota by showing that though Cs isotopes are elevated 10–1,000× over prior levels in waters off Japan, radiation risks due to these radionuclides are below those generally considered harmful to marine animals and human consumers, and even below those from naturally occurring radionuclides. PMID:22474387

Buesseler, Ken O.; Jayne, Steven R.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Rypina, Irina I.; Baumann, Hannes; Baumann, Zofia; Breier, Crystaline F.; Douglass, Elizabeth M.; George, Jennifer; Macdonald, Alison M.; Miyamoto, Hiroomi; Nishikawa, Jun; Pike, Steven M.; Yoshida, Sashiko

2012-01-01

160

Soil biota can change after exotic plant invasion: Does this affect ecosystem processes?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Invasion of the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum into stands of the native perennial grass Hilaria jamesii significantly reduced the abundance of soil biota, especially microarthropods and nematodes. Effects of invasion on active and total bacterial and fungal biomass were variable, although populations generally increased after 50+ years of invasion. The invasion of Bromus also resulted in a decrease in richness and a species shift in plants, microarthropods, fungi, and nematodes. However, despite the depauperate soil fauna at the invaded sites, no effects were seen on cellulose decomposition rates, nitrogen mineralization rates, or vascular plant growth. When Hilaria was planted into soils from not-invaded, recently invaded, and historically invaded sites (all currently or once dominated by Hilaria), germination and survivorship were not affected. In contrast, aboveground Hilaria biomass was significantly greater in recently invaded soils than in the other two soils. We attributed the Hilaria response to differences in soil nutrients present before the invasion, especially soil nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, as these nutrients were elevated in the soils that produced the greatest Hilaria biomass. Our data suggest that it is not soil biotic richness per se that determines soil process rates or plant productivity, but instead that either (1) the presence of a few critical soil food web taxa can keep ecosystem function high, (2) nutrient loss is very slow in this ecosystem, and/or (3) these processes are microbially driven. However, the presence of Bromus may reduce key soil nutrients over time and thus may eventually suppress native plant success. ?? 2005 by the Ecological Society of America.

Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Sherrod, S.K.; Moldenke, A.

2005-01-01

161

Absorbed dose rate conversion coefficients for reference terrestrial biota for external photon and internal exposures.  

PubMed

The paper describes dosimetric models that allow the estimation of average radiation exposures to terrestrial biota due to environmental sources in the soil as well as internal uniform distributions of radionuclides. Simple three-dimensional phantoms for 13 faunal reference organisms are specified. The calculation of absorbed dose per unit source strength for these targets is based on photon and electron transport simulations using the Monte Carlo method. The presented absorbed dose rate conversion coefficients are derived for terrestrial reference species. This allows the assessment of internal exposure as well as external photon exposure depending on the nuclide, habitat, target size and environmental contamination. To enable the application of specific radiation weighting factors for alpha-, low energy beta- (E0 < 10 keV), beta- and gamma-radiations, their partial contributions to the total absorbed dose are provided separately. The coefficients for external exposure are listed for organisms living above the ground for an infinite plane source 3 mm deep in soil, as well as for a horizontally infinite volume source uniformly distributed to a depth of 10 cm. Furthermore, the coefficients are also presented for organisms living in a contaminated 50 cm thick soil layer. A multi-layer canopy model for plants is also described. The conversion coefficients are given for 3H, 14C, 40K, 36Cl, 59,63Ni, 89,90Sr, 94Nb, 99Tc, 106Ru, 129,131I, 134,135,137Cs, 210Po, 210Pb, 226Ra, 227,228,230,231,232,234Th, 234,235,238U, 238,239,240,241Pu, 241Am, 237Np and 242,243,244Cm, together with their PMID:15700697

Taranenko, V; Pröhl, G; Gómez-Ros, J M

2004-12-01

162

Interactions of Grazing History, Cattle Removal and Time since Rain Drive Divergent Short-Term Responses by Desert Biota  

PubMed Central

Arid grasslands are used worldwide for grazing by domestic livestock, generating debate about how this pastoral enterprise may influence native desert biota. One approach to resolving this question is to experimentally reduce livestock numbers and measure the effects. However, a key challenge in doing this is that historical grazing impacts are likely to be cumulative and may therefore confound comparisons of the short-term responses of desert biota to changes in stocking levels. Arid areas are also subject to infrequent flooding rainfalls that drive productivity and dramatically alter abundances of flora and fauna. We took advantage of an opportunity to study the recent effects of a property-scale cattle removal on two properties with similarly varied grazing histories in central Australia. Following the removal of cattle in 2006 and before and after a significant rainfall event at the beginning of 2007, we sampled vegetation and small vertebrates on eight occasions until October 2008. Our results revealed significant interactions of time of survey with both grazing history and grazing removal for vascular plants, small mammals and reptiles. The mammals exhibited a three-way interaction of time, grazing history and grazing removal, thus highlighting the importance of careful sampling designs and timing for future monitoring. The strongest response to the cessation of grazing after two years was depressed reproductive output of plants in areas where cattle continued to graze. Our results confirm that neither vegetation nor small vertebrates necessarily respond immediately to the removal of livestock, but that rainfall events and cumulative grazing history are key determinants of floral and faunal performance in grassland landscapes with low and variable rainfall. We suggest that improved assessments could be made of the health of arid grazing environments if long-term monitoring were implemented to track the complex interactions that influence how native biota respond to grazing. PMID:23874635

Frank, Anke S. K.; Dickman, Chris R.; Wardle, Glenda M.; Greenville, Aaron C.

2013-01-01

163

A review of the effects of agricultural and industrial contamination on the Ebro delta biota and wildlife.  

PubMed

The Ebro delta (NE Spain) is a 320 km2 wetland area of international importance for conservation. The area is devoted to rice farming and receives large amounts of pesticides. Industrial pollutants are also carried to the delta by the river. The information accumulated during the last 25 year on the effect of such pollution on the biota is reviewed in order to identify the existing gaps and needs for management. Organochlorine pesticides were legally used until 1977, which has resulted in the widespread presence of these compounds in the Ebro delta biota. Lethal, sublethal or other detrimental effects of these pesticides on wildlife in the area were poorly investigated, but negative effects on the reproduction of ducks and herons were reported. Nowadays, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the main responsible of organochlorine pollution in the area: concentrations in biota samples are higher than levels observed in nearby coastal areas, as a result of the significant PCB inputs by the river which, in 1990, were evaluated at 126 kg yr(-1). The massive use of herbicides is thought to have contributed to the elimation of macrophyte vegetation in the lagoons during the eighties, which had strong consequences on diving ducks and coot populations. Weed control is also related to the loss of biodiversity held by rice fields. The massive and inadequate use of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides (involving more than 20,000 t yr(-1) has produced some waterbird mortality events, and may have direct and indirect effects on other non-target organisms. The accumulation in the soil of lead pellets used in waterfowl shooting is estimated to kill some 16,300 waterbirds in the Ebro delta every year. PMID:11686200

Mañosa, S; Mateo, R; Guitart, R

2001-10-01

164

Where and When did High Andean Relief Emerge?: Insights From Molecular Phylogenies of Andean Biota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emergence of mountains along the Andean margin created new ecosystems and thus triggered a variety of adaptive biotic radiations, to the point that the Andes are to-day one of the world's major biodiversity hotspots. The rising Andes came to serve as a rain barrier: cloud forests developed along their eastern side due to orographic concentration of the westward-moving Amazonian moisture, and environments became drier in the west, with highland steppes extending above ~2-3 km. Relevant biologic data concerning Andean taxa adapted to these environments might therefore shed some light on the issue of Andean orogeny and surface uplift. Phylogeography (the analysis of phylogenetic trees in terms of biogeographic distributions) and phylochronology (the use of phylogenetic trees as molecular clocks) can be employed to reconstruct syn- orogenic radiations and estimate their timing, respectively. We use published molecular phylogenies that inform on the evolution of a variety of Andean animal and plant taxa, and therefore provide indirect means to assess and approximately date the acquisition of altitude. Phylogeographic analyses of 6 phylogenetic trees concerning unrelated Andean biota coincide in having their basal clades established in areas within the Central Andean Orocline (CAO), 5 of them clearly pointing to southern Peru and/or western Bolivia as the region of origin of the corresponding high-Andean taxa. A histogram of 9 phylochronologic estimates, based on trees concerning unrelated taxa (independently constructed and calibrated), suggests that the 2.0-2.5 km critical altitude was acquired during the 23-17 Ma or 26-16 Ma intervals (depending on the threshold used), confirming some geomorphic and geologic estimates (but conflicting with others). Although more data are needed, these results suggest that it was within the CAO and approximately during the early Miocene that the Andes acquired altitudes sufficient to trigger radiations of cold-adapted taxa, i.e. >~2 km elevations. Identification of the CAO as the earliest segment of the Andes to have attained high altitudes is in agreement with the fact that it currently presents by far the largest orogenic volume in the entire Cordillera.

Sempere, T.; Picard, D.; Plantard, O.

2006-05-01

165

Biota: sediment partitioning of aluminium smelter related PAHs and pulp mill related diterpenes by intertidal clams at Kitimat, British Columbia.  

PubMed

The question of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability and its relationship to specific PAH sources with different PAH binding characteristics is an important one, because bioavailability drives PAH accumulation in biota and ultimately the biochemical responses to the PAH contaminants. The industrial harbour at Kitimat (British Columbia, Canada) provides an ideal location to study the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of sediment hydrocarbons to low trophic level biota. Samples of soft shell clams (Mya arenaria) and intertidal sediment collected from multiple sites over six years at various distances from an aluminium smelter and a pulp and paper mill were analysed for 106 PAHs, plant diterpenes and other aromatic fraction hydrocarbons. Interpretation using PAH source ratios and multivariate data analysis reveals six principal hydrocarbon sources: PAHs in coke, pitch and emissions from anode combustion from the aluminium smelter, vascular plant terpenes and aromatised terpenes from the pulp and paper mill, petroleum PAHs from shipping and other anthropogenic activities and PAHs from natural plant detritus. Harbour sediments predominantly contain either pitch or pyrogenic PAHs from the smelter, while clams predominantly contain plant derived PAHs and diterpenes from the adjacent pulp mill. PAHs from the smelter have low bioavailability to clams (Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors; BSAFs <1 for pitch and coke; <10 for anode combustion, decreasing to ?0.1 for the mass 300 and 302 PAHs), possibly due to binding to pitch or soot carbon matrices. Decreases in PAH isomer ratios between sediments and clams likely reflect a combination of variation in uptake kinetics of petroleum PAHs and compound specific metabolism, with the importance of petroleum PAHs decreasing with increasing molecular weight. Plant derived compounds exhibit little natural bioaccumulation at reference sites, but unsaturated and aromatised diterpenes released from resins by industrial pulping processes are readily accumulated by the clams (BSAFs >500). Thus while most of the smelter associated PAHs in sediments may not be bioavailable to benthic organisms, the plant terpenes (including retene, totarol, ferruginol, manool, dehydroabietane and other plant terpenes that form the chemical defence mechanism of conifers) released by pulp mills are bioavailable and possess demonstrated toxic properties. The large scale release of plant terpenes by some of the many pulp mills located in British Columbia and elsewhere represents a largely undocumented risk to aquatic biota. PMID:21788067

Yunker, Mark B; Lachmuth, Cara L; Cretney, Walter J; Fowler, Brian R; Dangerfield, Neil; White, Linda; Ross, Peter S

2011-09-01

166

Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for ?13C and ?15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, ?13C, and ?15N.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

2008-10-09

167

LEAD (Pb) IN BIOTA AND PERCEPTIONS OF Pb EXPOSURE AT A RECENTLY DESIGNATED SUPERFUND BEACH SITE IN NEW JERSEY  

PubMed Central

The Raritan Bay Slag Site (New Jersey) was designated a Superfund site in 2009 because the seawall, jetties, and sediment contained lead (Pb). Our objective was to compare Pb and mercury (Hg) levels in biota and public perceptions of exposure at the Superfund and reference sites. Samples (algae, invertebrates, fish) were collected from the Raritan Bay Slag Site and reference sites and analyzed for Pb and Hg. Waterfront users were interviewed using a standard questionnaire. Levels of Pb in aquatic organisms were compared to ecological and human health safety standards. Lead levels were related to location, trophic level, and mobility. Lead levels in biota were highest at the western side of the West Jetty. Mean Pb levels were highest for algae (Fucus = 53,600 ± 6990 ng/g = ppb [wet weight], Ulva = 23,900 ± 2430 ppb), intermediate for grass shrimp (7270 ± 1300 ppb, 11,600 ± 3340 ppb), and lowest for fish (Atlantic silversides 218 ± 44 ppb). Within species, Pb levels varied significantly across the sampling sites. Lead levels in algae, sometimes ingested by individuals, were sufficiently high to exceed human safety levels. Mercury levels did not differ between the Superfund and reference sites. Despite the fence and warnings, people (1) used the Superfund and reference sites similarly, (2) had similar fish consumption rates, and (3) were not concerned about Pb, although most individuals knew the metal was present. The fish sampled posed no apparent risk for human consumers, but the algae did. PMID:22409490

Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

2014-01-01

168

Acute toxicity to Daphnia pulex of six classes of chemical compounds potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota  

SciTech Connect

Of the six classes of chemicals potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota, derivatives of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were the most acutely toxic (48-h EC 50) to Daphnia pulex. The other classes, listed in order of decreasing toxicity, were alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, silicon-containing compounds. Of the 41 compounds representing the six chemical classes, 6 were extremely toxic (> 0.01-0.1 mg/L), 11 highly toxic (> 0.1 {minus} 1.0 mg/L), 20 moderately toxic (> 1.0 {minus} 10.0 mg/L), and 4 slightly toxic (> 10 {minus} 100 mg/L). The reference compound, p, p'DDT, was super toxic (< 0.01 mg/L). Based on toxicity and relative abundance (hazard ranking) of the 21 compounds that were detected in tissue of Great Lakes fishes, the classes of compounds that present the greatest threat to Great Lakes aquatic biota are PAH derivatives, alkyl halides, and cyclic alkanes.

Smith, S.B.; Savino, J.F.; Blouin, M.A. (Fish and Wildlife Service, Ann Arbor, MI (USA))

1988-01-01

169

Acute toxicity of Daphnia pulex to six classes of chemical compounds potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Of the six classes of chemicals potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota, derivatives of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were the most acutely toxic (48-h EC 50) to Daphnia pulex. The other classes, listed in order of decreasing toxicity were alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, silicon-containing compounds. O f the 41 compounds representing the six chemical classes, 6 were extremely toxic (> 0.01 - 0.1 mg/L), 11 highly toxic (> 01. - 1.0 mg/L), 20 moderately toxic (> 1.0 - 10.0 mg/L), and 4 slightly toxic (>10 - 100 mg/L). The reference compound, p, p'DDT, was super toxic (< 0.01 mg/L). Based on toxicity and relative abundance (hazard ranking) of the 21 compounds that were detected in tissue of Great Lakes fishes, the classes of compounds that present the greatest threat to Great Lakes aquatic biota are PAH derivatives, alkyl halides, and cyclic aklanes.

Smith, Stephen B.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Blouin, Marc A.

1988-01-01

170

Effects of land use on the water quality and biota of three streams in the Piedmont province of North Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three small streams in North Carolina 's northern Piedmont were studied to compare the effects of land use in their watersheds on water quality characteristics and aquatic biota. Devil 's Cradle Creek (agricultural watershed) had more than two times the sediment yield of Smith Creek (forested watershed) (0.34 tons/acre compared to 0.13 tons/acre), and Marsh Creek (urban watershed) had more than four times the yield of Smith Creek (0.59 tons/acre). Concentrations of nutrients were consistently highest in Devil 's Craddle Creek. Concentrations of total copper, iron, and lead in samples from each of the three streams at times exceeded State water quality standards as did concentrations of total zinc in samples from both Smith and Marsh Creeks. Successively lower aquatic invertebrate taxa richness was found in the forested, the agricultural, and the urban watershed streams. Invertebrate biota in Smith Creek was dominated by insects, such as Ephemeroptera, that are intolerant to stress from pollution, whereas Devil 's Cradle Creek was dominated by the more tolerant Diptera, and Marsh Creek was dominated by the most pollution-tolerant group, the Oligochaeta. Fish communities in the forested and agricultural watershed streams were characterized by more species and more individuals of each species, relative to a limited community in urban Marsh Creek. Three independent variables closely linked to land use--suspended-sediment yield, suspended-sediment load, and total lead concentrations in stream water--are inversely associated with the biological communities of the streams.

Crawford, J.K.; Lenat, D.R.

1989-01-01

171

Biomonitoring study of heavy metals in biota and sediments in the South Eastern coast of Mediterranean sea, Egypt.  

PubMed

Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Co, Zn, Mn and Fe were determined in biota and sediment samples collected from the Eastern Harbour and El-Mex Bay in the Mediterranean Sea, Egypt. The levels of Cu, Co, Zn, Mn and Fe in the macroalgae, Ulva lactuca, Enteromorpha compressa (green algae) and Jania rubens (red algae), recorded high concentrations except for Cd. Moreover, Fe was the most predominant metal in the seaweed. The two species of bivalves, Donax trunculus and Paphia textile, showed different amounts of metals in their tissue. The abundance of heavy metal concentrations in the mussel samples was found in the order Fe> Zn> Mn> Cu> Co> Cd and Fe> Zn> Mn> Cu> Cd> Co, respectively for the two species. The metals concentrations were generally higher compared with the previous studies in mussels from the same area. The levels of metals accumulated in the investigated fish samples, Saurida undosquamis, Siganus rivulatus, Lithognathus mormyrus and Sphyraena sphyraena, were higher than those of Marmara Sea (Turkey), for Co and Cd and lower for Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe. El-Mex Bay having the highest metals concentration in sediments as their order of abundance were Fe> Zn> Mn> Cu> Cd> Co. Nevertheless, a high variability in the metal levels occurs among the studied algae and biota and also between the investigated Harbour. A significant correlations (p < 0.05) were found for each of Zn and Fe in P. textile and of Co in D. trunculus relative to their concentrations in surficial sediments. PMID:18074236

Abdallah, Maha A M; Abdallah, Aly M A

2008-11-01

172

Occurrence of estrogens in water, sediment and biota and their ecological risk in Northern Taihu Lake in China.  

PubMed

Occurrence of five estrogens, including estrone (E1), 17?-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and bisphenol A (BPA) in water, sediment and biota in Northern Taihu Lake, were investigated and their ecological risk was evaluated. Most of the target estrogens were widely distributed in the eight studied sampling sites, and their levels showed a regional trend of Gong Bay > Meiliang Bay > Zhushan Bay. The average concentrations of E1, E2, E3, EE2 and BPA ranged from 3.86 to 64.4 ng l(-1), 44.3 to 64.1 ?g kg(-1) dry weight and 58.6 to 115 ?g kg(-1) dry weight in water, sediments and biota, respectively. In most cases, the average concentrations of BPA and E2 were higher than those of other estrogens. E1, E3 and EE2 were found to be accumulated in river snails with bioaccumulation factor values as high as 14,204, 35,327 and 20,127 l kg(-1), respectively. E3 was also considered to be accumulated in clams. The evaluation of environmental risk showed that the occurrence of E2 and EE2 in lakes might pose a high risk to aquatic organisms. These findings provide important information for estrogen control and management in the studied area. PMID:25117485

Wang, Yonghua; Wang, Qiuying; Hu, Liangfeng; Lu, Guanghua; Li, Yi

2015-02-01

173

Assessing radiation impact at a protected coastal sand dune site: an intercomparison of models for estimating the radiological exposure of non-human biota.  

PubMed

This paper presents the application of three publicly available biota dose assessment models (the ERICA Tool, R&D128/SP1a and RESRAD-BIOTA) to an assessment of the Drigg coastal sand dunes. Using measured (90)Sr, (99)Tc, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am activity concentrations in sand dune soil, activity concentration and dose rate predictions are made for a range of organisms including amphibians, birds, invertebrates, mammals, reptiles, plants and fungi. Predicted biota activity concentrations are compared to measured data where available. The main source of variability in the model predictions is the transfer parameters used and it is concluded that developing the available transfer databases should be a focus of future research effort. The value of taking an informed user approach to investigate the way in which models may be expected to be applied in practice is highlighted and a strategy for the future development of intercomparison exercises is presented. PMID:19447531

Wood, Michael D; Beresford, Nicholas A; Barnett, Catherine L; Copplestone, David; Leah, Richard T

2009-12-01

174

Evaluation of PCB and hexachlorobenzene biota-sediment accumulation factors based on ingested sediment in a deposit-feeding clam  

SciTech Connect

Contaminated sediment exposure experiments were conducted using a marine deposit-feeding clam (Macoma nasuta) to determine biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) based on ingested sediment and fecal organic carbon. Internal, or gut, BSAFs were determined for hexachlorobenzene and 13 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and were compared to those found with the standard method of calculating BSAFs, which uses the organic carbon and contaminant concentration of the whole or external sediment. The results of these experiments indicated that gut BSAFs were consistently smaller and less variable across sediment types than the corresponding standard BSAFs. Although these results indicate that using ingested sediment concentrations and fecal total organic carbon to calculate gut BSAFs might improve the predictive ability of the standard BSAF model, the benefit is small when compared to the difficulty in measuring the contaminant concentration on ingested sediment and the organic carbon content of feces.

Boese, B.L.; Lee, H. II; Specht, D.T.; Randall, R. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Pelletier, J. [Dyncorp, Newport, OR (United States)

1996-09-01

175

BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTORS FOR POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS, DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS, AND DIBENZOFURANS IN SOUTHERN LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE TROUT (SALVELINUS NAMAYCUSH)  

EPA Science Inventory

A set of high-quality, age-specific biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) have been determined from concentrations measured with high-resolution gas chroma tography/high-resolution ma...

176

Mercury Pollution from a Chloralkali Source in a Tropical Lake and Its Biomagnification in Aquatic Biota: Link between Chemical Pollution, Biomarkers, and Human Health Concern  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal that can cause adverse ecological and toxicological impacts through the mechanism of biomagnification. Hg accumulation in aquatic biota may thus also pose a serious threat to humans and other fish-eating animals. The present work observed the transfer of Hg from abiotic (water and sediments) to biotic (algae, aquatic macrophytes, and fish) components, belonging

Prabhat Kumar Rai

2008-01-01

177

Simulation of radioactive cesium transfer in the southern Fukushima coastal biota using a dynamic food chain transfer model.  

PubMed

The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) accident occurred on 11 March 2011. The accident introduced (137)Cs into the coastal waters which was subsequently transferred to the local coastal biota thereby elevating the concentration of this radionuclide in coastal organisms. In this study, the radioactive cesium levels in coastal biota from the southern Fukushima area were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. The simulation derived the possible maximum radioactive cesium levels in organisms, indicating that the maximum (137)Cs concentrations in invertebrates, benthic fish and predator fish occurred during late April, late May and late July, respectively in the studied area where the source was mainly the direct leakage of (137)Cs effluent from the 1F NPP. The delay of a (137)Cs increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer of (137)Cs introduced to the ecosystem from the initial contamination of the seawater. The model also provided the degree of radionuclide depuration in organisms, and it demonstrated the latest start of the decontamination phase in benthic fish. The ecological half-lives, derived both from model simulation and observation, were 1-4 months in invertebrates, and 2-9 months in plankton feeding fish and coastal predator fish from the studied area. In contrast, it was not possible to similarly calculate these parameters in benthic fish because of an unidentified additional radionuclide source which was deduced from the biological compartment model. To adequately reconstruct the in-situ depuration of radiocesium in benthic fish in the natural ecosystem, a contamination source associated with the bottom sediments is necessary. PMID:23639689

Tateda, Yutaka; Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki

2013-10-01

178

Evaluation of radiation doses and associated risk from the Fukushima nuclear accident to marine biota and human consumers of seafood.  

PubMed

Radioactive isotopes originating from the damaged Fukushima nuclear reactor in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 were found in resident marine animals and in migratory Pacific bluefin tuna (PBFT). Publication of this information resulted in a worldwide response that caused public anxiety and concern, although PBFT captured off California in August 2011 contained activity concentrations below those from naturally occurring radionuclides. To link the radioactivity to possible health impairments, we calculated doses, attributable to the Fukushima-derived and the naturally occurring radionuclides, to both the marine biota and human fish consumers. We showed that doses in all cases were dominated by the naturally occurring alpha-emitter (210)Po and that Fukushima-derived doses were three to four orders of magnitude below (210)Po-derived doses. Doses to marine biota were about two orders of magnitude below the lowest benchmark protection level proposed for ecosystems (10 µGy?h(-1)). The additional dose from Fukushima radionuclides to humans consuming tainted PBFT in the United States was calculated to be 0.9 and 4.7 µSv for average consumers and subsistence fishermen, respectively. Such doses are comparable to, or less than, the dose all humans routinely obtain from naturally occurring radionuclides in many food items, medical treatments, air travel, or other background sources. Although uncertainties remain regarding the assessment of cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation to humans, the dose received from PBFT consumption by subsistence fishermen can be estimated to result in two additional fatal cancer cases per 10,000,000 similarly exposed people. PMID:23733934

Fisher, Nicholas S; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hinton, Thomas G; Baumann, Zofia; Madigan, Daniel J; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

2013-06-25

179

Evaluation of radiation doses and associated risk from the Fukushima nuclear accident to marine biota and human consumers of seafood  

PubMed Central

Radioactive isotopes originating from the damaged Fukushima nuclear reactor in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 were found in resident marine animals and in migratory Pacific bluefin tuna (PBFT). Publication of this information resulted in a worldwide response that caused public anxiety and concern, although PBFT captured off California in August 2011 contained activity concentrations below those from naturally occurring radionuclides. To link the radioactivity to possible health impairments, we calculated doses, attributable to the Fukushima-derived and the naturally occurring radionuclides, to both the marine biota and human fish consumers. We showed that doses in all cases were dominated by the naturally occurring alpha-emitter 210Po and that Fukushima-derived doses were three to four orders of magnitude below 210Po-derived doses. Doses to marine biota were about two orders of magnitude below the lowest benchmark protection level proposed for ecosystems (10 µGy?h?1). The additional dose from Fukushima radionuclides to humans consuming tainted PBFT in the United States was calculated to be 0.9 and 4.7 µSv for average consumers and subsistence fishermen, respectively. Such doses are comparable to, or less than, the dose all humans routinely obtain from naturally occurring radionuclides in many food items, medical treatments, air travel, or other background sources. Although uncertainties remain regarding the assessment of cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation to humans, the dose received from PBFT consumption by subsistence fishermen can be estimated to result in two additional fatal cancer cases per 10,000,000 similarly exposed people. PMID:23733934

Fisher, Nicholas S.; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hinton, Thomas G.; Baumann, Zofia; Madigan, Daniel J.; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

2013-01-01

180

The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on marine biota: retrospective assessment of the first year and perspectives.  

PubMed

An international study under the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was performed to assess radiological impact of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) on the marine environment. This work constitutes the first international assessment of this type, drawing upon methodologies that incorporate the most up-to-date radioecological models and knowledge. To quantify the radiological impact on marine wildlife, a suite of state-of-the-art approaches to assess exposures to Fukushima derived radionuclides of marine biota, including predictive dynamic transfer modelling, was applied to a comprehensive dataset consisting of over 500 sediment, 6000 seawater and 5000 biota data points representative of the geographically relevant area during the first year after the accident. The dataset covers the period from May 2011 to August 2012. The method used to evaluate the ecological impact consists of comparing dose (rates) to which living species of interest are exposed during a defined period to critical effects values arising from the literature. The assessed doses follow a highly variable pattern and generally do not seem to indicate the potential for effects. A possible exception of a transient nature is the relatively contaminated area in the vicinity of the discharge point, where effects on sensitive endpoints in individual plants and animals might have occurred in the weeks directly following the accident. However, impacts on population integrity would have been unlikely due to the short duration and the limited space area of the initially high exposures. Our understanding of the biological impact of radiation on chronically exposed plants and animals continues to evolve, and still needs to be improved through future studies in the FDNPS marine environment. PMID:24784739

Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Aono, Tatsuo; Brown, Justin E; Hosseini, Ali; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Sazykina, Tatiana; Steenhuisen, Frits; Strand, Per

2014-07-15

181

A dynamic model to estimate the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of marine biota as consequences of a nuclear accident.  

PubMed

This paper describes a dynamic compartment model (K-BIOTA-DYN-M) to assess the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of marine biota as a result of a nuclear accident. The model considers the transport of radioactivity between the marine biota through the food chain, and applies the first order kinetic model for the sedimentation of radionuclides from seawater onto sediment. A set of ordinary differential equations representing the model are simultaneously solved to calculate the activity concentration of the biota and the sediment, and subsequently the dose rates, given the seawater activity concentration. The model was applied to investigate the long-term effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the marine biota using (131)I, (134)Cs, and, (137)Cs activity concentrations of seawater measured for up to about 2.5 years after the accident at two locations in the port of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) which was the most highly contaminated area. The predicted results showed that the accumulated dose for 3 months after the accident was about 4-4.5Gy, indicating the possibility of occurrence of an acute radiation effect in the early phase after the Fukushima accident; however, the total dose rate for most organisms studied was usually below the UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation)'s bench mark level for chronic exposure except for the initial phase of the accident, suggesting a very limited radiological effect on the marine biota at the population level. The predicted Cs sediment activity by the first-order kinetic model for the sedimentation was in a good agreement with the measured activity concentration. By varying the ecological parameter values, the present model was able to predict the very scattered (137)Cs activity concentrations of fishes measured in the port of FDNPS. Conclusively, the present dynamic model can be usefully applied to estimate the activity concentration and whole body dose rate of the marine biota as the consequence of a nuclear accident. PMID:25461520

Keum, Dong-Kwon; Jun, In; Kim, Byeong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-Ho

2014-11-25

182

Validation of a screening method based on liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry for analysis of perfluoroalkylated substances in biota.  

PubMed

A screening method for analysis of perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) in biota samples has been developed and validated using liver samples from polar cod (Boreogadus saida) and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus). The method was based on extraction of target compounds from homogenised samples into the solvent mixture used as mobile phase in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), i.e. methanol/water (50:50; 2 mM ammonium acetate). The extract was filtered and directly injected into a HPLC/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) system. Quantification was performed using 7H-perfluoroheptanoic acid as internal standard and a calibration standard solution dissolved in sample extract for each matrix type (matrix-matched calibration standard). The method is very time and cost efficient. Except for long-chain compounds and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (which cannot be covered by this method), recoveries were between 60% and 115% and method detection limits were in the range 0.04-1.3 ng/g wet weight. Blank values could be neglected with the exception of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). One of the major challenges in PFAS analysis is ionisation disturbance by co-eluting matrix in the ion source of the mass spectrometer. Both matrix and analyte specific signal enhancement and suppression was observed and quantified. Repeated extractions (n = 3) gave relative standard deviations (RSD) <35% for all PFAS. Accuracy was examined by comparing the screening method to the generally applied ion pair extraction (IPE) method. PFAS concentration values of a glaucous gull liver sample deviated by less than 30% for the two methods, provided that matrix-matched calibration standards were employed in both methods. PMID:16038211

Berger, Urs; Haukås, Marianne

2005-07-22

183

Polycyclic aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in Chukchi Sea biota and sediments and their toxicological response in the Arctic cod, Boreogadus saida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area-Chemical and Benthos (COMIDA CAB) project, we determined the distribution and concentrations of aliphatic n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments (0-1 cm) among 52 sites across the Chukchi Sea and in muscle tissues of the benthic Northern whelk, Neptunea heros, collected opportunistically. In addition, downcore profiles of contaminants were determined at three targeted sites to establish historic patterns. Baseline responses of PAH exposure and its potential toxicological effects were examined in the common Arctic cod, Boreogadus saida, through measures of cytochrome P4501A/ ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (CYP1A/EROD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver tissue. The total concentration of PAHs in surface sediments throughout the study area, including parent and alkyl-homologs, were very low (<1600 ng g-1 dry wt) except for a single station, where values were 2-20-fold greater than at other baseline sites (2956 ng g-1 dry wt). Alkyl-substituted PAHs were the dominant form in all surface (54-93%) and subsurface sediments (50-81% of the total), with a general decrease in total PAH concentrations observed downcore. In biota, larger Neptunea showed lower total concentrations of PAHs in foot muscles (4.5-10.7 ng g-1 wet wt) compared to smaller animals; yet aliphatic n-alkane (C19-C33) concentrations (0.655-5.20 ?g g-1 wet wt) increased in larger organisms with distributions dominated by long-chain (C23-C33) hydrocarbons. In B. saida, CYP1A1, GST, and SOD enzyme levels were comparable to baseline levels previously reported in other pristine systems. Of the three assays, only SOD had a significant correlation between gene expression and enzyme activity.

Harvey, H. Rodger; Taylor, Karen A.; Pie, Hannah V.; Mitchelmore, Carys L.

2014-04-01

184

Dual-age-class population model to assess radiation dose effects on non-human biota populations.  

PubMed

In the present paper, a two-age-class group, logistic growth model for generic populations of non-human biota is described in order to assess non-stochastic effects of low linear energy-transfer radiation using three endpoints: repairable radiation damage, impairment of reproductive ability and, at higher radiation dose rates, mortality. This model represents mathematically the exchange between two life stages considering fecundity, growth and mortality. Radiation effects are modeled with a built-in self-recovery pool whereupon individuals can repair themselves. In acute effects mode, the repairing pool becomes depleted due to radiation and the model tends to lethality mode. A base calibration of the model's two free parameters is possible assuming that in acute mode 50% of the individuals die on 30 days when a radiation dose equal to the LD(50/30) is applied during that period. The model, which requires 10 species-dependent life-history parameters, was applied to fish and mammals. Its use in the derivation of dose-rate screening values for the protection of non-human biota from the effects of ionizing radiation is demonstrated through several applications. First, results of model testing with radiation effects data for fish populations from the EPIC project show the predictive capability of the model in a practical case. Secondly, the model was further verified with FREDERICA radiation effects data for mice and voles. Then, consolidated predictions for mouse, rabbit, dog and deer were generated for use in a population model comparison made within the IAEA EMRAS II project. Taken together, model predictions suggest that radiation effects are more harmful for larger organisms that generate lower numbers of offspring. For small mammal and fish populations, dose rates that are below 0.02 Gy day(-1) are not fatal; in contrast, for large mammals, chronic exposure at this level is predicted to be harmful. At low exposure rates similar to the ERICA screening dose rate of 2.4 × 10(-4) Gy day(-1), long-term effects on the survivability of populations are negligible, supporting the appropriateness of this value for radiological assessments to wildlife. PMID:22544082

Vives i Batlle, J

2012-08-01

185

Literature Review and Database of Relations Between Salinity and Aquatic Biota: Applications to Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Long-term accumulation of salts in wetlands at Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Mont., has raised concern among wetland managers that increasing salinity may threaten plant and invertebrate communities that provide important habitat and food resources for migratory waterfowl. Currently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is evaluating various water management strategies to help maintain suitable ranges of salinity to sustain plant and invertebrate resources of importance to wildlife. To support this evaluation, the USFWS requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provide information on salinity ranges of water and soil for common plants and invertebrates on Bowdoin NWR lands. To address this need, we conducted a search of the literature on occurrences of plants and invertebrates in relation to salinity and pH of the water and soil. The compiled literature was used to (1) provide a general overview of salinity concepts, (2) document published tolerances and adaptations of biota to salinity, (3) develop databases that the USFWS can use to summarize the range of reported salinity values associated with plant and invertebrate taxa, and (4) perform database summaries that describe reported salinity ranges associated with plants and invertebrates at Bowdoin NWR. The purpose of this report is to synthesize information to facilitate a better understanding of the ecological relations between salinity and flora and fauna when developing wetland management strategies. A primary focus of this report is to provide information to help evaluate and address salinity issues at Bowdoin NWR; however, the accompanying databases, as well as concepts and information discussed, are applicable to other areas or refuges. The accompanying databases include salinity values reported for 411 plant taxa and 330 invertebrate taxa. The databases are available in Microsoft Excel version 2007 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5098/downloads/databases_21april2009.xls) and contain 27 data fields that include variables such as taxonomic identification, values for salinity and pH, wetland classification, location of study, and source of data. The databases are not exhaustive of the literature and are biased toward wetland habitats located in the glaciated North-Central United States; however, the databases do encompass a diversity of biota commonly found in brackish and freshwater inland wetland habitats.

Gleason, Robert A.; Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Stamm, John F.

2009-01-01

186

Oil spill in the Rio de la Plata estuary, Argentina: 1. Biogeochemical assessment of waters, sediments, soils and biota.  

PubMed

Aliphatic (ALI) and aromatic (ARO) hydrocarbon concentrations, composition and sources were evaluated in waters, sediments, soils and biota to assess the impact of approximately 1000 tons of oil spilled in Rio de la Plata coastal waters. Total ALI levels ranged from 0.4-262 microg/l in waters, 0.01-87 microg/g in sediments, 5-39 microg/g in bivalves, 12-323 microg/g in macrophytes to 948-5187 microg/g in soils. ARO varied from non-detected 10 microg/l, 0.01-1.3 mug/g, 1.0-16 microg/g, 0.5-6.9 microg/g to 22-67 microg/g, respectively. Offshore (1, 5, 15 km) waters and sediments were little affected and contained low background hydrocarbon levels reflecting an effective wind-driven transport of the slick to the coast. Six months after the spill, coastal waters, sediments, soils and biota still presented very high levels exceeding baseline concentrations by 1-3 orders of magnitude. UCM/resolved aliphatic ratio showed a clear trend of increasing decay: coastal waters (3.3) < macrophytes (6.7) < soils (9.4) < offshore sediments (13) < coastal sediments (17) < clams (52). All environmental compartments consistently indicated that the most impacted area was the central sector close to Magdalena city, specially low-energy stream embouchures and bays which acted as efficient oil traps. The evaluation of hydrocarbon composition by principal component analysis indicated the predominance of biogenic (algae, vascular plant cuticular waxes), background anthropic, pyrogenic and diagenetic hydrocarbons, offshore and in non-impacted coastal sites. In contrast, polluted stations presented petrogenic signatures characterized by the abundance of isoprenoids, low molecular weight n-alkanes and methylated aromatics in different stages of alteration. The petrogenic/biogenic ratio ( n-C23) and petrogenic/pyrogenic relationship (methylated/unsubstitued PAH) discriminated the samples according to the different degree of impact. The following paper present the results of the study of the progress of hydrocarbon disappearance in sediments and soils 13 and 42 months after the spill. PMID:15589655

Colombo, J C; Barreda, A; Bilos, C; Cappelletti, N; Demichelis, S; Lombardi, P; Migoya, M C; Skorupka, C; Suárez, G

2005-03-01

187

GROUP REPORT: INTERACTIONS AMONG ACIDIFICATION, PHOSPHOROUS, CONTAMINANTS, AND BIOTA IN FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Scientific investigations over the last two decades have examined the processes and effects of acidic deposition on surface waters and their catchments. hese studies have been performed on various scales: laboratory benchtop, mesocosm/plot studies, whole system manipulations, and...

188

The Submarine Volcano Eruption off El Hierro Island: Effects on the Scattering Migrant Biota and the Evolution of the Pelagic Communities  

PubMed Central

The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

2014-01-01

189

Direct and indirect effects of metal contamination on soil biota in a Zn-Pb post-mining and smelting area (S Poland).  

PubMed

Effects of metal contamination on soil biota activity were investigated at 43 sites in 5 different habitats (defined by substratum and vegetation type) in a post-mining area. Sites were characterised in terms of soil pH and texture, nutrient status, total and exchangeable metal concentrations, as well as plant species richness and cover, abundances of enchytraeids, nematodes and tardigrades, and microbial respiration and biomass. The concentrations of total trace metals were highest in soils developed on mining waste (metal-rich dolomite), but these habitats were more attractive than sandy sites for plants and soil biota because of their higher content of organic matter, clay and nutrients. Soil mesofauna and microbes were strongly dependent on natural habitat properties. Pollution (exchangeable Zn and Cd) negatively affected only enchytraeid density; due to a positive relationship between enchytraeids and microbes it indirectly reduced microbial activity. PMID:21477907

Kapusta, Pawe?; Szarek-?ukaszewska, Gra?yna; Stefanowicz, Anna M

2011-06-01

190

The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island: effects on the scattering migrant biota and the evolution of the pelagic communities.  

PubMed

The submarine volcano eruption off El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) on 10 October 2011 promoted dramatic perturbation of the water column leading to changes in the distribution of pelagic fauna. To study the response of the scattering biota, we combined acoustic data with hydrographic profiles and concurrent sea surface turbidity indexes from satellite imagery. We also monitored changes in the plankton and nekton communities through the eruptive and post-eruptive phases. Decrease of oxygen, acidification, rising temperature and deposition of chemicals in shallow waters resulted in a reduction of epipelagic stocks and a disruption of diel vertical migration (nocturnal ascent) of mesopelagic organisms. Furthermore, decreased light levels at depth caused by extinction in the volcanic plume resulted in a significant shallowing of the deep acoustic scattering layer. Once the eruption ceased, the distribution and abundances of the pelagic biota returned to baseline levels. There was no evidence of a volcano-induced bloom in the plankton community. PMID:25047077

Ariza, Alejandro; Kaartvedt, Stein; Røstad, Anders; Garijo, Juan Carlos; Arístegui, Javier; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Hernández-León, Santiago

2014-01-01

191

Atlantic Origin of the Arctic Biota? Evidence from Phylogenetic and Biogeographical Analysis of the Cheilostome Bryozoan Genus Pseudoflustra  

PubMed Central

The intricate geological evolution of the Arctic Ocean is paralleled by complexities in the biogeographical and phylogenetical histories of the Arctic biota, including bryozoans. Here we present revised taxonomic descriptions for all known species of the bryozoan genus Pseudoflustra, and use the present-day distributions and phylogenetic relationships between these species to infer the historical biogeography of the genus. Nine species belonging to the genus Pseudoflustra are recognized in the Arctic and North Atlantic. One new species, previously identified as Ichthyaria aviculata, is described as Pseudoflustra radeki sp. nov. Another species, previously assigned to Smittoidea as S. perrieri, is transferred to Pseudoflustra. Biogeographical analysis of Pseudoflustra reveals that species distributions mostly match current patterns pertaining in the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean. Distributions were probably shaped by recent geological history as present-day current directions in the Arctic Ocean are believed to have been similar for at least the last 120 000 years. Phylogenetic analysis of Pseudoflustra places the five Arctic-North Atlantic species in a clade crownward of a paraphyletic grouping of North Atlantic species. Given that the Arctic Ocean was fully glaciated until 18 000 years, the most likely explanation for this phylogeographical pattern is that species of Pseudoflustra colonized the Arctic relatively recently from North Atlantic sources. However, a fuller understanding of the origin of Pseudoflustra in the Arctic will require molecular and fossil data, neither of which are currently available. PMID:23536863

Kuklinski, Piotr; Taylor, Paul D.; Denisenko, Nina V.; Berning, Björn

2013-01-01

192

Distinguishing geology from biology in the Ediacaran Doushantuo biota relaxes constraints on the timing of the origin of bilaterians  

PubMed Central

The Ediacaran Doushantuo biota has yielded fossils that include the oldest widely accepted record of the animal evolutionary lineage, as well as specimens with alleged bilaterian affinity. However, these systematic interpretations are contingent on the presence of key biological structures that have been reinterpreted by some workers as artefacts of diagenetic mineralization. On the basis of chemistry and crystallographic fabric, we characterize and discriminate phases of mineralization that reflect: (i) replication of original biological structure, and (ii) void-filling diagenetic mineralization. The results indicate that all fossils from the Doushantuo assemblage preserve a complex mélange of mineral phases, even where subcellular anatomy appears to be preserved. The findings allow these phases to be distinguished in more controversial fossils, facilitating a critical re-evaluation of the Doushantuo fossil assemblage and its implications as an archive of Ediacaran animal diversity. We find that putative subcellular structures exhibit fabrics consistent with preservation of original morphology. Cells in later developmental stages are not in original configuration and are therefore uninformative concerning gastrulation. Key structures used to identify Doushantuo bilaterians can be dismissed as late diagenetic artefacts. Therefore, when diagenetic mineralization is considered, there is no convincing evidence for bilaterians in the Doushantuo assemblage. PMID:22319125

Cunningham, John A.; Thomas, Ceri-Wyn; Bengtson, Stefan; Kearns, Stuart L.; Xiao, Shuhai; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Donoghue, Philip C. J.

2012-01-01

193

Under Cover at Pre-Angiosperm Times: A Cloaked Phasmatodean Insect from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota  

PubMed Central

Background Fossil species that can be conclusively identified as stem-relatives of stick- and leaf-insects (Phasmatodea) are extremely rare, especially for the Mesozoic era. This dearth in the paleontological record makes assessments on the origin and age of the group problematic and impedes investigations of evolutionary key aspects, such as wing development, sexual size dimorphism and plant mimicry. Methodology/Principal Findings A new fossil insect species, Cretophasmomima melanogramma Wang, Béthoux and Ren sp. nov., is described on the basis of one female and two male specimens recovered from the Yixian Formation (Early Cretaceous, ca. 126±4 mya; Inner Mongolia, NE China; known as ‘Jehol biota’). The occurrence of a female abdominal operculum and of a characteristic ‘shoulder pad’ in the forewing allows for the interpretation of a true stem-Phasmatodea. In contrast to the situation in extant forms, sexual size dimorphism is only weakly female-biased in this species. The peculiar wing coloration, viz. dark longitudinal veins, suggests that the leaf-shaped plant organ from the contemporaneous ‘gymnosperm’ Membranifolia admirabilis was used as model for crypsis. Conclusions/Significance As early as in the Early Cretaceous, some stem-Phasmatodea achieved effective leaf mimicry, although additional refinements characteristic of recent forms, such as curved fore femora, were still lacking. The diversification of small-sized arboreal insectivore birds and mammals might have triggered the acquisition of such primary defenses. PMID:24646906

Wang, Maomin; Béthoux, Olivier; Bradler, Sven; Jacques, Frédéric M. B.; Cui, Yingying; Ren, Dong

2014-01-01

194

Determination of alkylphenol and alkylphenolethoxylates in biota by liquid chromatography with detection by tandem mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A quantitative method for the simultaneous determination of octylphenol, nonylphenol and the corresponding ethoxylates (1 to 5) in biota is presented. Extraction methods were developed for egg and fish matrices based on accelerated solvent extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction cleanup, using octadecylsilica or aminopropyl cartridges. Identification and quantitation were accomplished by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and compared to the traditional liquid chromatography with fluorescence spectroscopy detection. LC-MS-MS provides high sensitivity and specificity required for these complex matrices and an accurate quantitation with the use of 13C-labeled internal standards. Quantitation limits by LC-MS-MS ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g in eggs, and from 6 to 22 ng/g in fish samples. These methods were successfully applied to osprey eggs from the Chesapeake Bay and fish from the Great Lakes area. Total levels found in osprey egg samples were up to 18 ng/g wet mass and as high as 8.2 ug/g wet mass in the fish samples.

Schmitz-Afonso, I.; Loyo-Rosales, J.E.; de la Paz Aviles, M.; Rattner, B.A.; Rice, C.P.

2003-01-01

195

Determination of alkylphenol and alkylphenolethoxylates in biota by liquid chromatography with detection by tandem mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A quantitative method for the simultaneous determination of octylphenol, nonylphenol and the corresponding ethoxylates (1 to 5) in biota is presented. Extraction methods were developed for egg and fish matrices based on accelerated solvent extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction cleanup, using octadecylsilica or aminopropyl cartridges. Identification and quantitation were accomplished by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and compared to the traditional liquid chromatography with fluorescence spectroscopy detection. LC-MS-MS provides high sensitivity and specificity required for these complex matrices and an accurate quantitation with the use of 13C-labeled internal standards. Quantitation limits by LC-MS-MS ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g in eggs, and from 6 to 22 ng/g in fish samples. These methods were successfully applied to osprey eggs from the Chesapeake Bay and fish from the Great Lakes area. Total levels found in osprey egg samples were up to 18 ng/g wet mass and as high as 8.2 ??g/g wet mass in the fish samples. ?? Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Schmitz-Afonso, I.; Loyo-Rosales, J. E.; de la Paz Aviles, M.; Rattner, B.A.; Rice, C.P.

2003-01-01

196

Late cretaceous pelagic sediments, volcanic ASH and biotas from near the Louisville hotspot, Pacific Plate, paleolatitude ???42??S  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dredging on the deep inner slope of the Tonga Trench, immediately north of the intersection between the Louisville Ridge hotspot chain and the trench, recovered some Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian) slightly tuffaceous pelagic sediments. They are inferred to have been scraped off a recently subducted Late Cretaceous guyot of the Louisville chain. In the vicinity of the Louisville hotspot (present location 50??26???S, 139??09???W; Late Cretaceous location ???42??S, longitude unknown) Late Cretaceous rich diatom, radiolarian, silicoflagellate, foraminiferal and coccolith biotas, accumulated on the flanks of the guyot and are described in this paper. Rich sponge faunas are not described. ?Inoceramus prisms are present. Volcanic ash is of within-plate alkalic character. Isotope ratios in bulk carbonate ??18O - 2.63 to + 0.85, ??13C + 2.98 to 3.83) are normal for Pacific Maestrichtian sediments. The local CCD may have been shallower than the regional CCD, because of high organic productivity. In some samples Late Cretaceous materials have been mixed with Neogene materials. Mixing may have taken place on the flanks of the guyot during transit across the western Pacific, or on the trench slope during or after subduction and offscraping about 0.5 Ma. ?? 1989.

Ballance, P.F.; Barron, J.A.; Blome, C.D.; Bukry, D.; Cawood, P.A.; Chaproniere, G.C.H.; Frisch, R.; Herzer, R.H.; Nelson, C.S.; Quinterno, P.; Ryan, H.; Scholl, D. W.; Stevenson, A.J.; Tappin, D.G.; Vallier, T.L.

1989-01-01

197

Responses of freshwater biota to rising salinity levels and implications for saline water management: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

All of the plants and animals that make up freshwater aquatic communities are affected by salinity. Many taxa possess morphological, physiological and life-history characteristics that provide some capacity for tolerance, acclimatisation or avoidance. These characteristics impart a level of resilience to freshwater communities. To maintain biodiversity in aquatic systems it is important to manage the rate, timing, pattern, frequency and

Kimberley R. JamesA; Tom RyanB

198

Environmental contaminant concentrations in biota from the lower Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina  

Microsoft Academic Search

Planned harbor expansion and industrial developments may adversely affect the economically important aquatic resources of the lower Savannah River, including those at the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. To establish the present level of chemical contamination in this system, we collected a total of 102 samples of nine species of fish and fiddler crabs (Uca pugilator) from eleven sites in the

Parley V. Winger; Donald P. Schultz; W. Waynon Johnson

1990-01-01

199

Acute and sublethal effects of organotin compounds on aquatic biota: an interpretative literature evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this review were to: (1) collect, synthesize, and interpret acute and sublethal organotin toxicity data in both freshwater and estuarine-marine ecosystems; (2) present environmental water column and sediment concentrations of organotin compounds in both freshwater and estuarine-marine systems to facilitate interpretation of toxicity data; and (3) identify deficiencies in available data to recommend areas of future research

Lenwood W. Hall; Alfred E. Pinkney; Roy Laughlin

1985-01-01

200

Prediction under Change (PUC): Water, Earth and Biota in the Anthropocene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The world is facing severe water management challenges, in the context of population growth, degradation of a poorly distributed resource, and the considerable uncertainties posed by the effects of climate change. Sustainable management requires the ability to predict the space-time distribution of water resources, water quality and environmental health, to help balance the needs of both humans and the environment. The rapid rates of change that the water cycle and the environment are likely to experience as a result of increasing human impacts (e.g., climate change, land use and land cover changes) requires that prediction and management frameworks better capture coupling and feedbacks across the built, natural, and social systems that define the sustainability of water resources. As we ponder a changing environment - climate, hydrology, land use, biogeochemical cycles, human dynamics - there is an increasing need now to embrace the long-term evolution of linked sub-systems (climatic, hydrologic, geomorphic, ecological etc., as well as human) through a new generation of conceptual and quantitative models that either explicitly or implicitly include the interactions and feedbacks between these sub-systems. Their co-evolution is driven by exogenous variability imposed on the system by weather, climate and anthropogenic factors, and endogenous variability generated by the sub-systems themselves as a result of certain adaptive evolutionary processes. In this talk I will outline the fundamental issues involved in predictions at long time scales (decades) and large space scales (regions) in a fast changing environment, including significant paradigm shifts in the way we seek the fundamental understanding needed to underpin these predictions, including the need for sustained community efforts.

Sivapalan, M.

2011-12-01

201

Validation of a screening method based on liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry for analysis of perfluoroalkylated substances in biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

A screening method for analysis of perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) in biota samples has been developed and validated using liver samples from polar cod (Boreogadus saida) and glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus). The method was based on extraction of target compounds from homogenised samples into the solvent mixture used as mobile phase in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), i.e. methanol\\/water (50:50; 2mM ammonium

Urs Berger; Marianne Haukås

2005-01-01

202

Use of Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors to assess similarity of nonionic organic chemical exposure to benthically-coupled organisms of differing trophic mode  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is in the process of developing Sediment Quality Criteria (SQC) to specify the acceptable degree of risk from sediment-mediated chemical exposure for the protection of benthically-coupled organisms. In this study, potential differences in chemical exposure for benthic organisms of differing habitats or feeding types were evaluated through the use of Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factors (BSAFs). It

G. A. Tracey; D. J. Hansen

1996-01-01

203

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Churchill County, Nevada, 1986-87  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was initiated to determine whether irrigation drainage in and near the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area has caused or has potential to cause harmful effects on human health or fish and wildlife, or may adversely affect the suitability of water for beneficial uses. Samples of surface and groundwater, bottom sediment, and biota were collected from sites upstream and downstream from the Fallon agricultural area in the Carson Desert and were analyzed for potentially toxic trace elements, including selenium. Other analyses included radioactive substances, major dissolved constituents, and nutrients in water, and pesticide residues in bottom sediments and biota. In areas affected by irrigation drainage, concentrations of the following constituents commonly were found to exceed baseline concentrations or federal and state criteria for the protection of aquatic life or the propagation of wildlife: in water, arsenic, boron, dissolved solids, sodium, and un-ionized ammonia; in bottom sediments, arsenic, lithium, mercury, molybdenum, and selenium; and in biota, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. In some wetlands, selenium and mercury appear to be biomagnified whereas arsenic is bioaccumulated. Some radioactive substances were substantially higher at the downstream sites compared with upstream background sites, but the significance of this to wildlife is unknown at present. 88 refs., 32 figs., 19 tabs.

Hoffman, R.J.; Hallock, R.J.; Rowe, T.G.; Lico, M.S.; Burge, H.L.

1990-01-01

204

Influence of environmental gradients on C and N stable isotope ratios in coral reef biota of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Red Sea features a natural environmental gradient characterized by increasing water temperature, nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations from North to South. The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between ecohydrography, particulate organic matter (POM) and coral reef biota that are poorly understood by means of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) stable isotopes. Herbivorous, planktivorous and carnivorous fishes, zooplankton, soft corals (Alcyonidae), and bivalves (Tridacna squamosa) were a priori defined as biota guilds. Environmental samples (nutrients, chlorophyll a), oceanographic data (salinity, temperature), POM and biota were collected at eight coral reefs between 28°31? N and 16°31? N. Isotopic niches of guilds separated in ?13C and ?15N isotopic niche spaces and were significantly correlated with environmental factors at latitudinal scale. Dietary end member contributions were estimated using the Bayesian isotope mixing model SIAR. POM and zooplankton 15N enrichment suggested influences by urban run-off in the industrialized central region of the Red Sea. Both ?15N and their relative trophic positions (RTPs) tend to increase southwards, but urban runoff offsets the natural environmental gradient in the central region of the Red Sea toward higher ?15N and RTPs. The present study reveals that consumer ?13C and ?15N in Red Sea coral reefs are influenced primarily by the latitudinal environmental gradient and localized urban runoff. This study illustrates the importance of ecohydrography when interpreting trophic relationships from stable isotopes in Red Sea coral reefs.

Kürten, Benjamin; Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; Struck, Ulrich; Khomayis, Hisham Sulaiman; Gharbawi, Waleed Yousef; Sommer, Ulrich

2014-01-01

205

Separation of thermal and chemical effects in evaluating geothermal influences on aquatic biota. Completion report  

SciTech Connect

In this study a field based, stream microcosm system to experimentally separate the effects of the thermal and chemical components of geothermal fluids on the benthic community was developed. Using this system the separate and combined influences of these components on the numerical abundance of bacteria, the standing crop and productivity of algae, and the density, standing stock, and community structure of macroinvertebrates were evaluated. This heat shock experiment simulated acute thermal effects on organisms that drift into the lethal temperature zones that seasonally occur in geothermal streams. It also mimicked the effects of heated effluents on aquatic organisms that are drawn into the cooling water intake of a power plant, or entrained in the discharge plume.

Resh, V.H.; McElravy, E.P.; Wood, J.R.; Lambperti, G.A.

1983-03-01

206

A new approach for assessing the state of environment using isometric log-ratio transformation and outlier detection for computation of mean PCDD/F patterns in biota.  

PubMed

To assess the state of the environment, various compartments are examined as part of monitoring programs. Within monitoring, a special focus is on chemical pollution. One of the most toxic substances ever synthesized is the well-known dioxin 2,3,7,8-TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetra-chlor-dibenzo-dioxin). Other PCDD/F (polychlorinated-dibenzo-dioxin and furan) can act toxic too. They are ubiquitary and persistent in various environmental compartments. Assessing the state of environment requires knowledge of typical local patterns of PCDD/F for as many compartments as possible. For various species of wild animals and plants (so called biota), I present the mean local congenere profiles of ubiquitary PCDD/F contamination reflecting typical patterns and levels of environmental burden for various years. Trends in time series of means can indicate success or failure of a measure of PCDD/F reduction. For short time series of mean patterns, it can be hard to detect trends. A new approach regarding proportions of outliers in the corresponding annual cross-sectional data sets in parallel can help detect decreasing or increasing environmental burden and support analysis of time series. Further, in this article, the true structure of PCDD/F data in biota is revealed, that is, the compositional data structure. It prevents direct application of statistical standard procedures to the data rendering results of statistical analysis meaningless. Results indicate that the compositional data structure of PCDD/F in biota is of great interest and should be taken into account in future studies. Isometric log-ratio (ilr) transformation is used, providing data statistical standard procedures that can be applied too. Focusing on the identification of typical PCDD/F patterns in biota, outliers are removed from annual data since they represent an extraordinary situation in the environment. Identification of outliers yields two advantages. First, typical (mean) profiles and levels of PCDD/F contamination can be identified. Second, decreasing (increasing) proportions of outliers could indicate decreasing (increasing) numbers of extraordinary environmental burden rendering the success of PCDD/F reduction strategies for biota. Therefore, probabilities and proportions of outlier contamination are estimated too. To reveal the enormous influence of the method of outlier detection, the applied two well-known procedures are compared, that is, robust Mahalanobis distance and a projection pursuit-based approach. PMID:25427827

Lehmann, René

2015-01-01

207

Comparative analysis of marine paleogene sections and biota from West Siberia and the Arctic Region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of the main biospheric events that took place in West Siberia and the Arctic region during the Early Paleogene revealed the paleogeographic and paleobiogeographic unity of marine sedimentation basins and close biogeographic relations between their separate parts. Most biotic and abiotic events of the first half of the Paleogene in the Arctic region and West Siberia were synchronous, unidirectional, and interrelated. Shelf settings, sedimentation breaks, and microfaunal assemblages characteristic of these basins during the Paleogene are compared. The comparative analysis primarily concerned events of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and beds with Azolla (aquatic fern). The formation of the Eocene Azolla Beds in the Arctic region and West Siberia was asynchronous, although it proceeded in line with a common scenario related to the development of a system of estuarine-type currents in a sea basin partly isolated from the World Ocean.

Akhmet'ev, M. A.; Zaporozhets, N. I.; Iakovleva, A. I.; Aleksandrova, G. N.; Beniamovsky, V. N.; Oreshkina, T. V.; Gnibidenko, Z. N.; Dolya, Zh. A.

2010-12-01

208

Application of Non-Human Biota Assessment Methodologies to the Assessment of Potential Impacts from a Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect

The protection of the environment from the effects of ionising radiation has become increasingly more topical over the last few years as the intentions enshrined in international principles and agreements have become more binding through national and international law. For example, the Directive on impact of certain projects on the environment (EIA Directive 85/337/EEC) [CEC, 1985], amended in 1997 [CEC, 1997], places a mandatory requirement on all EU Member States to conduct environmental impact assessments for a range of project having potential impact on the environment, including radioactive waste disposal. Such assessments must consider humans, fauna and flora, the abiotic environment (soil, water, air), material assets and cultural heritage as well as the interactions between these factors. In Finland, Posiva Oy are responsible for the overall repository programme for spent nuclear fuel and, as such, are conducting the Safety Case Assessment for a proposed geological repository for nuclear waste. Within the European legislation framework, the Finnish regulatory body requires that the repository safety case assessment should include not only human radiological safety, but also an assessment of the potential impact upon populations of non-human biota. Specifically, the Safety Case should demonstrate that there will be: - no decline in the biodiversity of currently living populations; - no significant detriment to populations of fauna and flora; and, - no detrimental effects on individuals of domestic animals and rare plants and animals. At present, there are no internationally agreed criteria that explicitly address protection of the environment from ionising radiation. However, over recent years a number of assessment methodologies have been developed including, at a European level, the Framework for the Assessment of Environmental impact (FASSET) and Environmental Risks from Ionising Contaminants (ERICA). The International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP) have also proposed an approach to allow for assessments of potential impacts on non-human species, in its report in 2003. This approach is based on the development and use of a small set of reference animals and plants, with their associated dose models and data sets. Such approaches are broadly applicable to the Posiva Safety Case. However, the specific biota of concern and the current climatic conditions within Finland present an additional challenge to the assessment. The assessment methods most applicable to the Posiva Safety Case have therefore been reviewed in consideration of the regulatory requirements for the assessment and recommendations made on a suitable assessment approach. This has been applied within a test case and adaptations to the overall assessment method have been made to enable both population and individual impacts to be assessed where necessary. The test case has been undertaken to demonstrate the application of the recommended methodology, but also to identify data gaps, uncertainties and other specific issues associated with the application of an assessment method within the regulatory context. (authors)

Smith, K.L.; Robinson, C.A. [Enviros Consulting Ltd, D5 Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Ikonen, A.T.K. [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)

2007-07-01

209

Environmental contaminant concentrations in biota from the lower Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Planned harbor expansion and industrial developments may adversely affect the economically important aquatic resources of the lower Savannah River, including those at the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. To establish the present level of chemical contamination in this system, we collected a total of 102 samples of nine species of fish and fiddler crabs (Uca pugilator) from eleven sites in the lower Savannah River and on the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge, and analyzed them for concentrations of organochlorine chemicals, aliphatic and aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons, and 13 elemental contaminants: aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc. Residues of DDT (mainly as DDE),trans-nonachlor, dieldrin, Aroclor? 1260, mirex, and petroleum hydrocarbons were common in fish from the lower Savannah River, but concentrations were below those warranting environmental concern. In general, the concentrations of elemental contaminants also were low; however, arsenic, cadmium, and chromium concentrations were elevated in fish from river stations near the city of Savannah, and lead was elevated in samples from the National Wildlife Refuge. Contamination of the lower Savannah River by organic and elemental contaminants, as indicated by concentrations in fishes and fiddler crabs, did not appear to pose a hazard.

Winger, P.V.; Schultz, D.P.; Johnson, W.W.

1990-01-01

210

Development of a method for assessing the toxicity of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) to soil biota  

SciTech Connect

A method was developed to assess the toxicity of VOCs to plants and earthworms (survival of Eisenia foetida). The procedures followed were based on Greene et al. Gas samples for head space analyses were removed, at test initiation a termination, through a bulkhead fitting in the lid equipped with septa. Treatment levels were prepared, at low temperature to minimize volatilization, by spiking a soil sample with the compound of interest and then serially diluting it with clean soil. Root elongation tests were conducted on filter paper supported by 70 mesh silica sand spiked with the volatile of interest. Soils were then inundated with water, shaken with heating, and the headspace reanalyzed for the total contaminant concentration in the test system (total equals headspace plus adsorbed). Enclosing the seeds and worms in containers did not appear to have detrimental effects. VOCs tested included benzene, xylene, toluene, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,2-trichloroethylene. Each test was repeated three times with different batches of soil, seed lots and worms from different colonies. Endpoints derived based on nominal and measured concentrations included: NOEC, LOEC, LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 25} for earthworm mortality and EC{sub 50} and EC{sub 25} for emergence and root elongation.

Cureton, P.M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Evaluation and Interpretation Branch; Lintott, D.; Balch, G.; Goudey, S. [HydroQual Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1994-12-31

211

Spatial and temporal trends of mercury in water, sediments and biota in a mainstream Canadian reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) concentrations within several environmental matrices were examined, during high and low water periods of a 1,778.7 kM{sup 2} northern Canada drawdown reservoir, as part of an Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program. Mercury, and 20 other metals, were analyzed in liver tissues of two benthic foraging fish species, Largescale Sucker (Catastomus macrocheilus) and Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Previous work on the reservoir demonstrated a positive correlation between mercury in muscle tissue and Lake Whitefish weight, Results from the current investigation were compared to historical data from the reservoir and several mercuriferous lakes in the region. Research dating from 1970 indicated elevated Hg concentrations in reservoir water (0.026 to 0.09 ppb) and in Lake Whitefish, with no significant decline noted to date. Hg levels in Whitefish muscle tissue averaged 0.20 ppm and were comparable to post-impoundment concentrations observed in Alberta reservoirs. Sediment and water samples and in situ water profiles were examined at 34 stations throughout the system. Sediments and water underwent a variety of organic and inorganic analyses, including mercury. Spatial and temporal analytical concentration profiles were determined for a variety of specific environmental matrices.

Thomas, G.P.; Munteanu, N. [G3 Consulting Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia (Canada)

1995-12-31

212

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Biota from the Brisbane River Estuary, Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Six species of aquatic organisms from the Brisbane River estuarine system were sampled and their tissues analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These were the sea mullet, Mugil cephalus, bony bream, Nematolosa come, blue catfish, Arius graffei, mud crab, Scylla serrata, pelican, Pelecanus conspicillatus, and silver gull, Larus novaehollandiae. PAHs in the muscle (fish and birds) and soft (crab) tissue samples were isolated by first hydrolysing these samples and then solvent extraction followed by column chromatography. The compounds were then identified and quantified by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The samples contained low levels of PAHs that ranged in molecular weight from 128 (naphthalene) to 252 (benzo[k]fluoranthene). The highest total PAH level of 195 ng g -1, wet weight, was recorded in mullet samples whereas the blue catfish samples yielded the lowest level of 43 ng g -1. Relative ratios of low molecular weight (?3-rings) compounds to those with high molecular weights (?4-rings) suggested a petroleum related origin for the PAHs detected in the organisms. Results indicated that significant biomagnification of PAHs in the estuarine ecosystem sampled is highly unlikely. Characteristics such as the trophic level and size/age were not significant factors in determining the corresponding tissue PAH levels in the fish and crab species. Tissue lipid content, however, was found to be a primary factor in determining the PAH concentrations in fish species. PAH levels recorded in the samples are comparable to those levels reported from similarly urbanized areas in other geographical locations.

Kayal, S.; Connell, D. W.

1995-05-01

213

Hydrothermal vent fields and chemosynthetic biota on the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre.  

PubMed

The Mid-Cayman spreading centre is an ultraslow-spreading ridge in the Caribbean Sea. Its extreme depth and geographic isolation from other mid-ocean ridges offer insights into the effects of pressure on hydrothermal venting, and the biogeography of vent fauna. Here we report the discovery of two hydrothermal vent fields on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre. The Von Damm Vent Field is located on the upper slopes of an oceanic core complex at a depth of 2,300?m. High-temperature venting in this off-axis setting suggests that the global incidence of vent fields may be underestimated. At a depth of 4,960?m on the Mid-Cayman spreading centre axis, the Beebe Vent Field emits copper-enriched fluids and a buoyant plume that rises 1,100?m, consistent with >400?°C venting from the world's deepest known hydrothermal system. At both sites, a new morphospecies of alvinocaridid shrimp dominates faunal assemblages, which exhibit similarities to those of Mid-Atlantic vents. PMID:22233630

Connelly, Douglas P; Copley, Jonathan T; Murton, Bramley J; Stansfield, Kate; Tyler, Paul A; German, Christopher R; Van Dover, Cindy L; Amon, Diva; Furlong, Maaten; Grindlay, Nancy; Hayman, Nicholas; Hühnerbach, Veit; Judge, Maria; Le Bas, Tim; McPhail, Stephen; Meier, Alexandra; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Nye, Verity; Pebody, Miles; Pedersen, Rolf B; Plouviez, Sophie; Sands, Carla; Searle, Roger C; Stevenson, Peter; Taws, Sarah; Wilcox, Sally

2012-01-01

214

Environmental contaminant concentrations in biota from the lower Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina.  

PubMed

Planned harbor expansion and industrial developments may adversely affect the economically important aquatic resources of the lower Savannah River, including those at the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge. To establish the present level of chemical contamination in this system, we collected a total of 102 samples of nine species of fish and fiddler crabs (Uca pugilator) from eleven sites in the lower Savannah River and on the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge, and analyzed them for concentrations of organochlorine chemicals, aliphatic and aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons, and 13 elemental contaminants: aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc. Residues of DDT (mainly as DDE), trans-nonachlor, dieldrin, Aroclor 1260, mirex, and petroleum hydrocarbons were common in fish from the lower Savannah River, but concentrations were below those warranting environmental concern. In general, the concentrations of elemental contaminants also were low; however, arsenic, cadmium, and chromium concentrations were elevated in fish from river stations near the city of Savannah, and lead was elevated in samples from the National Wildlife Refuge. Contamination of the lower Savannah River by organic and elemental contaminants, as indicated by concentrations in fishes and fiddler crabs, did not appear to pose a hazard. PMID:2331144

Winger, P V; Schultz, D P; Johnson, W W

1990-01-01

215

Did southern Western Ghats of peninsular India serve as refugia for its endemic biota during the Cretaceous volcanism?  

PubMed Central

The Western Ghats (WG) of south India, a global biodiversity hotspot, has experienced complex geological history being part of Gondwana landmass and encountered extensive volcanic activity at the end of Cretaceous epoch. It also has a climatically and topographically heterogeneous landscape. Thus, the WG offer a unique setting to explore the influence of ecological and geological processes on the current diversity and distribution of its biota. To this end, three explicit biogeographical scenarios were hypothesized to evaluate the distribution and diversification of wet evergreen species of the WG – (1) southern WG was a refuge for the wet evergreen species during the Cretaceous volcanism, (2) phylogenetic breaks in the species phylogeny would correspond to geographic breaks (i.e., the Palghat gap) in the WG, and (3) species from each of the biogeographic subdivisions within the WG would form distinct clades. These hypotheses were tested on the centipede genus Digitipes from the WG which is known to be an ancient, endemic, and monophyletic group. The Digitipes molecular phylogeny was subjected to divergence date estimation using Bayesian approach, and ancestral areas were reconstructed using parsimony approach for each node in the phylogeny. Ancestral-area reconstruction suggested 13 independent dispersal events to explain the current distribution of the Digitipes species in the WG. Among these 13 dispersals, two dispersal events were at higher level in the Digitipes phylogeny and were from the southern WG to the central and northern WG independently in the Early Paleocene, after the Cretaceous Volcanism. The remaining 11 dispersal events explained the species’ range expansions of which nine dispersals were from the southern WG to other biogeographic subdivisions in the Eocene-Miocene in the post-volcanic periods where species-level diversifications occurred. Taken together, these results suggest that southern WG might have served as a refuge for Digitipes species during Cretaceous volcanism. PMID:24223267

Joshi, Jahnavi; Karanth, Praveen

2013-01-01

216

The uptake of iron-55 by marine sediment, macroalgae, and biota following discharge from a nuclear power station.  

PubMed

Significant quantities of 55Fe, an activation product of stable iron, have been released into the environment following the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons (mainly in the 1950s and 1960s) as well as through authorized discharges of radioactivity from nuclear power and reprocessing sites. Although some studies have been performed on the behavior of weapons' fallout-derived 55Fe in the environment and subsequent impact on humans, little has been published on the behavior of 55Fe released as a point source discharge from nuclear sites. This study presents data on the concentration and temporal variation of 55Fe in fucoid seaweeds, shellfish, crab, and lobster collected from Weymouth Bay and adjacent coastal areas, southern England. These areas have received authorized discharges of radionuclides originating from the operation of a now-decommissioned steam-generating, heavy water-type reactor at AEE Winfrith. The highest activities of 55Fe are found associated with marine sediments collected near the discharge pipeline and a rapid decline occurs away from the pipeline. This is consistent with rapid sorption of 55Fe by the sediment, and the data show there is only limited reworking and remobilization. Activities of 55Fe in biota generally decreased over time, due to a reduction in the amount of 55Fe discharged. The variation of 55Fe activity, revealed from the monthly sampling of seaweed, does not reflect the short-term fluctuations seen in the patterns of discharged 55Fe activity. Although discharges of 55Fe from AEE Winfrith exceeded other radionuclides, the radiological impact on local seafood consumers is considerably less than for other key radionuclides such as 60Co and 65Zn but of comparable magnitude to the global average population dose arising from fallout-derived 55Fe. PMID:11414015

Warwick, P E; Cundy, A B; Croudace, I W; Bains, M E; Dale, A A

2001-06-01

217

DDE mercury, and selenium in Biota, sediments, and water of the Rio Grande-Rio Bravo Basin, 1965-1995.  

PubMed

An assessment of contaminant stressors on biota of the Rio Grande was conducted to identify relevant contaminant issues, assess exposure and ecological effects, identify data gaps, and determine potential risks. Most contaminant data were from studies conducted during 1965-1995 in the Lower Rio Grande, on the Texas side of the river, within a 100-km boundary from Falcon Dam to the mouth. Contaminants most frequently reported were organochlorine compounds (OCs) and trace elements. The number of records for OCs and trace elements was at least twofold greater for fish than for birds, mammals, or reptiles. Of the OCs, p,p'-DDE was the most commonly reported. Among the trace elements, Hg was one of the most frequently reported; however, Se, As, Pb, Cu, and Zn were also common. The highest concentrations of OCs and trace elements were reported predominantly from Lower Rio Grande Valley locations, with approximately 68% of the highest values detected from Falcon Dam to the mouth of the river. Twenty-six (20%) of the locations with maximum concentrations corresponded to portions of Llano Grande Lake and the Arroyo Colorado. Recent analyses of birds and fish indicate that levels of DDE are currently much lower than in the 1970s or 1980s in Rio Grande wildlife. This apparent decline does not apply to Hg and Se levels in birds and fish, which have remained more or less constant, but may have increased over the years in some locations. Hg was of particular concern because of high levels found recently in addled eggs of aplomado falcons and in their potential prey. Hg was elevated in fish from the Big Bend area. Also, Se in fish sampled in 1993 and 1994 was near or above the threshold for potential effects in fish-eating wildlife. Future investigations should evaluate the potential impacts of Hg and Se on aquatic and terrestrial species from selected sites of concern. PMID:9751032

Mora, M A; Wainwright, S E

1998-01-01

218

Environmental Impact of the Helen, Research, and Chicago Mercury Mines on Water, Sediment, and Biota in the Upper Dry Creek Watershed, Lake County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Helen, Research, and Chicago mercury (Hg) deposits are among the youngest Hg deposits in the Coast Range Hg mineral belt and are located in the southwestern part of the Clear Lake volcanic field in Lake County, California. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of Dry Creek. The Helen Hg mine is the largest mine in the watershed having produced about 7,600 flasks of Hg. The Chicago and Research Hg mines produced only a small amount of Hg, less than 30 flasks. Waste rock and tailings have eroded from the mines, and mine drainage from the Helen and Research mines contributes Hg-enriched mine wastes to the headwaters of Dry Creek and contaminate the creek further downstream. The mines are located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines and in Dry Creek. This report is made in response to the USBLM request to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines as a means of reducing Hg transport to Dry Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, waste rock, sediment, and water at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines on April 19, 2001, during a storm event. Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota at the Helen mine area and the upper part of Dry Creek was completed on July 15, 2003, during low-flow conditions. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in the water, sediment, and biota that are impacted by historic mining.

Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Kim, Christopher S.; Lawler, David; Goldstein, Daniel; Brussee, Brianne E.

2009-01-01

219

Environmental Impact of the Contact and Sonoma Mercury Mines on Water, Sediment, and Biota in Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creek Watersheds, Sonoma County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Contact and Sonoma mercury (Hg) deposits are among the youngest Hg deposits in the Coast Range Hg mineral belt and are located in the western part of the Clear Lake volcanic field in Sonoma County, California. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of Anna Belcher Creek, which is a tributary to Little Sulphur Creek. The Contact Hg mine produced about 1,000 flasks of Hg, and the Sonoma mine produced considerably less. Waste rock and tailings eroded from the Contact and Sonoma mines have contributed Hg-enriched mine waste material to the headwaters of Anna Belcher Creek. The mines are located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Contact and Sonoma mines and in Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creeks. This report is made in response to the USBLM request, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Contact and Sonoma mines as a means of reducing Hg transport to Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creeks. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, waste rock, sediment, and water at the Contact and Sonoma mines that was initiated on April 20 during a storm event, and on June 19, 2001. Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota in a pond and tributaries that drain from the mine area was completed on April 1, 2003. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in tributaries and biota that are impacted by historic mining.

Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Kim, Christopher S.; Lawler, David; Goldstein, Daniel

2009-01-01

220

Simultaneous determination by APCI-LC/MS/MS of hydroxylated and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers found in marine biota.  

PubMed

A method has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of hydroxylated and methoxylated analogs of tetrabromodiphenyl ethers (OH-tetraBDEs and MeO-tetraBDEs) and of hydroxylated and methoxylated analogs of tetrabromobiphenyl (diOH-tetraBB and diMeO-tetraBB) using high performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-LC/MS/MS) in negative ion mode. Chromatographic separation was performed on a 150 mm ODS column with acetonitrile:water (9:1, v/v) in mobile phase. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was performed using the precursor [M-H]- ion for hydroxylated analogs, and the [M-Br+O]- ion for tetraBDEs and tetraBB, and their methoxylated analogs. The method was validated using cod liver oil samples spiked with nine analytes (100 ng/g) for linearity (r2 > 0.998), recovery (75-95%), repeatability (8-36% RSD), and sensitivity (limits of quantification (LOQ), 0.1-0.25 ng/g lipid for phenolic analytes and 6-80 ng/g lipid for neutral brominated compounds). The APCI-LC/MS/MS was applied to analyze tiger shark and bull shark liver samples, where their concentrations were up to 8 ng/g (lipid weight) for OH-BDEs, whereas they were up to 540 ng/g (lipid weight) for MeO-BDEs. The results were consistent with values determined by electron ionization (EI)-GC/MS. The first detection of 2,2'-dihydroxy-3,3',5,5'-tetrabromobiphenyl (2,2'-diOH-BB80) by this method was in marine sponge from Micronesia. The advantage of the LC/MS/MS method over GC/MS is that it provides rapid and simultaneous determination of OH-BDEs, MeO-BDEs, and their related analogs with a single preparation step and without the involvement of chemical derivatives. Although the method provides the different LOQ ranges between hydroxylated and neutral brominated analogs, future work could apply the method to the full range of PBDE-like contaminants present in the environment and in biota tissues. PMID:19530686

Kato, Yoshihisa; Okada, Syohei; Atobe, Kazutaka; Endo, Tetsuya; Matsubara, Futoshi; Oguma, Takayoshi; Haraguchi, Koichi

2009-07-15

221

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Columbia Basin Project, Washington, 1991-92  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The reconnaissance investigation results indicated that irrigation drainage generally has not adversely affected biota in the Columbia Basin Project. Hazards to biota from large concentrations of certain trace elements in water and bottom sediment, and caused by high evaporation rates in irrigated arid lands, are reduced by imported, dilute Columbia River water. However, boron concentrations in aquatic plants might affect waterfowl feeding on these plants and arsenic concentrations in juvenile coots were similar to those in mallard ducklings who exhibited abnormalities after being fed an arsenic-supplemented diet. During irrigation season, concentrations of boron, nitrate, and dissolved solids in water were increased in the southern wasteways because of water reuse. During non-irrigation season, constituent concentrations were large when stream flows are sustained by return water from tile drains and ground water. However, concentrations of dissolved constituents typically did not exceed standards or criteria for humans, freshwater life, or beneficial uses of the water. In water, the herbicide 2,4-D was detected more than any other pesticide and in concentrations from 0.01 to 1.0 microgram per liter. In bottom sediment, organochlorine insecticides were detected in samples from 19 of 21 sites. In fish collected from some wasteways, chlordane, DDT, and dieldrin concentrations occasionally exceeded freshwater protection criteria.

Embrey, S.S.; Block, E.K.

1995-01-01

222

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Salton Sea Area, California, 1986-87. Water-Resources investigation  

SciTech Connect

Water, bottom sediment, and biota were sampled during 1986-87 in the Salton Sea area to determine concentrations of trace elements and pesticides as part of the Department of Interior Irrigation Drainage Program. The sampling sites (12 water, 15 bottom sediment, and 5 biota) were located in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The focus of sampling was to determine if contaminants in irrigation drainage from Department of the Interior-sponsored irrigation projects have caused or have the potential to cause substantial harmful effects to humans, fish, or wildlife, or to reduce the suitability of water for beneficial uses. Results indicate that selenium is the major element of concern. Elevated concentrations of selenium in water were restricted to tile-drain effluent. The maximum selenium concentration of 300 micrograms per liter was detected in tile drain 6, and the minimum concentration of 1 microgram per liter was detected in a composite sample of Salton Sea water. The median selenium concentration was 19 micrograms per liter. In contrast to the water, the highest bottom-sediment selenium concentration of 3.3 milligrams per kilogram was in a composite sample from the Salton Sea. Concentrations of boron, chromium, nickel, zinc, and organochlorine pesticide residues were detected.

Setmire, J.G.; Wolfe, J.C.; Stroud, R.K.

1990-01-01

223

Biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF), bioaccumulation factor (BAF), and contaminant levels in prey fish to indicate the extent of PAHs and OCPs contamination in eggs of waterbirds.  

PubMed

Samples of pond sediment, fish, and shrimp were collected from the Ramsar site at Mai Po marshes, Hong Kong (south China), and samples of pond sediment, fish, and shrimp, as well as eggs of water birds (Chinese Pond Herons (Ardeola bacchus) and Little Egrets (Egretta garzetta)), were collected from two smaller wetland sites at Jiangsu Province (mid-China), between 2004 and 2007. Accumulation levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the biota were used to calculate biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) and bioaccumulation factor (BAF). For fish and shrimp, BSAFs of OCPs (3.8-56) were greater than those of PAHs (0.12-6.3). BSAFs and BAFs of 11-79 and 4-34, respectively, were registered for OCPs in eggs of the birds and were greater than those for PAHs (0.11-1.5 and 0.02-1.3, respectively). Assuming that fish were the main prey of the birds, greater bioaccumulation of OCPs was detected for both bird species (BAFs?=4.5-34), while accumulation of PAHs was only detected in Little Egret (BAF=1.3). A significant linear relationship (p<0.01) was observed between concentrations of OCPs in bird eggs and in the prey fish. The present study provides a new possibility of using OCP levels detected in prey fish to predict the extent of OCPs contamination in eggs of waterbirds including the endangered species, as a noninvasive method. PMID:23702571

Kwok, C K; Liang, Y; Leung, S Y; Wang, H; Dong, Y H; Young, L; Giesy, J P; Wong, M H

2013-12-01

224

Field screening of water, soil, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Dolores Project and the Macos River basin, southwestern Colorado, 1994  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A reconnaissance investigation for the National Irrigation Water Quality Program in 1990 indicated elevated selenium concentrations in some water and biota samples collected in the Dolores Project in southwestern Colorado. High selenium concentrations also were indicated in bird samples collected in the Mancos Project in 1989. In 1994, field screenings were done in parts of the Dolores Project and Mancos River Basin to collect additional selenium data associated with irrigation inthose areas. Selenium is mobilized from soils in newly irrigated areas of the Dolores Project called the Dove Creek area, which includes newly (since 1987) irrigated land north of Cortez and south of Dove Creek.Selenium was detected in 18 of 20stream samples, and the maximum concentration was 12micrograms per liter. The Dove Creek area is unique compared to other study areas of the National Irrigation Water Quality Program becauseselenium concentrations probably are indicative of initial leaching conditions in a newly irrigated area.Selenium concentrations in nine shallow soil samples from the Dove Creek area ranged from 0.13 to 0.20 micrograms per gram. Selenium concentrations in bottom sediment from six ponds were less than the level of concern for fish and wildlife of 4 micrograms per gram. Many biota samples collected in the Dove Creek area had elevated selenium concentrations when compared to various guidelines and effect levels,although selenium concentrations in water, soil, and bottom sediment were relatively low. Selenium concentrations in 12 of 14 aquatic-invertebratesamples from ponds exceeded 3 micrograms per gram dry weight, a dietary guideline for protection of fish and wildlife. The mean seleniumconcentration of 10.3 micrograms per gram dry weight in aquatic bird eggs exceeded the guideline for reduced hatchability of 8 micrograms per gramdry weight. Two ponds in the Dove Creek area had a high selenium hazard rating based on a new protocol for assessing selenium hazard in theenvironment; however, waterfowl were reproducing at the two ponds. Three tributary streams of Mc Elmo Creek that drain irrigated areas of the Montezuma Valley south of the creek were sampled in 1994. Mud Creek probably is the largest source of selenium to Mc Elmo Creek. Most biota samples from Mud Creek had elevated selenium concentrations when compared to guidelines for dietary items and freshwater fish. Selenium concentrations in water samples collected in the Mancos River Basin upstream from Navajo Wash, which includes the Mancos Project, ranged from less than 1 to 10 micrograms per liter. Mud Creek contributed about 74 percent of the selenium load to the upper Mancos River in March 1994.Selenium concentrations were much higher in Navajo Wash; a sample collected in March had 97 micrograms per liter of selenium. Bottom-sediment samples from two ponds in the Mancos Projectexceeded the concentration of concern of 4 micrograms per gram. The highest selenium concentrations in biota samples from streams in the Mancos River Basin were for samples from Navajo Wash. Mostconcentrations in biota in the upper Mancos River Basin were less than guidelines. Mean selenium concentrations in eggs from aquatic birds collected at three ponds in the Mancos Project slightly exceed the guideline associated with reduced hatchability.Five bird livers had a mean selenium concentration of 32.6 micrograms per gram dry weight, whichslightly exceeded the mean concentration of 30 micrograms per gram dry weight that is associated with reproductive impairment. Two of the pondshad a high selenium hazard rating; however, mallard reproduction was observed in 1994 at one of the ponds that had a high selenium-hazard rating.

Butler, D.L.; Osmundson, B.C.; Krueger, R.P.

1997-01-01

225

Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and its Effects on Continental Biotas: Evidence from Polecat Bench in Northwestern Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many important environmental events in the geological past were first recognized by their effects on the associated biota, and this is true for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum or PETM global greenhouse warming event, which happened 55 million years before present. In the Southern Ocean, PETM carbon and oxygen isotope anomalies were found to coincide with a major terminal-Paleocene disappearance or extinction of benthic foraminiferans. On North America the PETM carbon isotope excursion (CIE) was found to coincide with mammalian dwarfing and a major initial-Eocene appearance or origination event of continental mammals. Linking the two records, marine and continental, resolved a long-standing disagreement over competing definitions of the Paleocene-Eocene epoch boundary, and more importantly indicated that the PETM greenhouse warming event was global. Dwarfing of herbivorous mammals can be interpreted as a response to elevated atmospheric CO2. The origin of modern orders of mammals including Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, and Primates ('APP' taxa) is more complicated and difficult to explain but the origin of these orders may also be a response, directly or indirectly, to PETM warming. We now know from Polecat Bench and elsewhere in North America that the biotic response to PETM greenhouse warming involved the appearance of at least two new mammalian faunas distinct from previously known Clarkforkian mammals of the upper or late Paleocene and previously known Wasatchian mammals of the lower or early Eocene. Three stages and ages of the former are known (Cf-1 to Cf-3) and seven stages and ages of the latter are known (Wa-1 to Wa-7), each occupying about a hundred meters of strata representing a half-million years or so of time. Between the standard Clarkforkian and Wasatchian faunal zones is an initial 'Wa-M' faunal zone of only five or so meters in thickness and something on the order of 20 thousand years of geological time. The Wa-M fauna includes the first appearance of its namesake herbivorous condylarth, Meniscotherium, but Wa-M seemingly lacks APP taxa. Overlying Wa-M is the better known 'Wa-0' fauna in a zone spanning 30 meters of strata and about 120 thousand years of geological time. This has dwarfed mammals and APP taxa, and is overlain in turn by strata with a standard Wa-1 early Eocene fauna. Documentation is still in progress, but it appears that the change from a Cf-3 to a Wa-M fauna lagged behind the onset of the CIE, the Wa-M fauna coincided with maximum excursion of the CIE, and the Wa-0 fauna lagged behind this maximum excursion and filled the recovery phase of the CIE. It is possible that other short-lived faunas will be found in addition to those already known because the events of interest are so short in duration that they may not be preserved in every stratigraphic section. Biotic effects (e.g., dwarfing and other adaptive change, biotic extinction, and biotic origination) are compelling reasons to study global warming, and the PETM provides an opportunity to study warming and sustainability in an event free from human influence.;

Gingerich, P. D.

2012-12-01

226

Competing risks and the development of adaptive management plans for water resources: Field reconnaissance investigation of risks to fishes and other aquatic biota exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (edcs) in lake mead, Nevada USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The analysis and characterization of competing risks for water resources rely on a wide spectrum of tools to evaluate hazards and risks associated with their management. For example, waters of the lower Colorado River stored in reservoirs such as Lake Mead present a wide range of competing risks related to water quantity and water quality. These risks are often interdependent and complicated by competing uses of source waters for sustaining biological resources and for supporting a range of agricultural, municipal, recreational, and industrial uses. USGS is currently conducting a series of interdisciplinary case-studies on water quality of Lake Mead and its source waters. In this case-study we examine selected constituents potentially entering the Lake Mead system, particularly endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Worldwide, a number of environmental EDCs have been identified that affect reproduction, development, and adaptive behaviors in a wide range of organisms. Many EDCs are minimally affected by current treatment technologies and occur in treated sewage effluents. Several EDCs have been detected in Lake Mead, and several substances have been identified that are of concern because of potential impacts to the aquatic biota, including the sport fishery of Lake Mead and endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) that occur in the Colorado River system. For example, altered biomarkers relevant to reproduction and thyroid function in fishes have been observed and may be predictive of impaired metabolism and development. Few studies, however, have addressed whether such EDC-induced responses observed in the field have an ecologically significant effect on the reproductive success of fishes. To identify potential linkages between EDCs and species of management concern, the risk analysis and characterization in this reconnaissance study focused on effects (and attendant uncertainties) that might be expressed by exposed populations. In addition, risk reduction measures that may be of interest to resource managers are considered relative to emerging contaminants in treated effluents, interdependencies among biological resources at risk, and uses of reservoir waters derived from multiple inflows of widely varying qualities. ??2009 ASCE.

Linder, G.; Little, E.E.

2009-01-01

227

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Salton Sea area, California, 1986-87  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water, bottom sediment, and biota were sampled during 1986 and 1987 in the Salton Sea area to determine concentrations of trace elements and pesticides as part of the Department of Interior Irrigation Drainage Program. The sampling sites (12 water, 15 bottom sediment, and 5 biota) were located in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The focus of sampling was to determine the current or potential threat to the wildlife of the Salton National Wildlife Refuge from irrigation projects sponsored or operated by the Department of the Interior. Results of the investigation indicate that selenium is the major element of concern. Elevated concentrations of selenium in water were restricted to tile-drain effluent. The maximum selenium concentration of 300 microg/L was detected in a tile-drain sample, and the minimum concentration of 1 microg/L was detected in a composite sample of Salton Sea water. The median selenium concentration was 19 microg/L. In contrast to the water, the highest bottom-sediment selenium concentration of 3.3 mg/kg was in a composite sample from the Salton Sea. The selenium detected in samples of waterfowl and fish also are of concern, but, to date, no studies have been done in the Salton Sea area to determine if selenium has caused adverse biological effects. Concentrations of boron and manganese were elevated in tile-drain samples throughout the Imperial Valley. Boron concentrations in migratory waterfowl were at levels that could cause reproduction impairment. Elevated concentrations of chromium, nickel, and zinc were detected in the Whitewater River , but they were not associated with irrigation drainage. Organochlorine pesticide residues were detected in bottom sediment throughout the study area at levels approaching those measured more than 10 years ago. More detailed studies would be needed to determine if these residues are affecting the waterfowl. (USGS)

Setmire, J.G.; Wolfe, J.C.; Stroud, R.K.

1990-01-01

228

The Relationship between Genus Richness and Geographic Area in Late Cretaceous Marine Biotas: Epicontinental Sea versus Open-Ocean-Facing Settings  

PubMed Central

For present-day biotas, close relationships have been documented between the number of species in a given region and the area of the region. To date, however, there have been only limited studies of these relationships in the geologic record, particularly for ancient marine biotas. The recent development of large-scale marine paleontological databases, in conjunction with enhanced geographical mapping tools, now allow for their investigation. At the same time, there has been renewed interest in comparing the environmental and paleobiological properties of two broad-scale marine settings: epicontinental seas, broad expanses of shallow water covering continental areas, and open-ocean-facing settings, shallow shelves and coastlines that rim ocean basins. Recent studies indicate that spatial distributions of taxa and the kinetics of taxon origination and extinction may have differed in these two settings. Against this backdrop, we analyze regional Genus-Area Relationships (GARs) of Late Cretaceous marine invertebrates in epicontinental sea and open-ocean settings using data from the Paleobiology Database. We present a new method for assessing GARs that is particularly appropriate for fossil data when the geographic distribution of these data is patchy and uneven. Results demonstrate clear relationships between genus richness and area for regions worldwide, but indicate that as area increases, genus richness increases more per unit area in epicontinental seas than in open-ocean settings. This difference implies a greater degree of compositional heterogeneity as a function of geographic area in epicontinental sea settings, a finding that is consistent with the emerging understanding of physical differences in the nature of water masses between the two marine settings. PMID:22870199

Lagomarcino, Anne J.; Miller, Arnold I.

2012-01-01

229

Detailed study of selenium and other constituents in water, bottom sediment, soil, alfalfa, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Uncompahgre Project area and in the Grand Valley, west-central Colorado, 1991-93  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1985, the U.S. Department of the Interior began a program to study the effects of irrigation drainage in the Western United States. These studies were done to determine whether irrigation drainage was causing problems related to human health, water quality, and fish and wildlife resources. Results of a study in 1991-93 of irrigation drainage associated with the Uncompahgre Project area, located in the lower Gunnison River Basin, and of the Grand Valley, located along the Colorado River, are described in this report. The focus of the report is on the sources, distribution, movement, and fate of selenium in the hydrologic and biological systems and the effects on biota. Generally, other trace- constituent concentrations in water and biota were not elevated or were not at levels of concern. Soils in the Uncompahgre Project area that primarily were derived from Mancos Shale contained the highest concentrations of total and watrer-extractable selenium. Only 5 of 128\\x11alfalfa samples had selenium concentrations that exceeded a recommended dietary limit for livestock. Selenium data for soil and alfalfa indicate that irrigation might be mobilizing and redistributing selenium in the Uncompahgre Project area. Distribution of dissolved selenium in ground water is affected by the aqueous geochemical environment of the shallow ground- water system. Selenium concentrations were as high as 1,300\\x11micrograms per liter in water from shallow wells. The highest concentrations of dissolved selenium were in water from wells completed in alluvium overlying the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age; selenium concentrations were lower in water from wells completed in Mancos Shale residuum. Selenium in the study area could be mobilized by oxidation of reduced selenium, desorption from aquifer sediments, ion exchange, and dissolution. Infiltration of irrigation water and, perhaps nitrate, provide oxidizing conditions for mobilization of selenium from alluvium and shale residuum and for transport to streams and irrigation drains that are tributary to the Gunnison, Uncompahgre, and Colorado Rivers. Selenium concentrations in about 64\\x11percent of water samples collected from the lower Gunnison River and about 50 percent of samples from the Colorado River near the Colorado-Utah State line exceeded the U.S.\\x11Environmental Protection Agency criterion of 5\\x11micrograms per liter for protection of aquatic life. Almost all selenium concentrations in samples collected during the nonirrigation season from Mancos Shale areas exceeded the aquatic-life criterion. The maximum selenium concentrations in surface-water samples were 600\\x11micrograms per liter in the Uncompahgre Project area and 380\\x11micrograms per liter in the Grand Valley. Irrigation drainage from the Uncompahgre Project and the Grand Valley might account for as much as 75 percent of the selenium load in the Colorado River near the Colorado-Utah State line. The primary source areas of selenium were the eastern side of the Uncompahgre Project and the western one-half of the Grand Valley, where there is extensive irrigation on soils derived from Mancos Shale. The largest mean selenium loads from tributary drainages were 14.0 pounds per day from Loutsenhizer Arroyo in the Uncompahgre Project and 12.8 pounds per day from Reed Wash in the Grand Valley. Positive correlations between selenium loads and dissolved-solids loads could indicate that salinity-control projects designed to decrease dissolved-solids loads also could decrease selenium loads from the irrigated areas. Selenium concentrations in irrigation drainage in the Grand Valley were much higher than concentrations predicted by simple evaporative concentration of irrigation source water. Selenium probably is removed from pond water by chemical and biological processes and incorporated into bottom sediment. The maximum selenium concentration in bottom sediment was 47 micrograms per gram from a pond on the eastern side of the

Butler, D.L.; Wright, W.G.; Stewart, K.C.; Osmundson, B.C.; Krueger, R.P.; Crabtree, D.W.

1996-01-01

230

Ethoprophos fate on soil-water interface and effects on non-target terrestrial and aquatic biota under Mediterranean crop-based scenarios.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to assess the environmental fate of the insecticide and nematicide ethoprophos in the soil-water interface following the pesticide application in simulated maize and potato crops under Mediterranean agricultural conditions, particularly of irrigation. Focus was given to the soil-water transfer pathways (leaching and runoff), to the pesticide transport in soil between pesticide application (crop row) and non-application areas (between crop rows), as well as to toxic effects of the various matrices on terrestrial and aquatic biota. A semi-field methodology mimicking a "worst-case" ethoprophos application (twice the recommended dosage for maize and potato crops: 100% concentration v/v) in agricultural field situations was used, in order to mimic a possible misuse by the farmer under realistic conditions. A rainfall was simulated under a slope of 20° for both crop-based scenarios. Soil and water samples were collected for the analysis of pesticide residues. Ecotoxicity of soil and aquatic samples was assessed by performing lethal and sublethal bioassays with organisms from different trophic levels: the collembolan Folsomia candida, the earthworm Eisenia andrei and the cladoceran Daphnia magna. Although the majority of ethoprophos sorbed to the soil application area, pesticide concentrations were detected in all water matrices illustrating pesticide transfer pathways of water contamination between environmental compartments. Leaching to groundwater proved to be an important transfer pathway of ethoprophos under both crop-based scenarios, as it resulted in high pesticide concentration in leachates from Maize (130µgL(-1)) and Potato (630µgL(-1)) crop scenarios, respectively. Ethoprophos application at the Potato crop scenario caused more toxic effects on terrestrial and aquatic biota than at the Maize scenario at the recommended dosage and lower concentrations. In both crop-based scenarios, ethoprophos moved with the irrigation water flow to the soil between the crop rows where no pesticide was applied, causing toxic effects on terrestrial organisms. The two simulated agricultural crop-based scenarios had the merit to illustrate the importance of transfer pathways of pesticides from soil to groundwater through leaching and from crop rows to the surrounding soil areas in a soil-water interface environment, which is representative for irrigated agricultural crops under Mediterranean conditions. PMID:24562181

Leitão, Sara; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Van den Brink, Paul J; Ribeiro, Rui; José Cerejeira, M; Sousa, José Paulo

2014-05-01

231

Soil pollution associated to the El Borracho Pb-Ag mine (Badajoz Province, Spain). Metal transfer to biota: oak-tree and moss.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

El Borracho mine was active since Roman times, but with its higher production period on 19th Century. Mine closure occured without restoration works and nowadays the mining area is dedicated to deer hunting activities. In order to evaluate heavy metals distribution on mining tailings and surrounding soils of the studied area, 40 samples of dumps, soils and sediments were taken. Samples from the mine tailings were collected with an Eijkelkamp soil core sampler for undisturbed samples, with a vertical constant spacing of 25 cm. With this procedure, a total of 21 samples were taken in two points at main dump. Samples of Oak-tree leaves and moss were taken to evaluate metal transfer to biota. Analytical determinations have included soil parameters (pH, conductivity, organic matter content), and total metal contents in geological and biological samples by EDXRF. Analytical determinations shows higher metal contents in dumps, especially in surficial samples, 17,700 mg kg-1 and 470 mg kg-1 in average of Pb and Zn respectively, and lower contents in soils, 5,200 mg kg-1 and 300 mg kg-1, and sediments, 3,500 mg kg-1 and 120 mg kg-1. Metal contents in tailings profiles shows higher levels of Pb, Zn and Cu at 3.5 meters depth, a zone with lower grainsize and higher moisture. Differences in efficiency of extraction techniques and metal remobilization inside the dump can be an explanation for this enrichment level. Metal contents in agricultural soils exceeded maximum allowed levels by European Community (300 mg kg-1 for Pb and Zn and 140 mg kg-1 for Cu). Metal contents in biota evidence that Oak-tree bioaccumulates some metals, especially those with higher mobility in acidic conditions like Zn and Sb, with averages Bioaccumulation factor (BAF = plant concentration/soil concentration) of 0.48 and 0.85 respectively. Moss reaches high concentrations of Pb and Zn (3,000 mg kg-1 and 175 mg kg-1 in average respectively). Uptake pattern of Pb and Zn by plants leaves and mosses seems to be similar and can be characterized by logistic curves, with higher affinity of mosses to uptake metals from soils.

López-Berdonces, Miguel Angel; María Esbrí, José; Fernández-Calderón, Sergio; Naharro, Elena; García-Noguero, Eva Maria; Higueras, Pablo

2014-05-01

232

CONSOLIDATION OF BASELINE INFORMATION, DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY, AND INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL IMPACTS ON FRESHWATER SHELLFISH, INSECTS, AND OTHER BIOTA  

EPA Science Inventory

A computerized information system was developed for storing, retrieving, and analyzing data collected during limnological surveys. To facilitate storage of information, a series of hierarchial codes was developed. These codes not only reduced storage requirements, but also helped...

233

Urban stormwater inputs to an adapted coastal wetland: role in water treatment and impacts on wetland biota.  

PubMed

The Lake Pertobe wetland system is a semi-natural wetland that has been modified primarily for recreational use. However, this lake system receives stormwater from much of the central business district of Warrnambool City (Victoria, Australia) and serves as a buffer zone between the stormwater system and the Merri River and Merri Marine Sanctuary. This work considers the impact of stormwater inputs on Lake Pertobe and the effectiveness of the lake in protecting the associated marine sanctuary. Sediment contaminants (including heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) and water quality parameters within the lake, groundwater and stormwater system were measured. Water quality parameters were highly variable between stormwater drains and rain events. Suspended solids rapidly settled along open drains and shortly after entering the lake. Groundwater inputs increased both salinity and dissolved nitrogen in some stormwater drains. Some evidence of bioaccumulation of metals in the food chain was identified and sediment concentrations of several PAHs were very high. The lake acted as a sink for PAHs and some metals and reductions in Escherichia coli, biological oxygen demand and total phosphorus were observed, affording some protection to the associated marine sanctuary. Nutrient retention was inadequate overall and it was identified that managing the lake primarily as a recreational facility impacted on the effectiveness of stormwater treatment in the system. PMID:24747245

Howitt, Julia A; Mondon, Julie; Mitchell, Bradley D; Kidd, Toby; Eshelman, Bruce

2014-07-01

234

A fast and effective routine method based on HS-SPME-GC-MS/MS for the analysis of organotin compounds in biota samples.  

PubMed

This work validated an automated, fast, and low solvent- consuming methodology suited for routine analysis of tributyltin (TBT) and degradation products (dibutyltin, DBT; monobutyltin, MBT) in biota samples. The method was based on the headspace solid-phase microextraction methodology (HS-SPME), coupled with gas chromatographic separation and tandem mass-spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The effectiveness of the matrix-matched signal ratio external calibration was tested for quantification purposes. The exclusion of matrix influences in the calibration curves proved the suitability of this versatile quantification method. The method detection limits obtained were of 3ngSng(-1)dw for all the analytes. The analysis of references materials showed satisfying accuracy under optimum calibration conditions (% recovery between 87-111%; |Z-scores|<2). The repeatability RSD% and intra-laboratory reproducibility RSD% were lower than 9.6% and 12.6%, respectively. The work proved the remarkable analytical performances of the method and its high potential for routine application in monitoring organotin compounds (OTC). PMID:25597804

Noventa, Seta; Barbaro, Jvan; Formalewicz, Malgorzata; Gion, Claudia; Rampazzo, Federico; Brusà, Rossella Boscolo; Gabellini, Massimo; Berto, Daniela

2015-02-01

235

Dose assessment for marine biota and humans from discharge of (131)I to the marine environment and uptake by algae in Sydney, Australia.  

PubMed

Iodine-131 reaches the marine environment through its excretion to the sewer by nuclear medicine patients followed by discharge through coastal and deepwater out falls. 131I has been detected in macroalgae,which bio-accumulate iodine, growing near the coastal out fall of Cronulla sewage treatment plant (STP) since 1995. During this study, (131)I levels in liquid effluent and sludge from three Sydney STP's as well as in macroalgae (Ulva sp. and Ecklonia radiata) growing near their shoreline out falls were measured. Concentration factors of 176 for Ulva sp. and 526 for E. radiata were derived. Radiation dose rates to marine biota from (131)I discharged to coastal waters calculated using the ERICA dose assessment tool were below the ERICA screening level of 10 ?Gy/hr. Radiation dose rates to humans from immersion in seawater or consumption of Ulva sp. containing (131)I were three and two orders of magnitude below the IAEA screening level of 10 ?Sv/year, respectively. PMID:22180886

Carolan, Jessica Veliscek; Hughes, Catherine E; Hoffmann, Emmy L

2011-10-01

236

An integrated, multiscale approach to predicting the response of lotic biota to climate change in the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate change, land development, and water use are among the foremost problems faced by aquatic resource managers. Identifying and quantifying their effects on aquatic communities is crucial for evaluating potential stream conservation strategies. In the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint (ACF) river basins, increasing demand for water from the steady growth of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area and increased agricultural irrigation in the Coastal Plain has the potential to alter streamflows throughout the basin. Climate change is expected to have a broad-scale influence on the quantity and the seasonality of streamflows, exacerbating the effects of water use and land development. We developed a multiscale approach to predict the effects of flow and temperature alteration on the persistence of fish and mussel communities in the ACF basin. The modeling approach integrates climate, geology, geomorphology, hydrology, and landscape characterizations within the basin. Existing data sets have been used to allow regionalization of results to other watersheds while minimizing additional data collection. Climate, hydraulic, and ecological models were linked to predict persistence of fish and mussel species under future scenarios of flow alteration, land-use effects, and climate change. We intend this as an adaptive framework, within which model components will be iteratively improved with better understanding of mechanisms linking climate, land use, hydrology, and aquatic biota, to provide useful guidance to natural resource managers.

Peterson, J.; Freeman, M. C.

2010-12-01

237

A hybrid empirical-mechanistic modeling approach for extrapolating biota-sediment accumulation factors and bioaccumulation factors across species, time, and/or ecosystems.  

PubMed

An approach is presented for extrapolating field-measured biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) across species, time, and/or ecosystems. This approach, called the hybrid bioaccumulation modeling approach, uses mechanistic bioaccumulation models to extrapolate field-measured bioaccumulation data (i.e., BSAFs and BAFs) to new sets of ecological conditions. The hybrid approach predicts relative differences in bioaccumulation using food web models with two sets of ecological conditions and parameters: One set for the ecosystem where the BSAFs and/or BAFs were measured, and the other set for the ecological conditions and parameters for which the extrapolated BSAFs and/or BAFs are desired. The field-measured BSAF (or BAF) is extrapolated by adjusting the measured BSAF (or BAF) by the predicted relative difference, which is derived from two separate solutions of the food web model. Extrapolations of polychlorinated biphenyl BSAFs and BAFs for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from southern Lake Michigan to Green Bay of Lake Michigan (Green Bay, WI, USA) walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), as well as Hudson River largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens), resulted in generally better agreement between measured and predicted BSAFs and BAFs with the hybrid approach. PMID:16833159

Burkhard, Lawrence P; Cook, Philip M; Lukasewycz, Marta T

2006-07-01

238

Microbe-I: fungal biota analyses of the Japanese experimental module KIBO of the International Space Station before launch and after being in orbit for about 460 days.  

PubMed

In addition to the crew, microbes also find their way aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Therefore, microbial monitoring is necessary for the health and safety of the crew and for general maintenance of the facilities of this station. Samples were collected from three sites in the Japanese experimental module KIBO on the ISS (air diffuser, handrail, and surfaces) for analysis of fungal biota approximately 1 year after this module had docked with the ISS. Samples taken from KIBO before launch and from our laboratory were used as controls. In the case of KIBO, both microbe detection sheet (MDS) and swab culture tests of orbital samples were negative. The MDS were also examined by field emission-scanning electron microscopy; no microbial structures were detected. However, fungal DNAs were detected by real-time PCR and analyzed by the clone library method; Alternaria sp. and Malassezia spp. were the dominant species before launch and in space, respectively. The dominant species found in specimens from the air conditioner diffuser, lab bench, door push panel, and facility surfaces on our laboratory (ground controls) were Inonotus sp., Cladosporium sp., Malassezia spp., and Pezicula sp., respectively. The fungi in the KIBO were probably derived from contamination due to humans, while those in our laboratory came from the environment (e.g., the soil). In conclusion, the cleanliness in KIBO was equivalent to that in a clean room environment on the ground. PMID:21950271

Satoh, Kazuo; Nishiyama, Yayoi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Sugita, Takashi; Tsukii, Yuuji; Takatori, Kosuke; Benno, Yoshimi; Makimura, Koichi

2011-12-01

239

Transfer of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems--default concentration ratios for aquatic biota in the Erica Tool.  

PubMed

The process of assessing risk to the environment following a given release of radioactivity requires the quantification of activity concentrations in environmental media and reference organisms. The methodology adopted by the ERICA Integrated Approach involves the application of concentration ratios (CR values) and distribution coefficients (K(d) values) for aquatic systems. Within this paper the methodologies applied to derive default transfer parameters, collated within the ERICA Tool databases, are described to provide transparency and traceability in the documentation process. Detailed information is provided for the CR values used for marine and freshwater systems. Of the total 372 CR values derived for the marine ecosystem, 195 were identified by literature review. For the freshwater system, the number of values based on review was less, but still constituted 129 from a total of 372 values. In both types of aquatic systems, 70-80% of the data gaps have been filled by employing "preferable" approaches such as those based on substituting values from taxonomically similar organisms or biogeochemically similar elements. PMID:18343543

Hosseini, A; Thørring, H; Brown, J E; Saxén, R; Ilus, E

2008-09-01

240

Assessment of mercury and methylmercury in water, sediment, and biota in Sulphur Creek in the vicinity of the Clyde Gold Mine and the Elgin Mercury Mine, Colusa County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, we performed a study during April–July 2010 to characterize mercury (Hg), monomethyl mercury (MMeHg), and other geochemical constituents in sediment, water, and biota at the Clyde Gold Mine and the Elgin Mercury Mine, located in neighboring subwatersheds of Sulphur Creek, Colusa County, California. This study was in support of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act - Removal Site Investigation. The investigation was in response to an abatement notification from the California Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board to evaluate the release of Hg from the Clyde and Elgin mines. Samples of water, sediment, and biota (aquatic macroinvertebrates) were collected from sites upstream and downstream from the two mine sites to evaluate the level of Hg contamination contributed by each mine to the aquatic ecosystem. Physical parameters, as well as dissolved organic carbon, total Hg (HgT), and MMeHg were analyzed in water and sediment. Other relevant geochemical constituents were analyzed in sediment, filtered water, and unfiltered water. Samples of aquatic macroinvertebrates from each mine were analyzed for HgT and MMeHg. The presence of low to moderate concentrations of HgT and MMeHg in water, sediment, and biota from the Freshwater Branch of Sulphur Creek, and the lack of significant increases in these concentrations downstream from the Clyde Mine indicated that this mine is not a significant source of Hg to the watershed during low flow conditions. Although concentrations of HgT and MMeHg were generally higher in samples of sediment and water from the Elgin Mine compared to the Clyde Mine, concentrations in comparable biota from the two mine areas were similar. It is likely that highly saline effluent from nearby hot springs contribute more Hg to the West Fork of Sulphur Creek than the mine waste material at the Elgin Mine.

Hothem, Roger L.; Rytuba, James J.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

2013-01-01

241

Simulation of CO? leakages during injection and storage in sub-seabed geological formations: metal mobilization and biota effects.  

PubMed

To assess the potential effects on metal mobilization due to leakages of CO2 during its injection and storage in marine systems, an experimental set-up was devised and operated, using the polychaete Hediste diversicolor as the model organism. The objective was to study the effects of such leakage in the expected scenarios of pH values between 8.0 and 6.0. Polychaetes were exposed for 10 days to seawater with sediment samples collected in two different coastal areas, one with relatively uncontaminated sediment as reference (RSP) and the other with known contaminated sediment (ML), under pre-determined pH conditions. Survival and metal accumulation (Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, As and Hg) in the whole body of H. diversicolor were employed as endpoints. Mortality was significant at the lowest pH level in the sediment with highest metal concentrations. In general, metal concentrations in tissues of individuals exposed to the contaminated sediment were influenced by pH. These results indicate that ocean acidification due to CO2 leakages would provoke increased metal mobilization, causing adverse side effects in sediment toxicity. PMID:24721118

Rodríguez-Romero, Araceli; Basallote, M Dolores; De Orte, Manoela R; DelValls, T Ángel; Riba, Inmaculada; Blasco, Julián

2014-07-01

242

Toxicity of a secondary-treated sewage effluent to marine biota in Bass Strait, Australia: development of action trigger values for a toxicity monitoring program.  

PubMed

Melbourne Water's Eastern Treatment Plant (ETP) produces a secondary-treated sewage effluent which is chlorinated and discharged into Bass Strait at Boags Rocks, Victoria, Australia. Disappearance of the sensitive brown seaweed Hormosira banksii from rock platforms immediately adjacent to the shore-line discharge was identified in the early 1990s. Subsequently, Melbourne Water and CSIRO undertook an environmental impact assessment and review of land and marine effluent disposal options, which included ambient water quality monitoring, biological monitoring, bioaccumulation studies and toxicity testing of existing effluent to assess the nature and magnitude of the environmental effects. This paper presents data from the toxicity monitoring programs since 2001. Chronic toxicity testing using macroalgal germination and cell division (H. banksii), microalgal growth rate (Nitzschia closterium) and scallop larval development (Chlamys asperrima), confirmed that ammonia was the major cause of effluent toxicity. Results from this toxicity monitoring program were used to develop action trigger values for toxicity for each species, which were then used in a refined monitoring program in 2005-2007. An upgrade of the ETP is in progress to improve nitrification/denitrification in order to reduce ammonia concentrations and the toxicity of the effluent. Toxicity testing with a simulated upgraded effluent confirmed that ammonia concentrations and toxicity were reduced. Estimated "safe" dilutions of effluent, calculated using species sensitivity distributions, decreased from 1:140-300 for existing ETP effluent to 1:20 for nitrified effluent, further confirming that treatment improvements should reduce the impact on marine biota in the vicinity of the discharge. PMID:18241892

Adams, Merrin S; Stauber, Jennifer L; Binet, Monique T; Molloy, Robert; Gregory, David

2008-01-01

243

Are standard tests sensitive enough to evaluate effects of human pharmaceuticals in aquatic biota? Facing changes in research approaches when performing risk assessment of drugs.  

PubMed

Nowadays, the presence of pharmaceutical products in aquatic environments is not only common, but is also of significant concern regarding the adverse effect they may produce to aquatic biota. In order to determine the adverse effects of caffeine (CAF), ibuprofen (IBU), carbamazepine (CBZ) and novobiocin (NOV), at environmental occurring concentrations, standardized endpoints applied in current guidelines were evaluated in four organisms including bioluminescence response in Vibrio fischeri, growth inhibition in Isochrysis galbana (marine water) and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (fresh water) and fertilization and embryo-larval development in Paracentrotus lividus. To reach this aim bioassays were implemented by exposing organisms to water spiked with drugs dissolved in DMSO (0.001% v/v). Risk characterization was performed, calculating the environmental impact of drugs by calculating environmental concentration and predicted no effect concentration ratio (MEC/PNEC). Results indicate that acute toxicity was found above environmental concentrations in the order of mg L(-1) for bacteria bioluminescence, microalgae growth inhibition and sea urchin fertilization. However, teratogenicity was observed on sea urchin after exposure to environmental concentrations of drugs at 0.00001 mg L(-1); at this concentration CBZ and IBU were found to reduce significantly the embryo-larval development compared to controls (p<0.01). The risk calculated for selected drugs suggested they are harmless for aquatic environment except when applying the embryo-larval development endpoint. Endpoints applied in this study showed the necessity of using more sensitive responses, when assessing risk of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments, since endpoints applied in current guidelines may not be suitable. PMID:25000509

Aguirre-Martínez, G V; Owuor, M A; Garrido-Pérez, C; Salamanca, M J; Del Valls, T A; Martín-Díaz, M L

2015-02-01

244

How much is enough? Minimal responses of water quality and stream biota to partial retrofit stormwater management in a suburban neighborhood.  

PubMed

Decentralized stormwater management approaches (e.g., biofiltration swales, pervious pavement, green roofs, rain gardens) that capture, detain, infiltrate, and filter runoff are now commonly used to minimize the impacts of stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces on aquatic ecosystems. However, there is little research on the effectiveness of retrofit, parcel-scale stormwater management practices for improving downstream aquatic ecosystem health. A reverse auction was used to encourage homeowners to mitigate stormwater on their property within the suburban, 1.8 km(2) Shepherd Creek catchment in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA). In 2007-2008, 165 rain barrels and 81 rain gardens were installed on 30% of the properties in four experimental (treatment) subcatchments, and two additional subcatchments were maintained as controls. At the base of the subcatchments, we sampled monthly baseflow water quality, and seasonal (5×/year) physical habitat, periphyton assemblages, and macroinvertebrate assemblages in the streams for the three years before and after treatment implementation. Given the minor reductions in directly connected impervious area from the rain barrel installations (11.6% to 10.4% in the most impaired subcatchment) and high total impervious levels (13.1% to 19.9% in experimental subcatchments), we expected minor or no responses of water quality and biota to stormwater management. There were trends of increased conductivity, iron, and sulfate for control sites, but no such contemporaneous trends for experimental sites. The minor effects of treatment on streamflow volume and water quality did not translate into changes in biotic health, and the few periphyton and macroinvertebrate responses could be explained by factors not associated with the treatment (e.g., vegetation clearing, drought conditions). Improvement of overall stream health is unlikely without additional treatment of major impervious surfaces (including roads, apartment buildings, and parking lots). Further research is needed to define the minimum effect threshold and restoration trajectories for retrofitting catchments to improve the health of stream ecosystems. PMID:24465468

Roy, Allison H; Rhea, Lee K; Mayer, Audrey L; Shuster, William D; Beaulieu, Jake J; Hopton, Matthew E; Morrison, Matthew A; St Amand, Ann

2014-01-01

245

How Much Is Enough? Minimal Responses of Water Quality and Stream Biota to Partial Retrofit Stormwater Management in a Suburban Neighborhood  

PubMed Central

Decentralized stormwater management approaches (e.g., biofiltration swales, pervious pavement, green roofs, rain gardens) that capture, detain, infiltrate, and filter runoff are now commonly used to minimize the impacts of stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces on aquatic ecosystems. However, there is little research on the effectiveness of retrofit, parcel-scale stormwater management practices for improving downstream aquatic ecosystem health. A reverse auction was used to encourage homeowners to mitigate stormwater on their property within the suburban, 1.8 km2 Shepherd Creek catchment in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA). In 2007–2008, 165 rain barrels and 81 rain gardens were installed on 30% of the properties in four experimental (treatment) subcatchments, and two additional subcatchments were maintained as controls. At the base of the subcatchments, we sampled monthly baseflow water quality, and seasonal (5×/year) physical habitat, periphyton assemblages, and macroinvertebrate assemblages in the streams for the three years before and after treatment implementation. Given the minor reductions in directly connected impervious area from the rain barrel installations (11.6% to 10.4% in the most impaired subcatchment) and high total impervious levels (13.1% to 19.9% in experimental subcatchments), we expected minor or no responses of water quality and biota to stormwater management. There were trends of increased conductivity, iron, and sulfate for control sites, but no such contemporaneous trends for experimental sites. The minor effects of treatment on streamflow volume and water quality did not translate into changes in biotic health, and the few periphyton and macroinvertebrate responses could be explained by factors not associated with the treatment (e.g., vegetation clearing, drought conditions). Improvement of overall stream health is unlikely without additional treatment of major impervious surfaces (including roads, apartment buildings, and parking lots). Further research is needed to define the minimum effect threshold and restoration trajectories for retrofitting catchments to improve the health of stream ecosystems. PMID:24465468

Roy, Allison H.; Rhea, Lee K.; Mayer, Audrey L.; Shuster, William D.; Beaulieu, Jake J.; Hopton, Matthew E.; Morrison, Matthew A.; St. Amand, Ann

2014-01-01

246

Biota--sediment accumulation factors for polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins, and dibenzofurans in southern Lake Michigan lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).  

PubMed

A set of high-quality, age-specific biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) have been determined from concentrations measured with high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry, by use of the 13C isotopic dilution technique, in lake trout and surficial (0-2 cm) sediment samples from southern Lake Michigan. BSAFs ranged from <0.1 to 18 for PCBs and from <0.001 to 0.32 for PCDDs and PCDFs detected in the fish. PCBs with zero or one chlorine in an ortho position had smaller BSAFs than other PCBs. PCDDs and PCDFs with chlorines at the 2,3,7,8-positions had larger BSAFs than most other PCDDs and PCDFs. The fidelity of the relative bioaccumulation potential data between independent lake trout samples, within and among age classes, suggests that differences in slight rates of net metabolism in the food chain are important and contribute to the apparent differences in BSAFs, not only for PCDDs and PCDFs but also possibly for some PCBs. A complicating factor for non-ortho- and mono-ortho-PCBs is the uncertain contribution of enhanced affinity for black carbon (and possibly volatility) acting in concert with metabolism to reduce measured BSAFs for lake trout. On the basis of the association between chemicals with apparent slight rates of metabolism and measured dioxin-like toxicity, several PCDFs with similar measured BSAFs but unknown toxicity may be candidates for toxicity testing. PMID:15543729

Burkhard, Lawrence P; Cook, Philip M; Lukasewycz, Marta T

2004-10-15

247

Potential effects of climate change on inland glacial lakes and implications for lake-dependent biota in Wisconsin: final report April 2013  

USGS Publications Warehouse

F statewide, and an increase in precipitation of 1”–2”. However, summer precipitation in the northern part of the state is expected to be less and winter precipitation will be greater. By the end of the 21st century, the magnitude of changes in temperature and precipitation are expected to intensify. Such climatic changes have altered, and would further alter hydrological, chemical, and physical properties of inland lakes. Lake-dependent wildlife sensitive to changes in water quality, are particularly susceptible to lake quality-associated habitat changes and are likely to suffer restrictions to current breeding distributions under some climate change scenarios. We have selected the common loon (Gavia immer) to serve as a sentinel lake-dependent piscivorous species to be used in the development of a template for linking primary lake-dependent biota endpoints (e.g., decline in productivity and/or breeding range contraction) to important lake quality indicators. In the current project, we evaluate how changes in freshwater habitat quality (specifically lake clarity) may impact common loon lake occupancy in Wisconsin under detailed climate-change scenarios. In addition, we employ simple land-use/land cover and habitat scenarios to illustrate the potential interaction of climate and land-use/land cover effects. The methods employed here provide a template for studies where integration of physical and biotic models is used to project future conditions under various climate and land use change scenarios. Findings presented here project the future conditions of lakes and loons within an important watershed in northern Wisconsin – of importance to water resource managers and state citizens alike.

Meyer, Michael W.; Walker, John F.; Kenow, Kevin P.; Rasmussen, Paul W.; Garrison, Paul J.; Hanson, Paul C.; Hunt, Randall J.

2013-01-01

248

Compilation of 1988 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. Volume 2. Annual progress report No. 7, January-December 1988  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of eight studies performed during 1988 at the Wisconsin and Michigan Transmitting Facilities. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships.

Not Available

1989-08-01

249

Mercury at the Oat Hill Extension Mine and James Creek, Napa County, California: Tailings, Sediment, Water, and Biota, 2003-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Executive Summary The Oat Hill Extension (OHE) Mine is one of several mercury mines located in the James Creek/Pope Creek watershed that produced mercury from the 1870's until 1944 (U.S. Bureau of Mines, 1965). The OHE Mine developed veins and mineralized fault zones hosted in sandstone that extended eastward from the Oat Hill Mine. Waste material from the Oat Hill Mine was reprocessed at the OHE Mine using gravity separation methods to obtain cinnabar concentrates that were processed in a retort. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management requested that the U.S. Geological Survey measure and characterize mercury and other chemical constituents that are potentially relevant to ecological impairment of biota in tailings, sediment, and water at the OHE Mine and in the tributaries of James Creek that drain the mine area (termed Drainage A and B) (Figs. 1 and 2). This report summarizes such data obtained from sampling of tailings and sediments at the OHE on October 17, 2003; water, sediment, and biota from James Creek on May 20, 2004; and biota on October 29, 2004. These data are interpreted to provide a preliminary assessment of the potential ecological impact of the mine on the James Creek watershed. The mine tailings are unusual in that they have not been roasted and contain relatively high concentrations of mercury (400 to 1200 ppm) compared to unroasted waste rock at other mines. These tailings have contaminated a tributary to James Creek with mercury primarily by erosion, on the basis of higher concentration of mercury (780 ng/L) measured in unfiltered (total mercury, HgT) spring water flowing from the OHE to James Creek compared to 5 to 14 ng/L HgT measured in James Creek itself. Tailing piles (presumably from past Oat Hill mine dumping) near the USBLM property boundary and upstream of the main OHE mine drainage channel (Drainage A; Fig. 2) also likely emit mercury, on the basis of their mercury composition (930 to 1200 ppm). The OHE spring water is likely an appreciable source of sulfate and carbonate to James Creek, because the spring water was enriched in sulfate (130 mg/L) and carbonate (430 mg/L as CaCO3) compared to James Creek water (70 to 100 mg/L SO42- and 110 to 170 mg/L as CaCO3) at the time of sampling. Concentrations of mercury in active channel sediment from James Creek are variable and potentially high, on the basis of chemical analysis (2.5 to 17 _g/g-wet sediment) and easily visible cinnabar grains in panned concentrates. Average (geometric mean) organic mercury (presumably monomethyl mercury (MMHg); ?2.3.3) concentrations in several invertebrate taxa collected from the James Creek watershed locations were higher than invertebrates taken from a Northern California location lacking a known point source of mercury. The mean proportion of MMHg to total mercury in James Creek predatory insect samples was 40 percent (1 standard deviation = 30 percent); only 40 percent of all insect samples had a MMHg/HgT proportion greater than 0.5. The low proportions of MMHg measured in invertebrates in James Creek and the presence of cinnabar in the creek suggest that some invertebrates may have anomolously high Hg concentrations as a result of the injestion or adhesion of extremely fine-grained cinnabar particles. Interpretation of HgT in frogs and fish as an indicator of mercury reactivity, biouptake, or trophic transfer is limited, pending MMHg measuremens, by the possibility of these whole-body samples having contained cinnabar particles at the time of analysis. To minimize this limitation, the gastrointestinal tracts and external surfaces of all amphibians, where cinnabar most likely resides, were carefully flushed to remove any visible particles. However, extremely fine-grained, invisible, adhesive cinnabar particles likely exist in the amphibians' habitats. HgT in foothill yellow-legged frogs collected from the James Creek study area, ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 ug/g Hg, was on average twice that of an extensive

Slowey, Aaron J.; Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.

2007-01-01

250

The role of the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau for the evolution of Tibetan biotas.  

PubMed

Biodiversity is unevenly distributed on Earth and hotspots of biodiversity are often associated with areas that have undergone orogenic activity during recent geological history (i.e. tens of millions of years). Understanding the underlying processes that have driven the accumulation of species in some areas and not in others may help guide prioritization in conservation and may facilitate forecasts on ecosystem services under future climate conditions. Consequently, the study of the origin and evolution of biodiversity in mountain systems has motivated growing scientific interest. Despite an increasing number of studies, the origin and evolution of diversity hotspots associated with the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) remains poorly understood. We review literature related to the diversification of organisms linked to the uplift of the QTP. To promote hypothesis-based research, we provide a geological and palaeoclimatic scenario for the region of the QTP and argue that further studies would benefit from providing a complete set of complementary analyses (molecular dating, biogeographic, and diversification rates analyses) to test for a link between organismic diversification and past geological and climatic changes in this region. In general, we found that the contribution of biological interchange between the QTP and other hotspots of biodiversity has not been sufficiently studied to date. Finally, we suggest that the biological consequences of the uplift of the QTP would be best understood using a meta-analysis approach, encompassing studies on a variety of organisms (plants and animals) from diverse habitats (forests, meadows, rivers), and thermal belts (montane, subalpine, alpine, nival). Since the species diversity in the QTP region is better documented for some organismic groups than for others, we suggest that baseline taxonomic work should be promoted. PMID:24784793

Favre, Adrien; Päckert, Martin; Pauls, Steffen U; Jähnig, Sonja C; Uhl, Dieter; Michalak, Ingo; Muellner-Riehl, Alexandra N

2015-02-01

251

Areas Susceptible to Irrigation-Induced Selenium Contamination of Water and Biota in the Western United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) studied contamination induced by irrigation drainage in 26 areas of the Western United States during 1986-95. Comprehensive compilation, synthesis, and evaluation of the data resulting from these studies were initiated by DOI in 1992. Soils and ground water in irrigated areas of the West can contain high concentrations of selenium because of (1) residual selenium from the soil's parent rock beneath irrigated land; (2) selenium derived from rocks in mountains upland from irrigated land by erosion and transport along local drainages, and (3) selenium brought into the area in surface water imported for irrigation. Application of irrigation water to seleniferous soils can dissolve and mobilize selenium and create hydraulic gradients that cause the discharge of seleniferous ground water into irrigation drains. Given a source of selenium, the magnitude of selenium contamination in drainage-affected aquatic ecosystems is strongly related to the aridity of the area and the presence of terminal lakes and ponds. Marine sedimentary rocks and deposits of Late Cretaceous or Tertiary age are generally seleniferous in the Western United States. Depending on their origin and history, some Tertiary continental sedimentary deposits also are seleniferous. Irrigation of areas associated with these rocks and deposits can result in concentrations of selenium in water that exceed criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. Geologic and climatic data for the Western United States were evaluated and incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) to produce a map identifying areas susceptible to irrigation-induced selenium contamination. Land is considered susceptible where a geologic source of selenium is in or near the area and where the evaporation rate is more than 2.5 times the precipitation rate. In the Western United States, about 160,000 square miles of land, which includes about 4,100 square miles (2.6 million acres) of land irrigated for agriculture, has been identified as being susceptible. Biological data were used to evaluate the reliability of the map. In 12 of DOl's 26 study areas, concentrations of selenium measured in bird eggs were elevated sufficiently to significantly reduce hatchability of the eggs. The GIS map identifies 9 of those 12 areas. Deformed bird embryos having classic symptoms of selenium toxicosis were found in four of the study areas, and the map identifies all four as susceptible to irrigation-induced selenium contamination.

Seiler, Ralph L.; Skorupa, Joseph P.; Peltz, Lorri A.

1999-01-01

252

What's in the Biota Bag? Examining Australian Fossil Biota.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a classroom activity in which candy is used to represent some Australian fossils with students asked to examine specimens and locate on a map of Australia where it might have been discovered. (Author/MM)

Van Rooy, Wilhelmina

2002-01-01

253

Ecological Status of the St. Louis River System, as Informed by Spatially Comprehensive Surveys and Comparison to Coastal Wetlands Elsewhere  

EPA Science Inventory

Extensive data on biota and the physical/chemical environment were collected across the lower St. Louis River in 2004-2007 as part of multiple studies undertaken by EPA. The 2005-2007 work provides a spatially highly-resolved assessment of conditions across the system, while the ...

254

MODELING MERCURY DYNAMICS IN STREAM SYSTEMS WITH WASP7: CHARACTERIZING PROCESSES CONTROLLING SHORT AND LONG TERM RESPONSE  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury transport through stream ecosystems is driven by a complicated set of transport and transformation reactions operating on a variety of scales in the atmosphere, landscape, surface water, and biota. Riverine systems typically have short residence times and can experience l...

255

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Pine River Project area, Southern Ute Indian Reservation, southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico, 1988-89  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1988-89, water, bottom sediment, biota, soil, and plants were sampled for a reconnaissance investigation of the Pine River Project area in southwestern Colorado. Irrigation drainage does not seem to be a major source of dissolved solids in streams. Concentrations of manganese, mercury, and selenium exceeded drinking-water regulations in some streams. The maximum selenium concentration in a stream sample was 94 microg/L in Rock Creek. Irrigation drainage and natural groundwater are sources of some trace elements to streams. Water from a well in a nonirrigated area had 4,800 microg/L of selenium. Selenium concentrations in soil on the Oxford Tract were greater in areas previously or presently irrigated than in areas never irrigated. Some forage plants on the Oxford Tract had large selenium concentrations, including 180 mg/km in alfalfa. Most fish samples had selenium concentrations greater than the National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program 85th percentile. Selenium concentrations in aquatic plants, aquatic inverte- brates, and small mammals may be of concern to fish and wildlife because of possible food-chain bioconcentration. Selenium concentrations in bird samples indicate selenium contamination of biota on the Oxford Tract. Mallard breasts had selenium concentrations exceeding a guideline for human consumption. The maximum selenium concentration in biota was 50 microg/g dry weight in a bird liver from the Oxford Tract. In some fish samples, arsenic, cadmium, copper, and zinc exceeded background concentrations, but concentrations were not toxic. Mercury concentrations in 16 fish samples exceeded the background concentration. Ten mercury concentrations in fish exceeded a guideline for mercury in food for consumption by pregnant women.

Butler, D.L.; Krueger, R.P.; Osmundson, B.C.; Thompson, A.L.; Formea, J.J.; Wickman, D.W.

1993-01-01

256

Surface-water-quality assessment of the Yakima River basin in Washington; spatial and temporal distribution of trace elements in water, sediment, and aquatic biota, 1987-91; with a section on geology  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The report describes the distribution of trace elements in sediment, water, and aquatic biota in the Yakima River basin, Washington. Trace elements were determined from streambed sediment, suspended sediment, filtered and unfiltered water samples, aquatic insects, clams, fish livers, and fish fillets between 1987 and 1991. The distribution of trace elements in these media was related to local geology and anthropogenic sources. Additionally, annual and instantaneous loads were estimated for trace elements associated with suspended sediment and trace elements in filtered water samples. Trace elements also were screened against U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidelines established for the protection of human health and aquatic life.

Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Cain, Daniel J.; McKenzie, Stuart W.; Rinella, Joseph F.; Crawford, J. Kent; Skach, Kenneth A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Gannett, Marshall W.

1999-01-01

257

Detailed study of irrigation drainage in and near wildlife management areas, west-central Nevada, 1987-90; Part B, Effect on biota in Stillwater and Fernley Wildlife Management Areas and other nearby wetlands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A water-quality reconnaissance study during 1986-87 found high concentrations of several potentially toxic elements in water, bottom sediment, and biota in and near Stillwater Wildlife Management Area (WMA). This study prompted the U.S. Department of the Interior to initiate a more detailed study to determine the hydrogeochemical processes that control water quality in the Stillwater WMA, and other nearby wetlands, and the resulting effects on biota, especially migratory birds. Present wetland size is about 10% of historical size; the dissolved- solids load in the water in these now-isolated wetlands has increased only moderately, but the dissolved-solids concentration has increased more than seven-fold. Wetland vegetation has diminished and species composition in flow water has shifted to predominant salt-tolerant species in many areas. Decreased vegetative cover for nesting is implicated in declining waterfowl production. Decreases in numbers or virtual absence of several wildlife species are attributed to degraded water quality. Results of toxicity tests indicate that water in some drains and wetland areas is acutely toxic to some fish and invertebrates. Toxicity is attributed to the combined presence of arsenic, boron, lithium, and molybdenum. Biological pathways are involved in the transport of mercury and selenium from agricultural drains to wetlands. Hatch success of both artificially incubated and field-reared duck eggs was greater than/= 90 percent; no teratogenesis was observed. Mercury in muscle tissue of waterfowl harvested from Carson Lake in October 1987 exceeded the human health criterion six-fold.

Hallock, Robert J., (Edited By); Hallock, Linda L.

1993-01-01

258

Chapter 1. Determination of elements in natural-water, biota, sediment, and soil samples using collision/reaction cell inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new analytical method for the determination of elements in filtered aqueous matrices using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been implemented at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory that uses collision/reaction cell technology to reduce molecular ion interferences. The updated method can be used to determine elements in filtered natural-water and other filtered aqueous matrices, including whole-water, biota, sediment, and soil digestates. Helium or hydrogen is used as the collision or reaction gas, respectively, to eliminate or substantially reduce interferences commonly resulting from sample-matrix composition. Helium is used for molecular ion interferences associated with the determination of As, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Mg, Na, Ni, V, W and Zn, whereas hydrogen is used for Ca, Fe, Se, and Si. Other elements that are not affected by molecular ion interference also can be determined simply by not introducing a collision/reaction gas into the cell. Analysis time is increased by about a factor of 2 over the previous method because of the additional data acquisition time in the hydrogen and helium modes. Method detection limits for As, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, Se, Si (as SiO2), V, W, and Zn, all of which use a collision/reaction gas, are 0.06 microgram per liter (?g/L) As, 0.04 milligram per liter (mg/L) Ca, 0.02 ?g/L Co, 0.02 ?g/L Cr, 0.04 ?g/L Cu, 1 ?g/L Fe, 0.007 mg/L K, 0.009 mg/L Mg, 0.09 mg/L Na, 0.05 ?g/L Ni, 0.04 ?g/L Se, 0.03 mg/L SiO2, 0.05 ?g/L V, 0.03 ?g/L W, and 0.04 ?g/L Zn. Most method detection limits are lower or relatively unchanged compared to earlier methods except for Co, K, Mg, Ni, SiO2, and Tl, which are less than a factor of 2 higher. Percentage bias for samples spiked at about one-third and two-thirds of the concentration of the highest calibration standard ranged from -8.1 to 7.9 percent for reagent water, -14 to 21 percent for surface water, and -16 to 16 percent for ground water. The percentage bias for reagent water spiked at trace-element concentrations of 0.5 to 3 ?g/L averaged 4.4 percent with a range of -6 to 16 percent, whereas the average percentage bias for Ca, K, Mg, Na, and SiO2 was 1.4 percent with a range of -4 to 10 percent for spikes of 0.5 to 3 mg/L. Elemental results for aqueous standard reference materials compared closely to the certified concentrations; all elements were within 1.5 F-pseudosigma of the most probable concentration. In addition, results from 25 filtered natural-water samples and 25 unfiltered natural-water digestates were compared with results from previously used methods using linear regression analysis. Slopes from the regression analyses averaged 0.98 and ranged from 0.87 to 1.29 for filtered natural-water samples; for unfiltered natural-water digestates, the average slope was 1.0 and ranged from 0.83 to 1.22. Tests showed that accurate measurements can be made for samples having specific conductance less than 7,500 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) without dilution; earlier ICP-MS methods required dilution for samples with specific conductance greater than 2,500 ?S/cm.

Garbarino, John R.; Kanagy, Leslie K.; Cree, Mark E.

2006-01-01

259

Soil food web properties explain ecosystem services across European land use systems  

PubMed Central

Intensive land use reduces the diversity and abundance of many soil biota, with consequences for the processes that they govern and the ecosystem services that these processes underpin. Relationships between soil biota and ecosystem processes have mostly been found in laboratory experiments and rarely are found in the field. Here, we quantified, across four countries of contrasting climatic and soil conditions in Europe, how differences in soil food web composition resulting from land use systems (intensive wheat rotation, extensive rotation, and permanent grassland) influence the functioning of soils and the ecosystem services that they deliver. Intensive wheat rotation consistently reduced the biomass of all components of the soil food web across all countries. Soil food web properties strongly and consistently predicted processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations, and they were a better predictor of these processes than land use. Processes of carbon loss increased with soil food web properties that correlated with soil C content, such as earthworm biomass and fungal/bacterial energy channel ratio, and were greatest in permanent grassland. In contrast, processes of N cycling were explained by soil food web properties independent of land use, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacterial channel biomass. Our quantification of the contribution of soil organisms to processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations shows that soil biota need to be included in C and N cycling models and highlights the need to map and conserve soil biodiversity across the world. PMID:23940339

de Vries, Franciska T.; Thébault, Elisa; Liiri, Mira; Birkhofer, Klaus; Tsiafouli, Maria A.; Bjørnlund, Lisa; Bracht Jørgensen, Helene; Brady, Mark Vincent; Christensen, Søren; de Ruiter, Peter C.; d’Hertefeldt, Tina; Frouz, Jan; Hedlund, Katarina; Hemerik, Lia; Hol, W. H. Gera; Hotes, Stefan; Mortimer, Simon R.; Setälä, Heikki; Sgardelis, Stefanos P.; Uteseny, Karoline; van der Putten, Wim H.; Wolters, Volkmar; Bardgett, Richard D.

2013-01-01

260

Digital Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Geographic information systems (GIS), once used predominantly by experts in cartography and computer programming, have become pervasive in everyday business and consumer use. This unit explores GIS in general as a technology about which much more can be learned, and it also explores applications of that technology. Students experience GIS technology through the use of Google Earth on the environmental topic of plastics in the ocean in an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The use of this topic in GIS makes the unit multidisciplinary, incorporating the physics of ocean currents, the chemistry associated with pollutant degradation and chemical sorption to organic-rich plastics, and ecological impact to aquatic biota.

National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,

261

Compilation of 1989 annual reports of the Navy ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. Volume 2. tabs C-F. Annual progress report, Jan-Dec 89  

SciTech Connect

This is the eighth compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications Systems Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of eight studies performed during 1989 near the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility -- Republic, Michigan. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships. Soil Amoeba: Arthropoda and Earthworms: Pollinating Insects: Small Mammals and Nesting Birds.

Not Available

1990-08-01

262

Compilation of 1986 annual reports of the Navy ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program, volume 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Navy is conducting a long-term program to monitor for possible effects from the operation of its Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System to resident biota and their ecological relationships. This report documents progress of the following studies: soil amoeba; soil and litter arthropoda and earthworm studies; biological studies on pollinating insects: megachilid bees; and small vertebrates: small mammals and nesting birds.

1987-07-01

263

Detailed study of irrigation drainage in and near wildlife management areas, west-central Nevada, 1987-90; Part C, Summary of irrigation-drainage effects on water quality, bottom sediment, and biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents a summary of the detailed scientific study of Stillwater Wildlife Management Area and other nearby wetlands in west-central Nevada during 1987-90. The work was funded by the National Irrigation Water Quality Program of the U.S. Department of the Interior with the overall objectives of determining (1) the extent, magnitude, and effects of selected water-quality constituents associated with irrigation drainage on fish, wildlife, and human health, and (2) the sources and exposure pathways that cause contamination where adverse effects are documented. Much of the information in this report was summarized from two previously published interpretive reports that were completed to fulfill study objectives. Where applicable, data for the study area from other published sources also were utilized. The results of these studies indicate that the aquatic biota in natural wetlands of the Carson Desert are adversely affected by hydrological and geochemical sources and processes in the Newlands Irrigation Project area. Reactions between water and naturally occurring minerals in the shallow alluvial aquifer increase concentrations of potentially toxic constituents in ground water that eventually enters the wetlands. Once in the wetlands, these constituents are furhter concentrated by evaporation and transpiration. Water from some agricultural drains that enter Stillwater WMA was acutely toxic to aquatic organisms. The drains in the agricultural areas, which eventually discharge to the wetlands, were also implicated as sites of uptake of selenium and mercury by aquatic organisms.

Hoffman, Ray J.

1993-01-01

264

An Integrated Case Study for Evaluating the Impacts of an Oil Refinery Effluent on Aquatic Biota in the Delaware River: Sediment Core Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to (1) determine if historical exceedences of oil and grease concentrations above the limits allowed in the National Pollution Elimination Discharge System permit for the wastewater treatment facility of Motiva Enterprises LLC Refinery, Delaware City, Delaware, could be determined from the sedimentary records of the Delaware River and, if so, (2) were the concentrations

Clark R. Alexander; Richard F. Lee; Dennis T. Burton; Lenwood W. Hall Jr

2005-01-01

265

Selenium source identification and biogeochemical processes controlling selenium in surface water and biota, Kendrick Reclamation Project, Wyoming, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The major tributaries draining the Kendrick Reclamation Project (KRP) account for an average of 52% of the total Se load measured in the North Platte River downstream from Casper, Wyoming. The Casper Creek drainage basin contributed the largest Se load of the five tributary sites to the North Platte River. The 4-d average Se concentration in water samples from one site in the part of the North Platte River that receives irrigation return flows exceeded the 5 ??g/l U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's aquatic life criterion five time during a 50-d monitoring period in 1989. In agreement with the water-quality data, muscle and liver tissue rom rainbow trout collected from the same part of the North Platte River had Se concentrations exceeding levels known to cause reproductive failure and chronic Se poisoning. On the basis of Se: Cl, 18O/16O and D/H ratios in water from Goose and Rasmus Lee Lakes (closed-basin systems), the large Se concentrations in those lakes were derived by natural evaporation of irrigation water without leaching of soluble forms of Se from soil or rocks. Water samples from Thirtythree Mile Reservoir and Illco Pond (flow-through systems) showed considerable enrichment in Se over evaporative concentration, presumably due to leaching and desorption of Se from soil and rock. The Se: Cl ratios of irrigation drain water collected from the KRP indicate that leaching and desorption of soluble forms of Se from soils and rocks are the dominant processes in drain water. Results of a Wilcoxon matched-pairs test for 43 paired drain-water samples collected during June and August 1988, indicated there is a statistically larger concentration of Se (0.01 significance level) during the June sampling period. The larger concentrations of Se and other chemical constitutents during the early part of the irrigation season probably were due to dissolution of seleniferous salts that have accumulated in soils within the KRP since the last irrigation season. The large Se concentrations in water samples from wetland sites in the KRP were reflected in the aquatic-bird food chain. Most waterfowl and shorebirds nesting at the KRP showed Se concentrations in livers and eggs greater than levels suspected of causing adverse reproductive effects. ?? 1993.

Naftz, D.L.; See, R.B.; Ramirez, P.

1993-01-01

266

Surface-water-quality assessment of the upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin; pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota, 1975-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distribution of pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota in the upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin was examined from 1987 through 1990 as part of the pilot National Water-Quality Assesssment Program conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. Historical data for water and sediment collected from 1975 through 1986 were similar to data collected from 1987 through 1990. Some compounds were detected in concentrations that exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria. Results from pesticide sampling at four stations in 1988 and 1989 identified several agricultural pesticides that were detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in urban areas than in agricultural areas. Results from herbicide sampling at 17 stations in the Kankakee and Iroquois River Basins in 1990 indicated that atrazine concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for drinking water during runoff periods. Results from sampling for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in water indicate that, with one exception, all stations at which more than one compound was detected were within 2 miles downstream from the nearest point source. Detections at two stations in the Chicago urban area accounted for 37 percent of the total number of detections. Concentrations of tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and 1,2-dichlorethane from stations in the Des Plaines River Basin exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for drinking water in one and two samples from the two stations in the Chicago area. Phenols and pentachlorophenols were detected most frequently in the Des Plaines River Basin where point-source discharges were common. Phenol concentrations were significantly different among the Des Plaines, Kankakee, and Fox River Basins. Phenols and pentachlorophenols never exceeded the general use and secondary contact standards. Results from a 1989 synoptic survey of semivolatile organic compounds in sediment indicate that these compounds were detected most frequently at sites in the Chicago urban area. Of the 17 stations at which 10 or more compounds were detected, 14 were located in the Des Plaines River subbasin, and 1 was on the Illinois River mainstem. As was the case with organic compounds in water, each of these sites was located within 2 miles downstream from point sources. Biota samples were collected and analyzed for organochlorines and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in 1989 and 1990. The most commonly detected compound in both years was p,p'-DDE. National Academy of Science recommendations for chlordane and dieldrin for protection of predators were exceeded in 19 and 10 samples, respectively, when the 1989 and 1990 data were combined. In the nine fish-fillet samples collected in 1989, concentrations exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fish-tissue criteria in nine fillets for p,p'-DDE and five fillets for dieldrin.

Sullivan, Daniel J.; Stinson, Troy W.; Crawford, J. Kent; Schmidt, Arthur R.; Colman, John A.

1998-01-01

267

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge and adjacent areas of the Milk River basin, northeastern Montana, 1986-87  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of trace elements, radiochemicals, and pesticides in the Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge lakes generally were not substantially larger than those in the water supplied from Dodson South Canal or in irrigation drainage. Concentrations of arsenic (47 micrograms/L), uranium (43 microg/L), and vanadium (51 microg/L) in Dry Lake Unit, and boron (1,000 microg/L) in Lake Bowdoin were notably larger than at other sites. Zinc concentrations in an irrigation drain (56 microg/L) and two shallow domestic wells (40 and 47 microg/L) were elevated relative to other sites. Concentrations of gross alpha radiation (64 picocuries/L) and gross beta radiation (71 picocuries/L) were elevated in Dry Lake Unit. Pesticides concentrations at all sites were 0.08 microg/L or less. Water use guidelines concentrations for boron, cadmium, uranium, zinc, and gross alpha radiation were slightly exceeded at several sites. In general, trace-constituent concentrations measured in the water do not indicate any potential toxicity problems in Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge; however, highwater conditions in 1986 probably caused dilution of dissolved constituents compared to recent dry years. Trace element concentrations in bottom sediments of the refuge lakes were generally similar to background concentrations in the soils. The only exception was Dry Lake Unit, which had concentrations of chromium (99 micrograms/g), copper (37 microg/g), nickel (37 microg/g), vanadium (160 microg/g), and zinc (120 microg/g) that were about double the mean background concentrations. The maximum selenium concentration in bottom sediment was 0.6 microg/g. Pesticide concentrations in bottom sediments were less than analytical detection limits at all sites. With few exceptions, concentrations of trace elements and pesticides in biota generally were less than values known to produce harmful effects on growth or reproduction. (Lantz-PTT)

Lambing, J.H.; Jones, W.E.; Sutphin, J.W.

1988-01-01

268

Determination of selenomethionine and seleno-methyl-selenocysteine in biota by ultrasonic-assisted enzymatic digestion and multi-shot stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

A method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption (TD)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized for the determination of seleno-methyl-selenocysteine (SeMetSeCys) and selenomethionine (SeMet) in biota samples. Aliquots of freeze-dried tissue, a mixture of protease XIV-lipase and water were sonicated for 2min. After extraction, the extract was separated by centrifugation and subjected to derivatization and SBSE-TD-GC-MS. The parameters affecting derivatization, absorption and desorption steps were investigated. The optimized conditions consist of a derivatization with 40?L of ethyl chloroformate (ECF) in 400?L of a water:ethanol:pyridine (60:32:8) mixture, followed by dilution to 1.5mL of 70g NaClL(-1) in water at neutral pH and an extraction step using 10mm×1mm PDMS stir bar, stirring at 800rpm for 20min at room temperature (23±1°C). Three stir bars were used for the extraction of three different aliquots of the same sample and then placed in a single glass desorption liner and simultaneously desorbed for GC-MS analysis. The desorption step required the following conditions: 300°C (desorption temperature), 6min (desorption time), 50mLmin(-1) (vent flow) and -5°C (cryotrapping temperature). The method provided precise (8.1%) and accurate results in the mgSekg(-1) range (using the selected-ion monitoring-SIM mode) against certified reference material SELM-1 yeast, with recoveries higher than 80% for spiked algae and clams samples. PMID:23497851

Mellano, F; Bujalance, M; Giráldez, I; Ruiz-Azcona, P; Sánchez-Rodas, D; Morales, E

2013-07-26

269

Long-term growth-increment chronologies reveal diverse influences of climate forcing on freshwater and forest biota in the Pacific Northwest.  

PubMed

Analyses of how organisms are likely to respond to a changing climate have focused largely on the direct effects of warming temperatures, though changes in other variables may also be important, particularly the amount and timing of precipitation. Here, we develop a network of eight growth-increment width chronologies for freshwater mussel species in the Pacific Northwest, United States and integrate them with tree-ring data to evaluate how terrestrial and aquatic indicators respond to hydroclimatic variability, including river discharge and precipitation. Annual discharge averaged across water years (October 1-September 30) was highly synchronous among river systems and imparted a coherent pattern among mussel chronologies. The leading principal component of the five longest mussel chronologies (1982-2003; PC1mussel ) accounted for 47% of the dataset variability and negatively correlated with the leading principal component of river discharge (PC1discharge ; r = -0.88; P < 0.0001). PC1mussel and PC1discharge were closely linked to regional wintertime precipitation patterns across the Pacific Northwest, the season in which the vast majority of annual precipitation arrives. Mussel growth was also indirectly related to tree radial growth, though the nature of the relationships varied across the landscape. Negative correlations occurred in forests where tree growth tends to be limited by drought while positive correlations occurred in forests where tree growth tends to be limited by deep or lingering snowpack. Overall, this diverse assemblage of chronologies illustrates the importance of winter precipitation to terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems and suggests that a complexity of climate responses must be considered when estimating the biological impacts of climate variability and change. PMID:25258169

Black, Bryan A; Dunham, Jason B; Blundon, Brett W; Brim-Box, Jayne; Tepley, Alan J

2015-02-01

270

Detailed study of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Klamath Basin, California and Oregon, 1990-92  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The effect of irrigation drainage on the water quality and wildlife of the Klamath Basin in California and Oregon was evaluated during 1990-92 as part of the National Irrigation Water Quality Program of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The study focused on land serviced by the Bureau of Reclamation Klamath Project, which supplies irrigation water to agricultural land in the Klamath Basin and the Lost River Basin. The Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuges, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are in the study area. These refuges provide critical resting and breeding habitat for waterfowl on the Pacific flyway and are dependent on irrigation drainwater from upstream agriculture for most of their water supply. Water-quality characteristics throughout the study area were typical of highly eutrophic systems during the summer months of 1991 and 1992. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations and pH tended to fluctuate each day in response to diurnal patterns of photosynthesis, and frequently exceeded criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were generally at or above threshold levels characteristic of eutrophic lakes and streams. At most sites the bulk of dissolved nitrogen was organically bound. Elevated ammonia concentrations were common in the study area, especially down- stream of drain inputs. High pH of water increased the toxicity of ammonia, and concentrations exceeded criteria at sites upstream and downstream of irrigated land. Concentrations of ammonia in samples from small drains on the Tule Lake refuge leaseland were higher than those measured in the larger, integrating drains at primary monitoring sites. The mean ammonia concentration in leaseland drains [1.21 milligrams per liter (mg/L)] was significantly higher than the mean concentration in canals delivering water to the leaseland fields (0.065 mg/L) and higher than concentrations reported to be lethal to Daphnia magna (median lethal concentration of 0.66 mg/L). Dissolved- oxygen concentrations also were lower, and Daphnia survivability measured during in situ bioassays was correspondingly lower in the leaseland drains than in water delivery canals. In static laboratory bioassays, water samples collected at the primary monitoring sites caused toxicity in up to 78 percent of Lemna minor tests, in up to 49 percent of Xenopus laevis tests, in 17 percent and 8 percent of Hyalella azteca and Pimephales promelas tests, respectively, and 0 percent in Daphnia magna tests. In situ exposure at the sites caused mortality in more than 83 percent of Pimephales tests and in more than 41 percent of Daphnia and Hyalella tests. Much of the observed toxicity appears to have been caused by low dissolved oxygen, high pH, and ammonia. Although water in the study area was toxic to a variety of organisms, no statistically significant differences in the degree of toxicity between sites were observed above or below irrigated agricultural land in any of the bioassays. Pesticides were frequently detected in water samples collected at the monitoring sites during the 1991 and 1992 irrigation seasons. Among the most frequently detected compounds were the herbicides simazine, metribuzin, EPTC, and metolachlor and the insecticide terbufos. All the insecticides detected were at concentrations substantially below acute toxicity values reported for aquatic organisms. The herbicide acrolein has been used extensively in the basin to manage aquatic plant growth in irrigation canals and drains. The concentration of acrolein was monitored in a canal near Tule Lake after an application in order to evaluate the potential for the pesticide to be transported to refuge waters. Although acrolein concentrations were toxic to fish in the channels adjacent to Tule Lake, very little of the canal water entered the refuge during the monitoring period. Organochlorine pesticide concentrations in 25 surficial sediment samples collected in 1990 were below bas

Dileanis, P.D.; Schwarzbach, S.E.; Bennett, Jewel

1996-01-01

271

Biological indicators for monitoring water quality of MTF canals system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Biological models, diversity indexes, were developed to predict environmental effects of NASA's Mississippi test facility (MTF) chemical operations on canal systems in the area. To predict the effects on local streams, a physical model of unpolluted streams was established. The model is fed by artesian well water free of background levels of pollutants. The species diversity and biota composition of unpolluted MTF stream was determined; resulting information will be used to form baseline data for future comparisons. Biological modeling was accomplished by adding controlled quantities or kinds of chemical pollutants and evaluating the effects of these chemicals on the biological life of the stream.

Sethi, S. L.

1975-01-01

272

Land system architecture: Using land systems to adapt and mitigate global environmental change  

SciTech Connect

Land systems (mosaics of land use and cover) are human environment systems, the changes in which drive and respond to local to global environmental changes, climate to macro-economy (Foley et al., 2005). Changes in land systems have been the principal proximate cause in the loss of habitats and biota globally, long contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gases, and hypothesized to have triggered climate changes in the early Holocene (Ruddiman, 2003). Land use, foremost agriculture, is the largest source of biologically active nitrogen to the atmosphere, critical to sources and sinks of carbon, and a major component in the hydrologic cycle (e.g., Bouwman et al., 2011). Changes in land systems also affect regional climate (Feddema et al., 2005; Pielke, 2005), ecosystem functions, and the array of ecosystem services they provide. Land systems, therefore, are a central feature of how humankind manages its relationship with nature-intended or not, or whether this relationship proceeds sustainably or not.

Turner, B.L.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Verbug, Peter H.; Murray, Alan T.

2013-04-01

273

NMITA: Neogene Marine Biota of Tropical America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hosted by the Department of Geoscience, University of Iowa, and funded by the National Science Foundation, NMITA is an online biotic database "containing images and data for taxa used in analyses of Tropical American biodiversity over the past 25 million years." The Website offers Taxonomic Lists (with links to images and data for individual taxa), Morphologic Characters (currently for Zooxanthellate Corals and Elasmobranchs and Teleosteans), Identification Keys (currently for Zooxanthellate Corals), Occurrences in the Dominican Republic, and Instructional Aids. Images and data are provided for the following individual taxa: Bivalves, Gastropods, Bryozoans, Azooxanthellate Corals, Zooxanthellate Corals, Benthic Forams, Ostracodes, and Elasmobranchs and Teleosteans. Although Panama data will eventually be included, the site currently highlights data from the Dominican Republic.

274

Soil biota, ecosystem services and land productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The soil environment is likely the most complex biological community. Soil organisms are extremely diverse and contribute to a wide range of ecosystem services that are essential to the sustainable function of natural and managed ecosystems. The soil organism community can have direct and indirect impacts on land productivity. Direct impacts are those where specific organisms affect crop yield immediately.

Edmundo Barrios

2007-01-01

275

Toxaphene in Great Lakes biota and air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Toxaphene is a complex mixture of at least 600 hexa- through decachlorinated bornanes and bornenes, which was used as an insecticide in the United States from the 1950's until 1982, when it was banned. Toxaphene is ubiquitous in the environment, probably because of its atmospheric transport away from areas of use. Toxaphene's complex nature makes accurate quantitation difficult. I have developed a computer program to automate quantitation, thus decreasing the time required for analysis while maintaining precise quantitation. I have shown that toxaphene in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) taken from Lake Superior have not decreased as they have in the four other Great Lakes from the time of the ban though 1992. This result could be due to three possibilities: ( a) There had been a food chain perturbation that made the 1982 concentrations unusually low. (b) The physical properties of Lake Superior make the loss rate significantly lower than the other Great Lakes. (c) There are current sources of toxaphene entering the Lake Superior basin. I analyzed an extended time series of lake trout from Lake Superior and from northern Lake Michigan to test the first two hypotheses. The concentrations of toxaphene have been constant in trout from Lake Superior since the late 1970's, so hypothesis a can be negated. The northern Lake Michigan samples did not decline as greatly as the southern basin samples, so hypothesis b can not be disproved. To determine the atmospheric deposition of toxaphene to Lake Superior, I analyzed air samples collected every twelve days for sixteen months at Eagle Harbor, Michigan. The concentrations of toxaphene in these samples are similar to those found in recent studies of air collected at Traverse City, MI., but significantly lower than samples taken at a land based site in southern Ontario in 1988 and 1989. This difference in concentration may (or may not) be due to differences in sampling times or locations or in quantitation protocols. These finding imply that Lake Superior is not receiving a unique atmospheric burden, but, because I have not explored terrestrial inputs, I cannot fully nullify hypothesis c.

Glassmeyer, Susan Theresa

1998-11-01

276

Compilation of 1986 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological-monitoring program. Volume 2. Tabs D-G. Annual progress report, January-December 1986  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Navy is conducting a long-term program to monitor for possible effects from the operation of its Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System to resident biota and their ecological relationships. This report documents progress of the following studies: Soil Amoeba; Soil and Litter Arthropoda and Earthworm Studies; Biological Studies on Pollinating insects: Megachilid Bees; and Small Vertebrates: Small Mammals and Nesting Birds.

Not Available

1987-07-01

277

Detailed study of selenium and selected constituents in water, bottom sediment, soil, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the San Juan River area, New Mexico, 1991-95  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In response to increasing concern about the quality of irrigation drainage and its potential effects on fish, wildlife, and human health, the U.S. Department of the Interior began the National Irrigation Water Quality Program (NIWQP) to investigate these concerns at irrigation projects sponsored by the Department. The San Juan River in northwestern New Mexico was one of the areas designated for study. Study teams composed of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs collected water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples at 61 sites in the San Juan River area during 1993-94. Supplemental data collection conducted during 1991-95 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its contractor extended the time period and sampling sites available for analysis. Analytical chemistry performed on samples indicated that most potentially toxic elements other than selenium generally were not high enough to be of concern to fish, wildlife, and human health. Element concentrations in some water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples exceeded applicable standards and criteria suggested by researchers in current literature. Selenium concentrations in water samples from 28 sites in the study area exceeded the 2-microgram-per-liter wildlife-habitat standard. Vanadium concentrations in water exceeded the 100-microgram-per-liter standard for livestock-drinking water at one site. In biota, selenium and aluminum concentrations regularly equaled or exceeded avian dietary threshold concentrations. In bottom sediment and soil, element concentrations above the upper limit of the baseline range for western soils were: selenium, 24 exceedances; lead, 2 exceedances; molybdenum, 2 exceedances; strontium, 4 exceedances; and zinc, 4 exceedances. Concentrations of total selenium in bottom-sediment and soil samples were significantly greater for Cretaceous than for non-Cretaceous soil types in the study area and were generally similar for habitats within and outside irrigation-affected areas. Mean and median total-selenium concentrations in samples from areas with Cretaceous soil types were 4.6 and 2.2 micrograms per gram, respectively. Mean and median total-selenium concentrations in samples from areas with non-Cretaceous soil types were 0.6 and 0.15 microgram per gram, respectively. Samples from the study area had low concentrations of organic constituents. Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls were detected in a few biological samples at low concentrations. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds were not detected in whole-water samples collected using conventional water-sampling techniques. In tests involving the use of semipermeable-membrane devices to supplement conventional water assays for PAH's, low concentrations of PAH's were found at several locations in the Hammond Irrigation Supply Canal, but were not detected in the Hammond ponds at the downstream reach of the Hammond irrigation service area. PAH compounds do not appear to reach the San Juan River through the Hammond Canal. Data indicate that water samples from irrigation-drainage-affected habitats had increased mean selenium concentrations compared with samples from irrigation-delivery habitat. The mean selenium concentration in water was greatest at seeps and tributaries draining irrigated land (17 micrograms per liter); less in irrigation drains and in ponds on irrigated land (6 micrograms per liter); and least in backwater, the San Juan River, and irrigation-supply water (0.5 - 0.6 microgram per liter). Statistical tests imply that irrigation significantly increases selenium concentrations in water samples when a Department of the Interior irrigation project is developed on selenium-rich sediments. Water samples from sites with Cretaceous soils had signi

Thomas, Carole L.; Wilson, R.M.; Lusk, J.D.; Bristol, R.S.; Shineman, A.R.

1998-01-01

278

Field information management systems for DNA barcoding.  

PubMed

Information capture pertaining to the "what?", "where?", and "when?" of biodiversity data is critical to maintain data integrity, interoperability, and utility. Moreover, DNA barcoding and other biodiversity studies must adhere to agreed upon data standards in order to effectively contextualize the biota encountered. A field information management system (FIMS) is presented that locks down metadata associated with collecting events, specimens, and tissues. Emphasis is placed on ease of use and flexibility of operation. Standardized templates for data entry are validated through a flexible, project-oriented validation process that assures adherence to data standards and thus data quality. Furthermore, we provide export functionality to existing cloud-based solutions, including Google Fusion Tables and Flickr to allow sharing of these data elements across research collaboration teams and other potential data harvesters via API services. PMID:22684960

Deck, John; Gross, Joyce; Stones-Havas, Steven; Davies, Neil; Shapley, Rebecca; Meyer, Christopher

2012-01-01

279

Integrated Taxonomic Information System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Six US federal agencies have worked together to develop an efficient system for naming and classifying all of nature's living organisms. As the basic currency of scientific research, management, and education, ITIS is "a database of the current names and classifications of all biota." The website is organized into three main sections: About ITIS (general overview), Data Access (how to query the ITIS database), and TRED (the taxonomic experts behind the ITIS database). The core of the site is the Data Access section, which describes how to locate, access, and download scientific names and other information for a taxon. The ITIS database may be queried by full or partial Scientific Name, Vernacular (Common) Name, or TSN (Taxonomic Serial Number). Typical returns are Scientific Name, Vernacular (Common) Name, TSN, Author, Taxonomic Rank, and Synonym Name or TSN; note that the review process is still underway, and information is constantly added. In addition to the database, users are instructed on how to submit data to the ITIS database or match a list of taxa to the ITIS Database. A final, useful feature is the Taxonomic Workbench (free for downloading), "a windows-based software tool for entry of taxonomic information into ITIS' relational database format." Information on how to participate in this extraordinary and ambitious effort is provided at the site.

280

System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the anionic structures of the molten CaO-SiO2-P2O5 system. The results show that the average first nearest-neighbor distances for Si-O and P-O pairs are 1.61 and 1.53 Å, respectively. As expected, above 98 pct P and 95 pct Si show fourfold coordination and form tetrahedral structures. Due to the high basicity, nonbridging oxygen occupies a predominant position in Si and P tetrahedron. Based on the oxygen number of different types, the structures of both Si and P tetrahedron were classified as Q 0, Q 1, Q 2, Q 3, and Q 4, where the superscript referred to the number of bridging oxygen atoms. With the substitution of P2O5 for SiO2, Q 0 decreased and other type of Q i units increased. For Si tetrahedron, Q 2 and Q 3 show most notable change, for P tetrahedron, Q 1and Q 2 show the most notable change. The change of Q i units for Si tetrahedron is larger than that for P tetrahedron. The concentration of free oxygen decreases remarkably with the increase of P2O5 content. The Si-O-P linkage is energetically more favorable than Si-O-Si and P-O-P linkages. P ion has a tendency to promote the polymerization of phosphosilicate melts.

Diao, Jiang; Fan, Guozheng; Liu, Xuan; Xie, Bing

2014-10-01

281

Biogeochemistry of mercury in a river-reservoir system: impact of an inactive chloralkali plant on the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir, Virginia and Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Elevated mercury concentrations in fish species from the North Fork of the Holston River were observed in the early 1970's. The source of the mercury was a chloralkali plant which had ceased operation in 1972. Mercury continues to be released to the river from two large (approx. 40-ha) waste disposal ponds at the plant site. This report presents results of a study of the emission of mercury to the environment from the abandoned waste ponds and of the distribution of mercury in water, sediment, and biota of the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir System in Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

Hildebrand, S. G.; Lindberg, S. E.; Turner, R. R.; Huckabee, J. W.; Strand, R. H.; Lund, J. R.; Andren, A. W.

1980-08-01

282

Global analysis of river systems: from Earth system controls to Anthropocene syndromes.  

PubMed Central

Continental aquatic systems from rivers to the coastal zone are considered within two perspectives: (i) as a major link between the atmosphere, pedosphere, biosphere and oceans within the Earth system with its Holocene dynamics, and (ii) as water and aquatic biota resources progressively used and transformed by humans. Human pressures have now reached a state where the continental aquatic systems can no longer be considered as being controlled by only Earth system processes, thus defining a new era, the Anthropocene. Riverine changes, now observed at the global scale, are described through a first set of syndromes (flood regulation, fragmentation, sediment imbalance, neo-arheism, salinization, chemical contamination, acidification, eutrophication and microbial contamination) with their related causes and symptoms. These syndromes have direct influences on water uses, either positive or negative. They also modify some Earth system key functions such as sediment, water, nutrient and carbon balances, greenhouse gas emissions and aquatic biodiversity. Evolution of river syndromes over the past 2000 years is complex: it depends upon the stages of regional human development and on natural conditions, as illustrated here for the chemical contamination syndrome. River damming, eutrophication and generalized decrease of river flow due to irrigation are some of the other global features of river changes. Future management of river systems should also consider these long-term impacts on the Earth system. PMID:14728790

Meybeck, Michel

2003-01-01

283

Managing soil microbial communities in grain production systems through cropping practices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cropping practices can significantly influence the composition and activity of soil microbial communities with consequences to plant growth and production. Plant type can affect functional capacity of different groups of biota in the soil surrounding their roots, rhizosphere, influencing plant nutrition, beneficial symbioses, pests and diseases and overall plant health and crop production. The interaction between different players in the rhizosphere is due to the plethora of carbon and nutritional compounds, root-specific chemical signals and growth regulators that originate from the plant and are modulated by the physico-chemical properties of soils. A number of plant and environmental factors and management practices can influence the quantity and quality of rhizodeposition and in turn affect the composition of rhizosphere biota communities, microbe-fauna interactions and biological processes. Some of the examples of rhizosphere interactions that are currently considered important are: proliferation of plant and variety specific genera or groups of microbiota, induction of genes involved in symbiosis and virulence, promoter activity in biocontrol agents and genes correlated with root adhesion and border cell quality and quantity. The observation of variety-based differences in rhizodeposition and associated changes in rhizosphere microbial diversity and function suggests the possibility for the development of varieties with specific root-microbe interactions targeted for soil type and environment i.e. designer rhizospheres. Spatial location of microorganisms in the heterogeneous field soil matrix can have significant impacts on biological processes. Therefore, for rhizosphere research to be effective in variable seasonal climate and soil conditions, it must be evaluated in the field and within a farming systems context. With the current focus on security of food to feed the growing global populations through sustainable agricultural production systems there is a need to develop innovative cropping systems that are both economically and environmentally sustainable.

Gupta, Vadakattu

2013-04-01

284

Disjunct distributions of freshwater snails testify to a central role of the Congo system in shaping biogeographical patterns in Africa  

PubMed Central

Background The formation of the East African Rift System has decisively influenced the distribution and evolution of tropical Africa’s biota by altering climate conditions, by creating basins for large long-lived lakes, and by affecting the catchment and drainage directions of river systems. However, it remains unclear how rifting affected the biogeographical patterns of freshwater biota through time on a continental scale, which is further complicated by the scarcity of molecular data from the largest African river system, the Congo. Results We study these biogeographical patterns using a fossil-calibrated multi-locus phylogeny of the gastropod family Viviparidae. This group allows reconstructing drainage patterns exceptionally well because it disperses very poorly in the absence of existing freshwater connections. Our phylogeny covers localities from major drainage basins of tropical Africa and reveals highly disjunct sister-group relationships between (a) the endemic viviparids of Lake Malawi and populations from the Middle Congo as well as between (b) the Victoria region and the Okavango/Upper Zambezi area. Conclusions The current study testifies to repeated disruptions of the distribution of the Viviparidae during the formation of the East African Rift System, and to a central role of the Congo River system for the distribution of the continent’s freshwater fauna during the late Cenozoic. By integrating our results with previous findings on palaeohydrographical connections, we provide a spatially and temporarily explicit model of historical freshwater biogeography in tropical Africa. Finally, we review similarities and differences in patterns of vertebrate and invertebrate dispersal. Amongst others we argue that the closest relatives of present day viviparids in Lake Malawi are living in the Middle Congo River, thus shedding new light on the origin of the endemic fauna of this rift lake. PMID:24597925

2014-01-01

285

Extremely-low-frequency (ELF) communications system ecological monitoring program: Summary of 1990 progress. Technical report, 1 Jan-31 Dec 90  

SciTech Connect

A long term ecological monitoring program is being conducted to monitor for possible electromagnetic effects that operation of the U.S. Navy's ELF Communications System might have to resident biota and their ecological relationships. Monitoring studies were selected through a peer reviewed, competitive bidding process in mid-1982, and work on most studies began in late summer of that year. Preliminary activities of the program consisted of site selection, characterization of critical study aspects, and validation of assumptions made in original proposals. Data collection for studies at the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility (NRTF)-Clam Lake, Wisconsin was completed, as scheduled, during 1990. Data collection for studies at the NRTF-Republic, Michigan is planned to continue through 1992. This report summarizes the progress of the monitoring program during 1990. To date, investigators conclude that on effects have occurred on biota exposed to EM Fields produced by either a fully operational or an intermittently energized ELF transmitting produced by either a fully operational or an intermittently energized ELF transmitting facility.

Abromavage, M.M.; Zapotosky, J.E.

1991-12-01

286

PROTECTION OF CAVE SPRINGS CAVE BIOTA AND GROUNDWATER BASIN  

E-print Network

of Arkansas Stable Isotope Laboratory is acknowledged. GIS data was graciously provided by the US, Ozark Underground Laboratory, provided information on the cave's groundwater basin boundary. Cover image knowledgeable management of them. Cave Springs Cave should continue to be monitored to help fill this void

Soerens, Thomas

287

LINKING STORMFLOW HYDROLOGY AND BIOTA IN SUBURBAN STREAMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Suburban land development has been found to alter the hydrology of landscapes, changing streamflow transient behavior, which may contribute to the typical negative impacts of development on aquatic ecosystems. The linkages between residential development, hydrologic response, and...

288

Interactions between soil biota and the effects on geomorphological features  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaction of animals with abiotic features of their environment has long been known to cause alterations to geomorphic features, and these interactions may cause feedback loops that further alter geomorphic features and animal communities. This paper samples the literature on selected burrowing animals in western North America, and discusses the interactions of animals with abiotic features of the environment and with each other, and the resulting impacts on geomorphic features and each other. As expected, burrowing characteristics of animals influence geomorphological processes. For example, pocket gophers and certain ground squirrels that burrow horizontal tunnels on sloping grounds seem to have significant impacts on horizontal movement of soils, whereas prairie dogs and harvester ants have more impact on vertical movement of soils. Burrowing animals, in general, increase the patchiness of the environment, which creates localized patch habitat for other plants and animals, thereby increasing biodiversity at the landscape scale. Burrowing animals influence and are influenced by microbes: sylvatic plague wiped out large populations of prairie dogs, earthworms cause major changes in soil microflora, pocket gophers and harvester ants cause changes in mycorrhizal communities, which in turn impact plant communities.

Zaitlin, Beryl; Hayashi, Masaki

2012-07-01

289

SUSPENDED AND DISSOLVED SOLIDS EFFECTS ON FRESHWATER BIOTA: A REVIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

It is widely recognized that suspended and dissolved solids in lakes, rivers, streams, and reservoirs affect water quality. In this report the research needs appropriate to setting freshwater quality criteria or standards for suspended solids (not including bedload) and dissolved...

290

The Luoping biota: exceptional preservation, and new evidence on  

E-print Network

extinction of all time, the end-Permian event, which killed 80­90% of species [1­3]. The 10­20% of species for a short time as `disaster taxa', or (iii) rep- resent the final remnants of formerly significant clades events, post-extinction ecosystems may resemble those before the crisis [8]: the speed of the bounce

Benton, Michael

291

COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN CONTAMINANT AQUATIC BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATA  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous studies have been done to determine the levels of chemical contaminants in fish and sediment in the Columbia River Basin. These studies were done because of concern that releases of toxic Chemicals into the Columbia River Basin may be impacting health and the environment...

292

Mercury accumulation in biota of Thunder Creek, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect

Collection of biological organisms was undertaken to investigate the bioaccumulation of mercury in the food chain, the results of which are reported. Two sites were selected on Thunder Creek; the control or background site, site number 2, is located approximately 2.5 km upstream, from site number 1. The selection of organisms for analysis was based on the presence and abundance of each at both locations. Only crayfish (Orconcetes virilis) pearl dace (Semotilus margarita) and brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) were found to be sufficiently abundant. The importance of the data obtained is the significant difference in concentration between the upstream and downstream sites on Thunder Creek. This difference shows that more mercury is available to the biological community at site number 1 than at site number 2 confirming that mercury in the contaminated sediments is being methylated and taken up into the food chain.

Munro, D.J.; Gummer, W.D.

1980-12-01

293

EFFECTS OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS ON MARINE BENTHIC BIOTA AND COMMUNITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Our understanding of the effects of contaminants on benthic organisms lags well behind that for water column species because of the way in which sediments mediate bioavailability and because test protocols using infaunal organism are still in the developmental stage. lthough quan...

294

MOIRA-PLUS: A decision support system for the management of complex fresh water ecosystems contaminated by radionuclides and heavy metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accidental release of radioactive substances into the environment leads to the necessity of applying suitable countermeasures for the restoration of the polluted environment. However, despite their obvious benefits, such interventions may result in detrimental effects of an economic, ecological and social nature that must be carefully evaluated. MOIRA-PLUS is a PC-based user-friendly, computerised decision support system (DSS) that helps decision makers to choose optimal countermeasure strategies for different kinds of aquatic ecosystems and contamination scenarios. The DSS MOIRA-PLUS is based on: Validated models to evaluate the behaviour of radionuclides in contaminated water bodies and biota and to assess the effect of countermeasures on contamination levels; Models to assess the radiation dose to people and biota (fish) by relevant exposure pathways, the effect of countermeasures, and the associated economic impact; A multi-attribute analysis (MAA) module to evaluate the effectiveness of different countermeasure strategies by accounting for the social, ecological and economic detriments and costs in relation to their benefits; A software system consisting of: (1) software realisation of the mathematical models; (2) a Geographic Information System (GIS) and associated databases to select the aquatic system of interest and, if necessary, the default environmental data required to run the models; (3) a graphical user interface (GUI); (4) an operating system connecting all the above parts. The flexible structures of the environmental models implemented in MOIRA-PLUS DSS give the potential for the application of these models to several other types of pollutants, such as heavy metals. The DSS can be applied to complex water systems comprising lakes, reservoirs and rivers. In this paper, the main principles underpinning the functioning of the DSS MOIRA-PLUS are described and discussed.

Monte, Luigi; Brittain, John E.; Gallego, Eduardo; Håkanson, Lars; Hofman, Dmitry; Jiménez, Antonio

2009-05-01

295

Evolution of centralized nervous systems: Two schools of evolutionary thought  

PubMed Central

Understanding the evolution of centralized nervous systems requires an understanding of metazoan phylogenetic interrelationships, their fossil record, the variation in their cephalic neural characters, and the development of these characters. Each of these topics involves comparative approaches, and both cladistic and phenetic methodologies have been applied. Our understanding of metazoan phylogeny has increased greatly with the cladistic analysis of molecular data, and relaxed molecular clocks generally date the origin of bilaterians at 600–700 Mya (during the Ediacaran). Although the taxonomic affinities of the Ediacaran biota remain uncertain, a conservative interpretation suggests that a number of these taxa form clades that are closely related, if not stem clades of bilaterian crown clades. Analysis of brain–body complexity among extant bilaterians indicates that diffuse nerve nets and possibly, ganglionated cephalic neural systems existed in Ediacaran organisms. An outgroup analysis of cephalic neural characters among extant metazoans also indicates that the last common bilaterian ancestor possessed a diffuse nerve plexus and that brains evolved independently at least four times. In contrast, the hypothesis of a tripartite brain, based primarily on phenetic analysis of developmental genetic data, indicates that the brain arose in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Hopefully, this debate will be resolved by cladistic analysis of the genomes of additional taxa and an increased understanding of character identity genetic networks. PMID:22723354

Northcutt, R. Glenn

2012-01-01

296

Increased Use of No-till Cropping Systems Improves Stream Ecosystem Quality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Release of sediments to streams from tilled lands has been a significant stressor to streams in agro-ecosystems for decades and has been shown to impact aquatic biota in a variety of ways. To limit soil erosion from cultivated lands, conservation tillage techniques, including the use of no-till systems, have been developed and widely adopted throughout the region. However, there haves been no tests of the effects of no-till systems on stream quality at a watershed scale. We measured habitat and water quality and sampled the benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI) and fish communities in 32 small (100-1400 ha) subwatersheds along a gradient of the proportion of land under no-till cropping systems to determine relationships between the use of no-till and stream quality. Our results demonstrate that with increasing proportions of no-till, habitat scores improve, the quantities of sediment and sediment associated stressors in the water decline, the BMI community exhibits reduced dominance by Oligocheata and Sphaeriidae, as well as improved Family Biotic Index (FBI) scores, and fish species richness increases. We concluded that increased use of no-till cropping systems by farmers does contribute to improved quality of streams in agro-ecosystems.

Yates, A. G.; Bailey, R. C.; Schwindt, J. A.

2005-05-01

297

Assessing land-use impacts on biodiversity using an expert systems tool  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Habitat alteration, in the form of land-use development, is a leading cause of biodiversity loss in the U.S. and elsewhere. Although statutes in the U.S. may require consideration of biodiversity in local land-use planning and regulation, local governments lack the data, resources, and expertise to routinely consider biotic impacts that result from permitted land uses. We hypothesized that decision support systems could aid solution of this problem. We developed a pilot biodiversity expert systems tool (BEST) to test that hypothesis and learn what additional scientific and technological advancements are required for broad implementation of such a system. BEST uses data from the U.S. Geological Survey's Gap Analysis Program (GAP) and other data in a desktop GIS environment. The system provides predictions of conflict between proposed land uses and biotic elements and is intended for use at the start of the development review process. Key challenges were the development of categorization systems that relate named land-use types to ecological impacts, and relate sensitivities of biota to ecological impact levels. Although the advent of GAP and sophisticated desktop GIS make such a system feasible for broad implementation, considerable ongoing research is required to make the results of such a system scientifically sound, informative, and reliable for the regulatory process. We define a role for local government involvement in biodiversity impact assessment, the need for a biodiversity decision support system, the development of a prototype system, and scientific needs for broad implementation of a robust and reliable system.

Crist, P.J.; Kohley, T.W.; Oakleaf, J.

2000-01-01

298

Effects of placer mining on hydrologic systems in Alaska; status of knowledge  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The report briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding placer mining in Alaska. A review of literature indicates that nearly all of the significant information on the effects of placer mining on the hydrologic system in Alaska is referenced in available reports. The addition of sediment, as well as other indirect changes this generates, appears to be the primary impact of placer mining on Alaskan streams. Other potential water-quality effects that should be considered are: increases in organic loading in the stream system; increases in minor element content; potential for acid drainage; and impacts on fish and other aquatic biota. Existing information is adequate to define parameters that may be affected by placer mining but inadequate to quantify changes resulting from an individual mining operation or to allow the prediction of the magnitude or duration of the impact. Additional studies that would improve the knowledge of the effects of placer mining include: short-term assessments, using available photographic information and existing hydrologic records, to document historical changes and active placer mining features; short-term studies using emperical sediment-transport formulas to estimate the effects of placer mine activities; and river quality assessments of selected basins affected by placer mining. (USGS)

Madison, R.J.

1981-01-01

299

Climate-hydrology-ecology interactions in glacierized river systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High climatic sensitivity and low anthropogenic influence make glacierized river basins important environments for examining hydrological and ecological response to global change. This presentation is based on previous and ongoing research in glacierized river basins (located in the French Pyrenees, New Zealand and Swedish Lapland), which adopts an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the climate-hydrology-ecology cascade. Data are used to advance hypotheses concerning impacts of climate change/ variability on glacier river system hydrology and ecology. Aquatic ecosystems in high latitude and altitude environments are influenced strongly by cryospheric and hydrological processes due to links between atmospheric forcing, snowpack/ glacier mass-balance, river runoff, physico-chemistry and biota. In the current phase of global warming, many glaciers are retreating. Shrinking snow and ice-masses may alter spatial and temporal dynamics in bulk basin runoff with significant changes in the relative contributions of snowmelt, glacier-melt and groundwater to stream flow. The timing of peak snow- and ice-melt may shift; and proportion of stream flow sourced from rainfall-runoff and groundwater may increase. In this presentation, the influence of changing water source contributions on physico-chemical habitat and, in turn, benthic communities is assessed using an alternative alpine stream classification. In the future, this model predicts more rapid downstream change in benthic communities as meltwater contributions decline; and, at the basin-scale, biodiversity may be reduced due to less spatio-temporal heterogeneity in water sources contributions and, thus, physico-chemical habitat. Integrated, long-term research into the climate-hydrology-ecology cascade in other glacierized river basins is vital because interdisciplinary science is fundamental: to predicting stream hydrology and ecology under scenarios of future climate/ variability, to assessing the utility of alpine river systems as indicators of global change, and to developing conservation strategies for these fragile ecosystems. Future research imperatives and directions are outlined.

Hannah, David; Brown, Lee; Milner, Alexander

2010-05-01

300

HAZARD ASSESSMENT OF METALS AND METAL COMPOUNDS IN TERRESTRIAL SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Metal accumulation in soil can result in adverse effects on soil biota, and may concentrate metals in food chains to levels detrimental to humans and wildlife. A SETAC Pellston Workshop entitled " Hazard Identification Approach For Metals And Inorganic Metal Substances" examined...

301

Annual summary of the contents of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) 1993 data base  

SciTech Connect

The data base of the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) contains data of known quality that can be accessed by OREIS users. OREIS meets data management/access requirements for environmental data as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation and the State Oversight Agreement between the State of Tennessee and the Department of Energy. The types of environmental data within OREIS include measurement data from the following environmental disciplines: groundwater, surface water, sediment, soils, air, and biota. In addition to measurement data, the OREIS data base contains extensive descriptive and qualifier metadata to help define data quality and to enable end users to analyze the appropriateness of data for their purposes. Another important aspect of measurement data is their spatial context; OREIS maintains a comprehensive library of geographic data and tools to analyze and display spatial relationships of the data. As of November 1993, the OREIS data base consists of approximately 100,000 records associated with three environmental restoration projects along with coordinate data and background map data. The data base also contains 2,700 supporting codes and other reference data records. Geographic data include the S-16A base map for the Oak Ridge Reservation, boundaries for operable units, and high-resolution raster images for each of the sites.

McCord, R.A.; Herr, D.D.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Monroe, F.E.; Olson, R.J.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.

1994-06-01

302

Mercury pollution in Ria de Aveiro (Portugal): a review of the system assessment.  

PubMed

The Ria de Aveiro (Portugal) is a coast al lagoon adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean and it has an inner bay (Laranjo bay) that received a highly contaminated effluent discharged by a mercury cell chlor-alkali plant from the 1950s until 1994. The aim of this study is to review in a holistic way several research studies that have been carried out in the Ria de Aveiro, in order to evaluate the remobilization of the mercury accumulated within the system and the recovery of the lagoon. The spatial distribution of the total mercury in the surrounding terrestrial environment has also been considered. Results indicate that the main mercury contamination problems in the Ria de Aveiro are confined to the Laranjo bay. Mercury export to the coastal waters and its impact on the nearshore compartments (water column, sediment and biota) are low. No direct effects of the mercury from nearby industrial activities were detected in Aveiro's urban soils, although historical mercury contamination is still affecting soil quality in the immediate vicinity of the chlor-alkali plant, located in Estarreja. Moreover, macrophyte harvesting for human direct or indirect use and the consumption of mussels, crabs and the sea bass from the Laranjo bay may constitute a health risk. Further studies focusing on developing skills for the restoration of the ecosystem are presently underway. PMID:18592386

Pereira, M E; Lillebø, A I; Pato, P; Válega, M; Coelho, J P; Lopes, C B; Rodrigues, S; Cachada, A; Otero, M; Pardal, M A; Duarte, A C

2009-08-01

303

Effluent impact assessment using microarray-based analysis in common carp: a systems toxicology approach.  

PubMed

Effluents are a main source of direct and continuous input of pollutants to the aquatic environment, and can cause ecotoxicological effects at different levels of biological organization. Since gene expression responses represent the primary interaction site between environmental contaminants and biota, they provide essential clues to understand how chemical exposure can affect organismal health. The aim of the present study was to investigate the applicability of a microarray approach for unraveling modes of action of whole effluent toxicity and impact assessment. A chronic toxicity test with common carp (Cyprinus carpio) was conducted where fish were exposed to a control and 100% effluent for 21 days under flow-through conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that effluent treatment mainly affected molecular pathways associated with the energy balance of the fish, including changes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as digestive enzyme activity. These gene expression responses were in clear agreement with, and provided additional mechanistic information on various cellular and higher level effects observed for the same effluent. Our results demonstrate the benefit of toxicogenomic tools in a "systems toxicology" approach, involving the integration of adverse effects of chemicals and stressors across multiple levels of biological complexity. PMID:17267021

Moens, Lotte N; Smolders, Roel; van der Ven, Karlijn; van Remortel, Piet; Del-Favero, Jurgen; De Coen, Wim M

2007-05-01

304

Terrestrial Biosphere Dynamics in the Climate System: Past and Future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paleoenvironmental record makes it clear that climate change as large as is likely to occur in the next two centuries will drive change in the terrestrial biosphere that is both large and difficult to predict, or plan for. Many species, communities and ecosystems could experience rates of climate change, and "destination climates" that are unprecedented in their time on earth. The paleorecord also makes it clear that a wide range of possible climate system behavior, such as decades-long droughts, increases in large storm and flood frequency, and rapid sea level rise, all occurred repeatedly in the past, and for poorly understood reasons. These types of events, if they were to reoccur in the future, could have especially devastating impacts on biodiversity, both because their timing and spatial extent cannot be anticipated, and because the biota's natural defenses have been compromised by land-use, reductions in genetic flexibility, pollution, excess water utilization, invasive species, and other human influences. Vegetation disturbance (e.g., by disease, pests and fire) will undoubtedly be exacerbated by climate change (stress), but could also speed the rate at which terrestrial biosphere change takes place in the future. The paleoenvironmental record makes it clear that major scientific challenges include an improved ability to model regional biospheric change, both past and future. This in turn will be a prerequisite to obtaining realistic estimates of future biogeochemical and biophysical feedbacks, and thus to obtaining better assessments of future climate change. These steps will help generate the improved understanding of climate variability that is needed to manage global biodiversity. However, the most troubling message from the paleoenvironmental record is that unchecked anthropogenic climate change could make the Earth's 6th major mass extinction unavoidable.

Overpeck, J.; Whitlock, C.; Huntley, B.

2002-12-01

305

Coniform stromatolites from geothermal systems, North Island, New Zealand  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coniform stromatolites are found in several sites in the Tokaanu and Whakarewarewa geothermal areas of North Island, New Zealand. At Tokaanu, silicification of these stromatolites is taking place in Kirihoro, a shallow hot springfed pool. At Whakarewarewa, subfossil silicified coniform stromatolites are found on the floor of "Waikite Pool" on the discharge apron below Waikite Geyser, and in an old sinter succession at Te Anarata. The microbes in the coniform stromatolites from Tokaanu, Waikite Pool, and Te Anarata have been well preserved through rapid silicification. Nevertheless, subtle differences in the silicification style induced morphological variations that commonly mask or alter morphological features needed for identification of the microbes in terms of extant taxa. The coniform stromatolites in the New Zealand hotspring pools are distinctive because (1) they are formed of upward tapering (i.e., conical) columns, (2) neighboring columns commonly are linked by vertical sheets or bridges, (3) internally, they are formed of alternating high- and low-porosity laminae that have a conical vertical profile, and (4) Phormidium form more than 90% of the biota. As such, they are comparable to modern coniform mats and stromatolites found in the geothermal systems of Yellowstone National Park and ice-covered lakes in Antarctica. Formation of the coniform stromatolites is restricted to pools that are characterized by low current energy and a microflora that is dominated by Phormidium. These delicate and intricate stromatolites could not form in areas characterized by fast flowing water or a diverse microflora. Thus, it appears that the distribution of these distinctive stromatolites is controlled by biological constraints that are superimposed on environmental needs.

Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.; Rosen, M.R.; Ansdell, K.M.

2002-01-01

306

Library System Library System  

E-print Network

Library System #12;Library System 5150 Anthony Wayne Drive David Adamany Undergraduate Library that for the current fiscal year, we've been given an additional $600,000 for our library materials budget. We're very subscriptions. The Wayne State University Libraries are deeply committed to providing our faculty and students

Cinabro, David

307

Assessing waterbird habitat use in coastal evaporative systems using stable isotopes (? 13C, ? 15N and ?D) as environmental tracers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Isotopic patterns of biota across salinity gradients in man-made evaporative systems could assist in determining the use of these habitats by animals. Here we report ? 13C, ? 15N and ?D measurements of a euryhaline fish, the Mediterranean toothcarp ( Aphanius fasciatus), inhabiting a range of salinities in the Thyna saltworks near Sfax (Tunisia). The contribution of these salinity niches to egg formation of two typically piscivorous bird species breeding in the area and feeding within saltworks, Little Tern ( Sternula albifrons) and Little Egret ( Egretta garzetta), was inferred trough a triple-isotope (? 13C, ? 15N and ?D) Bayesian mixing model. Isotopic trends for fish ? 15N and ?D across the salinity gradient followed the equations: ? 15N = e (1.1 + 47.68/Salinity) and ?D = -175.74 + Salinity + Salinity 2; whereas fish ? 13C increased as salinity rose (? 13C = -10.83 + 0.02·Salinity), after a sudden drop in fish isotopic values for salinities >60 (Practical Salinity Scale) (average fish ? 13C for salinities <60 = -5.92‰). Both bird species fed largely on low hypersalinity ponds (salinity = 43; average contribution = 37% and 22% for Little Egrets and Little Terns, respectively), although the use of intermediate hypersalinities (salinities 63 and 70) by Little Terns also occurred (16% and 21%, respectively). Isotopic patterns across salinity gradients allow the use of isotopic measurements to inform studies of habitat occupancy within evaporative systems and provide further insights into how wildlife communities interact with them.

Ramírez, Francisco; Abdennadher, Aida; Sanpera, Carola; Jover, Lluís; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Hobson, Keith A.

2011-04-01

308

Distribution of biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic constituents as a proxy for sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Although conventional sediment parameters (mean grain size, sorting, and skewness) and provenance have typically been used to infer sediment transport pathways, most freshwater, brackish, and marine environments are also characterized by abundant sediment constituents of biological, and possibly anthropogenic and volcanic, origin that can provide additional insight into local sedimentary processes. The biota will be spatially distributed according to its response to environmental parameters such as water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, organic carbon content, grain size, and intensity of currents and tidal flow, whereas the presence of anthropogenic and volcanic constituents will reflect proximity to source areas and whether they are fluvially- or aerially-transported. Because each of these constituents have a unique environmental signature, they are a more precise proxy for that source area than the conventional sedimentary process indicators. This San Francisco Bay Coastal System study demonstrates that by applying a multi-proxy approach, the primary sites of sediment transport can be identified. Many of these sites are far from where the constituents originated, showing that sediment transport is widespread in the region. Although not often used, identifying and interpreting the distribution of naturally-occurring and allochthonous biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic sediment constituents is a powerful tool to aid in the investigation of sediment transport pathways in other coastal systems.

McGann, Mary; Erikson, Li H.; Wan, Elmira; Powell, Charles, II; Maddocks, Rosalie F.

2013-01-01

309

Paleoecology of benthic metazoans in the Early Cambrian Maotianshan Shale biota and the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale biota: evidence for the Cambrian substrate revolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the depth and intensity of bioturbation increased through the Proterozoic–Phanerozoic transition, the substrates on which marine benthos lived changed from being relatively firm with a sharp sediment–water interface to having a high water content and blurry sediment–water interface. Microbial mats, once dominant on normal marine Proterozoic seafloors, were relegated to stressed settings lacking intense metazoan activity. This change in

Stephen Q. Dornbos; David J. Bottjer; Jun-Yuan Chen

2005-01-01

310

Data Systems vs. Information Systems  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

Amatayakul, Margret K.

1982-01-01

311

Solar system positioning system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Power-rich spacecraft envisioned in Prometheus initiative open up possibilities for long-range high-rate communication. A constellation of spacecraft on orbits several A.U. from the Sun, equipped with laser transponders and precise clocks can be configured to measure their mutual distances to within few cm. High on-board power can create substantial non-inertial contribution to the spacecraft trajectory. We propose to alleviate this contribution by employing secondary ranging to a passive daughter spacecraft. Such constellation can form the basis of it navigation system capable of providing position information anywhere in the soIar system with similar accuracy. Apart from obvious Solar System exploration implications, this system can provide robust reference for GPS and its successors.

Penanen, Konstantin I.; Chui, Talso

2006-01-01

312

The performance, application and integration of various seabed classification systems suitable for mapping Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile meadows.  

PubMed

In the context of current global environmental changes, mapping and monitoring seagrass meadows have become highly important for management and preservation of coastal zone ecosystems. The purpose of this research was to determine the numerical precision of various cost-effective benthic habitat mapping techniques and their suitability for mapping and monitoring of Posidonia oceanica meadows in the Croatian Adriatic. We selected ultra-high resolution aerial imagery, single-beam echo sounder (SBES) seabed classification system from Quester Tangent Co. (QTC), and surface based underwater videography as affordable, non-destructive and simple to use systems for data acquisition. The ultra-high resolution digital imagery was capable of detecting P. oceanica meadows up to 4m depth with 94% accuracy, from 4m to 12.5m depth the accuracy dropped to app. 76%, and from 12.5 to 20 m the system was only capable of distinguishing seabed biota from substrata, though with 97% accuracy. The results of the QTC system showed over 90% detection accuracy for Cymodocea nodosa covered seabed, excellent separation capabilities (>92%) of different sediment types (slightly gravelly sand, gravelly muddy sand and slightly gravelly muddy sand) and reasonable accuracy for mapping underwater vegetation regardless of the bathymetric span. The system proved incapable of separating P. oceanica from dense macroalgae on the same type of substratum. Surface-based underwater videography demonstrated great potential for estimating P. oceanica cover in a sampled region using either a single human rater or a computer estimate. The consistency between two human scorers in evaluating P. oceanica bottom coverage was near perfect (>98%) and high between digital and human scorers (80%). The results indicate that although the selected systems are suitable for mapping seagrasses, they all display limitations in either detection accuracy or spatial coverage, which leads to a conclusion that suitable system integration is essential for producing high quality seagrass spatial distribution maps. PMID:24157476

Puhr, Kristian; Schultz, Stewart; Pikelj, Kristina; Petricioli, Donat; Bakran-Petricioli, Tatjana

2014-02-01

313

Systems autonomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information on systems autonomy is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on space systems integration, intelligent autonomous systems, automated systems for in-flight mission operations, the Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project on the Space Station Thermal Control System, the architecture of an autonomous intelligent system, artificial intelligence research issues, machine learning, and real-time image processing.

Lum, Henry, Jr.

1988-01-01

314

Immune System  

MedlinePLUS

... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih- myoon ) system, which ... Continue Things That Can Go Wrong With the Immune System Disorders of the immune system can be broken ...

315

SYSTEMS BIOM BIOMEDICAL SYSTEMS,  

E-print Network

and communication, cost-effective in vitro diagnostics, and continuous in vivo diagnostics. Metabolic Systems exercise studies under normal and diseased conditions. Cellular metabolic changes are quantitatively artificial joints, prosthetic limbs, dental implants, bone healing, and meth- ods to counteract loss of bone

Rollins, Andrew M.

316

Operating Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A computer operating system spans multiple layers of complexity, from commands entered at a keyboard to the details of electronic switching. In addition, the system is organized as a hierarchy of abstractions. Various parts of such a system and system dynamics (using the Unix operating system as an example) are described. (JN)

Denning, Peter J.; Brown, Robert L.

1984-01-01

317

Aerospace Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This pdf contains a syllabus for a course on aerospace systems as part of the Aerospace Technology Program. This course covers an introduction to expendable and reusable Space Launch Vehicle (SLV) systems including hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical, propulsion, mechanical, HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning), and ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support Systems). How systems interact with computer and data acquisition systems is also covered.

2011-08-11

318

Influence of Fatty Alcohols and Acids on the Clarity and Biota of Impounded Reservoirs  

E-print Network

investigations were also concerned with the derivation and experimental validation of an expression to give the dissolved oxygen concentration during the critical night period for a small lake or pond treated with a 1:1 mixture of hexadecanol and octadecanol....

Davis, W. B.; Reynolds, T. D.

319

Influence of Bt-plants on soil biota and pleiotropic effect of ?-endotoxin-encoding genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The critical review of experimental conclusions stating environmental safety of transgenic plants reveals that the methods\\u000a and test materials employed in some studies were inadequate to the goals pursued. A large-scale application of transgenic\\u000a Bt-plants may result in long-lasting negative impact on the environment. First, the cultivation of these plants leads to accumulation\\u000a of Bt-toxins in soil. Second, the decomposition

A. G. Viktorov

2008-01-01

320

Polybrominated diphenylethers in sediments and biota downstream of potential sources in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a pilot survey, samples of sediment and fish tissue have been collected in the vicinity and downstream of suspected sources of brominated flame retardant compounds. These have been analysed for polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) by means of gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC–ECD), with the identity of residues in some samples being confirmed by coupled gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The concentrations

C. R Allchin; R. J Law; S Morris

1999-01-01

321

The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 1, The ecosystem: Environments, biotas, and processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. The history of the laboratory and the reasons for its support by the United States Department of Energy are described in Chapter 1 of Volume 1. Volume 1 provides a

D. M. Devaney; E. S. Reese; B. L. Burch; P. Helfrich

1987-01-01

322

IMPACT OF NEARSTREAM VEGETATION AND STREAM MORPHOLOGY ON WATER QUALITY AND STREAM BIOTA  

EPA Science Inventory

As man modifies watersheds by removal of natural vegetation and stream channelization, disequilibria in both the terrestrial and aquatic environments result. These disequilibria are the major problem in controlling sediments and nutrients from non-point sources and improving the ...

323

Assessment of organotin (butyltin species) contamination in marine biota from the Eastern Aegean Sea, Turkey.  

PubMed

The marine environment continues to be adversely affected by tributyltin (TBT) release from maritime traffic. Therefore the concentrations of TBT, dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) were measured in barnacles, mussels and fish along the Eastern Aegean coastline. The average concentrations of TBT ng Sn g?¹ were found to be 235 in fish, 116 in mussels and 635 in barnacles. The highest concentrations of TBT, DBT and MBT were observed in the barnacles which had been sampled in marinas and harbors. All mussels sampled showed values of TBT+DBT, which were below the "tolerable average residue level (TARL)" as currently accepted. This indicates a lack of risk to the consumer. However, 7 out of the 15 fish sampled displayed TBT+DBT levels above the TARL, which indicates that a fish consumer group may be at risk. Barnacles have high potential as biomonitors for the presence of organotin in the Aegean Sea. PMID:21764084

Kucuksezgin, F; Aydin-Onen, S; Gonul, L T; Pazi, I; Kocak, F

2011-09-01

324

PARSING THE ALLOCHTHONOUS FROM THE AUTOCHTHONOUS FUNGAL BIOTA IN THE POULTRY INTESTINE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Examination of intestinal microbial communities is complicated by the presence of both autochthonous (natively colonizing) and allochthonous (transient) taxa. To examine community dynamics in poultry ceca an experiment was performed in which day-old turkeys were housed in isolators on raised wire f...

325

COMPARATIVE LIMNOLOGY AND BIOTA OF MINE SPOILS PONDS IN COLORADO (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Physico-chemical and biotic parameters were investigated from June 1977 to May 1978 in coal strip-mine ponds in Colorado which differed in age and in the proportion of drainage derived from the mine. There were no discernible effects of mine drainage on temperature, dissolved oxy...

326

Investigation of Isotopic and Geochemical Evidence for an Active Planktonic Biota in the Precambrian  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The funded research was motivated by the earlier study of Burdett et al. (1990), who collected carbon and oxygen isotopic data from Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Northwest Territories from deep-and shallow-water facies of the Rocknest Platform. Their results displayed a possible decrease in (delta)C-13 with depth when arranged by increasing distance from the paleoshore. The most C-13-depleted samples were seafloor cements and fans from the underlying siliciclastic Odjick Formation, and slope carbonates of the Rocknest platform.

Kump, Lee R.

1997-01-01

327

Spatially Explicit Analysis of Metal Transfer to Biota: Influence of Soil Contamination and Landscape  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concepts and developments for a new field in ecotoxicology, referred to as “landscape ecotoxicology,” were proposed in the 1990s; however, to date, few studies have been developed in this emergent field. In fact, there is a strong interest in developing this area, both for renewing the concepts and tools used in ecotoxicology as well as for responding to practical issues,

Clémentine Fritsch; Michaël Coeurdassier; Patrick Giraudoux; Francis Raoul; Francis Douay; Dominique Rieffel; Annette de Vaufleury; Renaud Scheifler; Stephen J. Johnson

2011-01-01

328

Spatially Explicit Analysis of Metal Transfer to Biota: Influence of Soil Contamination and Landscape  

E-print Network

metals (TMs: Cd, Pb and Zn) in invertebrates (the grove snail Cepaea sp and the glass snail Oxychilus draparnaudi) and vertebrates (the bank vole Myodes glareolus and the greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

Spatially Explicit Analysis of Metal Transfer to Biota: Influence of Soil Contamination and Landscape  

PubMed Central

Concepts and developments for a new field in ecotoxicology, referred to as “landscape ecotoxicology,” were proposed in the 1990s; however, to date, few studies have been developed in this emergent field. In fact, there is a strong interest in developing this area, both for renewing the concepts and tools used in ecotoxicology as well as for responding to practical issues, such as risk assessment. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of metal bioaccumulation in animals in order to identify the role of spatially explicit factors, such as landscape as well as total and extractable metal concentrations in soils. Over a smelter-impacted area, we studied the accumulation of trace metals (TMs: Cd, Pb and Zn) in invertebrates (the grove snail Cepaea sp and the glass snail Oxychilus draparnaudi) and vertebrates (the bank vole Myodes glareolus and the greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula). Total and CaCl2-extractable concentrations of TMs were measured in soils from woody patches where the animals were captured. TM concentrations in animals exhibited a high spatial heterogeneity. They increased with soil pollution and were better explained by total rather than CaCl2-extractable TM concentrations, except in Cepaea sp. TM levels in animals and their variations along the pollution gradient were modulated by the landscape, and this influence was species and metal specific. Median soil metal concentrations (predicted by universal kriging) were calculated in buffers of increasing size and were related to bioaccumulation. The spatial scale at which TM concentrations in animals and soils showed the strongest correlations varied between metals, species and landscapes. The potential underlying mechanisms of landscape influence (community functioning, behaviour, etc.) are discussed. Present results highlight the need for the further development of landscape ecotoxicology and multi-scale approaches, which would enhance our understanding of pollutant transfer and effects in ecosystems. PMID:21655187

Fritsch, Clémentine; Cœurdassier, Michaël; Giraudoux, Patrick; Raoul, Francis; Douay, Francis; Rieffel, Dominique; de Vaufleury, Annette; Scheifler, Renaud

2011-01-01

330

Spatially explicit analysis of metal transfer to biota: influence of soil contamination and landscape.  

PubMed

Concepts and developments for a new field in ecotoxicology, referred to as "landscape ecotoxicology," were proposed in the 1990s; however, to date, few studies have been developed in this emergent field. In fact, there is a strong interest in developing this area, both for renewing the concepts and tools used in ecotoxicology as well as for responding to practical issues, such as risk assessment. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of metal bioaccumulation in animals in order to identify the role of spatially explicit factors, such as landscape as well as total and extractable metal concentrations in soils. Over a smelter-impacted area, we studied the accumulation of trace metals (TMs: Cd, Pb and Zn) in invertebrates (the grove snail Cepaea sp and the glass snail Oxychilus draparnaudi) and vertebrates (the bank vole Myodes glareolus and the greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula). Total and CaCl(2)-extractable concentrations of TMs were measured in soils from woody patches where the animals were captured. TM concentrations in animals exhibited a high spatial heterogeneity. They increased with soil pollution and were better explained by total rather than CaCl(2)-extractable TM concentrations, except in Cepaea sp. TM levels in animals and their variations along the pollution gradient were modulated by the landscape, and this influence was species and metal specific. Median soil metal concentrations (predicted by universal kriging) were calculated in buffers of increasing size and were related to bioaccumulation. The spatial scale at which TM concentrations in animals and soils showed the strongest correlations varied between metals, species and landscapes. The potential underlying mechanisms of landscape influence (community functioning, behaviour, etc.) are discussed. Present results highlight the need for the further development of landscape ecotoxicology and multi-scale approaches, which would enhance our understanding of pollutant transfer and effects in ecosystems. PMID:21655187

Fritsch, Clémentine; Cœurdassier, Michaël; Giraudoux, Patrick; Raoul, Francis; Douay, Francis; Rieffel, Dominique; de Vaufleury, Annette; Scheifler, Renaud

2011-01-01

331

in Sri Lanka affect biota and human populations in and around coastal  

E-print Network

­119. 13. Dahdouh-Guebas, F. (2002). The use of remote sensing and GIS in the sustainable management of tropical coastal ecosystems. Environ. Dev. Sustain. 4, 93­112. 14. Chan, H.T. (1996). Mangrove management - the case of coastal zone management in the Puttalam District. (Brighton: University of Sussex

Chittka, Lars

332

Bioinvasion in a Brazilian Bay: Filling Gaps in the Knowledge of Southwestern Atlantic Biota  

PubMed Central

Background Biological invasions are a major cause of global species change. Nevertheless, knowledge about the distribution and ecology of introduced species is regionally biased, and many gaps in knowledge exist for most developing countries. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the zoobenthos on the hard substratum of the Ilha Grande Bay, a survey was conducted on both natural and artificial substrata at three depths and seven sites. The species recorded were classified as native, cryptogenic or introduced. Multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the prevalence of introduced species in these communities and to compare the distribution of species on natural and artificial substrata of this bay to identify possible discrepancies in habitat use. Of the 61 species, 25 were cryptogenic, 10 were introduced and 26 were native. Similar numbers of introduced species were found on both natural and artificial substrata, though the community composition was significantly different between them. We also compared the species composition of the Ilha Grande Bay survey to other inventories taken around the world. The highest similarities were found between the Ilha Grande Bay inventory and the Atlantic coastal region (Tampa Bay, USA and the Gulf of Mexico), American Samoa and Pearl Harbor (USA) inventories. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first published comprehensive list of hard substratum sessile marine invertebrate species in a Brazilian bay. The high percentage of cryptogenic species reveals gaps in both zoological records and information on introduced species for the Brazilian coast. The introduced species successfully colonized different sites in the Ilha Grande Bay, including both natural and artificial substrata. In addition, we find that artificial structures may not be good surrogates for natural rocky shores and may represent an ecological threat. Comparisons with other inventories suggest a history of broad-scale invasion, though more evidence is needed to support this conclusion. PMID:20927375

Ignacio, Barbara L.; Julio, Luciana M.; Junqueira, Andrea O. R.; Ferreira-Silva, Maria A. G.

2010-01-01

333

Technical report of biota, FEL Site 2, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is considering expansion of laser test facilities adjacent to its existing LLNL Site 300 test location. Construction of a free-electron laser, known as the FEL Project, is being considered on approximately 9600 hectares (24,000 acres) of land immediately southeast of Site 300. This report quantitatively describes the variation of vegetation on FEL Site 2, and relates the vegetation to potential environmental impacts associated with present operation and possible expansion of site facilities. The presence and status of any endangered, threatened, fully protected, or otherwise sensitive species of wildlife on FEL Site 2 that might be affected by site operations and developments was also determined. We directed our studies mainly toward the federally endangered San Joaquin kit for (Vulpes macrotis mutica), but also toward another 14 special status species that potentially occur on site, including the state threatened Alameda striped racer (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus).

Taylor, D.W.; Davilla, W.; Orloff, S.

1986-09-26

334

Technical report of biota, FEL Site 1, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is considering an expansion of laser test facilities adjacent to its existing LLNL Site 300 test location. Construction of a free-electron laser, known as the FEL Project, is being considered on approximately 3900 hectates (10,500 acres) of land. We will refer to this proposed site as FEL Site 1. Knowledge of the flora and vegetation resources of the proposed FEL Site 1 is necessary in order to plan for construction, operation, and possible future expansion of the FEL facility. The purpose of botanical sections of this report is to quantitatively describe the variation of vegetation on FEL Site 1, and to relate the vegetation to potential environmental impacts associated with present operation and possible expansion of site facilities. The primary purpose of the wildlife studies was to determine the presence and status of any endangered, threatened, fully protected, or otherwise sensitive species on FEL Site 1 that might be affected by the proposed FEL project. We directed our studies mainly toward the federally endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), but also toward another 14 special status species that potentially occur on site, including the state threatened Alameda striped racer (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus).

Taylor, D.W.; Davilla, W.; Orloff, S.

1986-09-26

335

Field Spectroscopy And Spectral Analysis Of Caribbean Scleractinian Reef Corals And Related Benthic Biota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coral reefs are highly heterogenic ecosystems with a plethora of photosynthetic organisms forming most of the benthic communities. Usually coral reef benthos is a composite of reef corals, different groups of algae, seagrasses, sandy bottoms, dead rubble, and even mangrove forests living in a relatively small area. The remote characterization of these important tropical ecosystems represents a challenge to scientists, particularly due to the similarity of the spectral signatures among some of these components. As such, we examined the similarities and differences between nine Scleractinian Caribbean shallow-water reef corals' spectral reflectance curves. Samples were also collected from each species for pigment analysis using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Reflectance curves were obtained with the aid of a GER-1500 hand-held field spectroradiometer enclosed in an underwater housing. Our findings showed that even though most of the pigmentation was directly related to the relationship of corals with their symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae), the presence of other endolithic photosynthetic organisms can also contribute to the light absorption of corals and, hence, the reflectance spectra of each species. Also, the relative contribution of chlorophylls vs. carotenes or xanthophylls depends on the coral species with some species relying more on Chlorophyll a and other species relying on Chlorophyl c2 and Peridinin with a small Chlorophyll a component. Pigments associated with the xanthophyll cycle of dinoflagellates (Diadinoxanthin and Diatoxanthin) were detected in most species. Pigments typical of endolithic organisms such as Zeaxanthin, Fucoxanthin, Violaxanthin and Siphonaxanthin were also detected in some coral species. The influence of major pigments on the reflectance curve was evidenced with a 2nd derivative analysis. This could be used to discriminate among most species. Further, an analysis of the integration of the area under the reflectance curve in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700nm) yielded an inverse relationship with the total pigment concentration with an up to 97% confidence level. Corals were distinguished from seagrasses and other benthic components based on their reflectance and differences in curve inflection peaks. Special care needs to be taken when characterizing sandy bottoms as they are influenced by the presence of photosynthetic microbiota as reflected in their reflectance curves. The use of this integration is proposed as a novel non-invasive method to predict pigment changes in reef corals aimed to monitor their health in the present climate change scenario.

Torres-Perez, J. L.; Guild, L. S.; Armstrong, R.; Corredor, J. E.; Polanco, R.; Zuluaga-Montero, A. B.

2013-05-01

336

HIGHLY SENSITIVE DIOXIN IMMUNOASSAY AND ITS APPLICATIONS TO SOIL AND BIOTA SAMPLES. (R825433)  

EPA Science Inventory

Tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin (TCDD) is a well-known highly toxic compound that is present in nearly all components of the global ecosystem, including air, soil, sediment, fish and humans. Dioxin analysis is equipment intensive and expensive requiring low ppt or even ppq ...

337

Impacts of New Highways and Subsequent Landscape Urbanization on Stream Habitat and Biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

New highways are pervasive, pernicious threats to stream ecosystems because of their short- and long-term physical, chemical, and biological impacts. Unfortunately, standard environmental impact statements (EISs) and environmental assessments (EAs) focus narrowly on the initial direct impacts of construction and ignore other long-term indirect impacts. More thorough consideration of highway impacts, and, ultimately, better land use decisions may be facilitated

Andrew P. Wheeler; Paul L. Angermeier; Amanda E. Rosenberger

2005-01-01

338

[Intergrated assessment of the radioecological state of the biota in Moscow water objects].  

PubMed

The paper presents the results of studying the regularities and distribution pattern of natural radionuclides (potassium-40, thorium-232), as well as the representatives of the uranium family (radium-226, polonium-210) and the technogenic isotope cesium-137 in different objects of the water ecosystem in the North-Western District of Moscow (bottom sediment, hydrobiota). Some radiation parameters of these objects (the total alpha- and beta-activities of the radionuclides, their specific effective activity are given. On the basis of the experimental findings, the authors have made an assessment of the radioecological situation in the water pool of the district examined. PMID:19354183

Shatokhin, A M; Shmonov, M G; Krasotkin, V A; Umniashova, E E; Nikiforova, S E; Zozul', Iu N

2009-01-01

339

Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analysis in plant biota.  

PubMed

Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, a new method was developed for the identification and the quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in plants. This method was particularly optimised for PAH analyses in marine plants such as the halophytic species, Salicornia fragilis Ball et Tutin. The saponification of samples and their clean up by Florisil solid-phase extraction succeeded in eliminating pigments and natural compounds, which may interfere with GC-MS analysis. Moreover, a good recovery of the PAHs studied was obtained with percentages ranging from 88 to 116%. Application to the determination of PAH in a wide range of coastal halophytic plants is presented and validated the efficiency, the accuracy and the reproducibility of this method. PMID:16442550

Meudec, A; Dussauze, J; Jourdin, M; Deslandes, E; Poupart, N

2006-03-10

340

SOIL BIOTA FACILITATE EXOTIC ACER INVASIONS IN EUROPE AND NORTH AMERICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary hypothesis for successful exotic plant invasions is that the invaders have escaped the specialist consumers that control them (Enemy Release Hy- pothesis). However, few studies have rigorously tested this assertion with biogeographical experiments or considered the effects of soil organisms. We tested the Enemy Release Hypothesis and the enhanced role of mutualisms by comparing density patterns of the

Kurt O. Reinhart; Ragan M. Callaway

2004-01-01

341

Understanding the influence of suspended solids on water quality and aquatic biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last 50 years the effects of suspended solids (SS) on fish and aquatic life have been studied intensively throughout the world. It is now accepted that SS are an extremely important cause of water quality deterioration leading to aesthetic issues, higher costs of water treatment, a decline in the fisheries resource, and serious ecological degradation of aquatic environments.

G. S. Bilottaa; R. E. Brazier

2008-01-01

342

Discrimination of factors influencing biota of a stream receiving multiple-source perturbations.  

PubMed

Blaine Creek is a fifth-order stream located in eastern Kentucky that has been subject to contamination by oil brines, surface mining, and a coal fly ash settling pond discharge. Toxicity tests, effluent and receiving water chemical monitoring, and Blaine Creek benthic sampling were used to evaluate the effect of the ash pond effluent on the creek. Reproductive impairment of Ceriodaphnia was demonstrated at effluent concentrations ranging from 30 to 100%, but no instream impact on benthic invertebrates could be found at effluent flows that provided up to 65% of the creek's discharge. Correlation and regression analysis of physicochemical versus benthic monitoring data indicated that upstream oil brine contamination and scouring of the creek's predominately shifting sand substrate during rainfall events were the primary factors affecting the benthic fauna, and appeared to override potential effects from other sources. These results demonstrated the value of integrated field/laboratory investigations for effluent impact assessments. PMID:15092496

Van Hassel, J H; Cherry, D S; Hendricks, J C; Specht, W L

1988-01-01

343

Effects of Antarctic sea ice biota on seeding as studied in aquarium experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential seeding impact of sea ice microbial communities was studied during late austral winter early spring 1988 in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Experiments were performed in seawater aquariums with natural seawater and seawater enriched with crushed ice. Algal, protozoan and bacterial cell numbers were followed, as well as nutrients and DOC levels. The results showed a potential seeding effect

Harri Kuosa; Bosse Norrman; Kai Kivi; Frederico Brandini

1992-01-01

344

Snow crystal imaging using scanning electron microscopy: III. Glacier ice, snow and biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and ice worms (a species of oligochaetes) were also collected and imaged. In the field, the snow and biological samples were mounted on copper plates, cooled in liquid nitrogen, and stored in dry shipping containers which maintain a temperature of -196??C. The firn and glacier ice samples were obtained by extracting horizontal ice cores, 8 mm in diameter, at different levels from larger standard glaciological (vertical) ice cores 7.5 cm in diameter. These samples were cooled in liquid nitrogen and placed in cryotubes, were stored in the same dry shipping container, and sent to the SEM facility. In the laboratory, the samples were sputter coated with platinum and imaged by a low-temperature SEM. To image the firn and glacier ice samples, the cores were fractured in liquid nitrogen, attached to a specimen holder, and then imaged. While light microscope images of snow and ice are difficult to interpret because of internal reflection and refraction, the SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. In addition, the SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities. The resulting images clearly show the individual grains of the seasonal snowpack and the bonding between the snow grains. Images of firn show individual ice crystals, the bonding between the crystals, and connected air spaces. Images of glacier ice show a crystal structure on a scale of 1-2 mm which is considerably smaller than the expected crystal size. Microscopic air bubbles, less than 15 ??m in diameter, clearly marked the boundaries between these crystal-like features. The life forms associated with the glacier were easily imaged and studied. The low-temperature SEM sample collecting and handling methods proved to be operable in the field; the SEM analysis is applicable to glaciological studies and reveals details unattainable by conventional light microscopic methods.Low temperature scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe metamorphosed snow, glacial firn, and glacial ice obtained from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State, USA. Biotic samples consisting of algae and ice worms were also collected and imaged. The SEM images provide a clear and unique view of the surface of the samples because they are generated from electrons emitted or reflected only from the surface of the sample. The SEM has a great depth of field with a wide range of magnifying capabilities.

Rango, A.; Wergin, W.P.; Erbe, E.F.; Josberger, E.G.

2000-01-01

345

Selected chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants in Bjørnøya (Bear Island) freshwater biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Levels of selected sparsely investigated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been measured in organisms from two Arctic lakes on Bjørnøya (Bear Island). Elevated levels of chlorobornanes (CHBs) (up to 46.7 ng\\/g wet weight=ww), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (up to 27.2 ng\\/g ww), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) (up to 1.1 ng\\/g ww) and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs, only 4 congeners) (up to 62.7

Anita Evenset; Guttorm N. Christensen; Roland Kallenborn

2005-01-01

346

Rapid toxicity screening tests for aquatic biota. 1. Methodology and experiments with Daphnia magna  

SciTech Connect

A promising new and rapid toxicity screening test was developed, the concept and principles of which are presented. The method consists of visual observation of in vivo inhibition of an enzymatic process, using a fluorescent substrate. Juvenile Daphnia magna was exposed to a toxicant dilution series for 1 h, after which the substrate was added and the enzymatic inhibition was observed visually, using a long-wave UV light. The 1-h EC50 results of 11 pure compounds are presented and compared to the conventional 24- and 48-h Daphnia magna EC50s. All 1-h fluorescence EC50s were of the same order of magnitude and correlated very well with the 24- and 48-h EC50s. The sensitivity and reproducibility of this cost-effective screening test were compared to those of the Microtox[reg sign] test. The scope for application and the potential of this new rapid toxicity screening test are evaluated.

Janssen, C.R.; Persoone, G. (State Univ. of Ghent (Belgium))

1993-04-01

347

Footprints of large theropod dinosaurs and implications on the age of Triassic biotas from Southern Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dinosaur footprints found in an outcrop of the Caturrita Formation (Rio Grande do Sul State, Southern Brazil), associated with a diverse and well preserved record of fauna and flora, reopen the debate about its exclusive Triassic age. The studied footprints were identified as Eubrontes isp. and are interpreted as having been produced by large theropod dinosaurs. The morphological characteristics and dimensions of the footprints are more derived than those commonly found in the Carnian-Norian, and are more consistent with those found during the Rhaetian-Jurassic. The trackmaker does not correspond to any type of dinosaur yet known from Triassic rocks of Brazil. Recent studies with the paleofloristic content of this unit also support a more advanced Rhaetian or even Jurassic age for this unit.

da Silva, Rafael Costa; Barboni, Ronaldo; Dutra, Tânia; Godoy, Michel Marques; Binotto, Raquel Barros

2012-11-01

348

Prediction of the response of pond biota to animal waste fertilization. Technical completion report  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the production and water quality response of non-flowing ponds fertilized with anaerobically digested dairy manure at three fertilization rates: 5,500, 16,400, and 36,900 kg ha -1 yr -1 (wet weight). Primary productivity, the concentration of solids and fish yield (Micropterus salmoides and Notemigonus crysoleucas) were monitored in addition to N and P concentrations and fluxes. Primary productivity was increased by the manure inputs. Microbial biomass supported by the organic substrates in the manure inputs contributed 17% of the total fixed carbon in these experiments. Calculations of N and P flux revealed that P limits production in the unfertilized ponds and in the low-rate ponds but not in the moderate and high rate ponds. The upper limits on pond fertilization rates are determined by water quality degradation from high ammonia concentrations which can be predicted as a function of manure load; thus, the upper limits on permissible manure inputs can be calculated.

Peverly, J.H.; Moran, E.C.

1983-01-01

349

Effects of reservoir drawdown and refill on mercury levels in fish and other biota  

SciTech Connect

Mercury bioavailability from contaminated sediments is controlled by methylation, related to bacterial activity and degradable organic material. These variables may be affected by large changes in water level and chemistry in a reservoir. At Par Pond, a 1,200 ha impoundment on the USDOE Savannah River Site, South Carolina, potential failure of an earthen dam prompted lowering the reservoir by 3 meters over a two month period in 1991, decreasing water volume about 70%. The reservoir was refilled over a two month period in 1995. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were sampled at quarterly intervals before, during and after the drawdown. Length and weight were determined, and liver and muscle analyzed for total Hg. Hg was also measured in top level predators (alligators), forage fish, macrophytes and invertebrates. From Fall 1991 Winter 1994--5, Hg ranged from 0.05 to 2.0 ug/g wet mass in bass muscle, and was strongly related to fish size, based on about 400 fish. Condition factor rose soon after drawdown, then declined as forage populations collapsed. Using fish size as covariate, bass muscle Hg was greater in spring 1992 than all other sampling dates. However, after 3 years of drawdown, there was no overall trend in bass Hg. Forage species differed in Hg, with highest concentrations in brook silversides (0.13 {micro}g Hg/g wet mass in 2 g fish). Alligators contained up to 20 {micro}g Hg/g dry mass in liver. Refill caused inundation of terrestrial plants on exposed sediments, and microbial action associated with the decay of these may enhance Hg methylation. Experiments with caged fish are underway to measure uptake rates.

Jagoe, C.H.; Salice, C.; Yabnochko, G.; Grasman, B.T.; Youngblood, T. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-12-31

350

Nonlinearity of effects of invasive ecosystem engineers on abiotic soil properties and soil biota  

E-print Network

of Biological Science, Univ. of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada. EJ also at threats to biodiversity. Particularly exotic ecosystem engineers such as earthworms potentially have by the lumbricid earthworms into an aspen forest of the Canadian Rocky Mountains on soil organic matter

Johnson, Edward A.

351

Biota and Biomolecules in Extreme Environments on Earth: Implications for Life Detection on Mars  

PubMed Central

The three main requirements for life as we know it are the presence of organic compounds, liquid water, and free energy. Several groups of organic compounds (e.g., amino acids, nucleobases, lipids) occur in all life forms on Earth and are used as diagnostic molecules, i.e., biomarkers, for the characterization of extant or extinct life. Due to their indispensability for life on Earth, these biomarkers are also prime targets in the search for life on Mars. Biomarkers degrade over time; in situ environmental conditions influence the preservation of those molecules. Nonetheless, upon shielding (e.g., by mineral surfaces), particular biomarkers can persist for billions of years, making them of vital importance in answering questions about the origins and limits of life on early Earth and Mars. The search for organic material and biosignatures on Mars is particularly challenging due to the hostile environment and its effect on organic compounds near the surface. In support of life detection on Mars, it is crucial to investigate analogue environments on Earth that resemble best past and present Mars conditions. Terrestrial extreme environments offer a rich source of information allowing us to determine how extreme conditions affect life and molecules associated with it. Extremophilic organisms have adapted to the most stunning conditions on Earth in environments with often unique geological and chemical features. One challenge in detecting biomarkers is to optimize extraction, since organic molecules can be low in abundance and can strongly adsorb to mineral surfaces. Methods and analytical tools in the field of life science are continuously improving. Amplification methods are very useful for the detection of low concentrations of genomic material but most other organic molecules are not prone to amplification methods. Therefore, a great deal depends on the extraction efficiency. The questions “what to look for”, “where to look”, and “how to look for it” require more of our attention to ensure the success of future life detection missions on Mars. PMID:25370528

Aerts, Joost W.; Röling, Wilfred F.M.; Elsaesser, Andreas; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

2014-01-01

352

Response of marine biota to a period of oceanic anoxia during the Toarcian (Early Jurassic)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE; 183 Ma) was associated with a species level extinction of marine fauna and a crisis in the marine phytoplankton. The event lasted c. 250 ka and was characterised by a large, negative C-isotope excursion (CIE) of ~-7 per mil in marine organic matter, marine carbonates and fossilized wood. Geochemical evidence suggests that there was a contemporaneous increase in seawater temperature of 6-13° C that was accompanied by a large increase in the rate of global weathering. The present study documents changes in marine macrofauna in the early Toarcian at a high resolution and explores how species composition and biometric measurements are linked to geochemical changes. Reanalysis of the published palaeontological data for the Toarcian OAE suggests three apparent extinction horizons on a global and regional scale. The youngest of these horizons coincides exactly with the initial decrease in ?13C, and with the initial increases in sea surface temperature, continental weathering rates and seawater anoxia. New species range data were collected during this study from Toarcian sections in N Yorkshire, England. The results show distinct relationships with high resolution geochemical datasets (Cohen et al. 2007; Pearce et al. 2008). For example, there was an almost complete absence of fauna for 1750-12500 years immediately after each of the four abrupt shifts that make up the overall CIE. Only one bivalve species, Pseudomytiloides dubius, occurs in high abundance throughout the event, except within these discrete horizons. Increased epifaunal bivalve diversity and the reappearance of infauna indicate a brief return to relatively oxygenated conditions towards the end of the CIE. Biometric data were obtained for the two dominant bivalve species P. dubius and Bositra radiata from over 226 stratigraphic levels across the event. The data show that shell size is related to fluctuating seawater anoxia as recorded from Mo abundance and Mo-isotope data. These relationships are apparent both over the duration of the entire event and on 20 ka time-scales. Cohen, A. S. et al. 2007. J. Geol. Soc. 164 Pearce, C. R. et al. 2008. Geology 36

Caswell, B. A.; Coe, A. L.; Cohen, A. S.

2008-12-01

353

Effects of 4-nonylphenol on the biota in a littoral pond ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

National water quality criteria for 4-nonylphenol, a surfactant precursor and metabolite, are currently being developed by the US EPA. Preliminary data from laboratory tests indicate that the criterion maximum concentration may be as low as 3--10 {mu}g/L; field data on biological effects are rare. The study presented here was designed to assess the effects of 4-nonylphenol on a natural aquatic community using a set of 18 littoral enclosures (average volume 33 m{sup 3}). The common occurrence of 4-nonylphenol in municipal and industrial discharges dictated the use of a ``chronic`` exposure scenario for this study. Test concentrations ranged from 3 to 300 {mu}g/L, with applications every 48 hours for a 20 day period. This ensured a 21-day ``chronic`` exposure period and allowed sediment concentration of 4-nonylphenol to steadily increase. Survival of juvenile bluegill sunfish was reduced at 300 {mu}g/L, but not at 100, {mu}g/L; no effects on growth were noted over the 68-day assessment period. Abundance of Cladocera and Copepoda were also reduced at 300 {mu}g/L, with recovery observed within 2--4 weeks after the last nonylphenol application. Benthic macroinvertebrates, including Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, and Mollusca, were affected at 100--300 {mu}g/L, with impacts persisting for several months. The slow recovery of benthic macroinvertebrates was partially attributed to their prolonged exposure to sediment associated nonylphenol residues.

Liber, K.; Schmude, K.; O`Halloran, S.; Corry, T.; Gangl, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States); Stay, F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

1994-12-31

354

Community palaeoecology of the early Cambrian Maotianshan Shale biota: Ecological dominance of priapulid worms  

E-print Network

of priapulid worms Stephen Q. Dornbos a,, Jun-Yuan Chen b a Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin that the three most abundant genera comprise 43.2% of all specimens: the tubiform priapulid worm Paraselkirkia (16.0%), the diminutive priapulid worm Sicyophorus (14.3%), and the brachiopod Heliomedusa (12

Dornbos, Stephen Q.

355

TOXICITY OF DIETBOURNE METALS IN AQUATIC BIOTA: EMERGING SCIENCE AND REGULATORY IMPLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A Pellston Workshop entitled "The Role of Dietborne Exposures in the Evaluation of Risk of Metals to Aquatic Organisms" was held in July 2002. The workshop was organized by SETAC, with funding from several government and industry organizations. The objective was to examine key ...

356

DETERMINATION OF SYNTHETIC MUSK COMPOUNDS IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER AND ESTIMATING BIOTA EXPOSURE IN THE RECEIVING WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Synthetic musk compounds are consumer chemicals manufactured as fragrance materials and consumed in very large quantities worldwide. Due to their high usage and release, they have become ubiquitous in the environment. The U.S. EPA (Las Vegas) developed surface water monitoring me...

357

LEVELS OF SYNTHETIC MUSKS COMPOUNDS IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER FOR ESTIMATING BIOTA EXPOSURE IN RECEIVING WATERS  

EPA Science Inventory

Synthetic musk compounds are consumer chemicals manufactured as fragrance materials and consumed in very large quantities worldwide. Due to their high use and release, they have become ubiquitous in the environment. We analyzed water samples from the confluence of three municipal...

358

Temporal trends of mercury in marine biota of west and northwest Greenland.  

PubMed

Temporal trends in mercury concentrations ([Hg]) during the last two to three decades were determined in liver of shorthorn sculpin, ringed seal and Atlantic walrus from northwest Greenland (NWG, 77 degrees N) and in liver of shorthorn sculpin and ringed seal from central west Greenland (CWG, 69 degrees N) during the last decade. Stable-nitrogen (delta(15)N) and carbon (delta(13)C) isotope values were determined in muscle of ringed seals to provide insight into potential trophic level changes through time. Log-linear regressions on annual median [Hg] did not reveal any temporal trend in shorthorn sculpin from CWG and NWG and walrus from NWG. In ringed seals from NWG, an increase in [Hg] of 7.8% per year was observed. When based on delta(15)N-adjusted [Hg] this rate increased to 8.5% but was still non-significant. In ringed seal from CWG no trend was found in [Hg] during the period 1994-2004. However, during the last part of the period (1999-2004) the [Hg] increased significantly. Including tissue delta(15)N values as a covariate had a marked effect on these results. The annual changes in delta(15)N-adjusted [Hg] was estimated to -5.0% for the whole period and 2.2% during the last 5 years compared to -1.3% and 12.4%, respectively, for the non-adjusted [Hg]. PMID:17049950

Rigét, Frank; Dietz, Rune; Born, Erik W; Sonne, Christian; Hobson, Keith A

2007-01-01

359

Biological Effects of Gamma-Ray Bursts: distances for severe damage on the biota  

E-print Network

We present in this work a unified, quantitative synthesis of analytical and numerical calculations of the effects that could be caused on Earth by a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), considering atmospheric and biological implications. The main effects of the illumination by a GRB are classified in four distinct ones and analyzed separately, namely: direct gamma Flash, UV Flash, Ozone Layer Depletion and Cosmic Rays. The effectiveness of each of these effects is compared and distances for significant biological damage are given for each one. We find that the first three effects have potential to cause global environmental changes and biospheric damages, even if the source is located at Galactic distances or even farther (up to 150 kpc, about five times the Galactic diameter of 30 kpc). Instead, cosmic rays would only be a serious threat for close sources (on the order of a few pc). As a concrete application from a well-recorded event, the effects on the biosphere of an event identical to the giant flare of SGR1806-20 on Dec 27, 2004 have been calculated. In spite of not beeing a classical GRB, most of the parameters of this recent flare are quite well-known and have been used as a calibration for our study. We find that a giant flare impinging on Earth is not a threat for life in all practical situations, mainly because it is not as energetic, in spite of being much more frequent than GRBs, unless the source happens to be extremely close.

Douglas Galante; Jorge Ernesto Horvath

2005-12-01

360

Environmental Exposure of Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota to Triclosan and Triclocarban  

PubMed Central

The synthetic biocides triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) and triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide) are routinely added to a wide array of antimicrobial personal care products and consumer articles. Both compounds can persist in the environment and exhibit toxicity toward a number of biological receptors. Recent reports of toxicological effects in wildlife, human cell cultures, and laboratory animals have heightened the interest in the occurrence of these biocide and related toxic effects. The present study aimed to summarize published environmental concentrations of biocides and contrast them with toxicity threshold values of susceptible organisms. Environmental occurrences and toxicity threshold values span more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. The highest biocide levels, measured in the mid parts-per-million range, were determined to occur in aquatic sediments and in municipal biosolids destined for land application. Crustacea and algae were identified as the most sensitive species, susceptible to adverse effects from biocide exposures in the parts-per-trillion range. An overlap of environmental concentrations and toxicity threshold values was noted for these more sensitive organisms, suggesting potential adverse ecological effects in aquatic environments. Affirmative evidence for this is lacking, however, since studies examining environmental occurrences of biocides vis-à-vis the health and diversity of aquatic species have not yet been conducted. PMID:20046971

Chalew, Talia E.; Halden, Rolf U.

2009-01-01

361

Selenium in aquatic biota inhabiting agricultural drains in the Salton Sea Basin, California.  

PubMed

Resource managers are concerned that water conservation practices in irrigated farmlands along the southern border of the Salton Sea, Imperial County, California, could increase selenium concentrations in agricultural drainwater and harm the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), a federally protected endangered species. As part of a broader attempt to address this concern, we conducted a 3-year investigation to collect baseline information on selenium concentrations in seven agricultural drains inhabited by pupfish. We collected water, sediment, selected aquatic food-chain taxa (particulate organic detritus, filamentous algae, net plankton, and midge [Chironomidae] larvae), and two poeciliid fishes (western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis and sailfin molly Poecilia latipinna) for selenium determinations. The two fish species served as ecological surrogates for pupfish, which we were not permitted to sacrifice. Dissolved selenium ranged from 0.70 to 32.8 ?g/L, with selenate as the major constituent. Total selenium concentrations in other environmental matrices varied widely among drains, with one drain (Trifolium 18) exhibiting especially high concentrations in detritus, 5.98-58.0 ?g Se/g; midge larvae, 12.7-50.6 ?g Se/g; mosquitofish, 13.2-20.2 ?g Se/g; and mollies, 12.8-30.4 ?g Se/g (all tissue concentrations are based on dry weights). Although toxic thresholds for selenium in fishes from the Salton Sea are still poorly understood, available evidence suggests that ambient concentrations of this element may not be sufficiently elevated to adversely affect reproductive success and survival in selenium-tolerant poeciliids and pupfish. PMID:21915593

Saiki, Michael K; Martin, Barbara A; May, Thomas W

2012-09-01

362

Summary of Information on Aquatic Biota and Their Habitats in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, through 1995  

E-print Network

......................................................................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Rationale for a Review of Biological Information .............................................................................................. 2 Purpose and Scope .............................................................................................................................................. 4 Sources of Information........................................................................................................................................ 4 Background Studies .................................................................................................................................. 5 Acknowledgments ..............

Oregon Through; Bob Altman; Avifauna Northwest; Colleen M. Henson; Ian; Ian R. Waite; U. S. Geological Survey; U. S. Fish; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; Wildlife Service; Bruce Babbitt Secretary; Gordon P. Eaton

363

Benson Beach Demonstration Project: Composition and Abundance of Biota at Three Alternative Sump Sites  

SciTech Connect

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is investigating plans to provide sediment to nourish beaches north of the Mouth of the Columbia River (MCR). Under the currently designed proposal, sediment dredged from the MCR will be temporarily stored at one of three proposed areas south of the North Jetty before being redredged and moved by a cutterhead pipeline dredge over the jetty to nourish Benson Beach. Resulting potential impacts to resident Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) and fishes represent one of the criteria for evaluating each of the alternative locations. To establish the species composition and relative abundance of crabs and fishes associated with each of the three proposed sump areas, researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Division completed nine field sampling trips from July 8, 2003, to November 1, 2003, for a total of 113 successful trawls comprising an area of over 7.4 ha (74,156 m2). This report documents the results of that effort. To understand the relative risk of losses to crab populations associated with dredging impacts at the sump alternative areas, it is recommended that a modified dredge impact model be developed using the data collected in this study. This model should estimate crab adult equivalent loss and associated error rates to gain a population-level perspective on the potential entrainment impacts at each of the three alternative sump areas. As well, a sustained survey of Dungeness crab distribution and movement within the Columbia River estuary would clarify the relative value of the sump areas as a migratory corridor for crab populations, and support management decisions relative to issues associated with dredged material handling and disposal.

Williams, Greg D.; Pearson, Walter H.; Evans, Nathan R.; Anderson, Michael G.

2004-01-15

364

Humus structure during a spruce forest rotation: quantitative changes and relationship to soil biota  

E-print Network

1 Humus structure during a spruce forest rotation: quantitative changes and relationship to soil a spruce forest cycle on acid soil. The study was carried out at four sites of different age, recent spruce litter, fragmented spruce litter, decomposed litter and faeces and fungi, which contributed

Boyer, Edmond

365

Americium and plutonium in water, biota, and sediment from the central Oregon coast  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-239, 240 and americium-241 were measured in the mussel Mytilus californianus from the region of Coos Bay, OR. The flesh of this species has a plutonium concentration of about 90 fCi/kg, and an Am-241/Pu-239, 240 ratio that is high relative to mixed fallout, ranging between two and three. Transuranic concentrations in sediment, unfiltered water, and filterable particulates were also measured; none of these materials has an Am/Pu ratio as greatly elevated as the mussels, and there is no apparent difference in the Am/Pu ratio of terrestrial runoff and coastal water. Sediment core profiles do not allow accumulation rates or depositional histories to be identified, but it does not appear that material characterized by a high Am/Pu ratio has ever been introduced to this estuary. Other bivalves (Tresus capax and Macoma nasuta) and a polychaete (Abarenicola sp.) do not have an elevated Am/Pu ratio, although the absolute activity of plutonium in the infaunal bivalves is roughly four times that in the mussels.

Nielsen, R. D.

1982-06-01

366

ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) IN SEDIMENTS AND BIOTA FROM FOUR US ARCTIC LAKES  

EPA Science Inventory

Organochlorine (OC) concentrations in surface sediment, snails (Lymnea sp.), and two freshwater fish species (grayling, Thymallus arcticus; and lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush) from four lakes in the US Arctic were determined. In surface sediment, chlorinated benzenes (including...

367

Is marine debris ingestion still a problem for the coastal marine biota of southern Brazil?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation of synthetic debris in marine and coastal environments is a consequence of the inten- sive and continuous release of these highly persistent materials. This study investigates the current status of marine debris ingestion by sea turtles and seabirds found along the southern Brazilian coast. All green turtles (n = 34) and 40% of the seabirds (14 of 35)

Paula S. Tourinho; Juliana A. Ivar do Sul; Gilberto Fillmann

2009-01-01

368

Monterey Bay cold-seep biota: Assemblages, abundance, and ultrastructure of living foraminifera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although there is a growing body of evidence indicating benthic foraminifera inhabit hydrocarbon and cold seep environments, biochemical and ultrastructural data on seep foraminiferal communities are not available. Therefore, sediments collected from cold seeps in Monterey Bay, CA (900-1000 m), were examined for the presence of live benthic foraminifera. Results from three independent methods (ATP assay, ultrastructural analysis, rose Bengal staining) indicate that certain species inhabit the Clam Flat and Clam Field seeps. Abundances in our seep samples were lower than in comparable non-seep sites, although not atypical for these bathyal depths. Of 38 species represented at these two seep sites by cytoplasm-containing specimens, only Spiroplectammina biformis was restricted to the seep environment. However, because S. biformis is also known from non-seep sites in other areas, it should not be considered as endemic to seeps. Ultrastructural studies show abundant peroxisomes in seep specimens, which may allow inhabitation of such environments. One specimen of Uvigerina peregrina had prokaryotes nestled in test pores, suggesting that bacteria may play a role in the survival of foraminifera in this seep environment.

Bernhard, Joan M.; Buck, Kurt R.; Barry, James P.

2001-10-01

369

On the eve of animal radiation: phylogeny, ecology and evolution of the Ediacara biota.  

PubMed

Ediacara fossils document an important evolutionary episode just before the Cambrian explosion and hold critical information about the early evolution of macroscopic and complex multicellular life. They also represent an enduring controversy in paleontology. How are the Ediacara fossils related to living animals? How did they live? Do they share any evolutionary patterns with other life forms? Recent developments indicate that Ediacara fossils epitomize a phylogenetically diverse biosphere, probably including animals, protists, algae, fungi and others. Their simple ecology is dominated by epibenthic osmotrophs, deposit feeders and grazers, but few if any predators. Their evolution started with an early morphospace expansion followed by taxonomic diversification within confined morphospace, and concluded by extinction of many taxa at the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary. PMID:18952316

Xiao, Shuhai; Laflamme, Marc

2009-01-01

370

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 30033018 Diversity and distribution of Victoria Land biota  

E-print Network

of tardigrade, rotifer, protist, fungal and prokaryote communities is emerging. The latter groups are the least for tardigrades and rotifers, and apparently low for mosses, lichens, protists, fungi and prokaryotes. Much

Wall, Diana

371

An international model validation exercise on radionuclide transfer and doses to freshwater biota.  

SciTech Connect

Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) program, activity concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 3}H in Perch Lake at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site were predicted, in freshwater primary producers, invertebrates, fishes, herpetofauna and mammals using eleven modelling approaches. Comparison of predicted radionuclide concentrations in the different species types with measured values highlighted a number of areas where additional work and understanding is required to improve the predictions of radionuclide transfer. For some species, the differences could be explained by ecological factors such as trophic level or the influence of stable analogues. Model predictions were relatively poor for mammalian species and herpetofauna compared with measured values, partly due to a lack of relevant data. In addition, concentration ratios are sometimes under-predicted when derived from experiments performed under controlled laboratory conditions representative of conditions in other water bodies.

Yankovich, T. L.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Heling, R.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Kryshev, A. I.; Nedveckaite, T.; Smith, J. T.; Wood, M. D.; Environmental Science Division; AREVA Resources; Environmental Science, Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd.; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; IRSN; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; The Environment Agency; Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group; Univ. of Liverpool; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Inst. of Physics, Lithuania; State Enterprise Scientific Production Association

2010-06-09

372

Availability of Biota-sediment Accumulation Factor Data Set and PCB Residue Effects Database  

EPA Science Inventory

At contaminated sites, EPA?s Superfund program must decide how best to protect public health and the environment. This research was undertaken to better inform decision making and reduce uncertainties related to risk assessments at Superfund sites. A residue-effects database (PCB...

373

Organochlorine Pesticides and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Sediments and Biota from Four US Arctic Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Organochlorine (OC) concentrations in surface sediment, snails (Lymnea sp.), and two freshwater fish species (grayling, Thymallus arcticus; and lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush) from four lakes in the US Arctic were determined. In surface sediment, chlorinated benzenes (including hexachlorobenzene,\\u000a HCB), and p,p?-DDT were the primary analytes detected (max?=?0.7 ng\\/g dry wt), while individual polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners\\u000a were always below

S. M. Allen-Gil; C. P. Gubala; R. Wilson; D. H. Landers; T. L. Wade; J. L. Sericano; L. R. Curtis

1997-01-01

374

Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediments and biota from four US Arctic lakes.  

PubMed

Organochlorine (OC) concentrations in surface sediment, snails (Lymnea sp.), and two freshwater fish species (grayling, Thymallus arcticus; and lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush) from four lakes in the US Arctic were determined. In surface sediment, chlorinated benzenes (including hexachlorobenzene, HCB), and p,p'-DDT were the primary analytes detected (max = 0.7 ng/g dry wt), while individual polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were always below 0.1 ng/g. A wider range of compounds and higher concentrations were found in lake trout, the top predatory fish species in the same lakes. The concentration ranges for hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), chlordane-related compounds (CHLORs), DDTs, and PCBs in lake trout and grayling were similar to those reported for other arctic freshwater fish (1-100 ng/g wet wt), but one to two orders of magnitude lower than Great Lakes salmonids. Nitrogen isotope analysis confirmed that differences in OC concentrations between grayling and lake trout are explained partly by differences in food web position. PMID:9419256

Allen-Gil, S M; Gubala, C P; Wilson, R; Landers, D H; Wade, T L; Sericano, J L; Curtis, L R

1997-11-01

375

Mercury Distribution in the Biota of a Great Lakes Estuary: Old Woman Creek, Ohio  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of mercury contamination in a wetland ecosystem was undertaken to assess degree of contamination in various compartments of the food web, and determine the most important routes for mercury to enter fish species. Old Woman Creek is a freshwater estuary on the southern shore of Lake Erie and has been recognized as an important nursery area for fish.

Donna R. Francis; David J. Jude; James A. Barres

1998-01-01

376

Effects of multi-scale environmental characteristics on agricultural stream biota in eastern Wisconsin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey examined 25 agricultural streams in eastern Wisconsin to determine relations between fish, invertebrate, and algal metrics and multiple spatial scales of land cover, geologic setting, hydrologic, aquatic habitat, and water chemistry data. Spearman correlation and redundancy analyses were used to examine relations among biotic metrics and environmental characteristics. Riparian vegetation, geologic, and hydrologic conditions affected the response of biotic metrics to watershed agricultural land cover but the relations were aquatic assemblage dependent. It was difficult to separate the interrelated effects of geologic setting, watershed and buffer land cover, and base flow. Watershed and buffer land cover, geologic setting, reach riparian vegetation width, and stream size affected the fish IBI, invertebrate diversity, diatom IBI, and number of algal taxa; however, the invertebrate FBI, percentage of EPT, and the diatom pollution index were more influenced by nutrient concentrations and flow variability. Fish IBI scores seemed most sensitive to land cover in the entire stream network buffer, more so than watershed-scale land cover and segment or reach riparian vegetation width. All but one stream with more than approximately 10 percent buffer agriculture had fish IBI scores of fair or poor. In general, the invertebrate and algal metrics used in this study were not as sensitive to land cover effects as fish metrics. Some of the reach-scale characteristics, such as width/depth ratios, velocity, and bank stability, could be related to watershed influences of both land cover and geologic setting. The Wisconsin habitat index was related to watershed geologic setting, watershed and buffer land cover, riparian vegetation width, and base flow, and appeared to be a good indicator of stream quality. Results from this study emphasize the value of using more than one or two biotic metrics to assess water quality and the importance of environmental characteristics at multiple scales.

Fitzpatrick, F.A.; Scudder, B.C.; Lenz, B.N.; Sullivan, D.J.

2001-01-01

377

The late Pleistocene desiccation of Lake Victoria and the origin of its endemic biota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lingering debate among evolutionary biologists over whether or not Lake Victoria dried out during the late Pleistocene focuses\\u000a on perceived conflicts between biological and geological evidence for the age of its endemic species. This article reviews\\u000a and updates the geophysical and paleoecological evidence for lake-wide desiccation and describes the environmental conditions\\u000a that aquatic species likely experienced during the low stand.

J. C. Stager; T. C. Johnson

2008-01-01

378

Effects of Continuous Cropping of Rye on Soil Biota and Biochemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term studies on the ecological effects of continuous rye cultivations carried out in Poland are summarized. It was shown that in continuous cropping of rye, despite the decrease of crop yields, no significant difference was observed in annual primary production rates compared with estimates found for rye fields cultivated in diversified crop rotation patterns. In continuous cultivation of rye fauna

Lech Ryszkowski; Lech Szajdak; Jerzy Karg

1998-01-01

379

How do cold water biota arrive in a tropical bay near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous ecological studies on foraminifera and ostracoda from the tropical Sepetiba Bay, located in the southern part of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, have noted the presence in this area of some cool water taxons typical of the Argentine continental platform. These studies have proposed that parcels of these temperate waters with their associated biological indicators are advected

Merritt R Stevenson; Dimas Dias-Brito; Jose L Stech; Milton Kampel

1998-01-01

380

The Jehol Biota (Lower Cretaceous, China): new discoveries and future prospects.  

PubMed

Continuing work on the paleontology and sedimentology of the Jehol Group (Lower Cretaceous, China) is yielding numerous new insights into the evolution of many Mesozoic plant and animal clades. Nevertheless, many questions remain unanswered regarding Jehol paleoenvironments, paleobiology and paleobiogeography. All of this information will be crucial in providing a detailed reconstruction of this extinct ecosystem. PMID:21395985

Barrett, Paul M; Hilton, Jason M

2006-03-01

381

Photographic monitoring of benthic biota at Stetson Bank, Gulf of Mexico  

E-print Network

. Conttnued Cover Category I Oct-93 2 May-94 Crutse Cover Averages 3 4 5 6 Sep-94 May-95 Oct-95 Jun-96 7 Ma -97 8 Jul-98 9 Jun-99 Average Cnidana Ag ariel a fragilis Diploria strigose Madracis decactis Millepora alctcornis Stephanocoenia t...

Bernhardt, Sarah Praeger

2012-06-07

382

Impacts on water quality and biota from natural acid rock drainage in Colorado's Lake Creek watershed  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Colorado's Lake Creek watershed hosts natural acid rock drainage that significantly impacts surface water, streambed sediment, and aquatic life. The source of the ARD is a group of iron-rich springs that emerge from intensely hydrothermally altered, unexploited, low-grade porphyry copper mineralization in the Grizzly Peak Caldera. Source water chemistry includes pH of 2.5 and dissolved metal concentrations of up to 277 mg/L aluminum, 498 mg/L iron, and 10 mg/L copper. From the hydrothermally altered area downstream for 27 kilometers to Twin Lakes Reservoir, metal concentrations in streambed sediment are elevated and the watershed experiences locally severe adverse impacts to aquatic life due to the acidic, metal-laden water. The water and sediment quality of Twin Lakes Reservoir is sufficiently improved that the reservoir supports a trout fishery, and remnants of upstream ARD are negligible.

Bird, D.A.; Sares, Matthew A.; Policky, Greg A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Church, Stanley E.

2006-01-01

383

Transfer of heavy metals to biota after remediation of contaminated soils with calcareous residues.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study was carried out to evaluate the assimilation of heavy metals by three types of horticultural plants (broccoli, lettuce and leek), different parts of which are destined for human and farm animals consumption (leaves, roots, fruits). Five consecutive crops of each vegetable were obtained in greenhouse. In a second stage, experiments were carried out with rabbits fed with such vegetables. The plants were cultivated in four types of soil. The first one was contaminated by heavy metals (S1), the second was a uncontaminated soil (blank soil) (S2), the third was the material obtained by mixing S1 with residues coming from demolition and construction activities (S3); while the fourth was the result of remediating S1 with lime residues coming from quarries (S4). The total metal content (As, Pb, Cd and Zn) of the soil samples, rizosphere, leached water and vegetable samples, were measured, and both the translocation and bioconcentration factors (TF and BCF, respectively) were calculated. In the second stage, the effect caused in rabbits fed with the vegetables was monitorized using both external observation and the analysis of blood, urine, and the levels of metals in muscles, liver and kidney. The statistical analysis of the results obtained showed that there were no significant differences in the heavy metal levels for the vegetables cultivated in S2, S3 and S4. The results for soil sample S1 did not have a normal distribution since the growing of the vegetables were not homogeneous and also strongly dependent on the type of vegetal. As regards the effect caused in rabbits, significant differences were observed for the animals fed with plants cultivated in S1 compared with the others.

Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martínez-Sánchez, Maria Jose; Agudo, Ines; Gonzalez, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Belen Martínez, Lucia; Hernández, Carmen; García-Fernandez, Antonio Juan; Bech, Jaime

2013-04-01

384

The Bering Land Bridge: a moisture barrier to the dispersal of steppe–tundra biota?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bering Land Bridge (BLB) connected the two principal arctic biological refugia, Western and Eastern Beringia, during intervals of lowered sea level in the Pleistocene. Fossil evidence from lowland BLB organic deposits dating to the Last Glaciation indicates that this broad region was dominated by shrub tundra vegetation, and had a mesic climate. The dominant ecosystem in Western Beringia and

Scott A. Elias; Barnaby Crocker

2008-01-01

385

The Bering Land Bridge: a moisture barrier to the dispersal of steppe-tundra biota?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bering Land Bridge (BLB) connected the two principal arctic biological refugia, Western and Eastern Beringia, during intervals of lowered sea level in the Pleistocene. Fossil evidence from lowland BLB organic deposits dating to the Last Glaciation indicates that this broad region was dominated by shrub tundra vegetation, and had a mesic climate. The dominant ecosystem in Western Beringia and the interior regions of Eastern Beringia was steppe-tundra, with herbaceous plant communities and arid climate. Although Western and Eastern Beringia shared many species in common during the Late Pleistocene, there were a number of species that were restricted to only one side of the BLB. Among the vertebrate fauna, the woolly rhinoceros was found only to the west of the BLB, North American camels, bonnet-horned musk-oxen and some horse species were found only to the east of the land bridge. These were all steppe-tundra inhabitants, adapted to grazing. The same phenomenon can be seen in the insect faunas of the Western and Eastern Beringia. The steppe-tundra beetle fauna of Western Beringia was dominated by weevils of the genus Stephanocleonus, a group that was virtually absent from Eastern Beringia. The dry-adapted weevils, Lepidophorus lineaticollis and Vitavitus thulius were important members of steppe-tundra communities in Eastern Beringia, but were either absent or rare in Western Beringia. The leaf beetles Chrysolina arctica, C. brunnicornis bermani, and Galeruca interrupta circumdata were typical members of the Pleistocene steppe-tundra communities of Western Beringia, but absent from Eastern Beringia. On the other hand, some steppe tundra-adapted leaf beetles managed to occupy both sides of the BLB, such as Phaedon armoraciae. Much of the BLB remains unstudied, but on biogeographic grounds, it appears that there was some kind of biological filter that blocked the movements of some steppe-tundra plants and animals across the BLB.

Elias, Scott A.; Crocker, Barnaby

2008-12-01

386

Organic Pollutants in Coastal Waters, Sediments, and Biota: A Relevant Driver for Ecosystems During the Anthropocene?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The total number of synthetic organic chemicals introduced to the environment by humans has never been quantified, but it\\u000a is not lower than thousands. A fraction of these chemicals have toxic effects to coastal organisms and presumably affect ecosystems\\u000a structure and function. During the last decades, some of the processes affecting the transport, degradation, and fate of a\\u000a limited number

Jordi Dachs; Laurence Méjanelle

2010-01-01

387

Changes in atmospheric CO2 - Influence of the marine biota at high latitude  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Approximately half of the nitrogen and phosphorus entering deep waters of the contemporary ocean are transported from the surface in inorganic form as preformed nutrients. A simple model for ocean chemistry is presented and shown to account for the present level of atmospheric CO2. Fluctuations in preformed nutrients, modulated by changes in insolation and circulation at high latitudes, can result in significant variations in CO2. It is suggested that these changes may account for the apparent control on climate exercised by secular variations in the orbital parameters of the earth.

Knox, F.; Mcelroy, M. B.

1984-01-01

388

Land cover and Urbanization links with stream Biota in the mid-Atlantic USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The amount of roads, parking lots, buildings and other developed land within a watershed, its impervious surface area (ISA), has long been known to impact the biotic health of streams and waterways. Vegetation in riparian zones can reduce the negative impacts of ISA by buffering runoff, filtering pollution, and reducing flow velocities that incise stream channels and transport pollutants. ISA has traditionally been mapped by assigning coefficients to land use categories, a type of 'classify and multiply' approach. This can be substantially improved using digital imagery capable of discriminating fine scale information of the land surface, including built areas and tree cover in riparian buffer zones. We used a combination of Landsat (30m) and IKONOS (4m) satellite imagery to develop accurate maps of subpixel ISA and tree cover across the Chesapeake Bay watershed, an area of highly altered land cover and rapid land use change. We report on analyses of the links between these maps and stream biotic measurements for a wide range of small watersheds across Maryland for which extensive in-stream monitoring has been established as part of the Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS). A regression tree statistical approach was used to determine the relationship between land cover and indices calculated by the MBSS, focusing on benthic indices of biologic integrity (IBI). We also explored the influence of landscape configuration and distance weighting of land cover relative to stream channels and sampling points. Thresholds of impervious and tree cover within the watersheds and riparian buffer zones established using the IKONOS imagery were found to vary more substantially across the diverse range of watersheds within the state, as assessed using the Landsat subpixel maps. Nonetheless, ISA was found to be the primary predictor of stream health, followed by tree cover in riparian buffers and within the watersheds. This work advances the estimation of stream health characteristics in areas where MBSS measurements do not exist, and aids the development of guidelines for management and restoration. We are now expanding the work to include our model projections of future urbanization trends, and will report on preliminary results from this analysis.

Goetz, S. J.; Fiske, G.

2005-12-01

389

The biota as ancient and modern modulator of the earth's atmosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The composition of the terrestrial atmosphere is thought to have been markedly modified by surface microbiota and modulated around quantities of gases optimized for growth of these microbiota. Three diagrams illustrating these suppositions are presented. The first shows a probable order of appearance of major metabolic pathways in microbes that interact with sediment and atmosphere. It is based on evolutionary considerations and is devised independently of the fossil record. The second diagram shows the qualitative emissions and removals of atmospheric gases by anaerobic organisms; it approximates those processes thought to have dominated the terrestrial atmosphere in Archean times. The third diagrams gaseous emissions and removals by the major groups of organisms, including oxygen-releasing and -utilizing forms. Biological gas exchange processes thought to have dominated the atmosphere since the Proterozoic are thus represented.

Margulis, L.; Lovelock, J. E.

1978-01-01

390

Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Rice and Wetland Biota: employing integrated indices of processes that drive methylmercury risk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wetlands often are associated with elevated methylmercury (MeHg) production and food web bioaccumulation, making them potentially important sources of Hg to surrounding waters and to wetland-dependent fish and wildlife. However, the cycling of MeHg through wetlands can vary markedly with wetland type. Agricultural wetlands such as rice fields can exhibit particularly pronounced MeHg concentrations and bioaccumulation because their biogeochemical, hydrological, and ecological characteristics facilitate the conversion of inorganic mercury (Hg) to MeHg. Rice fields are characterized by a series of seasonal extreme wetting and drying cycles, sulfate-containing fertilizers, and high levels of labile organic carbon, all of which are key processes in the Hg cycle. Rice fields comprise approximately 20% of freshwater habitats and 11% of cultivated land area globally, providing critical wildlife habitat while offering substantial economic, human health, and ecosystem benefits. Thus, there is strong impetus to better understand the drivers of Hg cycling in rice fields and to develop useful management approaches for minimizing Hg risk associated with rice agriculture without compromising rice production. We examined the role of rice wetlands on MeHg bioaccumulation through foodwebs by employing biosentinel caged fish as integrators of MeHg cycling processes. With experimental field studies in California's Central Valley, we placed biosentinel fishes into nine rice wetlands that were subjected to three different harvest strategies, and into nine managed wetlands that encompassed three different hydrological regimes. We simultaneously measured a suite of biogeochemical processes in surface water, sediment, and pore water in order to link the response in fish Hg bioaccumulation with within-field processes that regulate MeHg cycling. Our preliminary results indicate that fish Hg concentrations were 1.6 times higher in rice wetlands than in managed wetlands. Additionally, fish Hg concentrations increased across rice fields from inlets to outlets indicating that in situ processes enhanced MeHg production rice fields, whereas concentrations decreased from inlets to outlets in managed wetlands. Finally, our preliminary results suggest organic carbon associated with rice plants was an important contributor to fish Hg concentrations, whereas plants in managed wetlands were not strongly linked to fish Hg concentrations. Our preliminary findings suggest that there are strong linkages between biogeochemical processes inherent in rice wetlands and MeHg cycling and bioaccumulation, which are further described in a companion presentation by Windham-Myers (this session). These results have important implications for managing MeHg risk in areas with extensive rice agriculture.

Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.; Windham-Myers, L.; Fleck, J.

2013-12-01

391

Lake Michigan: Man's effects on native fish stocks and other biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Exploitation was largely responsible for the changes in Lake Michigan fish stocks before the invasion of the smelt, and probably before the invasion of the sea lamprey. The lamprey and alewife, however, have exerted a greater impact than the fishery on native fish populations in recent decades. Accelerated eutrophication and other pollution, although important, have not equalled the other factors in causing changes in native fish populations.

Wells, LaRue; McLain, Alberton L.

1973-01-01

392

Is marine debris ingestion still a problem for the coastal marine biota of southern Brazil?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation of synthetic debris in marine and coastal environments is a consequence of the intensive and continuous release of these highly persistent materials. This study investigates the current status of marine debris ingestion by sea turtles and seabirds found along the southern Brazilian coast. All green turtles (n=34) and 40% of the seabirds (14 of 35) were found to

Paula S. Tourinho; Juliana A. Ivar do Sul; Gilberto Fillmann

2010-01-01

393

GROUP REPORT: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ACIDIFICATION ON AQUATIC BIOTA  

EPA Science Inventory

Acidification affects all components of biological communities in lakes and streams: microbes, algae, macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, amphibians, and other vertebrates that rely on aquatic ecosystems for habitat or food. echanisms of effect are both direct (toxic responses to c...

394

Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples with advanced mercury analyzer: Method validation.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present a simple, fast and cost-effective method for determination of methyl mercury (MeHg) in marine samples. All important parameters influencing the sample preparation process were investigated and optimized. Full validation of the method was performed in accordance to the ISO-17025 (ISO/IEC, 2005) and Eurachem guidelines. Blanks, selectivity, working range (0.09-3.0ng), recovery (92-108%), intermediate precision (1.7-4.5%), traceability, limit of detection (0.009ng), limit of quantification (0.045ng) and expanded uncertainty (15%, k=2) were assessed. Estimation of the uncertainty contribution of each parameter and the demonstration of traceability of measurement results was provided as well. Furthermore, the selectivity of the method was studied by analyzing the same sample extracts by advanced mercury analyzer (AMA) and gas chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC-AFS). Additional validation of the proposed procedure was effectuated by participation in the IAEA-461 worldwide inter-laboratory comparison exercises. PMID:25624245

Azemard, Sabine; Vassileva, Emilia

2015-06-01

395

Increasing levels and biomagnification of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic biota.  

PubMed

Representatives of the Antarctic food web (krill, cephalopod, fish, penguin, seal) of the area around Elephant Island and from the Weddell Sea were analysed for the most recalcitrant organochlorine compounds. Due to sorption of the compounds to sinking particles and accumulation in sediments, two benthic fish species (Gobionotothen gibberifrons, Chaenocephalus aceratus) feeding on benthos invertebrates and fish reflected significantly increasing concentrations within a decade (1987-1996), while a benthopelagic species (Champsocephalus gunnari) feeding on krill did not. In the pelagic food chain, lipid normalised concentrations of all compounds increased from Antarctic krill to fish proving that biomagnification of highly lipophilic pollutants (log octanol-water partition coefficient>5) occurs in water-breathing animals. As top predators Weddell and southern elephant seals (Leptonychotes weddellii, Mirounga leonina) biomagnified the persistent organic pollutants relative to krill 30-160 fold with the exception of hexachlorobenzene, the levels of which were lower than in fish indicating its intense specific elimination. PMID:14972581

Goerke, Helmut; Weber, Kurt; Bornemann, Horst; Ramdohr, Sven; Plötz, Joachim

2004-02-01

396

Acetic Acid Bacterial Biota of the Pink Sugar Cane Mealybug, Saccharococcus sacchari, and Its Environs  

PubMed Central

Saccharococcus sacchari is the primary colonizer of the developing “sterile” tissue between the leaf sheath and stem of sugar cane. The honeydew secreted by the mealybugs is acidic (about pH 3) and supports an atypical epiphytic microbiota dominated by acetobacter-like bacteria and acidophilic yeast species. However, Erwinia and Leuconostoc species predominate within the leaf sheath pocket region when the mealybugs die out. The unidentified acetobacters were readily isolated from S. sacchari throughout its life cycle and from other genera of mealybugs on sugar cane and various other plants, both above and below ground. No other insect present on sugar cane was a significant vector of acetic acid bacteria. The major factors restricting microbial diversity within the environs of mealybugs were considered to be yeast activity along with bacterial production of acetic acid, ketogluconic acids, and gamma-pyrones, in association with their lowering of pH. The microbial products may aid in suppressing the attack by the parasitic mold Aspergillus parasiticus on mealybugs but could act as attractants for the predatory fruit fly Cacoxenus perspicax. PMID:16348144

Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Inkerman, Peter A.

1990-01-01

397

Operating Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CSC 342. Operating Systems (3) Prerequisite: CSC 332. Study of supervisory programs. System services and file systems; CPU scheduling; memory management; virtual memory; disk scheduling. Deadlock characterization, prevention, and avoidance; concurrent processes; semaphores; critical sections; synchronization. Distributed systems and communication protocols.

Dr Clayton Ferner

398

Hepatic metallothionein concentrations in the golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) - Relationship with environmental metal concentrations in a metal-contaminated coastal system in Portugal.  

PubMed

This field survey was designed to assess the environmental metal contamination status of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). To achieve that goal, the concentrations of Cd, Hg, Cu and Zn in the sediments and water were assessed and Liza aurata hepatic metallothionein (MT) determined. The relationships between MT and environmental metal concentrations and hydrological factors were examined. Results revealed a wide distribution of metals both in water and sediments throughout the lagoon, mainly at Rio Novo do Principe (RIO) and Laranjo (LAR), at concentrations that may affect biota. MT concentrations were higher at the sites with high metal content (RIO and LAR). A significant positive correlation was found between MT and Cd in the sediments as well as with MT and Hg and Cu in the water. Moreover, a negative correlation between MT and salinity was found. Thus, the current data support MT use as a biomarker of metal exposure emphasizing the importance of hydrological parameters in its concentrations. Results suggest the continued monitoring of this lagoon system. PMID:19913292

Oliveira, M; Ahmad, I; Maria, V L; Serafim, A; Bebianno, M J; Pacheco, M; Santos, M A

2010-05-01

399

Induction of chromosome aberrations in the Allium cepa test system caused by the exposure of seeds to industrial effluents contaminated with azo dyes.  

PubMed

Numerous potentially mutagenic chemicals have been studied mainly because they can cause damaging and inheritable changes in the genetic material. Several tests are commonly used for biomonitoring pollution levels and to evaluate the effects of toxic and mutagenic agents present in the natural environment. This study aimed at assessing the potential of a textile effluent contaminated with azo dyes to induce chromosomal and nuclear aberrations in Allium cepa test systems. A continuous exposure of seeds in samples of the textile effluent in different concentrations was carried out (0.3%, 3%, 10%, and 100%). Cells in interphase and undergoing division were examined to assess the presence of chromosome aberrations, nuclear changes, and micronuclei. Our results revealed a mutagenic effect of the effluent at concentrations of 10% and 100%. At lower concentrations, the effluent (3% and 0.3%) did not induce mutagenic alterations in the test organism A. cepa. These findings are of concern, since cell damage may be transmitted to subsequent generations, possibly affecting the organism as a whole, as well as the local biota exposed to the effluent discharge. If the damage results in cell death, the development of the organism may be affected, which could also lead to its death. PMID:18495201

Caritá, R; Marin-Morales, M A

2008-06-01

400

Projected Evolution of California's San Francisco Bay-Delta-River System in a Century of Climate Change  

PubMed Central

Background Accumulating evidence shows that the planet is warming as a response to human emissions of greenhouse gases. Strategies of adaptation to climate change will require quantitative projections of how altered regional patterns of temperature, precipitation and sea level could cascade to provoke local impacts such as modified water supplies, increasing risks of coastal flooding, and growing challenges to sustainability of native species. Methodology/Principal Findings We linked a series of models to investigate responses of California's San Francisco Estuary-Watershed (SFEW) system to two contrasting scenarios of climate change. Model outputs for scenarios of fast and moderate warming are presented as 2010–2099 projections of nine indicators of changing climate, hydrology and habitat quality. Trends of these indicators measure rates of: increasing air and water temperatures, salinity and sea level; decreasing precipitation, runoff, snowmelt contribution to runoff, and suspended sediment concentrations; and increasing frequency of extreme environmental conditions such as water temperatures and sea level beyond the ranges of historical observations. Conclusions/Significance Most of these environmental indicators change substantially over the 21st century, and many would present challenges to natural and managed systems. Adaptations to these changes will require flexible planning to cope with growing risks to humans and the challenges of meeting demands for fresh water and sustaining native biota. Programs of ecosystem rehabilitation and biodiversity conservation in coastal landscapes will be most likely to meet their objectives if they are designed from considerations that include: (1) an integrated perspective that river-estuary systems are influenced by effects of climate change operating on both watersheds and oceans; (2) varying sensitivity among environmental indicators to the uncertainty of future climates; (3) inevitability of biological community changes as responses to cumulative effects of climate change and other drivers of habitat transformations; and (4) anticipation and adaptation to the growing probability of ecosystem regime shifts. PMID:21957451

Cloern, James E.; Knowles, Noah; Brown, Larry R.; Cayan, Daniel; Dettinger, Michael D.; Morgan, Tara L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Stacey, Mark T.; van der Wegen, Mick; Wagner, R. Wayne; Jassby, Alan D.

2011-01-01

401

Solar System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At the end of this project, you will be able to explain the components of the Solar System and know the order of the planets starting from the Sun. Objective Question: What is the Solar System? First, listen and read about the Solar System 1. How many planets make up our Solar System? 2. What is at the center of the Solar System? Next,listen and read about the Planets. 1. Can you name all of the planets? Finally, listen and watch The Solar System Movie. 1. Can you list the ...

Ms.west

2009-07-07

402

Impacts and environmental catastrophes: A study of the effects of impact events on the climate system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this work is to investigate the perturbation of the climate system due to large impact events. Impacts are among the most important mechanisms for the evo